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Sample records for health service models

  1. Function Model for Community Health Service Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng; Pan, Feng; Liu, Danhong; Xu, Yongyong

    In order to construct a function model of community health service (CHS) information for development of CHS information management system, Integration Definition for Function Modeling (IDEF0), an IEEE standard which is extended from Structured Analysis and Design(SADT) and now is a widely used function modeling method, was used to classifying its information from top to bottom. The contents of every level of the model were described and coded. Then function model for CHS information, which includes 4 super-classes, 15 classes and 28 sub-classed of business function, 43 business processes and 168 business activities, was established. This model can facilitate information management system development and workflow refinement.

  2. Causal Model of a Health Services System

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James G.

    1972-01-01

    Path analysis is used to construct a causal model of the health services system serving the state of New Mexico. The model includes a network specifying the causal relationships among a set of social, demographic, and economic variables hypothesized to be related to the health status of the population; a set of mathematical equations that permit prediction of the effects of changes in the values of any one variable on all other variables in the model; and estimates of path coefficients based on U.S. Census data and vital statistics. The model is used to predict both direct and indirect effects on health status of changes in population structure resulting from natural causes or from the intervention of health programs. PMID:5025955

  3. [Automated geospatial model for health services strategic planning].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ávila, Juan Eugenio; Santos-Luna, René; Palacio-Mejía, Lina Sofía; Salgado-Salgado, Ana Lidia; Ríos-Salgado, Víctor Hugo; Rodríguez-López, Mario Henry; Sepúlveda-Amor, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    To develop an automated model for the operational regionalization needed in the planning of the health service networks proposed by the new Mexican health care model (Modelo Integrador de Servicios de Salud MIDAS). Using available data for México during 2005 and 2007, a geospatial model was developed to estimate potential catchment areas around health facilities based on access travel time. The results were compared with an operational regionalization (ERO) study manually carried out in Oaxaca with 2005 data. The ERO assigned 48% of villages to health care centers further away than those assigned by the geospatial model, and 23% of these health centers referred patients to more distant hospitals. The model calculated by this study generated a more efficient regionalization than the ERO model, minimizing travel time to access health services. This model has been adopted by the General Department of Health Planning and Development of the Mexican Ministry of Health for the implementation of the Health Sector Infrastructure Master Plan.

  4. Emerging Issues and Models in College Mental Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Ben; Wallace, David; Brunner, Jon

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of the psychological issues facing today's college students, information about students receiving mental health services, and an evidence-based model describing the practice and functions of today's counseling centers.

  5. Emerging Issues and Models in College Mental Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Ben; Wallace, David; Brunner, Jon

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of the psychological issues facing today's college students, information about students receiving mental health services, and an evidence-based model describing the practice and functions of today's counseling centers.

  6. Analysis model for personal eHealth solutions and services.

    PubMed

    Mykkänen, Juha; Tuomainen, Mika; Luukkonen, Irmeli; Itälä, Timo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for analysing and assessing various features of personal wellbeing information management services and solutions such as personal health records and citizen-oriented eHealth services. The model is based on general functional and interoperability standards for personal health management applications and generic frameworks for different aspects of analysis. It has been developed and used in the MyWellbeing project in Finland to provide baseline for the research, development and comparison of many different personal wellbeing and health management solutions and to support the development of unified "Coper" concept for citizen empowerment.

  7. Quebec mental health services networks: models and implementation

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Marie-Josée

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Purpose In the transformation of health care systems, the introduction of integrated service networks is considered to be one of the main solutions for enhancing efficiency. In the last few years, a wealth of literature has emerged on the topic of services integration. However, the question of how integrated service networks should be modelled to suit different implementation contexts has barely been touched. To fill that gap, this article presents four models for the organization of mental health integrated networks. Data sources The proposed models are drawn from three recently published studies on mental health integrated services in the province of Quebec (Canada) with the author as principal investigator. Description Following an explanation of the concept of integrated service network and a description of the Quebec context for mental health networks, the models, applicable in all settings: rural, urban or semi-urban, and metropolitan, and summarized in four figures, are presented. Discussion and conclusion To apply the models successfully, the necessity of rallying all the actors of a system, from the strategic, tactical and operational levels, according to the type of integration involved: functional/administrative, clinical and physician-system is highlighted. The importance of formalizing activities among organizations and actors in a network and reinforcing the governing mechanisms at the local level is also underlined. Finally, a number of integration strategies and key conditions of success to operationalize integrated service networks are suggested. PMID:16773157

  8. A Formative Model to Evaluate Health Services Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marconi, Katherine M.; Rudzinski, Karen A.

    1995-01-01

    A formative evaluation model is proposed for use by administrators of large health services research grant programs. The model assists in assessing the purpose, methodology, and level of analysis of funded research. It is illustrated through a discussion of HIV/AIDS care. (SLD)

  9. Two models for change in the health services in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Bloom, G

    1985-01-01

    The health situation in pre-Independence Zimbabwe was much as elsewhere in the Third World. While the majority suffered excess mortality and morbidity, the affluent enjoyed a health status similar to that of the populations of developed countries. The health services also showed the familiar pattern, with expenditure concentrated on sophisticated facilities in the towns, leaving the rural majority with practically no services at all. With the coming of Majority Rule, the previous pattern of controlling access to facilities on the basis of race could not continue. Two broad routes forward were defined. On the one hand, the private doctors, the private insurance companies, and the settler state proposed a model based on improving urban facilities, depending on a trickle-down to eventually answer the needs of the rural people. On the other hand, the post-Independence Ministry of Health advocated a policy of concentrating on developing services in the rural areas. The pattern of the future health service will depend on the capacity of the senior health planners and on the enthusiasm of front-line health workers but, of overriding importance will be the political commitment to answer the needs of the majority and the outcome of the inevitable struggle for access to scarce health sector resources.

  10. Mental health service use among those with depression: an exploration using Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use.

    PubMed

    Graham, Annette; Hasking, Penelope; Brooker, Joanne; Clarke, David; Meadows, Graham

    2017-01-15

    Despite positive effects on prognosis, less than half of the people diagnosed with depression access mental health services. Knowledge of what promotes such service use is limited. There is dispute about whether the receipt of mental illness related information encourages or discourages service use among those with depression. Accurate service use models are needed to inform programs designed to facilitate service use by those who would benefit most. We examine the appropriateness of Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use in this context. Data from 451 adults identified through the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing as meeting International Classification of Diseases Ten (ICD-10) criteria for depression were used. Confirmatory factor analysis failed to verify Andersen's model. Thus, an empirically derived service use model was developed using exploratory factor analysis and then structural equation modelling. Mental health need was the strongest predictor of service use and the model suggested the importance of social connectedness in promoting service use. Participants who had received helpful mental illness information were significantly more likely to have accessed mental health services than those who had not. The cross-sectional design and lack of replication preclude definitive conclusions CONCLUSION: Andersen's model is a useful starting point for the exploration of service use among people with depression. It is necessary, however, to develop specific models for this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Indian Health Service Model From the Treatment Perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mandie L

    2015-01-01

    The nonprofit dental delivery model is appropriate for the needs of specific patient populations. The Indian Health Service is an example of how care can be provided where traditional fee-for-service and indemnity mechanisms may be insufficient. Separating care from management in this context gives dentists greater power over individual treatment decisions, increased choice of patient-relevant care options, and control over development of the practice model and its evolution. The needs of various populations groups and the funding or profit model inevitably influence the composition of the dental team and assignment of dental duties.

  12. A community mental health service delivery model: integrating the evidence base within existing clinical models.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Frank; Adams, Danielle; O'Connor, Nick

    2011-02-01

    A model of care for community mental health services was developed by reviewing the available literature, surveying ?best practice? and evaluating the performance of existing services in a metropolitan area mental health service servicing a population of approximately 1.1 million people. A review of relevant academic literature and recognized ?good practice? service delivery models was undertaken in conjunction with a review of local activity data and consultation with key stakeholders (not addressed in this paper). A model was developed identifying the core functions of community mental health service delivery. The components of a comprehensive, integrated model of community mental health service (CMHS) are outlined. The essential components of a comprehensive, integrated model of CMHSs include: acute and emergency response, community continuing care services, assertive rehabilitation teams, partnerships with general practitioners and other human services agencies. We propose a comprehensive integrated model of community mental health service. Clarity of role, required outputs and expected outcomes will assist the development of effective and appropriate community mental health services. Outreach to the community is a key success factor for these services and their associated inpatient services. Gap analysis can assist in the planning and costing of community mental health services.

  13. New payment model for rural health services in Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Hindle, Don; Khulan, Buyankhishig

    2006-01-01

    This article describes experiences in Mongolia in designing and implementing a new method of payment for rural health services. The new method involves using a formula that allocates 65% of available funding on the basis of risk-adjusted capitation, 20% on the basis of asset costs, 10% on the basis of variations in distance-related costs, and 5% on the basis of satisfactory attainment of quality of care targets. Rural populations have inferior health services in most countries, whether rich or poor. Their situation has deteriorated in most transition economies, including Mongolia since 1990. One factor has been the use of inappropriate methods of payment of care providers. Changes in payment methods have therefore been made in most transition economies with mixed success. One factor has been a tendency to over-simplify, for example, to introduce capitation without risk adjustment or to make per case payments that ignored casemix. In 2002, the Mongolian government decided that its crude funding formula for rural health services should be replaced. It had two main components. The first was payment of an annual grant by the local government from its general revenue on the basis of estimated service population, number of inpatient beds, and number of clinical staff. The second was an output-based payment per inpatient day from the National Health Insurance Fund. The model was administratively complicated, and widely believed to be unfair. The two funding agencies were giving conflicting types of financial incentives. Most important, the funding methods gave few incentives or rewards for service improvement. In some respects, the incentives were perverse (such as the encouragement of hospital admission by the National Health Insurance Fund). A new funding model was developed through statistical analysis of data from routine service reports and opinions questionnaires. As noted above, there are components relating to per capita needs for care, capital assets, distance

  14. Modeling health impact of global health programs implemented by Population Services International.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongmei; Duvall, Susan; Ratcliffe, Amy; Jeffries, David; Stevens, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Global health implementing organizations benefit most from health impact estimation models that isolate the individual effects of distributed products and services - a feature not typically found in intervention impact models, but which allow comparisons across interventions and intervention settings. Population Services International (PSI), a social marketing organization, has developed a set of impact models covering seven health program areas, which translate product/service distribution data into impact estimates. Each model's primary output is the number of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted by an intervention within a specific country and population context. This paper aims to describe the structure and inputs for two types of DALYs averted models, considering the benefits and limitations of this methodology. PSI employs two modeling approaches for estimating health impact: a macro approach for most interventions and a micro approach for HIV, tuberculosis (TB), and behavior change communication (BCC) interventions. Within each intervention country context, the macro approach determines the coverage that one product/service unit provides a population in person-years, whereas the micro approach estimates an individual's risk of infection with and without the product/service unit. The models use these estimations to generate per unit DALYs averted coefficients for each intervention. When multiplied by program output data, these coefficients predict the total number of DALYs averted by an intervention in a country. Model outputs are presented by country for two examples: Water Chlorination DALYs Averted Model, a macro model, and the HIV Condom DALYs Averted Model for heterosexual transmission, a micro model. Health impact estimates measured in DALYs averted for PSI interventions on a global level are also presented. The DALYs averted models offer implementing organizations practical measurement solutions for understanding an intervention

  15. Modeling health impact of global health programs implemented by Population Services International

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Global health implementing organizations benefit most from health impact estimation models that isolate the individual effects of distributed products and services - a feature not typically found in intervention impact models, but which allow comparisons across interventions and intervention settings. Population Services International (PSI), a social marketing organization, has developed a set of impact models covering seven health program areas, which translate product/service distribution data into impact estimates. Each model's primary output is the number of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted by an intervention within a specific country and population context. This paper aims to describe the structure and inputs for two types of DALYs averted models, considering the benefits and limitations of this methodology. Methods PSI employs two modeling approaches for estimating health impact: a macro approach for most interventions and a micro approach for HIV, tuberculosis (TB), and behavior change communication (BCC) interventions. Within each intervention country context, the macro approach determines the coverage that one product/service unit provides a population in person-years, whereas the micro approach estimates an individual's risk of infection with and without the product/service unit. The models use these estimations to generate per unit DALYs averted coefficients for each intervention. When multiplied by program output data, these coefficients predict the total number of DALYs averted by an intervention in a country. Results Model outputs are presented by country for two examples: Water Chlorination DALYs Averted Model, a macro model, and the HIV Condom DALYs Averted Model for heterosexual transmission, a micro model. Health impact estimates measured in DALYs averted for PSI interventions on a global level are also presented. Conclusions The DALYs averted models offer implementing organizations practical measurement solutions for

  16. Entrepreneurship management in health services: an integrative model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kristina L

    2006-01-01

    This research develops an integrated systems model of entrepreneurship management as a method for achieving health care organizational survival and growth. Specifically, it analyzes current health care environment challenges, identifies roles of managers and discusses organizational theories that are relevant to the health care environment, outlines the role of entrepreneurship in health care, and describes the entrepreneurial manager in the entrepreneurial management process to produce desirable organizational outcomes. The study concludes that as current health care environment continues to show intense competition, entrepreneurial managers are responsible for creating innovations, managing change, investing in resources, and recognizing opportunities in the environment to increase organizational viability.

  17. Development of a framework for reporting health service models for managing rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Siobhan; Li, Linda C; King, Judy; Lauzon, Chantal; Finn, Heather; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P M

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a framework for reporting health service models for managing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We conducted a search of the health sciences literature for primary studies that described interventions which aimed to improve the implementation of health services in adults with RA. Thereafter, a nominal group consensus process was used to synthesize the evidence for the development of the reporting framework. Of the 2,033 citations screened, 68 primary studies were included which described 93 health service models for RA. The origin and meaning of the labels given to these health service delivery models varied widely and, in general, the reporting of their components lacked detail or was absent. The six dimensions underlying the framework for reporting RA health service delivery models are: (1) Why was it founded? (2) Who was involved? (3) What were the roles of those participating? (4) When were the services provided? (5) Where were the services provided/received? (6) How were the services/interventions accessed and implemented, how long was the intervention, how did individuals involved communicate, and how was the model supported/sustained? The proposed framework has the potential to facilitate knowledge exchange among clinicians, researchers, and decision makers in the area of health service delivery. Future work includes the validation of the framework with national and international stakeholders such as clinicians, health care administrators, and health services researchers.

  18. Modeling the mental health service utilization decisions of university undergraduates: A discrete choice conjoint experiment.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Charles E; Zipursky, Robert B; Christensen, Bruce K; Bieling, Peter J; Madsen, Victoria; Rimas, Heather; Mielko, Stephanie; Wilson, Fiona; Furimsky, Ivana; Jeffs, Lisa; Munn, Catharine

    2017-05-16

    We modeled design factors influencing the intent to use a university mental health service. Between November 2012 and October 2014, 909 undergraduates participated. Using a discrete choice experiment, participants chose between hypothetical campus mental health services. Latent class analysis identified three segments. A Psychological/Psychiatric Service segment (45.5%) was most likely to contact campus health services delivered by psychologists or psychiatrists. An Alternative Service segment (39.3%) preferred to talk to peer-counselors who had experienced mental health problems. A Hesitant segment (15.2%) reported greater distress but seemed less intent on seeking help. They preferred services delivered by psychologists or psychiatrists. Simulations predicted that, rather than waiting for standard counseling, the Alternative Service segment would prefer immediate access to E-Mental health. The Usual Care and Hesitant segments would wait 6 months for standard counseling. E-Mental Health options could engage students who may not wait for standard services.

  19. Cultural competence: a literature review and conceptual model for mental health services.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Mario; Nesman, Teresa; Mowery, Debra; Acevedo-Polakovich, Ignacio D; Callejas, Linda M

    2009-08-01

    This article presents a conceptual model of organizational cultural competence for use in mental health services that resulted from a comprehensive review of the research literature. The model identifies four factors associated with cultural competence in mental health services (community context, cultural characteristics of local populations, organizational infrastructure, and direct service support) and redefines cultural competence as the degree of compatibility among these factors. A strength of this model of organizational cultural competence is that it facilitates future research and practice in psychiatric services settings and links culturally competent practices to service parity.

  20. Study on a model for future occupational health: proposal for an occupational health service model in Japan.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Toshiaki

    2006-10-01

    The Study Model for Future Occupational Health (funded by a research grant from the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Labor) is a joint research project involving various organizations and agencies undertaken from 2002 to 2004. Society has undergone a dramatic transformation due to technological developments and internationalization. At the same time a low birth rate and an aging population have resulted in an increase in both the percentage of workers experiencing strong anxiety and stress in relation to their jobs and the working environment and the number of suicides. As a natural consequence, occupational health services are now expected to provide EAP, consulting and other functions that were formerly considered outside the realm of occupational health. In consideration of this background, the present study propose the following issues to provide a model for future occupational health services that meet the conditions presently confronted by each worker. 1. How to provide occupational health services and occupational physicians' services: 1) a basic time of 20 minutes of occupational health services per year should be allotted to each worker and to all workers; 2) the obligatory regulations should be revised to expand the obligation from businesses each with 50 or more employees under the present laws to businesses each with 30 or more employees. 2. Providers of occupational health services and occupational physicians' services: (1) reinforcement of outside occupational health agencies; (2) fostering occupational health consultant firms; (3) development of an institute of occupational safety and health; (4) support of activities by authorized occupational physicians in the field; (5) expanding of joint selection of occupational physicians including subsidy increase and the extension of a period of subsidy to five hears; (6) licensing of new entry into occupational health undertaking. 3. Introduction of new report system: (1) establishment of the obligation to

  1. The recovery model and complex health needs: what health psychology can learn from mental health and substance misuse service provision.

    PubMed

    Webb, Lucy

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews key arguments around evidence-based practice and outlines the methodological demands for effective adoption of recovery model principles. The recovery model is outlined and demonstrated as compatible with current needs in substance misuse service provision. However, the concepts of evidence-based practice and the recovery model are currently incompatible unless the current value system of evidence-based practice changes to accommodate the methodologies demanded by the recovery model. It is suggested that critical health psychology has an important role to play in widening the scope of evidence-based practice to better accommodate complex social health needs.

  2. Modeling of ubiquitous technology integration process in health services.

    PubMed

    Cruz, William A; Garcia, Renato

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare Development Framework (HDF) is a methodology of HL7 standard for development interoperability specifications in the healthcare. HDF was used in the process, artifacts and development of the information exchange messages. This paper presents a model of integration and interoperability process with information and communication technology (ICT) in emergency services, using the standard HL7 and RFID devices, as part of a platform for ubiquitous healthcare.

  3. Characteristics of Indigenous primary health care models of service delivery: a scoping review protocol.

    PubMed

    Harfield, Stephen; Davy, Carol; Kite, Elaine; McArthur, Alexa; Munn, Zachary; Brown, Ngiare; Brown, Alex

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the scoping review is to identify and describe within the existing literature the characteristics (values, principles, components and suggest practical applications) of primary health care models of service delivery for Indigenous people. More specifically, the review question is:What are the characteristics (values, principles, components and suggested practical applications) of primary health care models of service delivery for Indigenous people?Findings from this scoping review will inform two systematic reviews. One of these will explore the acceptability and the other the effectiveness of identified characteristics. The scoping review will follow the JBI Scoping Review methodology as outlined in the 2015 Joanna Briggs Institute Reviewers' Manual. Indigenous populations in colonized countries experience worse health outcomes relative to their non-Indigenous counterparts. In Australia, in the period 2010 to 2012 the estimated gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians compared to non-Indigenous Australians was 10 years Similar gaps in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous have been demonstrated in other countries, such as New Zealand, Canada and the United StatesThe gap in life expectancy and the health disadvantage experienced by Indigenous people is in part the result of mainstream health services not adequately meeting the health needs of Indigenous people and Indigenous people's inability to access mainstream services Part of the solution has been the establishment of primary health care services for and in many cases run by Indigenous people. Indigenous primary health services have been developed to provide culturally appropriate services that meet the needs of local Indigenous communities.In Australia, the first Aboriginal medical service was established in 1971 in Redfern, New South Wales, by "community activists in response to ongoing discrimination against Aboriginal people within

  4. Organizational models of school health services in the WHO European Region.

    PubMed

    Baltag, Valentina; Levi, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to produce a taxonomy of organizational models of school health services (SHS) in the WHO European Region, and to reflect upon the potential of each model to be effective, equitable, responsive and efficient. The authors used data from the WHO survey to identify organizational models. To produce a taxonomy of organizational models, three features of SHS organization were analyzed--the presence of health personnel specifically dedicated to school health services provision (school nurse and/or school doctor); the statutory involvement of other health professions in SHS provision; and the proximity of service provision to pupils (school-based or not school-based). There are five organizational models of school health services in the Member States of the WHO European Region: dedicated school-based, dedicated community-based, integrated with primary care, mixed school-based, and mixed community-based. Preliminary reflections show that school based models are more likely to produce better outcomes in terms of effectiveness, equity, responsiveness, and efficiency. The WHO European Region has 53 Member States; the data are therefore incomplete and conclusions are limited to the 37 respondent countries. Knowledge on performance of various models of service provision may inform decision-makers in the process of reforms. This is the first attempt to produce a taxonomy of organizational models of school health services based on data from 37 countries, and to investigate the potential of each model to achieve desirable health system objectives.

  5. Toward a New Model for Promoting Urban Children's Mental Health: Accessible, Effective, and Sustainable School-Based Mental Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Marc S.; Graczyk, Patricia A.; Frazier, Stacy L.; Abdul-Adil, Jaleel

    2003-01-01

    A program of research related to school-based models for urban children's mental health is described, with a particular focus on improving access to services, promoting children's functioning, and providing for program sustainability. The first study in this series responded to the urgent need to engage more families in mental health services, and…

  6. Model for the evaluation of drug-dispensing services in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, Vanessa de Bona; de Freitas, Sergio Fernando Torres

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop a model for evaluating the efficacy of drug-dispensing service in primary health care. METHODS An efficacy criterion was adopted to determine the level of achievement of the service objectives. The evaluation model was developed on the basis of a literature search and discussions with experts. The applicability test of the model was conducted in 15 primary health care units in the city of Florianópolis, state of Santa Catarina, in 2010, and data were recorded in structured and pretested questionnaires. RESULTS The model developed was evaluated using five dimensions of analysis for analysis. The model was suitable for evaluating service efficacy and helped to identify the critical points of each service dimension. CONCLUSIONS Adaptations to the data collection technique may be required to adjust for the reality and needs of each situation. The evaluation of the drug-dispensing service should promote adequate access to medications supplied through the public health system. PMID:25372174

  7. Value-added strategy models to provide quality services in senior health business.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Ting; Lin, Neng-Pai; Su, Shyi; Chen, Ya-Mei; Chang, Yao-Mao; Handa, Yujiro; Khan, Hafsah Arshed Ali; Elsa Hsu, Yi-Hsin

    2017-06-20

    The rapid population aging is now a global issue. The increase in the elderly population will impact the health care industry and health enterprises; various senior needs will promote the growth of the senior health industry. Most senior health studies are focused on the demand side and scarcely on supply. Our study selected quality enterprises focused on aging health and analyzed different strategies to provide excellent quality services to senior health enterprises. We selected 33 quality senior health enterprises in Taiwan and investigated their excellent quality services strategies by face-to-face semi-structured in-depth interviews with CEO and managers of each enterprise in 2013. A total of 33 senior health enterprises in Taiwan. Overall, 65 CEOs and managers of 33 enterprises were interviewed individually. None. Core values and vision, organization structure, quality services provided, strategies for quality services. This study's results indicated four type of value-added strategy models adopted by senior enterprises to offer quality services: (i) residential care and co-residence model, (ii) home care and living in place model, (iii) community e-business experience model and (iv) virtual and physical portable device model. The common part in these four strategy models is that the services provided are elderly centered. These models offer virtual and physical integrations, and also offer total solutions for the elderly and their caregivers. Through investigation of successful strategy models for providing quality services to seniors, we identified opportunities to develop innovative service models and successful characteristics, also policy implications were summarized. The observations from this study will serve as a primary evidenced base for enterprises developing their senior market and, also for promoting the value co-creation possibility through dialogue between customers and those that deliver service.

  8. Nine key principles to guide youth mental health: development of service models in New South Wales.

    PubMed

    Howe, Deborah; Batchelor, Samantha; Coates, Dominiek; Cashman, Emma

    2014-05-01

    Historically, the Australian health system has failed to meet the needs of young people with mental health problems and mental illness. In 2006, New South Wales (NSW) Health allocated considerable funds to the reform agenda of mental health services in NSW to address this inadequacy. Children and Young People's Mental Health (CYPMH), a service that provides mental health care for young people aged 12-24 years, with moderate to severe mental health problems, was chosen to establish a prototype Youth Mental Health (YMH) Service Model for NSW. This paper describes nine key principles developed by CYPMH to guide the development of YMH Service Models in NSW. A literature review, numerous stakeholder consultations and consideration of clinical best practice were utilized to inform the development of the key principles. Subsequent to their development, the nine key principles were formally endorsed by the Mental Health Program Council to ensure consistency and monitor the progress of YMH services across NSW. As a result, between 2008 and 2012 YMH Services across NSW regularly reported on their activities against each of the nine key principles demonstrating how each principle was addressed within their service. The nine key principles provide mental health services a framework for how to reorient services to accommodate YMH and provide a high-quality model of care. [Corrections added on 29 November 2013, after first online publication: The last two sentences of the Results section have been replaced with "As a result, between 2008 and 2012 YMH Services across NSW regularly reported on their activities against each of the nine key principles demonstrating how each principle was addressed within their service."]. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. An ABC Model for College Health Services in the '80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkle, Kenneth E.; Papalia, Anthony S.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a model for the concurrent staffing of a hospital ambulatory care/emergency department and a student health service. The model was created by interfacing the services and needs of two institutions and incorporates accountability, budget restraints, and creativity. (Author/RC)

  10. Care Models of eHealth Services: A Case Study on the Design of a Business Model for an Online Precare Service.

    PubMed

    van Meeuwen, Dorine Pd; van Walt Meijer, Quirine J; Simonse, Lianne Wl

    2015-03-24

    With a growing population of health care clients in the future, the organization of high-quality and cost-effective service providing becomes an increasing challenge. New online eHealth services are proposed as innovative options for the future. Yet, a major barrier to these services appears to be the lack of new business model designs. Although design efforts generally result in visual models, no such artifacts have been found in the literature on business model design. This paper investigates business model design in eHealth service practices from a design perspective. It adopts a research by design approach and seeks to unravel what characteristics of business models determine an online service and what are important value exchanges between health professionals and clients. The objective of the study was to analyze the construction of care models in-depth, framing the essential elements of a business model, and design a new care model that structures these elements for the particular context of an online pre-care service in practice. This research employs a qualitative method of an in-depth case study in which different perspectives on constructing a care model are investigated. Data are collected by using the visual business modeling toolkit, designed to cocreate and visualize the business model. The cocreated models are transcribed and analyzed per actor perspective, transactions, and value attributes. We revealed eight new actors in the business model for providing the service. Essential actors are: the intermediary network coordinator connecting companies, the service dedicated information technology specialists, and the service dedicated health specialist. In the transactions for every service providing we found a certain type of contract, such as a license contract and service contracts for precare services and software products. In addition to the efficiency, quality, and convenience, important value attributes appeared to be: timelines, privacy and

  11. [Marketing in health service].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    The gradual emergence of marketing activities in public health demonstrates an increased interest in this discipline, despite the lack of an adequate and universally recognized theoretical model. For a correct approach to marketing techniques, it is opportune to start from the health service, meant as a service rendered. This leads to the need to analyse the salient features of the services. The former is the intangibility, or rather the ex ante difficulty of making the patient understand the true nature of the performance carried out by the health care worker. Another characteristic of all the services is the extreme importance of the regulator, which means who performs the service (in our case, the health care professional). Indeed the operator is of crucial importance in health care: being one of the key issues, he becomes a part of the service itself. Each service is different because the people who deliver it are different, furthermore there are many variables that can affect the performance. Hence it arises the difficulty in measuring the services quality as well as in establishing reference standards.

  12. Coordinating the Provision of Health Services in Humanitarian Crises: a Systematic Review of Suggested Models

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Tamara; Bou-Karroum, Lama; Darzi, Andrea; Hajjar, Rayan; El Rahyel, Ahmed; El Eid, Jamale; Itani, Mira; Brax, Hneine; Akik, Chaza; Osman, Mona; Hassan, Ghayda; El-Jardali, Fadi; Akl, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our objective was to identify published models of coordination between entities funding or delivering health services in humanitarian crises, whether the coordination took place during or after the crises. Methods: We included reports describing models of coordination in sufficient detail to allow reproducibility. We also included reports describing implementation of identified models, as case studies. We searched Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the WHO Global Health Library. We also searched websites of relevant organizations. We followed standard systematic review methodology. Results: Our search captured 14,309 citations. The screening process identified 34 eligible papers describing five models of coordination of delivering health services: the “Cluster Approach” (with 16 case studies), the 4Ws “Who is Where, When, doing What” mapping tool (with four case studies), the “Sphere Project” (with two case studies), the “5x5” model (with one case study), and the “model of information coordination” (with one case study). The 4Ws and the 5x5 focus on coordination of services for mental health, the remaining models do not focus on a specific health topic. The Cluster approach appears to be the most widely used. One case study was a mixed implementation of the Cluster approach and the Sphere model. We identified no model of coordination for funding of health service. Conclusion: This systematic review identified five proposed coordination models that have been implemented by entities funding or delivering health service in humanitarian crises. There is a need to compare the effect of these different models on outcomes such as availability of and access to health services. PMID:27617167

  13. An integrated model for continuous quality improvement and productivity improvement in health services organizations.

    PubMed

    Rakich, J S; Darr, K; Longest, B B

    1993-01-01

    The health services paradigm with respect to quality has shifted to that of conformance to requirements (the absence of defects) and fitness for use (meeting customer expectations and needs). This article presents an integrated model of continuous quality improvement (CQI) (often referred to as total quality management) and productivity improvement for health services organizations. It incorporates input-output theory and focuses on the CQI challenge--"How can we be certain that we do the right things right the first time, every time?" The twin pillars of CQI are presented. Achievement of both will result in productivity improvement and enhancement of the health services organization's competitive position.

  14. Expanding oral health preventative services for young children: a successful interprofessional model.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Evelyn; Marino, Deborah; Thacker, Sherrey; DiMarco, Marguerite; Huff, Marlene; Biordi, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Progressive solutions are needed to solve the oral health chronic disease problem in the U.S. The importance of oral health coupled with urgent community oral health needs, shortage of primary providers, and emphasis on interprofessional collaboration make the timing ripe for allied health training and practice in oral health preventative services. A successful model is described that addressed the unmet oral health care needs of low-income and at-risk children. The model is a guide for integrating an oral health screen, fluoride varnish, anticipatory guidance, and dental referrals into allied health practice. An alternative oral health provider approach was used to address the low rate of early caries detection, preventative oral care, and access for underserved children. A comprehensive system for the administrative and clinical components of the project, including implementation plan, clinical protocols, prescriptive authority, a dental home referral system, clinical training and competency testing, was developed. The interprofessional project increased oral health services capacity and practice acceptance of oral health screening and fluoride varnishing among dietitians. Oral health care services provide allied health practitioners with unique opportunities to impact the poor access and unmet needs of at risk children and adults and to improve overall health.

  15. Innovation in health economic modelling of service improvements for longer-term depression: demonstration in a local health community

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the analysis was to develop a health economic model to estimate the costs and health benefits of alternative National Health Service (NHS) service configurations for people with longer-term depression. Method Modelling methods were used to develop a conceptual and health economic model of the current configuration of services in Sheffield, England for people with longer-term depression. Data and assumptions were synthesised to estimate cost per Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs). Results Three service changes were developed and resulted in increased QALYs at increased cost. Versus current care, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for a self-referral service was £11,378 per QALY. The ICER was £2,227 per QALY for the dropout reduction service and £223 per QALY for an increase in non-therapy services. These results were robust when compared to current cost-effectiveness thresholds and accounting for uncertainty. Conclusions Cost-effective service improvements for longer-term depression have been identified. Also identified were limitations of the current evidence for the long term impact of services. PMID:23622353

  16. Innovation in health economic modelling of service improvements for longer-term depression: demonstration in a local health community.

    PubMed

    Tosh, Jonathan; Kearns, Ben; Brennan, Alan; Parry, Glenys; Ricketts, Thomas; Saxon, David; Kilgarriff-Foster, Alexis; Thake, Anna; Chambers, Eleni; Hutten, Rebecca

    2013-04-26

    The purpose of the analysis was to develop a health economic model to estimate the costs and health benefits of alternative National Health Service (NHS) service configurations for people with longer-term depression. Modelling methods were used to develop a conceptual and health economic model of the current configuration of services in Sheffield, England for people with longer-term depression. Data and assumptions were synthesised to estimate cost per Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs). Three service changes were developed and resulted in increased QALYs at increased cost. Versus current care, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for a self-referral service was £11,378 per QALY. The ICER was £2,227 per QALY for the dropout reduction service and £223 per QALY for an increase in non-therapy services. These results were robust when compared to current cost-effectiveness thresholds and accounting for uncertainty. Cost-effective service improvements for longer-term depression have been identified. Also identified were limitations of the current evidence for the long term impact of services.

  17. Impacts of a Medicaid Wraparound Model Demonstration Program on Youth Specialty Mental Health Services Use.

    PubMed

    Blizzard, Angela M; Glos, Lukas J; Stephan, Sharon H; Medoff, Deborah; Slade, Eric P

    2016-06-15

    Effective coordination of mental health care is critical in Medicaid wraparound model programs for youth. This study examined participation over time in mental health services for youth diverted or transitioned from residential care to a Medicaid wraparound demonstration program. Youth in wraparound had more sustained use of mental health outpatient clinic services than did propensity score matched youth who were not in wraparound. However, the rate of outpatient clinic follow-up after inpatient discharge was no greater in wraparound. Routine assessment of wraparound programs' impacts on receipt of mental health care may inform the development of Medicaid wraparound program performance standards.

  18. Estimating Health Services Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    In computer program NOROCA populations statistics from National Center for Health Statistics used with computational procedure to estimate health service utilization rates, physician demands (by specialty) and hospital bed demands (by type of service). Computational procedure applicable to health service area of any size and even used to estimate statewide demands for health services.

  19. Information model design health service childhood cancer for parents and caregivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Syazwani; Muda, Zurina

    2015-05-01

    Most Malaysians do not realize that they are suffer from a chronic disease until the disease is confirmed to be at a critical stage. This is because lack of awareness among Malaysians about a chronic disease especially in a childhood cancer. Based on report of the National Cancer Council (MAKNA),11 million adults and children suffered with cancer and 6 million of them die in a worldwide. Lack of public exposure to this disease leads to health problems to their children. Information model design health service childhood cancer for p arents and caregivers using an android application medium can be used by a doctor to deliver an information of cancer to the parents and caregivers. The development of this information model design health service childhood cancer for parents and caregivers are using an integration of health promotion theory, spiral model and lean model to form a new model that can be used as a model design content of health service. The method using in this study are by an interview technique and questionnaires along the study was conducted. Hopefully the production of this information model design health service childhood cancer for parents and caregivers using an android apps as a medium can help parents, caregivers and public to know more about information of childhood cancer and at the same time can gain an awareness among them and this app also can be used as a medium for doctors to deliver an information to the parents and caregivers.

  20. Health and social services integration: a review of concepts and models.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Michael P; Elnitsky, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Health and social services integration is particularly relevant for populations whose needs span physical health, mental health, housing, and disability services, along with others. Veterans, homeless, chronically ill, and aging are among those populations. This review examines recent peer-reviewed literature about different approaches to services integration, rationales behind those approaches, and successes of those approaches, including factors that make them succeed or fail. The focus here is on services that cross disciplinary boundaries; that is, those that integrate health services with social services, health services with mental health services, or one social service with a categorically different social service.

  1. Organizational re-engineering using systems modelling: rediscovering the physics of the health service.

    PubMed

    Wolstenholme, E

    1995-01-01

    This paper explores the general role of systems modelling and its specific use in the UK National Health Service for providing a balanced overview of change management which links organizational structure, strategy, and process. The maps and modelling tools of the method are described, together with an outline of how they can be used to simulate and test alternative interventions in complex organizations and to create a management focus on generic insights, accelerated business learning, and improved financial performance. A case study involving the use of systems modelling at the interface between the health service and community care is presented as a specific example of the method in action.

  2. Franchising Reproductive Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Rob; Tsui, Amy Ong; Sulzbach, Sara; Bardsley, Phil; Bekele, Getachew; Giday, Tilahun; Ahmed, Rehana; Gopalkrishnan, Gopi; Feyesitan, Bamikale

    2004-01-01

    Objectives Networks of franchised health establishments, providing a standardized set of services, are being implemented in developing countries. This article examines associations between franchise membership and family planning and reproductive health outcomes for both the member provider and the client. Methods Regression models are fitted examining associations between franchise membership and family planning and reproductive health outcomes at the service provider and client levels in three settings. Results Franchising has a positive association with both general and family planning client volumes, and the number of family planning brands available. Similar associations with franchise membership are not found for reproductive health service outcomes. In some settings, client satisfaction is higher at franchised than other types of health establishments, although the association between franchise membership and client outcomes varies across the settings. Conclusions Franchise membership has apparent benefits for both the provider and the client, providing an opportunity to expand access to reproductive health services, although greater attention is needed to shift the focus from family planning to a broader reproductive health context. PMID:15544644

  3. Commentary: New Models for School-Based Mental Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierman, Karen L.

    2003-01-01

    There are critical challenges for the design of effective school-based mental health delivery systems. Atkins et al. (2003) provide illustrative examples of how these challenges can be addressed in ways that can significantly increase children's access to empirically supported interventions, integrate programming into existing school leadership…

  4. Commentary: New Models for School-Based Mental Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierman, Karen L.

    2003-01-01

    There are critical challenges for the design of effective school-based mental health delivery systems. Atkins et al. (2003) provide illustrative examples of how these challenges can be addressed in ways that can significantly increase children's access to empirically supported interventions, integrate programming into existing school leadership…

  5. The Cambridge Hospital Latino Health Clinic: a model for interagency integration of health services for Latinos at the provider level.

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, J. E.; de la Cancela, V.

    1992-01-01

    Latinos who present for health services often suffer from a complex interaction of medical and mental health needs, requiring a multifaceted intervention. An essential element of this multilevel approach is cultural and linguistic sensitivity on the part of health providers. New, innovative models of health service organization are needed to address the unique needs of the Latino population. Some of the key characteristics these models need to focus on include interagency collaboration rather than competition for resources, interdisciplinary teams of primary-care providers that also involve other nonmedical professional members, centralized case coordination and decentralized service delivery, flexibility and adaptability to changing priorities, continuity of care for all patients, and mutual support among providers to minimize the effects of stress and burnout. PMID:1608063

  6. The fiction of health Services.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, Oscar

    2012-04-01

    What we know today as Health Services is a fiction, perhaps shaped involuntarily, but with deep health repercussions, more negative than positive. About 24 centuries ago, Asclepius, god of medicine, and Hygeia, goddess of hygiene and health, generated a dichotomy between disease and health that remains with us until today. The confusing substitution of Health Services with Medical Services began toward the end of the XIX century. But it was in 1948 when the so called English National Health Service became a landmark in the world with its model being adopted by many countries with resulting distortion of the true meaning of Health Services. The consequences of this fiction have been ominous. It is necessary to call things by their names and not deceive society. To correct the serious imbalance between Medical Services and Health Services, Hygeia and Asclepius must become a brother and sisterhood.

  7. The fiction of health Services

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    What we know today as Health Services is a fiction, perhaps shaped involuntarily, but with deep health repercussions, more negative than positive. About 24 centuries ago, Asclepius, god of medicine, and Hygeia, goddess of hygiene and health, generated a dichotomy between disease and health that remains with us until today. The confusing substitution of Health Services with Medical Services began toward the end of the XIX century. But it was in 1948 when the so called English National Health Service became a landmark in the world with its model being adopted by many countries with resulting distortion of the true meaning of Health Services. The consequences of this fiction have been ominous. It is necessary to call things by their names and not deceive society. To correct the serious imbalance between Medical Services and Health Services, Hygeia and Asclepius must become a brother and sisterhood. PMID:24893062

  8. Eradicating Barriers to Mental Health Care Through Integrated Service Models: Contemporary Perspectives for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Horace; Alexander, Vinette

    2016-06-01

    There has been renewed, global interest in developing new and transformative models of facilitating access to high-quality, cost-effective, and individually-centered health care for severe mentally-ill (SMI) persons of diverse racial/ethnic, cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. However, in our present-day health-service delivery systems, scholars have identified layers of barriers to widespread dispersal of well-needed mental health care both nationally and internationally. It is crucial that contemporary models directed at eradicating barriers to mental health services are interdisciplinary in context, design, scope, sequence, and best-practice standards. Contextually, nurses are well-positioned to influence the incorporation and integration of new concepts into operationally interdisciplinary, evidence-based care models with measurable outcomes. The aim of this concept paper is to use the available evidence to contextually explicate how the blended roles of psychiatric mental health (PMH) nursing can be influential in eradicating barriers to care and services for SMI persons through the integrated principles of collaboration, integration and service expansion across health, socioeconomic, and community systems. A large body of literature proposes that any best-practice standards aimed at eliminating barriers to the health care needs of SMI persons require systematic, well-coordinated interdisciplinary partnerships through evidence-based, high-quality, person-centered, and outcome-driven processes. Transforming the conceptual models of collaboration, integration and service expansion could be revolutionary in how care and services are coordinated and dispersed to populations across disadvantaged communities. Building on their longstanding commitment to individual and community care approaches, and their pivotal roles in research, education, leadership, practice, and legislative processes; PMH nurses are well-positioned to be both influential and instrumental in

  9. Developing role models for health in the fire service: a pilot case study

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Michelle L; Bailey, Maryanne M; Burnett, Monica; Frutchey, Robin; Goheer, Attia; Ram, Anita; Pollack, Keshia M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The objectives of this case study were to develop role models for health in the fire service through knowledge and behaviour change, to improve the role models’ own health, and to facilitate behaviour change in other firefighters through their example. Design Volunteers interested in improving their own health and serving as role models to others in the fire service were identified at a statewide Maryland fire service leadership meeting. Setting Participants worked with the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center to learn how to improve their own health and shared that knowledge with others in their fire departments. Participants Three Maryland fire service leaders were recruited at a leadership meeting with the goal of improving their own health and becoming role models. One participant dropped out shortly after beginning, while two male participants, aged 57 and 61, completed the study. Main outcome measures Quantitative measures were collected at baseline and 12 months, and included weight, blood pressure and fasting glucose and cholesterol. Semi-structured interviews were conducted approximately 14 months postintervention to determine the participants’ perceptions of their own health and impact on others in the fire service. Results Each participant had biweekly to monthly visits over a one-year period to learn the knowledge and skills that would assist him with improving dietary behaviours, increasing fitness and achieving a healthy weight. Case study participants experienced reductions in body weight (−13% and −11% of total body weight), glucose and blood pressure. Qualitative one-on-one interviews conducted postintervention with the participants revealed that they embraced their status as role models and felt their success inspired other firefighters. Their experiences suggest that role models can play an important role in helping firefighters increase self-efficacy, self-regulation and social support in the workplace environment

  10. Formalize clinical processes into electronic health information systems: Modelling a screening service for diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Eguzkiza, Aitor; Trigo, Jesús Daniel; Martínez-Espronceda, Miguel; Serrano, Luis; Andonegui, José

    2015-08-01

    Most healthcare services use information and communication technologies to reduce and redistribute the workload associated with follow-up of chronic conditions. However, the lack of normalization of the information handled in and exchanged between such services hinders the scalability and extendibility. The use of medical standards for modelling and exchanging information, especially dual-model based approaches, can enhance the features of screening services. Hence, the approach of this paper is twofold. First, this article presents a generic methodology to model patient-centered clinical processes. Second, a proof of concept of the proposed methodology was conducted within the diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening service of the Health Service of Navarre (Spain) in compliance with a specific dual-model norm (openEHR). As a result, a set of elements required for deploying a model-driven DR screening service has been established, namely: clinical concepts, archetypes, termsets, templates, guideline definition rules, and user interface definitions. This model fosters reusability, because those elements are available to be downloaded and integrated in any healthcare service, and interoperability, since from then on such services can share information seamlessly.

  11. Swine models, genomic tools and services to enhance our understanding of human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Walters, Eric M; Wells, Kevin D; Bryda, Elizabeth C; Schommer, Susan; Prather, Randall S

    2017-03-22

    The pig is becoming increasingly important as a biomedical model. Given the similarities between pigs and humans, a greater understanding of the underlying biology of human health and diseases may come from the pig rather than from classical rodent models. With an increasing need for swine models, it is essential that the genomic tools, models and services be readily available to the scientific community. Many of these are available through the National Swine Resource and Research Center (NSRRC), a facility funded by the US National Institutes of Health at the University of Missouri. The goal of the NSRRC is to provide high-quality biomedical swine models to the scientific community.

  12. A model for community health service development in depressed rural areas in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To introduce a model of community health service organization (as implemented in urban areas) to less developed rural areas in China and evaluate the impact of this model on health care utilization. Methods The intervention involved developing leadership at county level, training rural health practitioners, providing clinical management guidelines and standards, encouraging clinic improvements and providing access to subsidies for public health work. We chose 7 townships and 49 administrative villages in Chongyi County as the intervention sites; 3 townships and 9 administrative villages in Luxi County as the comparison sites. Officers from county health bureaus and postgraduates from School of Public Health, Nanchang University visited each township hospital and village clinic in field together and made observations and interviewed clinic staff. Results There was little change in health facilities or workforce in the two areas. However, there was an increase in the use of public health services at township and village level in the intervention sites in Chongyi. In these, the proportion of clinics which had developed a child health (under the age of 3) management system, maternal postpartum visit and chronic disease management increased from 53%, 51% and 47% to 78%, 73%, and 71% respectively. There was no significant change in the comparison sites. Conclusions The trial demonstrated that it was feasible to implement a model of community health service delivery that was adapted to depressed rural areas because it required little organizational change, additional funding or personnel. The model had a positive impact on the provision of public health programs, a finding which has implications for efforts to improve access to primary health care in rural China. PMID:23244489

  13. Serving transgender people: clinical care considerations and service delivery models in transgender health.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Kevan; Knudson, Gail; Khan, Sharful Islam; Bonierbale, Mireille; Watanyusakul, Suporn; Baral, Stefan

    2016-07-23

    The World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) standards of care for transsexual, transgender, and gender non-conforming people (version 7) represent international normative standards for clinical care for these populations. Standards for optimal individual clinical care are consistent around the world, although the implementation of services for transgender populations will depend on health system infrastructure and sociocultural contexts. Some clinical services for transgender people, including gender-affirming surgery, are best delivered in the context of more specialised facilities; however, the majority of health-care needs can be delivered by a primary care practitioner. Across high-income and low-income settings alike, there often remains a dearth of educational programming for health-care professionals in transgender health, although the best evidence supports introducing modules on transgender health early during clinical education of clinicians and allied health professionals. While these challenges remain, we review the increasing evidence and examples of the defined roles of the mental health professional in transgender health-care decisions, effective models of health service provision, and available surgical interventions for transgender people. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Consumer Health Informatics in the Context of Engaged Citizens and eHealth Services - A New CHI Meta Model.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Martin; Griebel, Lena; Becker, Kurt; Pobiruchin, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) is a relatively new and interdisciplinary field in Medical Informatics. It focuses on consumer- rather than professional-centered services. However, the definitions and understanding of a) what is a "consumer"? or b) what is health technology in the context of CHI? and c) what factors and actors influence the usage of eHealth services? vary widely. The CHI special interest group (SIG) - associated with the German Association for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology - conducted two workshops in 2015 to improve the common understanding on these topics. The workshop outcomes, the derived CHI-specific meta model and examples how to apply this model are presented in this paper. The model supports the definition of multi-actor contexts, as it not solely reflects the conventional patient-physician relationship but also allows for the description of second health market providers.

  15. A stepped-care model of post-disaster child and adolescent mental health service provision

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Brett M.; Cobham, Vanessa E.

    2014-01-01

    Background From a global perspective, natural disasters are common events. Published research highlights that a significant minority of exposed children and adolescents develop disaster-related mental health syndromes and associated functional impairment. Consistent with the considerable unmet need of children and adolescents with regard to psychopathology, there is strong evidence that many children and adolescents with post-disaster mental health presentations are not receiving adequate interventions. Objective To critique existing child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) models of care and the capacity of such models to deal with any post-disaster surge in clinical demand. Further, to detail an innovative service response; a child and adolescent stepped-care service provision model. Method A narrative review of traditional CAMHS is presented. Important elements of a disaster response – individual versus community recovery, public health approaches, capacity for promotion and prevention and service reach are discussed and compared with the CAMHS approach. Results Difficulties with traditional models of care are highlighted across all levels of intervention; from the ability to provide preventative initiatives to the capacity to provide intense specialised posttraumatic stress disorder interventions. In response, our over-arching stepped-care model is advocated. The general response is discussed and details of the three tiers of the model are provided: Tier 1 communication strategy, Tier 2 parent effectiveness and teacher training, and Tier 3 screening linked to trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy. Conclusion In this paper, we argue that traditional CAMHS are not an appropriate model of care to meet the clinical needs of this group in the post-disaster setting. We conclude with suggestions how improved post-disaster child and adolescent mental health outcomes can be achieved by applying an innovative service approach. PMID:25045422

  16. A stepped-care model of post-disaster child and adolescent mental health service provision.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Brett M; Cobham, Vanessa E

    2014-01-01

    From a global perspective, natural disasters are common events. Published research highlights that a significant minority of exposed children and adolescents develop disaster-related mental health syndromes and associated functional impairment. Consistent with the considerable unmet need of children and adolescents with regard to psychopathology, there is strong evidence that many children and adolescents with post-disaster mental health presentations are not receiving adequate interventions. To critique existing child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) models of care and the capacity of such models to deal with any post-disaster surge in clinical demand. Further, to detail an innovative service response; a child and adolescent stepped-care service provision model. A narrative review of traditional CAMHS is presented. Important elements of a disaster response - individual versus community recovery, public health approaches, capacity for promotion and prevention and service reach are discussed and compared with the CAMHS approach. Difficulties with traditional models of care are highlighted across all levels of intervention; from the ability to provide preventative initiatives to the capacity to provide intense specialised posttraumatic stress disorder interventions. In response, our over-arching stepped-care model is advocated. The general response is discussed and details of the three tiers of the model are provided: Tier 1 communication strategy, Tier 2 parent effectiveness and teacher training, and Tier 3 screening linked to trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy. In this paper, we argue that traditional CAMHS are not an appropriate model of care to meet the clinical needs of this group in the post-disaster setting. We conclude with suggestions how improved post-disaster child and adolescent mental health outcomes can be achieved by applying an innovative service approach.

  17. Systems modelling and simulation in health service design, delivery and decision making.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Martin; Monks, Thomas; Crowe, Sonya; Vasilakis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The ever increasing pressures to ensure the most efficient and effective use of limited health service resources will, over time, encourage policy makers to turn to system modelling solutions. Such techniques have been available for decades, but despite ample research which demonstrates potential, their application in health services to date is limited. This article surveys the breadth of approaches available to support delivery and design across many areas and levels of healthcare planning. A case study in emergency stroke care is presented as an exemplar of an impactful application of health system modelling. This is followed by a discussion of the key issues surrounding the application of these methods in health, what barriers need to be overcome to ensure more effective implementation, as well as likely developments in the future.

  18. Care Models of eHealth Services: A Case Study on the Design of a Business Model for an Online Precare Service

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background With a growing population of health care clients in the future, the organization of high-quality and cost-effective service providing becomes an increasing challenge. New online eHealth services are proposed as innovative options for the future. Yet, a major barrier to these services appears to be the lack of new business model designs. Although design efforts generally result in visual models, no such artifacts have been found in the literature on business model design. This paper investigates business model design in eHealth service practices from a design perspective. It adopts a research by design approach and seeks to unravel what characteristics of business models determine an online service and what are important value exchanges between health professionals and clients. Objective The objective of the study was to analyze the construction of care models in-depth, framing the essential elements of a business model, and design a new care model that structures these elements for the particular context of an online pre-care service in practice. Methods This research employs a qualitative method of an in-depth case study in which different perspectives on constructing a care model are investigated. Data are collected by using the visual business modeling toolkit, designed to cocreate and visualize the business model. The cocreated models are transcribed and analyzed per actor perspective, transactions, and value attributes. Results We revealed eight new actors in the business model for providing the service. Essential actors are: the intermediary network coordinator connecting companies, the service dedicated information technology specialists, and the service dedicated health specialist. In the transactions for every service providing we found a certain type of contract, such as a license contract and service contracts for precare services and software products. In addition to the efficiency, quality, and convenience, important value attributes

  19. Developing Vibrant State Defense Forces: A Successful Medical and Health Service Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    MEDICAL AND HEALTH SERVICE MODEL Colonel (MD) H. Wayne Nelson, Ph.D. Colonel (MD) Robert Barish, M.D. Brigadier General (MD) Frederic Smalkin, J.D...Its Deputy Commander and MRC project action officer was (one of the authors, Nelson), a professor in the Health Science Department in Towson ...Director COL Wayne Nelson, to select “medically-qualified soldiers” who would accept assignment to “participate in humanitarian missions in response and

  20. Developing and Implementing A Model Program for Providing Services to Other Health Impaired Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Mary L.; And Others

    The report describes a model program designed to develop, implement, and evaluate services to health impaired children in compliance with the mandates of Public Law 94-142 (the Education for All Handicapped Children Act). The first four chapters provide an introduction, statement of the problem, research strategy, and review of the literature.…

  1. Involving mental health service users in suicide-related research: a qualitative inquiry model.

    PubMed

    Lees, David; Procter, Nicholas; Fassett, Denise; Handley, Christine

    2016-03-01

    To describe the research model developed and successfully deployed as part of a multi-method qualitative study investigating suicidal service-users' experiences of mental health nursing care. Quality mental health care is essential to limiting the occurrence and burden of suicide, however there is a lack of relevant research informing practice in this context. Research utilising first-person accounts of suicidality is of particular importance to expanding the existing evidence base. However, conducting ethical research to support this imperative is challenging. The model discussed here illustrates specific and more generally applicable principles for qualitative research regarding sensitive topics and involving potentially vulnerable service-users. Researching into mental health service users with first-person experience of suicidality requires stakeholder and institutional support, researcher competency, and participant recruitment, consent, confidentiality, support and protection. Research with service users into their experiences of sensitive issues such as suicidality can result in rich and valuable data, and may also provide positive experiences of collaboration and inclusivity. If challenges are not met, objectification and marginalisation of service-users may be reinforced, and limitations in the evidence base and service provision may be perpetuated.

  2. A novel approach for mental health disease management: the Air Force Medical Service's interdisciplinary model.

    PubMed

    Runyan, Christine N; Fonseca, Vincent P; Meyer, John G; Oordt, Mark S; Talcott, G Wayne

    2003-01-01

    Mental health disorders are one of the most substantial public health problems affecting society today, accounting for roughly 15% of the overall burden of disease from all causes in the United States. Although primary care (PC) has the potential to be the frontline for recognition and management of behavioral health conditions, this has been a challenge historically. In order to more effectively address the broad scope of behavioral health needs, the Air Force Medical Service (AFMS) established a new model of behavioral health care. Through a series of coordinated steps, the AFMS ultimately placed trained behavioral health providers into PC clinics to serve as consultants to PC providers (PCPs). Behavioral Health Consultants (BHCs) provide focused assessments, present healthcare options to patients, and deliver brief collaborative interventions in the PC setting. BHCs see patients at the request of the PCP, in 15-30-min appointments. In the pilot study, patients averaged 1.6 visits to the BHC. Over 70% of patients fell into six categories of presenting problems: situational reactions, depressive disorders, adjustment disorders, anxiety disorders, health promotion, and obesity. Patient data (n = 76) suggest 97% of patients seen were either "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with BHC services, and 100% of the PCPs (n = 23, 68% response rate) were highly satisfied and indicated they would "definitely recommend" others use BHC services for their patients. Both the implications and the limitations of this pilot study are discussed.

  3. Documenting good practices: scaling up the youth friendly health service model in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Huaynoca, Silvia; Svanemyr, Joar; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman C; Moreno Lopez, Diva Jeaneth

    2015-09-18

    Young people make up for 24.5 % of Latin America's population. Inadequate supply of specific and timely sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services and sexuality education for young people increases their risk of sexual and reproductive ill health. Colombia is one of the few countries in Latin America that has implemented and scaled up specific and differentiated health and SRH services-termed as its Youth Friendly Health Services (YFHS) Model. To provide a systematic description of the crucial factors that facilitated and hindered the scale up process of the YFHS Model in Colombia. A comprehensive literature search on SRH services for young people and national efforts to improve their quality of care in Colombia and neighbouring countries was carried out along with interviews with a selection of key stakeholders. The information gathered was analysed using the World Health Organization-ExpandNet framework (WHO-ExpandNet). In 7 years (2007-2013) of the implementation of the YFHS Model in Colombia more than 800 clinics nationally have been made youth friendly. By 2013, 536 municipalities in 32 departments had YFHS, resulting in coverage of 52 % of municipalities offering YHFS. The analysis using the WHO-ExpandNet framework identified five elements that enabled the scale up process: Clear policies and implementation guidelines on YFHS, clear attributes of the user organization and resource team, establishment and implementation of an inter-sectoral and interagency strategy, identification of and support to stakeholders and advocates of YFHS, and solid monitoring and evaluation. The elements that limited or slowed down the scale up effort were: Insufficient number of health personnel trained in youth health and SRH, a high turnover of health personnel, a decentralized health security system, inadequate supply of financial and human resources, and negative perceptions among community members about providing SRH information and services to young people. Colombia

  4. Location-allocation and accessibility models for improving the spatial planning of public health services.

    PubMed

    Polo, Gina; Acosta, C Mera; Ferreira, Fernando; Dias, Ricardo Augusto

    2015-01-01

    This study integrated accessibility and location-allocation models in geographic information systems as a proposed strategy to improve the spatial planning of public health services. To estimate the spatial accessibility, we modified the two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) model with a different impedance function, a Gaussian weight for competition among service sites, a friction coefficient, distances along a street network based on the Dijkstra's algorithm and by performing a vectorial analysis. To check the accuracy of the strategy, we used the data from the public sterilization program for the dogs and cats of Bogot´a, Colombia. Since the proposed strategy is independent of the service, it could also be applied to any other public intervention when the capacity of the service is known. The results of the accessibility model were consistent with the sterilization program data, revealing that the western, central and northern zones are the most isolated areas under the sterilization program. Spatial accessibility improvement was sought by relocating the sterilization sites using the maximum coverage with finite demand and the p-median models. The relocation proposed by the maximum coverage model more effectively maximized the spatial accessibility to the sterilization service given the non-uniform distribution of the populations of dogs and cats throughout the city. The implementation of the proposed strategy would provide direct benefits by improving the effectiveness of different public health interventions and the use of financial and human resources.

  5. Location-Allocation and Accessibility Models for Improving the Spatial Planning of Public Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Gina; Acosta, C. Mera; Ferreira, Fernando; Dias, Ricardo Augusto

    2015-01-01

    This study integrated accessibility and location-allocation models in geographic information systems as a proposed strategy to improve the spatial planning of public health services. To estimate the spatial accessibility, we modified the two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) model with a different impedance function, a Gaussian weight for competition among service sites, a friction coefficient, distances along a street network based on the Dijkstra’s algorithm and by performing a vectorial analysis. To check the accuracy of the strategy, we used the data from the public sterilization program for the dogs and cats of Bogot´a, Colombia. Since the proposed strategy is independent of the service, it could also be applied to any other public intervention when the capacity of the service is known. The results of the accessibility model were consistent with the sterilization program data, revealing that the western, central and northern zones are the most isolated areas under the sterilization program. Spatial accessibility improvement was sought by relocating the sterilization sites using the maximum coverage with finite demand and the p-median models. The relocation proposed by the maximum coverage model more effectively maximized the spatial accessibility to the sterilization service given the non-uniform distribution of the populations of dogs and cats throughout the city. The implementation of the proposed strategy would provide direct benefits by improving the effectiveness of different public health interventions and the use of financial and human resources. PMID:25775411

  6. Three models of community mental health services In low-income countries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare and contrast three models of community mental health services in low-income settings. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary and secondary data collected before, during, and after site visits to mental health programs in Nigeria, the Philippines, and India. Study Design Qualitative case study methodology. Data Collection Data were collected through interviews and observations during site visits to the programs, as well as from reviews of documentary evidence. Principal Findings A set of narrative topics and program indicators were used to compare and contrast three community mental health programs in low-income countries. This allowed us to identify a diversity of service delivery models, common challenges, and the strengths and weaknesses of each program. More definitive evaluations will require the establishment of data collection methods and information systems that provide data about the clinical and social outcomes of clients, as well as their use of services. Conclusions Community mental health programs in low-income countries face a number of challenges. Using a case study methodology developed for this purpose, it is possible to compare programs and begin to assess the effectiveness of diverse service delivery models. PMID:21266051

  7. A model of the impact of immigration on health and social service expenditures for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Factor, H; Habib, J

    1993-01-01

    "Immigration, primarily from the former Soviet Union, has swelled the population of Israel by 10% between 1990 and 1993 and total population growth by the end of the decade is expected to be over 30%. The research presented here represents part of a larger effort to project needs and costs for the entire population in order to assist health and social welfare services in planning and resource allocation. The paper presents an overview of the current demographic situation in Israel, a theoretical model for estimating the growth in needs, and estimates of needs and costs for services for the elderly population based upon this model." excerpt

  8. National implementation of a mental health service model: A survey of Crisis Resolution Teams in England.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Paterson, Bethan; Onyett, Steve; Brown, Ellie; Istead, Hannah; Gray, Richard; Henderson, Claire; Johnson, Sonia

    2017-01-11

    In response to pressures on mental health inpatient beds and a perceived 'crisis in acute care', Crisis Resolution Teams (CRTs), acute home treatment services, were implemented nationally in England following the NHS Plan in the year 2000: an unprecedentedly prescriptive policy mandate for three new types of functional community mental health team. We examined the effects of this mandate on implementation of the CRT service model. Two hundred and eighteen CRTs were mapped in England, including services in all 65 mental health administrative regions. Eighty-eight percent (n = 192) of CRT managers in England participated in an online survey. CRT service organization and delivery was highly variable. Nurses were the only professional group employed in all CRT staff teams. Almost no teams adhered fully to government implementation guidance. CRT managers identified several aspects of CRT service delivery as desirable but not routinely provided. A national policy mandate and government guidance and standards have proved insufficient to ensure CRT implementation as planned. Development and testing of resources to support implementation and monitoring of a complex mental health intervention is required.

  9. Interactive, open source, travel time scenario modelling: tools to facilitate participation in health service access analysis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Rohan; Lassa, Jonatan

    2017-04-18

    Modelling travel time to services has become a common public health tool for planning service provision but the usefulness of these analyses is constrained by the availability of accurate input data and limitations inherent in the assumptions and parameterisation. This is particularly an issue in the developing world where access to basic data is limited and travel is often complex and multi-modal. Improving the accuracy and relevance in this context requires greater accessibility to, and flexibility in, travel time modelling tools to facilitate the incorporation of local knowledge and the rapid exploration of multiple travel scenarios. The aim of this work was to develop simple open source, adaptable, interactive travel time modelling tools to allow greater access to and participation in service access analysis. Described are three interconnected applications designed to reduce some of the barriers to the more wide-spread use of GIS analysis of service access and allow for complex spatial and temporal variations in service availability. These applications are an open source GIS tool-kit and two geo-simulation models. The development of these tools was guided by health service issues from a developing world context but they present a general approach to enabling greater access to and flexibility in health access modelling. The tools demonstrate a method that substantially simplifies the process for conducting travel time assessments and demonstrate a dynamic, interactive approach in an open source GIS format. In addition this paper provides examples from empirical experience where these tools have informed better policy and planning. Travel and health service access is complex and cannot be reduced to a few static modeled outputs. The approaches described in this paper use a unique set of tools to explore this complexity, promote discussion and build understanding with the goal of producing better planning outcomes. The accessible, flexible, interactive and

  10. Trade in health services.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Rupa

    2002-01-01

    In light of the increasing globalization of the health sector, this article examines ways in which health services can be traded, using the mode-wise characterization of trade defined in the General Agreement on Trade in Services. The trade modes include cross- border delivery of health services via physical and electronic means, and cross-border movement of consumers, professionals, and capital. An examination of the positive and negative implications of trade in health services for equity, efficiency, quality, and access to health care indicates that health services trade has brought mixed benefits and that there is a clear role for policy measures to mitigate the adverse consequences and facilitate the gains. Some policy measures and priority areas for action are outlined, including steps to address the "brain drain"; increasing investment in the health sector and prioritizing this investment better; and promoting linkages between private and public health care services to ensure equity. Data collection, measures, and studies on health services trade all need to be improved, to assess better the magnitude and potential implications of this trade. In this context, the potential costs and benefits of trade in health services are shaped by the underlying structural conditions and existing regulatory, policy, and infrastructure in the health sector. Thus, appropriate policies and safeguard measures are required to take advantage of globalization in health services.

  11. Trade in health services.

    PubMed Central

    Chanda, Rupa

    2002-01-01

    In light of the increasing globalization of the health sector, this article examines ways in which health services can be traded, using the mode-wise characterization of trade defined in the General Agreement on Trade in Services. The trade modes include cross- border delivery of health services via physical and electronic means, and cross-border movement of consumers, professionals, and capital. An examination of the positive and negative implications of trade in health services for equity, efficiency, quality, and access to health care indicates that health services trade has brought mixed benefits and that there is a clear role for policy measures to mitigate the adverse consequences and facilitate the gains. Some policy measures and priority areas for action are outlined, including steps to address the "brain drain"; increasing investment in the health sector and prioritizing this investment better; and promoting linkages between private and public health care services to ensure equity. Data collection, measures, and studies on health services trade all need to be improved, to assess better the magnitude and potential implications of this trade. In this context, the potential costs and benefits of trade in health services are shaped by the underlying structural conditions and existing regulatory, policy, and infrastructure in the health sector. Thus, appropriate policies and safeguard measures are required to take advantage of globalization in health services. PMID:11953795

  12. Re-engineering pre-employment check-up systems: a model for improving health services.

    PubMed

    Rateb, Said Abdel Hakim; El Nouman, Azza Abdel Razek; Rateb, Moshira Abdel Hakim; Asar, Mohamed Naguib; El Amin, Ayman Mohammed; Gad, Saad abdel Aziz; Mohamed, Mohamed Salah Eldin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for improving health services provided by the pre-employment medical fitness check-up system affiliated to Egypt's Health Insurance Organization (HIO). Operations research, notably system re-engineering, is used in six randomly selected centers and findings before and after re-engineering are compared. The re-engineering model follows a systems approach, focusing on three areas: structure, process and outcome. The model is based on six main components: electronic booking, standardized check-up processes, protected medical documents, advanced archiving through an electronic content management (ECM) system, infrastructure development, and capacity building. The model originates mainly from customer needs and expectations. The centers' monthly customer flow increased significantly after re-engineering. The mean time spent per customer cycle improved after re-engineering--18.3 +/- 5.5 minutes as compared to 48.8 +/- 14.5 minutes before. Appointment delay was also significantly decreased from an average 18 to 6.2 days. Both beneficiaries and service providers were significantly more satisfied with the services after re-engineering. The model proves that re-engineering program costs are exceeded by increased revenue. Re-engineering in this study involved multiple structure and process elements. The literature review did not reveal similar re-engineering healthcare packages. Therefore, each element was compared separately. This model is highly recommended for improving service effectiveness and efficiency. This research is the first in Egypt to apply the re-engineering approach to public health systems. Developing user-friendly models for service improvement is an added value.

  13. Does type of gatekeeping model affect access to outpatient specialty mental health services?

    PubMed

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Horgan, Constance M; Garnick, Deborah W; McLaughlin, Thomas J

    2007-02-01

    To measure how a change in gatekeeping model affects utilization of specialty mental health services. Secondary data from health insurance claims for services during 1996-1999. The setting is a managed care organization that changed gatekeeping model in one of its divisions, from in-person evaluation to the use of a call-center. We evaluate the impact of the change in gatekeeping model by comparing utilization during the 2 years before and 2 years after the change, both in the affected division and in another division where gatekeeping model did not change. The design is thus a controlled quasi-experimental one. Subjects were not randomized. Key dependent variables are whether each individual had any specialty mental health visits in a year; the number of visits; and the proportion of users exceeding eight visits in a year. Key explanatory variables include demographic variables and indicators for patient diagnoses and their intervention status (time-period, study group). Claims data were aggregated to create analytic files with one record per member per year, with variables reporting demographic characteristics and mental health service use. After controlling for secular trends at the other division, the division which changed gatekeeping model eventually experienced an increase in the proportion of enrollees receiving specialty mental health treatment, of 0.5 percentage point. Similarly, there was an increase of about 0.6 annual visits per user, concentrated at the low end of the distribution. These changes occurred only in the second year after the gatekeeping changes. The results of this study suggest that the gatekeeping changes did lead to increases in utilization of mental health care, as hypothesized. At the same time, the magnitude of the increase in access and mean number of visits that we found was relatively modest. This suggests that while the change from face-to-face specialty gatekeeping to call-center intake does increase utilization, it is unlikely

  14. Occupational therapy influence on a carer peer support model in a clinical mental health service.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Cate; Sanders, Bronwyn; Allchin, Becca; Lentin, Primrose; Lang, Shannon

    2015-10-01

    Current policy frameworks call for the participation of consumers and carers in all levels of mental health service delivery in Australia. Such inclusion leads to better outcomes for all, however, it is recognised that carers have needs and occupations beyond their carer role. The aim of this article is to describe an innovative carer peer support program developed by a group of occupational therapists. The article describes the rationale, phases of development and the role that occupational therapists played in developing and sustaining the model. This is followed by an exploration of the occupational therapy attitudes, knowledge and skills that contributed to the conceptualisation and implementation of the model. Five occupational therapists engaged in a review process involving documentation, literature review, evaluation, reflection and discussion. Four of the occupational therapists had either coordinated or managed the service described. The fifth author facilitated the process. Review of the model indicates it equips carers to perform their caring occupation and helps carers recognise the need for occupations beyond caring, for their health and wellbeing. Employing carers as paid workers values their 'real life' experience in their caring occupation. Findings also illustrate that the attitudes, knowledge, skills and competency standards of occupational therapists are well suited in enabling this emerging area of service delivery. Although this model has been developed in a clinical mental health setting, the key principles could be applied with carers or consumers across a variety of settings in which occupational therapists are employed. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  15. Manpower Mix for Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Shuman, Larry J.; Young, John P.; Naddor, Eliezer

    1971-01-01

    A model is formulated to determine the mix of manpower and technology needed to provide health services of acceptable quality at a minimum total cost to the community. Total costs include both the direct costs associated with providing the services and with developing additional manpower and the indirect costs (shortage costs) resulting from not providing needed services. The model is applied to a hypothetical neighborhood health center, and its sensitivity to alternative policies is investigated by cost-benefit analyses. Possible extensions of the model to include dynamic elements in health delivery systems are discussed, as is its adaptation for use in hospital planning, with a changed objective function. PMID:5095652

  16. Towards modeling and simulation of integrated social and health care services for elderly.

    PubMed

    Horsch, Alexander; Khoshsima, Daryoush

    2007-01-01

    In order to estimate the impact of an innovation on a segment of the health care system under certain assumptions such as different possible regulatory or financing schemes (scenarios) prior to its diffusion, one must understand the dynamic behavior of the entire system with its essential control loops. Aim of this feasibility study was to explore the potential of System Dynamics (SD) modeling for this purpose. First, a UML-based modeling of an Innovative Care for Elderly (ICE) system for provision of integrated social and health care services to elderly living at home was done. Then monetary and quality of life aspects of the social and health care system were described by two coarse SD models. On these models the impact of the introduction of the ICE system under certain assumption (scenarios) was studied, based on data from the German Health Expenditure and German Federal Statistics Office. The simulations show plausible behavior, however, are not yet detailed enough for a final conclusion. A major problem is missing data for setting model parameters: estimates had to be made. In conclusion, SD modeling might be a useful method for studying impacts of the diffusion of an innovation in the health for elderly sector, but more research is needed.

  17. An Integrated Recovery-oriented Model (IRM) for mental health services: evolution and challenges.

    PubMed

    Frost, Barry G; Tirupati, Srinivasan; Johnston, Suzanne; Turrell, Megan; Lewin, Terry J; Sly, Ketrina A; Conrad, Agatha M

    2017-01-17

    Over past decades, improvements in longer-term clinical and personal outcomes for individuals experiencing serious mental illness (SMI) have been moderate, although recovery has clearly been shown to be possible. Recovery experiences are inherently personal, and recovery can be complex and non-linear; however, there are a broad range of potential recovery contexts and contributors, both non-professional and professional. Ongoing refinement of recovery-oriented models for mental health (MH) services needs to be fostered. This descriptive paper outlines a service-wide Integrated Recovery-oriented Model (IRM) for MH services, designed to enhance personally valued health, wellbeing and social inclusion outcomes by increasing access to evidenced-based psychosocial interventions (EBIs) within a service context that supports recovery as both a process and an outcome. Evolution of the IRM is characterised as a series of five broad challenges, which draw together: relevant recovery perspectives; overall service delivery frameworks; psychiatric and psychosocial rehabilitation approaches and literature; our own clinical and service delivery experience; and implementation, evaluation and review strategies. The model revolves around the person's changing recovery needs, focusing on underlying processes and the service frameworks to support and reinforce hope as a primary catalyst for symptomatic and functional recovery. Within the IRM, clinical rehabilitation (CR) practices, processes and partnerships facilitate access to psychosocial EBIs to promote hope, recovery, self-agency and social inclusion. Core IRM components are detailed (remediation of functioning; collaborative restoration of skills and competencies; and active community reconnection), together with associated phases, processes, evaluation strategies, and an illustrative IRM scenario. The achievement of these goals requires ongoing collaboration with community organisations. Improved outcomes are achievable for

  18. Interprofessional collaborative model for medication therapy management (MTM) services to improve health care access and quality for underserved populations.

    PubMed

    Truong, Hoai-An; Groves, C Nicole; Congdon, Heather Brennan; Botchway, Rosemary; Dang, Diem-Thanh Tanya; Clark, Nancy Ripp; Zarfeshan, Faramarz

    2012-08-01

    As part of the Health Resources and Services Administration Patient Safety and Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative (PSPC), an interprofessional model with medication therapy management documentation and outcomes tracking tools (MTM-DOTT) is established to improve health care access and quality for underserved populations. Despite limitations, there have been positive outcomes and national recognitions.

  19. Developing a new model for patient recruitment in mental health services: a cohort study using Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Callard, Felicity; Broadbent, Matthew; Denis, Mike; Hotopf, Matthew; Soncul, Murat; Wykes, Til; Lovestone, Simon; Stewart, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop a new model for patient recruitment that harnessed the full potential of Electronic Health Records (EHRs). Gaining access to potential participants’ health records to assess their eligibility for studies and allow an approach about participation (‘consent for contact’) is ethically, legally and technically challenging, given that medical data are usually restricted to the patient's clinical team. The research objective was to design a model for identification and recruitment to overcome some of these challenges as well as reduce the burdensome (and/or time consuming) gatekeeper role of clinicians in determining who is appropriate or not to participate in clinical research. Setting Large secondary mental health services context, UK. Participants 2106 patients approached for ‘consent for contact’. All patients in different services within the mental health trust are gradually and systematically being approached by a member of the clinical care team using the ‘consent for contact’ model. There are no exclusion criteria. Primary and secondary outcome measures Provision of ‘consent for contact’. Results A new model (the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust Consent for Contact model (SLaM C4C)) for gaining patients’ consent to contact them about research possibilities, which is built around a de-identified EHR database. The model allows researchers to contact potential participants directly. Of 2106 patients approached by 25 October 2013, nearly 3 of every 4 gave consent for contact (1560 patients; 74.1%). Conclusions The SLaM C4C model offers an effective way of expediting recruitment into health research through using EHRs. It reduces the gatekeeper function of clinicians; gives patients greater autonomy in decisions to participate in research; and accelerates the development of a culture of active research participation. More research is needed to assess how many of those giving consent for contact subsequently consent to

  20. Reorienting health services in the Northern Territory of Australia: a conceptual model for building health promotion capacity in the workforce.

    PubMed

    Judd, Jenni; Keleher, Helen

    2013-06-01

    Reorienting work practices to include health promotion and prevention is complex and requires specific strategies and interventions. This paper presents original research that used 'real-world' practice to demonstrate that knowledge gathered from practice is relevant for the development of practice-based evidence. The paper shows how practitioners can inform and influence improvements in health promotion practice. Practitioner-informed evidence necessarily incorporates qualitative research to capture the richness of their reflective experiences. Using a participatory action research (PAR) approach, the research question asked 'what are the core dimensions of building health promotion capacity in a primary health care workforce in a real-world setting?' PAR is a method in which the researcher operates in full collaboration with members of the organisation being studied for the purposes of achieving some kind of change, in this case to increase the amount of health promotion and prevention practice within this community health setting. The PAR process involved six reflection and action cycles over two years. Data collection processes included: survey; in-depth interviews; a training intervention; observations of practice; workplace diaries; and two nominal groups. The listen/reflect/act process enabled lessons from practice to inform future capacity-building processes. This research strengthened and supported the development of health promotion to inform 'better health' practices through respectful change processes based on research, practitioner-informed evidence, and capacity-building strategies. A conceptual model for building health promotion capacity in the primary health care workforce was informed by the PAR processes and recognised the importance of the determinants approach. Practitioner-informed evidence is the missing link in the evidence debate and provides the links between evidence and its translation to practice. New models of health promotion service

  1. Development of a model for sustainable delivery of outreach allied health services to remote north-west Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Battye, K M; McTaggart, K

    2003-01-01

    Development of sustainable multidisciplinary services in north-west Queensland, Australia, is challenged by large distances, culturally diverse communities, a prolonged wet season, a history of poor retention of allied health professionals (AHPs), and high prevalence of chronic disease. In 2001, the Northern Queensland Rural Division of General Practice drew on wide community consultation and recent research into the recruitment and retention of AHPs to develop a Model for delivery of outreach allied health services operating within a primary healthcare framework. to develop a Model of allied health service delivery using the principles of primary healthcare, to meet the needs of 11 culturally diverse (indigenous, non-indigenous and mixed) remote communities, in an area of over 373 000 km2. The development of the outreach Model of allied-health service delivery occurred over four stages: (1) Formulation of a planning matrix as the outcome of a workshop to identify the core components; (2) Environmental scan including mapping of existing allied health services and identification of gaps in service delivery; community consultation to assist in the gap analysis of service delivery, identification health priorities at a local level, and provision of context as to how services should be provided; analysis of available morbidity, mortality data and screening data; (3) Desktop analysis of previous research into the recruitment and retention of allied health professionals, and determination of a 'reasonable' level of service delivery in rural and remote areas; and (4) Synthesis of information to develop options or a Model of service delivery. The environmental scan indicated the need for a raft of AHPs to address chronic disease and injury in the target communities, including the disciplines of physiotherapy, podiatry, dietetics, occupational therapy, speech pathology and psychology. The Model of service delivery sought to provide services in a form appropriate to

  2. Comparative study: TQ and Lean Production ownership models in health services.

    PubMed

    Eiro, Natalia Yuri; Torres-Junior, Alvair Silveira

    2015-01-01

    compare the application of Total Quality (TQ) models used in processes of a health service, cases of lean healthcare and literature from another institution that has also applied this model. this is a qualitative research that was conducted through a descriptive case study. through critical analysis of the institutions studied it was possible to make a comparison between the traditional quality approach checked in one case and the theoretical and practice lean production approach used in another case and the specifications are described below. the research identified that the lean model was better suited for people that work systemically and generate the flow. It also pointed towards some potential challenges in the introduction and implementation of lean methods in health.

  3. Comparative study: TQ and Lean Production ownership models in health services

    PubMed Central

    Eiro, Natalia Yuri; Torres-Junior, Alvair Silveira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: compare the application of Total Quality (TQ) models used in processes of a health service, cases of lean healthcare and literature from another institution that has also applied this model. Method: this is a qualitative research that was conducted through a descriptive case study. Results: through critical analysis of the institutions studied it was possible to make a comparison between the traditional quality approach checked in one case and the theoretical and practice lean production approach used in another case and the specifications are described below. Conclusion: the research identified that the lean model was better suited for people that work systemically and generate the flow. It also pointed towards some potential challenges in the introduction and implementation of lean methods in health. PMID:26487134

  4. The secret to a health benefits self-service model: a more informed consumer.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, T R

    2001-01-01

    Sageo is the first full-service e-business to deliver health, dental, vision and welfare benefits via the Internet. The author describes the health care system's problems that have led to the need for participant-driven, self-service systems; describes Sageo's genesis and inaugural online enrollment; and explains how services like those offered by Sageo allow employers to "match, pace and lead" to a more informed health care consumer.

  5. Aligning health information technologies with effective service delivery models to improve chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Amy M; Thielke, Stephen M; Katon, Wayne; Unützer, Jürgen; Areán, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    Healthcare reforms in the United States, including the Affordable Care and HITECH Acts, and the NCQA criteria for the Patient Centered Medical Home have promoted health information technology (HIT) and the integration of general medical and mental health services. These developments, which aim to improve chronic disease care, have largely occurred in parallel, with little attention to the need for coordination. In this article, the fundamental connections between HIT and improvements in chronic disease management are explored. We use the evidence-based collaborative care model as an example, with attention to health literacy improvement for supporting patient engagement in care. A review of the literature was conducted to identify how HIT and collaborative care, an evidence-based model of chronic disease care, support each other. Five key principles of effective collaborative care are outlined: care is patient-centered, evidence-based, measurement-based, population-based, and accountable. The potential role of HIT in implementing each principle is discussed. Key features of the mobile health paradigm are described, including how they can extend evidence-based treatment beyond traditional clinical settings. HIT, and particularly mobile health, can enhance collaborative care interventions, and thus improve the health of individuals and populations when deployed in integrated delivery systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Aligning health information technologies with effective service delivery models to improve chronic disease care

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Amy M.; Thielke, Stephen M.; Katon, Wayne; Unützer, Jürgen; Areán, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Objective Healthcare reforms in the United States, including the Affordable Care and HITECH Acts, and the NCQA criteria for the Patient Centered Medical Home have promoted health information technology (HIT) and the integration of general medical and mental health services. These developments, which aim to improve chronic disease care have largely occurred in parallel, with little attention to the need for coordination. In this article, the fundamental connections between HIT and improvements in chronic disease management are explored. We use the evidence-based collaborative care model as an example, with attention to health literacy improvement for supporting patient engagement in care. Method A review of the literature was conducted to identify how HIT and collaborative care, an evidence-based model of chronic disease care, support each other. Results Five key principles of effective collaborative care are outlined: care is patient-centered, evidence-based, measurement-based, population-based, and accountable. The potential role of HIT in implementing each principle is discussed. Key features of the mobile health paradigm are described, including how they can extend evidence-based treatment beyond traditional clinical settings. Conclusion HIT, and particularly mobile health, can enhance collaborative care interventions, and thus improve the health of individuals and populations when deployed in integrated delivery systems. PMID:24963895

  7. Impact of the health services utilization and improvement model (HUIM) on self efficacy and satisfaction among a head start population.

    PubMed

    Tataw, David B; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate and report the impact of the Health Services Utilization Improvement Model (HUIM) on utilization and satisfaction with care, as well as knowledge regarding prevention, detection, and treatment of asthma, diabetes, tuberculosis, and child injury among low income health services consumers. HUIM outcomes data shows that the coupling of parental education and ecological factors (service linkage and provider orientation) impacts the health services utilization experience of low income consumers evidenced by improved self-efficacy (knowledge and voice), and satisfaction with care from a child's regular provider. Participation in HUIM activities also improved the low income consumer's knowledge of disease identification, self-care and prevention.

  8. Does Type of Gatekeeping Model Affect Access to Outpatient Specialty Mental Health Services?

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Horgan, Constance M; Garnick, Deborah W; McLaughlin, Thomas J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To measure how a change in gatekeeping model affects utilization of specialty mental health services. Data Sources/Study Setting Secondary data from health insurance claims for services during 1996–1999. The setting is a managed care organization that changed gatekeeping model in one of its divisions, from in-person evaluation to the use of a call-center. Study Design We evaluate the impact of the change in gatekeeping model by comparing utilization during the 2 years before and 2 years after the change, both in the affected division and in another division where gatekeeping model did not change. The design is thus a controlled quasi-experimental one. Subjects were not randomized. Key dependent variables are whether each individual had any specialty mental health visits in a year; the number of visits; and the proportion of users exceeding eight visits in a year. Key explanatory variables include demographic variables and indicators for patient diagnoses and their intervention status (time-period, study group). Data Collection/Extraction Methods Claims data were aggregated to create analytic files with one record per member per year, with variables reporting demographic characteristics and mental health service use. Principal Findings After controlling for secular trends at the other division, the division which changed gatekeeping model eventually experienced an increase in the proportion of enrollees receiving specialty mental health treatment, of 0.5 percentage point. Similarly, there was an increase of about 0.6 annual visits per user, concentrated at the low end of the distribution. These changes occurred only in the second year after the gatekeeping changes. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that the gatekeeping changes did lead to increases in utilization of mental health care, as hypothesized. At the same time, the magnitude of the increase in access and mean number of visits that we found was relatively modest. This suggests that

  9. Barriers and opportunities for evidence-based health service planning: the example of developing a Decision Analytic Model to plan services for sexually transmitted infections in the UK.

    PubMed

    Aicken, Catherine R H; Armstrong, Nigel T; Cassell, Jackie A; Macdonald, Neil; Bailey, Angela C; Johnson, Sandra A; Mercer, Catherine H

    2012-07-17

    Decision Analytic Models (DAMs) are established means of evidence-synthesis to differentiate between health interventions. They have mainly been used to inform clinical decisions and health technology assessment at the national level, yet could also inform local health service planning. For this, a DAM must take into account the needs of the local population, but also the needs of those planning its services. Drawing on our experiences from stakeholder consultations, where we presented the potential utility of a DAM for planning local health services for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the UK, and the evidence it could use to inform decisions regarding different combinations of service provision, in terms of their costs, cost-effectiveness, and public health outcomes, we discuss the barriers perceived by stakeholders to the use of DAMs to inform service planning for local populations, including (1) a tension between individual and population perspectives; (2) reductionism; and (3) a lack of transparency regarding models, their assumptions, and the motivations of those generating models. Technological advances, including improvements in computing capability, are facilitating the development and use of models such as DAMs for health service planning. However, given the current scepticism among many stakeholders, encouraging informed critique and promoting trust in models to aid health service planning is vital, for example by making available and explicit the methods and assumptions underlying each model, associated limitations, and the process of validation. This can be achieved by consultation and training with the intended users, and by allowing access to the workings of the models, and their underlying assumptions (e.g. via the internet), to show how they actually work. Constructive discussion and education will help build a consensus on the purposes of STI services, the need for service planning to be evidence-based, and the potential for mathematical

  10. Effectiveness of a Service Learning Model with Allied Health Assistant Students in Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zulch, Debbie; Saunders, Rosemary; Peters, Judith; Quinlivan, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of a student learning activity involving service learning. As part of a vocational course in the Academy of Health Sciences at a Western Australian TAFE (Technical and Further Education) institute, Allied Health Assistant (AHA) students participated in a service learning program focused on work-based learning in…

  11. Effectiveness of a Service Learning Model with Allied Health Assistant Students in Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zulch, Debbie; Saunders, Rosemary; Peters, Judith; Quinlivan, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of a student learning activity involving service learning. As part of a vocational course in the Academy of Health Sciences at a Western Australian TAFE (Technical and Further Education) institute, Allied Health Assistant (AHA) students participated in a service learning program focused on work-based learning in…

  12. Utilizing the CIPP Model as a Means to Develop an Integrated Service-Learning Component in a University Health Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Brent; Conrad, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the enhancement of a university health course through the utilization of the CIPP Model as a means to develop an integrated service-learning component. Methods: The CIPP model was utilized in two concurrent semesters of an undergraduate health course in order to design and evaluate the implementation of a drug and alcohol…

  13. A systems relations model for Tier 2 early intervention child mental health services with schools: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    van Roosmalen, Marc; Gardner-Elahi, Catherine; Day, Crispin

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, policy initiatives have aimed at the provision of more comprehensive Child and Adolescent Mental Health care. These presented a series of new challenges in organising and delivering Tier 2 child mental health services, particularly in schools. This exploratory study aimed to examine and clarify the service model underpinning a Tier 2 child mental health service offering school-based mental health work. Using semi-structured interviews, clinician descriptions of operational experiences were gathered. These were analysed using grounded theory methods. Analysis was validated by respondents at two stages. A pathway for casework emerged that included a systemic consultative function, as part of an overall three-function service model, which required: (1) activity as a member of the multi-agency system; (2) activity to improve the system working around a particular child; and (3) activity to universally develop a Tier 1 workforce confident in supporting children at risk of or experiencing mental health problems. The study challenged the perception of such a service serving solely a Tier 2 function, the requisite workforce to deliver the service model, and could give service providers a rationale for negotiating service models that include an explicit focus on improving the children's environments.

  14. Business Models, Vaccination Services, and Public Health Relationships of Retail Clinics: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Bayo C; Fisher, Allison Kennedy; Shoemaker, Sarah J; Pozniak, Alyssa; Stokley, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Despite the rapid growth of retail clinics (RCs), literature is limited in terms of how these facilities offer preventive services, particularly vaccination services. The purpose of this study was to obtain an in-depth understanding of the RC business model pertaining to vaccine offerings, profitability, and decision making. From March to June 2009, we conducted 15 interviews with key individuals from three types of organizations: 12 representatives of RC corporations, 2 representatives of retail hosts (i.e., stores in which the RCs are located), and 1 representative of an industry association. We analyzed interview transcripts qualitatively. Our results indicate that consumer demand and profitability were the main drivers in offering vaccinations. RCs in this sample primarily offered vaccinations to adults and adolescents, and they were not well integrated with local public health and immunization registries. Our findings demonstrate the potential for stronger linkages with public health in these settings. The findings also may help inform future research to increase patient access to vaccination services at RCs.

  15. The Resource Hub: an innovative e-information service delivery model addressing mental health knowledge management.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Julie; Powell, Jacinta; Gibbon, Peter; Emmerson, Brett

    2009-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of the Resource Hub, an intranet-based electronic information service designed to improve knowledge management and staff satisfaction in the Inner North Brisbane Mental Health Service, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Metro North Health Service District. The Resource Hub was launched in April 2007. It encompasses a large range of electronically stored resources and clinically relevant information, including direct links to approved internet sites, psychoeducation resources, fact sheets, resource lists and details of current service research projects. The Hub will continue to expand over time, improving access to clinical service delivery resources. A significant review conducted in April 2008 resulted in modifications to further improve the content and design of the Hub. Ongoing evaluation incorporates regular usage monitoring and stakeholder satisfaction surveys. The Resource Hub is a service delivery innovation that effectively addresses mental health service knowledge management issues. It is a strategy that could readily be transferred to other district mental health services and to health services in general.

  16. Development of modelling method selection tool for health services management: from problem structuring methods to modelling and simulation methods.

    PubMed

    Jun, Gyuchan T; Morris, Zoe; Eldabi, Tillal; Harper, Paul; Naseer, Aisha; Patel, Brijesh; Clarkson, John P

    2011-05-19

    There is an increasing recognition that modelling and simulation can assist in the process of designing health care policies, strategies and operations. However, the current use is limited and answers to questions such as what methods to use and when remain somewhat underdeveloped. The aim of this study is to provide a mechanism for decision makers in health services planning and management to compare a broad range of modelling and simulation methods so that they can better select and use them or better commission relevant modelling and simulation work. This paper proposes a modelling and simulation method comparison and selection tool developed from a comprehensive literature review, the research team's extensive expertise and inputs from potential users. Twenty-eight different methods were identified, characterised by their relevance to different application areas, project life cycle stages, types of output and levels of insight, and four input resources required (time, money, knowledge and data). The characterisation is presented in matrix forms to allow quick comparison and selection. This paper also highlights significant knowledge gaps in the existing literature when assessing the applicability of particular approaches to health services management, where modelling and simulation skills are scarce let alone money and time. A modelling and simulation method comparison and selection tool is developed to assist with the selection of methods appropriate to supporting specific decision making processes. In particular it addresses the issue of which method is most appropriate to which specific health services management problem, what the user might expect to be obtained from the method, and what is required to use the method. In summary, we believe the tool adds value to the scarce existing literature on methods comparison and selection.

  17. Development of modelling method selection tool for health services management: From problem structuring methods to modelling and simulation methods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is an increasing recognition that modelling and simulation can assist in the process of designing health care policies, strategies and operations. However, the current use is limited and answers to questions such as what methods to use and when remain somewhat underdeveloped. Aim The aim of this study is to provide a mechanism for decision makers in health services planning and management to compare a broad range of modelling and simulation methods so that they can better select and use them or better commission relevant modelling and simulation work. Methods This paper proposes a modelling and simulation method comparison and selection tool developed from a comprehensive literature review, the research team's extensive expertise and inputs from potential users. Twenty-eight different methods were identified, characterised by their relevance to different application areas, project life cycle stages, types of output and levels of insight, and four input resources required (time, money, knowledge and data). Results The characterisation is presented in matrix forms to allow quick comparison and selection. This paper also highlights significant knowledge gaps in the existing literature when assessing the applicability of particular approaches to health services management, where modelling and simulation skills are scarce let alone money and time. Conclusions A modelling and simulation method comparison and selection tool is developed to assist with the selection of methods appropriate to supporting specific decision making processes. In particular it addresses the issue of which method is most appropriate to which specific health services management problem, what the user might expect to be obtained from the method, and what is required to use the method. In summary, we believe the tool adds value to the scarce existing literature on methods comparison and selection. PMID:21595946

  18. The Vanderbilt School-Based Counseling Program: An Interagency, Primary-Care Model of Mental Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catron, Thomas; Weiss, Bahr

    1994-01-01

    The Vanderbilt School-Based Counseling Program in Nashville, Tennessee, increases access to mental health services for children from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds via a primary care model delivering on-site services. Possible interventions include psychotherapy, parent skill training, behavioral and psychiatric consultation to staff…

  19. Consumer Health: Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haag, Jessie Helen

    This book presents a general overview of consumer health, its products and services. Consumer health is defined as those topics dealing with a wise selection of health products and services, agencies concerned with the control of these products and services, evaluation of quackery and health misconceptions, health careers, and health insurance.…

  20. Consumer Health: Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haag, Jessie Helen

    This book presents a general overview of consumer health, its products and services. Consumer health is defined as those topics dealing with a wise selection of health products and services, agencies concerned with the control of these products and services, evaluation of quackery and health misconceptions, health careers, and health insurance.…

  1. The Starting Early Starting Smart Integrated Services Model: Improving Access to Behavioral Health Services in the Pediatric Health Care Setting for At-Risk Families with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Connie E.; Mansoor, Elana; Hanson, K. Lori; Vogel, April L.; Rose-Jacobs, Ruth; Genatossio, Carolyn Seval; Windham, Amy; Bandstra, Emmalee S.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the Starting Early Starting Smart (SESS) national initiative to integrate behavioral health services (parenting, mental health, and drug treatment) into the pediatric health care setting for families with young children. Data are presented from five pediatric care (PC) sites, drawing from families at risk due to demographic and…

  2. The Starting Early Starting Smart Integrated Services Model: Improving Access to Behavioral Health Services in the Pediatric Health Care Setting for At-Risk Families with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Connie E.; Mansoor, Elana; Hanson, K. Lori; Vogel, April L.; Rose-Jacobs, Ruth; Genatossio, Carolyn Seval; Windham, Amy; Bandstra, Emmalee S.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the Starting Early Starting Smart (SESS) national initiative to integrate behavioral health services (parenting, mental health, and drug treatment) into the pediatric health care setting for families with young children. Data are presented from five pediatric care (PC) sites, drawing from families at risk due to demographic and…

  3. A model of service quality perceptions and health care consumer behavior.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, S J; Shewchuk, R M; Bowers, M R

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of covariance structures (LISREL) was used to examine the influence of consumer held perceptions of service quality on consumer satisfaction and intentions to return. Results indicate that service quality is a significant predictor of consumer satisfaction which, in turn, predicts intention to return. Health care marketing implications are discussed.

  4. Consumer choice of on-demand mHealth app services: Context and contents values using structural equation modeling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Euehun; Han, Semi; Jo, Sang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    As smartphone penetration increases and the technology advances, various mobile services have reached the market. mHealth Applications are specifically highlighted for phenomena such as global aging & well-being, but the technology-driven mHealth services have not been successful in the market because consumer needs have not been reflected in the services properly. This study developed a research model consisting of context/contents values to explain the intention of consumers over the age of 40 in using mHealth Applications. To carry out this research, an online survey was conducted of mHealth Application users and recognizers in South Korea who are over 40 years old. 313 respondents gave usable data; those data were analyzed via a structural equation model. Context values (health stress, epistemic) produce an effect on contents values and contents values (convenience, usefulness), excepting reassurance and enjoyment, positively affect the intention to use mHealth Applications. The findings indicate that people who are stressed out about their health and are interested in new ways to control their health think that mHealth Applications are very convenient and useful because people can manage their health at home or at the office, even when they cannot go to a hospital. However, they feel that the current level of service does not provide reassurance. The level of service is behind people's expectations. Hence, a market-oriented approach that can determine user needs, specifically in terms of the reassurance value in the mHealth service field, is needed to develop mHealth Applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The psychological contract: is the UK National Health Service a model employer?

    PubMed

    Fielden, Sandra; Whiting, Fiona

    2007-05-01

    The UK National Health Service (NHS) is facing recruitment challenges that mean it will need to become an 'employer of choice' if it is to continue to attract high-quality employees. This paper reports the findings from a study focusing on allied health professional staff (n = 67), aimed at establishing the expectations of the NHS inherent in their current psychological contract and to consider whether the government's drive to make the NHS a model employer meets those expectations. The findings show that the most important aspects of the psychological contract were relational and based on the investment made in the employment relationship by both parties. The employment relationship was one of high involvement but also one where transactional contract items, such as pay, were still of some importance. Although the degree of employee satisfaction with the relational content of the psychological contract was relatively positive, there was, nevertheless, a mismatch between levels of importance placed on such aspects of the contract and levels of satisfaction, with employees increasingly placing greater emphasis on those items the NHS is having the greatest difficulty providing. Despite this apparent disparity between employee expectation and the fulfilment of those expectations, the overall health of the psychological contract was still high.

  6. A Collaboratively Designed Child Mental Health Service Model: Multiple Family Groups for Urban Children with Conduct Difficulties

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Mary McKernan; Gopalan, Geetha; Franco, Lydia; Assael, Kara Dean; Chacko, Anil; Jackson, Jerrold; Fuss, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary outcomes associated with an experimental, longitudinal study of a Multiple Family Group (MFG) service delivery approach set within thirteen urban outpatient clinics serving children and their families living in inner-city, primarily African American and Latino communities. Specifically, this paper focuses on parent reports of child oppositional behavior and parenting stress over time. MFG is a flexible, protocol-driven approach designed to address the most common reason for referral to outpatient child mental health clinics, childhood behavioral difficulties. The MFG also aims to enhance family-level engagement and retention in ongoing care. Further, the service delivery model was collaboratively developed with intensive input from parents rearing children with conduct difficulties, parent advocates, community-based child mental health providers and services research staff in order to ultimately expand the number of effective service models that can be situated within “real world,” urban child mental health settings. PMID:22194642

  7. Implications of State Policy Changes on Mental Health Service Models for Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Janelle E.; Cmar, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    For over 25 years, students with disabilities in California received educationally related mental health services through interagency collaboration between school districts and county mental health agencies. After a major change in state policy that eliminated state-mandated interagency collaboration, school districts in California are now solely…

  8. Cost accounting models used for price-setting of health services: an international review.

    PubMed

    Raulinajtys-Grzybek, Monika

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the article was to present and compare cost accounting models which are used in the area of healthcare for pricing purposes in different countries. Cost information generated by hospitals is further used by regulatory bodies for setting or updating prices of public health services. The article presents a set of examples from different countries of the European Union, Australia and the United States and concentrates on DRG-based payment systems as they primarily use cost information for pricing. Differences between countries concern the methodology used, as well as the data collection process and the scope of the regulations on cost accounting. The article indicates that the accuracy of the calculation is only one of the factors that determine the choice of the cost accounting methodology. Important aspects are also the selection of the reference hospitals, precise and detailed regulations and the existence of complex healthcare information systems in hospitals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reorganization of mental health services: from institutional to community-based models of care.

    PubMed

    Saraceno, B; Gater, R; Rahman, A; Saeed, K; Eaton, J; Ivbijaro, G; Kidd, M; Dowrick, C; Servili, C; Funk, M K; Underhill, C

    2015-09-28

    Mental health services in the Eastern Mediterranean Region are predominantly centralized and institutionalized, relying on scarce specialist manpower. This creates a major treatment gap for patients with common and disabling mental disorders and places an unnecessary burden on the individual, their family and society. Six steps for reorganization of mental health services in the Region can be outlined: (1) integrate delivery of interventions for priority mental disorders into primary health care and existing priority programmes; (2) systematically strengthen the capacity of non-specialized health personnel for providing mental health care; (3) scale up community-based services (community outreach teams for defined catchment, supported residential facilities, supported employment and family support); (4) establish mental health services in general hospitals for outpatient and acute inpatient care; (5) progressively reduce the number of long-stay beds in mental hospitals through restricting new admissions; and (6) provide transitional/bridge funding over a period of time to scale up community-based services and downsize mental institutions in parallel.

  10. HIV Education and Welfare Services in Primary Care: An Empirical Model of Integration in Brazil’s Unified Health System

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Rahbel; Pinto, Rogério M.; Wall, Melanie M.

    2017-01-01

    Integration of health education and welfare services in primary care systems is a key strategy to solve the multiple determinants of chronic diseases, such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS). However, there is a scarcity of conceptual models from which to build integration strategies. We provide a model based on cross-sectional data from 168 Community Health Agents, 62 nurses, and 32 physicians in two municipalities in Brazil’s Unified Health System (UHS). The outcome, service integration, comprised HIV education, community activities (e.g., health walks and workshops), and documentation services (e.g., obtainment of working papers and birth certificates). Predictors included individual factors (provider confidence, knowledge/skills, perseverance, efficacy); job characteristics (interprofessional collaboration, work-autonomy, decision-making autonomy, skill variety); and organizational factors (work conditions and work resources). Structural equation modeling was used to identify factors associated with service integration. Knowledge and skills, skill variety, confidence, and perseverance predicted greater integration of HIV education alongside community activities and documentation services. Job characteristics and organizational factors did not predict integration. Our study offers an explanatory model that can be adapted to examine other variables that may influence integration of different services in global primary healthcare systems. Findings suggest that practitioner trainings to improve integration should focus on cognitive constructs—confidence, perseverance, knowledge, and skills. PMID:28335444

  11. HIV Education and Welfare Services in Primary Care: An Empirical Model of Integration in Brazil's Unified Health System.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Rahbel; Pinto, Rogério M; Wall, Melanie M

    2017-03-14

    Integration of health education and welfare services in primary care systems is a key strategy to solve the multiple determinants of chronic diseases, such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS). However, there is a scarcity of conceptual models from which to build integration strategies. We provide a model based on cross-sectional data from 168 Community Health Agents, 62 nurses, and 32 physicians in two municipalities in Brazil's Unified Health System (UHS). The outcome, service integration, comprised HIV education, community activities (e.g., health walks and workshops), and documentation services (e.g., obtainment of working papers and birth certificates). Predictors included individual factors (provider confidence, knowledge/skills, perseverance, efficacy); job characteristics (interprofessional collaboration, work-autonomy, decision-making autonomy, skill variety); and organizational factors (work conditions and work resources). Structural equation modeling was used to identify factors associated with service integration. Knowledge and skills, skill variety, confidence, and perseverance predicted greater integration of HIV education alongside community activities and documentation services. Job characteristics and organizational factors did not predict integration. Our study offers an explanatory model that can be adapted to examine other variables that may influence integration of different services in global primary healthcare systems. Findings suggest that practitioner trainings to improve integration should focus on cognitive constructs-confidence, perseverance, knowledge, and skills.

  12. Comparison of distance measures in spatial analytical modeling for health service planning

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Several methodological approaches have been used to estimate distance in health service research. In this study, focusing on cardiac catheterization services, Euclidean, Manhattan, and the less widely known Minkowski distance metrics are used to estimate distances from patient residence to hospital. Distance metrics typically produce less accurate estimates than actual measurements, but each metric provides a single model of travel over a given network. Therefore, distance metrics, unlike actual measurements, can be directly used in spatial analytical modeling. Euclidean distance is most often used, but unlikely the most appropriate metric. Minkowski distance is a more promising method. Distances estimated with each metric are contrasted with road distance and travel time measurements, and an optimized Minkowski distance is implemented in spatial analytical modeling. Methods Road distance and travel time are calculated from the postal code of residence of each patient undergoing cardiac catheterization to the pertinent hospital. The Minkowski metric is optimized, to approximate travel time and road distance, respectively. Distance estimates and distance measurements are then compared using descriptive statistics and visual mapping methods. The optimized Minkowski metric is implemented, via the spatial weight matrix, in a spatial regression model identifying socio-economic factors significantly associated with cardiac catheterization. Results The Minkowski coefficient that best approximates road distance is 1.54; 1.31 best approximates travel time. The latter is also a good predictor of road distance, thus providing the best single model of travel from patient's residence to hospital. The Euclidean metric and the optimal Minkowski metric are alternatively implemented in the regression model, and the results compared. The Minkowski method produces more reliable results than the traditional Euclidean metric. Conclusion Road distance and travel time

  13. Impact of service delivery model on health care access among HIV-positive women in New York City.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Nandini V; Kupprat, Sandra A; Halkitis, Perry N

    2009-01-01

    As the New York City HIV=AIDS epidemic began generalizing beyond traditionally high-risk groups in the early 1990s, AIDS Service Organizations (ASO) sought to increase access to medical care and broaden service offerings to incorporate the needs of low-income women and their families. Strategies to achieve entry into and retention in medical care included the development of integrated care facilities, case management, and a myriad of supportive service offerings. This study examines a nonrandom sample of 60 HIV-positive women receiving case management and supportive services at New York City ASOs. Over 55% of the women interviewed reported high access to care, 43% reported the ability to access urgent care all of the time and 94% reported high satisfaction with obstetrics=gynecology (OB=GYN) care. This held true across race=ethnicity, income level, medical coverage, and service delivery model.Women who accessed services at integrated care facilities offering onsite medical care and case management=supportive services perceived lower access to medical specialists as compared to those who received services at nonintegrated sites. Data from this analysis indicate that supportive services increase access to and satisfaction with both HIV and non-HIV-related health care. Additionally, women who received services at a medical model agency were more likely to report accessing non-HIV care at a clinic compared to those receiving services at a nonmedical model agencies, these women were more likely to report receiving non-HIV care at a hospital.

  14. Enhancing Schools’ Capacity to Support Children in Poverty: An Ecological Model of School-Based Mental Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Stacy L.; Atkins, Marc S.; Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Glisson, Charles

    2013-01-01

    School based mental health services for children in poverty can capitalize on schools’ inherent capacity to support development and bridge home and neighborhood ecologies. We propose an ecological model informed by public health and organizational theories to refocus school based services in poor communities on the core function of schools to promote learning. We describe how coalescing mental health resources around school goals includes a focus on universal programming, mobilizing indigenous school and community resources, and supporting core teaching technologies. We suggest an iterative research–practice approach to program adaptation and implementation as a means toward advancing science and developing healthy children. PMID:18581225

  15. Enhancing schools' capacity to support children in poverty: an ecological model of school-based mental health services.

    PubMed

    Cappella, Elise; Frazier, Stacy L; Atkins, Marc S; Schoenwald, Sonja K; Glisson, Charles

    2008-09-01

    School based mental health services for children in poverty can capitalize on schools' inherent capacity to support development and bridge home and neighborhood ecologies. We propose an ecological model informed by public health and organizational theories to refocus school based services in poor communities on the core function of schools to promote learning. We describe how coalescing mental health resources around school goals includes a focus on universal programming, mobilizing indigenous school and community resources, and supporting core teaching technologies. We suggest an iterative research-practice approach to program adaptation and implementation as a means toward advancing science and developing healthy children.

  16. Principles underlying a model policy on relationships between staff and service recipients in a mental health system.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W A; Goldsmith, E

    1999-11-01

    The authors participated in a work group to produce a model policy addressing the boundaries of relationships between staff and recipients of service in a public mental health system that provides and regulates services in a variety of treatment settings. The chief medical officer of the New York State Office of Mental Health assembled a work group of administrators, clinicians, state officials, and a representative of service recipients. The group reviewed the professional literature and existing ethics guidelines and policies addressing relationships between staff members and service recipients and made recommendations for a new policy. The work group formulated five guiding principles: prevention of the exploitation of recipients of services by staff; the right of recipients to be treated as competent autonomous human beings; recognition that certain developmental stages, treatment settings, and pre-existing relationships increase a service recipient's vulnerability to exploitation and call for more stringent regulation of staff actions; acceptance of a spectrum of permissible relationships for staff and recipients outside of the relationship dictated by the staff member's job description; and recognition of the difference between a relationship focused on treatment or service provision and other professional relationships between providers and current or former recipients. The principles were used to develop a model policy on relationships between staff and recipients that addresses both the organizational complexity and the recipient-centered rehabilitation model of a large state-operated mental health system.

  17. Influencing Self-Reported Health among Rural Low-Income Women through Health Care and Social Service Utilization: A Structural Equation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bice-Wigington, Tiffany; Huddleston-Casas, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Using structural equation modeling, this study examined the mesosystemic processes among rural low-income women, and how these processes subsequently influenced self-reported health. Acknowledging the behavioral processes inherent in utilization of health care and formal social support services, this study moved beyond a behavioral focus by…

  18. Influencing Self-Reported Health among Rural Low-Income Women through Health Care and Social Service Utilization: A Structural Equation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bice-Wigington, Tiffany; Huddleston-Casas, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Using structural equation modeling, this study examined the mesosystemic processes among rural low-income women, and how these processes subsequently influenced self-reported health. Acknowledging the behavioral processes inherent in utilization of health care and formal social support services, this study moved beyond a behavioral focus by…

  19. Innovative health service delivery models in low and middle income countries - what can we learn from the private sector?

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Onil; Khor, Sara; McGahan, Anita; Dunne, David; Daar, Abdallah S; Singer, Peter A

    2010-07-15

    The poor in low and middle income countries have limited access to health services due to limited purchasing power, residence in underserved areas, and inadequate health literacy. This produces significant gaps in health care delivery among a population that has a disproportionately large burden of disease. They frequently use the private health sector, due to perceived or actual gaps in public services. A subset of private health organizations, some called social enterprises, have developed novel approaches to increase the availability, affordability and quality of health care services to the poor through innovative health service delivery models. This study aims to characterize these models and identify areas of innovation that have led to effective provision of care for the poor. An environmental scan of peer-reviewed and grey literature was conducted to select exemplars of innovation. A case series of organizations was then purposively sampled to maximize variation. These cases were examined using content analysis and constant comparison to characterize their strategies, focusing on business processes. After an initial sample of 46 studies, 10 case studies of exemplars were developed spanning different geography, disease areas and health service delivery models. These ten organizations had innovations in their marketing, financing, and operating strategies. These included approaches such a social marketing, cross-subsidy, high-volume, low cost models, and process reengineering. They tended to have a narrow clinical focus, which facilitates standardizing processes of care, and experimentation with novel delivery models. Despite being well-known, information on the social impact of these organizations was variable, with more data on availability and affordability and less on quality of care. These private sector organizations demonstrate a range of innovations in health service delivery that have the potential to better serve the poor's health needs and be

  20. Innovative health service delivery models in low and middle income countries - what can we learn from the private sector?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The poor in low and middle income countries have limited access to health services due to limited purchasing power, residence in underserved areas, and inadequate health literacy. This produces significant gaps in health care delivery among a population that has a disproportionately large burden of disease. They frequently use the private health sector, due to perceived or actual gaps in public services. A subset of private health organizations, some called social enterprises, have developed novel approaches to increase the availability, affordability and quality of health care services to the poor through innovative health service delivery models. This study aims to characterize these models and identify areas of innovation that have led to effective provision of care for the poor. Methods An environmental scan of peer-reviewed and grey literature was conducted to select exemplars of innovation. A case series of organizations was then purposively sampled to maximize variation. These cases were examined using content analysis and constant comparison to characterize their strategies, focusing on business processes. Results After an initial sample of 46 studies, 10 case studies of exemplars were developed spanning different geography, disease areas and health service delivery models. These ten organizations had innovations in their marketing, financing, and operating strategies. These included approaches such a social marketing, cross-subsidy, high-volume, low cost models, and process reengineering. They tended to have a narrow clinical focus, which facilitates standardizing processes of care, and experimentation with novel delivery models. Despite being well-known, information on the social impact of these organizations was variable, with more data on availability and affordability and less on quality of care. Conclusions These private sector organizations demonstrate a range of innovations in health service delivery that have the potential to better

  1. Extended Day Treatment: A Comprehensive Model of after School Behavioral Health Services for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderploeg, Jeffrey J.; Franks, Robert P.; Plant, Robert; Cloud, Marilyn; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2009-01-01

    Extended day treatment (EDT) is an innovative intermediate-level service for children and adolescents with serious emotional and behavioral disorders delivered during the after school hours. This paper describes the core components of the EDT model of care within the context of statewide systems of care, including its core service components,…

  2. Extended Day Treatment: A Comprehensive Model of after School Behavioral Health Services for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderploeg, Jeffrey J.; Franks, Robert P.; Plant, Robert; Cloud, Marilyn; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2009-01-01

    Extended day treatment (EDT) is an innovative intermediate-level service for children and adolescents with serious emotional and behavioral disorders delivered during the after school hours. This paper describes the core components of the EDT model of care within the context of statewide systems of care, including its core service components,…

  3. Study protocol for two randomized controlled trials examining the effectiveness and safety of current weekend allied health services and a new stakeholder-driven model for acute medical/surgical patients versus no weekend allied health services.

    PubMed

    Haines, Terry P; O'Brien, Lisa; Mitchell, Deb; Bowles, Kelly-Ann; Haas, Romi; Markham, Donna; Plumb, Samantha; Chiu, Timothy; May, Kerry; Philip, Kathleen; Lescai, David; McDermott, Fiona; Sarkies, Mitchell; Ghaly, Marcelle; Shaw, Leonie; Juj, Genevieve; Skinner, Elizabeth H

    2015-04-02

    Disinvestment from inefficient or ineffective health services is a growing priority for health care systems. Provision of allied health services over the weekend is now commonplace despite a relative paucity of evidence supporting their provision. The relatively high cost of providing this service combined with the paucity of evidence supporting its provision makes this a potential candidate for disinvestment so that resources consumed can be used in other areas. This study aims to determine the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of the current model of weekend allied health service and a new stakeholder-driven model of weekend allied health service delivery on acute medical and surgical wards compared to having no weekend allied health service. Two stepped wedge, cluster randomised trials of weekend allied health services will be conducted in six acute medical/surgical wards across two public metropolitan hospitals in Melbourne (Australia). Wards have been chosen to participate by management teams at each hospital. The allied health services to be investigated will include physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, dietetics, social work and allied health assistants. At baseline, all wards will be receiving weekend allied health services. Study 1 intervention will be the sequential disinvestment (roll-in) of the current weekend allied health service model from each participating ward in monthly intervals and study 2 will be the roll-out of a new stakeholder-driven model of weekend allied health service delivery. The order in which weekend allied health services will be rolled in and out amongst participating wards will be determined randomly. This trial will be conducted in each of the two participating hospitals at a different time interval. Primary outcomes will be length of stay, rate of unplanned hospital readmission within 28 days and rate of adverse events. Secondary outcomes will be number of complaints and compliments, staff absenteeism

  4. Implications for health services.

    PubMed Central

    Grimley Evans, J

    1997-01-01

    Health services for older people in the NHS have developed pragmatically, and reflect the nature of disease in later life and the need to agree objectives of care with patients. Although services are likely to be able to cope with the immediate future, the growth of the elderly population anticipated from 2030 calls for long-term planning and research. The issue of funding requires immediate political thought and action. Scientifically the focus needs to be on maximizing the efficiency of services by health services research and reducing the incidence of disability in later life through research on its biological and social determinants. Senescence is a progressive loss of adaptability due to an interaction between intrinsic (genetic) processes with extrinsic factors in environment and lifestyle. There are grounds for postulating that a policy of postponement of the onset of disability, by modifications of lifestyle and environment, could reduce the average duration of disability before death. The new political structures of Europe offer under exploited-unexploited opportunities for the necessary research. PMID:9460074

  5. Innovations on a shoestring: a study of a collaborative community-based Aboriginal mental health service model in rural Canada

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Collaborative, culturally safe services that integrate clinical approaches with traditional Aboriginal healing have been hailed as promising approaches to ameliorate the high rates of mental health problems in Aboriginal communities in Canada. Overcoming significant financial and human resources barriers, a mental health team in northern Ontario is beginning to realize this ideal. We studied the strategies, strengths and challenges related to collaborative Aboriginal mental health care. Methods A participatory action research approach was employed to evaluate the Knaw Chi Ge Win services and their place in the broader mental health system. Qualitative methods were used as the primary source of data collection and included document review, ethnographic interviews with 15 providers and 23 clients; and 3 focus groups with community workers and managers. Results The Knaw Chi Ge Win model is an innovative, community-based Aboriginal mental health care model that has led to various improvements in care in a challenging rural, high needs environment. Formal opportunities to share information, shared protocols and ongoing education support this model of collaborative care. Positive outcomes associated with this model include improved quality of care, cultural safety, and integration of traditional Aboriginal healing with clinical approaches. Ongoing challenges include chronic lack of resources, health information and the still cursory understanding of Aboriginal healing and outcomes. Conclusions This model can serve to inform collaborative care in other rural and Indigenous mental health systems. Further research into traditional Aboriginal approaches to mental health is needed to continue advances in collaborative practice in a clinical setting. PMID:20017919

  6. 42 CFR 441.545 - Service models.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service models. 441.545 Section 441.545 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... models. A State may choose one or more of the following as the service delivery model to provide self...

  7. Primary Mental Health Workers within Youth Offending Teams: A New Service Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaghan, Jane; Pace, Francis; Young, Bridget; Vostanis, Panos

    2003-01-01

    Primary Mental Health Workers (PMHWs) have been deployed to address the mental health needs of young offenders in two UK areas. The mental health characteristics of 60 young people consecutively referred to these PMHWs, the assessment outcome and interventions offered, are described. Findings indicate the usefulness of such a model in providing an…

  8. Service quality in health care setting.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Wan Edura Wan; Jusoff, Hj Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore the concept of service quality in a health care setting. This paper probes the definition of service quality from technical and functional aspects for a better understanding on how consumers evaluate the quality of health care. It adopts the conceptual model of service quality frequently used by the most researchers in the health care sector. The paper also discusses several service quality dimensions and service quality problems in order to provide a more holistic conception of hospital service quality. The paper finds that service quality in health care is very complex as compared to other services because this sector highly involves risk. The paper adds a new perspective towards understanding how the concept of service quality is adopted in a health care setting.

  9. Increasing the delivery of health care services to migrant farm worker families through a community partnership model.

    PubMed

    Connor, Ann; Rainer, Laura P; Simcox, Jordan B; Thomisee, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The Farm Worker Family Health Program (FWFHP) is a 13-year community partnership model designed to increase delivery of health care services for migrant farm worker families. During a yearly 2-week immersion experience, 90 students and faculty members provide health care services, including physical examinations, health screenings, health education, physical therapy, and dental care for 1,000 migrant farm workers and migrant children. Students and faculty members gain a deeper appreciation of the health and social issues that migrant farm worker families face by providing health care services in the places where migrant families live, work, and are educated. Although the model is not unique, it is significant because of its sustained history, interdisciplinary collaboration among community and academic partners, mutual trust and connections among the partners, and the way the program is tailored to meet the needs of the population served. The principles of social responsibility and leadership frame the FWFHP experience. This community partnership model can be replicated by others working with at-risk populations in low-resource settings.

  10. The association between aging inmate housing management models and non-geriatric health services in state correctional institutions.

    PubMed

    Thivierge-Rikard, R V; Thompson, Maxine S

    2007-01-01

    One of the current debates in the literature on aging inmates asks, what is the most efficient housing/health care model for this "special needs" population? State and federal correctional systems place elderly inmates either in specialized segregated housing units away from the general inmate population, consolidate elderly inmates in housing units within the prison, or provide a combination of both models. In general, proponents of the segregated housing model argue that aging inmates will receive specialized medical services in geriatric units. However, proponents of consolidated housing model argue that aging inmates will have the benefit of both geriatric and non-geriatric health services. This paper examines the association between the type of housing management model for aging inmates and the availability of non-geriatric physical and mental health services. Data for the analysis come from the 2000 Bureau of Justice Statistics Census of State and Federal Adult Correctional Facilities. The results suggest that institutions offering consolidated geriatric care provide more mental health services and that these effects are independent of the characteristics of prison facility.

  11. The Health Home: A Service Delivery Model for Autism and Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Fueyo, Michael; Caldwell, Tim; Mattern, Sarah B; Zahid, Jahanara; Foley, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID) are lifelong conditions with profound impact on the functioning of affected individuals and their families. Optimizing developmental outcomes requires a lifelong perspective on treatment. The patient-centered health care home (health home) model is currently used to improve health outcomes and care integration in a variety of chronic general medical and psychiatric conditions. The authors propose the health home model as a new conceptual framework from which to build systems of care for persons with ASD or ID and their families. The authors describe essential elements of a health home for these populations, which would be located in a behavioral health setting. They also describe an existing model of such a health home, the Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities in Pennsylvania.

  12. Health Sciences Libraries Forecasting Information Service Trends for Researchers: Models Applicable to All Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Timothy J.; Cheek, Fern M.; Kupsco, Jeremy; Hartel, Lynda J.; Getselman, Anna

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the value of current information services and to forecast the evolving information and data management needs of researchers, a study was conducted at two research-intensive universities. The methodology and planning framework applied by health science librarians at Emory University and The Ohio State University focused on…

  13. Health Sciences Libraries Forecasting Information Service Trends for Researchers: Models Applicable to All Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Timothy J.; Cheek, Fern M.; Kupsco, Jeremy; Hartel, Lynda J.; Getselman, Anna

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the value of current information services and to forecast the evolving information and data management needs of researchers, a study was conducted at two research-intensive universities. The methodology and planning framework applied by health science librarians at Emory University and The Ohio State University focused on…

  14. A facility location model for analysis of current and future demand for sexual health services

    PubMed Central

    Meskarian, Rudabeh; Penn, Marion L.; Williams, Sarah; Monks, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we address the clinic location selection problem for a fully integrated Sexual Health Service across Hampshire. The service provides outpatient services for Genito-Urinary Medicine, contraceptive and reproductive health, sexual health promotion and a sexual assault referral centre. We aim to assist the planning of sexual health service provision in Hampshire by conducting a location analysis using both current and predicted patient need. We identify the number of clinic locations required and their optimal geographic location that minimise patient travel time. To maximise the chances of uptake of results we validate the developed simple algorithm with an exact method as well as three well-known, but complex meta-heuristics. The analysis was conducted using car travel and public transport times. Two scenarios were considered: current clinic locations only; and anywhere within Hampshire. The results show that the clinic locations could be reduced from 28 to 20 and still keep 90% of all patient journeys by public transport (e.g. by bus or train) to a clinic within 30 minutes. The number of clinics could be further reduced to 8 if the travel time is based on car travel times within 15 minutes. Results from our simple solution method compared favourably to the exact solution as well as the complex meta-heuristics. PMID:28850627

  15. Evaluating Student Services Provided by School-based Health Centers: Applying the Shuler Nurse Practitioner Practice Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuler, Pamela A.

    2000-01-01

    Presents guidelines for evaluating school-based health clinic services coordinated and/or staffed by nurse practitioners from a holistic approach. The Shuler Nurse Practitioner Practice Model is used as a theoretical framework for the guidelines because it presents a holistic approach to patient assessment, problem identification/diagnosis…

  16. What? Another Form? The Process of Measuring and Comparing Service Utilization in a Community Mental Health Program Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewa, Carolyn S.; Horgan, Salinda; Russell, Marc; Keates, Jane

    2001-01-01

    Describes experiences in developing a multi-program economic evaluation and costing study of Assertive Community Treatment (ACT), a widely studied community mental health treatment model. The project description shows how the worlds of research and service delivery can collaborate to come to symbiotic resolutions. (Author/SLD)

  17. A health-promoting community dental service in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia: protocol for the North Richmond model of oral health care.

    PubMed

    Hall, Martin; Christian, Bradley

    2017-08-21

    Despite the best efforts and commitment of oral health programs, there is no evidence that the current surgical output-based model of oral health care is delivering better oral health outcomes to the community. In fact, Australian evidence indicates the oral health of the community could be getting worse. It is now well-understood that this traditional surgical model of oral health care will never successfully manage the disease itself. It is proposed that a health-promoting, minimally invasive oral disease management model of care may lead to a sustainable benefit to the oral health status of the individual and community groups. The aim of this paper is to describe such a model of oral health care (MoC) currently being implemented by the North Richmond Community Health Oral Health (NRCH-OH) program in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; this model may serve as a template for other services to re-orient their healthcare delivery towards health promotion and prevention. The paper describes the guiding principles and theories for the model and also its operational components, which are: pre-engagement while on the waitlist; client engagement at the reception area; the assessment phase; oral health education (high-risk clients only); disease management; and reviews and recall.

  18. Health Occupations Education. Health Services Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Twenty-four units on health service careers are presented in this teacher's guide. The units are organized into four sections as follow: Section A--Orientation (health careers, career success, Health Occupations Students of America); Section B--Health and First Aid (personal health, community health, and first aid); Section C--Body Structure and…

  19. Health Occupations Education. Health Services Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Twenty-four units on health service careers are presented in this teacher's guide. The units are organized into four sections as follow: Section A--Orientation (health careers, career success, Health Occupations Students of America); Section B--Health and First Aid (personal health, community health, and first aid); Section C--Body Structure and…

  20. Developing Targeted Health Service Interventions Using the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model: Two Australian Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jane L; Rolley, John X; Davidson, Patricia M

    2012-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. This paper provides an overview of the applicability of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model to the development of targeted nursing led chronic illness interventions. Background. Changing health care practice is a complex and dynamic process that requires consideration of social, political, economic, and organisational factors. An understanding of the characteristics of the target population, health professionals, and organizations plus identification of the determinants for change are also required. Synthesizing this data to guide the development of an effective intervention is a challenging process. The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model has been used in global health care settings to guide the identification, planning, implementation, and evaluation of various health improvement initiatives. Design. Using a reflective case study approach, this paper examines the applicability of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model to the development of targeted chronic care improvement interventions for two distinct Australian populations: a rapidly expanding and aging rural population with unmet palliative care needs and a disadvantaged urban community at higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Results. The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model approach demonstrated utility across diverse health settings in a systematic planning process. In environments characterized by increasing health care needs, limited resources, and growing community expectations, adopting planning tools such as PRECEDE-PROCEED Model at a local level can facilitate the development of the most effective interventions. Relevance to Clinical Practice. The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model is a strong theoretical model that guides the development of realistic nursing led interventions with the best chance of being successful in existing health care environments.

  1. Deployment of e-health services - a business model engineering strategy.

    PubMed

    Kijl, Björn; Nieuwenhuis, Lambert J M; Huis in 't Veld, Rianne M H A; Hermens, Hermie J; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M R

    2010-01-01

    We designed a business model for deploying a myofeedback-based teletreatment service. An iterative and combined qualitative and quantitative action design approach was used for developing the business model and the related value network. Insights from surveys, desk research, expert interviews, workshops and quantitative modelling were combined to produce the first business model and then to refine it in three design cycles. The business model engineering strategy provided important insights which led to an improved, more viable and feasible business model and related value network design. Based on this experience, we conclude that the process of early stage business model engineering reduces risk and produces substantial savings in costs and resources related to service deployment.

  2. Self-care behaviour for minor symptoms: can Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use help us to understand it?

    PubMed

    Porteous, Terry; Wyke, Sally; Hannaford, Philip; Bond, Christine

    2015-02-01

    To explore whether Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use can aid understanding of self-care behaviour and inform development of interventions to promote self-care for minor illness. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 24 Scottish participants about their experience and management of minor symptoms normally associated with analgesic use. Synthesised data from the interviews were mapped onto the Behavioral Model. All factors identified as influencing decisions about how to manage the symptoms discussed, mapped onto at least one domain of Andersen's model. Individual characteristics including beliefs, need factors and available resources were associated with health behaviour, including self-care. Outcomes such as perceived health status and consumer satisfaction from previous experience of managing symptoms also appeared to feed back into health behaviour. The Behavioral Model seems relevant to self-care as well as formal health services. Additional work is needed to explore applicability of the Behavioral Model to different types of symptoms, different modalities of self-care and in countries with different health care systems. Future quantitative studies should establish the relative importance of factors influencing the actions people take to manage minor symptoms to inform future interventions aimed at optimising self-care behaviour. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. Forecasting the need for physicians in the United States: the Health Resources and Services Administration's physician requirements model.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, L; Cultice, J M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Health Resources and Services Administration's Bureau of Health Professions developed a demographic utilization-based model of physician specialty requirements to explore the consequences of a broad range of scenarios pertaining to the nation's health care delivery system on need for physicians. DATA SOURCE/STUDY SETTING: The model uses selected data primarily from the National Center for Health Statistics, the American Medical Association, and the U.S. Bureau of Census. Forecasts are national estimates. STUDY DESIGN: Current (1989) utilization rates for ambulatory and inpatient medical specialty services were obtained for the population according to age, gender, race/ethnicity, and insurance status. These rates are used to estimate specialty-specific total service utilization expressed in patient care minutes for future populations and converted to physician requirements by applying per-physician productivity estimates. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: Secondary data were analyzed and put into matrixes for use in the mainframe computer-based model. Several missing data points, e.g., for HMO-enrolled populations, were extrapolated from available data by the project's contractor. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The authors contend that the Bureau's demographic utilization model represents improvements over other data-driven methodologies that rely on staffing ratios and similar supply-determined bases for estimating requirements. The model's distinct utility rests in offering national-level physician specialty requirements forecasts. Images Figure 1 PMID:9018213

  4. Forecasting the need for physicians in the United States: the Health Resources and Services Administration's physician requirements model.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, L; Cultice, J M

    1997-02-01

    The Health Resources and Services Administration's Bureau of Health Professions developed a demographic utilization-based model of physician specialty requirements to explore the consequences of a broad range of scenarios pertaining to the nation's health care delivery system on need for physicians. The model uses selected data primarily from the National Center for Health Statistics, the American Medical Association, and the U.S. Bureau of Census. Forecasts are national estimates. Current (1989) utilization rates for ambulatory and inpatient medical specialty services were obtained for the population according to age, gender, race/ethnicity, and insurance status. These rates are used to estimate specialty-specific total service utilization expressed in patient care minutes for future populations and converted to physician requirements by applying per-physician productivity estimates. Secondary data were analyzed and put into matrixes for use in the mainframe computer-based model. Several missing data points, e.g., for HMO-enrolled populations, were extrapolated from available data by the project's contractor. The authors contend that the Bureau's demographic utilization model represents improvements over other data-driven methodologies that rely on staffing ratios and similar supply-determined bases for estimating requirements. The model's distinct utility rests in offering national-level physician specialty requirements forecasts.

  5. Individual health services

    PubMed Central

    Schnell-Inderst, Petra; Hunger, Theresa; Hintringer, Katharina; Schwarzer, Ruth; Seifert-Klauss, Vanadin Regina; Gothe, Holger; Wasem, Jürgen; Siebert, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Background The German statutory health insurance (GKV) reimburses all health care services that are deemed sufficient, appropriate, and efficient. According to the German Medical Association (BÄK), individual health services (IGeL) are services that are not under liability of the GKV, medically necessary or recommendable or at least justifiable. They have to be explicitly requested by the patient and have to be paid out of pocket. Research questions The following questions regarding IGeL in the outpatient health care of GKV insurants are addressed in the present report: What is the empirical evidence regarding offers, utilization, practice, acceptance, and the relation between physician and patient, as well as the economic relevance of IGeL? What ethical, social, and legal aspects are related to IGeL? For two of the most common IGeL, the screening for glaucoma and the screening for ovarian and endometrial cancer by vaginal ultrasound (VUS), the following questions are addressed: What is the evidence for the clinical effectiveness? Are there sub-populations for whom screening might be beneficial? Methods The evaluation is divided into two parts. For the first part a systematic literature review of primary studies and publications concerning ethical, social and legal aspects is performed. In the second part, rapid assessments of the clinical effectiveness for the two examples, glaucoma and VUS screening, are prepared. Therefore, in a first step, HTA-reports and systematic reviews are searched, followed by a search for original studies published after the end of the research period of the most recent HTA-report included. Results 29 studies were included for the first question. Between 19 and 53% of GKV members receive IGeL offers, of which three-quarters are realised. 16 to 19% of the insurants ask actively for IGeL. Intraocular tension measurement is the most common single IGeL service, accounting for up to 40% of the offers. It is followed by ultrasound assessments

  6. Indian Health Service: Community Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Releases Reports to Congress Tribal Leader Letters Urban Leader Letters IHS Home Community Health Community Health ... Office of Tribal Self Governance - 08E05 Office of Urban Indian Health Programs - 08E65C Accessibility Budget Contact Information ...

  7. Modeling zero-modified count and semicontinuous data in health services research Part 1: background and overview.

    PubMed

    Neelon, Brian; O'Malley, A James; Smith, Valerie A

    2016-11-30

    Health services data often contain a high proportion of zeros. In studies examining patient hospitalization rates, for instance, many patients will have no hospitalizations, resulting in a count of zero. When the number of zeros is greater or less than expected under a standard count model, the data are said to be zero modified relative to the standard model. A similar phenomenon arises with semicontinuous data, which are characterized by a spike at zero followed by a continuous distribution with positive support. When analyzing zero-modified count and semicontinuous data, flexible mixture distributions are often needed to accommodate both the excess zeros and the typically skewed distribution of nonzero values. Various models have been introduced over the past three decades to accommodate such data, including hurdle models, zero-inflated models, and two-part semicontinuous models. This tutorial describes recent modeling strategies for zero-modified count and semicontinuous data and highlights their role in health services research studies. Part 1 of the tutorial, presented here, provides a general overview of the topic. Part 2, appearing as a companion piece in this issue of Statistics in Medicine, discusses three case studies illustrating applications of the methods to health services research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Interprofessional education and service learning: a model for the future of health professions education.

    PubMed

    De Los Santos, Maria; McFarlin, Christine Degnon; Martin, Lourdes

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of interprofessional education for healthcare professionals has been lackluster, at best, since it was recommended by the Institute of Medicine. There have been various attempts in institutions of higher learning to meet this goal with mixed results. Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University has developed the Green Family NeighborhoodHELP™ (GFNHelp) program to meet this challenge. GFNHelp is an interprofessional, longitudinal, service-learning program for healthcare students. Through participation in this program medical students team up with students from other professions, such as nursing, social work, and law, and collaborate to improve health outcomes for medically underserved families in the community. This educational program emphasizes the Core Competencies of the Interprofessional Education Collaborative through community-based service-learning, allowing student teams to engage firsthand and address the impact of social determinants on health.

  9. Service Modeling for Service Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Yoshiki; Tomiyama, Tetsuo

    Intensification of service and knowledge contents within product life cycles is considered crucial for dematerialization, in particular, to design optimal product-service systems from the viewpoint of environmentally conscious design and manufacturing in advanced post industrial societies. In addition to the environmental limitations, we are facing social limitations which include limitations of markets to accept increasing numbers of mass-produced artifacts and such environmental and social limitations are restraining economic growth. To attack and remove these problems, we need to reconsider the current mass production paradigm and to make products have more added values largely from knowledge and service contents to compensate volume reduction under the concept of dematerialization. Namely, dematerialization of products needs to enrich service contents. However, service was mainly discussed within marketing and has been mostly neglected within traditional engineering. Therefore, we need new engineering methods to look at services, rather than just functions, called "Service Engineering." To establish service engineering, this paper proposes a modeling technique of service.

  10. Modelling nutritional services in relation to the health status of older individuals living on Mediterranean islands.

    PubMed

    Tyrovolas, S; Polychronopoulos, E; Tountas, Y; Panagiotakos, D B

    2011-01-01

    The world's population is ageing and it has been suggested that improvements to health, wellbeing and lifespan can be attributed to improved standards of living, especially regarding diet and nutritional status. The impact of nutritional services provided by a dietician on an older population's health status has not been well evaluated or documented. This study sought to determine whether an association exists between available nutritional services and older people's health status in selected Greek islands and the Cyprus Republic. During 2010, information on nutritional services provided in 9 Greek Islands and the Cyprus Republic was retrieved through interviews of almost all dieticians (n=88) working on these islands. The health status (ie prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, obesity) of the older population studied (aged >65 years) was retrieved from the Mediterranean Islands Study (MEDIS). The main reasons for an older person's visit to a dietician was for the treatment of diabetes (79%), hypercholesterolemia (75%) and obesity (70%); 90% of older individuals visited the dietician on a physician's recommendation and 45% of them completed their consultations. The longer the presence of a dietician on an island, the lower the likelihood of observing the prevalence of hypertension (OR=0.59, 95% CI=0.36-0.94), hypercholesterolemia (OR=0.66, 95%CI=0.46-0.95), diabetes (OR=0.77, 95%CI=0.61-0.96) and obesity (OR=0.66, 95%CI=0.45-0.95) above the median rate of the population studied. Financial concerns and a long distance from home to the dieticians' office were the major reasons for ceasing visits to the dietician. Enhancing nutritional services within the healthcare system may contribute to reducing the burden of disease among older adults and, consequently, improve their quality of life.

  11. Do we have the right models for scaling up health services to achieve the Millennium Development Goals?

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Savitha; Naimoli, Joseph; Matsubayashi, Toru; Peters, David H

    2011-12-14

    There is widespread agreement on the need for scaling up in the health sector to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). But many countries are not on track to reach the MDG targets. The dominant approach used by global health initiatives promotes uniform interventions and targets, assuming that specific technical interventions tested in one country can be replicated across countries to rapidly expand coverage. Yet countries scale up health services and progress against the MDGs at very different rates. Global health initiatives need to take advantage of what has been learned about scaling up. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify conceptual models for scaling up health in developing countries, with the articles assessed according to the practical concerns of how to scale up, including the planning, monitoring and implementation approaches. We identified six conceptual models for scaling up in health based on experience with expanding pilot projects and diffusion of innovations. They place importance on paying attention to enhancing organizational, functional, and political capabilities through experimentation and adaptation of strategies in addition to increasing the coverage and range of health services. These scaling up approaches focus on fostering sustainable institutions and the constructive engagement between end users and the provider and financing organizations. The current approaches to scaling up health services to reach the MDGs are overly simplistic and not working adequately. Rather than relying on blueprint planning and raising funds, an approach characteristic of current global health efforts, experience with alternative models suggests that more promising pathways involve "learning by doing" in ways that engage key stakeholders, uses data to address constraints, and incorporates results from pilot projects. Such approaches should be applied to current strategies to achieve the MDGs.

  12. Do we have the right models for scaling up health services to achieve the Millennium Development Goals?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is widespread agreement on the need for scaling up in the health sector to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). But many countries are not on track to reach the MDG targets. The dominant approach used by global health initiatives promotes uniform interventions and targets, assuming that specific technical interventions tested in one country can be replicated across countries to rapidly expand coverage. Yet countries scale up health services and progress against the MDGs at very different rates. Global health initiatives need to take advantage of what has been learned about scaling up. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted to identify conceptual models for scaling up health in developing countries, with the articles assessed according to the practical concerns of how to scale up, including the planning, monitoring and implementation approaches. Results We identified six conceptual models for scaling up in health based on experience with expanding pilot projects and diffusion of innovations. They place importance on paying attention to enhancing organizational, functional, and political capabilities through experimentation and adaptation of strategies in addition to increasing the coverage and range of health services. These scaling up approaches focus on fostering sustainable institutions and the constructive engagement between end users and the provider and financing organizations. Conclusions The current approaches to scaling up health services to reach the MDGs are overly simplistic and not working adequately. Rather than relying on blueprint planning and raising funds, an approach characteristic of current global health efforts, experience with alternative models suggests that more promising pathways involve "learning by doing" in ways that engage key stakeholders, uses data to address constraints, and incorporates results from pilot projects. Such approaches should be applied to current strategies to achieve the MDGs

  13. Developing a Community-Based Participatory Research Model to Engage Transition Age Youth Using Mental Health Service in Research

    PubMed Central

    Lincoln, Alisa K.; Borg, Ryan; Delman, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We present a model for the development and conduct of a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) project with transition age youth (TAY) mental health service users. CBPR frameworks can facilitate equitable partnerships and meaningful inclusion, but have not been fully drawn-upon in mental health research. The model included TAY as trained research associates involved in every aspect of the research process. We describe the development of the project, creation of the research team, training, the design and conduct of the study, and challenges faced. The methods developed successfully provided support for the meaningful participation of TAY in the project. PMID:25423247

  14. Health service resource needs for pandemic influenza in developing countries: a linked transmission dynamics, interventions and resource demand model.

    PubMed

    Krumkamp, R; Kretzschmar, M; Rudge, J W; Ahmad, A; Hanvoravongchai, P; Westenhoefer, J; Stein, M; Putthasri, W; Coker, R

    2011-01-01

    We used a mathematical model to describe a regional outbreak and extrapolate the underlying health-service resource needs. This model was designed to (i) estimate resource gaps and quantities of resources needed, (ii) show the effect of resource gaps, and (iii) highlight which particular resources should be improved. We ran the model, parameterized with data from the 2009 H1N1v pandemic, for two provinces in Thailand. The predicted number of preventable deaths due to resource shortcomings and the actual resource needs are presented for two provinces and for Thailand as a whole. The model highlights the potentially huge impact of health-system resource availability and of resource gaps on health outcomes during a pandemic and provides a means to indicate where efforts should be concentrated to effectively improve pandemic response programmes.

  15. A model to estimate the cost of the National Essential Public Health Services Package in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Delu; Wong, Sabrina T; Chen, Wei; Xin, Qianqian; Wang, Lihong; Cui, Mingming; Yin, Tao; Li, Ruili; Zheng, Xiaoguo; Yang, Huiming; Yu, Juanjuan; Chen, Bowen; Yang, Weizhong

    2015-06-06

    In order to address several health challenges, the Chinese government issued the National Essential Public Health Services Package (NEPHSP) in 2009. In China's large cities, the lack of funding for community health centers and consequent lack of comprehensive services and high quality care has become a major challenge. However, no study has been carried out to estimate the cost of delivering the services in the package. This project was to develop a cost estimation approach appropriate to the context and use it to calculate the cost of the NEPHSP in Beijing in 2011. By adjusting models of cost analysis of primary health care and workload indicators of staffing need developed by the World Health Organization, a model was developed to estimate the cost of the services in the package through an intensive interactive process. A total of 17 community health centers from eight administrative districts in Beijing were selected. Their service volume and expenditure data in 2010 were used to evaluate the costs of providing the NEPHSP in Beijing based on the applied model. The total workload of all types of primary health care in 17 sample centers was equivalent to the workload requirement for 14,056,402 standard clinic visits. The total expenditure of the 17 sample centers was 26,329,357.62 USD in 2010. The cost of the workload requirement of one standard clinic visit was 1.87 USD. The workload of the NEPHSP was equivalent to 5,514,777 standard clinic visits (39.23 % of the total workload). The model suggests that the cost of the package in Beijing was 7.95 USD per capita in 2010. The cost of the NEPHSP in urban areas was lower than suburban areas: 7.31 and 8.65 USD respectively. The average investment of 3.97 USD per capita in NEPHSP was lower than the amount needed to meet its running costs. NEPHSP in Beijing is therefore underfunded. Additional investment is needed, and a dynamic cost estimate mechanism should be introduced to ensure services remain adequately funded.

  16. The impact of the "Village" model on health, well-being, service access, and social engagement of older adults.

    PubMed

    Graham, Carrie L; Scharlach, Andrew E; Price Wolf, Jennifer

    2014-10-01

    Villages represent an emerging consumer-driven social support model that aims to enhance the social engagement, independence, and well-being of community-dwelling seniors through a combination of social activities, volunteer opportunities, service referral, and direct assistance. This study aimed to assess the perceived impact of Village membership on factors associated with the likelihood of aging in place. Additionally, the research examines the characteristics and service use of members who benefit the most. Perceived impacts of Village membership in the areas of social engagement, service access, health and well-being, and self-efficacy for maintaining independence were assessed through a survey of 282 active Village members from five sites in California. Bivariate and multivariate analyses examined associations between member characteristics, volunteerism, service use, and self-reported impacts. Villages have the strongest impact in the area of promoting social engagement and facilitating access to services. Three quarters of the participants report that the Village increases their ability to age in place. Positive impacts were associated with level of Village involvement, but less likely among members who had worse self-reported health. Villages represent a promising new model designed to support community-dwelling seniors with a number of positive impacts that may reduce social isolation, improve well-being, and increase confidence aging in place. Villages appear to have the greatest benefit for members who are most involved and fewer positive impacts for members in poor health, prompting questions about the long-term effectiveness of the Village model in helping more frail seniors to age in place. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  17. Reliability assessment of home health care services.

    PubMed

    Spyrou, Stergiani; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Kilintzis, Vassilis; Lekka, Irini; Maglaveras, Nicos; Pappas, Costas

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a model of reliability assessment of services in Home Health Care Delivery is presented. Reliability is an important quality dimension for services and is included in non-functional requirements of a system. A stochastic Markov model for reliability assessment is applied to patient communication services, in the field of home health care delivery. The methodology includes the specification of scenarios, the definition of failures in scenarios as well as the application of the analytical model. The results of the methodology reveal the critical states of the Home Health Care System and recommendations for improvement of the services are proposed. The model gives valuable results in predicting service reliability and, independently of the error types, it can be applied to all fields of Regional Health Network (RHN).

  18. Assessment of the implementation of the model of integrated and humanised midwifery health services in Chile.

    PubMed

    Binfa, Lorena; Pantoja, Loreto; Ortiz, Jovita; Gurovich, Marcela; Cavada, Gabriel; Foster, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    in 2010, a pilot study was conducted among women who were attended by midwives in the public sector in Santiago, Chile. The purpose of that study was to evaluate the implementation of the 'Model of Integrated and Humanized Health Services', and the Clinical Guide for Humanized Attention during Labour and Childbirth. Results of that study indicated 92.7% of women had medically augmented labours (artificial rupture of the membranes, oxytocin and epidural analgesia). One third of the women reported discontent with the care they received. This study replicated the pilot study (2010) and was conducted in seven regional hospitals across Chile. The objectives were to : (i) describe selected obstetric and neonatal outcomes of women who received care according to this new guide, (ii) identify the level of maternal-neonatal well-being after experiencing this modality of attention, and (iii) explore professionals' perceptions (obstetricians and midwives), as well as consumers' perceptions of this humanised assistance during labour and childbirth. this is a cross sectional and descriptive, mixed methods study, conducted in two phases. The first phase was quantitative, measuring midwifery processes of care and maternal perceptions of well-being in labour and childbirth. The second phase was qualitative, exploring the perceptions of women, midwives and obstetricians regarding the discrepancy between the national guidelines and actual practice. maternity units from seven regional hospitals from the northern, central and southern regions and two metropolitan hospitals across Chile. 1882 parturient women in the quantitative phase (including the two Metropolitan hospitals published previously). Twenty-six focus groups discussions (FGD) participated from the regional and metropolitan hospitals for the qualitative phase. MEASUREMENTS/FINDINGS: all women started labour spontaneously; 74% of women had spontaneous vaginal childbirth. Caesarean section was the outcome for 20%, and 6% had

  19. Self-assessment of all the health centres of a public health service through the European Model of total quality management.

    PubMed

    Arcelay, A; Sánchez, E; Hernández, L; Inclán, G; Bacigalupe, M; Letona, J; González, R M; Martínez-Conde, A E

    1999-01-01

    The Basque Country Public Health Service has moved in the last years from considering quality as an attribute of patient care to thinking that all management can be subject to improvement. Consequently, its general management team has promoted and supported a self-assessment experience of all their centres by means of the European Quality Model. This strategy has been facilitated by the Basque Country Government, which has strongly encouraged total quality management in companies, and has created the Basque Foundation for Quality Promotion, a key institution in this whole process. A total of 26 centres of the Public Health Service concluded a self-assessment process. As the main result of this, different improvement areas were detected, and various necessary actions were implemented in the centres assessed. Advantages, troubles and future work lines to extend and improve the use of the EFQM model in the health sector are discussed.

  20. Service quality in health care.

    PubMed

    Kenagy, J W; Berwick, D M; Shore, M F

    1999-02-17

    Although US health care is described as "the world's largest service industry," the quality of service--that is, the characteristics that shape the experience of care beyond technical competence--is rarely discussed in the medical literature. This article illustrates service quality principles by analyzing a routine encounter in health care from a service quality point of view. This illustration and a review of related literature from both inside and outside health care has led to the following 2 premises: First, if high-quality service had a greater presence in our practices and institutions, it would improve clinical outcomes and patient and physician satisfaction while reducing cost, and it would create competitive advantage for those who are expert in its application. Second, many other industries in the service sector have taken service quality to a high level, their techniques are readily transferable to health care, and physicians caring for patients can learn from them.

  1. Acceptance of Swedish e-health services

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mary-Louise; Loria, Karla

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate older people’s acceptance of e-health services, in order to identify determinants of, and barriers to, their intention to use e-health. Method: Based on one of the best-established models of technology acceptance, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), in-depth exploratory interviews with twelve individuals over 45 years of age and of varying backgrounds are conducted. Results: This investigation could find support for the importance of usefulness and perceived ease of use of the e-health service offered as the main determinants of people’s intention to use the service. Additional factors critical to the acceptance of e-health are identified, such as the importance of the compatibility of the services with citizens’ needs and trust in the service provider. Most interviewees expressed positive attitudes towards using e-health and find these services useful, convenient, and easy to use. Conclusion: E-health services are perceived as a good complement to traditional health care service delivery, even among older people. These people, however, need to become aware of the e-health alternatives that are offered to them and the benefits they provide. PMID:21289860

  2. Acceptance of Swedish e-health services.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mary-Louise; Loria, Karla

    2010-11-16

    To investigate older people's acceptance of e-health services, in order to identify determinants of, and barriers to, their intention to use e-health. Based on one of the best-established models of technology acceptance, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), in-depth exploratory interviews with twelve individuals over 45 years of age and of varying backgrounds are conducted. This investigation could find support for the importance of usefulness and perceived ease of use of the e-health service offered as the main determinants of people's intention to use the service. Additional factors critical to the acceptance of e-health are identified, such as the importance of the compatibility of the services with citizens' needs and trust in the service provider. Most interviewees expressed positive attitudes towards using e-health and find these services useful, convenient, and easy to use. E-health services are perceived as a good complement to traditional health care service delivery, even among older people. These people, however, need to become aware of the e-health alternatives that are offered to them and the benefits they provide.

  3. [Terrorism, public health and health services].

    PubMed

    Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Cuartas Alvarez, Tatiana; Pérez-Berrocal Alonso, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Today the terrorism is a problem of global distribution and increasing interest for the international public health. The terrorism related violence affects the public health and the health care services in an important way and in different scopes, among them, increase mortality, morbidity and disability, generates a context of fear and anxiety that makes the psychopathological diseases very frequent, seriously alters the operation of the health care services and produces important social, political and economic damages. These effects are, in addition, especially intense when the phenomenon takes place on a chronic way in a community. The objective of this paper is to examine the relation between terrorism and public health, focusing on its effects on public health and the health care services, as well as to examine the possible frames to face the terrorism as a public health concern, with special reference to the situation in Spain. To face this problem, both the public health systems and the health care services, would have to especially adapt their approaches and operational methods in six high-priority areas related to: (1) the coordination between the different health and non health emergency response agencies; (2) the reinforcement of the epidemiological surveillance systems; (3) the improvement of the capacities of the public health laboratories and response emergency care systems to specific types of terrorism as the chemical or biological terrorism; (3) the mental health services; (4) the planning and coordination of the emergency response of the health services; (5) the relations with the population and mass media and, finally; (6) a greater transparency in the diffusion of the information and a greater degree of analysis of the carried out health actions in the scope of the emergency response.

  4. Health care's service fanatics.

    PubMed

    Merlino, James I; Raman, Ananth

    2013-05-01

    The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there and decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds Lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths. Hospital leaders: Publicized the problem internally. Seeing the hospital's dismal service scores shocked employees into recognizing that serious flaws existed. Worked to understand patients' needs. Management commissioned studies to get at the root causes of dissatisfaction. Made everyone a caregiver. An enterprisewide program trained everyone, from physicians to janitors, to put the patient first. Increased employee engagement. The Clinic instituted a "caregiver celebration" program and redoubled other motivational efforts. Established new processes. For example, any patient, for any reason, can now make a same-day appointment with a single call. Set patients' expectations. Printed and online materials educate patients about their stays--before they're admitted. Operating a truly patient-centered organization, the authors conclude, isn't a program; it's a way of life.

  5. Lessons from the Unexpected: The Importance of Data Infrastructure, Conceptual Models, and Serendipity in Health Services Research

    PubMed Central

    Mechanic, David

    2001-01-01

    In examining the importance of data systems, conceptual models, and serendipity in understanding health services, the case is made for a vigorous and responsive data infrastructure and more emphasis on conceptual development. Particularly important is the development of data systems that can keep pace with changes in health care organization and patterns of care. Three examples—from managed care, deinstitutionalization, and physician remuneration—demonstrate the need to empirically examine seemingly obvious assumptions about health patterns and trends, and the lessons to be learned when assumptions are proved incorrect. Major future challenges include incorporating patient preferences into outcomes research, meaningful communication about treatment options and health plan choices, and understanding how organizational culture and norms affect decision processes. PMID:11565164

  6. Lessons from the unexpected: the importance of data infrastructure, conceptual models, and serendipity in health services research.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, D

    2001-01-01

    In examining the importance of data systems, conceptual models, and serendipity in understanding health services, the case is made for a vigorous and responsive data infrastructure and more emphasis on conceptual development. Particularly important is the development of data systems that can keep pace with changes in health care organization and patterns of care. Three examples--from managed care, deinstitutionalization, and physician remuneration--demonstrate the need to empirically examine seemingly obvious assumptions about health patterns and trends, and the lessons to be learned when assumptions are proved incorrect. Major future challenges include incorporating patient preferences into outcomes research, meaningful communication about treatment options and health plan choices, and understanding how organizational culture and norms affect decision processes.

  7. Improving the planning of the GP workforce in Australia: a simulation model incorporating work transitions, health need and service usage.

    PubMed

    Laurence, Caroline O; Karnon, Jonathan

    2016-04-11

    In Australia, the approach to health workforce planning has been supply-led and resource-driven rather than need-based. The result has been cycles of shortages and oversupply. These approaches have tended to use age and sex projections as a measure of need or demand for health care. Less attention has been given to more complex aspects of the population, such as the increasing proportion of the ageing population and increasing levels of chronic diseases or changes in the mix of health care providers or their productivity levels. These are difficult measures to get right and so are often avoided. This study aims to develop a simulation model for planning the general practice workforce in South Australia that incorporates work transitions, health need and service usage. A simulation model was developed with two sub-models--a supply sub-model and a need sub-model. The supply sub-model comprised three components--training, supply and productivity--and the need sub-model described population size, health needs, service utilisation rates and productivity. A state transition cohort model is used to estimate the future supply of GPs, accounting for entries and exits from the workforce and changes in location and work status. In estimating the required number of GPs, the model used incidence and prevalence data, combined with age, gender and condition-specific utilisation rates. The model was run under alternative assumptions reflecting potential changes in need and utilisation rates over time. The supply sub-model estimated the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) GP stock in SA for the period 2004-2011 and was similar to the observed data, although it had a tendency to overestimate the GP stock. The three scenarios presented for the demand sub-model resulted in different outcomes for the estimated required number of GPs. For scenario one, where utilisation rates in 2003 were assumed optimal, the model predicted fewer FTE GPs were required than was observed. In scenario 2

  8. A conceptual model of optimal international service-learning and its application to global health initiatives in rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Pechak, Celia M; Thompson, Mary

    2009-11-01

    There is growing involvement by US clinicians, faculty members, and students in global health initiatives, including international service-learning (ISL). Limited research has been done to examine the profession's increasing global engagement, or the ISL phenomenon in particular, and no research has been done to determine best practices. This study was intended as an early step in the examination of the physical therapy profession's role and activities in the global health arena within and beyond academics. The purposes of this study were: (1) to identify and analyze the common structures and processes among established ISL programs within physical therapist education programs and (2) to develop a conceptual model of optimal ISL within physical therapist education programs. A descriptive, exploratory study was completed using grounded theory. Telephone interviews were completed with 14 faculty members who had been involved in international service, international learning, or ISL in physical therapist education programs. Interviews were transcribed, and transcriptions were analyzed using the grounded theory method. Four major themes emerged from the data: structure, reciprocity, relationship, and sustainability. A conceptual model of and a proposed definition for optimal ISL in physical therapist education were developed. Seven essential components of the conceptual model are: a partner that understands the role of physical therapy, community-identified needs, explicit service and learning objectives, reflection, preparation, risk management, and service and learning outcome measures. Essential consequences are positive effects on students and community. The conceptual model and definition of optimal ISL can be used to direct development of new ISL programs and to improve existing programs. In addition, they can offer substantive guidance to any physical therapist involved in global health initiatives.

  9. Value added telecommunication services for health care.

    PubMed

    Danelli-Mylonas, Vassiliki

    2003-01-01

    The successful implementation and operation of health care networks and the efficient and effective provision of health care services is dependent upon a number of different factors: Telecommunications infrastructure and technology, medical applications and services, user acceptance, education and training, product and applications/services development and service provision aspects. The business model and market development regarding policy and legal issues also must be considered in the development and deployment of telemedicine services to become an everyday practice. This chapter presents the initiatives, role and contribution of the Greek Telecommunications Company in the health care services area and also refers to specific case-studies focusing upon the key factors and issues of applications related to the telecommunications, informatics, and health care sectors, which can also be the drivers to create opportunities for Citizens, Society and the Industry.

  10. A model for interagency cooperation in the provision of mental health services to youths.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, J S; Levin, S

    1976-06-01

    In 1971 the Chedoke-McMaster center initiated an assessment and placement program for emotionally disturbed preadolescents in the Hamilton, Ontario, area. That project was used as the springboard for a cooperative venture with other health and social service agencies dealing with children. At the heart of the collaborative project is a multidisciplinary team, composed of representatives from the various participating agencies, that is responsible for all clinical decision-making regarding the need for impatient assessment and placement in residential treatment programs. The team also participates in the planning for discharge and aftercare. The other two components of the project are a short-term inpatient cottage assessment unit and several long-term residential treatment programs.

  11. Paying for quality not quantity: a wisconsin health maintenance organization proposes an incentive model for reimbursement of chiropractic services.

    PubMed

    Pursel, Kevin J; Jacobson, Martin; Stephenson, Kathy

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe a reimbursement model that was developed by one Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) to transition from fee-for-service to add a combination of pay for performance and reporting model of reimbursement for chiropractic care. The previous incentive program used by the HMO provided best-practice education and additional reimbursement incentives for achieving the National Committee for Quality Assurance Back Pain Recognition Program (NCQA-BPRP) recognition status. However, this model had not leveled costs between doctors of chiropractic (DCs). Therefore, the HMO management aimed to develop a reimbursement model to incentivize providers to embrace existing best-practice models and report existing quality metrics. The development goals included the following: it should (1) be as financially predictable as the previous system, (2) cost no more on a per-member basis, (3) meet the coverage needs of its members, and (4) be able to be operationalized. The model should also reward DCs who embraced best practices with compensation, not simply tied to providing more procedures, the new program needed to (1) cause little or no disruption in current billing, (2) be grounded achievable and defined expectations for improvement in quality, and (3) be voluntary, without being unduly punitive, should the DC choose not to participate in the program. The generated model was named the Comprehensive Chiropractic Quality Reimbursement Methodology (CCQRM; pronounced "Quorum"). In this hybrid model, additional reimbursement, beyond pay-for-procedures will be based on unique payment interpretations reporting selected, existing Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) codes, meaningful use of electronic health records, and achieving NCQA-BPRP recognition. This model aims to compensate providers using pay-for-performance, pay-for-quality reporting, pay-for-procedure methods. The CCQRM reimbursement model was developed to address the current needs of one

  12. Working with lay people in health service research: a model of co-evolution based on complexity theory.

    PubMed

    Kernick, David; Mitchell, Annie

    2010-01-01

    Involving lay researchers is an important part of Government policy in the United Kingdom within the context of the National Health Service. Here we draw upon insights from complexity theory to suggest a model that we call consensual qualitative research where lay researchers and professionals are co-producers of knowledge. The focus of attention is on understanding and facilitating the patterns that emerge from non-linear interaction at a local level. We describe some core principles that can facilitate the development of such a model and conclude that the resources in terms of time and effort that such an approach requires, should not be underestimated.

  13. Factors associated with the health care cost in older Australian women with arthritis: an application of the Andersen's Behavioural Model of Health Services Use.

    PubMed

    Lo, T K T; Parkinson, L; Cunich, M; Byles, J

    2016-05-01

    Factors associated with the utilisation of health care have not been rigorously examined in people with arthritis. The objective of this study was to examine the determinants of health care utilisation and costs in older women with arthritis using the Andersen's behavioural model as a framework. Longitudinal cohort study. Participants of Surveys 3 to 5 of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health who reported arthritis were included in the study. Information about health care utilisation and unit prices were based on linked Medicare Australia data, which included prescription medicines and health services. Total health care costs of participants with arthritis were measured for the years 2002 to 2003, 2005 to 2006, and 2008 to 2009, which corresponded to the survey years. Potential explanatory variables of the health care cost and other characteristics of the participants were collected from the health surveys. Explanatory variables were grouped into predisposing characteristics, enabling factors and need variables conforming to the Andersen's Behavioural Model of Health Services Use. Longitudinal data analysis was conducted using generalized estimating equations. A total of 5834 observations were included for the three periods. Regression analysis results show that higher health care cost in older Australian women with arthritis was significantly associated with residing in an urban area, having supplementary health insurance coverage, more comorbid conditions, using complementary and alternative medicine, and worse physical functioning. It was also found that predisposing characteristics (such as the area of residence) and enabling factors (such as health insurance coverage) accounted for more variance in the health care cost than need variables (such as comorbid conditions). These results may indicate an inefficient and unfair allocation of subsidised health care among older Australian women with arthritis, where individuals with less enabling

  14. Indian Health Service

    MedlinePlus

    ... Month Breast Cancer Awareness Month October is National Health Literacy Month Flu Season October is Domestic Violence Awareness ... Awareness Month 10/10/2017 October is National Health Literacy Month 10/06/2017 Flu Season 10/05/ ...

  15. African American Female Offender’s Use of Alternative and Traditional Health Services After Re-Entry: Examining the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations

    PubMed Central

    Oser, Carrie B.; Bunting, Amanda M.; Pullen, Erin; Stevens-Watkins, Danelle

    2016-01-01

    This is the first known study to use the Gelberg-Andersen Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations to predict African American women’s use of three types of health services (alternative, hospitalization, and ambulatory) in the 18 months after release from prison. In the multivariate models, the most robust predictors of all three types of service utilization were in the vulnerable theoretical domains. Alternative health services were predicted by ethnic community membership, higher religiosity, and HIV/HCV. Hospitalizations were predicted by the lack of barriers to health care and disability. Ambulatory office visits were predicted by more experiences of gendered racism, a greater number of physical health problems, and HIV/HCV. Findings highlight the importance of cultural factors and HIV/HCV in obtaining both alternative and formal health care during community re-entry. Clinicians and policy makers should consider the salient role that the vulnerable domain plays in offender’s accessing health services. PMID:27133515

  16. School Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charles C., Ed.

    A comprehensive guide for health procedures in small and large school systems, this volume emphasizes the need for coordination of school efforts with those of parents, departments of health, private practitioners of medicine and dentistry, and community health agencies. Particular attention is given to the role of the teacher in school health…

  17. Guidelines for School Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Sarah; And Others

    This publication was designed to assist chief school administrators, school nurses, school physicians, staff, and other school health personnel in developing, implementing, and evaluating sound school health programs for New Jersey public school students. Section I delineates responsibility for school health services, discussing the role of…

  18. Guidelines for School Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Sarah; And Others

    This publication was designed to assist chief school administrators, school nurses, school physicians, staff, and other school health personnel in developing, implementing, and evaluating sound school health programs for New Jersey public school students. Section I delineates responsibility for school health services, discussing the role of…

  19. Modeling the Impact of Integrating HIV and Outpatient Health Services on Patient Waiting Times in an Urban Health Clinic in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Sarang; Topp, Stephanie M.; Garcia, Ariel; Soldner, Mallory; Yagci Sokat, Kezban; Chipukuma, Julien; Wamulume, Chibesa S.; Reid, Stewart E.; Swann, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapid scale up of HIV treatment programs in sub-Saharan Africa has refueled the long-standing health policy debate regarding the merits and drawbacks of vertical and integrated system. Recent pilots of integrating outpatient and HIV services have shown an improvement in some patient outcomes but deterioration in waiting times, which can lead to worse health outcomes in the long run. Methods A pilot intervention involving integration of outpatient and HIV services in an urban primary care facility in Lusaka, Zambia was studied. Data on waiting time of patients during two seven-day periods before and six months after the integration were collected using a time and motion study. Statistical tests were conducted to investigate whether the two observation periods differed in operational details such as staffing, patient arrival rates, mix of patients etc. A discrete event simulation model was constructed to facilitate a fair comparison of waiting times before and after integration. The simulation model was also used to develop alternative configurations of integration and to estimate the resulting waiting times. Results Comparison of raw data showed that waiting times increased by 32% and 36% after integration for OPD and ART patients respectively (p<0.01). Using simulation modeling, we found that a large portion of this increase could be explained by changes in operational conditions before and after integration such as reduced staff availability (p<0.01) and longer breaks between consecutive patients (p<0.05). Controlling for these differences, integration of services, per se, would have resulted in a significant decrease in waiting times for OPD and a moderate decrease for HIV services. Conclusions Integrating health services has the potential of reducing waiting times due to more efficient use of resources. However, one needs to ensure that other operational factors such as staff availability are not adversely affected due to integration. PMID:22545108

  20. Preventing Youth from Falling Through the Cracks Between Child/Adolescent and Adult Mental Health Services: A Systematic Review of Models of Care.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tram; Embrett, Mark G; Barr, Neil G; Mulvale, Gillian M; Vania, Diana K; Randall, Glen E; DiRezze, Briano

    2017-02-20

    Optimizing the transition between child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) and adult mental health services (AMHS) is a priority for healthcare systems. The purpose of this systematic review is to: (1) identify and compare models of care that may be used to facilitate the transition from CAMHS to AMHS; and (2) discuss trends and implications to inform future research and practice. Results identified three models of care which move beyond healthcare services and incorporate a broader range of services that better meet the dynamic needs of transition-aged youth. Joint working among providers, coupled with individualized approaches, is essential to facilitating continuity of care.

  1. A cost and technical efficiency analysis of two alternative models for implementing the basic package of health services in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Blaakman, Aaron Philip; Salehi, Ahmad Shah; Boitard, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Since 2003, the Afghan Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) and international partners have directed a contracting-out model through which non-governmental organisations (NGOs) deliver the Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS) in 31 of the 34 Afghan provinces. The MoPH also managed health service delivery in three provinces under an alternative initiative entitled Strengthening Mechanisms (SM). In 2011, under the authority of the MoPH and Delegation of the European Union to Afghanistan, EPOS Health Management conducted a cost and technical efficiency study of the contracting-out and SM mechanisms in six provinces to examine economic trade-offs in the provision of the BPHS. The study provides analyses of all resource inputs and primary outputs of the BPHS in the six provinces during 2008 and 2009. The authors examined technical efficiency using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) at the BPHS facility level. Cost analysis results indicate that the weighted average cost per BPHS outpatient visit totalled $3.41 in the SM provinces and $5.39 in the NGO-led provinces in 2009. Furthermore, the data envelopment analyses (DEAs) indicate that facilities in the three NGO-led provinces scored 0.168 points higher on the DEA scale (0-1) than SM facilities. The authors conclude that an approximate 60% increase in costs yielded a 16.8% increase in technical efficiency in the delivery of the BPHS during 2009 in the six provinces.

  2. [The regional psychiatry budget (RPB): a model for a new payment system of hospital based mental health care services].

    PubMed

    König, Hans-Helmut; Heinrich, Sven; Heider, Dirk; Deister, Arno; Zeichner, Dirk; Birker, Thomas; Hierholzer, Cornelia; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Roick, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the impact of a capitated multi-sector-financing model for psychiatric care (RPB) on costs and effectiveness of care. Patients with a diagnosis according to ICD-10 F10, F2 or F3 were interviewed in the model region (MR, n = 258) and a control region (CR, n = 244) financed according to the fee-for-service principle. At baseline, 1.5 years and 3.5 years follow-up patients were interviewed using measures of psychopathology (CGI-S, HoNOS, SCL-90R, PANSS, BRMAS / BRMES), functioning (GAF, SOFAS) and quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF, EQ-5D). Use of care was determined semi-annually. There were no significant differences in the development of psychopathology and quality of life between MR and CR. In the MR, functioning of patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders improved significantly more strongly. The development of total mental health care costs was not different between MR and CR. However, the costs of office based mental health care increased slightly more strongly in the MR, indicating a small cost-shift from the RPB to extrabudgetary financed services. The RPB showed slight advantages regarding the effectiveness of care and did not significantly change the total mental health care costs. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  3. Mental health service provision in England.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S; Zinkler, M; Priebe, S

    2001-01-01

    To describe mental health service provision for adults of working age in England. Services in an inner London area are described so as to illustrate current patterns of service organization in England. National trends are then discussed. Despite relatively low public expenditure, substantial progress has been made in deinstitutionalization and development of comprehensive community-based services. Persisting difficulties include high staff turnover, a minority of patients. who do not engage with community services, user and carer dissatisfaction with emergency services, and social exclusion because of stigma. Recent government policy advocates resolving some of these problems using new service models such as assertive outreach and crisis teams. Closure of the large asylums has largely been accomplished. England is now entering a new phase in community service development, with a range of innovative developments aimed at resolving problems still encountered after the initial phases of integrated community service development.

  4. Integrating mental health services: the Finnish experience

    PubMed Central

    Lehtinen, Ville; Taipale, Vappu

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this paper is to give a short description of the most important developments of mental health services in Finland during the 1990s, examine their influences on the organisation and provision of services, and describe shortly some national efforts to handle the new situation. The Finnish mental health service system experienced profound changes in the beginning of the 1990s. These included the integration of mental health services, being earlier under own separate administration, with other specialised health services, decentralisation of the financing of health services, and de-institutionalisation of the services. The same time Finland underwent the deepest economic recession in Western Europe, which resulted in cut-offs especially in the mental health budgets. Conducting extensive national research and development programmes in the field of mental health has been one typically Finnish way of supporting the mental health service development. The first of these national programmes was the Schizophrenia Project 1981–97, whose main aims were to decrease the incidence of new long-term patients and the prevalence of old long-stay patients by developing an integrated treatment model. The Suicide Prevention Project 1986–96 aimed at raising awareness of this special problem and decreasing by 20% the proportionally high suicide rate in Finland. The National Depression Programme 1994–98 focused at this clearly increasing public health concern by several research and development project targeted both to the general population and specifically to children, primary care and specialised services. The latest, still on-going Meaningful Life Programme 1998–2003 which main aim is, by multi-sectoral co-operation, to improve the quality of life for people suffering from or living with the threat of mental disorders. Furthermore, the government launched in 1999 a new Goal and Action Programme for Social Welfare and Health Care 2000–2003, in which mental

  5. Regional dust storm modeling for health services: The case of valley fever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, William A.; Nickovic, Slobodan; Galgiani, John N.; Pejanovic, Goran; Petkovic, Slavko; Vujadinovic, Mirjam; Vukovic, Ana; Dacic, Milan; DiBiase, Scott; Prasad, Anup; El-Askary, Hesham

    2014-09-01

    On 5 July 2011, a massive dust storm struck Phoenix, Arizona (USA), raising concerns for increased cases of valley fever (coccidioidomycosis, or, cocci). A quasi-operational experimental airborne dust forecast system predicted the event and provides model output for continuing analysis in collaboration with public health and air quality communities. An objective of this collaboration was to see if a signal in cases of valley fever in the region could be detected and traced to the storm - an American haboob. To better understand the atmospheric life cycle of cocci spores, the DREAM dust model (also herein, NMME-DREAM) was modified to simulate spore emission, transport and deposition. Inexact knowledge of where cocci-causing fungus grows, the low resolution of cocci surveillance and an overall active period for significant dust events complicate analysis of the effect of the 5 July 2011 storm. In the larger context of monthly to annual disease surveillance, valley fever statistics, when compared against PM10 observation networks and modeled airborne dust concentrations, may reveal a likely cause and effect. Details provided by models and satellites fill time and space voids in conventional approaches to air quality and disease surveillance, leading to land-atmosphere modeling and remote sensing that clearly mark a path to advance valley fever epidemiology, surveillance and risk avoidance.

  6. A potential model for the first all Wales mental health service user and carer-led research group.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C; Fothergill, A; Rees, H

    2010-02-01

    This paper will inform mental health service users and carers on how a University in Wales established a service user and carer-led research group. * The group's primary aim will be to undertake its own service user and carer-led research projects. * Mental health service users have undergone empowerment and research training at a University in Wales. This is an important initiative because it is the first service user and carer-led research group in Wales. * This paper is co-authored by a mental health service user and includes transcripts of service users' stories written in their words. Abstract Service user and carer involvement in research has been gaining momentum in recent years. However, this involvement to date has primarily been as research respondents or 'subjects' in research studies. A group of mental health service users at a University in Wales underwent empowerment and research training to enable them to become active participants in the research process; this training was a necessary step to equip mental health service users with the skills to become independent researchers and to carry out service user-led research. We included transcripts from mental health service users on their views of the empowerment and research training received. We are not reporting, in this paper, on the findings from a research study rather it aims to inform readers how a service user and carer-led research group has been established in Wales. The group has two purposes: (1) to train service users in research methodologies, and thus for them to gain essential research skills; and (2) to undertake their own service user and carer-led research projects thereby implementing the research skills they have acquired from the training. The latter is a primary aim of the group; a future paper will report on its development.

  7. Predicting Help-Seeking Attitudes Toward Mental Health Services Among American Indian Older Adults: Is Andersen's Behavioral Model a Good Fit?

    PubMed

    Roh, Soonhee; Burnette, Catherine E; Lee, Kyoung Hag; Lee, Yeon-Shim; Martin, James I; Lawler, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    American Indian (AI) older adults are vulnerable to mental health disparities, yet very little is known about the factors associated with help-seeking for mental health services among them. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of Andersen's Behavioral Model in explaining AI older adults' help-seeking attitudes toward professional mental health services. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to examine predisposing, enabling, and need variables as predictors of help-seeking attitudes toward mental health services in a sample of 233 AI older adults from the Midwest. The model was found to have limited utility in the context of older AI help-seeking attitudes, as the proportion of explained variance was low. Gender, perceived stigma, social support, and physical health were significant predictors, whereas age, perceived mental health, and health insurance were not. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Development of a district Cord Blood Bank: a model for cord blood banking in the National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, C; Buchanan, R; Webster, J; Laundy, V; Horsley, H; Barron, C; Anderson, N; Bradley, B; Hows, J

    2000-04-01

    The Bristol Cord Blood Bank was established as a pilot project within existing health services to establish cost-effective recruitment, collection and processing suitable for use in the NHS should cord blood become a routine source of haemopoietic stem cells for transplantation in the UK. An important aim of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of establishing a midwifery-based collection network, thus utilising expertise already in place. Collection was performed on the delivery suite immediately after the placenta was delivered. The clinical experience of the midwife collector/counsellors allowed rapid pre-collection assessment of the condition of the cord and placenta. This prevented collection attempts from diseased or otherwise damaged placentas, leading to conservation of resources by preventing collection of most small volume donations. The bank was established within the National Blood Service, Bristol Centre to achieve Good Manufacturing Practice standards and ensure that processing was subject to the same stringency required for other sources of haemopoietic stem cells. Cord blood is an expensive resource. By utilising existing expertise in district Obstetric and National Blood Services, the Bristol Cord Blood Bank may serve as a model for health economic evaluation of cord blood banking of volunteer donations within the NHS.

  9. A national quitline service and its promotion in the mass media: modelling the health gain, health equity and cost-utility.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, Nhung; Cleghorn, Christine L; Leung, William; Nair, Nisha; Deen, Frederieke S van der; Blakely, Tony; Wilson, Nick

    2017-07-24

    Mass media campaigns and quitlines are both important distinct components of tobacco control programmes around the world. But when used as an integrated package, the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness are not well described. We therefore aimed to estimate the health gain, health equity impacts and cost-utility of the package of a national quitline service and its promotion in the mass media. We adapted an established Markov and multistate life-table macro-simulation model. The population was all New Zealand adults in 2011. Effect sizes and intervention costs were based on past New Zealand quitline data. Health system costs were from a national data set linking individual health events to costs. The 1-year operation of the existing intervention package of mass media promotion and quitline service was found to be net cost saving to the health sector for all age groups, sexes and ethnic groups (saving $NZ84 million; 95%uncertainty interval 60-115 million in the base-case model). It also produced greater per capita health gains for Māori (indigenous) than non-Māori (2.2 vs 0.73 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) per 1000 population, respectively). The net cost saving of the intervention was maintained in all sensitivity and scenario analyses for example at a discount rate of 6% and when the intervention effect size was quartered (given the possibility of residual confounding in our estimates of smoking cessation). Running the intervention for 20 years would generate an estimated 54 000 QALYs and $NZ1.10 billion (US$0.74 billion) in cost savings. The package of a quitline service and its promotion in the mass media appears to be an effective means to generate health gain, address health inequalities and save health system costs. Nevertheless, the role of this intervention needs to be compared with other tobacco control and health sector interventions, some of which may be even more cost saving. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  10. SeReM2--a meta-model for the structured definition of quality requirements for electronic health record services.

    PubMed

    Hoerbst, Alexander; Hackl, Werner; Ammenwerth, Elske

    2010-01-01

    Quality assurance is a major task with regard to Electronic Health Records (EHR). Currently there are only a few approaches explicitly dealing with the quality of EHR services as a whole. The objective of this paper is to introduce a new Meta-Model to structure and describe quality requirements of EHRs. This approach should support the transnational quality certification of EHR services. The Model was developed based on interviews with 24 experts and a systematic literature search and comprises a service and requirements model. The service model represents the structure of a service whereas the requirements model can be used to assign specific predefined aims and requirements to a service. The new model differs from existing approaches as it accounts for modern software architectures and the special attributes of EHRs.

  11. Mobile Health (mHealth) Services and Online Health Educators

    PubMed Central

    Anshari, Muhammad; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology enables health-care organizations to extend health-care services by providing a suitable environment to achieve mobile health (mHealth) goals, making some health-care services accessible anywhere and anytime. Introducing mHealth could change the business processes in delivering services to patients. mHealth could empower patients as it becomes necessary for them to become involved in the health-care processes related to them. This includes the ability for patients to manage their personal information and interact with health-care staff as well as among patients themselves. The study proposes a new position to supervise mHealth services: the online health educator (OHE). The OHE should be occupied by special health-care staffs who are trained in managing online services. A survey was conducted in Brunei and Indonesia to discover the roles of OHE in managing mHealth services, followed by a focus group discussion with participants who interacted with OHE in a real online health scenario. Data analysis showed that OHE could improve patients’ confidence and satisfaction in health-care services. PMID:27257387

  12. Mobile Health (mHealth) Services and Online Health Educators.

    PubMed

    Anshari, Muhammad; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology enables health-care organizations to extend health-care services by providing a suitable environment to achieve mobile health (mHealth) goals, making some health-care services accessible anywhere and anytime. Introducing mHealth could change the business processes in delivering services to patients. mHealth could empower patients as it becomes necessary for them to become involved in the health-care processes related to them. This includes the ability for patients to manage their personal information and interact with health-care staff as well as among patients themselves. The study proposes a new position to supervise mHealth services: the online health educator (OHE). The OHE should be occupied by special health-care staffs who are trained in managing online services. A survey was conducted in Brunei and Indonesia to discover the roles of OHE in managing mHealth services, followed by a focus group discussion with participants who interacted with OHE in a real online health scenario. Data analysis showed that OHE could improve patients' confidence and satisfaction in health-care services.

  13. Electronic Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Mounir M; Jones, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Information and communication technologies have made dramatic changes in our lives. Healthcare communities also made use of these technologies. Using computerized medical knowledge, electronic patients’ information and telecommunications a lot of applications are now established throughout the world. These include better ways of information management, remote education, telemedicine and public services. Yet, a lot of people don't know about these technologies and their applications. Understanding the concepts and ideologies behind these terms, knowing how they will be implemented, what is it like to use them and what benefit will be gained, are basic knowledge steps approaching these technologies. Difficulties using these services, especially in developing countries should not be neglected or underestimated. PMID:21503245

  14. 34 CFR 303.16 - Health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Health services. 303.16 Section 303.16 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.16 Health services. (a) Health services mean services..., the changing of dressings or colostomy collection bags, and other health services; and...

  15. 34 CFR 303.16 - Health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Health services. 303.16 Section 303.16 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.16 Health services. (a) Health services mean services..., the changing of dressings or colostomy collection bags, and other health services; and (2...

  16. 34 CFR 303.16 - Health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Health services. 303.16 Section 303.16 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.16 Health services. (a) Health services mean services..., the changing of dressings or colostomy collection bags, and other health services; and (2...

  17. Model Projects for Early Intervention in the Mental Health of Young People: Reorientation of Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Anne; Kosky, Robert; Martin, Graham; Dundas, Pauline; Davis, Cathy

    The Australian Early Intervention Network for Mental Health in Young People (AusEinet) was established to coordinate a national approach to early intervention for mental health in young people. The approach has three streams: (1) development and maintenance of a national early intervention network for mental health in young people; (2)…

  18. A 17-Month Review of the Care Model, Service Structure, and Design of THRIVE, a Community Mental Health Initiative in Northern Singapore.

    PubMed

    Cheang, K M; Cheok, C C S

    2015-12-01

    Effective delivery of psychiatric care requires the development of a range of services. The existing Singapore health care system provides a comprehensive range of psychiatric services based in restructured hospitals. The Ministry of Health Community Mental Health Masterplan (2012-2017) aims to build novel services for the community. This Masterplan envisions the development of ASCATs (Assessment Shared Care Teams) and COMITs (Community Intervention Teams) to build the capacity and capability for psychiatric care to be delivered outside the hospital in the community. A community mental health plan comprising a fast access clinic, internet-delivered self-help and building a community network of providers was devised for the North of Singapore through the THRIVE (Total Health Rich In Vitality and Energy) programme. This article provides an introduction to the care model, service structure and design of the THRIVE, and reviews its milestones and achievements from its inception in August 2012 until December 2013.

  19. Models of public-private engagement for health services delivery and financing in Southern Africa: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Whyle, Eleanor Beth; Olivier, Jill

    2016-12-01

    In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), the private sector-including international donors, non-governmental organizations, for-profit providers and traditional healers-plays a significant role in health financing and delivery. The use of the private sector in furthering public health goals is increasingly common. By working with the private sector through public -: private engagement (PPE), states can harness private sector resources to further public health goals. PPE initiatives can take a variety of forms and understanding of these models is limited. This paper presents the results of a Campbell systematic literature review conducted to establish the types and the prevalence of PPE projects for health service delivery and financing in Southern Africa. PPE initiatives identified through the review were categorized according to a PPE typology. The review reveals that the full range of PPE models, eight distinct models, are utilized in the Southern African context. The distribution of the available evidence-including significant gaps in the literature-is discussed, and key considerations for researchers, implementers, and current and potential PPE partners are presented. It was found that the literature is disproportionately representative of PPE initiatives located in South Africa, and of those that involve for-profit partners and international donors. A significant gap in the literature identified through the study is the scarcity of information regarding the relationship between international donors and national governments. This information is key to strengthening these partnerships, improving partnership outcomes and capacitating recipient countries. The need for research that disaggregates PPE models and investigates PPE functioning in context is demonstrated.

  20. Combating health care fragmentation through integrated health services delivery networks

    PubMed Central

    Ramagem, Caroline; Urrutia, Soledad; Griffith, Tephany; Cruz, Mario; Fabrega, Ricardo; Holder, Reynaldo; Montenegro, Hernán

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Despite existing initiatives to integrate health services in the Americas Health Care fragmentation remains a significant challenge. Excessive fragmentation leads to difficulties in access to services, delivery of services of poor technical quality, inefficient use of resources, increases in production costs, and low user satisfaction. To address this problem, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) has launched the Integrated Health Services Delivery Networks (IHSDN) Initiative to support the development of more accessible, equitable and efficient health care models in the Region [1]. Theory/conceptual framework IHSDN are defined as a network of organizations that provides, or makes arrangements to provide, equitable, comprehensive, and integrated health services to a defined population and is willing to be held accountable for its clinical and economic outcomes and the health status of the population served. IHSDN require 14 essential attributes for their adequate operation grouped according to four principal domains: model of care, governance and strategy, organization and management, and financial allocation and incentives [1]. Methods An extensive literature review, expert meetings and country consultations (national, subregional and regional) in the Americas resulted in a set of consensus-based essential attributes and policy options for implementing IHSDN. Results and conclusions The research and evidence on health services integration remains limited; however, several studies suggest that IHSDN could improve health systems performance. Principal lessons learned include: i) integration processes are difficult, complex and long term; ii) integration requires extensive systemic changes and a commitment by health workers, health service managers and policymakers; and iii) multiple modalities and degrees of integration can coexist within a single system. The public policy objective is to propose a design that meets each system’s specific

  1. Psychosocial Dynamics of College Students' Use of Mental Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Beth Spenciner; Wilson, William Cody

    2016-01-01

    The authors present and empirically test a multivariate model of the use of mental health counseling services. Use of such services by 1st-year college students is directly a result of need for these services and willingness to use them. Beliefs about mental health services and demographic characteristics are not directly related to use, but…

  2. Psychosocial Dynamics of College Students' Use of Mental Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Beth Spenciner; Wilson, William Cody

    2016-01-01

    The authors present and empirically test a multivariate model of the use of mental health counseling services. Use of such services by 1st-year college students is directly a result of need for these services and willingness to use them. Beliefs about mental health services and demographic characteristics are not directly related to use, but…

  3. Innovation in Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Kaluzny, Arnold D.

    1974-01-01

    The arrangements comprising the health care delivery system are analyzed in terms of social organization, and selected characteristics of the system are discussed that are pertinent to the study of diffusion and adoption of various types of innovations. Research currently under way or completed is then reviewed in terms of its contribution to overall understanding of the phenomenon of innovation, on both the individual practitioner and the organizational levels. The analysis is then used to delineate problem areas needing further study. The article provides a useful context in which to consider substantive findings of future empirical research. PMID:4606674

  4. The Infusion of Dust Model Model Outputs into Public Health Decision Making - an Examination of Differential Adoption of SOAP and Open Geospatial Consortium Service Products into Public Health Decision Support Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, K. K.

    2008-12-01

    Since 2004 the Earth Data Analysis Center, in collaboration with the researchers at the University of Arizona and George Mason University, with funding from NASA, has been developing a services oriented architecture (SOA) that acquires remote sensing, meteorological forecast, and observed ground level particulate data (EPA AirNow) from NASA, NOAA, and DataFed through a variety of standards-based service interfaces. These acquired data are used to initialize and set boundary conditions for the execution of the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) to generate daily 48-hour dust forecasts, which are then published via a combination of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) services (WMS and WCS), basic HTTP request-based services, and SOAP services. The goal of this work has been to develop services that can be integrated into existing public health decision support systems (DSS) to provide enhanced environmental data (i.e. ground surface particulate concentration estimates) for use in epidemiological analysis, public health warning systems, and syndromic surveillance systems. While the project has succeeded in deploying these products into the target systems, there has been differential adoption of the different service interface products, with the simple OGC and HTTP interfaces generating much greater interest by DSS developers and researchers than the more complex SOAP service interfaces. This paper reviews the SOA developed as part of this project and provides insights into how different service models may have a significant impact on the infusion of Earth science products into decision making processes and systems.

  5. A Crisis Mental Health Intervention Service: An Innovative Model for Working Intensively with Young People on the Edge of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkon, Yael

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the setting up and the first year of running of an innovative outreach service for adolescents on the edge of care that aimed at redressing family breakdown and preventing placements in the care system. It was a collaborative endeavour between social services and a child and adolescent mental health provision to facilitate the…

  6. A Crisis Mental Health Intervention Service: An Innovative Model for Working Intensively with Young People on the Edge of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkon, Yael

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the setting up and the first year of running of an innovative outreach service for adolescents on the edge of care that aimed at redressing family breakdown and preventing placements in the care system. It was a collaborative endeavour between social services and a child and adolescent mental health provision to facilitate the…

  7. A national public health service.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, N S

    1981-01-01

    The development of the British public health services is briefly reviewed and it is suggested that two types of epidemiologist (Community Physician) are necessary in each locality: one concerned with medical administration and health care planning-the medical administrator, and the other with the prevention of disease-the clinical epidemiologist. A new nation public health service is proposed to revive disease prevention with four main features: (1) A district Clinical Epidemiologist who is a member of the district department of community medicine with responsibility for prevention but with no district administrative duties. (2) A District Epidemiology Unit comprising other appropriate staff. (3) National specialist epidemiology units within the NHS with service roles to support and coordinate the District Clinical Epidemiologists. (4) A national authority within the NHS with responsibility for prevention and for administering the national specialist units. PMID:7007637

  8. Exploring key factors in the choice of e-health using an asthma care mobile service model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Ping; Yang, Hung-Yu

    2009-11-01

    Asthma care mobile service (ACMS) is a care platform for asthma patients using mobile phones to monitor asthma patients' real-time conditions. The anticipated benefits and development of the healthcare network platform rely on people's adoptive willingness and behavioral intention. The goal of this study is to understand and predict patients' acceptance behavior for ACMS as an application of e-health. The study is based on the technology acceptance model and integrates "subjective norm" and "innovativeness" to understand and predict the patient's attitude and behavioral intention. Employing a convenience sampling method, valid questionnaire responses were obtained from 229 patients. A confirmatory factor analysis examined the reliability and validity of the measurement model, while the structural equation modeling technique was employed to interpret the causal model. The model was used in the study to explain and predict the utilization of ACMS with a high explanatory power as a good-fit model. The results indicated the most critical factor that affects behavioral intentions related to ACMS is user attitude, followed by perceived usefulness, subjective norm, perceived ease of use, and innovativeness. The results provide the government developing high-tech, preventive medicine strategies the necessary data to define an appropriate policy to use in attracting greater participation in the effort.

  9. Health service delivery models for the provision of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Nicholson, Joey; Jaffar, Shabbar

    2014-10-01

    In response to the lack of evidence-based guidance for how to continue scaling up antiretroviral therapy (ART) in ways that make optimal use of limited resources, to assess comparative studies of ART service delivery models implemented in sub-Saharan Africa. A systematic literature search and analysis of studies that compared two or more methods of ART service delivery using either CD4 count or viral load as a primary outcome. Most studies identified in this review were small and non-randomised, with low statistical power. Four of the 30 articles identified by this review conclude that nurse management of ART compares favourably to physician management. Seven provide evidence of the viability of managing ART at lower levels within the health system, and one indicates that vertical and integrated ART programmes can achieve similar outcomes. Five articles show that community/home-based ART management can be as effective as facility-based ART management. Five of seven articles investigating community support link it to better clinical outcomes. The results of four studies suggest that directly observed therapy may not be an important component of ART programmes. Given that the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy represents the most sweeping change in healthcare delivery in sub-Saharan Africa in recent years, it is surprising to not find more evidence from comparative studies to inform implementation strategies. The studies reported on a wide range of service delivery models, making it difficult to draw conclusions about some models. The strongest evidence was related to the feasibility of decentralisation and task-shifting, both of which appear to be effective strategies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Strengthening Integration Of Health Services And Systems.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laurie T; Plough, Alonzo; Carman, Katherine G; Leviton, Laura; Bogdan, Olena; Miller, Carolyn E

    2016-11-01

    New care delivery models that hold providers more accountable for coordinated, high-quality care and the overall health of their patients have appeared in the US health care system, spurred by recent legislation such as the Affordable Care Act. These models support the integration of health care systems, but maximizing health and well-being for all individuals will require a broader conceptualization of health and more explicit connections between diverse partners. Integration of health services and systems constitutes the fourth Action Area in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Culture of Health Action Framework, which is the subject of this article. This Action Area conceives of a strengthened health care system as one in which medical care, public health, and social services interact to produce a more effective, equitable, higher-value whole that maximizes the production of health and well-being for all individuals. Three critical drivers help define and advance this Action Area and identify gaps and needs that must be addressed to move forward. These drivers are access, balance and integration, and consumer experience and quality. This article discusses each driver and summarizes practice gaps that, if addressed, will help move the nation toward a stronger and more integrated health system. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  11. Basic occupational health services in Baoan, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongwen; Chen, Jinxi; Sun, Yuwei; Liu, Yimin; Wu, Likang; Wang, Ya; Yu, Shujiang

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a model of basic occupational health services (BOHS) in Baoan, which could provide occupational health services (OHS) universally for workers and control occupational hazards. Steps involved in the BOHS strategy included construction of the BOHS system, capacity building, health training and education, surveillance of workplaces and the health of workers, risk assessment, control and evaluation processes. This model provided BOHS to employees universally, especially migrant workers in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) who had been underserved. It expanded the coverage of OHS and improved their content. The knowledge and recognition rate of occupational diseases, the coverage rates of working places and workers rose significantly after three years development. Furthermore, BOHS were cost-effective and accepted by both employers and employees. Our experience suggests that a BOHS strategy might be a feasible and effective way of protecting the health of workers confronted with occupational hazards.

  12. Effectiveness of Mechanisms and Models of Coordination between Organizations, Agencies and Bodies Providing or Financing Health Services in Humanitarian Crises: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Akl, Elie A; El-Jardali, Fadi; Bou Karroum, Lama; El-Eid, Jamale; Brax, Hneine; Akik, Chaza; Osman, Mona; Hassan, Ghayda; Itani, Mira; Farha, Aida; Pottie, Kevin; Oliver, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Effective coordination between organizations, agencies and bodies providing or financing health services in humanitarian crises is required to ensure efficiency of services, avoid duplication, and improve equity. The objective of this review was to assess how, during and after humanitarian crises, different mechanisms and models of coordination between organizations, agencies and bodies providing or financing health services compare in terms of access to health services and health outcomes. We registered a protocol for this review in PROSPERO International prospective register of systematic reviews under number PROSPERO2014:CRD42014009267. Eligible studies included randomized and nonrandomized designs, process evaluations and qualitative methods. We electronically searched Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the WHO Global Health Library and websites of relevant organizations. We followed standard systematic review methodology for the selection, data abstraction, and risk of bias assessment. We assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. Of 14,309 identified citations from databases and organizations' websites, we identified four eligible studies. Two studies used mixed-methods, one used quantitative methods, and one used qualitative methods. The available evidence suggests that information coordination between bodies providing health services in humanitarian crises settings may be effective in improving health systems inputs. There is additional evidence suggesting that management/directive coordination such as the cluster model may improve health system inputs in addition to access to health services. None of the included studies assessed coordination through common representation and framework coordination. The evidence was judged to be of very low quality. This systematic review provides evidence of possible effectiveness of information coordination and management/directive coordination

  13. Effectiveness of Mechanisms and Models of Coordination between Organizations, Agencies and Bodies Providing or Financing Health Services in Humanitarian Crises: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Elie A.; El-Jardali, Fadi; Bou Karroum, Lama; El-Eid, Jamale; Brax, Hneine; Akik, Chaza; Osman, Mona; Hassan, Ghayda; Itani, Mira; Farha, Aida; Pottie, Kevin; Oliver, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective coordination between organizations, agencies and bodies providing or financing health services in humanitarian crises is required to ensure efficiency of services, avoid duplication, and improve equity. The objective of this review was to assess how, during and after humanitarian crises, different mechanisms and models of coordination between organizations, agencies and bodies providing or financing health services compare in terms of access to health services and health outcomes. Methods We registered a protocol for this review in PROSPERO International prospective register of systematic reviews under number PROSPERO2014:CRD42014009267. Eligible studies included randomized and nonrandomized designs, process evaluations and qualitative methods. We electronically searched Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the WHO Global Health Library and websites of relevant organizations. We followed standard systematic review methodology for the selection, data abstraction, and risk of bias assessment. We assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. Results Of 14,309 identified citations from databases and organizations' websites, we identified four eligible studies. Two studies used mixed-methods, one used quantitative methods, and one used qualitative methods. The available evidence suggests that information coordination between bodies providing health services in humanitarian crises settings may be effective in improving health systems inputs. There is additional evidence suggesting that management/directive coordination such as the cluster model may improve health system inputs in addition to access to health services. None of the included studies assessed coordination through common representation and framework coordination. The evidence was judged to be of very low quality. Conclusion This systematic review provides evidence of possible effectiveness of information coordination

  14. Budgeting based on need: a model to determine sub-national allocation of resources for health services in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allocating national resources to regions based on need is a key policy issue in most health systems. Many systems utilise proxy measures of need as the basis for allocation formulae. Increasingly these are underpinned by complex statistical methods to separate need from supplier induced utilisation. Assessment of need is then used to allocate existing global budgets to geographic areas. Many low and middle income countries are beginning to use formula methods for funding however these attempts are often hampered by a lack of information on utilisation, relative needs and whether the budgets allocated bear any relationship to cost. An alternative is to develop bottom-up estimates of the cost of providing for local need. This method is viable where public funding is focused on a relatively small number of targeted services. We describe a bottom-up approach to developing a formula for the allocation of resources. The method is illustrated in the context of the state minimum service package mandated to be provided by the Indonesian public health system. Methods A standardised costing methodology was developed that is sensitive to the main expected drivers of local cost variation including demographic structure, epidemiology and location. Essential package costing is often undertaken at a country level. It is less usual to utilise the methods across different parts of a country in a way that takes account of variation in population needs and location. Costing was based on best clinical practice in Indonesia and province specific data on distribution and costs of facilities. The resulting model was used to estimate essential package costs in a representative district in each province of the country. Findings Substantial differences in the costs of providing basic services ranging from USD 15 in urban Yogyakarta to USD 48 in sparsely populated North Maluku. These costs are driven largely by the structure of the population, particularly numbers of births

  15. Budgeting based on need: a model to determine sub-national allocation of resources for health services in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ensor, Tim; Firdaus, Hafidz; Dunlop, David; Manu, Alex; Mukti, Ali Ghufron; Ayu Puspandari, Diah; von Roenne, Franz; Indradjaya, Stephanus; Suseno, Untung; Vaughan, Patrick

    2012-08-29

    Allocating national resources to regions based on need is a key policy issue in most health systems. Many systems utilise proxy measures of need as the basis for allocation formulae. Increasingly these are underpinned by complex statistical methods to separate need from supplier induced utilisation. Assessment of need is then used to allocate existing global budgets to geographic areas. Many low and middle income countries are beginning to use formula methods for funding however these attempts are often hampered by a lack of information on utilisation, relative needs and whether the budgets allocated bear any relationship to cost. An alternative is to develop bottom-up estimates of the cost of providing for local need. This method is viable where public funding is focused on a relatively small number of targeted services. We describe a bottom-up approach to developing a formula for the allocation of resources. The method is illustrated in the context of the state minimum service package mandated to be provided by the Indonesian public health system. A standardised costing methodology was developed that is sensitive to the main expected drivers of local cost variation including demographic structure, epidemiology and location. Essential package costing is often undertaken at a country level. It is less usual to utilise the methods across different parts of a country in a way that takes account of variation in population needs and location. Costing was based on best clinical practice in Indonesia and province specific data on distribution and costs of facilities. The resulting model was used to estimate essential package costs in a representative district in each province of the country. Substantial differences in the costs of providing basic services ranging from USD 15 in urban Yogyakarta to USD 48 in sparsely populated North Maluku. These costs are driven largely by the structure of the population, particularly numbers of births, infants and children and also key

  16. Local Tobacco Control: Application of the Essential Public Health Services Model in a County Health Department’s Efforts to Put It Out Rockland

    PubMed Central

    Diffley, Una; Chanler, Shelley; Ferrara, Maryanne; Alleyne, Oscar; Facelle, Joan

    2013-01-01

    In 2000, Rockland County, a small suburban county north of New York City, dedicated $1 million of its Master Settlement Agreement funds to a comprehensive tobacco control program, Put It Out Rockland. Developed and implemented by the county health department, this program used an essential public health services model and an ongoing financial investment, within the context of strong statewide tobacco control efforts, to lower adult smoking rates to 9.7% and to reduce both smoking among youths and exposure to secondhand smoke over the ensuing decade. By combining state funds and local dollars for a total of $6.75 cost per capita, this comprehensive effort yielded 11 000 fewer smokers and translated to a potential savings of more than $24 million for the county. PMID:24028263

  17. Service network analysis for agricultural mental health

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Brian; Law, Susan; Pollard, Georgia; Fragar, Lyn

    2009-01-01

    Background Farmers represent a subgroup of rural and remote communities at higher risk of suicide attributed to insecure economic futures, self-reliant cultures and poor access to health services. Early intervention models are required that tap into existing farming networks. This study describes service networks in rural shires that relate to the mental health needs of farming families. This serves as a baseline to inform service network improvements. Methods A network survey of mental health related links between agricultural support, health and other human services in four drought declared shires in comparable districts in rural New South Wales, Australia. Mental health links covered information exchange, referral recommendations and program development. Results 87 agencies from 111 (78%) completed a survey. 79% indicated that two thirds of their clients needed assistance for mental health related problems. The highest mean number of interagency links concerned information exchange and the frequency of these links between sectors was monthly to three monthly. The effectiveness of agricultural support and health sector links were rated as less effective by the agricultural support sector than by the health sector (p < .05). The most highly linked across all areas of activity were Rural Financial Counsellors, the Department of Primary Industry Drought Support Workers and Community Health Centres. Hence for a mental health service network targeting farming families these are three key agencies across the spectrum of case work to program development. The study limitations in describing service networks relate to the accuracy of network bounding, self report bias and missing data from non participants. Conclusion Aligning with agricultural agencies is important to build effective mental health service pathways to address the needs of farming populations. Work is required to ensure that these agricultural support agencies have operational and effective links to

  18. Service network analysis for agricultural mental health.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Brian; Law, Susan; Pollard, Georgia; Fragar, Lyn

    2009-05-29

    Farmers represent a subgroup of rural and remote communities at higher risk of suicide attributed to insecure economic futures, self-reliant cultures and poor access to health services. Early intervention models are required that tap into existing farming networks. This study describes service networks in rural shires that relate to the mental health needs of farming families. This serves as a baseline to inform service network improvements. A network survey of mental health related links between agricultural support, health and other human services in four drought declared shires in comparable districts in rural New South Wales, Australia. Mental health links covered information exchange, referral recommendations and program development. 87 agencies from 111 (78%) completed a survey. 79% indicated that two thirds of their clients needed assistance for mental health related problems. The highest mean number of interagency links concerned information exchange and the frequency of these links between sectors was monthly to three monthly. The effectiveness of agricultural support and health sector links were rated as less effective by the agricultural support sector than by the health sector (p < .05). The most highly linked across all areas of activity were Rural Financial Counsellors, the Department of Primary Industry Drought Support Workers and Community Health Centres. Hence for a mental health service network targeting farming families these are three key agencies across the spectrum of case work to program development. The study limitations in describing service networks relate to the accuracy of network bounding, self report bias and missing data from non participants. Aligning with agricultural agencies is important to build effective mental health service pathways to address the needs of farming populations. Work is required to ensure that these agricultural support agencies have operational and effective links to primary mental health care services. Network

  19. Green Infrastructure, Ecosystem Services, and Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Coutts, Christopher; Hahn, Micah

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary ecological models of health prominently feature the natural environment as fundamental to the ecosystem services that support human life, health, and well-being. The natural environment encompasses and permeates all other spheres of influence on health. Reviews of the natural environment and health literature have tended, at times intentionally, to focus on a limited subset of ecosystem services as well as health benefits stemming from the presence, and access and exposure to, green infrastructure. The sweeping influence of green infrastructure on the myriad ecosystem services essential to health has therefore often been underrepresented. This survey of the literature aims to provide a more comprehensive picture—in the form of a primer—of the many simultaneously acting health co-benefits of green infrastructure. It is hoped that a more accurately exhaustive list of benefits will not only instigate further research into the health co-benefits of green infrastructure but also promote consilience in the many fields, including public health, that must be involved in the landscape conservation necessary to protect and improve health and well-being. PMID:26295249

  20. Green Infrastructure, Ecosystem Services, and Human Health.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Christopher; Hahn, Micah

    2015-08-18

    Contemporary ecological models of health prominently feature the natural environment as fundamental to the ecosystem services that support human life, health, and well-being. The natural environment encompasses and permeates all other spheres of influence on health. Reviews of the natural environment and health literature have tended, at times intentionally, to focus on a limited subset of ecosystem services as well as health benefits stemming from the presence, and access and exposure to, green infrastructure. The sweeping influence of green infrastructure on the myriad ecosystem services essential to health has therefore often been underrepresented. This survey of the literature aims to provide a more comprehensive picture-in the form of a primer-of the many simultaneously acting health co-benefits of green infrastructure. It is hoped that a more accurately exhaustive list of benefits will not only instigate further research into the health co-benefits of green infrastructure but also promote consilience in the many fields, including public health, that must be involved in the landscape conservation necessary to protect and improve health and well-being.

  1. Gender and health services use for a mental health problem

    PubMed Central

    Albizu-Garcia, Carmen E.; Alegría, Margarita; Freeman, Daniel; Vera, Mildred

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses whether the predictors of seeking help for a mental health problem differ by gender. An adaptation of Andersen’s Socio-Behavioral Model is used to identify factors associated with seeking care for a mental health problem. Data are derived from two waves of a community survey undertaken in 1992–1993 and in 1993–1994 among a probability sample of adults (18–69 years), residing in poor areas of Puerto Rico. Paired data was used from those individuals who responded to both waves of the survey for a total of 3221 community respondents. Responses from wave 1 were used to predict mental health service use in wave 2. The dependent variable is any use of outpatient mental health services in the year preceding the second interview. Logistic regression was used to model the effects of the independent variables on use. Males and females were found to use mental health services in nearly equal proportions. Gender did not have a main effect on use when other covariates were controlled. Significant interactions with gender were found for several predictors of use. The largest intervention effects were encountered in our need for care indicators. Having a definite need for mental health care and poor self-rated mental health had a larger effect on predicting use of services for men than they do for women. It is concluded that strategies designed to improve access to mental health services for minority disadvantaged populations ought to take into account gender differences in the predictors of use. Studies addressing factors influencing health services utilization for a mental health problem should consider stratifying their sample by gender. Future research should establish whether or not these findings are sustained with other population groups. PMID:11522134

  2. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45... Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health services... preventive health and health services block grant. (b) For the purposes of determining eligible...

  3. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45... Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health services... preventive health and health services block grant. (b) For the purposes of determining eligible...

  4. HEALTH SERVICES FOR UNMARRIED MOTHERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BERNSTEIN, ROSE; HERZOG, ELIZABETH

    FROM REPORTS AND DATA THAT WERE AVAILABLE TO THE UNITED STATES CHILDREN'S BUREAU THROUGH 1962, A REVIEW WAS MADE OF RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATIONS THAT RELATED TO AVAILABILITY AND USE OF HEALTH SERVICES BY UNMARRIED MOTHERS. INCLUDED ARE COMPLICATIONS OF PREGNANCY IN BIRTHS OUT OF WEDLOCK--(1) STUDIES OF PRENATAL MEDICAL CARE FOR UNMARRIED MOTHERS,…

  5. Single, Integrated, Service-Centric Model of Military Health System Governance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-09

    76 BIBLIOGRAPHY ...www.defense.gov/News/ Article / Article /1066045/dunford-speed-of-military- decision-making-must-exceed-speed-of-war/source/GovDelivery/. 7 Figure 2...Government Printing Office, September 2011), 37. Lawmakers stated: “The current organizational structure —essentially three separate health

  6. [Psychosomatic Consultation in the Workplace--Description and Modelling of a New Health-Related Service].

    PubMed

    Preiser, C; Wittich, A; Rieger, M A

    2015-11-01

    In Germany, mental disorders have increasing importance for disability and early retirement. However, patients may have to wait several months before becoming an appointment with a psycho(somatic) therapist. Accordingly, several companies initiated a "psychosomatic consultation in the workplace" (PCIW). This concept has been explored. Qualitative data analysis (expert interviews with stakeholders, focus group interviews with occupational health physicians; Mayring's content analysis) focussed on the question of how the concept of a PCIW can be tailored to meet the employees' needs. Concepts and implementation of PCIW differed with regard to the aspects dissemination of information about the consultation, gatekeeping, place of the consultation, and number of appointments with the psycho(somatic) therapist. The concepts of PCIW may be described as more or less "restrictive" or "liberal". The interviewees emphasised the need for PCIW and discussed the involvement of the occupational health physician within this approach. PCIW proved of value. Yet, the interviewees were ambivalent regarding the fact that companies offer and pay for treatment which should be provided within standard health care. Shaping company-based elements of standard health care should respect setting-specific needs and involve in-company stakeholders into the process. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Does the organizational model of the maternity health clinic have an influence on women's and their partners' experiences? A service evaluation survey in Southwest Finland.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Miia; Kaljonen, Anne; Ahonen, Pia; Rautava, Päivi

    2012-09-14

    In high-income countries, great disparities exist in the organizational characteristics of maternity health services. In Finland, primary maternity care is provided at communal maternity health clinics (MHC). At these MHCs there are public health nurses and general practitioners providing care. The structure of services in MHCs varies largely. MHCs are maintained independently or merged with other primary health care sectors. A widely used organizational model of services is a combined maternity and child health clinic (MHC & CHC) where the same public health nurse takes care of the family from pregnancy until the child is at school age. The aim of this study was to determine how organizational model, MHC independent or combined MHC & CHC, influence on women's and their partners' service experiences. A comparative, cross-sectional service evaluation survey was used. Women (N = 995) and their partners (N = 789) were recruited from the MHCs in the area of Turku University Hospital. Four months postpartum, the participants were asked to evaluate the content and amount of the MHC services via a postal questionnaire. Comparisons were made between the clients of the separate MHCs and the MHCs combined to the child health clinics. Women who had used the combined MHC & CHCs generally evaluated services more positively than women who had used the separate MHCs. MHC's model was related to several aspects of the service which were evaluated "good" (the content of the service) or "much" (the amount of the service). Significant differences accumulated favoring the combined MHC & CHCs' model. Twelve aspects of the service were ranked more often as "good" or "much" by the parents who had used the combined MHC & CHC, only group activities regarding delivery were evaluated better by women who had used the separate MHCs. Based on the women's and partners' experiences an organizational model of the combined MHC & CHC where the same nurse will take care of family during

  8. Does the organizational model of the maternity health clinic have an influence on women’s and their partners’ experiences? A service evaluation survey in Southwest Finland

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In high-income countries, great disparities exist in the organizational characteristics of maternity health services. In Finland, primary maternity care is provided at communal maternity health clinics (MHC). At these MHCs there are public health nurses and general practitioners providing care. The structure of services in MHCs varies largely. MHCs are maintained independently or merged with other primary health care sectors. A widely used organizational model of services is a combined maternity and child health clinic (MHC & CHC) where the same public health nurse takes care of the family from pregnancy until the child is at school age. The aim of this study was to determine how organizational model, MHC independent or combined MHC & CHC, influence on women’s and their partners’ service experiences. Methods A comparative, cross-sectional service evaluation survey was used. Women (N = 995) and their partners (N = 789) were recruited from the MHCs in the area of Turku University Hospital. Four months postpartum, the participants were asked to evaluate the content and amount of the MHC services via a postal questionnaire. Comparisons were made between the clients of the separate MHCs and the MHCs combined to the child health clinics. Results Women who had used the combined MHC & CHCs generally evaluated services more positively than women who had used the separate MHCs. MHC’s model was related to several aspects of the service which were evaluated “good” (the content of the service) or “much” (the amount of the service). Significant differences accumulated favoring the combined MHC & CHCs’ model. Twelve aspects of the service were ranked more often as “good” or “much” by the parents who had used the combined MHC & CHC, only group activities regarding delivery were evaluated better by women who had used the separate MHCs. Conclusions Based on the women’s and partners’ experiences an organizational model of the combined

  9. Costs of a Public Health Model to Increase Receipt of Hepatitis-Related Services for Persons with Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Eric P.; Rosenberg, Stanley D.; Dixon, Lisa B.; Goldberg, Richard W.; Wolford, George; Himelhoch, Seth; Tapscott, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective was to contextualize the costs associated with implementation of a specialized HIV/hepatitis preventive services model designed to reach persons with serious mental illness and co-occurring disorders, an underserved population. Methods Between 2006 and 2008, a random sample of 236 non-elderly, predominantly African American, male participants with serious mental illness and a co-occurring substance use disorder were recruited at four community mental health outpatient programs in a large metropolitan area. All participants had been diagnosed with a psychotic or major depressive disorder. Participants were randomized within site to receive either the experimental intervention Screen, Test, Immunize, Reduce risk, and Refer (STIRR) or enhanced treatment as usual, which consisted of education and referral to medical testing. We estimated STIRR’s standardized costs, the costs of STIRR per person who received hepatitis testing, HIV testing, and/or hepatitis A/B vaccination during the 6-months post-randomization. Results The average cost of delivering the STIRR intervention was $423 (SD±$90) per participant (in 2008 dollars) and the average cost of delivering the eTAU intervention was $24 (SD±$22) per participant (test of difference t=52.9, P<.001). The standardized costs per person who received hepatitis C testing, hepatitis B testing, HIV testing, and hepatitis A/B vaccination were $706 (SD±$165), $776 (SD±$181), $3,630 (SD±$846), and $561 (SD±131). Conclusions The STIRR model’s standardized costs suggest that hepatitis and HIV prevention services delivered in outpatient mental health settings to persons with serious mental illness can be at least as cost-effective as similar interventions designed for other at-risk populations. PMID:23475451

  10. 34 CFR 303.13 - Health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Health services. 303.13 Section 303.13 Education... DISABILITIES General Purpose, Eligibility, and Other General Provisions § 303.13 Health services. (a) As used in this part, health services means services necessary to enable a child to benefit from the...

  11. 34 CFR 303.13 - Health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Health services. 303.13 Section 303.13 Education... DISABILITIES General Purpose, Eligibility, and Other General Provisions § 303.13 Health services. (a) As used in this part, health services means services necessary to enable a child to benefit from the...

  12. Juvenile justice mental health services.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christopher R; Penn, Joseph V

    2002-10-01

    As the second century of partnership begins, child psychiatry and juvenile justice face continuing challenges in meeting the mental health needs of delinquents. The modern juvenile justice system is marked by a significantly higher volume of cases, with increasingly complicated multiproblem youths and families with comorbid medical, psychiatric, substance abuse disorders, multiple family and psychosocial adversities, and shrinking community resources and alternatives to confinement. The family court is faced with shrinking financial resources to support court-ordered placement and treatment programs in efforts to treat and rehabilitate youths. The recognition of high rates of mental disorders for incarcerated youth has prompted several recommendations for improvement and calls for reform [56,57]. In their 2000 annual report, the Coalition for Juvenile Justice advocated increased access to mental health services that provide a continuum of care tailored to the specific problems of incarcerated youth [58]. The specific recommendations of the report for mental health providers include the need for wraparound services, improved planning and coordination between agencies, and further research. The Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has set three priorities in dealing with the mental health needs of delinquents: further research on the prevalence of mental illness among juvenile offenders, development of mental health screening assessment protocols, and improved mental health services [59]. Other programs have called for earlier detection and diversion of troubled youth from juvenile justice to mental health systems [31,56]. Most recently, many juvenile and family courts have developed innovative programs to address specific problems such as truancy or substance use and diversionary or alternative sentencing programs to deal with first-time or nonviolent delinquents. All youths who come in contact with the juvenile justice system

  13. A hybrid health service accreditation program model incorporating mandated standards and continuous improvement: interview study of multiple stakeholders in Australian health care.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, David; Hinchcliff, Reece; Hogden, Anne; Mumford, Virginia; Debono, Deborah; Pawsey, Marjorie; Westbrook, Johanna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    The study aim was to investigate the understandings and concerns of stakeholders regarding the evolution of health service accreditation programs in Australia. Stakeholder representatives from programs in the primary, acute and aged care sectors participated in semi-structured interviews. Across 2011-12 there were 47 group and individual interviews involving 258 participants. Interviews lasted, on average, 1 h, and were digitally recorded and transcribed. Transcriptions were analysed using textual referencing software. Four significant issues were considered to have directed the evolution of accreditation programs: altering underlying program philosophies; shifting of program content focus and details; different surveying expectations and experiences and the influence of external contextual factors upon accreditation programs. Three accreditation program models were noted by participants: regulatory compliance; continuous quality improvement and a hybrid model, incorporating elements of these two. Respondents noted the compatibility or incommensurability of the first two models. Participation in a program was reportedly experienced as ranging on a survey continuum from "malicious compliance" to "performance audits" to "quality improvement journeys". Wider contextual factors, in particular, political and community expectations, and associated media reporting, were considered significant influences on the operation and evolution of programs. A hybrid accreditation model was noted to have evolved. The hybrid model promotes minimum standards and continuous quality improvement, through examining the structure and processes of organisations and the outcomes of care. The hybrid model appears to be directing organisational and professional attention to enhance their safety cultures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Diverse and Dynamic Interactions: A Model of Suicidal Men's Help Seeking as It Relates to Health Services.

    PubMed

    River, Jo

    2016-07-29

    There is a striking gender difference in suicide rates worldwide, with men accounting for approximately 80% of all suicide deaths. In contradictory public discussions, suicidal men are presented sometimes as victims of "poor" health services and sometimes as irremediable, "poor" help seekers. A more substantive theory of suicidal men's help seeking, which moves beyond homogenizing accounts to examine the complex interplay between help seeking and health services, is now required. Eighteen life history interviews were undertaken with men who had engaged in nonfatal suicide. Interviews were analyzed within a theoretical framework of gender relations. The findings challenge static and uniform notions of suicidal men's help seeking. While a few men actively avoided health services, others actively sought help, and in many cases help-seeking practices were triggered by unsolicited encounters with health services. Responsibility for help-seeking behavior did not rest solely with suicidal men. Men's help-seeking practices could either be facilitated or blocked by the character of the professional support that was available. Men in this study overwhelmingly rejected services that framed emotional distress and suicidal behavior as mental illness.

  15. An Econometric Model of Health Services Delivery: National Capital Area (NCA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Disorders $3,210,814 9.3% Diseases and Disorders of the Nervous  System $2,708,940 7.8% Diseases and Disorders of the  Digestive   System $2,022,856 5.8...Nervous  System $6,429,140 6.7% Mental Diseases and Disorders $5,224,147 5.4% Diseases and Disorders of the  Digestive   System $5,177,988 5.4% Diseases and...The Quadruple Aim: Working Together, Achieving Success TRICARE Regional Office - North 2011 Military Health System Conference CAPT Steven Keener Mr

  16. [Patient-Proposed Health Services].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The Patient-Proposed Health Services(PPHS)was launched in April 2016. PPHS was proposed by the Council for Regulatory Reform, which was established in January 2013 under the Second Abe Administration. After discussion within the council, PPHS was published in the Japan Revitalization Strategy(2014 revised edition), which was endorsed by the Cabinet on June 24, 2014. PPHS was proposed therein as a new mechanism within the mixed billing system to apply for a combination of treatment not covered by the public health insurance with treatment covered by the insurance. Subsequently, PPHS was submitted for diet deliberations in April and May 2015 and inserted into article 63 of the health insurance act in accordance with "a law for making partial amendments to the National Health Insurance Act, etc., in order to create a sustainable medical insurance system", which was promulgated on May 29, 2015. In this paper I will review the background of the birth of PPHS and discuss its overview.

  17. Service quality and clinical outcomes: an example from mental health rehabilitation services in England.

    PubMed

    Killaspy, Helen; Marston, Louise; Omar, Rumana Z; Green, Nicholas; Harrison, Isobel; Lean, Melanie; Holloway, Frank; Craig, Tom; Leavey, Gerard; King, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Current health policy assumes better quality services lead to better outcomes. To investigate the relationship between quality of mental health rehabilitation services in England, local deprivation, service user characteristics and clinical outcomes. Standardised tools were used to assess the quality of mental health rehabilitation units and service users' autonomy, quality of life, experiences of care and ratings of the therapeutic milieu. Multiple level modelling investigated relationships between service quality, service user characteristics and outcomes. A total of 52/60 (87%) National Health Service trusts participated, comprising 133 units and 739 service users. All aspects of service quality were positively associated with service users' autonomy, experiences of care and therapeutic milieu, but there was no association with quality of life. Quality of care is linked to better clinical outcomes in people with complex and longer-term mental health problems. Thus, investing in quality is likely to show real clinical gains.

  18. Exploring Perceptions about and Behaviors Related to Mental Illness and Mental Health Service Utilization among College Students Using the Health Belief Model (HBM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nobiling, Brandye D.; Maykrantz, Sherry Azadi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mental health service is underutilized in the United States. Adolescent and young adults, including college students, are especially unlikely to seek professional help for mental illness. This issue presents a concern, because signs and symptoms commonly appear during this part of growth and development. Purpose: The Health Belief…

  19. From socialist principles to motorcycle maintenance: the origin and development of the salaried physician model in the Israeli Public Health Services, 1918 to 1998.

    PubMed Central

    Shvarts, S; de Leeuw, D L; Granit, S; Benbassat, J

    1999-01-01

    For more than 70 years, physicians in the Israeli health care system have been employed on a fixed salary rather than on a fee-for-service basis. The present report is a brief review of the origin and development of this unique salaried physician model and its effect on the terms of physicians' employment. Archival documents were reviewed. The salaried physician model was introduced to ensure egalitarian health care for patients rather than equal payment for physicians. It was accepted by physicians because it guaranteed their employment and income. However, over the years, the salaried physician model has evolved into a complex wage scale, with multiple fringe benefits that bypass formal agreements in order to reward individual physicians. In addition, the salaried physician model has encouraged illegal private practice, which is viewed today as one of the major problems of the Israeli Public Health Services. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:9949759

  20. Designing Quality Service: The Service Excellence Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellicott, Michael A.; Conard, Rodney J.

    1997-01-01

    Recent experiences of manufacturing and commercial service industries provide insights to college facilities managers for combining downsizing with quality improvement. The Service Excellence Model emphasizes creation of shared responsibility, focus on core service processes, empowerment of cross-functional process-improvement teams, performance…

  1. Designing Quality Service: The Service Excellence Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellicott, Michael A.; Conard, Rodney J.

    1997-01-01

    Recent experiences of manufacturing and commercial service industries provide insights to college facilities managers for combining downsizing with quality improvement. The Service Excellence Model emphasizes creation of shared responsibility, focus on core service processes, empowerment of cross-functional process-improvement teams, performance…

  2. Integrating complementary and alternative medicine into mainstream healthcare services: the perspectives of health service managers.

    PubMed

    Singer, Judy; Adams, Jon

    2014-05-22

    within a health promotion model and focus on the relevance of diet and lifestyle factors as central to a CAM approach. From the perspectives of the health service managers, these findings contribute to our understanding around the rationale to include CAM within mainstream health services that deal with psychological trauma and chronic disease. The broader implications of this study can help assist in the development of health service policy on CAM integration in mainstream healthcare services.

  3. Integrating complementary and alternative medicine into mainstream healthcare services: the perspectives of health service managers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    of treating the whole person within a health promotion model and focus on the relevance of diet and lifestyle factors as central to a CAM approach. Conclusions From the perspectives of the health service managers, these findings contribute to our understanding around the rationale to include CAM within mainstream health services that deal with psychological trauma and chronic disease. The broader implications of this study can help assist in the development of health service policy on CAM integration in mainstream healthcare services. PMID:24885066

  4. Health services research resources for surgeons.

    PubMed

    Kuy, SreyRam; Greenberg, Caprice C; Gusani, Niraj J; Dimick, Justin B; Kao, Lillian S; Brasel, Karen J

    2011-11-01

    Health services research examines how people get access to health care, how much care costs, and what happens to patients as a result of this care. Some of the challenges to conducting methodologically rigorous health services research as a surgeon are support, training, funding, acquisition of data, and resources. A review of support, training, funding, data, and organizational resources useful for surgeons interested in health services research, with a focus on existing online resources relevant to surgical health services researchers. Opportunities for research collaboration and mentoring are available through the Association for Academic Surgery, Society of University Surgeons, American College of Surgeons and surgical specialty societies. Advanced training is essential to performing high-impact health services research and is available through private foundations such as the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars program, the American College of Surgeons Fellowship, government funded fellowships, and institution hosted fellowships. Funding sources for health services research exist through academic surgical societies, private sector, and government sources. A variety of data sources for health services research are available, with different limitations, strengths, and ease of accessibility. Organizational resources in health services research include AcademyHealth, the Health Services Research Projects in Progress database, and the National Library of Medicine's Health Services Research Resources. The resources highlighted describe some of the opportunities available to surgeons pursuing health services research. It is valuable for surgeons to tap into the available resources and collaborate with existing expertise to facilitate methodologically rigorous surgical health services research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Supporting good practice in the provision of services to people with comorbid mental health and alcohol and other drug problems in Australia: describing key elements of good service models.

    PubMed

    Merkes, Monika; Lewis, Virginia; Canaway, Rachel

    2010-12-03

    The co-occurrence of mental illness and substance use problems (referred to as "comorbidity" in this paper) is common, and is often reported by service providers as the expectation rather than the exception. Despite this, many different treatment service models are being used in the alcohol and other drugs (AOD) and mental health (MH) sectors to treat this complex client group. While there is abundant literature in the area of comorbidity treatment, no agreed overarching framework to describe the range of service delivery models is apparent internationally or at the national level. The aims of the current research were to identify and describe elements of good practice in current service models of treatment of comorbidity in Australia. The focus of the research was on models of service delivery. The research did not aim to measure the client outcomes achieved by individual treatment services, but sought to identify elements of good practice in services. Australian treatment services were identified to take part in the study through a process of expert consultation. The intent was to look for similarities in the delivery models being implemented across a diverse set of services that were perceived to be providing good quality treatment for people with comorbidity problems. A survey was designed based on a concept map of service delivery devised from a literature review. Seventeen Australian treatment services participated in the survey, which explored the context in which services operate, inputs such as organisational philosophy and service structure, policies and procedures that guide the way in which treatment is delivered by the service, practices that reflect the way treatment is provided to clients, and client impacts. The treatment of people with comorbidity of mental health and substance use disorders presents complex problems that require strong but flexible service models. While the treatment services included in this study reflected the diversity of

  6. Infusion of Atmospheric Dust Model Outputs into a Public Health Decision Support System: The Integration of Open Geospatial Consortium Service Products Into the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudspeth, W. B.; Cavner, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    New Mexico's Environmental Public Health Tracking System (EPHTS), funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN), aims to improve health awareness and services by linking health effects data with levels and frequency of environmental exposure. As a public health web-based decision-support system, EPHTS systems include: state-of-the-art statistical analysis tools; geospatial visualization tools; data discovery, extraction, and delivery tools; and environmental/public health linkage information. As part of its mandate, EPHTS issues public health advisories and forecasts of environmental conditions that have consequences for human health. Through a NASA-funded partnership between the University of New Mexico and the University of Arizona, efforts have been underway to infuse NASA Earth Science results, as well as meteorological forecast data, into two existing models (the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model) in order to improve forecasts of atmospheric dust, ozone, and aerosols. The goal of this work has been to develop services that can be integrated into existing public health decision support systems (DSS) to provide enhanced environmental data (i.e. ground surface particulate concentration estimates) for use in epidemiological analysis, public health warning systems, and syndromic surveillance systems. The results and products derived from the outputs of these models are made available to the New Mexico EPHTS. In particular, these products are integrated into existing clients within the larger framework of the EPHTS Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). The SOA can be described as an multi-tiered architecture of interacting services, each providing a specific function. They include SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) and OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) services to deliver maps, data, and analytical capabilities. This paper reviews the SOA developed as

  7. The Health Service and Gay Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Douglas F.

    1976-01-01

    Gay students have particular problems in using university health services, which can be overcome only through education, sympathy, personal awareness, and professionalism on the part of university health service personnel. (MB)

  8. Prevention and dental health services.

    PubMed

    Widström, Eeva

    2004-01-01

    There has been, and still is a firm belief that regular use of dental services is beneficial for all. Thus governments in most European countries have shown some interest in training oral health care professionals, distributing the dental workforce and cost sharing. Constantly evolving treatment options and the introduction of new methods make dental clinicians feel uncertain as to which treatments are most useful, who would benefit from them, and which treatments will achieve cost-effective health gain. Although there is a considerable quantity of scientific literature showing that most available preventive measures are effective, and the number of sensible best-practice guidelines in prevention is growing, there are few studies on cost-efficiency of different methods and, secondly, the prevention and treatment guidelines are poorly known among general practitioners. In the eyes of the public, it is obvious that preventive methods practised by patients at home have been eclipsed by clinical procedures performed in dental clinics. Reliance on an increasingly individualistic approach to health care leads to the medicalisation of issues that are not originally health or medical problems. It is important to move general oral disease prevention back to the people who must integrate this in their daily routines. Prevention primarily based on healthy lifestyles, highlighted in the new public health strategy of the European Union (EU), is the key to future health policy.

  9. [Vulnerability and National Health Service].

    PubMed

    Lima, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Safegarding health has been an objective of every learned civilization, ancient and modern. In modern times, at least in the western world, the increase in longevity associated with social isolation has created further vu1nerability for the older individua1. Today, healthcare is a social burden of extremely high cost. Among us this service is provided by the National Health Service in accordance to the Constituição da República Portuguesa (Constitution of the Portuguese Republic). Despite the constitutional guarantees of equa1ity in health there are obvious discrepancies in access to health care and the conditions that promote health such as education and wealth. In a poor country, even with limited resources, inequa1ity can be minimized via policies and practical measures founded in equa1ity and social responsibility, not only the principles of economic efficiency. Only in this way can we guarantee equa1 access to health and the distribution of available resources in accordance to health care necessities. Yet, the investment in high technology among us seems out of fase with the investment in the area concerning functional recovery from high morta1ity illness, such as stroke. In Portugal the problem is extremely bad. Life expectancy has been extended but qua1ity of life is still very low. Victims of the social order, the elderly live alone without family who can care for them; on the other hand, the lack of investment in recovery and social integration of individua1s with disabling scars, Turns the ends of their life's into a nightmare for themselves and their kin. It follows stating the necessity to analyse and define the criteria to be used when allocating resources in order to guarantee equality in health and relief from suffering and also to stop discrimination of vu1nerable populations in access to healthcare. Whatever the criteria, it must be pre-defined and its principles widely discussed, reiterating, only that longevity cannot be an acceptable criteria

  10. Help-Seeking Intentions and Behaviors among Mainland Chinese College Students: Integrating the Theory of Planned Behavior and Behavioral Model of Health Services Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Wenjing; Denson, Linley A.; Dorstyn, Diana S.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated help-seeking intentions and use of mental health services within a sample of 1128 Mainland Chinese college students (630 males and 498 females; mean age = 20.01 years, SD = 1.48). Results of structural equation modeling and logistic regression analysis suggested that social-cognitive variables had significant effects both…

  11. World Trade Organization activity for health services.

    PubMed

    Gros, Clémence

    2012-01-01

    Since the establishment of a multilateral trading system and the increasing mobility of professionals and consumers of health services, it seems strongly necessary that the World Trade Organization (WTO) undertakes negotiations within the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), and that WTO's members attempt to reach commitments for health-related trade in services. How important is the GATS for health policy and how does the GATS refer to health services? What are the current negotiations and member's commitments?

  12. Creating an innovative youth mental health service in the United Kingdom: The Norfolk Youth Service.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jon; Clarke, Tim; Lower, Rebecca; Ugochukwu, Uju; Maxwell, Sarah; Hodgekins, Jo; Wheeler, Karen; Goff, Andy; Mack, Robert; Horne, Rebecca; Fowler, David

    2017-08-04

    Young people attempting to access mental health services in the United Kingdom often find traditional models of care outdated, rigid, inaccessible and unappealing. Policy recommendations, research and service user opinion suggest that reform is needed to reflect the changing needs of young people. There is significant motivation in the United Kingdom to transform mental health services for young people, and this paper aims to describe the rationale, development and implementation of a novel youth mental health service in the United Kingdom, the Norfolk Youth Service. The Norfolk Youth Service model is described as a service model case study. The service rationale, national and local drivers, principles, aims, model, research priorities and future directions are reported. The Norfolk Youth Service is an innovative example of mental health transformation in the United Kingdom, comprising a pragmatic, assertive and "youth-friendly" service for young people aged 14 to 25 that transcends traditional service boundaries. The service was developed in collaboration with young people and partnership agencies and is based on an engaging and inclusive ethos. The service is a social-recovery oriented, evidence-based and aims to satisfy recent policy guidance. The redesign and transformation of youth mental health services in the United Kingdom is long overdue. The Norfolk Youth Service represents an example of reform that aims to meet the developmental and transitional needs of young people at the same time as remaining youth-oriented. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. 42 CFR 136.24 - Authorization for contract health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Authorization for contract health services. 136.24 Section 136.24 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Contract Health Services §...

  14. California Community Colleges Health Services Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Chuck

    In 1990, a telephone survey was conducted of health services offered by California's community colleges. Statewide, 42 of the 71 districts in California levied a health service fee, 18 districts offered services without charge, and 11 offered no service. Districts operating programs collected an average of $15.81 in student fees per credit average…

  15. Student Health Services at Orchard Ridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Don D.

    This paper provides a synoptic review of student health services at the community college level while giving a more detailed description of the nature of health services at Orchard Ridge, a campus of Oakland Community College. The present College Health Service program provides for a part-time (24 hrs./wk.) nurse at Orchard Ridge. A variety of…

  16. School Staff's Satisfaction with School Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winland, Julie; Shannon, Amy

    2004-01-01

    The School Nurse Impact Committee of the Columbus Public Schools in Columbus, Ohio, initiated a survey to determine staff satisfaction with the delivery of health services. School nurses need the cooperation and support of the staff to successfully deliver school health services, therefore, the staff's satisfaction with school health services is…

  17. Student Health Services at Orchard Ridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Don D.

    This paper provides a synoptic review of student health services at the community college level while giving a more detailed description of the nature of health services at Orchard Ridge, a campus of Oakland Community College. The present College Health Service program provides for a part-time (24 hrs./wk.) nurse at Orchard Ridge. A variety of…

  18. Providing end-of-life care in disability community living services: An organizational capacity-building model using a public health approach.

    PubMed

    Grindrod, Andrea; Rumbold, Bruce

    2017-05-24

    There is broad consensus within the disability field that the end-of-life care offered to people with intellectual disabilities should be of a quality consistent with that advocated by contemporary palliative care. In practice, however, various barriers are encountered when applying palliative care strategies to the end-of-life care of people with intellectual disabilities, particularly those in disability community living services. A mixed-methods approach was used. Quantitative data were gathered through a survey of disability support staff working in government-managed community living services in the Australian state of Victoria. These quantitative data informed the collection of qualitative data through focus groups and research interviews. A public health palliative care framework provided the basis for developing an organizational change model from the consolidated data. There is a strong relationship between organizational structure and culture, and both influence end-of-life practice in community living services. Barriers to good practice arise from the differing attitudes of paid carers involved, and from uncoordinated approaches reflecting misaligned service systems in the disability and palliative care fields. Organizational reorientation is crucial to achieving sustainable change that will support healthy dying. End-of-life care requires the collaboration of disability and palliative care services, but for care to achieve palliative care goals, the collaboration must be led by disability services. We outline here an organizational model we have developed from public health principles to manage end-of-life care in community living services. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Reproductive Health Services v. Freeman.

    PubMed

    1980-01-09

    In an opinion later vacated (Reproductive Health Services v. Freeman, Federal Reporter, 2d series, 634: 1133-1134), the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit held invalid a Missouri medical assistance regulation which provided public subsidy of abortions only when a full-term pregnancy and childbirth would be fatal to the ¿mother. Further, the court found that Missouri's Medicaid exclusion for therapeutic abortions--those for which the state would not be reimbursed under the federal Hyde Amendment--was also invalid under the equal protection clause and because it excluded this one medically necessary procedure without a legitimate state interest in doing so.

  20. Progressive segmented health insurance: Colombian health reform and access to health services.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Fernando; Amaya, Liliana; Venegas, Stella

    2007-01-01

    Equal access for poor populations to health services is a comprehensive objective for any health reform. The Colombian health reform addressed this issue through a segmented progressive social health insurance approach. The strategy was to assure universal coverage expanding the population covered through payroll linked insurance, and implementing a subsidized insurance program for the poorest populations, those not affiliated through formal employment. A prospective study was performed to follow-up health service utilization and out-of-pocket expenses using a cohort design. It was representative of four Colombian cities (Cendex Health Services Use and Expenditure Study, 2001). A four part econometric model was applied. The model related medical service utilization and medication with different socioeconomic, geographic, and risk associated variables. Results showed that subsidized health insurance improves health service utilization and reduces the financial burden for the poorest, as compared to those non-insured. Other social health insurance schemes preserved high utilization with variable out-of-pocket expenditures. Family and age conditions have significant effect on medical service utilization. Geographic variables play a significant role in hospital inpatient service utilization. Both, geographic and income variables also have significant impact on out-of-pocket expenses. Projected utilization rates and a simulation favor a dual policy for two-stage income segmented insurance to progress towards the universal insurance goal.

  1. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45 Section 96.45 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health...

  2. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45 Section 96.45 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health...

  3. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45 Section 96.45 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health...

  4. The Mother Teresa Effect: the modulation of spirituality in using the CISM model with mental health service providers.

    PubMed

    Newmeyer, Mark; Keyes, Benjamin; Gregory, Sonji; Palmer, Kamala; Buford, Daniel; Mondt, Priscilla; Okai, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mental health service providers are at risk of experiencing compassion fatigue, burnout, and vicarious traumatization as a result of working in difficult contexts or when working with individuals who have experienced trauma. Numerous studies have examined the mitigating factors in professional caregivers' stress and related prevention strategies thought to be associated with professional self-care. This retrospective study examined the impact of debriefing strategies referred to as Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) and spirituality in 22 mental health service providers working in a stressful, cross-cultural context. Quantitative analysis of pre and post self-report instruments suggests that training and utilization of CISM techniques may be important in preventing future problems. To the surprise of the researchers, spirituality may not only serve as a protective factor in moderating compassion fatigue, but also increases compassion satisfaction among professional caregivers. Thus, the "Mother Teresa Effect".

  5. Definition and scope of health services administration.

    PubMed

    Begun, James W; Kaissi, Amer

    2004-01-01

    The definition and scope of health services administration are important to public policy, educational programs, new entrants to the field, and practitioners. Formal definition of the field of health services administration has not received concerted attention since 1975. Significant changes in the field have occurred since that time, widening opportunities for graduates of educational programs and increasing interdependencies between health services organizations and public policy organizations, supplier organizations, insurers, and other businesses that are not involved directly in health services delivery. Stakeholders in the field of health services administration should consider a broadened definition of the field that would institutionalize and build on those increased opportunities and interdependencies.

  6. Health Service Delivery in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benyoussef, Amor

    1977-01-01

    Reviews recent work dealing with methodological and technical issues in health and development; presents examples of the application of social sciences, including health demography and economics, in questions of health services delivery; and analyzes delivery of health services to rural and nomadic populations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.…

  7. Guidelines for Health Services for Migrant Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strazicich, Mirko, Ed.

    This publication provides a standard by which California migrant education health staff can plan, implement, and evaluate a health program for students in grades K-12. Following sections which describe current state legislation, the need for health services, and California's objectives and activities regarding health services for migrant students…

  8. Health Service Delivery in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benyoussef, Amor

    1977-01-01

    Reviews recent work dealing with methodological and technical issues in health and development; presents examples of the application of social sciences, including health demography and economics, in questions of health services delivery; and analyzes delivery of health services to rural and nomadic populations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.…

  9. 42 CFR 136a.15 - Health Service Delivery Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health Service Delivery Areas. 136a.15 Section 136a.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH What Services Are Available and Who Is Eligible To...

  10. 42 CFR 136a.15 - Health Service Delivery Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health Service Delivery Areas. 136a.15 Section 136a.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH What Services Are Available and Who Is Eligible To...

  11. 42 CFR 136a.15 - Health Service Delivery Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Health Service Delivery Areas. 136a.15 Section 136a.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH What Services Are Available and Who Is Eligible...

  12. 42 CFR 136a.15 - Health Service Delivery Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Health Service Delivery Areas. 136a.15 Section 136a.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH What Services Are Available and Who Is Eligible...

  13. 42 CFR 136a.13 - Authorization for contract health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Authorization for contract health services. 136a.13 Section 136a.13 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH What Services Are Available and Who...

  14. Mobile and Portable Dental Services Catering to the Basic Oral Health Needs of the Underserved Population in Developing Countries: A Proposed Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganavadiya, R; Chandrashekar, BR; Goel, P; Hongal, SG; Jain, M

    2014-01-01

    (adding each of these terms in a sequential order). Based on the review of the programs successfully implemented in developed countries, we propose a model to cater to the basic oral health needs of an extensive underserved population in India that may be pilot tested. The increasing dental manpower can best be utilized for the promotion of oral health through mobile and portable dental services. The professional dental organizations should have a strong motive to translate this into reality. PMID:24971198

  15. Mobile and portable dental services catering to the basic oral health needs of the underserved population in developing countries: a proposed model.

    PubMed

    Ganavadiya, R; Chandrashekar, Br; Goel, P; Hongal, Sg; Jain, M

    2014-05-01

    (adding each of these terms in a sequential order). Based on the review of the programs successfully implemented in developed countries, we propose a model to cater to the basic oral health needs of an extensive underserved population in India that may be pilot tested. The increasing dental manpower can best be utilized for the promotion of oral health through mobile and portable dental services. The professional dental organizations should have a strong motive to translate this into reality.

  16. Models of health and disease.

    PubMed

    Tamm, M E

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes and analyses six models of health and disease. These are: religious, biomedical, psychosomatic, humanistic, existential and transpersonal. Of these six models, only one was unequivocally reductionist: the biomedical. The others were all holistic. The religious, humanistic and transpersonal models could be considered as health models, the biomedical, psychosomatic and existential models as disease or illness models. The different models were assumed to depict different, but related, ways of representing health and disease. It is probable that different groups in society, including the different groups in the health service--doctors, nurses and patients--look at health and illness from partly different models. This is considered to have significant implications for the health service.

  17. Mental Health Service Delivery Systems and Perceived Qualifications of Mental Health Service Providers in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Decia Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Latest research on the mental health status of children indicates that schools are key providers of mental health services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003). The push for school mental health services has only increased as stakeholders have begun to recognize the significance of sound mental health as an essential part of…

  18. A conceptual framework for the evolution of sexual medicine and a model for the development of alternative sexual health services: 10-year experience of the center for sexual and reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Kirana, Paraskevi-Sofia; Papaharitou, Stamatis; Athanasiadis, Loukas; Nakopoulou, Evangelia; Salpiggidis, George; Moysidis, Kyriakos; Pipilaki, Chryssa; Hatzimouratidis, Konstantinos; Tzotstzis, Vassilios; Portseli, Aleka; Iraklidou, Maria; Apostolidis, Apostolos; Bekos, Athanasios; Hatzichristou, Dimitrios

    2009-09-01

    Sexual health services are limited and inadequate to reduce factors that hinder treatment and adequate care, despite the growing interest for public awareness and prevention strategies. The aim of this study was to present an integrative conceptual framework, which led to the development of a model of alternative sexual health services and the 10-year experience of the practice of the service. Multiple-level needs assessments. The conceptual framework is composed of four distinct elements: (i) it adopts a social/ecological perspective; (ii) it assumes that results are optimal when multiple interventions are used; (iii) interventions are influenced by behavioral theories; and (iv) sexual health is conceptualized through the biopsychosocial model. Based on this model, a Sexual and Reproductive Health Center was developed, dedicated to research, education, and public awareness. Over 10 years of experience show that the present approach constitutes a process which: (i) facilitates our understanding of the needs at individual, community, and system level; and (ii) increases the individuals', community and systems' capacity to control sexual health. Alternative models for sexual and reproductive health services should be encouraged, in order for best practices to be explored and identified. In addition, future research in the effectiveness of such interventions shall be beneficial in order for evidence-based interventions to be designed.

  19. The Impact of the "Village" Model on Health, Well-Being, Service Access, and Social Engagement of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carrie L.; Scharlach, Andrew E.; Price Wolf, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background: Villages represent an emerging consumer-driven social support model that aims to enhance the social engagement, independence, and well-being of community-dwelling seniors through a combination of social activities, volunteer opportunities, service referral, and direct assistance. This study aimed to assess the perceived impact of…

  20. The Impact of the "Village" Model on Health, Well-Being, Service Access, and Social Engagement of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carrie L.; Scharlach, Andrew E.; Price Wolf, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background: Villages represent an emerging consumer-driven social support model that aims to enhance the social engagement, independence, and well-being of community-dwelling seniors through a combination of social activities, volunteer opportunities, service referral, and direct assistance. This study aimed to assess the perceived impact of…

  1. [Vulnerable children detected by the school health service: the forgotten?].

    PubMed

    Noirhomme-Renard, F; Bullens, Q; Malchair, A; Gosset, C

    2014-12-01

    The current health needs of children largely exceeds the biomedical model. The school doctor occupies a special position where he can take into account the social determinants of health and identify vulneirable children. After the detection by the school health service, the harmonious development of, the child requires that health professionals cooperate in a "preventive network".

  2. A prison mental health in-reach model informed by assertive community treatment principles: evaluation of its impact on planning during the pre-release period, community mental health service engagement and reoffending.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Brian; Skipworth, Jeremy; Tapsell, Rees; Madell, Dominic; Pillai, Krishna; Simpson, Alexander; Cavney, James; Rouse, Paul

    2015-12-01

    It is well recognised that prisoners with serious mental illness (SMI) are at high risk of poor outcomes on return to the community. Early engagement with mental health services and other community agencies could provide the substrate for reducing risk. To evaluate the impact of implementing an assertive community treatment informed prison in-reach model of care (PMOC) on post-release engagement with community mental health services and on reoffending rates. One hundred and eighty prisoners with SMI released from four prisons in the year before implementation of the PMOC were compared with 170 such prisoners released the year after its implementation. The assertive prison model of care was associated with more pre-release contacts with community mental health services and contacts with some social care agencies in some prisons. There were significantly more post-release community mental health service engagements after implementation of this model (Z = -2.388, p = 0.02). There was a trend towards reduction in reoffending rates after release from some of the prisons (Z =1.82, p = 0.07). Assertive community treatment applied to prisoners with mental health problems was superior to 'treatment as usual', but more work is needed to ensure that agencies will engage prisoners in pre-release care. The fact that the model showed some benefits in the absence of any increase in resources suggests that it may be the model per se that is effective. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. [Transparency as a prerequisite of innovation in health services research: deficits in the reporting of model projects concerning managed care].

    PubMed

    Wiethege, J; Ommen, O; Ernstmann, N; Pfaff, H

    2010-10-01

    Currently, elements of managed care are being implemented in the German health-care system. The legal basis for these innovations are § 140, § 73, § 137, and §§ 63 et seq. of the German Social Code - Part 5 (SGB V). For the model projects according to §§ 63 et seq. of the German Social Code a scientific evaluation and publication of the evaluation results is mandatory. The present study examines the status of evaluation of German model projects. The present study has a mixed method design: A mail and telephone survey with the German Federal Social Insurance Authority, the health insurance funds, and the regional Associations of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians has been conducted. Furthermore, an internet research on "Medpilot" and "Google" has been accomplished to search for model projects and their evaluation reports. 34 model projects met the inclusion criteria. 13 of these projects had been terminated up to 30/9/2008. 6 of them have published an evaluation report. 4 model projects have published substantial documents. One model project in progress has published a meaningful interim report. 12 model projects failed to give information concerning the evaluator or the duration of the model projects. The results show a significant deficit in the mandatory reporting of the evaluation of model projects in Germany. There is a need for action for the legislator and the health insurance funds in terms of promoting the evaluation and the publication of the results. The institutions evaluating the model projects should obligate themselves to publish the evaluation results. The publication is an essential precondition for the development of managed care structures in the health-care system and in the development of scientific evaluation methods. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Place and provision: mapping mental health advocacy services in London.

    PubMed

    Foley, Ronan; Platzer, Hazel

    2007-02-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) Executive for London carried out an investigation in 2002 as part of their wider mental health strategy to establish whether existing mental health advocacy provision in the city was meeting need. The project took a two-part approach, with an emphasis on, (a) mapping the provision of advocacy services and, (b) cartographic mapping of service location and catchments. Data were collected through a detailed questionnaire with service providers in collaboration with the Greater London Mental Health Advocacy Network (GLMHAN) and additional health and government sources. The service mapping identified some key statistics on funding, caseloads and models of service provision with an additional emphasis on coverage, capacity, and funding stability. The questionnaire was augmented by interviews and focus groups with commissioners, service providers and service users and identified differing perspectives and problems, which informed the different perspectives of each of these groups. The cartographic mapping exercise demonstrated a spatially-even provision of mental health advocacy services across the city with each borough being served by at least one local service as well as by London wide specialist schemes. However, at local level, no one borough had the full range of specialist provision to match local demographic need. Ultimately the research assisted the Advisory Group in providing commissioning agencies with clear information on the current status of city-wide mental health advocacy services, and on gaps in existing advocacy provision alongside previously unconsidered geographical and service dimensions of that provision.

  5. Funding Assistive Technology and Related Health Services in Service Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Crystal E.; Parette, Howard P.; Hourcade, Jack J.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the options for securing funding to provide assistive technology devices and services in service settings. Options include Medicaid, The School Health and Related Services Program, and The Early Periodic, Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment Program. Considers Medicaid payment requirements and private insurance as a funding source.…

  6. Trade in health-related services.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard D; Chanda, Rupa; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2009-02-14

    The supervision of a domestic health system in the context of the trade environment in the 21st century needs a sophisticated understanding of how trade in health services affects, and will affect, a country's health system and policy. This notion places a premium on people engaged in the health sector understanding the importance of a comprehensive outlook on trade in health services. However, establishment of systematic comparative data for amounts of trade in health services is difficult to achieve, and most trade negotiations occur in isolation from health professionals. These difficulties compromise the ability of a health system to not just minimise the risks presented by trade in health services, but also to maximise the opportunities. We consider these issues by presenting the latest trends and developments in the worldwide delivery of health-care services, using the classification provided by the World Trade Organization for the General Agreement on Trade in Services. This classification covers four modes of service delivery: cross-border supply of services; consumption of services abroad; foreign direct investment, typically to establish a new hospital, clinic, or diagnostic facility; and the movement of health professionals. For every delivery mode we discuss the present magnitude and pattern of trade, main contributors to this trade, and key issues arising.

  7. Health Services: Results from the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brener, Nancy D.; Wheeler, Lani; Wolfe, Linda C.; Vernon-Smiley, Mary; Caldart-Olson, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Background: The specific health services provided to students at school and the model for delivering these services vary across districts and schools. This article describes the characteristics of school health services in the United States, including state- and district-level policies and school practices. Methods: The Centers for Disease Control…

  8. Health Services: Results from the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brener, Nancy D.; Wheeler, Lani; Wolfe, Linda C.; Vernon-Smiley, Mary; Caldart-Olson, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Background: The specific health services provided to students at school and the model for delivering these services vary across districts and schools. This article describes the characteristics of school health services in the United States, including state- and district-level policies and school practices. Methods: The Centers for Disease Control…

  9. Public Service Ethics in Health Sciences Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, M. Sandra

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of ethics in libraries focuses on health sciences libraries. Highlights include distinguishing features of reference services in health sciences libraries, including the technical nature of the literature and pressures and time constraints on health care personnel; quality of service; access to information; confidentiality; intellectual…

  10. Children's Health Services Manual. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia.

    This manual for South Carolina's child health personnel covers program planning, evaluation, monitoring, and administration, and provides standards, procedures, policies, and regulations concerning health services for children in the state. An initial section on children's health services covers eligibility; the Women, Infants and Children…

  11. Health Services Assistant. Revised. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This color-coded curriculum guide was developed to help health services educators prepare students for health services occupations. The curriculum is organized in 20 units that cover the following topics: interpersonal relationships and the health care team; communication and observation skills; safety considerations; microbiology; the body as a…

  12. Children's Health Services Manual. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia.

    This manual for South Carolina's child health personnel covers program planning, evaluation, monitoring, and administration, and provides standards, procedures, policies, and regulations concerning health services for children in the state. An initial section on children's health services covers eligibility; the Women, Infants and Children…

  13. Health Services Assistant. Revised. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This color-coded curriculum guide was developed to help health services educators prepare students for health services occupations. The curriculum is organized in 20 units that cover the following topics: interpersonal relationships and the health care team; communication and observation skills; safety considerations; microbiology; the body as a…

  14. Hispanics and Culturally Sensitive Mental Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hispanic Research Center Research Bulletin, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The objective of improving mental health care for Hispanics has been reviewed, most often, as dependent upon the provision of culturally sensitive mental health services. "Cultural sensitivity," however, is an imprecise term, especially when efforts are made to put it into operation when providing mental health services to Hispanic…

  15. Improving Coordination of Addiction Health Services Organizations with Mental Health and Public Health Services.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Erick G; Andrews, Christina; Harris, Lesley; Padwa, Howard; Kong, Yinfei; M S W, Karissa Fenwick

    2016-01-01

    In this mixed-method study, we examined coordination of mental health and public health services in addiction health services (AHS) in low-income racial and ethnic minority communities in 2011 and 2013. Data from surveys and semistructured interviews were used to evaluate the extent to which environmental and organizational characteristics influenced the likelihood of high coordination with mental health and public health providers among outpatient AHS programs. Coordination was defined and measured as the frequency of interorganizational contact among AHS programs and mental health and public health providers. The analytic sample consisted of 112 programs at time 1 (T1) and 122 programs at time 2 (T2), with 61 programs included in both periods of data collection. Forty-three percent of AHS programs reported high frequency of coordination with mental health providers at T1 compared to 66% at T2. Thirty-one percent of programs reported high frequency of coordination with public health services at T1 compared with 54% at T2. Programs with culturally responsive resources and community linkages were more likely to report high coordination with both services. Qualitative analysis highlighted the role of leadership in leveraging funding and developing creative solutions to deliver coordinated care. Overall, our findings suggest that AHS program funding, leadership, and cultural competence may be important drivers of program capacity to improve coordination with health service providers to serve minorities in an era of health care reform. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Predictors of health service use over the palliative care trajectory.

    PubMed

    Masucci, Lisa; Guerriere, Denise N; Zagorski, Brandon; Coyte, Peter C

    2013-05-01

    Health system restructuring coupled with the preference of patients to be cared for at home has altered the setting for the provision of palliative care. Accordingly, there has been emphasis on the provision of home-based palliative care by multidisciplinary teams of health care providers. Evidence suggests that these teams are better able to identify and deal with the needs of patients and their family members. Currently there is a lack of literature examining the predictors of palliative care service use for various professional service categories. The purpose of this study was to examine the predictors of the propensity and intensity of five main health service categories in the last three months of life for home-based palliative care patients. This was a prospective cohort study. The predictors of service use were assessed using a two-part model, which treats the decision to use a service (propensity) and the amount of service use (intensity) as two distinct processes. Propensity was modeled using a logistic regression and intensity was modeled using ordinary least squares regression. The results indicate that each service category emerged with a different set of predictor variables. Common predictors of health service use across service categories were patient age and functional status. The results suggest that a consistent set of predictors across service categories does not exist, and thus the determinants of access to each service category are unique. These findings will help case managers, health administrators, and policy decision makers better allocate human resources to palliative patients.

  17. Strategic planning and public mental health services.

    PubMed

    Goding, Margaret

    2005-06-01

    To provide an overview of approaches to strategic planning and to examine issues in relation to their applicability to public mental health services. Strategic planning is important for optimal functioning of mental health services in an increasingly complex environment. Although each approach will have advantages depending on context, the overall principles of the learning organization developed by Senge have particular relevance for mental health services.

  18. Understanding patient e-loyalty toward online health care services.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Caro, Eva; Cegarra-Navarro, Juan Gabriel; Solano-Lorente, Marcelina

    2013-01-01

    Public health institutions are making a great effort to develop patient-targeted online services in an attempt to enhance their effectiveness and reduce expenses. However, if patients do not use those services regularly, public health institutions will have wasted their limited resources. Hence, patients' electronic loyalty (e-loyalty) is essential for the success of online health care services. In this research, an extended Technology Acceptance Model was developed to test e-loyalty intent toward online health care services offered by public health institutions. Data from a survey of 256 users of online health care services provided by the public sanitary system of a region in Spain were analyzed. The research model was tested by using the structural equation modeling approach. The results obtained suggest that the core constructs of the Technology Acceptance Model (perceived usefulness, ease of use, and attitude) significantly affected users' behavioral intentions (i.e., e-loyalty intent), with perceived usefulness being the most decisive antecedent of affective variables (i.e., attitude and satisfaction). This study also reveals a general support for patient satisfaction as a determinant of e-loyalty intent in online health care services. Policy makers should focus on striving to get the highest positive attitude in users by enhancing easiness of use and, mainly, perceived usefulness. Because through satisfaction of patients, public hospitals will enlarge their patient e-loyalty intent, health care providers must always work at obtaining satisfied users and to encourage them to continue using the online services.

  19. Disaster mental health services: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Weeks, S M

    1999-02-01

    1. Services that may be provided by psychiatric-mental health nurses following a disaster include education, intervention, problem solving, advocacy, and referral. 2. Nurses providing disaster mental health services must be flexible and creative. Strong observational skills and teamwork are also essential characteristics in disaster settings. 3. Psychiatric-mental health nurses who wish to receive training for disaster mental health volunteer opportunities should contact their local chapter of the American Red Cross.

  20. [Prisma France: implementation program of an innovation in health and services system for disabled people. Adaptation of a case-management based integration model].

    PubMed

    Somme, D; Trouvé, H; Couturier, Y; Carrier, S; Gagnon, D; Lavallart, B; Hébert, R; Cretin, C; Saint-Jean, O

    2008-02-01

    The French health and services system to maintain at home is characterized by its fragmentation, whereas the need of the people for intervention is generally total. This fragmentation have consequences: delay in services delivery, inadequate transmission of information, redundant evaluation, service conditioned by the entrance point solicited rather than by the need of the person and inappropriate use of expensive resources by ignorance or difficulty of access to the less expensive resources. The purpose of integration is to improve continuity of interventions for people in loss of autonomy. It consists in setting up a whole of organisational, managerial and clinical common tools. Organisational model "Projet et Recherches sur l'Intégration des Services pour le Maintien de l'Autonomie" (Prisma) tested in Quebec showed a strong impact on the prevention of the loss of autonomy in term of public health on a population level. This model rests on six principal elements: partnership, single entry point, case-management, a multidimensional standardized tool for evaluation, an individualized services plan and a system for information transmission. Thus, it was decided to try to implement in France this organisational model. The project is entitled Prisma France and is presented here. The analysis of the context of implementation of the innovation which represents integration in the field of health and services for frail older reveals obstacles (in particular because of diversity of professional concerned and a presentiment of complexity of the implementation of the model) and favourable conditions (in particular the great tension towards change in this field). The current conditions in France appear mainly favourable to the implementation of integration. The establishment of Prisma model in France requires a partnership work of definition of a common language as well on the diagnoses as on the solutions. The strategic and operational dialogue is thus a key element of the

  1. A systemic approach to understanding mental health and services.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mark

    2017-10-01

    In the UK mental health and associated NHS services face considerable challenges. This paper aims to form an understanding both of the complexity of context in which services operate and the means by which services have sought to meet these challenges. Systemic principles as have been applied to public service organisations with reference to interpersonal relations, the wider social culture and its manifestation in service provision. The analysis suggests that the wider culture has shaped service demand and the approaches adopted by services resulting in a number of unintended consequences, reinforcing loops, increased workload demands and the limited value of services. The systemic modelling of this situation provides a necessary overview prior to future policy development. The paper concludes that mental health and attendant services requires a systemic understanding and a whole system approach to reform. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modeling the Structure of Partnership Between Researchers and Front-Line Service Providers: Strengthening Collaborative Public Health Research.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rogério M; Wall, Melanie M; Spector, Anya Y

    2014-01-01

    Partnerships between HIV researchers and service providers are essential for reducing the gap between research and practice. Community-Based Participatory Research principles guided this cross-sectional study, combining 40 in-depth interviews with surveys of 141 providers in 24 social service agencies in New York City. We generated the Provider-Researcher Partnership Model to account for provider- and agency-level factors' influence on intentions to form partnerships with researchers. Providers preferred "balanced partnerships" in which researchers and providers allocated research tasks and procedures to reflect diverse knowledge/skill sets. An organizational culture that values research can help enhance providers' intentions to partner. Providers' intentions and priorities found in this study may encourage researchers to engage in and policy makers to fund collaborative research.

  3. Linking pharmacists to the delivery of public health services.

    PubMed

    Strand, Mark A; Davidson, Kaylee M; Schulze, Natalie

    2017-09-23

    To describe components fundamental to the process of linking pharmacy to the delivery of public health services in a sustainable way. Pharmacists deliver public health services with varying frequency. A literature review was conducted to create a set of fundamental links necessary for pharmacists to deliver public health services in a sustainable way. The service needed to be in alignment with public health priorities, be incorporated in the pharmacy curriculum, have postgraduate training opportunities, have a policy or legal platform supporting the service, and have a business model for financial sustainability. Immunization delivery was identified as an exemplary public health service delivered by pharmacists. Additional services evaluated were tobacco cessation counseling, transitions of care, hypertension screening, and substance abuse counseling. Pharmacists are well positioned to provide public health services. Although pharmacists can offer these services, their delivery is variable because of unclearly defined links in the process necessary for their implementation. This article identifies actionable steps to establish sustainable methods for community pharmacists to deliver public health services. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Health care in a homophobic climate: the SPEND model for providing sexual health services to men who have sex with men where their health and human rights are compromised

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Michael W.; Nyoni, Joyce; Larsson, Markus; Mbwambo, Jessie; Agardh, Anette; Kashiha, John; McCurdy, Sheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a model for developing health services for men who have sex with men (MSM) in sub-Saharan Africa and other places where MSM are heavily stigmatized and marginalized. The processes of the SPEND model include Safe treatment for sexually transmissible infections (STIs) and HIV; Pharmacy sites for treatment of STIs in countries where pharmacies and drug stores are the source of medical advice and treatment; Education in sexual health issues for health professionals to reduce discrimination against MSM patients; Navigation for patients who have HIV and are rejected or discriminated against for treatment; and Discrimination reduction through educating potential leaders in tertiary education in issues of human sexuality. Supporting empirical evidence from qualitative and quantitative studies is summarized, and barriers to implementation are discussed. Health care for MSM is one of the casualties of anti-homosexual social and legal climates. There is no amnesty for MSM in health care settings, where the stigma and discrimination that they face in the rest of society is replicated. Such conditions, however, make it necessary to consider ways of providing access to health care for MSM, especially where rates of HIV and STIs in MSM populations are high, and stigma and discrimination encourages high proportions of MSM to marry. This in itself enhances the status of MSM as an important bridge population for STIs including HIV. Where anti-homosexual laws encourage, or are believed to encourage, the reporting of MSM to authorities, health care may be seen as an agent of authority rather than an agency for care. PMID:25787179

  5. Health care in a homophobic climate: the SPEND model for providing sexual health services to men who have sex with men where their health and human rights are compromised.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael W; Nyoni, Joyce; Larsson, Markus; Mbwambo, Jessie; Agardh, Anette; Kashiha, John; McCurdy, Sheryl A

    2015-01-01

    We present a model for developing health services for men who have sex with men (MSM) in sub-Saharan Africa and other places where MSM are heavily stigmatized and marginalized. The processes of the SPEND model include Safe treatment for sexually transmissible infections (STIs) and HIV; Pharmacy sites for treatment of STIs in countries where pharmacies and drug stores are the source of medical advice and treatment; Education in sexual health issues for health professionals to reduce discrimination against MSM patients; Navigation for patients who have HIV and are rejected or discriminated against for treatment; and Discrimination reduction through educating potential leaders in tertiary education in issues of human sexuality. Supporting empirical evidence from qualitative and quantitative studies is summarized, and barriers to implementation are discussed. Health care for MSM is one of the casualties of anti-homosexual social and legal climates. There is no amnesty for MSM in health care settings, where the stigma and discrimination that they face in the rest of society is replicated. Such conditions, however, make it necessary to consider ways of providing access to health care for MSM, especially where rates of HIV and STIs in MSM populations are high, and stigma and discrimination encourages high proportions of MSM to marry. This in itself enhances the status of MSM as an important bridge population for STIs including HIV. Where anti-homosexual laws encourage, or are believed to encourage, the reporting of MSM to authorities, health care may be seen as an agent of authority rather than an agency for care.

  6. Mental health literacy as a mediator in use of mental health services among older korean adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Sun; Rhee, T Greg; Lee, Hee Yun; Park, Byung Hyun; Sharratt, Monica L

    2017-02-01

    Existing literature suggests that mental health literacy is positively associated with mental health services utilization. Despite an aging population that faces significant mental health concerns in Korea, the role of mental health literacy on mental health services utilization is not known among older adults in Korea. This study aimed to (1) identify whether mental health literacy mediates the association between population characteristics and mental health services utilization and (2) identify an optimal path model for mental health services utilization among Korean older adults. Using a cross-sectional survey with a quota sampling strategy, we collected and analyzed responses from 596 community-dwelling individuals ages 65 years and older. We used structural equation modeling (SEM) to estimate the effect of mental health literacy as a mediator. When controlling for other relevant covariates in the optimal path model, mental health literacy mediated the relationships between three socio-demographic factors (education, general literacy, and health status) and mental health services utilization. The model fit index shows that the SEM fits very well (CFI = 0.92, NFI = 0.90, RMSEA = 0.07). Efforts to improve mental health literacy through community-based education programs may need to particularly target Korean older adults with the relevant socio-demographic characteristics to enhance their utilization of appropriate mental health services.

  7. Health-related services provided by public health educators.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Hans H; Becker, Craig M

    2011-09-01

    This study identifies the health-related services provided by public health educators. The investigators, with the help of practicing public health educators, created the list of health-related services. Respondents received questionnaires in 2001 and 2007. Thus, this study determined the changes in health-related services provided over a 6-year period. Respondents ranked up to five health-related services by the amount of time spent delivering each health-related service. The list of health-related services presented in a 2001 survey and a 2007 survey were identical. As in 2001, this list in the 2007 survey captured the breadth of health-related services provided, with one exception. In 2007, several participants wrote-in "emergency preparedness/bioterrorism." The types of health-related services provided did not change over the 6-year period; however, the ranking of these services did change. Most notably, nutrition education and involvement with physical activity moved up in the ranking in 2007.

  8. Indian Health Trends and Services, 1974 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Washington, DC. Div. of Indian Health.

    The American Indian Health Service (AIHS), subsidiary of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, is dedicated to elevating the health status of Indian and Alaskan Native peoples by: developing modern health facilities; encouraging Indian acquaintance with and participation in existing programs; being responsive to the concept of…

  9. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. A New Business Model for Problem Solving-Infusing Open Collaboration and Innovation Health and Human Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Eliabeth E.; Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Rando, Cynthia M.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) new business model for problem solving, with emphasis on open collaboration and innovation. The topics that are discussed are: an overview of the work of the Space Life Sciences Directorate and the strategic initiatives that arrived at the new business model. A new business model was required to infuse open collaboration/innovation tools into existing models for research, development and operations (research announcements, procurements, SBIR/STTR etc). This new model involves use of several open innovation partnerships: InnoCentive, Yet2.com, TopCoder and NASA@work. There is also a new organizational structure developed to facilitate the joint collaboration with other NASA centers, international partners, other U.S. Governmental organizations, Academia, Corporate, and Non-Profit organizations: the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC).

  11. [Health needs and masculinities: primary health care services for men].

    PubMed

    Schraiber, Lilia Blima; Figueiredo, Wagner dos Santos; Gomes, Romeu; Couto, Márcia Thereza; Pinheiro, Thiago Félix; Machin, Rosana; Silva, Geórgia Sibele Nogueira da; Valença, Otávio

    2010-05-01

    This study deals with the relations between masculinities and health care, approaching the recognition of health needs among male users of primary health care and the responses by the services. The study is part of a larger research project in four Brazilian States, with a convenience sample of eight health services. Ethnographic observation was compared with semi-structured interviews with 182 health care users from 15 to 65 years of age and 72 health professionals. Thematic analysis of the ethnographic records and interviews was based on gender references and studies on health work. The findings show how medicalization of health needs affects users, professionals, and services, disguising issues related to masculinity. Primary care focuses mainly on women, thereby reproducing gender inequalities in health services operations and professional performance, with women receiving disciplined care and men receiving insufficient attention and care.

  12. Health services for mothers and children.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, E V

    1975-03-01

    The requirements for an adequate system of maternal and child health care are outlined, including, instruction in health and sex education before marriage, preferably beginning early in school; adequate prenatal care (i.e., monthly examinations until the 28th week, biweekly checkups from the 28th to the 36th week, then weekly thereafter) which should include instruction in diet and a complete physical examination; delivery services and postpartum checkups; infant care instruction, including feeding instructions; and infant immunization and health monitoring services. In India, maternal and child health care services are provided through a network of primary health centers and subcenters in rural areas. The maternal-child health care personnel regularly visit homes. In urban areas there are public and private hospitals and maternity homes. The maternal-child health services, both rural and urban provided by each state in India are listed in chart form.

  13. 42 CFR 93.220 - Public Health Service or PHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public Health Service or PHS. 93.220 Section 93.220 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES...

  14. 42 CFR 93.220 - Public Health Service or PHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Public Health Service or PHS. 93.220 Section 93.220 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES......

  15. 42 CFR 93.220 - Public Health Service or PHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Health, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the offices of the... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Public Health Service or PHS. 93.220 Section 93.220 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS...

  16. 42 CFR 93.220 - Public Health Service or PHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Health, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the offices of the... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Public Health Service or PHS. 93.220 Section 93.220 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS...

  17. 42 CFR 93.220 - Public Health Service or PHS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Health, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the offices of the... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Public Health Service or PHS. 93.220 Section 93.220 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS...

  18. Department of Health and Human Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... content HHS .gov Search U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Search Close A-Z Index About HHS ... below. Email HHS Headquarters U.S. Department of Health & Human Services 200 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. ...

  19. Home Health Care: Services and Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widmer, Geraldine; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Findings from a study of home care services in one New York district document the value and relatively modest costs of home health care for the chronically ill and dependent elderly. Professional nurses coordinated the care, but most of the direct services were provided by home health aides and housekeepers. (MF)

  20. Investigating the preferences of older people for telehealth as a new model of health care service delivery: A discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Kaambwa, Billingsley; Ratcliffe, Julie; Shulver, Wendy; Killington, Maggie; Taylor, Alan; Crotty, Maria; Carati, Colin; Tieman, Jennifer; Wade, Victoria; Kidd, Michael R

    2017-02-01

    preference amongst respondents for face-to-face pre-telehealth health assessments and, thereafter, a comprehensive telehealth model (in terms of services offered) targeted at those with some technological know-how as a substitute for attendance at hospitals and clinics, especially where these health facilities were far away from older people's homes. The findings may be usefully incorporated into the design of future telehealth models of service delivery for older people.

  1. Local Government Health Services in Interwar England:

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Summary This article provides a critical discussion of recent work on local government health care and health services in interwar England. A literature review examines case study approaches and comparative quantitative surveys, highlighting conventional and revisionist interpretations. Noting the differing selection criteria evident in some works, it argues that studies based upon a limited number of personal health services provide an insufficient basis for assessing local health activity and policy. There follows a regional study demonstrating various discrepancies between health financing data in local sources and those in nationally collated returns. These in turn give rise to various problems of assessment and interpretation in works relying on the latter, particularly with respect to services for schoolchildren and long-stay patients. The case study points to the importance of integrating poor law medical services in evaluations, and of learning more about the role of government subsidy in supporting expanding services. PMID:22080797

  2. Designing online health services for patients.

    PubMed

    Crotty, Bradley H; Slack, Warner V

    2016-01-01

    Patients are increasingly interacting with their healthcare system through online health services, such as patient portals and telehealth programs. Recently, Shabrabani and Mizrachi provided data outlining factors that are most important for users or potential users of these online services. The authors conclude convincingly that while online health services have great potential to be helpful to their users, they could be better designed. As patients and their families play an increasingly active role in their health care, online health services should be made easier for them to use and better suited to their health-related needs. Further, the online services should be more welcoming to people of all literacy levels and from all socioeconomic backgrounds.

  3. Coordination between child welfare agencies and mental health service providers, children's service use, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Wells, Rebecca; Hillemeier, Marianne M

    2009-06-01

    Interorganizational relationships (IORs) between child welfare agencies and mental health service providers may facilitate mental health treatment access for vulnerable children. This study investigates whether IORs are associated with greater use of mental health services and improvement in mental health status for children served by the child welfare system. This was a longitudinal analysis of data from a 36-month period in the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW). The sample consisted of 1,613 children within 75 child welfare agencies who were 2 years or older and had mental health problems at baseline. IOR intensity was measured as the number of coordination approaches between each child welfare agency and mental health service providers. Separate weighted multilevel logistic regression models tested associations between IORs and service use and outcomes, respectively. Agency-level factors accounted for 9% of the variance in the probability of service use and 12% of mental health improvement. Greater intensity of IORs was associated with higher likelihood of both service use and mental health improvement. Having greater numbers of ties with mental health providers may help child welfare agencies improve children's mental health service access and outcomes. Policymakers should develop policies and initiatives to encourage a combination of different types of organizational ties between child welfare and mental health systems. For instance, information sharing at the agency level in addition to coordination at the case level may improve the coordination necessary to serve these vulnerable children.

  4. Are one-stop shops acceptable? Community perspectives on one-stop shop models of sexual health service provision in the UK.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, C; Gerressu, M; French, R S

    2008-10-01

    Traditionally, genitourinary medicine (GUM) and contraceptive services have been provided separately. Providing these services on one site, as a one-stop shop, has been suggested as a way of improving access to care. There is little evidence about the acceptability of such an approach. We aimed to assess acceptability of different one-stop shop models (a young people's, an all ages (mainstream) and a general practice service) of sexual health provision among different community groups. Between April and December 2005, 19 semi-structured interviews and 14 focus groups were conducted with young heterosexual men (n = 48), men who have sex with men (MSM; n = 46) and minority ethnic men and women (n = 28) across England. Knowledge of one-stop shops was limited. The concept was acceptable to participants (except MSM), although there was variation as to the preferred model. Young men and African individuals described distrust of general practice confidentiality, preferring young people's or mainstream models, respectively. South Asians associated stigma with GUM, preferring instead a general practice one-stop shop. Regardless of model, respondents expressed preference for one provider/one session to provide GUM and contraceptive care. In terms of acceptability there can be no blue print one-stop shop model. Local assessments should determine whether a one-stop shop would have public health benefit and if so how best one should be set up to maximise access. To accommodate client preference for one provider/session for their sexual health needs it may be that the development of "integrated training" for providers across clinical specialties is a more realistic way forward.

  5. Occupational Health Services Integrated in Primary Health Care in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rafiei, Masoud; Ezzatian, Reza; Farshad, Asghar; Sokooti, Maryam; Tabibi, Ramin; Colosio, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    A healthy workforce is vital for maintaining social and economic development on a global, national and local level. Around half of the world's people are economically active and spend at least one third of their time in their place of work while only 15% of workers have access to basic occupational health services. According to WHO report, since the early 1980s, health indicators in Iran have consistently improved, to the extent that it is comparable with those in developed countries. In this paper it was tried to briefly describe about Health care system and occupational Health Services as part of Primary Health care in Iran. To describe the health care system in the country and the status of occupational health services to the workers and employers, its integration into Primary Health Care (PHC) and outlining the challenges in provision of occupational health services to the all working population. Iran has fairly good health indicators. More than 85 percent of the population in rural and deprived regions, for instance, have access to primary healthcare services. The PHC centers provide essential healthcare and public-health services for the community. Providing, maintaining and improving of the workers' health are the main goals of occupational health services in Iran that are presented by different approaches and mostly through Workers' Houses in the PHC system. Iran has developed an extensive network of PHC facilities with good coverage in most rural areas, but there are still few remote areas that might suffer from inadequate services. It seems that there is still no transparent policy to collaborate with the private sector, train managers or provide a sustainable mechanism for improving the quality of services. Finally, strengthening national policies for health at work, promotion of healthy work and work environment, sharing healthy work practices, developing updated training curricula to improve human resource knowledge including occupational health

  6. The spread of health services and fertility transition.

    PubMed

    Brauner-Otto, Sarah R; Axinn, William G; Ghimire, Dirghaj J

    2007-11-01

    We use detailed measures of social change over time, increased availability of various health services, and couples' fertility behaviors to document the independent effects of health services on fertility limitation. Our investigation focuses on a setting in rural Nepal that experienced a transition from virtually no use of birth control in 1945 to the widespread use of birth control by 1995 to limit fertility. Changes in the availability of many different dimensions of health services provide the means to evaluate their independent influences on contraceptive use to limit childbearing. Findings show that family planning as well as maternal and child health services have independent effects on the rate of ending childbearing. For example, the provision of child immunization services increases the rate of contraceptive use to limit fertility independently of family planning services. Additionally, new Geographic Information System (GIS)-based measures also allow us to test many alternative models of the spatial distribution of services. These tests reveal that complex, geographically defined measures of all health service providers outperform more simple measures. These results provide new information about the consequences of maternal and child health services and the importance of these services in shaping fertility transitions.

  7. School mental health resources and adolescent mental health service use.

    PubMed

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A; Alegría, Margarita; Costello, E Jane; Gruber, Michael J; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A; Kessler, Ronald C

    2013-05-01

    Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to increase service use. This article examines associations of school resources with past-year mental health service use among students with 12-month DSM-IV mental disorders. Data come from the U.S. National Comorbidity Survey Adolescent Supplement (NCS-A), a national survey of adolescent mental health that included 4,445 adolescent-parent pairs in 227 schools in which principals and mental health coordinators completed surveys about school resources and policies for addressing student emotional problems. Adolescents and parents completed the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and reported mental health service use across multiple sectors. Multilevel multivariate regression was used to examine associations of school mental health resources and individual-level service use. Nearly half (45.3%) of adolescents with a 12-month DSM-IV disorder received past-year mental health services. Substantial variation existed in school resources. Increased school engagement in early identification was significantly associated with mental health service use for adolescents with mild/moderate mental and behavior disorders. The ratio of students to mental health providers was not associated with overall service use, but was associated with sector of service use. School mental health resources, particularly those related to early identification, may facilitate mental health service use and may influence sector of service use for youths with DSM disorders. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegría, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A,; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to increase service use. This paper examines associations of school resources with past-year mental health service use among students with 12-month DSM-IV mental disorders. Method Data come from the U.S. National Comorbidity Survey Adolescent Supplement (NCS-A), a national survey of adolescent mental health that included 4,445 adolescent-parent pairs in 227 schools in which principals and mental health coordinators completed surveys about school resources-policies for addressing student emotional problems. Adolescents and parents completed the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and reported mental health service use across multiple sectors. Multilevel multivariate regression was used to examine associations of school mental health resources and individual-level service use. Results Roughly half (45.3%) of adolescents with a 12-month DSM-IV disorder received past-year mental health services. Substantial variation existed in school resources. Increased school engagement in early identification was significantly associated with mental health service use for adolescents with mild/moderate mental and behavior disorders. The ratio of students-to-mental health providers was not associated with overall service use, but was associated with sector of service use. Conclusions School mental health resources, particularly those related to early identification, may facilitate mental health service use and influence sector of service use for youths with DSM disorders. PMID:23622851

  9. A Service Design Thinking Approach for Stakeholder-Centred eHealth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunji

    2016-01-01

    Studies have described the opportunities and challenges of applying service design techniques to health services, but empirical evidence on how such techniques can be implemented in the context of eHealth services is still lacking. This paper presents how a service design thinking approach can be applied for specification of an existing and new eHealth service by supporting evaluation of the current service and facilitating suggestions for the future service. We propose Service Journey Modelling Language and Service Journey Cards to engage stakeholders in the design of eHealth services.

  10. A health services framework of spiritual care.

    PubMed

    Daaleman, Timothy P

    2012-12-01

    To introduce a health services framework of spiritual care that addresses the empirical and applied issues surrounding spirituality and nursing practice. Despite over 20 years of study, the concept of spirituality is still under development, which limits application to nursing practice. Three studies using a health services framework are reviewed: (1) a survey study of dying patients and family that describes the providers, types and outcomes of spiritual care; (2) an exploratory study of the process of spiritual care; and (3) a multi-level study of the structure and outcomes of spiritual care in long-term care facilities. Spiritual care recipients identify family or friends (41%), clergy (17%) and health care providers (29%) as spiritual care providers. The most frequently reported type of spiritual care was help in coping with illness (87%). Just over half (55%) were satisfied with the care that they received. The processes of spiritual care involved: (1) presence, (2) opening eyes, and; (3) co-creating, which was a mutual and fluid activity between patients, family members and care providers. In long term care facilities, decedents who received spiritual care were perceived as receiving better overall care in the last month of life, when compared with those decedents who did not receive spiritual care. A health services framework provides a holistic view of spiritual care, one that is consistent with integrated nursing models. By focusing on the structure, process and outcome elements of spiritual care within organisational settings, nursing management can develop feasible approaches to implement, improve and evaluate the delivery of this unique type of care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Factors shaping intersectoral action in primary health care services.

    PubMed

    Anaf, Julia; Baum, Fran; Freeman, Toby; Labonte, Ron; Javanparast, Sara; Jolley, Gwyn; Lawless, Angela; Bentley, Michael

    2014-12-01

    To examine case studies of good practice in intersectoral action for health as one part of evaluating comprehensive primary health care in six sites in South Australia and the Northern Territory. Interviews with primary health care workers, collaborating agency staff and service users (Total N=33); augmented by relevant documents from the services and collaborating partners. The value of intersectoral action for health and the importance of partner relationships to primary health care services were both strongly endorsed. Factors facilitating intersectoral action included sufficient human and financial resources, diverse backgrounds and skills and the personal rewards that sustain commitment. Key constraining factors were financial and time limitations, and a political and policy context which has become less supportive of intersectoral action; including changes to primary health care. While intersectoral action is an effective way for primary health care services to address social determinants of health, commitment to social justice and to adopting a social view of health are constrained by a broader health service now largely reinforcing a biomedical model. Effective organisational practices and policies are needed to address social determinants of health in primary health care and to provide a supportive context for workers engaging in intersectoral action. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  12. [User involvement in mental health services research].

    PubMed

    Krumm, Silvia; Becker, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    User involvement in mental health services research is discussed in Great Britain, and a number of user-led research initiatives can be found. In Germany, less attention is paid to the concept while virtually no initiatives can be found. The concept of user involvement is introduced by reviewing the relevant literature. After discussion of theoretical and methodological implications, practicability of the concept for mental health services research is illustrated by some examples from Great Britain. User involvement in mental health services may promote the provision of user focused services. User involvement aims at the empowerment of mental health service users and can also improve the quality of mental health services research. Frequently, user-led/collaborative studies are focused on mental health service assessment. Some problematic aspects (e. g. representativeness, knowledge/skills of users) are discussed. Although more research is needed to document the additional benefit of user involvement in mental health services research it is conceivable that the concept will gain in importance.

  13. The Effects of Medicaid Eligibility on Mental Health Services and Out-of-Pocket Spending for Mental Health Services.

    PubMed

    Golberstein, Ezra; Gonzales, Gilbert

    2015-12-01

    Millions of low-income Americans will gain health insurance through Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. This study assesses the impact of previous Medicaid expansions on mental health services utilization and out-of-pocket spending. Secondary data from the 1998-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Household Component merged with National Health Interview Survey and state Medicaid eligibility rules data. Instrumental variables regression models were used to estimate the impact of expanded Medicaid eligibility on health insurance coverage, mental health services utilization, and out-of-pocket spending for mental health services. Person-year files were constructed including adults ages 21-64 under 300 percent of the Federal Poverty Level. Medicaid expansions significantly increased health insurance coverage and reduced out-of-pocket spending on mental health services for low-income adults. Effects of expanded Medicaid eligibility on out-of-pocket spending were strongest for adults with psychological distress. Expanding Medicaid eligibility did not significantly increase the use of mental health services. Previous Medicaid eligibility expansions did not substantially increase mental health service utilization, but they did reduce out-of-pocket mental health care spending. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  14. The structural reform of mental health services.

    PubMed

    Haver, Eitan; Baruch, Yehuda; Kotler, Moshe

    2003-01-01

    During past decades many countries have initiated extensive mental health care system reforms, and the main goal of these reforms has been the transfer of treatment of the mentally ill from psychiatric hospitals to the community. For example, assessment of the results of these reforms in Italy and Austria demonstrates considerable reduction in the number of psychiatric beds, higher quality and more available community services, and increased total expenditure for mental health services. However, because sufficient data is not yet available, many questions regarding how these reforms impact improvement in patient clinical parameters remain unanswered. Some of the answers to these questions can be gleaned from the results of research carried out in the United States and Canada in the 1980s. This research evaluated transfer of psychiatric treatment from a hospital setting to a community service setting. The results demonstrated that community treatment models were more effective than a hospital treatment model in reducing the number of hospitalizations and shortening length of stay. Patient monitoring also demonstrated good integration into the community. However, alongside the research supporting these reforms, there is some research that demonstrates a number of possible disadvantages: an increase in the number of homeless and in the mortality rate among psychiatric patients, and an increase in rehospitalization rates of chronically ill patients," referred to as the "Revolving Door Syndrome." To avoid the disadvantages that could possibly accompany the reform, particular attention needs to be given to planning and funding, so that development of community services and reduction in psychiatric hospital system correspond. Care must be taken to ensure that the number and the geographic location of these services meets the need of the population at risk, and that staff is available and well trained. A monitoring system should be set in place to monitor the patients

  15. Mental health services in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Orotaloa, Paul; Blignault, Ilse

    2012-06-01

    The Solomon Islands comprise an archipelago of nearly 1,000 islands and coral atolls and have an estimated population of 549,574 people. Formal mental health services date back to 1950 when an asylum was established. Since then the process of mental health service development has been largely one of incremental change, with a major boost to community services in the last two decades. During the 1990s a mental health outpatient clinic was established in Honiara, together with attempts to recruit nursing staff as psychiatric coordinators in the provinces. In 1996, the Ministry commenced sending registered nurses for psychiatric training in Papua New Guinea. By 2010, there were 13 psychiatric nurses and one psychiatrist, with a second psychiatrist in training. A National Mental Health Policy was drafted in 2009 but is yet to be endorsed by Cabinet. A significant portion of the population still turns to traditional healers or church leaders for purposes of healing, seeking help from Western medicine only after all other alternatives in the community have been exhausted. There is still a long way to go before mental health services are available, affordable and accessible to the whole population, including people living in geographically remote areas. Realization of this vision requires increased resourcing for mental health services; improved communication and collaboration between the centrally-based, national mental health services and the provincial health services; and closer, ongoing relationships between all stakeholders and partners, both locally and internationally.

  16. First impressions: towards becoming a health-literate health service.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anne

    2014-05-01

    A 'health-literate organisation' recognises that miscommunication is very common and can negatively affect consumer care and outcomes, and makes it easier for people to navigate, understand, and use health information and services. This paper reports on the First Impressions Activities conducted by consumers to assess aspects of the literacy environment of a rural health service. The First Impressions Activities consists of three tools to assist health services to begin to consider some of the characteristics of their organisation that help and hinder a consumer's ability to physically navigate their way to and about the health service. The results show that navigation to and within the rural health service was made more complex due to lack of information, difficulty finding information, inconsistent terminology used in signage, missing signage, signage obscured by foliage, and incorrect signage.

  17. Community Service Models for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic relapsing and remitting mental illness with lifetime prevalence between 0.40 to 1.4 percent. Most people with schizophrenia are treated in psychiatric units of local general hospitals for short periods of time when acutely ill. With the worldwide trend toward closure of asylums and institutions in the 1950s, there has been an increasing focus on treatment in the community. Community mental health teams (CMHT) are the kernel of community treatment. Although their composition and modus operandi differ according to patient need, all models claim superiority over outcomes of long inpatient stay. Case management, assertive outreach, and crisis resolution sometimes compete for resources. What is the evidence for their efficacy? What is the right mix of their use? As we discuss these, we propose that there may be room for the application of established industry models of service delivery, such as Just-in-Time (JIT), in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia. PMID:21179632

  18. [Accessibility of health services for users].

    PubMed

    Sousa-Fragoso, M A; Villarreal-Ríos, E

    2000-01-01

    To measure the accessibility to health services and determine a model to explain this accessibility. All states of the Mexican Republic were included. The measurement of accessibility considers the availability of resources and the perception of barriers. Place of residence, education, participation in the work forces and household conditions were included in the model. The average of availability resources was 64.59% sd 15.68 (range 42 to 100) and the average corresponding to perception of barriers, 87.61% SD 4.04 (range 79.23 to 95.65). Accessibility was 71.50% SD 10.74 (range 56 to 96). The states with highest accessibility were the Federal District and Baja California Sur and the lowest, Chiapas and Oaxaca. The model included education and labor participation (R2 = 0.67, p < 0.05). Accessibility was determined by socioeconomic factors.

  19. [Health and social services used by the rural elderly].

    PubMed

    Rubio, Encarnación; Comín, Magdalena; Montón, Gema; Martínez, Tomás; Magallón, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    To describe the use of health and social services, and to analyze the influence of functional capacity for Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) and other factors in their use. Cross-sectional study in a non-institutionalized population older than 64 years old in a basic rural health area of Zaragoza. use of different health and social services. Main independent variable: functional capacity for IADL according to the Lawton-Brody. Confounding variables: sociodemographic, physical exercise, comorbidity, self-perceived health, walking aids, social resources and economic resources (OARS-MAFQ). The relationship between the use of services and functional capacity for IADL was assessed using crude OR (ORC) and adjusted (adjusted OR) with CI95% by means of multivariate logistic regression models. The use of social and health services increased with age and worse functional capacity for IADL. The increased use of health services was related with bad stage of health, limited social and economic resources, physical inactivity and female. The increased use of home help services was related with limited social resources, low education level and male. Regular physical activity and using walking aids were associated with greater participation in recreational activities. The probability of using social and health services increased in older people with impaired functional capacity for IADL. The specific use of them changed according to differences in health, demographic and contextual features. Copyright © 2013 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Trust - Essential Requirement and Basis for pHealth Services.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, Pekka; Blobel, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Trust is a social code and glue between persons and organizations in any business domain including health. pHealth is a complex concept that is built around health service providers, individuals and artefacts such as sensors, mobile devices, networks, computers, and software applications. It has many stakeholders such as organizations, persons, patients, customers, and tele-operators. pHealth services are increasingly offered in insecure information space, and used over organizational, geographical and jurisdictional borders. This all means that trust is an essential requirement for successful pHealth services. To make pHealth a successful business, organizations offering pHealth services should establish inter-organizational trust and trusted relationship between their customers. Before starting to use services, the pHealth user should have a possibility to define how much it trusts on the service provider and on the surrounding information infrastructure. The authors' analysis show that trust models used in today's health care and e-commerce are insufficient for networked pHealth. Calculated trust as proposed by the authors is stronger than the predefined dispositional trust model currently used in health care, other's recommendations used in e-commerce and risk assessment. Until now, caused by the lack of business incentive, lack of regulatory and political pressure, pHealth providers have not demonstrated meaningful interest in moving from the current unsatisfactory situation to trust calculation by making information necessary for this methodology available. To make pHealth successful, a combination of legal, political, organizational, technological and educational efforts is needed to initiate the paradigm change and start the era of trust-based pHealth services.

  1. Assessing the performance of mental health service facilities for meeting patient priorities and health service responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Bramesfeld, A; Stegbauer, C

    2016-10-01

    The World Health Organisation has defined health service responsiveness as one of the key-objectives of health systems. Health service responsiveness relates to the ability to respond to service users' legitimate expectations on non-medical issues when coming into contact with the services of a healthcare system. It is defined by the areas showing respect for persons and patient orientation. Health service responsiveness is particularly relevant to mental health services, due to the specific vulnerability of mental health patients but also because it matches what mental health patients consider as good quality of care as well as their priorities when seeking healthcare. As (mental) health service responsiveness applies equally to all concerned services it would be suitable as a universal indicator for the quality of services' performance. However, performance monitoring programs in mental healthcare rarely assess health service performance with respect to meeting patient priorities. This is in part due of patient priorities as an outcome being underrepresented in studies that evaluate service provision. The lack of studies using patient priorities as outcomes transmits into evidence based guidelines and subsequently, into underrepresentation of patient priorities in performance monitoring. Possible ways out of this situation include more intervention studies using patient priorities as outcome, considering evidence from qualitative studies in guideline development and developing performance monitoring programs along the patient pathway and on key-points of relevance for service quality from a patient perspective.

  2. The Fly-in Fly-out and Drive-in Drive-out model of health care service provision for rural and remote Australia: benefits and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rafat; Maple, Myfanwy; Hunter, Sally V; Mapedzahama, Virginia; Reddy, Prasuna

    2015-01-01

    Rural Australians experience poorer health and poorer access to health care services than their urban counterparts, and there is a chronic shortage of health professionals in rural and remote Australia. Strategies designed to reduce this rural-urban divide include fly-in fly-out (FIFO) and drive-in drive-out (DIDO) services. The aim of this article is to examine the opportunities and challenges involved in these forms of service delivery. This article reviews recent literature relating to FIFO and DIDO healthcare services and discusses their benefits and potential disadvantages for rural Australia, and for health practitioners. FIFO and DIDO have short-term benefits for rural Australians seeking healthcare services in terms of increasing equity and accessibility to services and reducing the need to travel long distances for health care. However, significant disadvantages need to be considered in the longer term. There is a potential for burnout among health professionals who travel long distances and work long hours, often without adequate peer support or supervision, in order to deliver these services. A further disadvantage, particularly in the use of visiting medical practitioners to provide generalist services, is the lack of development of a sufficiently well-resourced local primary healthcare system in small rural communities. Given the potential negative consequences for both health professionals and rural Australians, the authors caution against the increasing use of FIFO and DIDO services, without the concurrent development of well-resourced, funded and staffed primary healthcare services in rural and remote communities.

  3. Toward a framework for health service research.

    PubMed

    Saunders, L D; Wanke, M

    1996-01-01

    Fiscal concerns have provided the impetus for wide-ranging attempts to reform the delivery of health care in Canada. Health reform has in turn stimulated great interest and activity in health service research. For health service research to be of maximum use in addressing current and future challenges to the health care system, closer liaison is needed between researchers and decision makers--the users of research. The purpose of this paper is to promote greater interaction between decision makers and researchers by proposing a framework for health predicated on types of information needed for decision-making rather than on study methodologies. We distinguish between decision makers at the societal, health system, program and service levels. Types of studies are classified by their purpose and by the phase of the management cycle for which they provide information for decision-making.

  4. European comparisons between mental health services.

    PubMed

    Wahlbeck, K

    2011-03-01

    When developing accessible, affordable and effective mental health systems, exchange of data between countries is an important moving force towards better mental health care. Unfortunately, health information systems in most countries are weak in the field of mental health, and comparability of data is low. Special international data collection exercises, such as the World Health Organization (WHO) Atlas Project and the WHO Baseline Project have provided valuable insights in the state of mental health systems in countries, but such single-standing data collections are not sustainable solutions. Improvements in routine data collection are urgently needed. The European Commission has initiated major improvements to ensure harmonized and comprehensive health data collection, by introducing the European Community Health Indicators set and the European Health Interview Survey. However, both of these initiatives lack strength in the field of mental health. The neglect of the need for relevant and valid comparable data on mental health systems is in conflict with the importance of mental health for European countries and the objectives of the 'Europe 2020' strategy. The need for valid and comparable mental health services data is today addressed only by single initiatives, such as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development work to establish quality indicators for mental health care. Real leadership in developing harmonized mental health data across Europe is lacking. A European Mental Health Observatory is urgently needed to lead development and implementation of monitoring of mental health and mental health service provision in Europe.

  5. Health Services for Migrant Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bove, Beverly A.

    Intended as a resource for administrators, teachers, nurses, paraprofessionals, health coordinators, and community action personnel who are interested in meeting the health needs of migrant children, this handbook offers suggestions for organizing community resources in providing health care to migrant children. Poor nutrition, the lack of dental…

  6. Japanese Outreach Model Project for patients who have difficulty maintaining contact with mental health services: Comparison of care between higher-functioning and lower-functioning groups.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Aki; Kido, Yoshifumi; Kayama, Mami

    2017-10-09

    The Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare sponsored the current examination of a new community mental health service, the Japan Outreach Model Project (JOMP), for persons with mental illnesses and who find it difficult to continue with ongoing treatment. Shorter readmission rates and hospital stays were found. In this study, the amount and type of care that were delivered by the JOMP were examined in order to inform the process of establishing the public insurance system. The data were collected from 32 JOMP outreach teams from 21 prefectures in Japan that agreed to participate; 415 patients were included in the analysis. The clients' characteristics, social functions, problematic behavior score, and the amount and type of care that were delivered were examined. Higher amounts of care were delivered in the first month, compared to the remaining months, and the care was relatively stable from months 2-5. This suggests that consistently high care was needed for the JOMP clients who found it difficult to maintain contact with mental health services. Those clients with an increased overall global assessment functioning score at 6 months (n = 151) had received significantly more care than those whose functioning had decreased or remained stable (n = 150). The types of increased care that were provided to the higher functioning group were: "assistance with daily living tasks," "medical support for psychiatric symptoms," "empowering the client," "communication and coordination," "support for physical health," and "vocational and educational support." The type and amount of care can positively influence good functional outcomes for those in the community who find it difficult to maintain contact with mental health services. © 2017 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  7. Planning Campus Health Care Services 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazard, Sprague W.

    1975-01-01

    New trends in campus health care delivery were discussed at a workshop in Chicago sponsored by the Society for College and University Planning on January 30-31, 1975. Consideration was given to the repercussions of strong consumer demands for broader and more accessible health services, the emergence of health maintenance organizations, and…

  8. Planning Campus Health Care Services 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Bruce L.

    1975-01-01

    In a context of forecasts of major changes for America's entire health care system, colleges and universities are exploring the implications of new trends in campus health care delivery. On January 30-31, 1975, the Society for College and University Planning sponsored a workshop on "Campus Health Care Services" in Chicago to discuss such issues as…

  9. Health Care and Services for Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Mabel

    This module, consisting of materials for use in conducting a consumer education mini-course, deals with health care and services for consumers. Covered in the individual lessons are the following topics: understanding what is and is not covered by Medicare, assessing the need for private health insurance, purchasing private health insurance,…

  10. Health Care and Services for Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Mabel

    This module, consisting of materials for use in conducting a consumer education mini-course, deals with health care and services for consumers. Covered in the individual lessons are the following topics: understanding what is and is not covered by Medicare, assessing the need for private health insurance, purchasing private health insurance,…

  11. [Portfolio of services in a public health organization].

    PubMed

    Villalbí, J R; Guix, J; Plasència, A; Armengou, J M; Llebaría, X; Torralba, L

    2003-01-01

    Health services in Spain are currently being improved. Definition of the services portfolio has been one of the elements in this process, from which public health services have been largely left out. In the present article public health services are examined from the perspective of the Public Health Agency of Barcelona. We propose a scheme to classify services into productive public health services, health care services, services that are intermediate products, support services, and liaison or coordinating services. Indicators of productivity, result, impact, and cost are explored, and a catalogue of services for a public health organization with a well defined population and area is proposed.

  12. Mental Health Care in a High School Based Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jepson, Lisa; Juszczak, Linda; Fisher, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Describes the mental-health and medical services provided at a high-school-based service center. Five years after the center's inception mental health visits had quadrupled. One third of students utilizing the center reported substance abuse within their family. Other reasons for center use included pregnancy, suicidal ideation, obesity,…

  13. Social networks and health service utilization.

    PubMed

    Deri, Catherine

    2005-11-01

    While social networks have been examined in the context of many economic choices and outcomes, this study is the first to investigate the effects of social networks on health service utilization decisions. Networks can affect utilization decisions in many ways. They can provide information on institutional details of the health care system, and can reduce the search costs of locating an appropriate health care provider. Networks can even alter the demand for services by affecting the perceived efficacy or desirability of the available services. Using health service utilization decisions to study networks has two main advantages over work that studies other public programs. First, because health care in Canada is universal, there are no questions of eligibility. Second, by studying the different measures of utilization, it is possible to observe how the network effects vary across measures that reflect visits primarily instigated by the patient, to measures that reflect visits instigated by both patients and their physician. Using data from three cycles of the Canadian National Population Health Survey, this work exploits regional and language group variation to identify network effects. Strong and robust evidence of networks effects is found on the decision to utilize services reflecting initial contact with the health care system. As well, this work presents novel evidence that utilization of health services by immigrants increases with the number of doctors that speak their language in their neighborhood.

  14. From pioneers to scientists: challenges in establishing evidence-gathering models in torture and trauma mental health services for refugees.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Jessica; Sonne, Charlotte; Silove, Derrick

    2014-09-01

    Outcome studies on treatment of trauma-affected refugees have been published but are limited in design and quality. In this article, we discuss possible impediments to pursuing research aimed at gathering evidence to support the efficacy of treatments in the field and the challenges in carrying out such inquiries. We then present a working model that demonstrates the feasibility of integrating outcome research into clinical settings. The aim of this model is to involve all personnel in generating research of high quality with minimal additional costs and time commitment. We conclude that although challenges remain in carrying out treatment outcome studies, they can be overcome by careful consultation and negotiation in a setting with an established ethos of commitment to the scientific endeavor. Ultimately, identifying the most effective interventions will provide better treatment and quality of life for the large number of traumatized refugees seeking assistance for mental health problems.

  15. Bridging community intervention and mental health services research.

    PubMed

    Wells, Kenneth; Miranda, Jeanne; Bruce, Martha L; Alegria, Margarita; Wallerstein, Nina

    2004-06-01

    This article explores the potential of community intervention perspectives for increasing the relevance, reach, and public health impact of mental health services research. The authors reviewed community intervention strategies, including public health and community development and empowerment interventions, and contrast community intervention with practice-based quality improvement and policy research. A model was proposed to integrate health services and community intervention research, building on the evidence-based strength of quality improvement and participatory methods of community intervention to produce complementary functions, such as linking community-based case finding and referral with practice-based quality improvement, enhanced by community-based social support for treatment adherence. The community intervention approach is a major paradigm for affecting public health or addressing health disparities. Despite challenges in implementation and evaluation, it represents a promising approach for extending the reach of mental health services interventions into diverse communities.

  16. Costs of integrating demand-based reproductive health commodity model into the Government and NGO service delivery systems in Bangladesh: a supply side perspective.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ziaul; Sarker, Abdur Razzaque; Anwar, Shahela; Kabir, Humayun; Gazi, Rukhsana

    2015-01-01

    To estimate additional total cost and average cost of integrating the demand-based reproductive health commodity model into the existing Government and NGO facilities in Bangladesh. Activity based cost analysis was conducted during 2006-2008 in two low performing rural sub-districts (Nabigong and Raipur sub-district) and one urban slum area in Dhaka city, Bangladesh. Activity-based cost data were collected using ingredient approach, which comprised of listing all types of inputs by activity, quantities and prices for each input. Total cost was presented according to capital and recurrent items. The supply side perspective was considered for entire analysis. The total cost of integrating demand-based reproductive health commodity (DBRHC) model into the Government and NGO service delivery system was estimated to BDT 18,667,634 (US$274,524). The proportion of capital cost was 59 % and the recurrent cost was 41 % of the total cost. The average cost per beneficiaries was BDT 230 (US$3.38) only for introducing this model into the existing health system. The built-in interventions of DBRHC model were doable at low-cost at the selected Government and NGO settings at the grass-root level. The model has potential of further cost containment during scaling up-if the intervention costs are adjusted with the existing functionaries of the Government and NGOs.

  17. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  18. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  19. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  20. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  1. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  2. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  3. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  4. Health services under the General Agreement on Trade in Services.

    PubMed

    Adlung, R; Carzaniga, A

    2001-01-01

    The potential for trade in health services has expanded rapidly in recent decades. More efficient communication systems have helped to reduce distance-related barriers to trade; rising incomes and enhanced information have increased the mobility of patients; and internal cost pressures have led various governments to consider possibilities for increased private participation. As yet, however, health services have played only a modest role in the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). It is possible that Members of the World Trade Organization have been discouraged from undertaking access commitments by the novelty of the Agreement, coordination problems between relevant agencies, widespread inexperience in concepts of services trade, a traditionally strong degree of government involvement in the health sector, and concerns about basic quality and social objectives. However, more than five years have passed since GATS entered into force, allowing hesitant administrations to familiarize themselves with its main elements and its operation in practice. The present paper is intended to contribute to this process. It provides an overview of the basic structure of GATS and of the patterns of current commitments in health services and of limitations frequently used in this context. The concluding section discusses possibilities of pursuing basic policy objectives in a more open environment and indicates issues that may have to be dealt with in current negotiations on services.

  5. Health services under the General Agreement on Trade in Services.

    PubMed Central

    Adlung, R.; Carzaniga, A.

    2001-01-01

    The potential for trade in health services has expanded rapidly in recent decades. More efficient communication systems have helped to reduce distance-related barriers to trade; rising incomes and enhanced information have increased the mobility of patients; and internal cost pressures have led various governments to consider possibilities for increased private participation. As yet, however, health services have played only a modest role in the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). It is possible that Members of the World Trade Organization have been discouraged from undertaking access commitments by the novelty of the Agreement, coordination problems between relevant agencies, widespread inexperience in concepts of services trade, a traditionally strong degree of government involvement in the health sector, and concerns about basic quality and social objectives. However, more than five years have passed since GATS entered into force, allowing hesitant administrations to familiarize themselves with its main elements and its operation in practice. The present paper is intended to contribute to this process. It provides an overview of the basic structure of GATS and of the patterns of current commitments in health services and of limitations frequently used in this context. The concluding section discusses possibilities of pursuing basic policy objectives in a more open environment and indicates issues that may have to be dealt with in current negotiations on services. PMID:11357215

  6. Exploring the Feasibility of Service Integration in a Low-Income Setting: A Mixed Methods Investigation into Different Models of Reproductive Health and HIV Care in Swaziland

    PubMed Central

    Church, Kathryn; Wringe, Alison; Lewin, Simon; Ploubidis, George B.; Fakudze, Phelele; Mayhew, Susannah H.

    2015-01-01

    Integrating reproductive health (RH) with HIV care is a policy priority in high HIV prevalence settings, despite doubts surrounding its feasibility and varying evidence of effects on health outcomes. The process and outcomes of integrated RH-HIV care were investigated in Swaziland, through a comparative case study of four service models, ranging from fully integrated to fully stand-alone HIV services, selected purposively within one town. A client exit survey (n=602) measured integrated care received and unmet family planning (FP) needs. Descriptive statistics were used to assess the degree of integration per clinic and client demand for services. Logistic regression modelling was used to test the hypothesis that clients at more integrated sites had lower unmet FP needs than clients in a stand-alone site. Qualitative methods included in-depth interviews with clients and providers to explore contextual factors influencing the feasibility of integrated RH-HIV care delivery; data were analysed thematically, combining deductive and inductive approaches. Results demonstrated that clinic models were not as integrated in practice as had been claimed. Fragmentation of HIV care was common. Services accessed per provider were no higher at the more integrated clinics compared to stand-alone models (p>0.05), despite reported demand. While women at more integrated sites received more FP and pregnancy counselling than stand-alone models, they received condoms (a method of choice) less often, and there was no statistical evidence of difference in unmet FP needs by model of care. Multiple contextual factors influenced integration practices, including provider de-skilling within sub-specialist roles; norms of task-oriented routinised HIV care; perceptions of heavy client loads; imbalanced client-provider interactions hindering articulation of RH needs; and provider motivation challenges. Thus, despite institutional support, factors related to the social context of care inhibited

  7. Exploring the Feasibility of Service Integration in a Low-Income Setting: A Mixed Methods Investigation into Different Models of Reproductive Health and HIV Care in Swaziland.

    PubMed

    Church, Kathryn; Wringe, Alison; Lewin, Simon; Ploubidis, George B; Fakudze, Phelele; Mayhew, Susannah H

    2015-01-01

    Integrating reproductive health (RH) with HIV care is a policy priority in high HIV prevalence settings, despite doubts surrounding its feasibility and varying evidence of effects on health outcomes. The process and outcomes of integrated RH-HIV care were investigated in Swaziland, through a comparative case study of four service models, ranging from fully integrated to fully stand-alone HIV services, selected purposively within one town. A client exit survey (n=602) measured integrated care received and unmet family planning (FP) needs. Descriptive statistics were used to assess the degree of integration per clinic and client demand for services. Logistic regression modelling was used to test the hypothesis that clients at more integrated sites had lower unmet FP needs than clients in a stand-alone site. Qualitative methods included in-depth interviews with clients and providers to explore contextual factors influencing the feasibility of integrated RH-HIV care delivery; data were analysed thematically, combining deductive and inductive approaches. Results demonstrated that clinic models were not as integrated in practice as had been claimed. Fragmentation of HIV care was common. Services accessed per provider were no higher at the more integrated clinics compared to stand-alone models (p>0.05), despite reported demand. While women at more integrated sites received more FP and pregnancy counselling than stand-alone models, they received condoms (a method of choice) less often, and there was no statistical evidence of difference in unmet FP needs by model of care. Multiple contextual factors influenced integration practices, including provider de-skilling within sub-specialist roles; norms of task-oriented routinised HIV care; perceptions of heavy client loads; imbalanced client-provider interactions hindering articulation of RH needs; and provider motivation challenges. Thus, despite institutional support, factors related to the social context of care inhibited

  8. Office for prevention and health services assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, James A.

    1994-12-01

    The Air Force Surgeon General has established the Office for Prevention and Health Care ASsessment (OPHSA) to become the center of excellence for preventive services and health care assessment in the U.S. Air Force and the Department of Defense. OPHSA using the principles of total quality management and integrated teams will evaluate, compare, and modify preventive services delivery guidelines to preserve the fighting force by preventing illness and injuries in military populations. OPHSA will evaluate and formulate health care delivery guidelines to improve health care access and delivery to military patient populations. OPHSA will develop data to determine the health status and health needs to beneficiary populations so medical managers can deliver medical care in the most cost effective manner. OPHSA is located at Brooks Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. OPHSA will have thirty seven active duty military, civil service, and contract employees and should be fully functional by the end of 1995.

  9. Clinical Preventive Services for Older Adults: The Interface Between Personal Health Care and Public Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Chesley L.; Shenson, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Healthy aging must become a priority objective for both population and personal health services, and will require innovative prevention programming to span those systems. Uptake of essential clinical preventive services is currently suboptimal among adults, owing to a number of system- and office-based care barriers. To achieve maximum health results, prevention must be integrated across community and clinical settings. Many preventive services are portable, deliverable in either clinical or community settings. Capitalizing on that flexibility can improve uptake and health outcomes. Significant reductions in health disparities, mortality, and morbidity, along with decreases in health spending, are achievable through improved collaboration and synergy between population health and personal health systems. PMID:22390505

  10. 42 CFR 417.103 - Providers of basic and supplemental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Providers of basic and supplemental health services... Providers of basic and supplemental health services. (a)(1) The HMO must provide that the services of health... contracts with the HMO. (2) A staff or medical group model HMO may have as providers of basic...

  11. Access to specialty mental health services among women in California.

    PubMed

    Kimerling, Rachel; Baumrind, Nikki

    2005-06-01

    The Anderson behavioral model was used to investigate racial and ethnic disparities in access to specialty mental health services among women in California as well as factors that might account for such disparities. The study was a cross-sectional examination of a probability sample of 3,750 California women. The main indicators of access to services were perceived need, service seeking, and service use. Multivariate models were constructed that accounted for need and enabling and demographic variables. Significant racial and ethnic variations in access to specialty mental health services were observed. African-American, Hispanic, and Asian women were significantly less likely to use specialty mental health services than white women. Multivariate analyses showed that Hispanic and Asian women were less likely than white women to report perceived need, even after frequent mental distress had been taken into account. Among women with perceived need, African-American and Asian women were less likely than white women to seek mental health services after differences in insurance status had been taken into account. Among women who sought services, Hispanic women were less likely than white women to obtain services after adjustment for the effects of poverty. Need and enabling factors did not entirely account for the observed disparities in access to services. Additional research is needed to identify gender- and culture-specific models for access to mental health services in order to decrease disparities in access. Factors such as perceived need and decisions to seek services are important factors that should be emphasized in future studies.

  12. Towards a model of Strategic Roster Planning and Control: an empirical study of nurse rostering practices in the UK National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Silvestro, Rhian; Silvestro, Claudio

    2008-05-01

    Despite the criticality of nurse rostering practices, there is a surprising lack of attention paid to this managerial activity both in practice and in the health-service management literature. This paper reports the results of an inductive, empirical study of rostering practices in the UK National Health Service with a view to developing a shared understanding of roster planning processes and of what constitutes rostering effectiveness. A survey of rostering practices in 50 wards, followed by five in-depth, longitudinal case studies, revealed the complexity of rostering activities, and identified the main design parameters, which were used to specify rostering systems and to prepare periodic rosters. Rostering activities were perceived to directly impact upon service delivery, resource utilization and nurse retention. A number of poor rostering practices were identified, which could lead to dysfunctional behaviour. This analysis points to a clear managerial imperative to improve local competencies in roster planning and control, recognizing their strategic significance in contributing to hospital effectiveness. A 'Strategic Roster Planning and Control (SRPC)' model is proposed, which may provide a framework for evaluating rostering effectiveness, and a platform for the sharing of best practice, in order to stimulate organizational learning and achieve nationwide improvements in hospital performance.

  13. The Early Motherhood Service: an acceptable and accessible perinatal mental health service.

    PubMed

    Judd, Fiona; Stafford, Lesley; Gibson, Penelope; Ahrens, Jennifer

    2011-06-01

    The aims of this paper are to quantify the effect of an innovative perinatal mental health program, the Early Motherhood Service, to identify factors contributing to its success, and to make recommendations as to its general applicability across other rural services. The study involved stakeholder evaluation, analysis of available outcome data and analysis of consumer feedback data. Service functions were grouped into four key areas: increasing awareness of perinatal mental health problems; providing information and advice; providing treatment and support; and education, training and capacity building. Women accessing the service showed significant improvement in outcomes as measured by change over time in the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the Health of the Nation Outcome Scale. Consumer feedback demonstrated that the service was highly valued. Key factors identified as contributing to the service's success were broad coverage of perinatal mental health problems; inclusion of early intervention and prevention; outreach capacity; partnership with, support for and capacity building of other health providers; a location which is accessible and non-stigmatizing; and staff comprising senior and skilled clinicians. The Early Motherhood Service is an innovative perinatal mental health service. It provides a useful model for the development of such services in rural communities.

  14. School Health Services Guidelines, Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haufler, Lillian H.

    This manual is intended to serve as a guideline for school administrators and personnel who are concerned with the health education of school age children. Because of the different and complicated health problems now facing children and youth, it is deemed imperative that new priorities be established. Thus, policies and methods of school health…

  15. Emergency Health Services Selected Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    This annotated bibliography contains books, journal articles, visual aids, and other documents pertaining to emergency health care, which are organized according to: (1) publications dealing with day-to-day health emergencies that occur at home, work, and play, (2) documents that will help communities prepare for emergencies, including natural…

  16. Ethical issues in providing occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Rest, K M

    1994-04-01

    In the rush to capture new segments of the health care market, occupational health services have become an attractive "product line" for some provider groups. However, providers may not appreciate the significant ethical dimensions of delivering occupational health services. The environment of the workplace gives rise to competing goals, interests, and expectations and creates thorny ethical issues for health care providers. It is important that providers develop a framework for recognizing and addressing these ethical issues and the influence of their own and other parties' values on their decision-making processes.

  17. The politics of evaluating Aboriginal Health Services.

    PubMed

    Moodie, R

    1989-01-01

    Evaluation of Aboriginal Health Services (AHSs) has become a topic of importance to service providers and governments in recent years. This paper examines some of the difficulties AHSs have in conducting evaluation and presents an example of an inappropriate evaluation methodology as proposed by the Commonwealth Department of Aboriginal Affairs (DAA) in 1986. The paper examines the contradictory nature of the DAA proposal and the mistrust it has engendered in many AHSs. It then highlights some of the political difficulties in developing meaningful national and community health objectives as a basis for sound evaluation of health services. The paper concludes by identifying some of the processes whereby more appropriate evaluation methodologies might be developed and suggests that negotiation and consultation with the Aboriginal communities and their health services are imperative to successful evaluation.

  18. Socialism and the British National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Powell, M

    1997-09-01

    This paper examines some of the key characteristics of a socialist health care system using the example of the British National Health Service (NHS). It has been claimed that the NHS has socialist principles, and represents an island of socialism in a capitalist sea. However, using historical analysis, this paper argues that while the NHS claims some socialist ends, they could never be fully achieved because of the lack of socialist means. The socialist mechanisms which were associated with earlier plans for a national health service such as salaried service, health centres, elected health authorities and divorcing private practice from the public service were discarded in negotiation. Moreover, even these would have achieved socialism merely in the sense of distributing health care, without any deeper transformation associated with doctor-patient relationships and prevention. In short, the NHS is more correctly seen as nationalised rather than socialised medicine, achieving the first three levels of a socialist health service identified here. It can be said to have socialist principles in the limited distributional sense and has some socialist means to achieve these. However, it lacks the stronger means to fully achieve its distributional goals, and is very distant from the third level of a radical transformation of health care.

  19. Time stamp services for trustworthy health communications.

    PubMed

    Pharow, Peter; Blobel, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    Trustworthy communication and co-operation requires in general static TTP services describing status and relation of communicating principals as well as their corresponding keys and attributes. Additional TTP services are needed to provide trustworthy information about dynamic issues of communication and cooperation such as message identifier, time and location of processes, workflow relations and system behaviour. Certified time stamps are important notary's functions dealing with the services mentioned above. Within the European RESHEN project, the ONCONET regional health network for improving cancer care has been moving from system-related to certified time stamps using a local secure time stamp server or deploying remote time stamp services provided by an accredited CA. After implementing such services at the beginning of 2002, an evaluation of the operation modes will be performed during 2002 to derive recommendations for optimisation of these important services in national and international health networks.

  20. The effectiveness of an integrated collaborative care model vs. a shifted outpatient collaborative care model on community functioning, residential stability, and health service use among homeless adults with mental illness: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Schuler, Andrée; Nisenbaum, Rosane; deRuiter, Wayne; Guimond, Tim; Wasylenki, Donald; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Hwang, Stephen W; Rouleau, Katherine; Dewa, Carolyn

    2015-08-28

    Although a growing number of collaborative mental health care models have been developed, targeting specific populations, few studies have utilized such interventions among homeless populations. This quasi-experimental study compared the outcomes of two shelter-based collaborative mental health care models for men experiencing homelessness and mental illness: (1) an integrated multidisciplinary collaborative care (IMCC) model and (2) a less resource intensive shifted outpatient collaborative care (SOCC) model. In total 142 participants, 70 from IMCC and 72 from SOCC were enrolled and followed for 12 months. Outcome measures included community functioning, residential stability, and health service use. Multivariate regression models were used to compare study arms with respect to change in community functioning, residential stability, and health service use outcomes over time and to identify baseline demographic, clinical or homelessness variables associated with observed changes in these domains. We observed improvements in both programs over time on measures of community functioning, residential stability, hospitalizations, emergency department visits and community physician visits, with no significant differences between groups over time on these outcome measures. Our findings suggest that shelter-based collaborative mental health care models may be effective for individuals experiencing homelessness and mental illness. Future studies should seek to confirm these findings and examine the cost effectiveness of collaborative care models for this population.

  1. Recommendations for the referral of patients for proton-beam therapy, an Alberta Health Services report: a model for Canada?

    PubMed Central

    Patel, S.; Kostaras, X.; Parliament, M.; Olivotto, I.A.; Nordal, R.; Aronyk, K.; Hagen, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Compared with photon therapy, proton-beam therapy (pbt) offers compelling advantages in physical dose distribution. Worldwide, gantry-based proton facilities are increasing in number, but no such facilities exist in Canada. To access pbt, Canadian patients must travel abroad for treatment at high cost. In the face of limited access, this report seeks to provide recommendations for the selection of patients most likely to benefit from pbt and suggests an out-of-country referral process. Methods The medline, embase, PubMed, and Cochrane databases were systematically searched for studies published between January 1990 and May 2014 that evaluated clinical outcomes after pbt. A draft report developed through a review of evidence was externally reviewed and then approved by the Alberta Health Services Cancer Care Proton Therapy Guidelines steering committee. Results Proton therapy is often used to treat tumours close to radiosensitive tissues and to treat children at risk of developing significant late effects of radiation therapy (rt). In uncontrolled and retrospective studies, local control rates with pbt appear similar to, or in some cases higher than, photon rt. Randomized trials comparing equivalent doses of pbt and photon rt are not available. Summary Referral for pbt is recommended for patients who are being treated with curative intent and with an expectation for long-term survival, and who are able and willing to travel abroad to a proton facility. Commonly accepted indications for referral include chordoma and chondrosarcoma, intraocular melanoma, and solid tumours in children and adolescents who have the greatest risk for long-term sequelae. Current data do not provide sufficient evidence to recommend routine referral of patients with most head-and-neck, breast, lung, gastrointestinal tract, and pelvic cancers, including prostate cancer. It is recommended that all referrals be considered by a multidisciplinary team to select appropriate cases. PMID

  2. Customer complaints in the National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Reid, N; Reid, R; Morris, D

    1995-11-01

    This paper addresses the role of consumer complaints in the flourishing quality assurance industry within the National Health Service (NHS), and considers the traditional ethos of complaints within the service. The advent of the internal market is considered as one of a range of factors which may change attitudes of NHS staff to complaints. In evaluating how complaints services might develop relevant literature is reviewed and recent national data on complaints procedures are cited.

  3. COMPREHENSIVE MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES FOR THE DEAF.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALTSHULER, KENNETH Z.; RAINER, JOHN D.

    A THREE YEAR PILOT PROJECT DESIGNED TO DEMONSTRATE THE VALUE AND FEASIBILITY OF PROVIDING COMPREHENSIVE MENTAL HEALTH (PSYCHIATRIC) SERVICES FOR THE DEAF ESTABLISHED A CLINICAL UNIT FOR THE DEAF WITH INPATIENT, OUTPATIENT, AND AFTERCARE SERVICES. THE CLINIC SERVED 50 PATIENTS (MINIMUM AGE 16) IN THE WARDS AND 96 PATIENTS (ALL AGES) IN THE…

  4. Health and Human Services Issues. Transition Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) should take actions in four critical areas in order to serve the millions dependent on it for benefit payments and services. First, HHS should improve departmental management by investing in department-wide planning, its personnel, and its financial and information management. HHS can eliminate…

  5. The Mental Health Information Services. Program Audit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geizer, Bernard P., Ed.

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of New York State's Mental Health Information Services (MHISs). The goals of the evaluation were to determine the effectiveness with which legislatively mandated information services to the mentally disabled and to the courts were carried out, and to evaluate MHIS workload and activity in order to…

  6. High volume acupuncture clinic (HVAC) for chronic knee pain--audit of a possible model for delivery of acupuncture in the National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, Saul; Cummings, Mike; Perrin, Chris; Ito, Rieko

    2008-03-01

    Recent research has established the efficacy, effectiveness and cost effectiveness of acupuncture for some forms of chronic musculoskeletal pain. However, there are practical problems with delivery which currently prevent its large scale implementation in the National Health Service. We have developed a delivery model at our hospital, a 'high volume' acupuncture clinic (HVAC) in which patients are treated in a group setting for single conditions using standardised or semi-standardised electroacupuncture protocols by practitioners with basic training. We discuss our experiences using this model for chronic knee pain and present an outcome audit for the first 77 patients, demonstrating satisfactory initial (eight week) clinical results. Longer term (one year) data are currently being collected and the model should next be tested in primary care to confirm its feasibility.

  7. Early diagnosis and Early Start Denver Model intervention in autism spectrum disorders delivered in an Italian Public Health System service.

    PubMed

    Devescovi, Raffaella; Monasta, Lorenzo; Mancini, Alice; Bin, Maura; Vellante, Valerio; Carrozzi, Marco; Colombi, Costanza

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis combined with an early intervention program, such as the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), can positively influence the early natural history of autism spectrum disorders. This study evaluated the effectiveness of an early ESDM-inspired intervention, in a small group of toddlers, delivered at low intensity by the Italian Public Health System. Twenty-one toddlers at risk for autism spectrum disorders, aged 20-36 months, received 3 hours/wk of one-to-one ESDM-inspired intervention by trained therapists, combined with parents' and teachers' active engagement in ecological implementation of treatment. The mean duration of treatment was 15 months. Cognitive and communication skills, as well as severity of autism symptoms, were assessed by using standardized measures at pre-intervention (Time 0 [T0]; mean age =27 months) and post-intervention (Time 1 [T1]; mean age =42 months). Children made statistically significant improvements in the language and cognitive domains, as demonstrated by a series of nonparametric Wilcoxon tests for paired data. Regarding severity of autism symptoms, younger age at diagnosis was positively associated with greater improvement at post-assessment. Our results are consistent with the literature that underlines the importance of early diagnosis and early intervention, since prompt diagnosis can reduce the severity of autism symptoms and improve cognitive and language skills in younger children. Particularly in toddlers, it seems that an intervention model based on the ESDM principles, involving the active engagement of parents and nursery school teachers, may be effective even when the individual treatment is delivered at low intensity. Furthermore, our study supports the adaptation and the positive impact of the ESDM entirely sustained by the Italian Public Health System.

  8. Rural health service managers' perspectives on preparing rural health services for climate change.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Rachael; McGirr, Joe

    2017-08-17

    To determine health service managers' (HSMs) recommendations on strengthening the health service response to climate change. Self-administered survey in paper or electronic format. Rural south-west of New South Wales. Health service managers working in rural remote metropolitan areas 3-7. Proportion of respondents identifying preferred strategies for preparation of rural health services for climate change. There were 43 participants (53% response rate). Most respondents agreed that there is scepticism regarding climate change among health professionals (70%, n = 30) and community members (72%, n = 31). Over 90% thought that climate change would impact the health of rural populations in the future with regard to heat-related illnesses, mental health, skin cancer and water security. Health professionals and government were identified as having key leadership roles on climate change and health in rural communities. Over 90% of the respondents believed that staff and community in local health districts (LHDs) should be educated about the health impacts of climate change. Public health education facilitated by State or Federal Government was the preferred method of educating community members, and education facilitated by the LHD was the preferred method for educating health professionals. Health service managers hold important health leadership roles within rural communities and their health services. The study highlights the scepticism towards climate change among health professionals and community members in rural Australia. It identifies the important role of rural health services in education and advocacy on the health impacts of climate change and identifies recommended methods of public health education for community members and health professionals. © 2017 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  9. Manpower Needs in Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Herman S.

    All hospitals, nursing homes, clinics, and home nursing and ambulance services in New York State were surveyed to determine projected needs for 39 specific occupations for nursing staff, technicians, and aides. There were 326,000 persons working in the medical care facilities in December 1966, and 182,000 held jobs in the 39 occupations. Hospitals…

  10. Students' community health service delivery: experiences of involved parties.

    PubMed

    Greeff, M; van der Walt, E; Strydom, C; Wessels, C; Schutte, P J

    2009-03-01

    For several years the School of Nursing Science and the School of Psychosocial Behavioural Science, of a specific university, have been offering health care services in response to some of the health needs of a disadvantaged community as part of their students' experiential learning. However, these health care services were rendered independently by these two schools, implying that no feedback system existed to evaluate the worth and quality of these student-rendered health care services. The objectives of this research were to explore and describe the experiences of senior nursing and social work students, the experiences of health service delivery organisations concerned and the experiences of the disadvantaged community members receiving such health care services, as well as to investigate which communication models were apparent with regard to the major factors within health communication. An exploratory descriptive qualitative research design was used. Focus group discussions were held, interviews were conducted and field notes taken. Focus group discussions and interviews were transcribed and analysed by the research team to determine themes and sub-themes using the open coding technique. The results of the three groups showed similarities. The health service delivery organisations also identified a communication barrier, although the students were prepared to bridge it. The health service delivery organisations and the community felt positive towards the students and what they offered to the organisations and to the patients. A greater need for multi-disciplinary team work was recognised by al parties concerned. Recommendations focus on improved student accompaniment by lecturers; extending health care delivery to include a multi-disciplinary team approach by students; as well as improving the delivery of health care services.

  11. [Effective access to health services: operationalizing universal health coverage].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Dolci, Germán; Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; García-Saisó, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    The right to health and its operational form, as an organized social response to health: the right to health protection, are the mainstay for the global push towards universal health coverage. The path to achieve this goal is particular to each country and relates to the baseline and specific context in relation to what is feasible. In practical terms, universal coverage involves the correlation between demand and supply of services (promotion, prevention, and care), expressed by the ability for each individual to make use of services when these are required. In those terms universal coverage is then effective access. The objective of the paper is to explore the conceptualization of effective access to health services and propose a definition that allows its operationalization thereof. This definition considers key elements of supply and demand of services, including the availability of resources and adequate provision (quality), as well as barriers to use them.

  12. 78 FR 61367 - Health Resources and Services Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Public Comment Request AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS...

  13. 78 FR 14806 - Health Resources and Services Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Statement of Organization, Functions and Delegations of Authority; Correction AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION...

  14. Health services research: the gradual encroachment of ideas.

    PubMed

    Black, Nick

    2009-04-01

    There is increasing pressure on researchers and research funding bodies to demonstrate the value of research. Simple approaches, consistent with the biomedical paradigm, based on relating the cost of research to its supposed impact are being investigated and adopted in laboratory and clinical research. While this may be appropriate in such research areas, it should not be applied to health services research which aims to alter the ways policy-makers and managers think about health, disease and health care or, as John Maynard Keynes put it, 'the gradual encroachment of ideas'. By considering six fundamental assumptions about health care that have been successfully challenged and overturned over the past few decades, the profound and sustained impact of health services research can be demonstrated. The application of economic models of 'payback' would fail to recognize such contributions which, in turn, could threaten future funding of health services research.

  15. Expanding HIV testing and counselling into communities: Feasibility, acceptability, and effects of an integrated family planning/HTC service delivery model by Village Health Teams in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Brunie, Aurélie; Wamala-Mucheri, Patricia; Akol, Angela; Mercer, Sarah; Chen, Mario

    2016-10-01

    Improving HIV testing and counselling (HTC) requires a range of strategies. This article reports on HTC service delivery by Village Health Teams (VHTs) in Uganda in the context of a model integrating this new component into pre-existing family planning services. Eight health centres from matched pairs were randomly allocated to intervention or control. After being trained, 36 VHTs reporting to selected facilities in the intervention group started offering HTC along with family planning, while VHTs in the control group provided family planning only. Proficiency testing was conducted as external quality assurance. A survey of all 36 VHTs and 137 family planning clients in the intervention group and 119 clients in the control group and a review of record data were conducted after 10 months. Survey responses by VHTs and their clients in the intervention group demonstrate knowledge of counselling messages and safe testing. External quality assessment results provide additional evidence of competency. Eighty per cent of the family planning clients surveyed in the intervention group received an HIV test during the intervention; 27% of those were first-time testers. More clients had ever tested for HIV in the intervention group compared with the control; clients also retested more often. Findings indicate that this model is feasible and acceptable for expanding quality HTC into communities. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number [NCT02244398]. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Provision of Personal Healthcare Services by Local Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Huabin; Sotnikov, Sergey; Winterbauer, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The scope of local health department (LHD) involvement in providing personal healthcare services versus population-based services has been debated for decades. A 2012 IOM report suggests that LHDs should gradually withdraw from providing personal healthcare services. The purpose of this study is to assess the level of LHD involvement in provision of personal healthcare services during 2008–2013 and examine the association between provision of personal healthcare services and per capita public health expenditures. Methods Data are from the 2013 survey of LHDs and Area Health Resource Files. The number, ratio, and share of revenue from personal healthcare services were estimated. Both linear and panel fixed effects models were used to examine the association between provision of personal healthcare services and per capita public health expenditures. Data were analyzed in 2014. Results The mean number of personal healthcare services provided by LHDs did not change significantly in 2008–2013. Overall, personal services constituted 28% of total service items. The share of revenue from personal services increased from 16.8% in 2008 to 20.3% in 2013. Results from the fixed effect panel models show a positive association between personal healthcare services’ share of revenue and per capita expenditures (b=0.57, p<0.001). Conclusions A lower share of revenue from personal healthcare services is associated with lower per capita expenditures. LHDs, especially those serving <25,000 people, are highly dependent on personal healthcare revenue to sustain per capita expenditures. LHDs may need to consider strategies to replace lost revenue from discontinuing provision of personal healthcare services. PMID:25997902

  17. Improving throughput in a youth mental health service.

    PubMed

    Coates, Dominiek; Howe, Deborah

    2017-04-18

    Purpose The discrepancy between increasing demand and limited resources in public mental health is putting pressure on services to continuously review their practices and develop innovative models of care that redress this discrepancy. To ensure the service models continue to meet the needs of all stakeholders, children and young people's mental health (CYPMH) conducts regular reviews of its service models. Accordingly, the youth mental health (YMH) model at CYPMH has evolved significantly over time in response to the needs of young people and service demand. The purpose of this paper is to outline the findings of a recent review of the YMH service, and the subsequent changes to the service model. Design/methodology/approach Informed by a participatory action philosophy, feedback was sought from staff on the service model through a range of methods including a questionnaire, staff consultations through a working party and interviews. This feedback was used to redesign the model, which was then evaluated again. Findings Staff identified a number of challenges with the service model and a range of service improvement solutions. The key issues included exceedingly high caseloads, workplace tensions, and fragmentation of the client journey. This paper outlines the primary solution to these key concerns, namely, the introduction of brief intervention (BI) as the entry point to the service. Originality/value BI approaches provide a solution to overly high caseloads as the direct and focussed approach of BI generally reduces the number of sessions people need. BI is an important addition to other treatment options and should be seen as a valid component of the continuum of mental healthcare.

  18. Modeling the Structure of Partnership between Researchers and Front-Line Service Providers: Strengthening Collaborative Public Health Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Rogério M.; Wall, Melanie M.; Spector, Anya Y.

    2014-01-01

    Partnerships between HIV researchers and service providers are essential for reducing the gap between research and practice. Community-Based Participatory Research principles guided this cross-sectional study, combining 40 in-depth interviews with surveys of 141 providers in 24 social service agencies in New York City. We generated the…

  19. Modeling the Structure of Partnership between Researchers and Front-Line Service Providers: Strengthening Collaborative Public Health Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Rogério M.; Wall, Melanie M.; Spector, Anya Y.

    2014-01-01

    Partnerships between HIV researchers and service providers are essential for reducing the gap between research and practice. Community-Based Participatory Research principles guided this cross-sectional study, combining 40 in-depth interviews with surveys of 141 providers in 24 social service agencies in New York City. We generated the…

  20. 45 CFR 1308.18 - Disabilities/health services coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disabilities/health services coordination. 1308.18... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.18 Disabilities/health services coordination. (a) The...

  1. 45 CFR 1308.18 - Disabilities/health services coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disabilities/health services coordination. 1308.18... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.18 Disabilities/health services coordination. (a) The...

  2. 45 CFR 1308.18 - Disabilities/health services coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disabilities/health services coordination. 1308.18... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.18 Disabilities/health services coordination. (a) The...

  3. 45 CFR 1308.18 - Disabilities/health services coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disabilities/health services coordination. 1308.18... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.18 Disabilities/health services coordination. (a) The...

  4. 45 CFR 1308.18 - Disabilities/health services coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disabilities/health services coordination. 1308.18... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.18 Disabilities/health services coordination. (a) The...

  5. Developing an Australian-first recovery model for parents in Victorian mental health and family services: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Maybery, Darryl; Goodyear, Melinda; Reupert, Andrea; Sheen, Jade; Cann, Warren; Dalziel, Kim; Tchernagovski, Phillip; O'Hanlon, Brendan; von Doussa, Henry

    2017-05-26

    A considerable number of people with a mental illness are parents caring for dependent children. For those with a mental illness, parenting can provide a sense of competence, belonging, identity and hope and hence is well aligned to the concept of personal recovery. However, little research has focused on the recovery journey of those who are parents and have a mental illness. This randomised controlled trial aims to (i) evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention model of recovery for parents (Let's Talk about Children) in three different mental health service sectors and (ii) examine the economic value of a larger roll out (longer term) of the parent recovery model. A two arm parallel randomised controlled trial will be used with participants, who are being treated for their mental illness in adult mental health, non-government community mental health or family welfare services. The study will involve 192 parents, who are considered by their treating practitioner to be sufficiently well to provide informed consent and participate in an intervention (Let's Talk about Children) or control group (treatment as usual). Participant randomisation will occur at the level of the treating practitioner and will be based on whether the randomised practitioner is trained in the intervention. Outcomes are compared at pre, post intervention and six-month follow-up. Recovery, parenting and family functioning, and quality of life questionnaires will be used to measure parent wellbeing and the economic benefits of the intervention. This is the first randomised controlled trial to investigate the efficacy of a parenting intervention on recovery outcomes and the first to provide an economic evaluation of an intervention for parents with a mental illness. An implementation model is required to embed the intervention in different sectors. The trial was retrospectively registered: ACTRN12616000460404 on the 8/4/2016.

  6. A Health Services Framework of Spiritual Care

    PubMed Central

    Daaleman, Timothy P.

    2012-01-01

    , such as nurses, than those who did not; no differences were observed based on the presence of other sources of support. Conclusions A health services framework provides a holistic view of spiritual care, one that is consistent with integrated nursing models. Implications for Nursing Management By focusing on the structure, process, and outcome elements of spiritual care within organizational settings, nursing management can develop feasible approaches to implement, improve, and evaluate the delivery of this unique type of care. PMID:23151104

  7. Early Intervention Services in Youth Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Darryl; Johnston, Amy; Campbell, Bronwyn; Littlefield, Lyn

    2007-01-01

    Mental and substance use disorders are leading contributors to the burden of disease among young people in Australia, but young people experience a range of barriers to accessing appropriate treatment for their mental health concerns. The development of early intervention services that provide accessible and effective mental health care has the…

  8. The public's priorities in health services.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Giora; Baron-Epel, Orna

    2015-10-01

    Rationing in health services cannot be solved only by cost-effective analysis because social values play a central role in the difficult trade-off dilemma of prioritizing some service over others. To examine the relative importance ascribed by the public to selected components of health services, in the national allocation of resources as well as in their personal insurance. A telephone survey of a representative sample of the Israeli adult population (N = 1225). Two versions of the questionnaire were used. At the national level, interviewees were asked to assume they were the Minister of Health. At the personal level, interviewees were asked to choose items to be included in their personal complementary health insurance. Check-ups for early disease detection and nursing care for the frail elderly got the highest support for extra budget as well as to be included in personal insurance. Other items presented were fertility treatments, cardiac rehabilitation, mental health, dental health, programmes for preventive medicine and health promotion, subsidizing supplemental insurance for the poor, additional staff for primary clinics and building a new hospital. The lowest support was for alternative medicine and for cosmetic surgery. No subgroup in the Israeli society presented a different first priority. The Israeli public does not give high priority to 'nice to have' services but their selections are 'mature' and responsible. Rationing in health care requires listening to the public even if there are still many methodological limitations on how to reflect the public's opinion. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. The Nurse in the School Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Amelia

    2001-01-01

    This 1937 paper examines school nurses' roles in providing health education and health services. Duties include observing conditions indicating need for medical attention; interpreting children's needs to parents and teachers; teaching; providing materials for teachers; helping physicians with examinations; developing procedures for controlling…

  10. Diabetes and Adult Day Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabelko, Holly I.; DeCoster, Vaughn A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a profile of individuals with diabetes who receive services in adult day centers. This exploratory study uses an administrative data set (N = 280) from five programs in central Ohio to examine four areas: demographics, health and mental health, financial and social resources, and disenrollment status. Older…

  11. Diabetes and Adult Day Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabelko, Holly I.; DeCoster, Vaughn A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a profile of individuals with diabetes who receive services in adult day centers. This exploratory study uses an administrative data set (N = 280) from five programs in central Ohio to examine four areas: demographics, health and mental health, financial and social resources, and disenrollment status. Older…

  12. Profiles of Grant Programs: Public Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health , Education, and Welfare, Washington., DC. Office of the Secretary.

    For potential grant applicants and for the general public, the booklet describes the programs of the six Public Health Service agencies in the American health care system. Each program is described concisely in terms of: its purpose and legal basis; applicants' eligibility for grants and the basis for their award; the special requirements made of…

  13. Online sexual health services: examining youth's perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shoveller, Jean; Knight, Rod; Davis, Wendy; Gilbert, Mark; Ogilvie, Gina

    2012-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are high and rising in British Columbia, Canada, and youth ages 15-24 account for a disproportionate amount of the infections. As a result, new public health interventions have increasingly turned towards media such as the internet to reach youth populations at risk for STIs/HIV. We describe youth's perceptions about online sexual health services. We used data from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 38 men and 14 women between the ages of 15 and 24 who discussed: online STI/HIV testing services and online counselling and education services. In general, youth are familiar with, receptive to and have an affinity for online sexual health services. Youth in the current study suggested that online STI/HIV risk assessment and testing as well as online counselling and education could enhance opportunities for low-threshold service provision. Online services appealed to youth's needs for convenience, privacy, as well as expedient access to testing and/or counselling; however, youth also appear to have relatively low tolerance for technologies that they perceive to be antiquated (e.g., printing lab requisition forms), revealing the challenges of designing online approaches that will not quickly become outdated. Globally, pilot programs for Internet-based sexual health services such as online testing and partner notification have shown promising results. As Canadian interventions of this type emerge, research with youth populations can provide relevant insights to help program planners launch effective interventions.

  14. Health perspectives regarding adolescents in military service.

    PubMed

    Hardoff, Daniel; Halevy, Ari

    2006-08-01

    Our purpose is to illuminate health perspectives of adolescents in military service, who comprise the main bulk of military personnel. Two views are emphasized: the soldier as a developing adolescent and the healthcare of adolescent soldiers. The capacity for abstract thinking and future planning, characteristic of late adolescence, opposes the military challenges of obedience, disengagement from the family, and potential threats for physical injury and mental stress, in addition to the requirement for responsibility beyond the individual's personal needs. On the other hand, at discharge from military service, the mature young adult faces questions of a 17-year-old adolescent. Health perspectives regarding adolescents in military service include physical and mental health screening before draft; recruiting adolescents with chronic illnesses; specific healthcare issues during service, including routine medical care, psychosocial problems of young people in service and approach to suicide and to risk behaviors; health aspects of adolescent women in military frameworks; and the dual commitment of physicians as military officers. Professionals who care for the well-being of young people in their late teens and early 20s in military service need to consider the service period as an additional developmental stage within late adolescence that requires attention as part of the comprehensive healthcare.

  15. Commitment and concern in the health service.

    PubMed

    Weir, R D

    1976-01-01

    As part of a general review of the use of local health services resources, a specific enquiry was mounted to examine the recurring complaint of a lack of identity or sense of belonging made by staff working in the largest district of the Grampian Health Board. The investigation pointed to clearly identifiable sources of confusion and concern: (a) a need to identify with and feel committed to the health service; (b) a sense of purpose and direction; (c) satisfaction with the conditions of service; (d) an understanding of an individual's role and its relationship to others'. It is relatively easy to list the problems, such as friction between occupational groups, lack of commitment, uncertainty over duties and authority, reluctance to delegate and resistance to, or even outright rejection of, decisions apparently at variance with professional advice. In addition to these internal stresses the health service is perpetually beset by two other external problems, namely what it is expected to achieve and the finance allowed to attain its goals. The various groups within the service are in no way agreed on roles and responsibilities, Without agreement goals cannot be defined. Without goals, use of resources cannot be rationalized. Without a demonstrably fair distribution of resources, neither the public nor health service staff will feel confident or committed. Somewhere this cycle must be broken.

  16. [Quality assurance in occupational health services].

    PubMed

    Michalak, J

    1996-01-01

    The general conditions influencing the quality assurance and audit in Polish occupational health services are presented. The factors promoting or hampering the implementation of quality assurance and audits are also discussed. The major influence on the transformation of Polish occupational health services in exorted by employers who are committed to cover the costs of the obligatory prophylactic examination of their employees. This is the factor which also contributes to the improvement of quality if services. The definitions of the most important terms are reviewed to highlight their accordance with the needs of occupational health services in Poland. The examples of audit are presented and the elements of selected methods of auditing are suggested to be adopted in Poland.

  17. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective.

    PubMed

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, I R; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, C M; Purcarea, V L

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer's perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician's perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician's perspective.

  18. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, IR; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, CM; Purcarea, VL

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer’s perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician’s perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician’s perspective. PMID:27453745

  19. Primary health care models

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Judith Belle; French, Reta; McCulloch, Amy; Clendinning, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the knowledge and perceptions of fourth-year medical students regarding the new models of primary health care (PHC) and to ascertain whether that knowledge influenced their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Design Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. Setting The Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario in London. Participants Fourth-year medical students graduating in 2009 who indicated family medicine as a possible career choice on their Canadian Residency Matching Service applications. Methods Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted between January and April of 2009. Data were analyzed using an iterative and interpretive approach. The analysis strategy of immersion and crystallization assisted in synthesizing the data to provide a comprehensive view of key themes and overarching concepts. Main findings Four key themes were identified: the level of students’ knowledge regarding PHC models varied; the knowledge was generally obtained from practical experiences rather than classroom learning; students could identify both advantages and disadvantages of working within the new PHC models; and although students regarded the new PHC models positively, these models did not influence their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Conclusion Knowledge of the new PHC models varies among fourth-year students, indicating a need for improved education strategies in the years before clinical training. Being able to identify advantages and disadvantages of the PHC models was not enough to influence participants’ choice of specialty. Educators and health care policy makers need to determine the best methods to promote and facilitate knowledge transfer about these PHC models. PMID:22518904

  20. PLANNING FOR RURAL HEALTH SERVICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHAPMAN, A.L.

    THE RURAL POPULATION HAS BEEN SHIFTING TOWARD THE URBAN CENTERS OF OUR COUNTRY. SOME EVIDENCE INDICATES A REVERSAL OF THIS SITUATION IN THE NEAR FUTURE. INDUSTRY IS MOVING AWAY FROM THE CITIES TO AVOID WATER POLLUTION, TRAFFIC CONGESTION, AND HIGHER OPERATIONAL COSTS. PLANNED CITIES WHICH INCLUDE COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH PLANS ARE BEING CONSTRUCTED IN…

  1. Determinants of maternal health services utilization in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Rutaremwa, Gideon; Wandera, Stephen Ojiambo; Jhamba, Tapiwa; Akiror, Edith; Kiconco, Angela

    2015-07-17

    Uganda's poor maternal health indicators have resulted from weak maternal health services delivery, including access to quality family planning, skilled birth attendance, emergency obstetric care, and postnatal care for mothers and newborns. This paper investigated the predictors of maternal health services (MHS) utilization characterized as: desirable, moderate and undesirable. We used a sample of 1728 women of reproductive ages (15-49), who delivered a child a year prior to the 2011 UDHS survey. A multinomial logistic regression model was used to analyze the relative contribution of the various predictors of ideal maternal health services package utilization. Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization guided the selection of covariates in the regression model. Women with secondary and higher education were more likely to utilize the desirable maternal health care package (RRR = 4.5; 95% CI = 1.5-14.0), compared to those who had none (reference = undesirable MHS package). Women who lived in regions outside Kampala, Uganda's capital, were less likely to utilize the desirable package of maternal health services (Eastern--RRR = 0.2, CI = 0.1-0.5; Western--RRR = 0.3, CI = 0.1-0.8; Central--RRR = 0.3, CI = 0.1-0.8; Northern--RRR = 0.4, CI = 0.2-1.0). Women from the richest households were more likely to utilize the desirable maternal health services package (RRR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.0-3.7). Residence in rural areas, being Moslem and being married reduced a woman's chances of utilizing moderate maternal health care services. Utilization of maternal health services varied greatly by demographic and socio-economic characteristics. Women with a secondary and higher education, and those of higher income levels, were more likely to utilize the ideal maternal health services package. Therefore, there is need to formulate policies and design maternal health services programs that target the socially marginalized

  2. 42 CFR 136a.15 - Health Service Delivery Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health Service Delivery Areas. 136a.15 Section 136a... Receive Care? § 136a.15 Health Service Delivery Areas. (a) The Indian Health Service will designate and... Federal Indian reservations and areas surrounding those reservations as Health Service Delivery Areas....

  3. Tourist health services at tropical island resorts.

    PubMed

    Wilks, J; Walker, S; Wood, M; Nicol, J; Oldenburg, B

    1995-01-01

    An unfamiliar holiday environment may give rise to a range of common and unique medical conditions and injuries. Based on a six-month retrospective analysis of clinic records, the present study reports a detailed profile of health services provided for guests at three tropical island tourist resorts. A total of 1183 clinic visits were analysed; 735 (62 per cent) concerned medical conditions, while 448 (38 per cent) were related to injuries. The most common medical conditions treated were respiratory, digestive, skin problems, eye disorders, and genito-urinary complaints. Injuries included lacerations, bites and stings, sprains and fractures. Health services consisted mainly of medication, specialist nursing care and first aid. Study findings highlight the advantages of using an internationally accepted classification system for primary health research, and the critical role of the nurse in tourist health services.

  4. [Marketing mix in health service].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The marketing mix is the combination of the marketing variables that a firm employs with the purpose to achieve the expected volume of business within its market. In the sale of goods, four variables compose the marketing mix (4 Ps): Product, Price, Point of sale and Promotion. In the case of providing services, three further elements play a role: Personnel, Physical Evidence and Processes (7 Ps). The marketing mix must be addressed to the consumers as well as to the employees of the providing firm. Furthermore, it must be interpreted as employees ability to satisfy customers (interactive marketing).

  5. Models To Improve Service Delivery. Chapter 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This collection of papers presented at a 1996 conference on children's mental health focuses on models to improve service delivery. Papers have the following titles and authors: (1) "Empirical Evaluation of an Alternative to Hospitalization for Youth Presenting Psychiatric Emergencies" (Scott W. Henggeler); (2) "An Experimental Study of the…

  6. Strategic service quality management for health care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E A; Zwelling, L A

    1996-01-01

    Quality management has become one of the most important and most debated topics within the service sector. This is especially true for health care, as the controversy rages on how the existing American system should be restructured. Health care reform aimed at reducing costs and ensuring access to all Americans cannot be allowed to jeopardize the quality of care. As such, total quality management (TQM) has become a vital ingredient to strategic planning within the health care domain. At the heart of any such quality improvement effort is the issue of measurement. TQM cannot be effectively utilized as a competitive weapon unless quality can be accurately defined, measured, evaluated, and monitored over time. Through such analysis a hospital can elect how to expend its limited resources toward those quality improvement projects which will impact customer perceptions of service quality the most. Thus, the purpose of this report is to establish a framework by which to approach the issue of quality measurement, delineate the various components of quality that exist in health care, and explore how these elements affect one another. We propose that the issue of quality measurement in health care be approached as an integration of service quality attributes common to other service organizations and technical quality attributes unique to health care. We hope that this research will serve as a first step toward the synthesis of the various quality attributes inherent in the health care domain and encourage other researchers to address the interactions of the various quality attributes.

  7. [Public-private partnerships for health services: the solution for the peruvian health system?].

    PubMed

    Zevallos, Leslie; Salas, Valerio; Robles, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Private investor participation in the provision of public health care services (called “public-private partnership” or PPP) dates from the last century, both in Latin America and Europe. In Peru, legislation for PPPs was published in 2008 in terms of infrastructure, maintenance and service provisions in general; but it was at the end of 2013 when PPP began to be implemented for health services. In Colombia, it was realized that this model was very costly. In Chile, the private sector was not regulated from the beginning and today it is difficult to regulate. Costa Rica never gave full decisional power to private sector; the responsibility for providing health services to its population and maintaining health as a right has always been maintained. In Peru, at this stage of PPPs implementation for health services, other experiences are not taken into account such as: transparency, participation of all stakeholders, development of specific legislation, among others.

  8. Student Services Planning Model (SSPM).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Ed

    This manual describes the Virginia Community College System's strategic and operational planning methodology for student services: the Student Services Planning Model (SSPM). Introductory material outlines the role, philosophy, and objectives of the SSPM; offers guidelines for its use and background to its development; and presents the assumptions…

  9. The Complexity of Health Service Integration: A Review of Reviews.

    PubMed

    Heyeres, Marion; McCalman, Janya; Tsey, Komla; Kinchin, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of health service integration is to provide a sustainable and integrated health system that better meets the needs of the end user. Yet, definitions of health service integration, methods for integrating health services, and expected outcomes are varied. This review was commissioned by Queensland Health, the government department responsible for health service delivery in Queensland, Australia, to inform efforts to integrate their mental health services. This review reports on the characteristics, reported outcomes, and design quality of studies included in systematic reviews of health service integration research. The review was developed by systematically searching nine electronic databases to find peer-reviewed Australian and international systematic reviews with a focus on health service integration. Reviews were included if they were in the English language and published between 2000 and 2015. A standardized assessment tool was used to analyze the study design quality of included reviews. Data relating to the integration types, methods, and reported outcomes of integration were synthesized. Seventeen publications met the inclusion criteria. Eleven (65%) reviews were published during the past 5 years, which may indicate a trend for increased awareness of the need for service integration. The majority of reviews were published by researchers in the UK (8/47%), USA (3/18%), and Australia (3/18%). Included reviews focused on a variety of integration types, including integrated care pathways, governance models, integration of interventions, collaborative/integrated care models, and integration of different types of health care. Most (53%) of the reviews reported on the cost-effectiveness of service integration, e.g., positive results, no effect, or inconclusive. Only one of the reviews reported on the importance of consumer involvement. The overall design of 70% of the reviews was high, 18% medium, and 12% low. There is no "one size fits all" approach to

  10. Global perspective on health service financing.

    PubMed

    Abel-Smith, B

    1985-01-01

    Are there new sources of finance which Third World countries can tap to pay for Health for All? Is there anything valuable to be learnt in this respect from the experience of countries which are now developed? Countries have drifted into different ways of paying for health services, often without foreseeing the long run consequences. In many Third World countries the financing of services has been strongly influenced by their colonial past. This explains why many of them attempt to provide wholly free services and provide privileged services not only to the armed forces but to public servants as well. Introducing charges is one way of securing more revenue. It is noticeable that in some countries which were never colonized, there is a greater willingness to use charging and that this stimulates the growth of informal systems of voluntary health insurance. While many developed countries have made a transition from health insurance to universal services while retaining a considerable element of contributions from employers and employees, it is more difficult in political terms to introduce contributions unless those who contribute get something specific for them. The problem for developing countries contemplating the introduction of compulsory health insurance is to design systems which avoid all the problems which have manifested themselves in Europe, North America and on a wider scale in Latin America. These problems include the escalation of costs, failure to collect contributions due, the provision of 'paper' rights, bureaucratic obstacles to receiving care, different funds with varying rights, wholly separated services for insured persons, the bias to urban curative services and the separation of curative from preventive services.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Role of the police in linking individuals experiencing mental health crises with mental health services.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, Rob H S; Broer, Jan; Tholen, Alfons J; Winthorst, Wim H; Visser, Ellen; Wiersma, Durk

    2012-10-17

    The police are considered frontline professionals in managing individuals experiencing mental health crises. This study examines the extent to which these individuals are disconnected from mental health services, and whether the police response has an influence on re-establishing contact. Police records were searched for calls regarding individuals with acute mental health needs and police handling of these calls. Mental healthcare contact data were retrieved from a Psychiatric Case Register. The police were called upon for mental health crisis situations 492 times within the study year, involving 336 individuals (i.e. 1.7 per 1000 inhabitants per year). Half of these individuals (N=162) were disengaged from mental health services, lacking regular care contact in the year prior to the crisis (apart from contact for crisis intervention). In the month following the crisis, 21% of those who were previously disengaged from services had regular care contact, and this was more frequent (49%) if the police had contacted the mental health services during the crisis. The influence of police referral to the services was still present the following year. However, for the majority (58%) of disengaged individuals police did not contact the mental health services at the time of crisis. The police deal with a substantial number of individuals experiencing a mental health crisis, half of whom are out of contact with mental health services, and police play an important role in linking these individuals to services. Training police officers to recognise and handle mental health crises, and implementing practical models of cooperation between the police and mental health services in dealing with such crises may further improve police referral of individuals disengaged from mental health services.

  12. Role of the police in linking individuals experiencing mental health crises with mental health services

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The police are considered frontline professionals in managing individuals experiencing mental health crises. This study examines the extent to which these individuals are disconnected from mental health services, and whether the police response has an influence on re-establishing contact. Methods Police records were searched for calls regarding individuals with acute mental health needs and police handling of these calls. Mental healthcare contact data were retrieved from a Psychiatric Case Register. Results The police were called upon for mental health crisis situations 492 times within the study year, involving 336 individuals (i.e. 1.7 per 1000 inhabitants per year). Half of these individuals (N=162) were disengaged from mental health services, lacking regular care contact in the year prior to the crisis (apart from contact for crisis intervention). In the month following the crisis, 21% of those who were previously disengaged from services had regular care contact, and this was more frequent (49%) if the police had contacted the mental health services during the crisis. The influence of police referral to the services was still present the following year. However, for the majority (58%) of disengaged individuals police did not contact the mental health services at the time of crisis. Conclusions The police deal with a substantial number of individuals experiencing a mental health crisis, half of whom are out of contact with mental health services, and police play an important role in linking these individuals to services. Training police officers to recognise and handle mental health crises, and implementing practical models of cooperation between the police and mental health services in dealing with such crises may further improve police referral of individuals disengaged from mental health services. PMID:23072687

  13. A School-Based Mental Health Service Model for Youth Exposed to Disasters: "Project Fleur-de-lis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Douglas W.

    2008-01-01

    Project Fleur-de-lis was designed only days after Hurricane Katrina to address the intermediate and long-term mental health issues of students as they re-entered school. This article describes the creation, design, impact, and "lessons learned" of this innovative school-based mental health system. (Contains 1 figure.)

  14. A School-Based Mental Health Service Model for Youth Exposed to Disasters: "Project Fleur-de-lis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Douglas W.

    2008-01-01

    Project Fleur-de-lis was designed only days after Hurricane Katrina to address the intermediate and long-term mental health issues of students as they re-entered school. This article describes the creation, design, impact, and "lessons learned" of this innovative school-based mental health system. (Contains 1 figure.)

  15. Climate services to improve public health.

    PubMed

    Jancloes, Michel; Thomson, Madeleine; Costa, María Mánez; Hewitt, Chris; Corvalan, Carlos; Dinku, Tufa; Lowe, Rachel; Hayden, Mary

    2014-04-25

    A high level expert panel discussed how climate and health services could best collaborate to improve public health. This was on the agenda of the recent Third International Climate Services Conference, held in Montego Bay, Jamaica, 4-6 December 2013. Issues and challenges concerning a demand led approach to serve the health sector needs, were identified and analysed. Important recommendations emerged to ensure that innovative collaboration between climate and health services assist decision-making processes and the management of climate-sensitive health risk. Key recommendations included: a move from risk assessment towards risk management; the engagement of the public health community with both the climate sector and development sectors, whose decisions impact on health, particularly the most vulnerable; to increase operational research on the use of policy-relevant climate information to manage climate- sensitive health risks; and to develop in-country capacities to improve local knowledge (including collection of epidemiological, climate and socio-economic data), along with institutional interaction with policy makers.

  16. Climate Services to Improve Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Jancloes, Michel; Thomson, Madeleine; Costa, María Máñez; Hewitt, Chris; Corvalan, Carlos; Dinku, Tufa; Lowe, Rachel; Hayden, Mary

    2014-01-01

    A high level expert panel discussed how climate and health services could best collaborate to improve public health. This was on the agenda of the recent Third International Climate Services Conference, held in Montego Bay, Jamaica, 4–6 December 2013. Issues and challenges concerning a demand led approach to serve the health sector needs, were identified and analysed. Important recommendations emerged to ensure that innovative collaboration between climate and health services assist decision-making processes and the management of climate-sensitive health risk. Key recommendations included: a move from risk assessment towards risk management; the engagement of the public health community with both the climate sector and development sectors, whose decisions impact on health, particularly the most vulnerable; to increase operational research on the use of policy-relevant climate information to manage climate- sensitive health risks; and to develop in-country capacities to improve local knowledge (including collection of epidemiological, climate and socio-economic data), along with institutional interaction with policy makers. PMID:24776719

  17. The prospects for health services in the United States.

    PubMed

    Freidson, E

    1978-12-01

    The enormous variety of diagnoses and prescriptions for dealing with the health care crisis in the United States can be simplified and clarified by reference to four logically distinct models of methods for organizing the production of health services. The assumptions of the free market model, the bureaucratic planning model, the professional model and the cooperative equalitarian model are described, as are the characteristic pathologies connected with the form those models take in reality. The intrinsically expansionist character of the manufacturing, service and consumer segments of the U.S. health system is described and the suggestion made that legislative attempts to contain costs will lead to increased bureaucratization primarily at the expense of the consumer.

  18. Semantic interoperability between clinical and public health information systems for improving public health services.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Diego M; Blobel, Bernd G M E

    2007-01-01

    Improving public health services requires comprehensively integrating all services including medical, social, community, and public health ones. Therefore, developing integrated health information services has to start considering business process, rules and information semantics of involved domains. The paper proposes a business and information architecture for the specification of a future-proof national integrated system, concretely the requirements for semantic integration between public health surveillance and clinical information systems. The architecture is a semantically interoperable approach because it describes business process, rules and information semantics based on national policy documents and expressed in a standard language such us the Unified Modeling Language UML. Having the enterprise and information models formalized, semantically interoperable Health IT components/services development is supported.

  19. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home health...

  20. Policy paradox and political neglect in community health services.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Bob

    2014-09-01

    Community health services (CHSs) have never had a settled organisational existence but the turmoil has intensified since the publication of Transforming Community Services in 2009. CHSs are now beset by three dilemmas: ongoing organisational fragmentation; the extension of competition law and the spread of privatisation; inadequate workforce development and lack of clarity on the nature of CHS activity. This has left the services in a position of policy and political vulnerability. The solution may be for the service to be part of horizontal integration models such as the accountable care organisation, with a focus on locality and multi-professional teams wrapped around patient pathways.

  1. Integrating occupational health services and occupational prevention services.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, L; Deitchman, S; Dervin, K

    2001-09-01

    Despite the human and monetary costs of occupational injury and illness, occupational health care has focused more on treatment than prevention, and prevention is not part of many clinical occupational health practices. This represents a failure of occupational health care to meet the health care needs of the working patients. MEDLINE searches were conducted for literature on occupational medical treatment and the prevention of occupational injury and illness were reviewed to for linkages between prevention and treatment. Policy discussions which identify examples of programs that integrated prevention and treatment were included. Although examples of the integration of clinical and preventive occupational health services exist, there are challenges and barriers to such integration. These include inaction by clinicians who do not recognize their potential role in prevention; the absence of a relationship between the clinician and an employer willing to participate in prevention; economic disincentives against prevention; and the absence of tools that evaluate clinicians on their performance in prevention. Research is needed to improve and promote clinical occupational health preventive services. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Treatment dropout at a secondary mental health service.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mário Sérgio; Xavier Júnior, José Cândido Caldeira; Mascarenhas, Tiago Rodrigues; Silva, Priscila Matthiesen; Vieira, Eveline Maria de Melo; Ribeiro, Luiz Cláudio

    2012-01-01

    To investigate mental health dropout rates in secondary care and to identify possible associations between this variable and social, demographic, psychopathologic, and health care process-related variables. This prospective, observational study included 994 patients referred to a secondary service by four primary care units and evaluated by a specialist mental health team between 2004 and 2008. The dependent variable was treatment dropout. Bivariate analyses investigated possible associations between treatment dropout and 57 independent variables. The overall dropout rate from specialist mental health treatment was relatively low (mean = 25.6%). Only four independent variables were associated with dropout: one socioeconomic, two psychopathological, and one health care process variable. All associations were marginally significant (p < 0.1). Our findings suggest that family members, patients, and health care professionals are well engaged in this mental health care system based on a model of primary care. The use of this mental health model of care should be extended to other regions of our country.

  3. School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

  4. School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

  5. Community financed and operated health services: the case of the Ajo-Lukeville Health Service District.

    PubMed

    Lopes, P M; Nichols, A W

    1990-07-01

    The concept of a health service district, as a variation of the special tax district, is described and discussed. Tax districts have traditionally been used to support both capital construction (revenue bonds) and operational expenses of single-purpose governmental entities. The health service district, where authorized by state laws, may be used by local areas to subsidize the delivery of ambulatory health care. A particular case, the Ajo-Lukeville Health Service District in Arizona, illustrates what can be accomplished by this mechanism with the cooperation of local residents and outside agencies. Both the process of establishing such a district and the outcome of the Ajo-Lukeville experience is described. Reasons why health service districts may prove potentially attractive at this time are reviewed. Impediments to the development of more health service districts are also explored, including the lack of technical assistance, an inadequate awareness of the potential of health service districts, and the absence of a widespread orientation toward community financed and controlled health care. Movement in this direction should facilitate the development of additional health service districts.

  6. Evaluating a Model of School-Based Health and Social Services: An Interdisciplinary Community-University Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronstein, Laura R.; Anderson, Elizabeth; Terwilliger, Susan H.; Sager, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share results of an exploratory qualitative research study designed to shed light on experiences of an interdisciplinary group of elementary school staff and graduate students in a school-based services project. A researcher conducted 20 interviews with staff and graduate students who represented the fields of…

  7. A Collaboratively Designed Child Mental Health Service Model: Multiple Family Groups for Urban Children with Conduct Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Mary M.; Gopalan, Geetha; Franco, Lydia; Dean-Assael, Kara; Chacko, Anil; Jackson, Jerrold M.; Fuss, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    This article presents preliminary outcomes associated with an experimental, longitudinal study of a Multiple Family Group (MFG) service delivery approach set within 13 urban outpatient clinics serving children and their families living in inner-city, primarily African American and Latino communities. Specifically, this article focuses on parent…

  8. Evaluating a Model of School-Based Health and Social Services: An Interdisciplinary Community-University Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronstein, Laura R.; Anderson, Elizabeth; Terwilliger, Susan H.; Sager, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share results of an exploratory qualitative research study designed to shed light on experiences of an interdisciplinary group of elementary school staff and graduate students in a school-based services project. A researcher conducted 20 interviews with staff and graduate students who represented the fields of…

  9. A Collaboratively Designed Child Mental Health Service Model: Multiple Family Groups for Urban Children with Conduct Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Mary M.; Gopalan, Geetha; Franco, Lydia; Dean-Assael, Kara; Chacko, Anil; Jackson, Jerrold M.; Fuss, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    This article presents preliminary outcomes associated with an experimental, longitudinal study of a Multiple Family Group (MFG) service delivery approach set within 13 urban outpatient clinics serving children and their families living in inner-city, primarily African American and Latino communities. Specifically, this article focuses on parent…

  10. Designing Competitive Service Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Veronica; Turner, Trevor

    The explosives developed in Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth ­century by the famous Swede and patron of the world peace prize, Alfred Nobel, were extremely durable and, apart from the introduction of the electric detonator, have remained in use with minor modifications for almost a century (Fig. 5.1a). In the 1970s a new invention started a process of change that has transformed the explosives business from being a supplier of products to a provider of a service. Survival very much depended on the agility of ICI Explosives UK, hereinafter referred to as "ICI Explosives," in adapting to the new competitive environment. Manufacturing excellence was not a solution. Innovative thinking was required to sustain the ­business as changes in technology reduced the complexity that had ­protected the business from serious competition for over a century.

  11. Integrated Models of Education and Service Involving Community-Based Health Care for Underserved Populations: Tulane Student-Run Free Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Rebholz, Casey M.; Macomber, Meghan W.; Althoff, Meghan D.; Garstka, Meghan; Pogribny, Andrej; Rosencrans, Amanda; Selzer, Sydney; Springgate, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Throughout the United States numerous models of local programs, including student-run clinics, exist to address the issue of access to care. The role of these clinics in serving the local community and contributing to medical education has been documented only in limited detail, however. The purpose of this article is to describe the clinic models, patient demographics, and services provided by four student-run clinics in New Orleans. Methods This is a retrospective, multisite chart review study of adult patients examined at student-run clinics between January 1, 2010 and July 31, 2011. Results During a 19-month period, 859 patients collectively were seen at the clinics, for a total of 1455 visits. The most common reasons for seeking care were medication refills (21.6%) and musculoskeletal pain (12.0%). Counseling and health education were provided primarily for smoking cessation (9.0%), diabetes management (7.1%), and hypertension management (5.8%). Nearly one-fifth of patients were given a referral to primary care services. In the 2010–2011 academic year, 87.6% of preclinical medical students volunteered at ≥1 of these clinics and spent 4508 hours during 1478 shifts. Conclusions This article highlights the role of student-run clinics in the community, the safety-net healthcare system, and medical education. Future directions include the establishment of a new clinic, fundraising, and prospective studies to further assess the impact of student-run clinics. PMID:23462491

  12. Public health capacity in the provision of health care services.

    PubMed

    Valdmanis, Vivian; DeNicola, Arianna; Bernet, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we assess the capacity of Florida's public health departments. We achieve this by using bootstrapped data envelopment analysis (DEA) applied to Johansen's definition of capacity utilization. Our purpose in this paper is to measure if there is, theoretically, enough excess capacity available to handle a possible surge in the demand for primary care services especially after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act that includes provisions for expanded public health services. We measure subunit service availability using a comprehensive data source available for all 67 county health departments in the provision of diagnostic care and primary health care. In this research we aim to address two related research questions. First, we structure our analysis so as to fix budgets. This is based on the assumption that State spending on social and health services could be limited, but patient needs are not. Our second research question is that, given the dearth of primary care providers in Florida if budgets are allowed to vary is there enough medical labor to provide care to clients. Using a non-parametric approach, we also apply bootstrapping to the concept of plant capacity which adds to the productivity research. To preview our findings, we report that there exists excess plant capacity for patient treatment and care, but question whether resources may be better suited for more traditional types of public health services.

  13. Developing specialist perinatal mental health services.

    PubMed

    Jomeen, Julie; Martin, Colin

    2014-03-01

    Perinatal mental illness (PMI) represents a significant public health concern affecting considerable numbers of pregnant women and mothers of infants. Depression and anxiety are key issues; however accurate identification of PMI, suitable intervention and provision of adequate services are salient contemporary challenges. Coherence in the commissioning of PMI services, appropriate and contextually sensitive to the needs of the locality, remains a critical factor in the provision of high quality, integrated and seamless care. However, such coherence has had difficulty in finding traction, largely as a consequence of complex service and organisational structures and commissioning pathways. This paper discusses many of the issues that must be considered in the provision of high quality PMI services that are sensitive and appropriate for the needs of women and their families in the community. An exemplar of the development of a local service is discussed in detail.

  14. Health Services and Financing of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Maureen T.; Horgan, Constance M.

    2011-01-01

    Financing, payment, and organization and management of alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment services are closely intertwined and together determine whether people have access to treatment, how the treatment system is designed, and the quality and cost of treatment services. Since the 1960s, changes in these arrangements have driven changes in the delivery of AOD treatment, and recent developments, including the passage of Federal parity legislation and health reform, as well as increasing use of performance contracting, promise to bring additional changes. This article outlines the current state of the AOD treatment system and highlights implications of these impending changes for access to and quality of AOD treatment services. PMID:23580023

  15. Mental health services then and now.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, David

    2007-01-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, psychiatric services have shifted from hospital to community. Managed care reinforces this trend. Mental illness is better understood and less stigmatized, and services are more commonly used. But many in need do not receive care consistent with evidence-based standards, or at all. Challenges are greatest for people with serious and persistent mental illnesses who depend on generic health and welfare programs and integrated services. Evidence-based rehabilitative care is often unavailable. Failures in community care lead to arrest; jail diversion and treatment are required. Despite progress, implementing an effective, patient-centered care system remains a formidable challenge.

  16. Health needs, demand for health services and expenditure across social groups in Italy: an empirical investigation.

    PubMed

    Mapelli, V

    1993-04-01

    The shortage of empirical studies on socio-economic factors influencing demand for health care and inequalities across social groups is dramatic in the case of Italy. The present study aims at discussing these issues, although its results are to be considered mainly methodological, given the small dimension of the sample (n = 807). A survey was carried out in a 'qualitative' sample of 9 Local Health Units of different Italian regions. Attention was paid to report every 'illness episode', considered as a cause of demand for health services, within the reference period (4 weeks) in order to properly link health needs with utilization of health services and relative expenditure. The assessment of health status across social groups, using 4 different indicators, shows the weakest social groups as the most vulnerable. The same groups report higher per capita health services uses and expenditures than their morbidity conditions would require. Assuming equity to be defined as 'equal use for equal need' a particular use-need ratio is developed (i.e. health services used per illness episode) able to capture the 'intensity' of health services use and expenditure per need. The 'over-equity' towards the less favoured groups is interpreted as a possible accomplishment of the N.H.S. fundative goals. A structural model of determinants of health services utilization, carried out through the LISREL technique (R2 = 0.36), confirms the irrelevance of the social variables with respect to need variables.

  17. 77 FR 11557 - National Advisory Council on the National Health Service Corps; Request for Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Advisory Council on the National Health Service Corps; Request for Nominations AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services...

  18. Preparing the Health Services Research Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Ricketts, Thomas C

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe the ways in which investigators are trained for careers in health services research and estimate their number. Data Sources/Study Setting Sources describing health services research (HSR) training were consulted and published inventories of HSR training programs were reviewed and 124 training programs were contacted and interviewed to determine the numbers of students and the content of their HSR degree programs. Study Design Observational study. Data Collection HSR programs listed by AcademyHealth were surveyed and asked for details of enrollments; course content was captured from websites for the remaining programs. Principal Findings There are over 300 programs that train investigators in health services research in master's and doctoral programs. The number of graduates who become HSRs in any given year is unknown, but approximately 5,000 individuals graduate with skills that would allow them to function in or lead HSR projects and up to 200 fellows are annually trained as potential independent health services researchers. Conclusions The training pipeline for HSR appears to match demand because there are no apparent shortages of skilled workers in the field. There are many forces that are pressuring the field to adapt to technology demands and the increasing need for “translation” of results from research into practice. PMID:20459585

  19. Mental health services at selected private schools.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Sherwin, Tierney E; Baggish, Rosemary C; Tacy, Peter B; Meehan, Thomas P

    2004-04-01

    Private schools educate a significant percentage of US children and adolescents. Private schools, particularly where students reside during the academic year, assume responsibility for the health and well-being of their students. Children and adolescents experience mental health problems at a predictable rate, and private schools need a mechanism for addressing their students' mental health needs. Understanding that need requires data to guide the services and programs a school may put in place. Having data helps inform those services, and comparative data from other schools provides feedback and perspective. This project surveyed type and frequency of mental health problems experienced by students who received a formal evaluation at 11 private schools in Connecticut during academic year 2001-2002.

  20. [Health services access survey for Colombian households].

    PubMed

    Arrivillaga, Marcela; Aristizabal, Juan Carlos; Pérez, Mauricio; Estrada, Victoria Eugenia

    The aim of this study was to design and validate a health services access survey for households in Colombia to provide a methodological tool that allows the country to accumulate evidence of real-life access conditions experienced by the Colombian population. A validation study with experts and a pilot study were performed. It was conducted in the municipality of Jamundi, located in the department of Valle del Cauca, Colombia. Probabilistic, multistage and stratified cluster sampling was carried out. The final sample was 215 households. The survey was composed of 63 questions divided into five modules: socio-demographic profile of the head of the household or adult informant, household socioeconomic profile, access to preventive services, access to curative and rehabilitative services and household out of pocket expenditure. In descriptive terms, the promotion of preventive services only reached 44%; the use of these services was always highest among children younger than one year old and up to the age of ten. The perceived need for emergency medical care and hospitalisation was between 82% and 85%, but 36% perceived the quality of care to be low or very low. Delays were experienced in medical visits with GPs and specialists. The designed survey is valid, relevant and representative of access to health services in Colombia. Empirically, the pilot showed institutional weaknesses in a municipality of the country, indicating that health coverage does not in practice mean real and effective access to health services. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Health providers' perspectives on delivering public health services under the contract service policy in rural China: evidence from Xinjian County.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huixuan; Zhang, Weijun; Zhang, Shengfa; Wang, Fugang; Zhong, You; Gu, Linni; Qu, Zhiyong; Liang, Xiaoyun; Sa, Zhihong; Wang, Xiaohua; Tian, Donghua

    2015-02-27

    promote public health services in rural areas. To inspire the positive perspective and optimal work performance of the health workforce, it is imperative for the Chinese government to fortify financial support to health providers, adopt an advanced management model and escalate administrative capacity.

  2. Essential concepts in modern health services.

    PubMed

    El Taguri, A

    2008-09-01

    Health services have the functions to define community health problems, to identify unmet needs and survey the resources to meet them, to establish SMART objectives, and to project administrative actions to accomplish the purpose of proposed action programs. For maximum efficacy, health systems should rely on newer approaches of management as management-by-objectives, risk-management, and performance management with full and equal participation from professionals and consumers. The public should be well informed about their needs and what is expected from them to improve their health. Inefficient use of budget allocated to health services should be prevented by tools like performance management and clinical governance. Data processed to information and intelligence is needed to deal with changing disease patterns and to encourage policies that could manage with the complex feedback system of health. e-health solutions should be instituted to increase effectiveness and improve efficiency and informing human resources and populations. Suitable legislations should be introduced including those that ensure coordination between different sectors. Competent workforce should be given the opportunity to receive lifetime appropriate adequate training. External continuous evaluation using appropriate indicators is vital. Actions should be done both inside and outside the health sector to monitor changes and overcome constraints.

  3. Health services reforms in revolutionary Nicaragua.

    PubMed Central

    Garfield, R M; Taboada, E

    1984-01-01

    Before the Nicaraguan revolution of 1979, access to health services was largely limited to the affluent sectors of the urban population and the minority of workers with social security coverage. Repeated attempts at reform by organized medicine were ineffective. Since the revolution, a tremendous expansion in health services has occurred. The national health system receives approximately one-third of its funds from the social security system. Steadily increasing equity in access is a result of the promotion of primary care, health campaigns involving up to 10 per cent of the general population as volunteers, the use of paramedical aides, and foreign assistance. Private practice nevertheless remains strong. In the coming years, several complex issues must be examined, including: a balance in the number of nurses and doctors trained, the role of private practice, and the relationship of the Ministry of Health to the social security system. Further progress in health reforms may be delayed by the defensive war which Nicaragua is fighting on its northern and southern borders. Despite emergent health problems in the war zones, most of the innovative aspects of the health system remain intact as of this writing. PMID:6476169

  4. Delivery of health services to migrant and seasonal farmworkers.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Quandt, Sara A

    2007-01-01

    Farmworkers are low-paid, uninsured employees in an extremely hazardous industry, and they provide an essential service for U.S. society. This review evaluates the delivery of health services to farmworkers. It describes the farmworker population in the United States, noting characteristics (e.g., migratory and immigration status) that limit their access to and utilization of health services. It describes the health services needs of this population, including occupational health, mental health, oral health, and chronic disease treatment. Cultural, structural, legal, financial, and geographic barriers to health services utilization are described. Existing research on health services utilization among farmworkers is discussed. Programs that have been developed to address the barriers to health services utilization among farmworkers are reviewed. Finally, research needed to improve knowledge of farmworker health services utilization is suggested. These research needs include formal evaluations of existing programs and basic research to characterize the health services utilization patterns of farmworkers.

  5. [Methods of health economic evaluation for health services research].

    PubMed

    Icks, A; Chernyak, N; Bestehorn, K; Brüggenjürgen, B; Bruns, J; Damm, O; Dintsios, C-M; Dreinhöfer, K; Gandjour, A; Gerber, A; Greiner, W; Hermanek, P; Hessel, F; Heymann, R; Huppertz, E; Jacke, C; Kächele, H; Kilian, R; Klingenberger, D; Kolominsky-Rabas, P; Krämer, H; Krauth, C; Lüngen, M; Neumann, T; Porzsolt, F; Prenzler, A; Pueschner, F; Riedel, R; Rüther, A; Salize, H J; Scharnetzky, E; Schwerd, W; Selbmann, H-K; Siebert, H; Stengel, D; Stock, S; Völler, H; Wasem, J; Schrappe, M

    2010-12-01

    On August 30, 2010, the German Network for Health Services Research [Deutsches Netzwerk Versorgungsforschung e. V. (DNVF e. V.)] approved the Memorandum III "Methods for Health Services Research", supported by the member societies mentioned as authors and published in this Journal [Gesundheitswesen 2010; 72: 739-748]. The present paper focuses on methodological issues of economic evaluation of health care technologies. It complements the Memorandum III "Methods for Health Services Research", part 2. First, general methodological principles of the economic evaluations of health care technologies are outlined. In order to adequately reflect costs and outcomes of health care interventions in the routine health care, data from different sources are required (e. g., comparative efficacy or effectiveness studies, registers, administrative data, etc.). Therefore, various data sources, which might be used for economic evaluations, are presented, and their strengths and limitations are stated. Finally, the need for methodological advancement with regard to data collection and analysis and issues pertaining to communication and dissemination of results of health economic evaluations are discussed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Quality of life, health status, and health service utilization related to a new measure of health literacy: FLIGHT/VIDAS.

    PubMed

    Ownby, Raymond L; Acevedo, Amarilis; Jacobs, Robin J; Caballero, Joshua; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna

    2014-09-01

    Researchers have identified significant limitations in some currently used measures of health literacy. The purpose of this paper is to present data on the relation of health-related quality of life, health status, and health service utilization to performance on a new measure of health literacy in a nonpatient population. The new measure was administered to 475 English- and Spanish-speaking community-dwelling volunteers along with existing measures of health literacy and assessments of health-related quality of life, health status, and healthcare service utilization. Relations among measures were assessed via correlations and health status and utilization was tested across levels of health literacy using ANCOVA models. The new health literacy measure is significantly related to existing measures of health literacy as well as to participants' health-related quality of life. Persons with lower levels of health literacy reported more health conditions, more frequent physical symptoms, and greater healthcare service utilization. The new measure of health literacy is valid and shows relations to measures of conceptually related constructs such as quality of life and health behaviors. FLIGHT/VIDAS may be useful to researchers and clinicians interested in a computer administered and scored measure of health literacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Accessing maternal and child health services in Melbourne, Australia: reflections from refugee families and service providers.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Elisha; Davis, Elise; Gibbs, Lisa; Block, Karen; Szwarc, Jo; Casey, Sue; Duell-Piening, Philippa; Waters, Elizabeth

    2012-05-15

    Often new arrivals from refugee backgrounds have experienced poor health and limited access to healthcare services. The maternal and child health (MCH) service in Victoria, Australia, is a joint local and state government operated, cost-free service available to all mothers of children aged 0-6 years. Although well-child healthcare visits are useful in identifying health issues early, there has been limited investigation in the use of these services for families from refugee backgrounds. This study aims to explore experiences of using MCH services, from the perspective of families from refugee backgrounds and service providers. We used a qualitative study design informed by the socioecological model of health and a cultural competence approach. Two geographical areas of Melbourne were selected to invite participants. Seven focus groups were conducted with 87 mothers from Karen, Iraqi, Assyrian Chaldean, Lebanese, South Sudanese and Bhutanese backgrounds, who had lived an average of 4.7 years in Australia (range one month-18 years). Participants had a total of 249 children, of these 150 were born in Australia. Four focus groups and five interviews were conducted with MCH nurses, other healthcare providers and bicultural workers. Four themes were identified: facilitating access to MCH services; promoting continued engagement with the MCH service; language challenges; and what is working well and could be done better. Several processes were identified that facilitated initial access to the MCH service but there were implications for continued use of the service. The MCH service was not formally notified of new parents arriving with young children. Pre-arranged group appointments by MCH nurses for parents who attended playgroups worked well to increase ongoing service engagement. Barriers for parents in using MCH services included access to transportation, lack of confidence in speaking English and making phone bookings. Service users and providers reported that

  8. Accessing maternal and child health services in Melbourne, Australia: Reflections from refugee families and service providers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Often new arrivals from refugee backgrounds have experienced poor health and limited access to healthcare services. The maternal and child health (MCH) service in Victoria, Australia, is a joint local and state government operated, cost-free service available to all mothers of children aged 0–6 years. Although well-child healthcare visits are useful in identifying health issues early, there has been limited investigation in the use of these services for families from refugee backgrounds. This study aims to explore experiences of using MCH services, from the perspective of families from refugee backgrounds and service providers. Methods We used a qualitative study design informed by the socioecological model of health and a cultural competence approach. Two geographical areas of Melbourne were selected to invite participants. Seven focus groups were conducted with 87 mothers from Karen, Iraqi, Assyrian Chaldean, Lebanese, South Sudanese and Bhutanese backgrounds, who had lived an average of 4.7 years in Australia (range one month-18 years). Participants had a total of 249 children, of these 150 were born in Australia. Four focus groups and five interviews were conducted with MCH nurses, other healthcare providers and bicultural workers. Results Four themes were identified: facilitating access to MCH services; promoting continued engagement with the MCH service; language challenges; and what is working well and could be done better. Several processes were identified that facilitated initial access to the MCH service but there were implications for continued use of the service. The MCH service was not formally notified of new parents arriving with young children. Pre-arranged group appointments by MCH nurses for parents who attended playgroups worked well to increase ongoing service engagement. Barriers for parents in using MCH services included access to transportation, lack of confidence in speaking English and making phone bookings. Service users

  9. 42 CFR 417.105 - Payment for supplemental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for supplemental health services. 417.105 Section 417.105 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS,...

  10. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home...

  11. 42 CFR 417.105 - Payment for supplemental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for supplemental health services. 417.105 Section 417.105 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE...

  12. 42 CFR 417.104 - Payment for basic health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for basic health services. 417.104 Section 417.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE...

  13. 42 CFR 417.104 - Payment for basic health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for basic health services. 417.104 Section 417.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE...

  14. 42 CFR 417.105 - Payment for supplemental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for supplemental health services. 417.105 Section 417.105 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL...

  15. A preliminary model of wheelchair service delivery.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Sara L; Myaskovsky, Larissa; Burkitt, Kelly H; Tolerico, Michelle; Switzer, Galen E; Fine, Michael J; Boninger, Michael L

    2009-06-01

    To integrate and expand on previously published models of wheelchair service delivery, and provide a preliminary framework for developing more comprehensive, descriptive models of wheelchair service delivery for adults with spinal cord injury within the U.S. health care system. Literature review and a qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews. Not applicable. Ten academic, clinical, regulatory, and industry experts (Department of Veterans Affairs [VA] and non-VA) in wheelchair service delivery. Not applicable. Interviewees were asked to discuss the full range of variables and stakeholders involved in wheelchair service delivery, and to limit their scope to the provision of primary subsequent or replacement chairs (not backup chairs) to adults within the United States. Most experts we interviewed stressed that clients who require a wheelchair play a central role in the wheelchair service delivery process. Providers (including clinicians, rehabilitation engineers, and rehabilitation counselors) are also critical stakeholders. More so than in other health care settings, suppliers play an integral role in the provision of wheelchairs to clients and may significantly influence the appropriateness of the wheelchair provided. Suppliers often have a direct role in wheelchair service delivery through their interactions with the clinician and/or client. This model also identified a number of system-level factors (including facility administration and standards, policies, and regulations) that influence wheelchair service delivery and ultimately the appropriateness of the wheelchair provided. We developed a detailed, descriptive model of wheelchair service delivery that integrates the delivery process and device outcomes, and includes the patient-level, provider-level, and system-level factors that may directly influence those processes and outcomes. We believe that this detailed model can help clinicians and researchers describe and consider the complexities of wheelchair

  16. Decentralization and district health services in Nepal: understanding the views of service users and service providers.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Krishna; Naidoo, Jennie; Pilkington, Paul A; Greer, Alan

    2010-09-01

    Within the decentralization framework of Government, the Ministry of Health (MoH) Nepal initiated the decentralization of primary care services closer to citizens. This paper aims to examine and understand the effect of decentralization at the district health service from the perspectives of service users and providers. Using non-probability purposive sampling, we conducted a series of in-depth interviews and focus group discussions in four primary health care institutions with service users, providers and other stakeholders. QSRNVivo7 software was used to analyse and categorize the data under emerging themes. Decentralization was positively associated with increased service access and utilization and improved service delivery. The study also revealed areas of concern and possible improvement and identified the barriers to implementing these improvements. Problems described included three main areas: functions, functionaries and funding. Both service users and providers convey a generally positive message about the health sector decentralization. The active involvement of service users, providers, policy-makers in the process of decentralization and clear national and local policy agendas may bring positive changes in district health services.

  17. Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Service-Learning: Lessons from the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Kara; Seifer, Sarena; Sebastian, Juliann; Cora-Bramble, Denice; Hart, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Argues that, in the context of the present health care system, interdisciplinary service-learning holds promise for equipping future health professionals with collaborative problem-solving skills needed to effect change in community health care. Describes three models of interdisciplinary service-learning in health professions education, explores…

  18. Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Service-Learning: Lessons from the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Kara; Seifer, Sarena; Sebastian, Juliann; Cora-Bramble, Denice; Hart, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Argues that, in the context of the present health care system, interdisciplinary service-learning holds promise for equipping future health professionals with collaborative problem-solving skills needed to effect change in community health care. Describes three models of interdisciplinary service-learning in health professions education, explores…

  19. Student Mental Health Services in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Facts about mental and emotional illness and implications for student mental health services in higher education are reviewed. Psychoses, which are types of mental illness that are usually quite severe, are discussed in terms of symptoms, as are neuroses, which cause severe distress and impair coping with living conditions but are not as…

  20. Health Services Mobility Study, Plan of Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Univ. of New York Research Foundation, NY.

    To determine ways and means of facilitating horizontal and vertical mobility within New York City's Health Services Administration and selected private hospitals, a systems approach was adopted. Methodology for manpower development and training in an organizational setting related to the educational system and other accrediting institutions will…

  1. Health Service Areas (HSAs) - Small Area Estimates

    Cancer.gov

    Health Service Areas (HSAs) are a compromise between the 3000 counties and the 50 states. An HSA may be thought of as an area that is relatively self-contained with respect to hospital care and may cross over state boundries.

  2. Who killed the English National Health Service?

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The death of the English National Health Service (NHS) has been pronounced many times over the years, but the time and cause of death and the murder weapon remains to be fully established. This article reviews some of these claims, and asks for clearer criteria and evidence to be presented. PMID:25905477

  3. Health systems analysis: radiation therapy services

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    A plan for the distribution of radiation therapy services within Health Services Area I (HSA I) is presented in this report. Four problems concerning health status or health system aspects of megavoltage radiation therapy services within HSA I are identified: (1) the health status of the populations residing in the area of Lexington, Winchester, Louisa and Fluvanna with respect to cancer; (2) the failure of Rockingham Memorial Hospital to meet minimum volume standards and the projection of a failure to meet this minimum volume standard by 1986; (3) the absence of the specialities of hematology or medical oncology on the medical staff of the hospital at Rockingham; and (4) a lack of registered nurses/licensed practical nurses and a docimetrist at Winchester Memorial Hospital, which could impact on the quality of care. An additional area of concern is the increase in charges on the linear accelerator at the University of Virginia. Preliminary findings do not indicate that radiation therapy services within HSA I are inappropriate. Recommendations for addressing problem areas are proposed.

  4. [Memorandum registry for health services research].

    PubMed

    Müller, D; Augustin, M; Banik, N; Baumann, W; Bestehorn, K; Kieschke, J; Lefering, R; Maier, B; Mathis, S; Rustenbach, S J; Sauerland, S; Semler, S C; Stausberg, J; Sturm, H; Unger, C; Neugebauer, E A M

    2010-11-01

    On August 30, 2010, the German Network for Health Services Research [Deutsches Netzwerk Versorgungsforschung e. V. (DNVF e. V.)] approved the Memorandum III "Methods for Health Services Research", supported by their member societies mentioned as authors and published in this Journal [Gesundheitswesen 2010; 72: 739-748]. Registries in Health Services Research vary in their aims and research questions as well as in their designs, methods of data collection, and statistical analyses. This paper aims to provide both a methodological guideline for developers to ensure a high quality of a planned registry and, to provide an instrument for users of data from registries to assess their overall quality. First, the paper provides a definition of registries and presents an overview of objectives in Health Services Research where registries can be useful. Second, several areas of methodological importance for the development of registries are presented. This includes the different phases of a registry (i. e., conceptual and preliminary design, implementation), technical organisation of a registry, statistical analysis, reporting of results, data protection, and ethical/legal aspects. From these areas, several criteria are deduced to allow the assessment of the quality of a registry. Finally, a checklist to assess a registry's quality is presented. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Student Mental Health Services in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Facts about mental and emotional illness and implications for student mental health services in higher education are reviewed. Psychoses, which are types of mental illness that are usually quite severe, are discussed in terms of symptoms, as are neuroses, which cause severe distress and impair coping with living conditions but are not as…

  6. School-Based Health Services: Administrative Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Human Resources, Salem.

    This manual outlines the State of Oregon's program to reimburse medical providers furnishing health services to students with medical disabilities in special education settings. The program was established to comply with federal provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1990. The guide will assist school personnel in…

  7. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Civil Rights Search U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Search Close HHS A-Z Index About ... opportunities to participate in certain health care and human services programs without unlawful discrimination. HIPAA - Health Information ...

  8. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blog Home Our Focus Animal Health Animal Welfare Biotechnology Business Services Civil Rights Emergency Response Imports & Exports ... Landing Page Popular Topics Animal Health Animal Welfare Biotechnology Emergency Response Imports & Exports International Services Plant Health ...

  9. Mental health-related discrimination as a predictor of low engagement with mental health services.

    PubMed

    Clement, Sarah; Williams, Paul; Farrelly, Simone; Hatch, Stephani L; Schauman, Oliver; Jeffery, Debra; Henderson, R Claire; Thornicroft, Graham

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to test the hypothesis that mental health-related discrimination experienced by adults receiving care from community mental health teams is associated with low engagement with services and to explore the pathways between these two variables. In this cross-sectional study, 202 adults registered with inner-city community mental health teams in the United Kingdom completed interviews assessing their engagement with mental health services (service user-rated version of the Service Engagement Scale), discrimination that they experienced because of mental illness, and other variables. Structural equation modeling was conducted to examine the relationship of experienced discrimination and service engagement with potential mediating and moderating variables, such as anticipated discrimination (Questionnaire on Anticipated Discrimination), internalized stigma (Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale), stigma stress appraisal (Stigma Stress Appraisal), mistrust in services, the therapeutic relationship (Scale to Assess Therapeutic Relationships), difficulty disclosing information about one's mental health, and social support. Analyses controlled for age, race-ethnicity, and symptomatology. No evidence was found for a direct effect between experienced discrimination and service engagement. The total indirect effect of experienced discrimination on service engagement was statistically significant (coefficient=1.055, 95% confidence interval [CI]=.312-2.074, p=.019), mainly via mistrust in mental health services and therapeutic relationships (coefficient=.804, CI=.295-1.558, p=.019). A 1-unit increase in experienced discrimination via this pathway resulted in .804-unit of deterioration in service engagement. Findings indicate the importance of building and maintaining service users' trust in mental health services and in therapeutic relationships with professionals and countering the discrimination that may erode trust.

  10. Predictors of Healthcare Service Utilization for Mental Health Reasons

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Marie-Josée; Ngamini Ngui, André; Bamvita, Jean-Marie; Grenier, Guy; Caron, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to identify: (1) predictors of 12-month healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons, framed by the Andersen model, among a population cohort in an epidemiological catchment area; and (2) correlates associated with healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons among individuals with and without mental disorders respectively. Analyses comprised univariate, bivariate, and multiple regression analyses. Being male, having poor quality of life, possessing better self-perception of physical health, and suffering from major depressive episodes, panic disorder, social phobia, and emotional problems predicted healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons. Among individuals with mental disorders, needs factors (psychological distress, impulsiveness, emotional problems, victim of violence, and aggressive behavior) and visits to healthcare professionals were associated with healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons. Among individuals without mental disorders, healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons is strongly associated with enabling factors such as social support, income, environmental variables, and self-perception of the neighborhood. Interventions facilitating social cohesion and social solidarity in neighborhood settings may reduce the need to seek help among individuals without mental disorders. Furthermore, in their capacity as frontline professionals, general practitioners should be more sensitive in preventing, detecting, and treating mental disorders in routine primary care. PMID:25321874

  11. Health workforce equity in urban community health service of China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Zhao, Yali; Du, Juan; Wu, Tao; Huang, Yafang; Guo, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    To reveal the equity of health workforce distribution in urban community health service (CHS), and to provide evidence for further development of community health service in China. A community-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in China from September to December 2011. In the study, 190 CHS centers were selected from 10 provinces of China via stratified multistage cluster sampling. Human resources profiles and basic characteristics of each CHS centers were collected. Lorenz curves and Gini Coefficient were used to measure the inequality in the distribution of health workforce in community health service centers by population size and geographical area. Wilcoxon rank test for paired samples was used to analyze the differences in equity between different health indicators. On average, there were 7.37 health workers, including 3.25 doctors and 2.32 nurses per 10,000 population ratio. Significant differences were found in all indicators across the samples, while Beijing, Shandong and Zhejiang ranked the highest among these provinces. The Gini coefficients for health workers, doctors and nurses per 10,000 population ratio were 0.39, 0.44, and 0.48, respectively. The equity of doctors per 10,000 population ratio (G = 0.39) was better than that of doctors per square kilometer (G = 0.44) (P = 0.005). Among the total 6,573 health workers, 1,755(26.7%) had undergraduate degree or above, 2,722(41.4%)had junior college degree and 215(3.3%) had high school education. Significant inequity was found in the distribution of workers with undergraduate degree or above (G = 0.52), which was worse than that of health works per 10000 population (P<0.001). Health workforce inequity was found in this study, especially in quality and geographic distribution. These findings suggest a need for more innovative policies to improve health equity in Chinese urban CHS centers.

  12. Regionalization of services within a multihospital health maintenance organization.

    PubMed Central

    Luft, H S; Crane, S

    1980-01-01

    Among the many factors that may explain lower costs for enrollees in Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) is the possibility that the HMO provides inpatient services more efficiently. While direct cost comparisons are in appropriate, it is reasonable to examine whether the Kaiser program in the San Francisco Bay Area regionalizes services among its ten hospitals. The presence of each of 43 facilities/services reported is examined in a regression model that includes type of hospital, size, a size-type interaction, and the distance to the nearest competing facility. When the generally smaller size of the Kaiser hospitals was controlled for, Kaiser hospitals had fewer technologically based services and concentrated these services in larger hospitals. Kaiser had more outpatient-oriented services. Among non-Kaiser hospitals, some specialized facilities were competitively distributed. PMID:7204063

  13. Marketing service guarantees for health care.

    PubMed

    Levy, J S

    1999-01-01

    The author introduces the concept of service guarantees for application in health care and differentiates between explicit, implicit, and conditional vs. unconditional types of guarantees. An example of an unconditional guarantee of satisfaction is provided by the hospitality industry. Firms conveying an implicit guarantee are those with outstanding reputations for products such as luxury automobiles, or ultimate customer service, like Nordstrom. Federal Express and Domino's Pizza offer explicit guarantees of on-time delivery. Taking this concept into efforts to improve health care delivery involves a number of caveats. Customers invited to use exceptional service cards may use these to record either satisfaction or dissatisfaction. The cards need to provide enough specific information about issues so that "immediate action could be taken to improve processes." Front-line employees should be empowered to respond to complaints in a meaningful way to resolve the problem before the client leaves the premises.

  14. Women's health centers and specialized services.

    PubMed

    LaFleur, E K; Taylor, S L

    1996-01-01

    More than 75% of the female respondents in this study would choose a women's health center (WHC) over a standard health facility. Women who worked outside the home perceived a greater WHC need. And almost all respondents were interested in communications from the center via a quarterly newsletter. Significant test results related to age, income, education, and work status as segmentation variables, offering WHC's an opportunity to target their patients with specialized services such as cosmetic surgery, infertility treatment, breast imaging, etc. If enough resources are allocated, a WHC can design itself to attract highly lucrative patients. Little difference was found in the opinions of women regarding the need for a WHC or the core services desired, but the specific service mix decision must be carefully considered when designing a WHC.

  15. Robots and service innovation in health care.

    PubMed

    Oborn, Eivor; Barrett, Michael; Darzi, Ara

    2011-01-01

    Robots have long captured our imagination and are being used increasingly in health care. In this paper we summarize, organize and criticize the health care robotics literature and highlight how the social and technical elements of robots iteratively influence and redefine each other. We suggest the need for increased emphasis on sociological dimensions of using robots, recognizing how social and work relations are restructured during changes in practice. Further, we propose the usefulness of a 'service logic' in providing insight as to how robots can influence health care innovation. The Royal Society of Medicine Press Ltd 2011.

  16. Occupational Safety and Health in the Temporary Services Industry: A Model for a Community-University Partnership.

    PubMed

    Bonney, Tessa; Forst, Linda; Rivers, Samara; Love, Marsha; Pratap, Preethi; Bell, Tim; Fulkerson, Sean

    2017-08-01

    Workers in the temporary staffing industry face hazardous working conditions and have a high risk of occupational injury. This project brought together local workers' centers and university investigators to build a corps of Occupational Health Promoters (OHPs) and to test a survey tool and recruitment methods to identify hazards and raise awareness among workers employed by temporary staffing companies. OHPs interviewed ninety-eight workers employed by thirty-three temporary agencies and forty-nine client companies, working mainly in shipping and packing, manufacturing, and warehousing sectors. Surveys identified workplace hazards. OHPs reported two companies to OSHA, resulting in several citations. Partners reported greater understanding of occupational safety and health challenges for temporary workers and continue to engage in training, peer education, and coalition building.

  17. The Rural-Urban Divide: Health Services Utilization among Older Mexicans in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Jennifer J.; Al Snih, Soham; Markides, Kyriakos; Ray, Laura A.; Angel, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Mexico. Purpose: Using the health care service utilization model as a framework, this paper will analyze the differences in health care service use among older Mexicans living in urban and rural areas in Mexico. Methods: The Mexican Health and Aging Survey (MHAS) data were used to test the applicability of Andersen's "model of health…

  18. The Rural-Urban Divide: Health Services Utilization among Older Mexicans in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Jennifer J.; Al Snih, Soham; Markides, Kyriakos; Ray, Laura A.; Angel, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Mexico. Purpose: Using the health care service utilization model as a framework, this paper will analyze the differences in health care service use among older Mexicans living in urban and rural areas in Mexico. Methods: The Mexican Health and Aging Survey (MHAS) data were used to test the applicability of Andersen's "model of health…

  19. Building service capacity within a regional district mental health service: recommendations from an Indigenous mental health symposium.

    PubMed

    Eley, Diann S; Hunter, Keith

    2006-01-01

    In response to recent developments within the mental