Science.gov

Sample records for health system reform

  1. Strengthening health systems by health sector reforms

    PubMed Central

    Senkubuge, Flavia; Modisenyane, Moeketsi; Bishaw, Tewabech

    2014-01-01

    Background The rising burden of disease and weak health systems are being compounded by the persistent economic downturn, re-emerging diseases, and violent conflicts. There is a growing recognition that the global health agenda needs to shift from an emphasis on disease-specific approaches to strengthening of health systems, including dealing with social, environmental, and economic determinants through multisectoral responses. Methods A review and analysis of data on strengthening health sector reform and health systems was conducted. Attention was paid to the goal of health and interactions between health sector reforms and the functions of health systems. Further, we explored how these interactions contribute toward delivery of health services, equity, financial protection, and improved health. Findings Health sector reforms cannot be developed from a single global or regional policy formula. Any reform will depend on the country's history, values and culture, and the population's expectations. Some of the emerging ingredients that need to be explored are infusion of a health systems agenda; development of a comprehensive policy package for health sector reforms; improving alignment of planning and coordination; use of reliable data; engaging ‘street level’ policy implementers; strengthening governance and leadership; and allowing a holistic and developmental approach to reforms. Conclusions The process of reform needs a fundamental rather than merely an incremental and evolutionary change. Without radical structural and systemic changes, existing governance structures and management systems will continue to fail to address the existing health problems. PMID:24560261

  2. Canadian health system reforms: lessons for Australia?

    PubMed

    Marchildon, Gregory P

    2005-02-01

    This paper analyses recent health reform agenda in Canada. From 1988 until 1997, the first phase of reforms focused on service integration through regionalisation and a rebalancing of services from illness care to prevention and wellness. The second phase, which has been layered onto the ongoing first phase, is concerned with fiscal sustainability from a provincial perspective, and the fundamental nature of the system from a national perspective. Despite numerous commissions and studies, some questions remain concerning the future direction of the public system. The Canadian reform experience is compared with recent Australian health reform initiatives in terms of service integration through regionalisation, primary care reform, Aboriginal health, the public-private debate, intergovernmental relations and the role of the federal government.

  3. Health Care System Reforms in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a critical but non-systematic review of recent health care system reforms in developing countries. The literature reports mixed results as to whether reforms improve the financial protection of the poor or not. We discuss the reasons for these differences by comparing three representative countries: Mexico, Vietnam, and China. First, the design of the health care system reform, as well as the summary of its evaluation, is briefly described for each country. Then, the discussion is developed along two lines: policy design and evaluation methodology. The review suggests that i) background differences, such as social development, poverty level, and population health should be considered when taking other countries as a model; ii) although demand-side reforms can be improved, more attention should be paid to supply-side reforms; and iii) the findings of empirical evaluation might be biased due to the evaluation design, the choice of outcome, data quality, and evaluation methodology, which should be borne in mind when designing health care system reforms. PMID:25170464

  4. [Perspectives of the Tunisian health system reform].

    PubMed

    Achouri, H

    2001-05-01

    Perspectives of development of the Tunisian health system are presented, in reference to the conceptual framework recommended by the World Health Organization, while a project of health insurance reform of the social security regimes is submitted to a dialogue with the different concerned parts. Recommended orientations articulate around five axes: 1. The promotion of care provision by improving the accessibility to services, notably in zones under served, by introducing new modes of dispensation, organization and management of care provision in the framework of a continuous quality assurance strategy. 2. The financing of health care, with the implementation of the health insurance reform, has to allow an improvement of the financial accessibility of the population to health care, while supervising the evolution of total health expenditures and by developing the system's management capacities. 3. Proposals relative to the mobilization of resources are advanced in areas of medicine, training of health professionals and research on the health system. 4. Adaptation of the health system governance to the new context is necessary and would have to be developed around evolving standards for the health system, on evaluation of its performances and on information and communication with its users. 5. The health system responsiveness, new motion whose contours are again blurred, would have to be analysed and adapted to the specific context of the country. PMID:11515474

  5. Reforming the Military Health Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slackman, Joel

    Serious problems beset the military's extensive system of health care: rising budgetary costs, dissatisfaction among its beneficiaries, and inadequate readiness for war. This report was written at the request of the House Committee on Armed Services to examine some of these issues. It looks at a range of possible reforms in the military health…

  6. Health system reform in the United States

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, John E

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the United States adopted its first-ever comprehensive set of health system reforms in the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Implementation of the law, though politically contentious and controversial, has now reached a stage where reversal of most elements of the law is no longer feasible. The controversial portions of the law that expand affordable health insurance coverage to most U.S. citizens and legal residents do not offer any important lessons for the global community. The portions of the law seeking to improve the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of medical care as delivered in the U.S., hold lessons for the global community as all nations struggle to gain greater value from the societal resources they invest in medical care for their peoples. Health reform is an ongoing process of planning, legislating, implementing, and evaluating system changes. The U.S. set of delivery system reforms has much for reformers around the globe to assess and consider. PMID:24596894

  7. [Health system reform in the United Kingdom].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    How to control the increasing health expenditures is a common problem in the developed countries. The main causes of this increase are ageing of the society and medical innovation. The UK government has introduced a market oriented health reform in order to balance the increasing expenditures and the quality of care. For example, they have introduced the GP Fundholding, Private Financial Initiative (PFI) for construction of public hospital, and personal budget system (a patient owns a budget for buying health services in the deregulated market). However, there is little evidence indicating the effectiveness of these programs. On the other hand, it is important to strengthen the labor policy in order to maintain the social security system. For example, programs for increasing the employment rate and those for increasing productivity work sharing are such policies. From this viewpoint, the EU countries have introduced a series of active employment policies, i.e., job training for unemployed persons and work sharing. Furthermore, as other authors report in other articles of this volume, the government of the UK has introduced the Fit for Work (FFW) program that intends to medically support workers. PMID:24334695

  8. An American approach to health system reform.

    PubMed

    Holahan, J; Moon, M; Welch, W P; Zuckerman, S

    1991-05-15

    In terms of the major objectives one would have for health system reform, this plan makes the following choices: 1. It would cover everyone, through Medicare (the elderly), employer-based coverage (some workers and dependents) or a state-level public program that would replace Medicaid (the poor, unemployed, and other workers and dependents). 2. There would be a standard minimum package of required benefits for employer-based and public programs, with legislative requirements on maximum cost-sharing. Choice of provider might be restricted in some states. 3. Administration of the private programs would be the responsibility, as now, of the employers and/or insurance companies. Administration of the public program would be the responsibility of the states, with the objective of maximizing responsiveness to local needs and conditions. 4. It would control costs through giving the states a substantial financial stake in ensuring that the public program costs did not grow faster than nominal GNP. State control would also allow the testing of different mechanisms for cost control, with the ultimate objective of identifying the most effective cost-containment strategies. 5. The cost would be borne by employers, employees, and taxpayers. Employers would be protected from exorbitant costs by being allowed the option of paying into a public plan rather than providing health insurance themselves. The poor and unemployed would be protected by having their coverage under the public program subsidized on a sliding scale. 6. The political feasibility test would be met by retaining a major role for insurance companies and by retaining the role of employer-based coverage--thus reducing the tax increase needed to ensure universal coverage. By allowing flexibility in design of cost-containment strategy, some of the controversy over this issue would also be deflected. Our proposal is also not without problems. First, our approach would still have adverse effects on the profitability of

  9. The Chilean health system: 20 years of reforms.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Annick

    2002-01-01

    The Chilean health care system has been intensively reformed in the past 20 years. Reforms under the Pinochet government (1973-1990) aimed mainly at the decentralization of the system and the development of a private sector. Decentralization involved both a deconcentration process and the devolution of primary health care to municipalities. The democratic governments after 1990 chose to preserve the core organization but introduced reforms intended to correct the system's failures and to increase both efficiency and equity. The present article briefly explains the current organization of the Chilean health care system. It also reviews the different reforms introduced in the past 20 years, from the Pinochet regime to the democratic governments. Finally, a brief discussion describes the strengths and weaknesses of the system, as well as the challenges it currently faces.

  10. [Health system reforms in South America: an opportunity for UNASUR].

    PubMed

    Gomes-Temporão, José; Faria, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Health systems in South America still support segmentation, privatization and fragmentation. Health reforms of the structural adjustment programs in the 1980s and 1990s in South America followed different purposes and strategies ranging from privatization, commodification and state intervention for the implementation of a national public health service with universal access as a right of the citizens. Since the 2000s, many countries have expanded social policies, reduced poverty and social inequalities, and improved access to healthcare. This article proposes to discuss the health systems in South America from historical and political backgrounds, and the progress from the reforms in the last three decades. It also presents the three paradigmatic models of reform and their evolution, as well as the contrasts between universal coverage and universal systems. Finally, it presents current strengths and weaknesses of the twelve South American health systems as well as current opportunities and challenges in health for UNASUR. PMID:25597728

  11. LPN-BSN: education for a reformed health care system.

    PubMed

    Redmond, G M

    1997-03-01

    Nursing practice has experienced a paradigm shift in health care delivery from hospitals to community-based models of health care. Nursing education must respond to accommodate the shift through curriculum reform. This article discusses a LPN-BSN program to promote educational mobility for LPNs while educating them for a reformed health care system. The needs assessment and curriculum implementation are discussed. Student comments and experiences are included throughout. Student academic support and recruiting which addresses the special needs of the LPN-BSN student are also described. The evaluation of the project thus far indicates student success. PMID:9067870

  12. Health system reforms--toward a framework for international comparisons.

    PubMed

    Twaddle, A C

    1996-09-01

    Health care reform efforts internationally are focused more on efficiency than on effectiveness or equity. We lack a coherent theoretical framework for understanding those reforms or for engaging in comparative research. This paper presents some theoretical ideas that could contribute to such a framework. A model constructed from expert opinion suggests that hegemonic systems, national systems and medical care systems all contribute, with specific elements identified in each. Three sociological ideas are suggested: a model of trends leading to a fiscal crisis and a crisis of alienation; communities, professions and markets as ideal typical organizational alternatives; global post-Fordist and world systems theories; and hegemonic projects. Together these could explain the timing, speed and direction of health care reform efforts throughout the world. PMID:8870129

  13. Regulatory system reform of occupational health and safety in China

    PubMed Central

    WU, Fenghong; CHI, Yan

    2015-01-01

    With the explosive economic growth and social development, China’s regulatory system of occupational health and safety now faces more and more challenges. This article reviews the history of regulatory system of occupational health and safety in China, as well as the current reform of this regulatory system in the country. Comprehensive, a range of laws, regulations and standards that promulgated by Chinese government, duties and responsibilities of the regulatory departments are described. Problems of current regulatory system, the ongoing adjustments and changes for modifying and improving regulatory system are discussed. The aim of reform and the incentives to drive forward more health and safety conditions in workplaces are also outlined. PMID:25843565

  14. Health care delivery system reform: accountable care organizations.

    PubMed

    Dove, James T; Weaver, W Douglas; Lewin, Jack

    2009-09-01

    Health care reform is moving forward at a frantic pace. There have been 3 documents released from the Senate Finance Committee and proposed legislation from the Senate HELP Committee and the House of Representatives Tri-Committee on Health Reform. The push for legislative action has not been sidetracked by the economic conditions. Integrated health care delivery is the current favored approach to aligning resource use and cost. Accountable care organizations (ACOs), a concept included in health care reform legislation before both the House and Senate, propose to translate the efficiencies and lessons learned from large integrated systems and apply them to nonintegrated practices. The ACO design could be real or virtual integration of local delivery providers. This new structure is complicated, and clinicians, patients, and payers should have input regarding the design and function of it. Because most of health care is delivered in the ambulatory setting, it remains to be determined whether the ACOs are best developed in parallel among physician practices and hospitals or as partnerships between hospitals and physicians. Many are concerned that hospital-led ACOs will force physician employment by hospitals with possible unintended negative consequences for physicians, hospitals, and patients. Patients, physicians, other providers, and payers are in a better position to guide the redesign of the health care delivery system than government agencies, policy organizations, or elected officials, no matter how well intended. We strongly believe-and ACC has proclaimed-that change in health care delivery must be accomplished with patients and physicians at the table.

  15. Policy challenges in US health care system reform.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Aftab; Rivers, Patrick A

    2010-01-01

    Once again, efforts are being made to overhaul the US health care system. Democrats and Republicans have conflicting views on how to repair this ailing system. However, this is not a new phenomenon. Reformers have long struggled to form a universal health care system only to find themselves in conflict with groups whose financial stake is threatened as well as numerous labor associations who are concerned about a loss of power. This struggle is also caused by differences in ideologies. This article surveys social movements for national health insurance (NHI) that occurred in the United States and will examine features that prevented NHI policy formation. PMID:22329329

  16. Four proposals for market-based health care system reform.

    PubMed

    Sumner, W

    1994-08-01

    A perfectly free, competitive medical market would not meet many social goals, such as universal access to health care. Micromanagement of interactions between patients and providers does not guarantee quality care and frequently undermines that relationship, to the frustration of all involved. Furthermore, while some North American health care plans are less expensive than others, none have reduced the medical inflation rate to equal the general inflation rate. Markets have always fixed uneven inflation rates in other domains. The suggested reforms could make elective interactions between patients and providers work more like a free market than did any preceding system. The health and life insurance plan creates cost-sensitive consumers, informed by a corporation with significant research incentives and abilities. The FFEB proposal encourages context-sensitive pricing, established by negotiation processes that weigh labor and benefit. Publication of providers' expected outcomes further enriches the information available to consumers and may reduce defensive medicine incentives. A medical career ladder would ease entry and exit from medical professions. These and complementary reforms do not specifically cap spending yet could have a deflationary impact on elective health care prices, while providing incentives to maintain quality. They accomplish these ends by giving more responsibility, information, incentives, and choice to citizens. We could provide most health care in a marketlike environment. We can incorporate these reforms in any convenient order and allow them to compete with alternative schemes. Our next challenge is to design, implement, and evaluate marketlike health care systems.

  17. [Importance of health information systems in the process of reform and reconstruction of health care].

    PubMed

    Ridanović, Z

    1998-01-01

    Reform and reconstruction of health care system can not be carried out without health information systems and modern information and communication technologies. In other hand, health information system of The Federation of BiH must be an object of both reform and reconstruction. This thesis points out that reform of health information system is a crucial priorities in order to improve and fasten reform. There is a paradigmatic question: who provides service, to whom, what is the price, and what is the final solution? In order to answer this question, an integral health information system that will be computer supported is necessary. For integral work and information exchange, computers must be connected and follow the same operating procedures. Benefits of an integral health information system, as well as impact factors for its implementation are discussed in the paper. PMID:9623089

  18. Therapeutic Communities and Mental Health System Reform

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Barbara; Ware, Norma C.

    2009-01-01

    Topic The contemporary relevance of therapeutic communities as a treatment modality in mental health is described. Methods This paper builds upon on a qualitative study to provide a case illustration of a working therapeutic community for persons with serious mental illness. Sources Used The data are seventeen interviews conducted with staff and residents and observations carried out during four days of field work by the research team. Conclusions Studies are needed to determine whether therapeutic communities strengthen consumer capacity for social integration and thus contribute to empowerment and the larger recovery agenda. PMID:18840564

  19. Commentary: Medicaid reform issues affecting the Indian health care system.

    PubMed

    Wellever, A; Hill, G; Casey, M

    1998-02-01

    Substantial numbers of Indian people rely on Medicaid for their primary health insurance coverage. When state Medicaid programs enroll Indians in managed care programs, several unintended consequences may ensue. This paper identifies some of the perverse consequences of Medicaid reform for Indians and the Indian health care system and suggests strategies for overcoming them. It discusses the desire of Indian people to receive culturally appropriate services, the need to maintain or improve Indian health care system funding, and the duty of state governments to respect tribal sovereignty. Because of their relatively small numbers, Indians may be treated differently under Medicaid managed care systems without significantly endangering anticipated program savings. Failure of Medicaid programs to recognize the uniqueness of Indian people, however, may severely weaken the Indian health care system. PMID:9491006

  20. Hurricanes provide impetus for health system reform in Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    The clear lesson, for Louisiana and any other state that is contemplating the potential disruption of health care following large-scale dislocations caused by either natural or man-made major disasters, is that proper mechanisms must be put in place before the event. This is necessary to provide greater portability of health care coverage and alternatively, temporary finance that coverage. Our Louisiana State Medical Society's plan Health Access Louisiana will help Louisiana recover from the devastating effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and serve as a model for the reform of our healthcare coverage system for our country. We firmly believe the devastation in Louisiana presents a unique opportunity to rebuild a healthcare system from scratch. The new system will not be a modification of the old system, which did not work, but a system which effectively and economically offers equal access to high quality healthcare for all.

  1. Leveraging the military health system as a laboratory for health care reform.

    PubMed

    Dorrance, Kevin A; Ramchandani, Suneil; Neil, Nancy; Fisher, Harry

    2013-02-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act recently passed into law is poised to profoundly affect the provision of medical care in the United States. In today's environment, the foundation for most ongoing comparative effectiveness research is financial claims data. However, there is an alternative that possesses much richer data. That alternative, uniquely positioned to serve as a test system for national health reform efforts, is the Department of Defense Military Health System. This article describes how to leverage the Military Health System and provide effective solutions to current health care reform challenges in the United States. PMID:23495458

  2. Leveraging the military health system as a laboratory for health care reform.

    PubMed

    Dorrance, Kevin A; Ramchandani, Suneil; Neil, Nancy; Fisher, Harry

    2013-02-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act recently passed into law is poised to profoundly affect the provision of medical care in the United States. In today's environment, the foundation for most ongoing comparative effectiveness research is financial claims data. However, there is an alternative that possesses much richer data. That alternative, uniquely positioned to serve as a test system for national health reform efforts, is the Department of Defense Military Health System. This article describes how to leverage the Military Health System and provide effective solutions to current health care reform challenges in the United States.

  3. Health systems research in the time of health system reform in India: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research on health systems is an important contributor to improving health system performance. Importantly, research on program and policy implementation can also create a culture of public accountability. In the last decade, significant health system reforms have been implemented in India. These include strengthening the public sector health system through the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM), and expansion of government-sponsored insurance schemes for the poor. This paper provides a situation analysis of health systems research during the reform period. Methods We reviewed 9,477 publications between 2005 and 2013 in two online databases, PubMed and IndMED. Articles were classified according to the WHO classification of health systems building blocks. Results Our findings indicate the number of publications on health systems progressively increased every year from 92 in 2006 to 314 in 2012. The majority of papers were on service delivery (40%), with fewer on information (16%), medical technology and vaccines (15%), human resources (11%), governance (5%), and financing (8%). Around 70% of articles were lead by an author based in India, the majority by authors located in only four states. Several states, particularly in eastern and northeastern India, did not have a single paper published by a lead author located in a local institution. Moreover, many of these states were not the subject of a single published paper. Further, a few select institutions produced the bulk of research. Of the foreign author lead papers, 77% came from five countries (USA, UK, Canada, Australia, and Switzerland). Conclusions The growth of published research during the reform period in India is a positive development. However, bulk of this research is produced in a few states and by a few select institutions Further strengthening health systems research requires attention to neglected health systems domains like human resources, financing, and governance. Importantly

  4. Health-system reform and universal health coverage in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat; de Andrade, Luiz Odorico Monteiro; Almeida, Gisele; Cotlear, Daniel; Dmytraczenko, T; Frenz, Patricia; Garcia, Patrícia; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio; Knaul, Felicia M; Muntaner, Carles; de Paula, Juliana Braga; Rígoli, Felix; Serrate, Pastor Castell-Florit; Wagstaff, Adam

    2015-03-28

    Starting in the late 1980s, many Latin American countries began social sector reforms to alleviate poverty, reduce socioeconomic inequalities, improve health outcomes, and provide financial risk protection. In particular, starting in the 1990s, reforms aimed at strengthening health systems to reduce inequalities in health access and outcomes focused on expansion of universal health coverage, especially for poor citizens. In Latin America, health-system reforms have produced a distinct approach to universal health coverage, underpinned by the principles of equity, solidarity, and collective action to overcome social inequalities. In most of the countries studied, government financing enabled the introduction of supply-side interventions to expand insurance coverage for uninsured citizens--with defined and enlarged benefits packages--and to scale up delivery of health services. Countries such as Brazil and Cuba introduced tax-financed universal health systems. These changes were combined with demand-side interventions aimed at alleviating poverty (targeting many social determinants of health) and improving access of the most disadvantaged populations. Hence, the distinguishing features of health-system strengthening for universal health coverage and lessons from the Latin American experience are relevant for countries advancing universal health coverage.

  5. A systemic and value-based approach to strategic reform of the mental health system.

    PubMed

    McCubbin, M; Cohen, D

    1999-01-01

    Most writers now recognize that mental health policy and the mental health system are extremely resistant to real changes that reflect genuine biopsychosocial paradigms of mental disorder. Writers bemoaning the intransigence of the mental health system tend to focus on a small analytical level, only to find themselves mired in the rationalities of the existing system. Problems are acknowledged to be system-wide, yet few writers have used a method of analysis appropriate for systemic problems. Drawing upon the General System Theory (GST) analytical perspective, this article advances a systematic approach to understand the mental health system and to facilitate the development of reform strategies that recognize the system's complexity and changing nature. The article first discusses the failure of major reform efforts in the mental health system and the limitations of mainstream analysis of mental health politics and policies with respect to the objectives of analysis and reform. This article describes how systems thinking has thus far influenced the study of the mental health policy and politics system, and argues that a systemic perspective is profitable for reconceiving the mental health system, enabling a fresh basis for the development of reform strategies. The mental health system should be seen as a social system influenced by larger political and economic dimensions, not just as a 'delivery system' scientifically constructed by neutral experts. Furthermore, the policy planning process should be viewed as part and parcel of a mental health system modeled as complex and dynamic. The systemic perspective outlined here should help both to clarify the value-based objectives that we hold for the system and, consequently, to plan for the strategic reforms that have so far eluded us.

  6. [Intercultural aspects of the health system reform in Bolivia].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Hita, Susana

    2014-01-01

    This article is a reflection on how interculturality, understood as the way to improve the health of the Bolivian population and coupled with the concept of living well, is not contributing to improving the quality of life and health of the most vulnerable populations in the country. The discourse is coupled with the intention of saving lives in its broadest sense; however, for this it is necessary to make decisions about environmental health and extractivist policies that are not taken into account in the health issues affecting indigenous communities, a population targeted by the intercultural aspects of the health reform. PMID:25597731

  7. [Intercultural aspects of the health system reform in Bolivia].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Hita, Susana

    2014-01-01

    This article is a reflection on how interculturality, understood as the way to improve the health of the Bolivian population and coupled with the concept of living well, is not contributing to improving the quality of life and health of the most vulnerable populations in the country. The discourse is coupled with the intention of saving lives in its broadest sense; however, for this it is necessary to make decisions about environmental health and extractivist policies that are not taken into account in the health issues affecting indigenous communities, a population targeted by the intercultural aspects of the health reform.

  8. HealthPathways: creating a pathway for health systems reform.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Suzanne; Varhol, Richard; Bell, Colin; Quirk, Frances; Durrington, Learne

    2015-02-01

    Inefficiencies in the co-ordination and integration of primary and secondary care services in Australia, have led to increases in waiting times, unnecessary presentations to emergency departments and issues around poor discharge of patients. HealthPathways is a program developed in Canterbury, New Zealand, that builds relationships between General Practitioners and Specialists and uses information technology so that efficiency is maximised and the right patient is given the right care at the right time. Healthpathways is being implemented by a number of Medicare Locals across Australia however, little is known about the impact HealthPathways may have in Australia. This article provides a short description of HealthPathways and considers what it may offer in the Australian context and some of the barriers and facilitators to implementation. PMID:25433515

  9. HealthPathways: creating a pathway for health systems reform.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Suzanne; Varhol, Richard; Bell, Colin; Quirk, Frances; Durrington, Learne

    2015-02-01

    Inefficiencies in the co-ordination and integration of primary and secondary care services in Australia, have led to increases in waiting times, unnecessary presentations to emergency departments and issues around poor discharge of patients. HealthPathways is a program developed in Canterbury, New Zealand, that builds relationships between General Practitioners and Specialists and uses information technology so that efficiency is maximised and the right patient is given the right care at the right time. Healthpathways is being implemented by a number of Medicare Locals across Australia however, little is known about the impact HealthPathways may have in Australia. This article provides a short description of HealthPathways and considers what it may offer in the Australian context and some of the barriers and facilitators to implementation.

  10. Comparing the Canadian and US systems of health care in an era of health care reform.

    PubMed

    LaPierre, Tracey A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an informed comparison of health care in the United States and Canada along multiple dimensions. Specifically this article looks at coverage, access, cost, health outcomes, satisfaction, and underlying ideology. Canada fares better than the United States with regard to coverage, cost, and health outcomes. While overall access is better in Canada, patients are sometimes required to endure longer wait times than in the United States. Reports of satisfaction levels vary across studies, but most evidence points toward comparable levels of satisfaction in Canada and the United States. Strong ideological differences underlie the Canadian and American systems, making the acceptance and implementation of certain reforms difficult. The potential impact of the US Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), as well as recent Canadian health care reforms on coverage, access, cost, and health outcomes are also discussed. PMID:22894018

  11. Health care reforms

    PubMed Central

    Prevolnik Rupel, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In large systems, such as health care, reforms are underway constantly. The article presents a definition of health care reform and factors that influence its success. The factors being discussed range from knowledgeable personnel, the role of involvement of international experts and all stakeholders in the country, the importance of electoral mandate and governmental support, leadership and clear and transparent communication. The goals set need to be clear, and it is helpful to have good data and analytical support in the process. Despite all debates and experiences, it is impossible to clearly define the best approach to tackle health care reform due to a different configuration of governance structure, political will and state of the economy in a country. PMID:27703543

  12. Obesity and health system reform: private vs. public responsibility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Tony; Nichols, Len M

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a particularly vexing public health challenge, since it not only underlies much disease and health spending but also largely stems from repeated personal behavioral choices. The newly enacted comprehensive health reform law contains a number of provisions to address obesity. For example, insurance companies are required to provide coverage for preventive-health services, which include obesity screening and nutritional counseling. In addition, employers will soon be able to offer premium discounts to workers who participate in wellness programs that emphasize behavioral choices. These policies presume that government intervention to reduce obesity is necessary and justified. Some people, however, argue that individuals have a compelling interest to pursue their own health and happiness as they see fit, and therefore any government intervention in these areas is an unwarranted intrusion into privacy and one's freedom to eat, drink, and exercise as much or as little as one wants. This paper clarifies the overlapping individual, employer, and social interest in each person's health generally to avoid obesity and its myriad costs in particular. The paper also explores recent evidence on the impact of government interventions on obesity through case studies on food labeling and employer-based anti-obesity interventions. Our analysis suggests a positive role for government intervention to reduce and prevent obesity. At the same time, we discuss criteria that can be used to draw lines between government, employer, and individual responsibility for health, and to derive principles that should guide and limit government interventions on obesity as health reform's various elements (e.g., exchanges, insurance market reforms) are implemented in the coming years. PMID:21871035

  13. Reforms and Challenges of Post-conflict Kosovo Health System.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mybera; Berisha, Merita; Lenjani, Basri

    2014-04-01

    Before its collapse, Kosovo's healthcare system was an integrated part of the Former Yugoslav Republics System (known as relatively well advanced for its time). Standstill had begun in the last decade of the twentieth century as the result of political disintegration of the former state. The enthusiasm of the healthcare professionals and the people of Kosovo that at the end of the conflict healthcare services will consolidate did not prove just right. Although we can claim that reorganization of Kosovo healthcare was a serious push (especially in the first years after the conflict), the intensity of development begun to fall at the latter stages. Although the basic legislation for the operation of the Healthcare System today in Kosovo does exist, the largest cause for the reform stagnation is where the law is not implemented properly and measures are not set as to a meaningful system of accountability. Twelve years have passed by since the 1999 war-conflict and, although, Kosovo has made progress in many other spheres, it has not yet reached to consolidate a health system comparable to those of other European countries. Intending to get out of difficult situation, several healthcare strategic plans have been developed in the past decade in Kosovo, but attempts in this direction have not been particularly fruitful. This script describes the actual Healthcare complexity of a situation in Kosovo 12 years after the end of the 1999 war-conflict. Interconnection and historical background is also looked upon and is described in the flow of events. Finally, the description of transfer competencies from international administrators to the local authorities as well as the flow of strategic planning that took place since 1999 has also been analyzed. PMID:24944539

  14. On residents’ satisfaction with community health services after health care system reform in Shanghai, China, 2011

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Health care system reform is a major issue in many countries and therefore how to evaluate the effects of changes is incredibly important. This study measured residents’ satisfaction with community health care service in Shanghai, China, and aimed to evaluate the effect of recent health care system reform. Methods Face-to-face interviews were performed with a stratified random sample of 2212 residents of the Shanghai residents using structured questionnaires. In addition, 972 valid responses were retrieved from internet contact. Controlling for sex, age, income and education, the study used logistic regression modeling to analyze factors associated with satisfaction and to explain the factors that affect the residents’ satisfaction. Results Comparing current attitudes with those held at the initial implementation of the reform in this investigation, four dimensions of health care were analyzed: 1) the health insurance system; 2) essential drugs; 3) basic clinical services; and 4) public health services. Satisfaction across all dimensions improved since the reform was initiated, but differences of satisfaction level were found among most dimensions and groups. Residents currently expressed greater satisfaction with clinical service (average score=3.79, with 5 being most satisfied) and the public health/preventive services (average score=3.62); but less satisfied with the provision of essential drugs (average score=3.20) and health insurance schemes (average score=3.23). The disadvantaged groups (the elderly, the retired, those with only an elementary education, those with lower incomes) had overall poorer satisfaction levels on these four aspects of health care (P<0.01). 25.39% of the respondents thought that their financial burden had increased and 38.49% thought that drugs had become more expensive. Conclusion The respondents showed more satisfaction with the clinical services (average score=3.79) and public health services/interventions (average

  15. Family planning and sexual health organizations: management lessons for health system reform.

    PubMed

    Ambegaokar, Maia; Lush, Louisiana

    2004-10-01

    Advocates of health system reform are calling for, among other things, decentralized, autonomous managerial and financial control, use of contracting and incentives, and a greater reliance on market mechanisms in the delivery of health services. The family planning and sexual health (FP&SH) sector already has experience of these. In this paper, we set forth three typical means of service provision within the FP&SH sector since the mid-1900s: independent not-for-profit providers, vertical government programmes and social marketing programmes. In each case, we present the context within which the service delivery mechanism evolved, the management techniques that characterize it and the lessons learned in FP&SH that are applicable to the wider debate about improving health sector management. We conclude that the FP&SH sector can provide both positive and negative lessons in the areas of autonomous management, use of incentives to providers and acceptors, balancing of centralization against decentralization, and employing private sector marketing and distribution techniques for delivering health services. This experience has not been adequately acknowledged in the debates about how to improve the quality and quantity of health services for the poor in developing countries. Health sector reform advocates and FP&SH advocates should collaborate within countries and regions to apply these management lessons.

  16. Health system reform and the role of field sites based upon demographic and health surveillance.

    PubMed Central

    Tollman, S. M.; Zwi, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    Field sites for demographic and health surveillance have made well-recognized contributions to the evaluation of new or untested interventions, largely through efficacy trials involving new technologies or the delivery of selected services, e.g. vaccines, oral rehydration therapy and alternative contraceptive methods. Their role in health system reform, whether national or international, has, however, proved considerably more limited. The present article explores the characteristics and defining features of such field sites in low-income and middle-income countries and argues that many currently active sites have a largely untapped potential for contributing substantially to national and subnational health development. Since the populations covered by these sites often correspond with the boundaries of districts or subdistricts, the strategic use of information generated by demographic surveillance can inform the decentralization efforts of national and provincial health authorities. Among the areas of particular importance are the following: making population-based information available and providing an information resource; evaluating programmes and interventions; and developing applications to policy and practice. The question is posed as to whether their potential contribution to health system reform justifies arguing for adaptations to these field sites and expanded investment in them. PMID:10686747

  17. Who pays for health care in the United States? Implications for health system reform.

    PubMed

    Holahan, J; Zedlewski, S

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the distribution of health care spending and financing in the United States. We analyze the distribution of employer and employee contributions to health insurance, private nongroup health insurance purchases, out-of-pocket expenses, Medicaid benefits, uncompensated care, tax benefits due to the exemption of employer-paid health benefits, and taxes paid to finance Medicare, Medicaid, and the health benefit tax exclusion. All spending and financing burdens are distributed across the U.S. population using the Urban Institute's TRIM2 microsimulation model. We then examine the distributional effects of the U.S. health care system across income levels, family types, and regions of the country. The results show that health care spending increases with income. Spending for persons in the highest income deciles is about 60% above that of persons in the lowest decile. Nonetheless, the distribution of health care financing is regressive. When direct spending, employer contributions, tax benefits, and tax spending are all considered, the persons in the lowest income deciles devote nearly 20% of cash income to finance health care, compared with about 8% for persons in the highest income decile. We discuss how alternative health system reform approaches are likely to change the distribution of health spending and financing burdens.

  18. Insights on a New Era Under a Reforming Health Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvihill, James E.

    1995-01-01

    Economic and social trends that will affect the health care system are examined, including federal health care reform efforts, federal budget trimming through managed care and cost-cutting, declines in state spending, adoption of single-payer systems, growing competition in the private sector (mergers, alliances, acquisitions), dominance of health…

  19. Health system reform in rural China: voices of healthworkers and service-users.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xu Dong; Li, Lu; Hesketh, Therese

    2014-09-01

    Like many other countries China is undergoing major health system reforms, with the aim of providing universal health coverage, and addressing problems of low efficiency and inequity. The first phase of the reforms has focused on strengthening primary care and improving health insurance coverage and benefits. The aim of the study was to explore the impacts of these reforms on healthworkers and service-users at township level, which has been the major target of the first phase of the reforms. From January to March 2013 we interviewed eight health officials, 80 township healthworkers and 80 service-users in eight counties in Zhejiang and Yunnan provinces, representing rich and poor provinces respectively. Thematic analysis identified key themes around the impacts of the health reforms. We found that some elements of the reforms may actually be undermining primary care. While the new health insurance system was popular among service-users, it was criticised for contributing to fast-growing medical costs, and for an imbalance of benefits between outpatient and inpatient services. Salary reform has guaranteed healthworkers' income, but greatly reduced their incentives. The essential drug list removed perverse incentives to overprescribe, but led to falls in income for healthworkers, and loss of autonomy for doctors. Serious problems with drug procurement also emerged. The unintended consequences have included a brain drain of experienced healthworkers from township hospitals, and patients have flowed to county hospitals at greater cost. In conclusion, in the short term resources must be found to ensure rural healthworkers feel appropriately remunerated and have more clinical autonomy, measures for containment of the medical costs must be taken, and drug procurement must show increased transparency and accountability. More importantly the study shows that all countries undergoing health reforms should elicit the views of stakeholders, including service-users, to avoid

  20. Effect of health system reforms in Turkey on user satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jonathan; Gurol-Urganci, Ipek; Hone, Thomas; Atun, Rifat

    2015-12-01

    In 2003, the Turkish government introduced major health system changes, the Health Transformation Programme (HTP), to achieve universal health coverage (UHC). The HTP leveraged changes in all parts of the health system, organization, financing, resource management and service delivery, with a new family medicine model introducing primary care at the heart of the system. This article examines the effect of these health system changes on user satisfaction, a key goal of a responsive health system. Utilizing the results of a nationally representative yearly survey introduced at the baseline of the health system transformation, multivariate logistic regression analysis is used to examine the yearly effect on satisfaction with health services. During the 9-year period analyzed (2004-2012), there was a nearly 20% rise in reported health service use, coinciding with increased access, measured by insurance coverage. Controlling for factors known to contribute to user satisfaction in the literature, there is a significant (P < 0.001) increase in user satisfaction with health services in almost every year (bar 2006) from the baseline measure, with the odds of being satisfied with health services in 2012, 2.56 (95% confidence interval (CI) of 2.01-3.24) times that in 2004, having peaked at 3.58 (95% CI 2.82-4.55) times the baseline odds in 2011. Additionally, those who used public primary care services were slightly, but significantly (P < 0.05) more satisfied than those who used any other services, and increasingly patients are choosing primary care services rather than secondary care services as the provider of first contact. A number of quality indicators can probably help account for the increased satisfaction with public primary care services, and the increase in seeking first-contact with these providers. The implementation of primary care focused UHC as part of the HTP has improved user satisfaction in Turkey.

  1. Effect of health system reforms in Turkey on user satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Jonathan; Gurol–Urganci, Ipek; Hone, Thomas; Atun, Rifat

    2015-01-01

    In 2003, the Turkish government introduced major health system changes, the Health Transformation Programme (HTP), to achieve universal health coverage (UHC). The HTP leveraged changes in all parts of the health system, organization, financing, resource management and service delivery, with a new family medicine model introducing primary care at the heart of the system. This article examines the effect of these health system changes on user satisfaction, a key goal of a responsive health system. Utilizing the results of a nationally representative yearly survey introduced at the baseline of the health system transformation, multivariate logistic regression analysis is used to examine the yearly effect on satisfaction with health services. During the 9–year period analyzed (2004–2012), there was a nearly 20% rise in reported health service use, coinciding with increased access, measured by insurance coverage. Controlling for factors known to contribute to user satisfaction in the literature, there is a significant (P < 0.001) increase in user satisfaction with health services in almost every year (bar 2006) from the baseline measure, with the odds of being satisfied with health services in 2012, 2.56 (95% confidence interval (CI) of 2.01–3.24) times that in 2004, having peaked at 3.58 (95% CI 2.82–4.55) times the baseline odds in 2011. Additionally, those who used public primary care services were slightly, but significantly (P < 0.05) more satisfied than those who used any other services, and increasingly patients are choosing primary care services rather than secondary care services as the provider of first contact. A number of quality indicators can probably help account for the increased satisfaction with public primary care services, and the increase in seeking first–contact with these providers. The implementation of primary care focused UHC as part of the HTP has improved user satisfaction in Turkey. PMID:26528391

  2. Effect of health system reforms in Turkey on user satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jonathan; Gurol-Urganci, Ipek; Hone, Thomas; Atun, Rifat

    2015-12-01

    In 2003, the Turkish government introduced major health system changes, the Health Transformation Programme (HTP), to achieve universal health coverage (UHC). The HTP leveraged changes in all parts of the health system, organization, financing, resource management and service delivery, with a new family medicine model introducing primary care at the heart of the system. This article examines the effect of these health system changes on user satisfaction, a key goal of a responsive health system. Utilizing the results of a nationally representative yearly survey introduced at the baseline of the health system transformation, multivariate logistic regression analysis is used to examine the yearly effect on satisfaction with health services. During the 9-year period analyzed (2004-2012), there was a nearly 20% rise in reported health service use, coinciding with increased access, measured by insurance coverage. Controlling for factors known to contribute to user satisfaction in the literature, there is a significant (P < 0.001) increase in user satisfaction with health services in almost every year (bar 2006) from the baseline measure, with the odds of being satisfied with health services in 2012, 2.56 (95% confidence interval (CI) of 2.01-3.24) times that in 2004, having peaked at 3.58 (95% CI 2.82-4.55) times the baseline odds in 2011. Additionally, those who used public primary care services were slightly, but significantly (P < 0.05) more satisfied than those who used any other services, and increasingly patients are choosing primary care services rather than secondary care services as the provider of first contact. A number of quality indicators can probably help account for the increased satisfaction with public primary care services, and the increase in seeking first-contact with these providers. The implementation of primary care focused UHC as part of the HTP has improved user satisfaction in Turkey. PMID:26528391

  3. Effects of Medicare payment reform: evidence from the home health interim and prospective payment systems.

    PubMed

    Huckfeldt, Peter J; Sood, Neeraj; Escarce, José J; Grabowski, David C; Newhouse, Joseph P

    2014-03-01

    Medicare continues to implement payment reforms that shift reimbursement from fee-for-service toward episode-based payment, affecting average and marginal payment. We contrast the effects of two reforms for home health agencies. The home health interim payment system in 1997 lowered both types of payment; our conceptual model predicts a decline in the likelihood of use and costs, both of which we find. The home health prospective payment system in 2000 raised average but lowered marginal payment with theoretically ambiguous effects; we find a modest increase in use and costs. We find little substantive effect of either policy on readmissions or mortality.

  4. Health maintenance organizations: critical issues raised by restructuring delivery for health systems reform.

    PubMed

    Gold, M

    1993-10-01

    In sum, the potential that managed care will grow under health systems reform creates an opportunity for the HMO industry but also serves as a challenge and a threat. Faced with greater scrutiny and growing demands, HMOs increasingly are being forced to demonstrate their potential and live up to their expectation. At the same time, the changing nature of the health care system creates a challenge for HMOs. Cost pressures create needs to review the entire delivery system, including the ambulatory component, with a focus on enhancing cost-effectiveness. Greater visibility also creates demands; growing market penetration argues for the creation of a new paradigm to define an appropriate structure for public accountability and management. Finally, the transformation of an HMO industry into a managed care industry is not without its risks as HMO performance becomes evaluated not only against itself but as part of the performance of the broader managed care industry in which HMOs have become embedded. PMID:10128419

  5. Toward a 21st-century health care system: recommendations for health care reform.

    PubMed

    Arrow, Kenneth; Auerbach, Alan; Bertko, John; Brownlee, Shannon; Casalino, Lawrence P; Cooper, Jim; Crosson, Francis J; Enthoven, Alain; Falcone, Elizabeth; Feldman, Robert C; Fuchs, Victor R; Garber, Alan M; Gold, Marthe R; Goldman, Dana; Hadfield, Gillian K; Hall, Mark A; Horwitz, Ralph I; Hooven, Michael; Jacobson, Peter D; Jost, Timothy Stoltzfus; Kotlikoff, Lawrence J; Levin, Jonathan; Levine, Sharon; Levy, Richard; Linscott, Karen; Luft, Harold S; Mashal, Robert; McFadden, Daniel; Mechanic, David; Meltzer, David; Newhouse, Joseph P; Noll, Roger G; Pietzsch, Jan B; Pizzo, Philip; Reischauer, Robert D; Rosenbaum, Sara; Sage, William; Schaeffer, Leonard D; Sheen, Edward; Silber, B Michael; Skinner, Jonathan; Shortell, Stephen M; Thier, Samuel O; Tunis, Sean; Wulsin, Lucien; Yock, Paul; Nun, Gabi Bin; Bryan, Stirling; Luxenburg, Osnat; van de Ven, Wynand P M M

    2009-04-01

    The coverage, cost, and quality problems of the U.S. health care system are evident. Sustainable health care reform must go beyond financing expanded access to care to substantially changing the organization and delivery of care. The FRESH-Thinking Project (www.fresh-thinking.org) held a series of workshops during which physicians, health policy experts, health insurance executives, business leaders, hospital administrators, economists, and others who represent diverse perspectives came together. This group agreed that the following 8 recommendations are fundamental to successful reform: 1. Replace the current fee-for-service payment system with a payment system that encourages and rewards innovation in the efficient delivery of quality care. The new payment system should invest in the development of outcome measures to guide payment. 2. Establish a securely funded, independent agency to sponsor and evaluate research on the comparative effectiveness of drugs, devices, and other medical interventions. 3. Simplify and rationalize federal and state laws and regulations to facilitate organizational innovation, support care coordination, and streamline financial and administrative functions. 4. Develop a health information technology infrastructure with national standards of interoperability to promote data exchange. 5. Create a national health database with the participation of all payers, delivery systems, and others who own health care data. Agree on methods to make de-identified information from this database on clinical interventions, patient outcomes, and costs available to researchers. 6. Identify revenue sources, including a cap on the tax exclusion of employer-based health insurance, to subsidize health care coverage with the goal of insuring all Americans. 7. Create state or regional insurance exchanges to pool risk, so that Americans without access to employer-based or other group insurance could obtain a standard benefits package through these exchanges

  6. How to reform the health care system given the experience of past failures.

    PubMed

    Longo, Daniel R; Cox, Ryan R

    2002-01-01

    There have been a number of attempts at a large-scale reform of the US health care system during the 20th century and all have failed. Problems continue to exist, however, in the organization, delivery, and financing of health care services. Under current economic conditions, the possibility for both reform and recovery is slim if at all. In this article, we discusses a realistic option to incremental reform that takes a more realistic view of the US social and economic situation of the 21st century and is more consistent with basic US values. Perhaps it is time for reformers to take such a pragmatic approach to this long-term problem. PMID:12462654

  7. The health-care system: an assessment and reform agenda.

    PubMed

    Mataria, Awad; Khatib, Rana; Donaldson, Cam; Bossert, Thomas; Hunter, David J; Alsayed, Fahed; Moatti, Jean-Paul

    2009-04-01

    Attempts to establish a health plan for the occupied Palestinian territory were made before the 1993 Oslo Accords. However, the first official national health plan was published in 1994 and aimed to regulate the health sector and integrate the activities of the four main health-care providers: the Palestinian Ministry of Health, Palestinian non-governmental organisations, the UN Relief and Works Agency, and a cautiously developing private sector. However, a decade and a half later, attempts to create an effective, efficient, and equitable system remain unsuccessful. This failure results from arrangements for health care established by the Israeli military government between 1967 and 1994, the nature of the Palestinian National Authority, which has little authority in practice and has been burdened by inefficiency, cronyism, corruption, and the inappropriate priorities repeatedly set to satisfy the preferences of foreign aid donors. Although similar problems exist elsewhere, in the occupied Palestinian territory they are exacerbated and perpetuated under conditions of military occupation. Developmental approaches integrated with responses to emergencies should be advanced to create a more effective, efficient, and equitable health system, but this process would be difficult under military occupation.

  8. Benefits and Systems of Care for Maternal and Child Health under Health Care Reform: Workshop Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Cynthia H., Ed.

    This report discusses the health care needs of and benefits for women, children, and adolescents in light of national health care reform proposals put forth in 1994, and is based on presentations and discussions at an invitational workshop on maternal and child health. The report asserts that since women and children are disproportionately…

  9. [Democracy without equity: analysis of health reform and nineteen years of National Health System in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Coelho, Ivan Batista

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the nineteen years of the National Health System in Brazil, under the prism of equity. It takes into account the current political context in Brazil in the 80s, that the democratization of the country and the health sector could, per se, lead to a more equitable situation regarding the access to health services. Democracy and equity concepts are here discussed; analyzing which situations may facilitate or make it difficult its association in a theoretical plan, applying them to the Brazilian context in a more general form and, to emphasizing practical implications to the National Health System and to groups of activism related to health reforms. It also seeks to show the limits and possibilities of these groups with regards to the reduction of inequality, in relation to the access to health services, which still remain. To conclude, the author points out the need for other movements to be established which seek the reduction of such and other inequalities, such as access to education, housing, etc, drawing special attention to the role played by the State, which is questioned regarding its incapacity of promoting equity, once it presents itself as being powerful when approaching other matters.

  10. Ecuador's silent health reform.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Pierre; Echeverría Tapia, Ramiro; Aguilar Santacruz, Edison; Unger, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Health sector reform was implemented in many Latin American countries in the 1980s and 1990s, leading to reduced public expenditure on health, limitations on public provision for disease control, and a minimum package of services, with concomitant growth of the private sector. At first sight, Ecuador appeared to follow a different pattern: no formal reform was implemented, despite many plans to reform the Ministry of Health and social health insurance. The authors conducted an in-depth review and analysis of published and gray literature on the Ecuadorian health sector from 1990 onward. They found that although neoliberal reform of the health sector was not openly implemented, many of its typical elements are present: severe reduction of public budgets, "universal" health insurance with limited coverage for targeted groups, and contracting out to private providers. The health sector remains segmented and fragmented, explaining the population's poor health status. The leftist Correa government has prepared an excellent long-term plan to unite services of the Ministry of Health and social security, but implementation is extremely slow. In conclusion, the health sector in Ecuador suffered a "silent" neoliberal reform. President Correa's progressive government intends to reverse this, increasing public budgets for health, but hesitates to introduce needed radical changes.

  11. [Proposal for an structural reform for the national health system].

    PubMed

    Ares-Parga, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Since the forties, the National Health System has been organized based on a segmented and shortly linked model by the different service providers. This segmentation is because the population has always been the criterion that differentiates the provision among institutions. Additionally, these institutions have followed strategies conditioned by their own development and in accordance with the needs of population segments that they care (vertical system: each institution is responsible for stewardship, financing and service delivery). According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the fragmentation of the National Health System (NHS) in various organizations that vertically integrate the functions of financing, security and provision, generates inefficiencies and inequities that affect the Federal government's efforts to achieve universal coverage, and impacting on its financial viability. One of the first challenges facing the NHS is associated with the financing; therefore, this paper aims to develop a proposal for structural change in the way of financing the system and changes in management and delivery of health services Mexico.

  12. The effect of market reforms and new public management mechanisms on the Swiss health care system.

    PubMed

    Moresi-Izzo, Stefania; Bankauskaite, Vaida; Gericke, Christian A

    2010-01-01

    In 1996, the Federal Law on Health Insurance (LAMal) was adopted in order to contain costs in Swiss health care. At the same time, the reform aimed to maintain or even improve solidarity and encourage institutional reform through new public management (NPM) and market mechanisms. More freedom in contractual conditions between insurers and providers and a clearer distinction of responsibilities between federal and regional (cantonal) authorities were stipulated to achieve efficiency, effectiveness, and transparency. The focus of this paper is an analysis of the effects of market reforms and NPM mechanisms introduced with the LAMal on the cost-containment, quality of care and equity objectives in the Swiss health care system. PMID:20540084

  13. Reforming America's health system through innovation and entrepreneurship.

    PubMed

    Reece, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    America's attempts for healthcare reform are gridlocked. Healthcare special interests are reluctant to abandon profitable activities, and American culture-distrust of centralized federal power, belief in self-improvement, desire for choice, and belief in equal access to medical technologies-is slow to change. Physician entrepreneurship and innovation, coupled with consumer-driven healthcare and public-private partnerships, may break the present gridlock.

  14. Reforming health insurance in Argentina and Chile.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, A; Lloyd-Sherlock, P

    2000-12-01

    The paper examines the recent reforms of health insurance in Chile and Argentina. These partially replace social health insurance with individual insurance administered through the private sector. In Chile, reforms in the early 1980s allowed private health insurance funds to compete for affiliates with the social health insurance system. In Argentina, reforms in the 1990s aim to open up the union-administered social insurance system to competition both internally and from private insurers. The paper outlines the specific articulation of social and individual health insurance produced by these reforms, and discusses the implications for health insurance coverage, inequalities in access to healthcare, and health expenditures.

  15. The Canadian health care system: development, reform, and opportunities for nurses.

    PubMed

    Attenborough, R

    1997-01-01

    The Canadian health care system is a public insurance model built on the four fundamental principles of comprehensiveness, universality, portability, and public administration. Canadians are infinitely proud of the system and value it highly. Widespread fiscal concerns have placed all publicly financed programs under scrutiny, including health care. The challenge for health care planners and providers will be to improve the health status of Canadians, keep costs under control, and maintain the four principles on which the Canadian health care system was built. Nurses have many of the skills required to make a significant contribution to a reformed system. Working together and with other members of the health care team, nurses can play a pivotal role in shaping the future of health care and ensuring the health of Canadians.

  16. Ethics in American health 2: an ethical framework for health system reform.

    PubMed

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2008-10-01

    I argue that an ethical vision resting on explicitly articulated values and norms is critical to ensuring comprehensive health reform. Reform requires a consensus on the public good transcending self-interest and narrow agendas and underpinning collective action for universal coverage. In what I call shared health governance, individuals, providers, and institutions all have essential roles in achieving health goals and work together to create a positive environment for health. This ethical paradigm provides (1) reasoned consensus through a joint scientific and deliberative approach to judge the value of a health care intervention; (2) a method for achieving consensus that differs from aggregate tools such as a strict majority vote; (3) combined technical and ethical rationality for collective choice; (4) a joint clinical and economic approach combining efficiency with equity, but with economic solutions following and complementing clinical progress; and (5) protection for disabled individuals from discrimination. PMID:18703448

  17. Ethics in American Health 2: An Ethical Framework for Health System Reform

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    I argue that an ethical vision resting on explicitly articulated values and norms is critical to ensuring comprehensive health reform. Reform requires a consensus on the public good transcending self-interest and narrow agendas and underpinning collective action for universal coverage. In what I call shared health governance, individuals, providers, and institutions all have essential roles in achieving health goals and work together to create a positive environment for health. This ethical paradigm provides (1) reasoned consensus through a joint scientific and deliberative approach to judge the value of a health care intervention; (2) a method for achieving consensus that differs from aggregate tools such as a strict majority vote; (3) combined technical and ethical rationality for collective choice; (4) a joint clinical and economic approach combining efficiency with equity, but with economic solutions following and complementing clinical progress; and (5) protection for disabled individuals from discrimination. PMID:18703448

  18. Is the Colombian health system reform improving the performance of public hospitals in Bogotá?

    PubMed

    McPake, Barbara; Yepes, Francisco Jose; Lake, Sally; Sanchez, Luz Helena

    2003-06-01

    Many countries are experimenting with public hospital reform - both increasing the managerial autonomy with which hospitals conduct their affairs, and separating 'purchaser' and 'provider' sides of the health system, thus increasing the degree of market pressure brought to bear on hospitals. Evidence suggesting that such reform will improve hospital performance is weak. From a theoretical perspective, it is not clear why public hospitals should be expected to behave like firms and seek to maximize profits as this model requires. Empirically, there is very slight evidence that such reforms may improve efficiency, and reason to be concerned about their equity implications. In Colombia, an ambitious reform programme includes among its measures the attempt to universalize a segmented health system, the creation of a purchaser-provider split and the transformation of public hospitals into 'autonomous state entities'. By design, the Colombian reform programme avoids the forces that produce equity losses in other developing countries. This paper reports the results of a study that has tried to track hospital performance in other dimensions in the post-reform period in Bogotá. Trends in hospital inputs, production and productivity, quality and patient satisfaction are presented, and qualitative data based on interviews with hospital workers are analyzed. The evidence we have been able to collect is capable of providing only a partial response to the study question. There is some evidence of increased activity and productivity and sustained quality despite declining staffing levels. Qualitative data suggest that hospital workers have noticed considerable changes, which include greater responsiveness to patients but also a heavier administrative burden. It is difficult to attribute specific causality to all of the changes measured and this reflects the inherent difficulty of judging the effects of large-scale reform programmes as well as weaknesses and gaps in the data

  19. Integrating Continuing Professional Development With Health System Reform: Building Pillars of Support.

    PubMed

    Davis, David A; Rayburn, William F

    2016-01-01

    Clinical failures sparked a widespread desire for health system reform at the beginning of the 21st century, but related efforts have resulted in changes that are either slow or nonexistent. In response, academic medicine has moved in two directions: (1) system-wide reform using electronic health records, practice networks, and widespread data applications (a macro pathway); and (2) professional development of individual clinicians through continuous performance improvement (a micro pathway). Both pathways exist to improve patient care and population health, yet each suffers from limitations in widespread implementation. The authors call for a better union between these two parallel pathways through four pillars of support: (1) an acknowledgment that both pathways are essential to each other and to the final outcome they intend to achieve, (2) a strong faculty commitment to educate about quality improvement and patient safety at all education levels, (3) a reengineering of tools for professional development to serve as effective change agents, and (4) the development of standards to sustain this alignment of pathways. With these pillars of support integrating continuing professional development with health system reform, the authors envision a better functioning system, with improved metrics and value to enhance patient care and population health. PMID:26556296

  20. Integrating Continuing Professional Development With Health System Reform: Building Pillars of Support.

    PubMed

    Davis, David A; Rayburn, William F

    2016-01-01

    Clinical failures sparked a widespread desire for health system reform at the beginning of the 21st century, but related efforts have resulted in changes that are either slow or nonexistent. In response, academic medicine has moved in two directions: (1) system-wide reform using electronic health records, practice networks, and widespread data applications (a macro pathway); and (2) professional development of individual clinicians through continuous performance improvement (a micro pathway). Both pathways exist to improve patient care and population health, yet each suffers from limitations in widespread implementation. The authors call for a better union between these two parallel pathways through four pillars of support: (1) an acknowledgment that both pathways are essential to each other and to the final outcome they intend to achieve, (2) a strong faculty commitment to educate about quality improvement and patient safety at all education levels, (3) a reengineering of tools for professional development to serve as effective change agents, and (4) the development of standards to sustain this alignment of pathways. With these pillars of support integrating continuing professional development with health system reform, the authors envision a better functioning system, with improved metrics and value to enhance patient care and population health.

  1. What can we learn from international comparisons of health systems and health system reform?

    PubMed Central

    McPake, B.; Mills, A.

    2000-01-01

    Most commonly, lessons derived from comparisons of international health sector reform can only be generalized in a limited way to similar countries. However, there is little guidance as to what constitutes "similarity" in this respect. We propose that a framework for assessing similarity could be derived from the performance of individual policies in different contexts, and from the cause and effect processes related to the policies. We demonstrate this process by considering research evidence in the "public-private mix", and propose variables for an initial framework that we believe determine private involvement in the public health sector. The most influential model of public leadership places the private role in a contracting framework. Research in countries that have adopted this model suggests an additional list of variables to add to the framework. The variables can be grouped under the headings "demand factors", "supply factors", and "strength of the public sector". These illustrate the nature of a framework that could emerge, and which would help countries aiming to learn from international experience. PMID:10916918

  2. China's health system and its reform: a review of recent studies.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Adam; Yip, Winnie; Lindelow, Magnus; Hsiao, William C

    2009-07-01

    This paper provides a survey of the recent empirical research on China's 'old' health system (i.e. prior to the spate of reforms beginning in 2003). It argues that this research has enhanced our understanding of the system prior to 2003, in some cases reinforcing conclusions (e.g. the demand-inducement associated with perverse incentives) while in other cases suggesting a slightly less clear storyline (e.g. the link between insurance and out-of-pocket spending). It also concludes that the research to date points to the importance of careful evaluation of the current reforms, and its potential to modify policies as the rollout proceeds. Finally, it argues that the research on the pre-2003 system suggests that while the recently announced further reforms are a step in the right direction, the hoped-for improvements in China's health system will far more likely occur if the reforms become less timid in certain key areas, namely provider payments and intergovernmental fiscal relations. PMID:19551753

  3. Economic crisis and counter-reform of universal health care systems: Spanish case

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, Paulo Antônio de Carvalho; Carvalho, Regina Ribeiro Parizi; Louvison, Marília Cristina Prado

    2015-01-01

    The economic crisis that has been affecting Europe in the 21st century has modified social protection systems in the countries that adopted, in the 20th century, universal health care system models, such as Spain. This communication presents some recent transformations, which were caused by changes in Spanish law. Those changes relate to the access to health care services, mainly in regards to the provision of care to foreigners, to financial contribution from users for health care services, and to pharmaceutical assistance. In crisis situations, reforms are observed to follow a trend which restricts rights and deepens social inequalities. PMID:26083942

  4. European health systems reforms: looking backward to see forward?

    PubMed

    Oliver, Adam; Mossialos, Elias

    2005-01-01

    In this article we outline the different schools of new institutionalism and a few other selected political science theories. Moreover, we relate the insights offered by a series of analyses of health sector change in a large number of European countries over the past twenty to thirty years to these theoretical frameworks. Our main conclusion is that it is unlikely that a single explanatory theory will ever be able to account for all of the health sector developments in any one country, let alone across many countries with diverse cultures, histories, institutions, and interest groups. Consequently, a real understanding of health sector change will require a recognition that different theoretical approaches will be more (or less) appropriate in some circumstances than in others.

  5. Welfare Reform and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitler, Marianne P.; Gelback, Jonah B.; Hoynes, Hilary W.

    2005-01-01

    A study of the effect of state and federal welfare reforms over the period 1990-2000 on health insurance coverage and healthcare utilization by single women aged between 20-45 is presented. It is observed that Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act of 1996 which replaced the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program of 1990s with…

  6. Policy Capacity in the Learning Healthcare System Comment on "Health Reform Requires Policy Capacity".

    PubMed

    Gardner, William

    2015-01-01

    Pierre-Gerlier Forest and his colleagues make a strong argument for the need to expand policy capacity among healthcare actors. In this commentary, I develop an additional argument in support of Forest et al view. Forest et al rightly point to the need to have embedded policy experts to successfully translate healthcare reform policy into healthcare change. Translation of externally generated innovation policy into local solutions is only one source of healthcare system change. We also need to build learning healthcare systems that can discover new health solutions at the frontline of care. Enhanced policy capacity staffing in those organizations will be key to building continuously learning health systems. PMID:26673470

  7. Congress enacts health care reform.

    PubMed

    2010-03-01

    Health care reform at last: After nearly a century of effort by Presidents from Theodore Roosevelt on down, the Congress finally agreed on and President Barack Obama signed into law a system that covers most Americans, regulates sharp insurance practices, and embraces a paradigm shift from acute institutionally focused care to chronic disease management based on home and community-based care. PMID:20465039

  8. [Theory and practice of the health systems reforms: the cases of Brazil and Mexico].

    PubMed

    Abrantes Pego, Raquel; Almeida, Celia

    2002-01-01

    This study focuses on the role of public health experts in the contemporary health sector reform process. The authors discuss the issue based on the case of Brazil and Mexico, where a group of public health specialists have oriented their participation to influence the conflict concerning health policy reform in the respective countries. One approach has been to develop a new cognitive framework for technical health sector reform projects viewed as policy proposals with technical content. The purpose is to demonstrate how these specialists have managed to influence the national debate over health sector reform when the technical and scientific discussion leaves the academic sphere and reaches the social and political realm. The authors contend that this occurs because such technical and scientific knowledge has been postulated (independently of its intrinsic value) as a political and ideological alternative platform for sustaining a health sector reform proposal which, once transformed into a policy project, has served to aggregate certain political and social forces.

  9. New systems of care for substance use disorders: treatment, finance, and technology under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Pating, David R; Miller, Michael M; Goplerud, Eric; Martin, Judith; Ziedonis, Douglas M

    2012-06-01

    This article outlined ways in which persons with addiction are currently underserved by our current health care system. However, with the coming broad scale reforms to our health care system, the access to and availability of high-quality care for substance use disorders will increase. Addiction treatments will continue to be offered through traditional substance abuse care systems, but these will be more integrated with primary care, and less separated as treatment facilities leverage opportunities to blend services, financing mechanisms, and health information systems under federally driven incentive programs. To further these reforms, vigilance will be needed by consumers, clinicians, and policy makers to assure that the unmet treatment needs of individuals with addiction are addressed. Embedded in this article are essential recommendations to facilitate the improvement of care for substance use disorders under health care reform. Ultimately, as addiction care acquires more of the “look and feel” of mainstream medicine, it is important to be mindful of preexisting trends in health care delivery overall that are reflected in recent health reform legislation. Within the world of addiction care, clinicians must move beyond their self-imposed “stigmatization” and sequestration of specialty addiction treatment. The problem for addiction care, as it becomes more “mainstream,” is to not comfortably feel that general slogans like “Treatment Works,” as promoted by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment during its annual Recovery Month celebrations, will meet the expectations of stakeholders outside the specialty addiction treatment community. Rather, the problem is to show exactly how addiction treatment works, and to what extent it works-there have to be metrics showing changes in symptom level or functional outcome, changes in health care utilization, improvements in workplace attendance and

  10. New systems of care for substance use disorders: treatment, finance, and technology under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Pating, David R; Miller, Michael M; Goplerud, Eric; Martin, Judith; Ziedonis, Douglas M

    2012-06-01

    This article outlined ways in which persons with addiction are currently underserved by our current health care system. However, with the coming broad scale reforms to our health care system, the access to and availability of high-quality care for substance use disorders will increase. Addiction treatments will continue to be offered through traditional substance abuse care systems, but these will be more integrated with primary care, and less separated as treatment facilities leverage opportunities to blend services, financing mechanisms, and health information systems under federally driven incentive programs. To further these reforms, vigilance will be needed by consumers, clinicians, and policy makers to assure that the unmet treatment needs of individuals with addiction are addressed. Embedded in this article are essential recommendations to facilitate the improvement of care for substance use disorders under health care reform. Ultimately, as addiction care acquires more of the “look and feel” of mainstream medicine, it is important to be mindful of preexisting trends in health care delivery overall that are reflected in recent health reform legislation. Within the world of addiction care, clinicians must move beyond their self-imposed “stigmatization” and sequestration of specialty addiction treatment. The problem for addiction care, as it becomes more “mainstream,” is to not comfortably feel that general slogans like “Treatment Works,” as promoted by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment during its annual Recovery Month celebrations, will meet the expectations of stakeholders outside the specialty addiction treatment community. Rather, the problem is to show exactly how addiction treatment works, and to what extent it works-there have to be metrics showing changes in symptom level or functional outcome, changes in health care utilization, improvements in workplace attendance and

  11. Turkish health system reform from the people’s perspective: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2003, Turkey has implemented major health care reforms to develop easily accessible, high-quality, efficient, and effective healthcare services for the population. The purpose of this study was to bring out opinions of the Turkish people on health system reform process, focusing on several aspects of health system and assessing whether the public prefer the current health system or that provided a decade ago. Methods A cross sectional survey study was carried out in Turkey to collect data on people’s opinions on the healthcare reforms. Data was collected via self administered household’s structured questionnaire. A five-point Likert-type scale was used to score the closed comparative statements. Each statement had response categories ranging from (1) “strongly agree” to (5) “strongly disagree.” A total of 482 heads of households (response rate: 71.7%) with the mean age of (46.60 years) were selected using a multi stage sampling technique from seven geographical regions in Turkey from October 2011 to January 2012. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to identify significant contributing factors in this study. Results Employing descriptive statistics it is observed that among the respondents, more than two third of the population believes that the changes have had positive effects on the health system. A vast majority of respondents (82.0%) believed that there was an increase in accessibility, 73.7% thought more availability of health resources, 72.6% alleged improved quality of care, and 72.6% believed better attitude of politician/mass media due to the changes in the last 10 years. Indeed, the majority of respondents (77.6%) prefer the current health care system than the past. In multivariate analysis, there was a statistically significant relationship between characteristics and opinions of the respondents. The elderly, married females, perceived themselves healthy and those who believe that people are happier now than 10 years

  12. Addressing the epidemiologic transition in the former Soviet Union: strategies for health system and public health reform in Russia.

    PubMed Central

    Tulchinsky, T H; Varavikova, E A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This paper reviews Russia's health crisis, financing, and organization and public health reform needs. METHODS. The structure, policy, supply of services, and health status indicators of Russia's health system are examined. RESULTS. Longevity is declining; mortality rates from cardiovascular diseases and trauma are high and rising; maternal and infant mortality are high. Vaccine-preventable diseases have reappeared in epidemic form. Nutrition status is problematic. CONCLUSIONS. The crisis relates to Russia's economic transition, but it also goes deep into the former Soviet health system. The epidemiologic transition from a predominance of infectious to noninfectious diseases was addressed by increasing the quantity of services. The health system lacked mechanisms for epidemiologic or economic analysis and accountability to the public. Policy and funding favored hospitals over ambulatory care and individual routine checkups over community-oriented preventive approaches. Reform since 1991 has centered on national health insurance and decentralized management of services. A national health strategy to address fundamental public health problems is recommended. PMID:8604754

  13. Challenges facing the finance reform of the health system in Chile.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Tania

    2014-05-28

    Financing is one of the key functions of health systems, which includes the processes of revenue collection, fund pooling and acquisitions in order to ensure access to healthcare for the entire population. The article analyzes the financing model of the Chilean health system in terms of the first two processes, confirming low public spending on healthcare and high out-of-pocket expenditure, in addition to an appropriation of public resources by private insurers and providers. Insofar as pooling, there is lack of solidarity and risk sharing leading to segmentation of the population that is not consistent with the concept of social security, undermines equity and reduces system-wide efficiency. There is a pressing need to jumpstart reforms that address these issues. Treatments must be considered together with public health concerns and primary care in order to ensure the right to health of the entire population.

  14. Management of health system reform: a view of changes within New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, D

    1998-08-01

    This paper reports on the context and process of health system reform in New Zealand. The study is based on interviews conducted with 31 managers from three Crown Health Enterprises (publicly funded hospital-based health care organizations). A number of countries with publicly funded health services (e.g., UK, Australia and New Zealand) have sought to shift from the traditional 'passive' health management style (using transactional management skills to balance historically-based expenditure budgets) to 'active' transformational leadership styles that reflect a stronger 'private sector' orientation (requiring active management of resources--including a return on 'capital' investment, identification of costs and returns on 'product lines', 'marketing' a 'product mix', reducing non-core activities and overhead costs, and a closer relationship with 'shareholders', suppliers and customers/clients). Evidence of activities and processes associated with transformational leadership are identified. Success of the New Zealand health reforms will be determined by the approach the new managers adopt to improve their organization's performance. Transformational leadership has been frequently linked to the successful implementation of significant organizational change in other settings (Kurz et al., 1988; Dunphy and Stace, 1990) but it is too early to assess whether this is applicable in a health care context.

  15. Management of health system reform: a view of changes within New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, D

    1998-08-01

    This paper reports on the context and process of health system reform in New Zealand. The study is based on interviews conducted with 31 managers from three Crown Health Enterprises (publicly funded hospital-based health care organizations). A number of countries with publicly funded health services (e.g., UK, Australia and New Zealand) have sought to shift from the traditional 'passive' health management style (using transactional management skills to balance historically-based expenditure budgets) to 'active' transformational leadership styles that reflect a stronger 'private sector' orientation (requiring active management of resources--including a return on 'capital' investment, identification of costs and returns on 'product lines', 'marketing' a 'product mix', reducing non-core activities and overhead costs, and a closer relationship with 'shareholders', suppliers and customers/clients). Evidence of activities and processes associated with transformational leadership are identified. Success of the New Zealand health reforms will be determined by the approach the new managers adopt to improve their organization's performance. Transformational leadership has been frequently linked to the successful implementation of significant organizational change in other settings (Kurz et al., 1988; Dunphy and Stace, 1990) but it is too early to assess whether this is applicable in a health care context. PMID:10181886

  16. Reforming the Israeli health system: findings of a 3-year evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Rosen, B; Shirom, A

    2001-04-01

    Israel, like many other European countries, has recently reformed its health care system. The regulated market created by the National Health Insurance (NHI) law embodies many of the principles of managed competition. The purpose of this paper is to present initial findings from an evaluation of the first 3 years of the reform (1995-1997) regarding the implementation of the reform and the extent to which it has achieved its main goals. The evaluation was conducted using multiple quantitative and qualitative research tools: interviews with key informants; analysis of documents and sick fund financial statements; analysis of trends in sick fund membership; and population surveys conducted in 1995 and 1997 to assess the impact of the reform on outcome measures related to level of services to the public. Data from the evaluation show that the NHI law achieved a considerable number of its goals: to provide insurance coverage for the entire population, to ensure freedom of movement among sick funds, and to standardize the way resources are allocated to sick funds. The incentives that are embodied in the law have encouraged the sick funds to improve the level of services provided to the average insuree, and to develop services in the periphery and for some of the weaker populations. From the financial perspective, concerns that NHI would lead to a rise in the national health expenditure were not realized as of 1997. In the wake of NHI, there has been a decline in the age adjusted per capita expenditure in three sick funds, with no reports by insurees, at least through 1997, on a decline in satisfaction or level of service. However, the Israeli experience shows that regulating competition does not necessarily lead to economic stability and equality. Regulating the competition also did not solve some of the major policy issues in the Israeli health system including level of resources allocated to health, organizational structure of the hospital system, manpower planning and

  17. Value-based leadership. A prescription for reforming the American health care system.

    PubMed

    Cross, L A

    1997-01-01

    Many reforms have been suggested for health care in the last 30 years yet they are mainly treating symptoms rather than getting at the root cause of the problems. The underlying problem is a lack of vision for the health care system. There is no comprehensive, uniform vision of American medicine rooted in the needs of our society. This vision should be based on the values that significantly challenge physicians: patient satisfaction, patient empowerment, cost effectiveness and the appropriate use of resources, patent access, and continuous quality improvement based on appropriate data techniques.

  18. Arkansas: a leading laboratory for health care payment and delivery system reform.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, Deborah; du Pont, Lammot; Lipson, Mindy

    2014-08-01

    As states' Medicaid programs continue to evolve from traditional fee-for-service to value-based health care delivery, there is growing recognition that systemwide multipayer approaches provide the market power needed to address the triple aim of improved patient care, improved health of populations, and reduced costs. Federal initiatives, such as the State Innovation Model grant program, make significant funds available for states seeking to transform their health care systems. In crafting their reform strategies, states can learn from early innovators. This issue brief focuses on one such state: Arkansas. Insights and lessons from the Arkansas Health Care Payment Improvement Initiative (AHCPII) suggest that progress is best gained through an inclusive, deliberative process facilitated by committed leadership, a shared agreement on root problems and opportunities for improvement, and a strategy grounded in the state's particular health care landscape. PMID:25204031

  19. Arkansas: a leading laboratory for health care payment and delivery system reform.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, Deborah; du Pont, Lammot; Lipson, Mindy

    2014-08-01

    As states' Medicaid programs continue to evolve from traditional fee-for-service to value-based health care delivery, there is growing recognition that systemwide multipayer approaches provide the market power needed to address the triple aim of improved patient care, improved health of populations, and reduced costs. Federal initiatives, such as the State Innovation Model grant program, make significant funds available for states seeking to transform their health care systems. In crafting their reform strategies, states can learn from early innovators. This issue brief focuses on one such state: Arkansas. Insights and lessons from the Arkansas Health Care Payment Improvement Initiative (AHCPII) suggest that progress is best gained through an inclusive, deliberative process facilitated by committed leadership, a shared agreement on root problems and opportunities for improvement, and a strategy grounded in the state's particular health care landscape.

  20. Investigating the health care delivery system in Japan and reviewing the local public hospital reform

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Oyama, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Japan’s health care system is considered one of the best health care systems in the world. Hospitals are one of the most important health care resources in Japan. As such, we investigate Japanese hospitals from various viewpoints, including their roles, ownership, regional distribution, and characteristics with respect to the number of beds, staff, doctors, and financial performance. Applying a multivariate analysis and regression model techniques, we show the functional differences between urban populated prefectures and remote ones; the equality gap among all prefectures with respect to the distribution of the number of beds, staff, and doctors; and managerial differences between private and public hospitals. We also review and evaluate the local public hospital reform executed in 2007 from various financial aspects related to the expenditure and revenue structure by comparing public and private hospitals. We show that the 2007 reform contributed to improving the financial situation of local public hospitals. Strategic differences between public and private hospitals with respect to their management and strategy to improve their financial situation are also quantitatively analyzed in detail. Finally, the remaining problems and the future strategy to further improve the Japanese health care system are described. PMID:27051323

  1. Investigating the health care delivery system in Japan and reviewing the local public hospital reform.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing; Oyama, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Japan's health care system is considered one of the best health care systems in the world. Hospitals are one of the most important health care resources in Japan. As such, we investigate Japanese hospitals from various viewpoints, including their roles, ownership, regional distribution, and characteristics with respect to the number of beds, staff, doctors, and financial performance. Applying a multivariate analysis and regression model techniques, we show the functional differences between urban populated prefectures and remote ones; the equality gap among all prefectures with respect to the distribution of the number of beds, staff, and doctors; and managerial differences between private and public hospitals. We also review and evaluate the local public hospital reform executed in 2007 from various financial aspects related to the expenditure and revenue structure by comparing public and private hospitals. We show that the 2007 reform contributed to improving the financial situation of local public hospitals. Strategic differences between public and private hospitals with respect to their management and strategy to improve their financial situation are also quantitatively analyzed in detail. Finally, the remaining problems and the future strategy to further improve the Japanese health care system are described. PMID:27051323

  2. Transitioning to a national health system in Cyprus: a stakeholder analysis of pharmaceutical policy reform

    PubMed Central

    Kanavos, Panos G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the pharmaceutical sector in Cyprus in terms of the availability and affordability of medicines and to explore pharmaceutical policy options for the national health system finance reform expected to be introduced in 2016. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews in April 2014 with senior representatives from seven key national organizations involved in pharmaceutical care. The captured data were coded and analysed using the predetermined themes of pricing, reimbursement, prescribing, dispensing and cost sharing. We also examined secondary data provided by the Cypriot Ministry of Health; these data included the prices and volumes of prescription medicines in 2013. Findings We identified several key issues, including high medicine prices, underuse of generic medicines and high out-of-pocket drug spending. Most stakeholders recommended that the national government review existing pricing policies to ensure medicines within the forthcoming national health system are affordable and available, introduce a national reimbursement system and incentivize the prescribing and dispensing of generic medicines. There were disagreements over how to (i) allocate responsibilities to governmental agencies in the national health system, (ii) reconcile differences in opinion between stakeholders and (iii) raise awareness among patients, physicians and pharmacists about the benefits of greater generic drug use. Conclusion In Cyprus, if the national health system is going to provide universal health coverage in a sustainable fashion, then the national government must address the current issues in the pharmaceutical sector. Importantly, the country will need to increase the market share of generic medicines to contain drug spending. PMID:26478624

  3. Mental Health Reform at a Systems Level: Widening the Lens on Recovery-Oriented Care

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Sean A; McKenzie, Kwame J; Virdee, Gursharan

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an initial attempt to collate the literature on psychiatric inpatient recovery-based care and, more broadly, to situate the inpatient care sector within a mental health reform dialogue that, to date, has focused almost exclusively on outpatient and community practices. We make the argument that until an evidence base is developed for recovery-oriented practices on hospital wards, the effort to advance recovery-oriented systems will stagnate. Our scoping review was conducted in line with the 2009 Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (commonly referred to as PRISMA) guidelines. Among the 27 papers selected for review, most were descriptive or uncontrolled outcome studies. Studies addressing strategies for improving care quality provide some modest evidence for reflective dialogue with former inpatient clients, role play and mentorship, and pairing general training in recovery oriented care with training in specific interventions, such as Illness Management and Recovery. Relative to some other fields of medicine, evidence surrounding the question of recovery-oriented care on psychiatric wards and how it may be implemented is underdeveloped. Attention to mental health reform in hospitals is critical to the emergence of recovery-oriented systems of care and the realization of the mandate set forward in the Mental Health Strategy for Canada. PMID:25007277

  4. Incremental health system reform policy: Ecuador's law for the provision of free maternity and child care.

    PubMed

    Chiriboga, Sonia Ruiz

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the impact that the Ley de Maternidad Gratuita y Atencion a la Infancia (LMGAI) [Law for the Provision of Free Maternity and Child Care] in Ecuador has had on health services utilization and infant mortality. These outcomes were also examined by socioeconomic status. This retrospective study used demographic and health surveys, ENDEMAIN 1999 and 2004, with multivariate logistic regression to assess the impact post-LMGAI, controlling for mother's socioeconomic status, maternal and birth history, and demographic characteristics. Primary healthcare services utilization outcomes significantly improved post-LMGAI. Neonatal mortality decreased post-LMGAI. Further evaluation is needed as implementation continues to understand the expansion of primary healthcare services in future health system reforms.

  5. Primary care and reform of health systems: a framework for the analysis of Latin American experiences.

    PubMed

    Frenk, J; González-Block, M A

    1992-03-01

    The article first proposes a framework within which to assess the potential of health sector reforms in Latin America for primary health care (PHC). Two dimensions are recognized: the scope of the reforms, content, and the means of participation that are put into play. This framework is then complemented through a critique of the often-sought but little-analyzed PHC reform strategies of decentralization and health sector integration. The analytical framework is next directed to the financing of health services, a chief aspect of any reform aiming toward PHC. Two facets of health service finance are first distinguished: its formal aspect as a means for economic subsistence and growth, and its substantive aspect as a means to promote the rational use of services and thus improvement of health. Once finance is understood in this microeconomic perspective, the focus shifts to the analysis of health care reforms at the macro, health policy level. The article concludes by positing that PHC is in essence a new health care paradigm, oriented by the values of universality, redistribution, integration, plurality, quality, and efficiency.

  6. Engaging sub-national governments in addressing health equities: challenges and opportunities in China's health system reform.

    PubMed

    Brixi, Hana; Mu, Yan; Targa, Beatrice; Hipgrave, David

    2013-12-01

    China's current health system reform (HSR) is striving to resolve deep inequities in health outcomes. Achieving this goal is difficult not only because of continuously increasing income disparities in China but also because of weaknesses in healthcare financing and delivery at the local level. We explore to what extent sub-national governments, which are largely responsible for health financing in China, are addressing health inequities. We describe the recent trend in health inequalities in China, and analyse government expenditure on health in the context of China's decentralization and intergovernmental model to assess whether national, provincial and sub-provincial public resource allocations and local government accountability relationships are aligned with this goal. Our analysis reveals that government expenditure on health at sub-national levels, which accounts for ∼90% of total government expenditure on health, is increasingly regressive across provinces, and across prefectures within provinces. Increasing inequity in public expenditure at sub-national levels indicates that resources and responsibilities at sub-national levels in China are not well aligned with national priorities. China's HSR would benefit from complementary measures to improve the governance and financing of public service delivery. We discuss the existing weaknesses in local governance and suggest possible approaches to better align the responsibilities and capacity of sub-national governments with national policies, standards, laws and regulations, therefore ensuring local-level implementation and enforcement. Drawing on China's institutional framework and ongoing reform pilots, we present possible approaches to: (1) consolidate key health financing responsibilities at the provincial level and strengthen the accountability of provincial governments, (2) define targets for expenditure on primary health care, outputs and outcomes for each province and (3) use independent sources to

  7. What can developing economies learn from health system reforms of developed countries?

    PubMed

    Chernichovsky, D

    1995-01-01

    This paper outlines some general lessons developing nations can draw from the health system reform experiences of developed nations. Using the experiences of developed countries, developing countries should be better able to anticipate socio-economic changes and choose an optimal path for their health systems development to accompany those changes. Most developed countries have adopted rather common objectives and principles in their health systems because of market failure in health care; developing countries may start adopting those principles because they do not have market conditions in the first place. It is suggested that developing countries strengthen what is probably the most fundamental initial systemic asset they have: public finance. They should do so by attracting democratically, possibly through earmarked taxes, resources otherwise channelled through the private sector, competing with public finance for limited real resources. This effort can be promoted by giving consumers, mainly of high income groups and in urban areas, more say (through institutions performing the OMCC function) in the nature of care these groups have access to under auspices of public finance. Where feasible, private insurance as a major source of finance should be seen as a transitional phenomenon, giving way to the emergence of OMCC institutions which require similar financial and managerial market infrastructure. Private and competitive provision of care may be unrealistic in many developing areas because of both scarcity of real resources, mainly manpower, and health needs. The challenge of government is, as resources grow, to divest itself from the provision of care and stay involved in activities and facilities that are of 'public nature'--under specific circumstances--that foster private competitive provision. In general, the government should play an enabling role also by investing in health promotions and management skills for health systems.

  8. What can developing economies learn from health system reforms of developed countries?

    PubMed

    Chernichovsky, D

    1995-01-01

    This paper outlines some general lessons developing nations can draw from the health system reform experiences of developed nations. Using the experiences of developed countries, developing countries should be better able to anticipate socio-economic changes and choose an optimal path for their health systems development to accompany those changes. Most developed countries have adopted rather common objectives and principles in their health systems because of market failure in health care; developing countries may start adopting those principles because they do not have market conditions in the first place. It is suggested that developing countries strengthen what is probably the most fundamental initial systemic asset they have: public finance. They should do so by attracting democratically, possibly through earmarked taxes, resources otherwise channelled through the private sector, competing with public finance for limited real resources. This effort can be promoted by giving consumers, mainly of high income groups and in urban areas, more say (through institutions performing the OMCC function) in the nature of care these groups have access to under auspices of public finance. Where feasible, private insurance as a major source of finance should be seen as a transitional phenomenon, giving way to the emergence of OMCC institutions which require similar financial and managerial market infrastructure. Private and competitive provision of care may be unrealistic in many developing areas because of both scarcity of real resources, mainly manpower, and health needs. The challenge of government is, as resources grow, to divest itself from the provision of care and stay involved in activities and facilities that are of 'public nature'--under specific circumstances--that foster private competitive provision. In general, the government should play an enabling role also by investing in health promotions and management skills for health systems. PMID:10156647

  9. The financial crisis and health care systems in Europe: universal care under threat? Trends in health sector reforms in Germany, the United Kingdom, and Spain.

    PubMed

    Giovanella, Lígia; Stegmüller, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    The paper analyzes trends in contemporary health sector reforms in three European countries with Bismarckian and Beveridgean models of national health systems within the context of strong financial pressure resulting from the economic crisis (2008-date), and proceeds to discuss the implications for universal care. The authors examine recent health system reforms in Spain, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Health systems are described using a matrix to compare state intervention in financing, regulation, organization, and services delivery. The reforms' impacts on universal care are examined in three dimensions: breadth of population coverage, depth of the services package, and height of coverage by public financing. Models of health protection, institutionality, stakeholder constellations, and differing positions in the European economy are factors that condition the repercussions of restrictive policies that have undermined universality to different degrees in the three dimensions specified above and have extended policies for regulated competition as well as commercialization in health care systems. PMID:25493982

  10. The market and health sector reform.

    PubMed

    Collins, C; Hunter, D J; Green, A

    1994-01-01

    A new international orthodoxy has developed on health sector reform. The dominant theme of the orthodoxy is the alleged benefits of market style reforms for health development. This is shaping changes formulated, and being implemented, in the British NHS and other European health services (including Central and Eastern Europe), Latin America and a number of developing health systems in Africa and Asia. Sets out a ten-point description of the orthodoxy. Contends that the orthodoxy is showing distinct signs of restricting the analysis and development of health management and planning. This is a matter for considerable concern as the adoption of market-style reforms can generate unforeseen and, in some cases, negative consequences. There is clearly a need for strengthening management research and development as a basis for effective health sector reform.

  11. Priorities of the Russian health care reform.

    PubMed

    Shishkin, S

    1998-09-01

    The introduction of health insurance system has been the core of the Russian health care reform. It has coincided with the decentralization of the state administration. The reform has thus been decentralized, and the transition has been fragmentary and incomplete. As a result, the existing health financing system is eclectic and contradictory. Meanwhile, the reform has had a positive stabilizing influence on financing of health care under conditions of continued economic crisis. The new priorities of the reform should be to balance the financial flows and the state's obligations, and to increase the efficiency of the use of resources through encouragement of competition, assurance of transparency of public funding, development of health care planning, and shift from inpatient to outpatient care. PMID:9740643

  12. HIPAA and the military health system: organizing technological and organizational reform in large enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collmann, Jeff R.

    2001-08-01

    The global scale, multiple units, diverse operating scenarios and complex authority structure of the Department of Defense Military Health System (MHS) create social boundaries that tend to reduce communication and collaboration about data security. Under auspices of the Defense Health Information Assurance Program (DHIAP), the Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) is contributing to the MHS's efforts to prepare for and comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 through organizational and technological innovations that bridge such boundaries. Building interdisciplinary (clinical, administrative and information technology) medical information security readiness teams (MISRT) at each military treatment facility (MTF) constitutes the heart of this process. DHIAP is equipping and training MISRTs to use new tools including 'OCTAVE', a self-directed risk assessment instrument and 'RIMR', a web-enabled Risk Information Management Resource. DHIAP sponsors an interdisciplinary, triservice workgroup for review and revision of relevant DoD and service policies and participates in formal DoD health information assurance activities. These activities help promote a community of proponents across the MHS supportive of improved health information assurance. The MHS HIPAA-compliance effort teaches important general lessons about organizational reform in large civilian or military enterprises.

  13. A case study of health sector reform in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The impact of conflict on population health and health infrastructure has been well documented; however the efforts of the international community to rebuild health systems in post-conflict periods have not been systematically examined. Based on a review of relevant literature, this paper develops a framework for analyzing health reform in post-conflict settings, and applies this framework to the case study of health system reform in post-conflict Kosovo. The paper examines two questions: first, the selection of health reform measures; and second, the outcome of the reform process. It measures the success of reforms by the extent to which reform achieved its objectives. Through an examination of primary documents and interviews with key stakeholders, the paper demonstrates that the external nature of the reform process, the compressed time period for reform, and weak state capacity undermined the ability of the success of the reform program. PMID:20398389

  14. Reframing the debate over health care reform: the role of system performance and affordability.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Kenneth E

    2007-01-01

    The failure to pass comprehensive national health care reform requires a new approach for framing and structuring the debate. Since 85 percent of Americans have health insurance, framing the debate around the affordability of coverage is important. More important is understanding the factors responsible for driving growth in spending, and crafting effective interventions. Our work shows that much of the rise in spending is linked to the rise in the prevalence of treated disease--much of which is preventable. Reform strategies that address this issue are not inherently partisan and may prove to be a fruitful starting point for launching the debate. PMID:17978375

  15. [PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION OF PERSONNEL POLICY IN REFORMING OF UKRAINIAN HEALTH CARE SYSTEM USING THE EXAMPLE OF DERMATOVENEREOLOGICAL SERVICE].

    PubMed

    Korolenko, V V; Dykun, O P; Isayenko, R M; Remennyk, O I; Avramenko, T P; Stepanenko, V I; Petrova, K I; Volosovets, O P; Lazoryshynets, V V

    2014-01-01

    The health care system, its modernization and optimization are among the most important functions of the modern Ukrainian state. The main goal of the reforms in the field of healthcare is to improve the health of the population, equal and fair access for all to health services of adequate quality. Important place in the health sector reform belongs to optimizing the structure and function of dermatovenereological service. The aim of this work is to address the issue of human resources management of dermatovenereological services during health sector reform in Ukraine, taking into account the real possibility of disengagement dermatovenereological providing care between providers of primary medical care level (general practitioners) and providers of secondary (specialized) and tertiary (high-specialized) medical care (dermatovenerologists and pediatrician dermatovenerologists), and coordinating interaction between these levels. During research has been found, that the major problems of human resources of dermatovenereological service are insufficient staffing and provision of health-care providers;,growth in the number of health workers of retirement age; sectoral and regional disparity of staffing; the problem of improving the skills of medical personnel; regulatory support personnel policy areas and create incentives for staff motivation; problems of rational use of human resources for health care; problems of personnel training for dermatovenereological service. Currently reforming health sector should primarily serve the needs of the population in a fairly effective medical care at all levels, to ensure that there must be sufficient qualitatively trained and motivated health workers. To achieve this goal directed overall work of the Ministry of Health of Uktaine, the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, medical universities, regional health authorities, professional medical associations. Therefore Ukrainian dermatovenereological care, in particular

  16. Justice and fairness: a critical element in U.S. health system reform.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Paul T

    2012-01-01

    The case for U.S. health system reform aimed at achieving wider insurance coverage in the population and disciplining the growth of costs is fundamentally a moral case, grounded in two principles: (1) a principle of social justice, the Just Sharing of the costs of illness, and (2) a related principle of fairness, the Prevention of Free-Riding. These principles generate an argument for universal access to basic care when applied to two existing facts: the phenomenon of "market failure" in health insurance and, in the U.S., the existing legal guarantee of access to emergency care. The principles are widely shared in U.S. moral culture by conservatives and liberals alike. Similarly, across the political spectrum, the fact of market failure is not contested (though it is sometimes ignored), and the guarantee of access to emergency care is rarely challenged. The conclusion generated by the principles is not only that insurance for a basic minimum of care should be mandatory but that the scope of that care should be lean, efficient, and constrained in its cost.

  17. Justice and fairness: a critical element in U.S. health system reform.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Paul T

    2012-01-01

    The case for U.S. health system reform aimed at achieving wider insurance coverage in the population and disciplining the growth of costs is fundamentally a moral case, grounded in two principles: (1) a principle of social justice, the Just Sharing of the costs of illness, and (2) a related principle of fairness, the Prevention of Free-Riding. These principles generate an argument for universal access to basic care when applied to two existing facts: the phenomenon of "market failure" in health insurance and, in the U.S., the existing legal guarantee of access to emergency care. The principles are widely shared in U.S. moral culture by conservatives and liberals alike. Similarly, across the political spectrum, the fact of market failure is not contested (though it is sometimes ignored), and the guarantee of access to emergency care is rarely challenged. The conclusion generated by the principles is not only that insurance for a basic minimum of care should be mandatory but that the scope of that care should be lean, efficient, and constrained in its cost. PMID:23061586

  18. Do health care delivery system reforms improve value? The jury is still out

    PubMed Central

    Korenstein, Deborah; Duan, Kevin; Diaz, Manuel Jose; Ahn, Rosa; Keyhani, Salomeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Widespread restructuring of health delivery systems is underway in the US to reduce costs and improve the quality of healthcare. Objective To describe studies evaluating the impact of system-level interventions (incentives and delivery structures) on the value of US healthcare, defined as the balance between quality and cost. Research Design We identified articles in PubMed (2003 to July 2014) using keywords identified through an iterative process, with reference and author tracking. We searched tables of contents of relevant journals from August 2014 through 11 August 2015 to update our sample. Subjects We included prospective or retrospective studies of system-level changes, with a control, reporting both quality and either cost or utilization of resources. Measures Data about study design, study quality, and outcomes was extracted by one reviewer and checked by a second. Results Thirty reports of 28 interventions were included. Interventions included patient-centered medical home (PCMH) implementations (n=12), pay-for-performance programs (n=10), and mixed interventions (n=6); no other intervention types were identified. Most reports (n=19) described both cost and utilization outcomes. Quality, cost, and utilization outcomes varied widely; many improvements were small and process outcomes predominated. Improved value (improved quality with stable or lower cost/utilization or stable quality with lower cost/utilization) was seen in 23 reports; 1 showed decreased value, and 6 showed unchanged, unclear or mixed results. Study limitations included variability among specific endpoints reported, inconsistent methodologies, and lack of full adjustment in some observational trials. Lack of standardized MeSH terms was also a challenge in the search. Conclusions On balance the literature suggests that health system reforms can improve value. However, this finding is tempered by the varying outcomes evaluated across studies with little documented improvement in

  19. Who needs what from a national health research system: lessons from reforms to the English Department of Health's R&D system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Health research systems consist of diverse groups who have some role in health research, but the boundaries around such a system are not clear-cut. To explore what various stakeholders need we reviewed the literature including that on the history of English health R&D reforms, and we also applied some relevant conceptual frameworks. We first describe the needs and capabilities of the main groups of stakeholders in health research systems, and explain key features of policymaking systems within which these stakeholders operate in the UK. The five groups are policymakers (and health care managers), health professionals, patients and the general public, industry, and researchers. As individuals and as organisations they have a range of needs from the health research system, but should also develop specific capabilities in order to contribute effectively to the system and benefit from it. Second, we discuss key phases of reform in the development of the English health research system over four decades - especially that of the English Department of Health's R&D system - and identify how far legitimate demands of key stakeholder interests were addressed. Third, in drawing lessons we highlight points emerging from contemporary reports, but also attempt to identify issues through application of relevant conceptual frameworks. The main lessons are: the importance of comprehensively addressing the diverse needs of various interacting institutions and stakeholders; the desirability of developing facilitating mechanisms at interfaces between the health research system and its various stakeholders; and the importance of additional money in being able to expand the scope of the health research system whilst maintaining support for basic science. We conclude that the latest health R&D strategy in England builds on recent progress and tackles acknowledged weaknesses. The strategy goes a considerable way to identifying and more effectively meeting the needs of key groups such as

  20. Problems and the potential direction of reforms for the current individual medical savings accounts in the Chinese health care system.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangjin; Yang, Yang; Gong, Fuqing; Zhao, Mingjie

    2012-12-01

    Individual health savings accounts are an important part of the current basic medical insurance system for urban workers in China. Since 1998 when the system of personal medical insurance accounts was first implemented, there has been considerable controversy over its function and significance within different social communities. This paper analyzes the main problems in the practical implementation of individual medical insurance accounts and discusses the social and cultural foundations for the establishment of family health savings accounts from the perspective of Chinese Confucian familism. Accordingly, it addresses the direction of the reform and the development of the current system of individual health insurance accounts in China.

  1. What must be the Pillars of Iran’s Health System in 2025? Values and Principles of Health System Reform Plan

    PubMed Central

    RAJABI, Fateme; ESMAILZADEH, Hamid; ROSTAMIGOORAN, Narges; MAJDZADEH, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Preparing long term reformatory plan for the health system, like other macro plans, requires guiding principles which is according to the values, and as a bridge, connect the ideals and values to the goals. This study was designed with the purpose of explaining the values and principles of health system, and as a pre-requisite to compilation of Iran’s health system reform plan at 2025. Method: The document of values and principles of health system reform plan for 2025 was developed by reviewing the literature and receiving the opinions of senior experts of health system, and was criticized in focus group discussion sessions of experts and decision makers. Results: The values of Iran are: dignity of human, the right to maximum attainable level of health, comprehensive health, equity and social cohesion. The principles of this health system include: institutionalizing the ethical values, responsiveness and accountability, equitable access (utilization), prevention and health promotion, community participation, inter-sectoral collaboration, integrated stewardship, benefit from innovation and desired technology, human resources promotion and excellence and harmony. Conclusion: Based on the perception of cultural and religious teachings in Iran, protecting of human dignity and human prosperity are the ultimate social goal. In this sense, health and healthy humans, in its holistic concept (physical, mental, social health and spiritual) are the center and development in any form should lead to the human prosperity in a way that each of the individuals could enjoy the maximum attainable level of health in its holistic meaning and in a faire manner. PMID:23515322

  2. Environmental Health: Health Care Reform's Missing Pieces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadope, Cece Modupe; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A series of articles that examine environmental health and discuss health care reform; connections between chlorine, chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins and reproductive disorders and cancers; the rise in asthma; connections between poverty and environmental health problems; and organizations for health care professionals who want to address…

  3. Health care reform and changes: the Malaysian experience.

    PubMed

    Merican, Mohd Ismail; bin Yon, Rohaizat

    2002-01-01

    Health care reform is an intentional, sustained and systematic process of structural change to one or more health subsystems to improve efficiency, effectiveness, patient choices and equity. Health care all over the world is continuously reforming with time. Health care reform has become an increasingly important agenda for policy change in both developed and developing countries including Malaysia. This paper provides an overview of the Malaysian health care system, its achievements, and issues and challenges leading to ongoing reform towards a more efficient and equitable health care system that possess a better quality of life for the population.

  4. Health insurance reform: labor versus health perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Walid; Awar, May

    2012-01-01

    The Ministry of Labor (MOL) has submitted to the Council of Ministers a social security reform plan. The Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) considers that health financing should be dealt with as part of a more comprehensive health reform plan that falls under its prerogatives. While a virulent political discussion is taking place, major stakeholders' inputs are very limited and civil society is totally put away from the whole policy making process. The role of the media is restricted to reproducing political disputes, without meaningful substantive debate. This paper discusses health insurance reform from labor market as well as public health perspectives, and aims at launching a serious public debate on this crucial issue that touches the life of every citizen.

  5. Reforms are needed to increase public funding and curb demand for private care in Israel's health system.

    PubMed

    Chernichovsky, Dov

    2013-04-01

    Historically, the Israeli health care system has been considered a high-performance system, providing universal, affordable, high-quality care to all residents. However, a decline in the ratio of physicians to population that reached a modern low in 2006, an approximate ten-percentage-point decline in the share of publicly financed health care between 1995 and 2009, and legislative mandates that favored private insurance have altered Israel's health care system for the worse. Many Israelis now purchase private health insurance to supplement the state-sponsored universal care coverage, and they end up spending more out of pocket even for services covered by the entitlement. Additionally, many publicly paid physicians moonlight at private facilities to earn more money. In this article I recommend that Israel increase public funding for health care and adopt reforms to address the rising demand for privately funded care and the problem of publicly paid physicians who moonlight at private facilities.

  6. Performance-based financing as a health system reform: mapping the key dimensions for monitoring and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Performance-based financing is increasingly being applied in a variety of contexts, with the expectation that it can improve the performance of health systems. However, while there is a growing literature on implementation issues and effects on outputs, there has been relatively little focus on interactions between PBF and health systems and how these should be studied. This paper aims to contribute to filling that gap by developing a framework for assessing the interactions between PBF and health systems, focusing on low and middle income countries. In doing so, it elaborates a general framework for monitoring and evaluating health system reforms in general. Methods This paper is based on an exploratory literature review and on the work of a group of academics and PBF practitioners. The group developed ideas for the monitoring and evaluation framework through exchange of emails and working documents. Ideas were further refined through discussion at the Health Systems Research symposium in Beijing in October 2012, through comments from members of the online PBF Community of Practice and Beijing participants, and through discussion with PBF experts in Bergen in June 2013. Results The paper starts with a discussion of definitions, to clarify the core concept of PBF and how the different terms are used. It then develops a framework for monitoring its interactions with the health system, structured around five domains of context, the development process, design, implementation and effects. Some of the key questions for monitoring and evaluation are highlighted, and a systematic approach to monitoring effects proposed, structured according to the health system pillars, but also according to inputs, processes and outputs. Conclusions The paper lays out a broad framework within which indicators can be prioritised for monitoring and evaluation of PBF or other health system reforms. It highlights the dynamic linkages between the domains and the different pillars

  7. Medical liability and health care reform.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Leonard J; Morrisey, Michael A; Becker, David J

    2011-01-01

    We examine the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on medical liability and the controversy over whether federal medical reform including a damages cap could make a useful contribution to health care reform. By providing guaranteed access to health care insurance at community rates, the ACA could reduce the problem of under-compensation resulting from damages caps. However, it may also exacerbate the problem of under-claiming in the malpractice system, thereby reducing incentives to invest in loss prevention activities. Shifting losses from liability insurers to health insurers could further undermine the already weak deterrent effect of the medical liability system. Republicans in Congress and physician groups both pushed for the adoption of a federal damages cap as part of health care reform. Physician support for damages caps could be explained by concerns about the insurance cycle and the consequent instability of the market. Our own study presented here suggests that there is greater insurance market stability in states with caps on non-economic damages. Republicans in Congress argued that the enactment of damages caps would reduce aggregate health care costs. The Congressional Budget Office included savings from reduced health care utilization in its estimates of cost savings that would result from the enactment of a federal damages cap. But notwithstanding recent opinions offered by the CBO, it is not clear that caps will significantly reduce health care costs or that any savings will be passed on to consumers. The ACA included funding for state level demonstration projects for promising reforms such as offer and disclosure and health courts, but at this time the benefits of these reforms are also uncertain. There is a need for further studies on these issues.

  8. Financial Management Reforms in the Health Sector: A Comparative Study Between Cash-based and Accrual-based Accounting Systems

    PubMed Central

    Abolhallaje, Masoud; Jafari, Mehdi; Seyedin, Hesam; Salehi, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Financial management and accounting reform in the public sectors was started in 2000. Moving from cash-based to accrual-based is considered as the key component of these reforms and adjustments in the public sector. Performing this reform in the health system is a part of a bigger reform under the new public management. Objectives: The current study aimed to analyze the movement from cash-based to accrual-based accounting in the health sector in Iran. Patients and Methods: This comparative study was conducted in 2013 to compare financial management and movement from cash-based to accrual-based accounting in health sector in the countries such as the United States, Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Iran. Library resources and reputable databases such as Medline, Elsevier, Index Copernicus, DOAJ, EBSCO-CINAHL and SID, and Iranmedex were searched. Fish cards were used to collect the data. Data were compared and analyzed using comparative tables. Results: Developed countries have implemented accrual-based accounting and utilized the valid, reliable and practical information in accrual-based reporting in different areas such as price and tariffs setting, operational budgeting, public accounting, performance evaluation and comparison and evidence based decision making. In Iran, however, only a few public organizations such as the municipalities and the universities of medical sciences use accrual-based accounting, but despite what is required by law, the other public organizations do not use accrual-based accounting. Conclusions: There are advantages in applying accrual-based accounting in the public sector which certainly depends on how this system is implemented in the sector. PMID:25763194

  9. Seeing difference: market health reform in Europe.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, A

    1998-02-01

    The comparative literature on health care reform has identified a convergence upon market models as nations respond to similar economic, technological, social, and demographic pressures. In this article I first challenge the conventional view by comparing "market" reforms of the late 1980s and early 1990s in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Sweden. Though these nations did indeed converge upon the instrument of the market incentive, there was considerable divergence in the content and aims of their reform strategies. These nations designed their respective markets to make different tradeoffs among competing values. While all three exploited the principle of provider competition, they appointed different actors to judge the contest: the cost-conscious public authority in the United Kingdom, the quality-conscious patient in Sweden, and the optimizing consumer in the Netherlands. I argue that these countries were thus using common market tools to promote different health policy goals. Distinguishing these reforms further is the fact that--particularly in the Netherlands--there was a gap between market plans and the reality of implemented change. I then ask why nations responded so differently to such similar objective pressures. My contention is that this divergence reflects, in part, the different ideological orientations of the ruling party or coalition in each nation. Yet divergence is also the result of differences in both the design of political institutions and the structure of the pre-reform health system in each country.

  10. Health Reform and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Elwood, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    The era of the Obama Administration draws to a close at the end of 2016, leaving behind a signature achievement in the form of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) that became law in 2010. Beginning with that year, I have contributed an annual essay to the Journal of Allied Health describing various aspects of this legislation. The current essay initially will start down that same path, but then take a sharp detour to discuss related aspects of what is occurring in the broader health domain. PMID:27585611

  11. [Human resources for health in the context of the reform of the health system in Mexico: professional training and labor market].

    PubMed

    Nigenda, Gustavo; Magaña-Valladares, Laura; Ortega-Altamirano, Doris Verónica

    2013-01-01

    The role that human resources for health should play in future stages of the Mexican Health System reform is discussed. The following dimensions are considered to guide the discussion: the orientation of training, the institutions responsible for training, the mechanisms to link graduates to health institutions and the ways health workers should respond to the current managerial modifications. Changes should be based on a pre-defined strategic planning exercise based on institutional agreements which allow defining common objectives as well as clear procedures to attain those objectives.

  12. [Health care reform and management models].

    PubMed

    González García, G

    2001-06-01

    This article tries to indicate the direction of progress in management being taken in health sector reforms in Latin America. The piece first discusses the tension between local forces and international neoliberal trends being manifested in the reform in various countries. The article next looks at the distinction between the tools and the management models that are being applied, presenting a taxonomy of three management levels: macromanagement (national health systems), midlevel management (hospitals, insurers, and other such institutions) and micromanagement (clinics). The piece concludes by reflecting on the future of management in the health sector in Latin America, where health systems are overadministered and undermanaged. Their future depends on multiple factors, most of which are outside the health care field itself. Better management of policies, institutions, and patients would be a tremendous tool in directing the future. Management is here to stay, with greater emphasis on either supply--hospitals and physicians--or demand--citizens or clients. For both the public and private sectors, health management is central to health sector reforms in Latin America.

  13. The Soft Underbelly of System Change: The Role of Leadership and Organizational Climate in Turnover during Statewide Behavioral Health Reform

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Sommerfeld, David H.; Willging, Cathleen E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined leadership, organizational climate, staff turnover intentions, and voluntary turnover during a large-scale statewide behavioral health system reform. The initial data collection occurred nine months after initiation of the reform with a follow-up round of data collected 18 months later. A self-administered structured assessment was completed by 190 participants (administrators, support staff, providers) employed by 14 agencies. Key variables included leadership, organizational climate, turnover intentions, turnover, and reform-related financial stress (“low” versus “high”) experienced by the agencies. Analyses revealed that positive leadership was related to a stronger empowering climate in both high and low stress agencies. However, the association between more positive leadership and lower demoralizing climate was evident only in high stress agencies. For both types of agencies empowering climate was negatively associated with turnover intentions, and demoralizing climate was associated with stronger turnover intentions. Turnover intentions were positively associated with voluntary turnover. Results suggest that strong leadership is particularly important in times of system and organizational change and may reduce poor climate associated with turnover intentions and turnover. Leadership and organizational context should be addressed to retain staff during these periods of systemic change. PMID:22229021

  14. The Soft Underbelly of System Change: The Role of Leadership and Organizational Climate in Turnover during Statewide Behavioral Health Reform.

    PubMed

    Aarons, Gregory A; Sommerfeld, David H; Willging, Cathleen E

    2011-01-01

    This study examined leadership, organizational climate, staff turnover intentions, and voluntary turnover during a large-scale statewide behavioral health system reform. The initial data collection occurred nine months after initiation of the reform with a follow-up round of data collected 18 months later. A self-administered structured assessment was completed by 190 participants (administrators, support staff, providers) employed by 14 agencies. Key variables included leadership, organizational climate, turnover intentions, turnover, and reform-related financial stress ("low" versus "high") experienced by the agencies. Analyses revealed that positive leadership was related to a stronger empowering climate in both high and low stress agencies. However, the association between more positive leadership and lower demoralizing climate was evident only in high stress agencies. For both types of agencies empowering climate was negatively associated with turnover intentions, and demoralizing climate was associated with stronger turnover intentions. Turnover intentions were positively associated with voluntary turnover. Results suggest that strong leadership is particularly important in times of system and organizational change and may reduce poor climate associated with turnover intentions and turnover. Leadership and organizational context should be addressed to retain staff during these periods of systemic change.

  15. Bending the curve through health reform implementation.

    PubMed

    Antos, Joseph; Bertko, John; Chernew, Michael; Cutler, David; de Brantes, Francois; Goldman, Dana; Kocher, Bob; McClellan, Mark; McGlynn, Elizabeth; Pauly, Mark; Shortell, Stephen

    2010-11-01

    In September 2009, we released a set of concrete, feasible steps that could achieve the goal of significantly slowing spending growth while improving the quality of care. We stand by these recommendations, but they need to be updated in light of the new Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Reducing healthcare spending growth remains an urgent and unresolved issue, especially as the ACA expands insurance coverage to 32 million more Americans. Some of our reform recommendations were addressed completely or partially in ACA, and others were not. While more should be done legislatively, the current reform legislation includes important opportunities that will require decisive steps in regulation and execution to fulfill their potential for curbing spending growth. Executing these steps will not be automatic or easy. Yet doing so can achieve a healthcare system based on evidence, meaningful choice, balance between regulation and market forces, and collaboration that will benefit patients and the economy (see Appendix A for a description of these key themes). We focus on three concrete objectives to be reached within the next five years to achieve savings while improving quality across the health system: 1. Speed payment reforms away from traditional volume-based payment systems so that most health payments in this country align better with quality and efficiency. 2. Implement health insurance exchanges and other insurance reforms in ways that assure most Americans are rewarded with substantial savings when they choose plans that offer higher quality care at lower premiums. 3. Reform coverage so that most Americans can save money and obtain other meaningful benefits when they make decisions that improve their health and reduce costs. We believe these are feasible objectives with much progress possible even without further legislation (see Appendix B for a listing of recommendations). However, additional legislation is still needed to support consumers

  16. Health services reforms in revolutionary Nicaragua.

    PubMed Central

    Garfield, R M; Taboada, E

    1984-01-01

    Before the Nicaraguan revolution of 1979, access to health services was largely limited to the affluent sectors of the urban population and the minority of workers with social security coverage. Repeated attempts at reform by organized medicine were ineffective. Since the revolution, a tremendous expansion in health services has occurred. The national health system receives approximately one-third of its funds from the social security system. Steadily increasing equity in access is a result of the promotion of primary care, health campaigns involving up to 10 per cent of the general population as volunteers, the use of paramedical aides, and foreign assistance. Private practice nevertheless remains strong. In the coming years, several complex issues must be examined, including: a balance in the number of nurses and doctors trained, the role of private practice, and the relationship of the Ministry of Health to the social security system. Further progress in health reforms may be delayed by the defensive war which Nicaragua is fighting on its northern and southern borders. Despite emergent health problems in the war zones, most of the innovative aspects of the health system remain intact as of this writing. PMID:6476169

  17. [Health reform, equity and the right to health in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Mario

    2002-01-01

    The author develops a long-term perspective to assess advances in equity and the right to health in the Colombian health system reform. In a restricted political system, actors in the field of health in Colombia have chosen individualistic alternatives to legalize inequities in individual purchasing power for services. Despite the complex regulations established in the General System for Social Security in Health, there is a trend towards consolidating traditional inequities and to further restrict opportunities for achieving the right to health with full, equitable, universal guarantees. PMID:12118306

  18. [Health reform, equity and the right to health in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Mario

    2002-01-01

    The author develops a long-term perspective to assess advances in equity and the right to health in the Colombian health system reform. In a restricted political system, actors in the field of health in Colombia have chosen individualistic alternatives to legalize inequities in individual purchasing power for services. Despite the complex regulations established in the General System for Social Security in Health, there is a trend towards consolidating traditional inequities and to further restrict opportunities for achieving the right to health with full, equitable, universal guarantees.

  19. Setting a research agenda for interprofessional education and collaborative practice in the context of United States health system reform.

    PubMed

    Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Brandt, Barbara; Delaney, Connie; Pechacek, Judith; Cerra, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice (CP) have been prolific areas of inquiry exploring research questions mostly concerned with local program and project assessment. The actual sphere of influence of this research has been limited. Often discussed separately, this article places IPE and CP in the same conceptual space. The interface of these form a nexus where new knowledge creation may be facilitated. Rigorous research on IPE in relation to CP that is relevant to and framed by health system reform in the U.S. is the ultimate research goal of the National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education at the University of Minnesota. This paper describes the direction and scope for a focused and purposive IPECP research agenda linked to improvement in health outcomes, contextualized by health care reform in the U.S. that has provided a revitalizing energy for this area of inquiry. A research agenda articulates a focus, meaningful and robust questions, and a theory of change within which intervention outcomes are examined. Further, a research agenda identifies the practices the area of inquiry is interested in informing, and the types of study designs and analytic approaches amenable to carrying out the proposed work.

  20. Health reforms as examples of multilevel interventions in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Flood, Ann B; Fennell, Mary L; Devers, Kelly J

    2012-05-01

    To increase access and improve system quality and efficiency, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act with sweeping changes to the nation's health-care system. Although not intended to be specific to cancer, the act's implementation will profoundly impact cancer care. Its components will influence multiple levels of the health-care environment including states, communities, health-care organizations, and individuals seeking care. To illustrate these influences, two reforms are considered: 1) accountable care organizations and 2) insurance-based reforms to gather evidence about effectiveness. We discuss these reforms using three facets of multilevel interventions: 1) their intended and unintended consequences, 2) the importance of timing, and 3) their implications for cancer. The success of complex health reforms requires understanding the scientific basis and evidence for carrying out such multilevel interventions. Conversely and equally important, successful implementation of multilevel interventions depends on understanding the political setting and goals of health-care reform.

  1. Health care reform in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hackler, C

    1993-06-01

    The need for change in the system of health care delivery in the United States has finally emerged as a political issue alongside continuing budget deficits, a growing national debt, declining educational outcomes, and decreased competitiveness of American business in the global economy. The two most pressing health care problems at the present time are rapidly increasing costs and lack of access to the system. A more distant but potentially more recalcitrant problem is the ageing of our population. This paper outlines and discusses some of the options for reform which are currently under consideration in the United States. PMID:10134356

  2. Law reform, politics and mental health.

    PubMed

    Kirby, M D

    1983-03-01

    A major problem of democratic government is to get lawmakers to address controversial and sensitive subjects such as mental health law reform. By reference to current and past projects in the Australian Law Reform Commission, its Chairman outlines the way in which permanent law reform agencies can mobilise expert and community opinion to help the lawmaking process address sufficiently the needs of law reform. After outlining briefly the history of mental health law reform in English-speaking countries, the author suggests that moves for reform tend to come in 'cycles' or 'waves'. This is especially so in federations such as Australia. Reforms introduced in South Australia in 1976 are now working their way into the laws of other jurisdictions of Australia, where mental health law is basically a state concern. The reforms deal with such matters as legal representation for persons involuntarily committed and stricter definitions of circumstances for and objectives of hospitalisation of the mentally ill. Some comments are offered on new approaches to the defence of insanity in criminal trials following the jury verdict in the Hinkley case arising out of an attempt on the life of a President of the United States. The implications of this and other cases for the 'anti-psychiatry' movement are referred to and discussed. The author concludes with comments on the implications of mental health law reform for democracies. He suggests a law for law reform agencies in reconciling needs for law reform and community tolerance of change.

  3. Preventive Health Care in Six Countries: Models for Reform?

    PubMed Central

    Chaulk, C. Patrick

    1994-01-01

    International systems are frequently offered as models for health care reform. This study, focusing on preventive services for children and pregnant women in six industrialized countries, finds that a broad range of preventive services can be provided through health care systems with divergent financing and cost containment, utilizing multiple entry points into the health care system, and employing targeted programs for high-risk patients. Despite variability in form and financing, health outcomes are not compromised, suggesting that health care reformers in this country need not be restricted to any single model to strengthen preventive health care for children and pregnant women. PMID:10138486

  4. Foundational ethics of the health care system: the moral and practical superiority of free market reforms.

    PubMed

    Sade, Robert M

    2008-10-01

    Proposed solutions to the problems of this country's health care system range along a spectrum from central planning to free market. Central planners and free market advocates provide various ethical justifications for the policies they propose. The crucial flaw in the philosophical rationale of central planning is failure to distinguish between normative and metanormative principles, which leads to mistaken understanding of the nature of rights. Natural rights, based on the principle of noninterference, provide the link between individual morality and social order. Free markets, the practical expression of natural rights, are uniquely capable of achieving the goals that central planners seek but find beyond their grasp. The history of this country's health care system and the experiences of other nations provide evidence of the superiority of free markets in reaching for the goals of universal access, control of costs, and sustaining the quality of health care.

  5. Foundational ethics of the health care system: the moral and practical superiority of free market reforms.

    PubMed

    Sade, Robert M

    2008-10-01

    Proposed solutions to the problems of this country's health care system range along a spectrum from central planning to free market. Central planners and free market advocates provide various ethical justifications for the policies they propose. The crucial flaw in the philosophical rationale of central planning is failure to distinguish between normative and metanormative principles, which leads to mistaken understanding of the nature of rights. Natural rights, based on the principle of noninterference, provide the link between individual morality and social order. Free markets, the practical expression of natural rights, are uniquely capable of achieving the goals that central planners seek but find beyond their grasp. The history of this country's health care system and the experiences of other nations provide evidence of the superiority of free markets in reaching for the goals of universal access, control of costs, and sustaining the quality of health care. PMID:18840853

  6. Health care reform and family planning services.

    PubMed

    Policar, M

    1993-01-01

    With the reforms expected for US health care, the question remains as to the impact on family planning services. Although the focus is on health care finance reform, the mix of patients seen, the incentives for decision making, and the interactions between health care providers will change. Definition of key concepts is provided for universal access, managed competition, and managed care. The position of the obstetrician/gynecologist (Ob/Gyn) does not fit well within the scheme for managed health care, because Ob/Gyns are both primary care providers and specialists in women's health care. Most managed health care systems presently consider Ob/Gyn to be a specialty. Public family planning clinics, which have a client constituency of primarily uninsured women, may have to compete with traditional private sector providers. "Ambulatory health care providers" have developed a reputation for high quality, cost effective preventive health care services; this record should place providers with a range of services in a successful position. Family planning providers in a managed competition system will be at a disadvantage. 3 scenarios possible under managed competition are identified as the best case, out of the mainstream, and most likely. The best case is when primary reproductive health care services, contraception, sexually transmitted disease screening and management, and preventive services are all obtained directly from reproductive health care providers. Under managed care, this means allowing for an additional entry gatekeeper to specialized services. The benefits are to clients who prefer seeing reproductive health care providers first; reproductive services would be separated from medical services. The out of the mainstream scenario would place contraceptive services and other preventive services as outside the mandated benefits. The government would still provide Title X type programs for the indigent. The most likely scenario is one where primary care providers

  7. Does the Accountable Care Act aim to promote quality, health, and control costs or has it missed the mark? Comment on "Health system reform in the United States".

    PubMed

    Molinari, Carol

    2014-02-01

    McDonough's perspective on healthcare reform in the US provides a clear, coherent analysis of the mix of access and delivery reforms in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) aka Obamacare. As noted by McDonough, this major reform bill is designed to expand access for health coverage that includes both prevention and treatment benefits among uninsured Americans. Additionally, this legislation includes several financial strategies (e.g. incentives and penalties) to improve care coordination and quality in the hospital and outpatient settings while also reducing healthcare spending and costs. This commentary is intended to discuss this mix of access and delivery reform in terms of its potential to achieve the Triple Aim: population health, quality, and costs. Final remarks will include the role of the US federal government to reform the American private health industry together with that of an informed consume.

  8. The German health care system: a model for hospital reform in the United States?

    PubMed

    Weil, T P

    1992-01-01

    Experience in Germany illustrates that the United States could potentially achieve universal access, comprehensive and high-quality services, and value for the money expended with what is often referred to as a "quasi-private and quasi-public" health care system. The German hospital system is analyzed from a number of perspectives, and it is concluded that this approach has some advantages over a single-payer, monolithic-type national health insurance model. This is primarily because of its pluralistic prepayment system and because the commencement of reimbursement negotiations are without direct governmental intervention. The adoption of the German design in the United States, it is concluded, would result in a sharp change in policy direction from a conceptually procompetitive, market-driven hospital environment to a highly federally regulated, state-administered one. The implementation of the German approach in this country would also require a shift from managed care plans and other third party payers having to micromanage the use of health care services for individual patients to tightly centralized national and state fiscal controls (e.g., institutional global capital and operating budgets) targeted at providers.

  9. Health information system reform in South Africa: developing an essential data set.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Health services are increasingly under pressure to develop information systems that are responsive to changing health needs and appropriate to service objectives. Developing an essential data set provides managers with a clearly defined set of indicators for monitoring and evaluating services. This article describes a process that resulted in the creation of an essential data set at district level. This had a significant impact on neighbouring districts and resulted in the development of a regional essential data set, which in turn helped to influence the creation of a provincial and then national essential data set. Four key lessons may be drawn from the process. The development of an essential data set both requires and can contribute to a process that allows the reporting requirements to be adjusted over time in response to changing circumstances. In addition, it contributes to (and requires) the integration of programme reporting requirements into a coherent information system. While the case study describes a bottom-up approach, a top-down consultative process is advocated because it establishes a framework within which information needs can be reviewed. Lastly, the use of surveys can aid efforts to keep the essential elements to a minimum. In conclusion, the development of an essential data set contributes to strengthening health services because it necessitates dialogue between programme managers and defines indicators to be monitored by them. PMID:16184283

  10. Reforming the Greek health system: a role for non-medical, clinical bioscientists.

    PubMed

    Kazanis, Ilias

    2013-01-01

    Within the context of the recent debt crisis and the subsequently adopted austerity measures, the Greek health system faces important challenges including the necessity to rationalize public spending. One domain where there is scope for reducing expenses is laboratory medicine services, that are provided by both public and private facilities. Specialized non-medical, clinical bioscientists (such as molecular biologists, biochemists and geneticists) massively participate in the provision of laboratory medicine services in both sectors; however, they are excluded from key positions, such as the direction of laboratories and sitting in regulatory bodies. This is in breach with European standards of practice and also constitutes an impediment to the much anticipated rationalization of spending; therefore has to be addressed by the Greek health services authorities. PMID:22537581

  11. Big things come in bundled packages: implications of bundled payment systems in health care reimbursement reform.

    PubMed

    Delisle, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    With passage of the Affordable Care Act, the ever-evolving landscape of health care braces for another shift in the reimbursement paradigm. As health care costs continue to rise, providers are pressed to deliver efficient, high-quality care at flat to minimally increasing rates. Inherent systemwide inefficiencies between payers and providers at various clinical settings pose a daunting task for enhancing collaboration and care coordination. A change from Medicare's fee-for-service reimbursement model to bundled payments offers one avenue for resolution. Pilots using such payment models have realized varying degrees of success, leading to the development and upcoming implementation of a bundled payment initiative led by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation. Delivery integration is critical to ensure high-quality care at affordable costs across the system. Providers and payers able to adapt to the newly proposed models of payment will benefit from achieving cost reductions and improved patient outcomes and realize a competitive advantage.

  12. Working on reform. How workers' compensation medical care is affected by health care reform.

    PubMed Central

    Himmelstein, J; Rest, K

    1996-01-01

    The medical component of workers' compensation programs-now costing over $24 billion annually-and the rest of the nation's medical care system are linked. They share the same patients and providers. They provide similar benefits and services. And they struggle over who should pay for what. Clearly, health care reform and restructuring will have a major impact on the operation and expenditures of the workers' compensation system. For a brief period, during the 1994 national health care reform debate, these two systems were part of the same federal policy development and legislative process. With comprehensive health care reform no longer on the horizon, states now are tackling both workers' compensation and medical system reforms on their own. This paper reviews the major issues federal and state policy makers face as they consider reforms affecting the relationship between workers' compensation and traditional health insurance. What is the relationship of the workers' compensation cost crisis to that in general health care? What strategies are being considered by states involved in reforming the medical component of workers compensation? What are the major policy implications of these strategies? Images p13-a p14-a p15-a p16-a p18-a p19-a p20-a p22-a p24-a PMID:8610187

  13. Health reform requires policy capacity

    PubMed Central

    Forest, Pierre-Gerlier; Denis, Jean-Louis; Brown, Lawrence D.; Helms, David

    2015-01-01

    Among the many reasons that may limit the adoption of promising reform ideas, policy capacity is the least recognized. The concept itself is not widely understood. Although policy capacity is concerned with the gathering of information and the formulation of options for public action in the initial phases of policy consultation and development, it also touches on all stages of the policy process, from the strategic identification of a problem to the actual development of the policy, its formal adoption, its implementation, and even further, its evaluation and continuation or modification. Expertise in the form of policy advice is already widely available in and to public administrations, to well-established professional organizations like medical societies and, of course, to large private-sector organizations with commercial or financial interests in the health sector. We need more health actors to join the fray and move from their traditional position of advocacy to a fuller commitment to the development of policy capacity, with all that it entails in terms of leadership and social responsibility. PMID:25905476

  14. Health reform requires policy capacity.

    PubMed

    Forest, Pierre-Gerlier; Denis, Jean-Louis; Brown, Lawrence D; Helms, David

    2015-04-17

    Among the many reasons that may limit the adoption of promising reform ideas, policy capacity is the least recognized. The concept itself is not widely understood. Although policy capacity is concerned with the gathering of information and the formulation of options for public action in the initial phases of policy consultation and development, it also touches on all stages of the policy process, from the strategic identification of a problem to the actual development of the policy, its formal adoption, its implementation, and even further, its evaluation and continuation or modification. Expertise in the form of policy advice is already widely available in and to public administrations, to well-established professional organizations like medical societies and, of course, to large private-sector organizations with commercial or financial interests in the health sector. We need more health actors to join the fray and move from their traditional position of advocacy to a fuller commitment to the development of policy capacity, with all that it entails in terms of leadership and social responsibility.

  15. A reforming accountability: GPs and health reform in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, K

    1997-01-01

    Over the last ten years or so, many countries have undertaken public sector reforms. As a result of these changes, accounting has come to play a more important role. However, many of the studies have only discussed the reforms at a conceptual level and have failed to study how the reforms have been implemented and operated in practice. Based on the work of Lipsky (1980) and Gorz (1989), it can be argued that those affected by the reforms have a strong incentive to subvert the reforms. This prediction is explored via a case study of general practitioner (GP) response to the New Zealand health reforms. The creation of Independent Practice Associations (IPAs) allowed the State to impose contractual-accountability and to cap their budget exposure for subsidies. From the GP's perspective, the IPAs absorbed the changes initiated by the State, and managed the contracting, accounting and budgetary administration responsibilities that were created. This allowed individual GPs to continue practising as before and provided some collective protection against the threat of state intrusion into GP autonomy. The creation of IPAs also provided a new way to manage the professional/financial tension, the contradiction between the professional motivation noted by Gorz (1989) and the need to earn a living. PMID:10175302

  16. A reforming accountability: GPs and health reform in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, K

    1997-01-01

    Over the last ten years or so, many countries have undertaken public sector reforms. As a result of these changes, accounting has come to play a more important role. However, many of the studies have only discussed the reforms at a conceptual level and have failed to study how the reforms have been implemented and operated in practice. Based on the work of Lipsky (1980) and Gorz (1989), it can be argued that those affected by the reforms have a strong incentive to subvert the reforms. This prediction is explored via a case study of general practitioner (GP) response to the New Zealand health reforms. The creation of Independent Practice Associations (IPAs) allowed the State to impose contractual-accountability and to cap their budget exposure for subsidies. From the GP's perspective, the IPAs absorbed the changes initiated by the State, and managed the contracting, accounting and budgetary administration responsibilities that were created. This allowed individual GPs to continue practising as before and provided some collective protection against the threat of state intrusion into GP autonomy. The creation of IPAs also provided a new way to manage the professional/financial tension, the contradiction between the professional motivation noted by Gorz (1989) and the need to earn a living.

  17. Health reform in Finland: current proposals and unresolved challenges.

    PubMed

    Saltman, Richard B; Teperi, Juha

    2016-07-01

    The Finnish health care system is widely respected for its pilot role in creating primary-care-led health systems. In the early 1990s, however, a severe economic downturn in Finland reduced public funding and weakened the Finnish system's deeply decentralized model of health care administration. Recent Bank of Finland projections forecasting several decades of slow economic growth, combined with the impact of an aging population, appear to make major reform of the existing public system inevitable. Over the last several years, political attention has focused mostly on administrative consolidation inside the public sector, particularly integration of health and social services. Current proposals call for a reformed health sector governance structure based on a new meso-level configuration of public administration. In addition, Finland's national government has proposed replacing the current multi-channel public funding structure (which includes health insurance subsidies for occupational health services) with a single-channel public funding structure. This commentary examines several key issues involved in reforming the delivery structure of the Finnish health care system. It also explores possible alternative strategies to reform current funding arrangements. The article concludes with a brief discussion of implications from this Finnish experience for the wider health reform debate. PMID:26865494

  18. Where dentistry stands in light of health care reform.

    PubMed

    Collignon, B H

    1994-01-01

    The hot topic from Capitol Hill in Washington to Capitol Hill in Jefferson City is health care reform. President Clinton started the ball rolling during the campaign in 1992 by including health care reform in his platform. He continued the effort after his election by appointing his wife, Hillary, to chair a task force to present an outline for federal legislation. Since the package was presented to Congress, there has been much discussion, lobbying, and rumoring about the implications of health care reform and what it could mean to all of us as dentists. On the home front, Governor Carnahan has introduced legislation in Missouri to reform the health care system. This effort is known as the Missouri Health Assurance Plan (H.B. 1622). Missouri Dental Association members are vitally concerned about the impact of health care reform on their practice, their taxes, their relationship with their patients and employees, and on their ability to seek out health care services since each member is also a consumer of health care. This article represents answers to some of the questions being asked by MDA members in order that they might be more aware of the activities by the MDA, the ADA, and other levels of organized dentistry relating to health care reform.

  19. Where dentistry stands in light of health care reform.

    PubMed

    Collignon, B H

    1994-01-01

    The hot topic from Capitol Hill in Washington to Capitol Hill in Jefferson City is health care reform. President Clinton started the ball rolling during the campaign in 1992 by including health care reform in his platform. He continued the effort after his election by appointing his wife, Hillary, to chair a task force to present an outline for federal legislation. Since the package was presented to Congress, there has been much discussion, lobbying, and rumoring about the implications of health care reform and what it could mean to all of us as dentists. On the home front, Governor Carnahan has introduced legislation in Missouri to reform the health care system. This effort is known as the Missouri Health Assurance Plan (H.B. 1622). Missouri Dental Association members are vitally concerned about the impact of health care reform on their practice, their taxes, their relationship with their patients and employees, and on their ability to seek out health care services since each member is also a consumer of health care. This article represents answers to some of the questions being asked by MDA members in order that they might be more aware of the activities by the MDA, the ADA, and other levels of organized dentistry relating to health care reform. PMID:9564299

  20. Health reform and the quality assurance imperative.

    PubMed

    Webber, A

    The administration's blueprint for healthcare reform contains a number of positive features, including a national healthcare information database, quality "report cards," and state-based patient complaint offices. Missing from the plan, however, is "an active quality monitoring system that holds health plans and providers publicly accountable for improved performance," says Andrew Webber, Executive Vice President of the American Medical Peer Review Association, the national association of Peer Review Organizations (PROs). His antidote includes the creation of an independent, state-based network to coordinate quality assurance activities; a program to monitor compliance with practice guidelines; and a quality foundation to measure, manage, improve, and oversee quality. PMID:10131335

  1. Vermont's Catamount Health: a roadmap for health care reform?

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Kenneth E

    2007-01-01

    Vermont's new health reform program was enacted under a Republican governor in a state with a Democrat-controlled legislature. It thus serves as an intriguing approach to resolving political differences in health care. James Maxwell's interview of Vermont governor Jim Douglas provides background and insight on these reforms. I build on the interview, focusing on what changed between the 2005 reform failure and the passage of the new reforms. Key to the reform's political success was the recognition by both sides that it focused on issues of bipartisan concern: cost control through the effective management and prevention of disease.

  2. Improving the quality of Health Care in the Romanian public health system - a priority in the reform process

    PubMed Central

    Purcărea, VL; Coculescu, BI; Coculescu, EC

    2015-01-01

    To meet the shortfalls caused by the economic crisis, the Romanian medical system needed an objective analysis of the quality of medical care as a whole, of the entire package of health services as well as accountable joint efforts to identify system problems and, especially, firm action without compromising resolution, regardless of any limitations or emotional picture. In addition, last but not least, the judicious use of available resources. PMID:25866573

  3. Health financing and insurance reform in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah; Kress, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The government of Morocco approved two reforms in 2005 to expand health insurance coverage. The first is a payroll-based mandatory health insurance plan for public- and formal private-sector employees to extend coverage from the current 16 percent of the population to 30 percent. The second creates a publicly financed fund to cover services for the poor. Both reforms aim to improve access to high-quality care and reduce disparities in access and financing between income groups and between rural and urban dwellers. In this paper we analyze these reforms: the pre-reform debate, benefits covered, financing, administration, and oversight. We also examine prospects and future challenges for implementing the reforms. PMID:17630444

  4. Health care reform and the new economy.

    PubMed

    Starr, P

    2000-01-01

    The objectives and assumptions of health care reform have changed repeatedly during the past century and may now be entering a new historical phase as a result of the "new economy" rooted in information technology. In a high-growth context, proponents of reform may no longer feel obliged to bundle expanded coverage with tighter cost containment. At the same time, the new digital environment may facilitate innovations intended to inform and expand consumer choice and to improve quality. The new environment elevates "transparency" to a guiding principle. Health informatics has long been peripheral to reform and must now become more central. PMID:11192407

  5. The potential impact of the World Trade Organization's general agreement on trade in services on health system reform and regulation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Skala, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    The collapse of the World Trade Organization's (WTO) Doha Round of talks without achieving new health services liberalization presents an important opportunity to evaluate the wisdom of granting further concessions to international investors in the health sector. The continuing deterioration of the U.S. health system and the primacy of reform as an issue in the 2008 presidential campaign make clear the need for a full range of policy options for addressing the national health crisis. Yet few commentators or policymakers realize that existing WTO health care commitments may already significantly constrain domestic policy options. This article illustrates these constraints through an evaluation of the potential effects of current WTO law and jurisprudence on the implementation of a single-payer national health insurance system in the United States, proposed incremental national and state health system reforms, the privatization of Medicare, and other prominent health system issues. The author concludes with some recommendations to the U.S. Trade Representative to suspend existing liberalization commitments in the health sector and to interpret current and future international trade treaties in a manner consistent with civilized notions of health care as a universal human right.

  6. The potential impact of the World Trade Organization's general agreement on trade in services on health system reform and regulation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Skala, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    The collapse of the World Trade Organization's (WTO) Doha Round of talks without achieving new health services liberalization presents an important opportunity to evaluate the wisdom of granting further concessions to international investors in the health sector. The continuing deterioration of the U.S. health system and the primacy of reform as an issue in the 2008 presidential campaign make clear the need for a full range of policy options for addressing the national health crisis. Yet few commentators or policymakers realize that existing WTO health care commitments may already significantly constrain domestic policy options. This article illustrates these constraints through an evaluation of the potential effects of current WTO law and jurisprudence on the implementation of a single-payer national health insurance system in the United States, proposed incremental national and state health system reforms, the privatization of Medicare, and other prominent health system issues. The author concludes with some recommendations to the U.S. Trade Representative to suspend existing liberalization commitments in the health sector and to interpret current and future international trade treaties in a manner consistent with civilized notions of health care as a universal human right. PMID:19492630

  7. Physician payments under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Abe; Shapiro, Adam Hale

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the impact of major health insurance reform on payments made in the health care sector. We study the prices of services paid to physicians in the privately insured market during the Massachusetts health care reform. The reform increased the number of insured individuals as well as introduced an online marketplace where insurers compete. We estimate that, over the reform period, physician payments increased at least 11 percentage points relative to control areas. Payment increases began around the time legislation passed the House and Senate-the period in which their was a high probability of the bill eventually becoming law. This result is consistent with fixed-duration payment contracts being negotiated in anticipation of future demand and competition. PMID:25497755

  8. How Health Reform is Recasting Public Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Shaner, Roderick; Thompson, Kenneth S; Braslow, Joel; Ragins, Mark; Parks, Joseph John; Vaccaro, Jerome V

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews the fiscal, programmatic, clinical, and cultural forces of health care reform that are transforming the work of public psychiatrists. Areas of rapid change and issues of concern are discussed. A proposed health care reform agenda for public psychiatric leadership emphasizes (1) access to quality mental health care, (2) promotion of recovery practices in primary care, (3) promotion of public psychiatry values within general psychiatry, (4) engagement in national policy formulation and implementation, and (5) further development of psychiatric leadership focused on public and community mental health.

  9. How Health Reform is Recasting Public Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Shaner, Roderick; Thompson, Kenneth S; Braslow, Joel; Ragins, Mark; Parks, Joseph John; Vaccaro, Jerome V

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews the fiscal, programmatic, clinical, and cultural forces of health care reform that are transforming the work of public psychiatrists. Areas of rapid change and issues of concern are discussed. A proposed health care reform agenda for public psychiatric leadership emphasizes (1) access to quality mental health care, (2) promotion of recovery practices in primary care, (3) promotion of public psychiatry values within general psychiatry, (4) engagement in national policy formulation and implementation, and (5) further development of psychiatric leadership focused on public and community mental health. PMID:26300038

  10. Medicare, health care reform, and older adults.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Ann L

    2010-12-01

    Nurses will play a key role in health care reform, educating and engaging consumers, providing input into and monitoring implementation, and assisting organizations with transition to new policies. As the largest group of professional health care providers, nurses must be key players in the actualization of health care reform. This article addresses how The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 will affect the solvency of Medicare, what older adults will gain, effects on quality and effectiveness of care, cost reduction, changes in taxes, and the key provisions of special interest to nurses.

  11. Critical issues in reforming rural mental health service delivery.

    PubMed

    Blank, M B; Fox, J C; Hargrove, D S; Turner, J T

    1995-12-01

    Critical issues in reforming rural mental health service delivery systems under health care reform are outlined. It is argued that the exclusive focus on health care financing reform fails to include obstacles to effective mental health service delivery in rural area, which should focus on issues of availability, accessibility, and acceptability, as well as financing and accountability. Characteristics of rural areas are delineated and three assumptions about the structure of rural communities which are shaping the dialogue on rural health and mental health service delivery are examined. These assumptions include the notion that rural communities are more closely knit than urban ones, that rural services can be effectively delivered through urban hubs, and that rural dwellers represent a low risk population which can be effectively served through existing facilities and by extending existing services. PMID:8608697

  12. Health care reform and social movements in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Beatrix

    2003-01-01

    Because of the importance of grassroots social movements, or "change from below," in the history of US reform, the relationship between social movements and demands for universal health care is a critical one. National health reform campaigns in the 20th century were initiated and run by elites more concerned with defending against attacks from interest groups than with popular mobilization, and grassroots reformers in the labor, civil rights, feminist, and AIDS activist movements have concentrated more on immediate and incremental changes than on transforming the health care system itself. However, grassroots health care demands have also contained the seeds of a wider critique of the American health care system, leading some movements to adopt calls for universal coverage.

  13. Health care reform and social movements in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Beatrix

    2008-09-01

    Because of the importance of grassroots social movements, or "change from below," in the history of US reform, the relationship between social movements and demands for universal health care is a critical one. National health reform campaigns in the 20th century were initiated and run by elites more concerned with defending against attacks from interest groups than with popular mobilization, and grassroots reformers in the labor, civil rights, feminist, and AIDS activist movements have concentrated more on immediate and incremental changes than on transforming the health care system itself. However, grassroots health care demands have also contained the seeds of a wider critique of the American health care system, leading some movements to adopt calls for universal coverage.

  14. Health Care Reform and Social Movements in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Beatrix

    2003-01-01

    Because of the importance of grassroots social movements, or “change from below,” in the history of US reform, the relationship between social movements and demands for universal health care is a critical one. National health reform campaigns in the 20th century were initiated and run by elites more concerned with defending against attacks from interest groups than with popular mobilization, and grassroots reformers in the labor, civil rights, feminist, and AIDS activist movements have concentrated more on immediate and incremental changes than on transforming the health care system itself. However, grassroots health care demands have also contained the seeds of a wider critique of the American health care system, leading some movements to adopt calls for universal coverage. PMID:12511390

  15. Health care reform and social movements in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Beatrix

    2008-09-01

    Because of the importance of grassroots social movements, or "change from below," in the history of US reform, the relationship between social movements and demands for universal health care is a critical one. National health reform campaigns in the 20th century were initiated and run by elites more concerned with defending against attacks from interest groups than with popular mobilization, and grassroots reformers in the labor, civil rights, feminist, and AIDS activist movements have concentrated more on immediate and incremental changes than on transforming the health care system itself. However, grassroots health care demands have also contained the seeds of a wider critique of the American health care system, leading some movements to adopt calls for universal coverage. PMID:18687625

  16. Health Care Reform and Social Movements in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Beatrix

    2008-01-01

    Because of the importance of grassroots social movements, or “change from below,” in the history of US reform, the relationship between social movements and demands for universal health care is a critical one. National health reform campaigns in the 20th century were initiated and run by elites more concerned with defending against attacks from interest groups than with popular mobilization, and grassroots reformers in the labor, civil rights, feminist, and AIDS activist movements have concentrated more on immediate and incremental changes than on transforming the health care system itself. However, grassroots health care demands have also contained the seeds of a wider critique of the American health care system, leading some movements to adopt calls for universal coverage. PMID:18687625

  17. Health care reform: prospects and progress.

    PubMed

    Rockefeller, J

    1992-03-01

    No longer can the health care community and the politicians work separately as they usually did until just a generation ago. Now, with or without the frustrations involved, both groups need one another and must work together to fulfill their common goal of caring for people. The U.S. economy can no longer sustain the immense and mounting costs of health care: the system must change drastically before the end of the century or there will be revolution or a collapse of the system. For the first time, there is a strong constituency calling for health care reform. The politicians and the health care community must stop ignoring that constituency and instead work together on a health care bill to head off the coming crisis. Such a bill will exact sacrifices and compromises from all sectors, and must control costs and provide universal access to health care. The author outlines proposed bills and other activities that are now being considered, describes a bill that he has helped craft and introduce, and notes that the Bush administration has done an about-face and is now promising a health care bill. He challenges academic medicine to help produce more primary care physicians, gives examples of efforts that are fostering primary care, especially in rural areas, and explains why having more primary care physicians is vital and also a key to cost containment. He ends by again urging the health care community to participate in defining what can be done to avert the coming crisis and establish a workable and equitable health care system.

  18. [A proposal for the definitive reform of the private health insurance system in Chile].

    PubMed

    Zúñiga F, Alejandra

    2014-04-01

    Private health insurance should be able to provide coverage to people considered as high risk, such as women and the elderly. The only way to do that is to organize implicit or explicit cross-subsidies from low to high-risk individuals. This paper examines how European private health insurance companies introduced regulatory measures that could be introduced in Chile such as open enrollment, community-rated premiums, lifetime coverage, a package of minimum benefits and a risk equalization scheme.

  19. Policy Capacity for Health Reform: Necessary but Insufficient: Comment on "Health Reform Requires Policy Capacity".

    PubMed

    Adams, Owen

    2015-09-04

    Forest and colleagues have persuasively made the case that policy capacity is a fundamental prerequisite to health reform. They offer a comprehensive life-cycle definition of policy capacity and stress that it involves much more than problem identification and option development. I would like to offer a Canadian perspective. If we define health reform as re-orienting the health system from acute care to prevention and chronic disease management the consensus is that Canada has been unsuccessful in achieving a major transformation of our 14 health systems (one for each province and territory plus the federal government). I argue that 3 additional things are essential to build health policy capacity in a healthcare federation such as Canada: (a) A means of "policy governance" that would promote an approach to cooperative federalism in the health arena; (b) The ability to overcome the "policy inertia" resulting from how Canadian Medicare was implemented and subsequently interpreted; and (c) The ability to entertain a long-range thinking and planning horizon. My assessment indicates that Canada falls short on each of these items, and the prospects for achieving them are not bright. However, hope springs eternal and it will be interesting to see if the July, 2015 report of the Advisory Panel on Healthcare Innovation manages to galvanize national attention and stimulate concerted action.

  20. Policy Capacity for Health Reform: Necessary but Insufficient: Comment on "Health Reform Requires Policy Capacity".

    PubMed

    Adams, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Forest and colleagues have persuasively made the case that policy capacity is a fundamental prerequisite to health reform. They offer a comprehensive life-cycle definition of policy capacity and stress that it involves much more than problem identification and option development. I would like to offer a Canadian perspective. If we define health reform as re-orienting the health system from acute care to prevention and chronic disease management the consensus is that Canada has been unsuccessful in achieving a major transformation of our 14 health systems (one for each province and territory plus the federal government). I argue that 3 additional things are essential to build health policy capacity in a healthcare federation such as Canada: (a) A means of "policy governance" that would promote an approach to cooperative federalism in the health arena; (b) The ability to overcome the "policy inertia" resulting from how Canadian Medicare was implemented and subsequently interpreted; and (c) The ability to entertain a long-range thinking and planning horizon. My assessment indicates that Canada falls short on each of these items, and the prospects for achieving them are not bright. However, hope springs eternal and it will be interesting to see if the July, 2015 report of the Advisory Panel on Healthcare Innovation manages to galvanize national attention and stimulate concerted action. PMID:26673650

  1. Nursing leadership and health sector reform.

    PubMed

    Borthwick, C; Galbally, R

    2001-06-01

    The political, technological and economic changes that have occurred over the past decade are increasingly difficult to manage within the traditional framework of health-care, and the organisation of health-care is seen to need radical reform to sweep away many of the internal barriers that now divide one form of health-care, and one profession, from another. Nursing must equip itself with skills in advocacy and political action to influence the direction the system will take. Nursing currently suffers from a weakness in self-concept that goes hand in hand with a weakness in political status, and nursing leadership must build the foundations for both advocacy for others and self-advocacy for the nursing movement. The profession faces tensions between different conceptions of its role and status, its relationship to medicine, and its relationship to health. Health indices are tightly linked to status, and to trust, hope, and control of one's own life. Can nurses help empower others when they are not particularly good at empowering themselves? What will the role of the nurse be in creating the information flows that will guide people toward health? Nursing's long history of adaptation to an unsettled and negotiated status may mean that it is better fitted to make this adaptation than other more confident disciplines.

  2. Reform, change, and continuity in Finnish health care.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Unto; Lehto, Juhani

    2005-01-01

    This article describes some essential aspects of the Finnish political and governmental system and the evolution of the basic institutional elements of the health care system. We examine the developments that gave rise to a series of health care reforms and reform proposals in the late 1980s and early 1990s and relate them to changes in health care expenditure, structure, and performance. Finally, we discuss the relationship between policy changes, reforms, and health system changes and the strength of neo-institutional theory in explaining both continuity and change. Much of the change in Finnish health care can be explained by institutional path dependency. The tradition of strong but small local authorities and the lack of legitimate democratic regional authorities as well as the coexistence of a dominant Beveridge-style health system with a marginal Bismarckian element explain the specific path of Finnish health care reform. Public responsibility for health care has been decentralized to smaller local authorities (known as municipalities) more than in any other country. Even an exceptionally deep economic recession in the early 1990s did not lead to systems change; rather, the economic imperative was met by the traditional centralized policy pattern. Some of the developments of the 1990s are, however, difficult to explain by institutional theory. Thus, there is a need for testing alternative theories as well. PMID:15943388

  3. [Proposals for the reform of public health services in Catalonia].

    PubMed

    Villalbí, Joan R; Antó, Josep M; Pané, Olga; de Peray, Josep L

    2006-01-01

    In the year 2004 the government of Catalonia undertook a process to reform its public health services. In this context, it created a working groupinvolving experts from diverse backgrounds to analyse the reforms to be undertaken, the Scientific Committee for the Reform of Public Health in Catalonia. Its members produced eight documents on specific aspects of public health, from which a global report of the Committee was compiled by the end of 2005. This paper makes a synthesis of their production, and includes as an annex their recommendations and proposals. Public health policies should be structured around three main goal: the reduction of health inequalities, the control and removal of social and environmental risks, and effective improvements in quality of life. To reach them, common criteria are defined as main directions. These are based in favouring decentralization of public health services and their administration, linking public health activities with health care services, designing interventions with a population perspective, and reinforcing cross-sectional implications of public health. The work of this Committee is produced in the context of an international debate on the future of public health services and the disproportion between its contribution to health and well being and its resources and visibility. The Committee produced proposals and recommendations which can he grouped in five facets: consolidating a solid and coherent system, developing an organizational reform, defining a port-folio of services, adopting improvements in management, and taking into account cross sectional aspects relating to public health.

  4. The impact of health insurance reform on insurance instability.

    PubMed

    Freund, Karen M; Isabelle, Alexis P; Hanchate, Amresh D; Kalish, Richard L; Kapoor, Alok; Bak, Sharon; Mishuris, Rebecca G; Shroff, Swati M; Battaglia, Tracy A

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the impact of the 2006 Massachusetts health care reform on insurance coverage and stability among minority and underserved women. We examined 36 months of insurance claims among 1,946 women who had abnormal cancer screening at six community health centers pre-(2004-2005) and post-(2007-2008) insurance reform. We examined frequency of switches in insurance coverage as measures of longitudinal insurance instability. On the date of their abnormal cancer screening test, 36% of subjects were publicly insured and 31% were uninsured. Post-reform, the percent ever uninsured declined from 39% to 29% (p .001) and those consistently uninsured declined from 23% to 16%. To assess if insurance instability changed between the pre- and post-reform periods, we conducted Poisson regression models, adjusted for patient demographics and length of time in care. These revealed no significant differences from the pre- to post-reform period in annual rates of insurance switches, incident rate ratio 0.98 (95%- CI 0.88-1.09). Our analysis is limited by changes in the populations in the pre- and post-reform period and inability to capture care outside of the health system network. Insurance reform increased stability as measured by decreasing uninsured rates without increasing insurance switches.

  5. Oncology payment reform to achieve real health care reform.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Mark B; Thoumi, Andrea I

    2015-05-01

    Cancer care is transforming, moving toward increasingly personalized treatment with the potential to save and improve many more lives. Many oncologists and policymakers view current fee-for-service payments as an obstacle to providing more efficient, high-quality cancer care. However, payment reforms create new uncertainties for oncologists and may be challenging to implement. In this article, we illustrate how accountable care payment reforms that directly align payments with quality and cost measures are being implemented and the opportunities and challenges they present. These payment models provide more flexibility to oncologists and other providers to give patients the personalized care they need, along with more accountability for demonstrating quality improvements and overall cost or cost growth reductions. Such payment reforms increase the importance of person-level quality and cost measures as well as data analysis to improve measured performance. We describe key features of quality and cost measures needed to support accountable care payment reforms in oncology. Finally, we propose policy recommendations to move incrementally but fundamentally to payment systems that support higher-value care in oncology.

  6. Costs and coverage. Pressures toward health care reform.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, P R; Soffel, D; Luft, H S

    1992-01-01

    Signs of discontent with the health care system are growing. Calls for health care reform are largely motivated by the continued increase in health care costs and the large number of people without adequate health insurance. For the past 20 years, health care spending has risen at rates higher than the gross national product. As many as 35 million people are without health insurance. As proposals for health care reform are developed, it is useful to understand the roots of the cost problem. Causes of spiraling health care costs include "market failure" in the health care market, expansion in technology, excessive administrative costs, unnecessary care and defensive medicine, increased patient complexity, excess capacity within the health care system, and low productivity. Attempts to control costs, by the federal government for the Medicare program and then by the private sector, have to date been mostly unsuccessful. New proposals for health care reform are proliferating, and important changes in the health care system are likely. PMID:1441510

  7. Health sector reform and reproductive health in Latin America and the Caribbean: strengthening the links.

    PubMed Central

    Langer, A.; Nigenda, G.; Catino, J.

    2000-01-01

    Many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) are currently reforming their national health sectors and also implementing a comprehensive approach to reproductive health care. Three regional workshops to explore how health sector reform could improve reproductive health services have revealed the inherently complex, competing, and political nature of health sector reform and reproductive health. The objectives of reproductive health care can run parallel to those of health sector reform in that both are concerned with promoting equitable access to high quality care by means of integrated approaches to primary health care, and by the involvement of the public in setting health sector priorities. However, there is a serious risk that health reforms will be driven mainly by financial and/or political considerations and not by the need to improve the quality of health services as a basic human right. With only limited changes to the health systems in many Latin American and Caribbean countries and a handful of examples of positive progress resulting from reforms, the gap between rhetoric and practice remains wide. PMID:10859860

  8. An introduction to oral health care reform.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, Kristen L

    2009-07-01

    Oral health care reform is made up of several components, but access to care is central. Health care reform will occur in some fashion at some point, and how it will impact the entire dental sector is unclear. In the short term, there is likely to be a dental component during the reauthorization of State Children's Health Insurance Program in early 2009, and several federal oral health bills are expected to be reintroduced as well. Additional public funding for new programs and program expansions remains questionable, as federal funding will be tight. Fiscal conservancy will be occurring in the states as well; however, various proposals to expand dental hygienists' duties are likely, as are proposals related to student grants for dental schools. Regardless of one's political stance, the profile of oral health care has been elevated, offering countless opportunities for improvement in the oral health of the nation. PMID:19482130

  9. Ukraine: health system review.

    PubMed

    Lekhan, Valery; Rudiy, Volodymyr; Shevchenko, Maryna; Nitzan Kaluski, Dorit; Richardson, Erica

    2015-03-01

    This analysis of the Ukrainian health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. Since the country gained independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, successive governments have sought to overcome funding shortfalls and modernize the health care system to meet the needs of the population's health. However, no fundamental reform of the system has yet been implemented and consequently it has preserved the main features characteristic of the Semashko model; there is a particularly high proportion of total health expenditure paid out of pocket (42.3 % in 2012), and incentives within the system do not focus on quality or outcomes. The most recent health reform programme began in 2010 and sought to strengthen primary and emergency care, rationalize hospitals and change the model of health care financing from one based on inputs to one based on outputs. Fundamental issues that hampered reform efforts in the past re-emerged, but conflict and political instability have proved the greatest barriers to reform implementation and the programme was abandoned in 2014. More recently, the focus has been on more pressing humanitarian concerns arising from the conflict in the east of Ukraine. It is hoped that greater political, social and economic stability in the future will provide a better environment for the introduction of deep reforms to address shortcomings in the Ukrainian health system. PMID:26106880

  10. Mental health care delivery system reform in Belgium: the challenge of achieving deinstitutionalisation whilst addressing fragmentation of care at the same time.

    PubMed

    Nicaise, Pablo; Dubois, Vincent; Lorant, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Most mental health care delivery systems in welfare states currently face two major issues: deinstitutionalisation and fragmentation of care. Belgium is in the process of reforming its mental health care delivery system with the aim of simultaneously strengthening community care and improving integration of care. The new policy model attempts to strike a balance between hospitals and community services, and is based on networks of services. We carried out a content analysis of the policy blueprint for the reform and performed an ex-ante evaluation of its plan of operation, based on the current knowledge of mental health service networks. When we examined the policy's multiple aims, intermediate goals, suggested tools, and their articulation, we found that it was unclear how the new policy could achieve its goals. Indeed, deinstitutionalisation and integration of care require different network structures, and different modes of governance. Furthermore, most of the mechanisms contained within the new policy were not sufficiently detailed. Consequently, three major threats to the effectiveness of the reform were identified. These were: issues concerning the relationship between network structure and purpose, the continued influence of hospitals despite the goal of deinstitutionalisation, and the heterogeneity in the actual implementation of the new policy. PMID:24582489

  11. Mental health care delivery system reform in Belgium: the challenge of achieving deinstitutionalisation whilst addressing fragmentation of care at the same time.

    PubMed

    Nicaise, Pablo; Dubois, Vincent; Lorant, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Most mental health care delivery systems in welfare states currently face two major issues: deinstitutionalisation and fragmentation of care. Belgium is in the process of reforming its mental health care delivery system with the aim of simultaneously strengthening community care and improving integration of care. The new policy model attempts to strike a balance between hospitals and community services, and is based on networks of services. We carried out a content analysis of the policy blueprint for the reform and performed an ex-ante evaluation of its plan of operation, based on the current knowledge of mental health service networks. When we examined the policy's multiple aims, intermediate goals, suggested tools, and their articulation, we found that it was unclear how the new policy could achieve its goals. Indeed, deinstitutionalisation and integration of care require different network structures, and different modes of governance. Furthermore, most of the mechanisms contained within the new policy were not sufficiently detailed. Consequently, three major threats to the effectiveness of the reform were identified. These were: issues concerning the relationship between network structure and purpose, the continued influence of hospitals despite the goal of deinstitutionalisation, and the heterogeneity in the actual implementation of the new policy.

  12. [The main directions of public health reforms in the Republic of Uzbekistan].

    PubMed

    Ibragimov, A Iu; Asadov, D A; Menlikulov, P R

    2012-01-01

    The article covers the directive documents regulating the development of public health. The main directions of reforms of public health system of the Republic of Uzbekistan are covered too. The statistical data reflecting the structural changes in public health is presented. The purpose and tasks of reformation of the key public health issues in the Republic of Uzbekistan are explained. PMID:23373349

  13. Health reform: setting the agenda for long term care.

    PubMed

    Hatch, O G; Wofford, H; Willging, P R; Pomeroy, E

    1993-06-01

    The White House Task Force on National Health Care Reform, headed by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, is expected to release its prescription for health care reform this month. From the outset, Clinton's mandate was clear: to provide universal coverage while reining in costs for delivering quality health care. Before President Clinton was even sworn into office, he had outlined the major principles that would shape the health reform debate. Global budgeting would establish limits on all health care expenditures, thereby containing health costs. Under a system of managed competition, employers would form health alliances for consumers to negotiate for cost-effective health care at the community level. So far, a basic approach to health care reform has emerged. A key element is universal coverage--with an emphasis on acute, preventive, and mental health care. Other likely pieces are employer-employee contributions to health care plans, laws that guarantee continued coverage if an individual changes jobs or becomes ill, and health insurance alliances that would help assure individual access to low-cost health care. What still is not clear is the extent to which long term care will be included in the basic benefits package. A confidential report circulated by the task force last month includes four options for long term care: incremental Medicaid reform; a new federal/state program to replace Medicaid; a social insurance program for home and community-based services; or full social insurance for long term care. Some work group members have identified an additional option: prefunded long term care insurance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Health reform: setting the agenda for long term care.

    PubMed

    Hatch, O G; Wofford, H; Willging, P R; Pomeroy, E

    1993-06-01

    The White House Task Force on National Health Care Reform, headed by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, is expected to release its prescription for health care reform this month. From the outset, Clinton's mandate was clear: to provide universal coverage while reining in costs for delivering quality health care. Before President Clinton was even sworn into office, he had outlined the major principles that would shape the health reform debate. Global budgeting would establish limits on all health care expenditures, thereby containing health costs. Under a system of managed competition, employers would form health alliances for consumers to negotiate for cost-effective health care at the community level. So far, a basic approach to health care reform has emerged. A key element is universal coverage--with an emphasis on acute, preventive, and mental health care. Other likely pieces are employer-employee contributions to health care plans, laws that guarantee continued coverage if an individual changes jobs or becomes ill, and health insurance alliances that would help assure individual access to low-cost health care. What still is not clear is the extent to which long term care will be included in the basic benefits package. A confidential report circulated by the task force last month includes four options for long term care: incremental Medicaid reform; a new federal/state program to replace Medicaid; a social insurance program for home and community-based services; or full social insurance for long term care. Some work group members have identified an additional option: prefunded long term care insurance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10126659

  15. Mental Health under National Health Care Reform: The Empirical Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Christopher G.; DeVito, Jo Anne

    1994-01-01

    Reviews research pertinent to mental health services under health care reform proposals. Examines redistributional impact of inclusion of outpatient mental health benefits, optimal benefit packages, and findings that mental health services lower medical utilization costs. Argues that extending minimalist model of time-limited benefits to national…

  16. Health information technology: laying the infrastructure for national health reform.

    PubMed

    Buntin, Melinda Beeuwkes; Jain, Sachin H; Blumenthal, David

    2010-06-01

    The enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is a signal achievement on the road to reform, which arguably began with the passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. That statute's Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) provisions created an essential foundation for restructuring health care delivery and for achieving the key goals of improving health care quality; reducing costs; and increasing access through better methods of storing, analyzing, and sharing health information. This article discusses the range of initiatives under HITECH to support health reform, including proposed regulations on "meaningful use" and standards; funding of regional extension centers and Beacon communities; and support for the development and use of clinical registries and linked health outcomes research networks, all of which are critical to carrying out the comparative clinical effectiveness research that will be expanded under health reform.

  17. Practice budgets and the patient mix of physicians - the effect of a remuneration system reform on health care utilisation.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Hendrik

    2013-12-01

    This study analyses the effect of a change in the remuneration system for physicians on the treatment lengths as measured by the number of doctor visits using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel over the period 1995-2002. Specifically, I analyse the introduction of a remuneration cap (so called practice budgets) for physicians who treat publicly insured patients in 1997. I find evidence that the reform of 1997 did not change the extensive margin of doctor visits but strongly affected the intensive margin. The conditional number of doctor visits among publicly insured decreased while it increased among privately insured. This can be seen as evidence that physicians respond to the change in incentives induced by the reform by altering their patient mix.

  18. Health reform redux: learning from experience and politics.

    PubMed

    Ross, Johnathon S

    2009-05-01

    The 2008 presidential campaign season featured health care reform proposals. I discuss 3 approaches to health care reform and the tools for bringing about reform, such as insurance market reforms, tax credits, subsidies, individual and employer mandates, and public program expansions. I also discuss the politics of past and current health care reform efforts. Market-based reforms and mandates have been less successful than public program expansions at expanding coverage and controlling costs. New divisions among special interest groups increase the likelihood that reform efforts will succeed. Federal support for state efforts may be necessary to achieve national health care reform. History suggests that state-level success precedes national reform. History also suggests that an organized social movement for reform is necessary to overcome opposition from special interest groups.

  19. Health Reform Redux: Learning From Experience and Politics

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 presidential campaign season featured health care reform proposals. I discuss 3 approaches to health care reform and the tools for bringing about reform, such as insurance market reforms, tax credits, subsidies, individual and employer mandates, and public program expansions. I also discuss the politics of past and current health care reform efforts. Market-based reforms and mandates have been less successful than public program expansions at expanding coverage and controlling costs. New divisions among special interest groups increase the likelihood that reform efforts will succeed. Federal support for state efforts may be necessary to achieve national health care reform. History suggests that state-level success precedes national reform. History also suggests that an organized social movement for reform is necessary to overcome opposition from special interest groups. PMID:19299668

  20. Health sector reforms and human resources for health in Uganda and Bangladesh: mechanisms of effect

    PubMed Central

    Ssengooba, Freddie; Rahman, Syed Azizur; Hongoro, Charles; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus; Mustafa, Ahmed; Kielmann, Tara; McPake, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite the expanding literature on how reforms may affect health workers and which reactions they may provoke, little research has been conducted on the mechanisms of effect through which health sector reforms either promote or discourage health worker performance. This paper seeks to trace these mechanisms and examines the contextual framework of reform objectives in Uganda and Bangladesh, and health workers' responses to the changes in their working environments by taking a 'realistic evaluation' approach. Methods The study findings were generated by triangulating both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis among policy technocrats, health managers and groups of health providers. Quantitative surveys were conducted with over 700 individual health workers in both Bangladesh and Uganda and supplemented with qualitative data obtained from focus group discussions and key interviews with professional cadres, health managers and key institutions involved in the design, implementation and evaluation of the reforms of interest. Results The reforms in both countries affected the workforce through various mechanisms. In Bangladesh, the effects of the unification efforts resulted in a power struggle and general mistrust between the two former workforce tracts, family planning and health. However positive effects of the reforms were felt regarding the changes in payment schemes. Ugandan findings show how the workforce responded to a strong and rapidly implemented system of decentralisation where the power of new local authorities was influenced by resource constraints and nepotism in recruitment. On the other hand, closer ties to local authorities provided the opportunity to gain insight into the operational constraints originating from higher levels that health staff were dealing with. Conclusion Findings from the study suggest that a) reform planners should use the proposed dynamic responses model to help design reform objectives

  1. The politics of health reform: why do bad things happen to good plans?

    PubMed

    Oberlander, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines political feasibility and its implications for health reform. I discuss the political obstacles to health reform in the United States, disentangling perennial barriers from contemporary constraints. I then explore major reform options and their political prospects. I argue that while incremental reform now appears to be the most feasible option, the political climate may change in a way that permits a bolder vision. Moreover, incremental reform may not be sustainable in the long run, for the same reason that makes it politically popular now: It does not change the status quo in the health system.

  2. [Neoliberal health sector reforms in Latin America: unprepared managers and unhappy workers].

    PubMed

    Ugalde, Antonio; Homedes, Nuria

    2005-03-01

    This work analyzes the neoliberal health sector reforms that have taken place in Latin America, the preparation of health care workers for the reforms, the reforms' impacts on the workers, and the consequences that the reforms have had on efficiency and quality in the health sector. The piece also looks at the process of formulating and implementing the reforms. The piece utilizes secondary sources and in-depth interviews with health sector managers in Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, and Mexico. Neoliberal reforms have not solved the human resources problems that health sector evaluations and academic studies had identified as the leading causes of health system inefficiency and low-quality services that existed before the reforms. The reforms worsened the situation by putting new pressures on health personnel, in terms of both the lack of necessary training to face the challenges that came with the reforms and efforts to take away from workers the rights and benefits that they had gained during years of struggles by unions, and to replace them with temporary contracts, reduced job security, and lower benefits. The secrecy with which the reforms were developed and applied made workers even more unified. In response, unions opposed the reforms, and in some countries they were able to delay the reforms. The neoliberal reforms have not improved the efficiency or quality of health systems in Latin America despite the resources that have been invested. Nor have the neoliberal reforms supported specific changes that have been applied in the public sector and that have demonstrated their ability to solve important health problems. These specific changes have produced better results than the neoliberal reforms, and at a lower cost.

  3. Welfare Reform and Children's Health.

    PubMed

    Baltagi, Badi H; Yen, Yin-Fang

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of the Temporary Aid to Needy Families (TANF) program on children's health outcomes using data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation over the period 1994 to 2005. The TANF policies have been credited with increased employment for single mothers and a dramatic drop in welfare caseload. Our results show that these policies also had a significant effect on various measures of children's medical utilization among low-income families. These health measures include a rating of the child's health status reported by the parents, the number of times that parents consulted a doctor, and the number of nights that the child stayed in a hospital. We compare the overall changes of health status and medical utilization for children with working and nonworking mothers. We find that the child's health status as reported by the parents is affected by the maternal employment status.

  4. Using accountability for mental health to drive reform.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Sebastian P; Hickie, Ian B; McGorry, Patrick D; Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Burns, Jane; Christensen, Helen; Mendoza, John; Rosen, Alan; Russell, Lesley M; Sinclair, Sally

    2015-10-19

    Greatly enhanced accountability can drive mental health reform. As extant approaches are ineffective, we propose a new approach. Australia spends around $7.6 billion on mental health services annually, but is anybody getting better? Effective accountability for mental health can reduce variation in care and increase effective service provision. Despite 20 years of rhetoric, Australia's approach to accountability in mental health is overly focused on fulfilling governmental reporting requirements rather than using data to drive reform. The existing system is both fragmented and outcome blind. Australia has failed to develop useful local and regional approaches to benchmarking in mental health. New approaches must address this gap and better reflect the experience of care felt by consumers and carers, as well as by service providers. There are important social priorities in mental health that must be assessed. We provide a brief overview of the existing system and propose a new, modest but achievable set of indicators by which to monitor the progress of national mental health reform. These indicators should form part of a new, system-wide process of continuous quality improvement in mental health care and suicide prevention. PMID:26465695

  5. The Big Ideas behind Whole System Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullan, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Whole system reform means that every vital part of the system--school, community, district, and government--contributes individually and in concert to forward movement and success, using practice, not research, as the driver of reform. With this in mind, several "big ideas", based on successful implementation, informed Ontario's reform strategy:…

  6. The health care reform in Italy: transition or turmoil.

    PubMed

    Taroni, F; Guerra, R; D'Ambrosio, M G

    1998-01-01

    Health care reform in Italy is transforming its centrally planned, vertically integrated National Health Service into a market-oriented system in which public funders contract directly with individual providers. A model is envisaged in which a plurality of public and private care providers compete for contracts with capitated health agencies responsible for assuring uniform levels of services for geographically defined populations. The ultimate goal of the reform is to guarantee universal coverage and secure global spending limits while, at the same time, promoting efficiency in the delivery of care and enhancing responsiveness to consumers. The emphasis upon incentives for the individual provider which will be introduced should, however, be considered against the quest for equity in health care which was the central tenet of the 1978 reform and is yet to be attained. The fragmentation of the National Health Service into many separate, competing delivery units might well damage the ability to plan strategically for addressing the substantial inequities in health status, health care utilization, and health service availability which still exist across the country. Competition between a plurality of providers and fee-for-service payment schemes add additional concerns about unnecessary care and supplier-induced demand. It creates the need for developing rules to make competition manageable and providing sound clinical and financial information that make enforcement possible. The poor record scored in managing the contractual relationships between the LHUs and the strong private health sector suggests that massive investment in promoting managerial skills and developing appropriate clinical and financial information systems are required. Careful experimentation in implementing the reform and continuous monitoring of its impact on the health care system are, therefore, the imperatives of the next two years.

  7. Consumer-directed health care: understanding its value in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kristina L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the importance of consumer-directed health care as the essential strategy needed to lower health care costs and support its widespread adoption for making significant strides in health care reform. The pros and cons of health care consumerism are discussed. The intent is to show that the viability of the US health care system depends on the application of appropriate consumer-directed health care strategies. PMID:20145464

  8. Mandate-based health reform and the labor market: Evidence from the Massachusetts reform.

    PubMed

    Kolstad, Jonathan T; Kowalski, Amanda E

    2016-05-01

    We model the labor market impact of the key provisions of the national and Massachusetts "mandate-based" health reforms: individual mandates, employer mandates, and subsidies. We characterize the compensating differential for employer-sponsored health insurance (ESHI) and the welfare impact of reform in terms of "sufficient statistics." We compare welfare under mandate-based reform to welfare in a counterfactual world where individuals do not value ESHI. Relying on the Massachusetts reform, we find that jobs with ESHI pay $2812 less annually, somewhat less than the cost of ESHI to employers. Accordingly, the deadweight loss of mandate-based health reform was approximately 8 percent of its potential size.

  9. Innovation in Medicare and Medicaid will be central to health reform's success.

    PubMed

    Guterman, Stuart; Davis, Karen; Stremikis, Kristof; Drake, Heather

    2010-06-01

    The health reform legislation signed into law by President Barack Obama contains numerous payment reform provisions designed to fundamentally transform the nation's health care system. Perhaps the most noteworthy of these is the establishment of a Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation within the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. This paper presents recommendations that would maximize the new center's effectiveness in promoting reforms that can improve the quality and value of care in Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children's Health Insurance Program, while helping achieve health reform's goals of more efficient, coordinated, and effective care. PMID:20530353

  10. Comprehensive health care reform in Vermont: a conversation with Governor Jim Douglas. Interview by James Maxwell.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Jim

    2007-01-01

    In this conversation, Vermont's Republican governor, Jim Douglas, discusses his role in and views on the state's comprehensive health reforms adopted in 2006. The reforms are designed to provide universal access to coverage, improve the quality and performance of the health care system, and promote health and wellness across the lifespan. He describes the specific features of the reforms, the plan for their financing, and the difficult compromises that had to be reached with the Democratically controlled legislature. He talks about his need, as governor, to balance the goals of health reform against other state priorities such as education and economic development.

  11. Health reform: getting the essentials right.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Victor R

    2009-01-01

    As the ninety-year history and failure of health care reform illustrates, it is easy for policymakers to disagree about the details of any new plan. In this Perspective, the author suggests trying a new approach this time: enacting a plan that encompasses four essential principles and then making midcourse adjustments later to get the details right. He defines the essentials as the Four Cs: coverage, cost control, coordinated care, and choice. PMID:19151005

  12. Systemic Reform--Monitoring Its Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Soleil

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a series of questions that state policymakers can use to assess the systemic nature of their education reform efforts. Suggestions are offered for identifying the evidence of scope, coherence, and balance of reform. To assess the scope of reform, a first step is to determine if the performance-based standards provide the…

  13. The readiness of addiction treatment agencies for health care reform.

    PubMed

    Molfenter, Todd; Capoccia, Victor A; Boyle, Michael G; Sherbeck, Carol K

    2012-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) aims to provide affordable health insurance and expanded health care coverage for some 32 million Americans. The PPACA makes provisions for using technology, evidence-based treatments, and integrated, patient-centered care to modernize the delivery of health care services. These changes are designed to ensure effectiveness, efficiency, and cost-savings within the health care system.To gauge the addiction treatment field's readiness for health reform, the authors developed a Health Reform Readiness Index (HRRI) survey for addiction treatment agencies. Addiction treatment administrators and providers from around the United States completed the survey located on the http://www.niatx.net website. Respondents self-assessed their agencies based on 13 conditions pertinent to health reform readiness, and received a confidential score and instant feedback.On a scale of "Needs to Begin," "Early Stages," "On the Way," and "Advanced," the mean scores for respondents (n = 276) ranked in the Early Stages of health reform preparation for 11 of 13 conditions. Of greater concern was that organizations with budgets of < $5 million (n = 193) were less likely than those with budgets > $5 million to have information technology (patient records, patient health technology, and administrative information technology), evidence-based treatments, quality management systems, a continuum of care, or a board of directors informed about PPACA.The findings of the HRRI indicate that the addiction field, and in particular smaller organizations, have much to do to prepare for a future environment that has greater expectations for information technology use, a credentialed workforce, accountability for patient care, and an integrated continuum of care. PMID:22551101

  14. Health care reform: motivation for discrimination?

    PubMed

    Navin, J C; Pettit, M A

    1995-01-01

    One of the major issues in the health care reform debate is the requirement that employers pay a portion of their employees' health insurance premiums. This paper examines the method for calculating the employer share of the health care premiums, as specified in the President's health care reform proposal. The calculation of the firm's cost of providing employee health care benefits is a function of marital status as well as the incidence of two-income earner households. This paper demonstrates that this method provides for lower than average premiums for married employees with no dependents in communities in which there is at least one married couple where both individuals participate in the labor market. This raises the non-wage labor costs of employing single individuals relative to individuals which are identical in every respect except their marital status. This paper explores the economic implications for hiring, as well as profits, for firms located in a perfectly-competitive industry. The results of the theoretical model presented here are clear. Under this proposed version of health care reform, ceteris paribus, firms have a clear preference for two-earner households. This paper also demonstrates that the incentive to discriminate is related to the size of the firm and to the size of the average wage of full-time employees for firms which employ fewer than fifty individuals. While this paper examines the specifics of President Clinton's original proposal, the conclusions reached here would apply to any form of employer-mandated coverage in which the premiums are a function of family status and the incidence of two-earner households. PMID:7613598

  15. Introducing a complex health innovation--primary health care reforms in Estonia (multimethods evaluation).

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat Ali; Menabde, Nata; Saluvere, Katrin; Jesse, Maris; Habicht, Jarno

    2006-11-01

    All post-Soviet countries are trying to reform their primary health care (PHC) systems. The success to date has been uneven. We evaluated PHC reforms in Estonia, using multimethods evaluation: comprising retrospective analysis of routine health service data from Estonian Health Insurance Fund and health-related surveys; documentary analysis of policy reports, laws and regulations; key informant interviews. We analysed changes in organisational structure, regulations, financing and service provision in Estonian PHC system as well as key informant perceptions on factors influencing introduction of reforms. Estonia has successfully implemented and scaled-up multifaceted PHC reforms, including new organisational structures, user choice of family physicians (FPs), new payment methods, specialist training for family medicine, service contracts for FPs, broadened scope of services and evidence-based guidelines. These changes have been institutionalised. PHC effectiveness has been enhanced, as evidenced by improved management of key chronic conditions by FPs in PHC setting and reduced hospital admissions for these conditions. Introduction of PHC reforms - a complex innovation - was enhanced by strong leadership, good co-ordination between policy and operational level, practical approach to implementation emphasizing simplicity of interventions to be easily understood by potential adopters, an encircling strategy to roll-out which avoided direct confrontations with narrow specialists and opposing stakeholders in capital Tallinn, careful change-management strategy to avoid health reforms being politicized too early in the process, and early investment in training to establish a critical mass of health professionals to enable rapid operationalisation of policies. Most importantly, a multifaceted and coordinated approach to reform - with changes in laws; organisational restructuring; modifications to financing and provider payment systems; creation of incentives to enhance

  16. Introducing a complex health innovation--primary health care reforms in Estonia (multimethods evaluation).

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat Ali; Menabde, Nata; Saluvere, Katrin; Jesse, Maris; Habicht, Jarno

    2006-11-01

    All post-Soviet countries are trying to reform their primary health care (PHC) systems. The success to date has been uneven. We evaluated PHC reforms in Estonia, using multimethods evaluation: comprising retrospective analysis of routine health service data from Estonian Health Insurance Fund and health-related surveys; documentary analysis of policy reports, laws and regulations; key informant interviews. We analysed changes in organisational structure, regulations, financing and service provision in Estonian PHC system as well as key informant perceptions on factors influencing introduction of reforms. Estonia has successfully implemented and scaled-up multifaceted PHC reforms, including new organisational structures, user choice of family physicians (FPs), new payment methods, specialist training for family medicine, service contracts for FPs, broadened scope of services and evidence-based guidelines. These changes have been institutionalised. PHC effectiveness has been enhanced, as evidenced by improved management of key chronic conditions by FPs in PHC setting and reduced hospital admissions for these conditions. Introduction of PHC reforms - a complex innovation - was enhanced by strong leadership, good co-ordination between policy and operational level, practical approach to implementation emphasizing simplicity of interventions to be easily understood by potential adopters, an encircling strategy to roll-out which avoided direct confrontations with narrow specialists and opposing stakeholders in capital Tallinn, careful change-management strategy to avoid health reforms being politicized too early in the process, and early investment in training to establish a critical mass of health professionals to enable rapid operationalisation of policies. Most importantly, a multifaceted and coordinated approach to reform - with changes in laws; organisational restructuring; modifications to financing and provider payment systems; creation of incentives to enhance

  17. The interface between health sector reform and human resources in health

    PubMed Central

    Rigoli, Felix; Dussault, Gilles

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between health sector reform and the human resources issues raised in that process has been highlighted in several studies. These studies have focused on how the new processes have modified the ways in which health workers interact with their workplace, but few of them have paid enough attention to the ways in which the workers have influenced the reforms. The impact of health sector reform has modified critical aspects of the health workforce, including labor conditions, degree of decentralization of management, required skills and the entire system of wages and incentives. Human resources in health, crucial as they are in implementing changes in the delivery system, have had their voice heard in many subtle and open ways – reacting to transformations, supporting, blocking and distorting the proposed ways of action. This work intends to review the evidence on how the individual or collective actions of human resources are shaping the reforms, by spotlighting the reform process, the workforce reactions and the factors determining successful human resources participation. It attempts to provide a more powerful way of predicting the effects and interactions in which different "technical designs" operate when they interact with the human resources they affect. The article describes the dialectic nature of the relationship between the objectives and strategies of the reforms and the objectives and strategies of those who must implement them. PMID:14613523

  18. What Health Care Reform Means for Immigrants: Comparing the Affordable Care Act and Massachusetts Health Reforms.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Tiffany D

    2016-02-01

    The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed to provide more affordable health coverage to Americans beginning in 2014. Modeled after the 2006 Massachusetts health care reform, the ACA includes an individual mandate, Medicaid expansion, and health exchanges through which middle-income individuals can purchase coverage from private insurance companies. However, while the ACA provisions exclude all undocumented and some documented immigrants, Massachusetts uses state and hospital funds to extend coverage to these groups. This article examines the ACA reform using the Massachusetts reform as a comparative case study to outline how citizenship status influences individuals' coverage options under both policies. The article then briefly discusses other states that provide coverage to ACA-ineligible immigrants and the implications of uneven ACA implementation for immigrants and citizens nationwide.

  19. The aftermath of health sector reform in the Republic of Georgia: effects on people's health.

    PubMed

    Collins, Téa

    2003-04-01

    After the collapse of the Former Soviet Union a health reform process was undertaken in Georgia beginning in 1994. This process was intended to encompass all aspects of the health-care sector and to transform the Soviet-style health system into one that was directed towards quality of care, improved access, efficiency, and a strengthened focus on Primary Health Care (PHC). Health sector reform fundamentally changed the ways health care is financed in Georgia. There has been a transition to program-based financing, and payroll-tax-based social insurance schemes have been introduced. Despite these measures, the performance of the health system is still disappointing. All health programs are severely under-funded, and when the majority of the population is unemployed or self-employed, collection of taxes seems impossible. Overall, Georgian consumers are uninformed about the basic principles of health reforms and their entitlements and therefore do not support them. The analysis introduced in this paper of the current situation in Georgia establishes that the rush to insurance-based medicine was more a rush from the previous system than a well-thought-out policy direction. After 70 years of a Soviet rule, the country had no institutional capacity to provide insurance-based health care. To achieve universal coverage, or at least ensure that the majority of the population has access to basic health services, government intervention is essential. In addition, educating the public on reforms would allow the reform initiators to fundamentally change the nature of the reform process from a "top-down" centralized process to one that is demand-driven and collaborative. PMID:12705312

  20. Health Care Reform: Impact on Total Joint Replacement.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Monique C; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2016-10-01

    The US health care system has been fragmented for more than 40 years; this model created a need for modification. Sociopoliticomedical system-related factors led to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and a restructuring of health care provision/delivery. The ACA increases access to high-quality "affordable care" under cost-effective measures. This article provides a comprehensive review of health reform and the motivating factors that drive policy to empower arthroplasty providers to effectively advocate for the field of orthopedics as a whole, and the patients served. PMID:27637650

  1. Narrativity and the mediation of health reform agendas.

    PubMed

    Hodgetts, Darrin; Chamberlain, Kerry

    2003-09-01

    Over the last two decades the repositioning of state-funded health systems and the increased use of private services have been the focus of extensive public debate. This paper explores the ways in which media coverage of healthcare reform is made sense of by lower socio-economic status (SES) audiences. We presented television documentaries to participants and analysed their accounts from focus group discussions following the viewing. We explore these discussions as shared social spaces within which participants work through the dilemmas posed by the reforms. In exploring reception as a storytelling process, we link audience and lay beliefs research and investigate how aspects of television coverage are appropriated by viewers to make sense of the causes and implications of healthcare reform. PMID:12919445

  2. Reform in public health: where does it take nursing?

    PubMed

    Gibb, H

    1998-12-01

    The Australian healthcare system is undergoing changes that are impacting tangibly on professional nursing practice. While the evidence is clear that the changes pose a challenge to maintaining standards amidst resource cuts and restructuring, the processes through which these changes occur and the decisions which drive the reforms remain complex and largely obscure. This paper intends to stimulate further thinking and debate among nurses about the effects of these reforms on the conduct of practice, both in terms of our emerging discipline and our ability to conduct clinical nursing practice. It offers a way of understanding the policy 'reform' process through an application of policy analysis grounded in critical social theory. The discussion sets out to apply these analytical propositions to specific events that constitute examples of change in the nursing workplace, and to focus on the implications for nurses and health service clientele. PMID:10188487

  3. [Health reform and its political component: a feasibility analysis].

    PubMed

    González Rossetti, A; Mogollón, O

    2002-01-01

    The political dimension of the health reform is a fundamental aspect that not only influences the project's feasibility, but also its form and content. Therefore the study of the political aspects involved in the health reform process is essential to determine the political feasibility of the reform. Based on the case studies of Colombia and Mexico, this study concentrates on the State's capability to promote health reform projects successfully. It specifically focuses on those elements that seek to improve the political feasibility of formulating, legislating and implementing reform proposals. The relevant variables under study are: the institutional context in which the reform initiatives develop; the political dynamic of the reform process; and the characteristics and strategies of the teams in charge of leading the reforms (change teams). The similarities in the political strategies used by the teams in charge of the health reform, and those of similar technocratic teams in charge of economic reform, stand out as one the study's main findings. It is argued that, although these strategies were effective in bringing about the creation of new actors in the health sector such as private organizations for the financing and provision of health services, they did not have the same impact on the transformation of the old actors the health ministries and the social security institutes, therefore considerably limiting the scope of the reforms.

  4. Future Directions for Public Health Education Reforms in India

    PubMed Central

    Zodpey, Sanjay P.; Negandhi, Himanshu; Yeravdekar, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Health systems globally are experiencing a shortage of competent public health professionals. Public health education across developing countries is stretched by capacity generation and maintaining an adequate ‘standard’ and ‘quality’ of their graduate product. We analyzed the Indian public health education scenario using the institutional and instructional reforms framework advanced by the Lancet Commission report on Education of Health Professionals. The emergence of a new century necessitates a re-visit on the institutional and instructional challenges surrounding public health education. Currently, there is neither an accreditation council nor a formal structure or system of collaboration between academic stakeholders. Health systems have little say in health professional training with limited dialogue between health systems and public health education institutions. Despite a recognized shortfall of public health professionals, there are limited job opportunities for public health graduates within the health system and absence of a structured career pathway for them. Public health institutions need to evolve strategies to prevent faculty attrition. A structured development program in teaching–learning methods and pedagogy is the need of the hour. PMID:25295242

  5. Determining Capacity within Systemic Educational Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Century, Jeanne Rose

    The idea of "capacity" is particularly important in the reform of educational systems because the system can be both the initiator and the subject of change. In fact, the requirement for capacity is present at all levels of the system in systemic reform. In educational change, four types of capacity are generally considered: (1) human capacity;…

  6. Armenia: health system review.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Erica

    2013-01-01

    This analysis of the Armenian health system reviews the developments in organization and governance, health financing, healthcare provision, health reforms and health system performance since 2006. Armenia inherited a Semashko style health system on independence from the Soviet Union in 1991. Initial severe economic and sociopolitical difficulties during the 1990s affected the population health, though strong economic growth from 2000 benefited the populations health. Nevertheless, the Armenian health system remains unduly tilted towards inpatient care concentrated in the capital city despite overall reductions in hospital beds and concerted efforts to reform primary care provision. Changes in health system financing since independence have been more profound, as out-of-pocket (OOP) payments now account for over half of total health expenditure. This reduces access to essential services for the poorest households - particularly for inpatient care and pharmaceuticals - and many households face catastrophic health expenditure. Improving health system performance and financial equity are therefore the key challenges for health system reform. The scaling up of some successful recent programmes for maternal and child health may offer solutions, but require sustained financial resources that will be challenging in the context of financial austerity and the low base of public financing.

  7. Agents of Change for Health Care Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Larry M.

    2007-01-01

    It is widely recognized throughout the health care industry that the United States leads the world in health care spending per capita. However, the chilling dose of reality for American health care consumers is that for all of their spending, the World Health Organization ranks the country's health care system 37th in overall performance--right…

  8. Health Behaviors, Mental Health, and Health Care Utilization Among Single Mothers After Welfare Reforms in the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Rehkopf, David H; Siddiqi, Arjumand; Glymour, M Maria; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2016-03-15

    We studied the health of low-income US women affected by the largest social policy change in recent US history: the 1996 welfare reforms. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (1993-2012), we performed 2 types of analysis. First, we used difference-in-difference-in-differences analyses to estimate associations between welfare reforms and health outcomes among the most affected women (single mothers aged 18-64 years in 1997; n = 219,469) compared with less affected women (married mothers, single nonmothers, and married nonmothers of the same age range in 1997; n = 2,422,265). We also used a synthetic control approach in which we constructed a more ideal control group for single mothers by weighting outcomes among the less affected groups to match pre-reform outcomes among single mothers. In both specifications, the group most affected by welfare reforms (single mothers) experienced worse health outcomes than comparison groups less affected by the reforms. For example, the reforms were associated with at least a 4.0-percentage-point increase in binge drinking (95% confidence interval: 0.9, 7.0) and a 2.4-percentage-point decrease in the probability of being able to afford medical care (95% confidence interval: 0.1, 4.8) after controlling for age, educational level, and health care insurance status. Although the reforms were applauded for reducing welfare dependency, they may have adversely affected health. PMID:26946395

  9. Effectiveness of the Health Complex Model in Iranian primary health care reform: the study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Farahbakhsh, Mostafa; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Hassanzadeh, Roya; Zakeri, Akram; Abedi, Leili

    2016-01-01

    Background Iranian traditional primary health care (PHC) system, although proven to be successful in some areas in rural populations, suffers major pitfalls in providing PHC services in urban areas especially the slum urban areas. The new government of Iran announced a health reform movement including the health reform in PHC system of Iran. The Health Complex Model (HCM) was chosen as the preferred health reform model for this purpose. Methods This paper aims to report a detailed research protocol for the assessment of the effectiveness of the HCM in Iran. An adaptive controlled design is being used in this research. The study is planned to measure multiple endpoints at the baseline and 2 years after the intervention. The assessments will be done both in a population covered by the HCM, as intervention area, and in control populations covered by the traditional health care system as the control area. Discussion Assessing the effectiveness of the HCM, as the Iranian PHC reform initiative, could help health system policy makers for future decisions on its continuation or modification. PMID:27784996

  10. School Readiness Goal Begins with Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1992-01-01

    Currently 59 bills are awaiting Congressional action. Meanwhile, a national coalition of economists and medical specialists (the National Leadership Coalition for Health Care Reform) are circulating a sensible consensus health reform plan proposing national practice guidelines; universal health care access; and efficient cost control, delivery,…

  11. Reform the watchword as OECD countries struggle to contain health care costs.

    PubMed

    MacPhee, S

    1996-03-01

    Like other countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Canada is attempting to contain the overall costs of health care by concentrating on the reform of health care delivery, not health care financing. Systems like Canada's, with predominantly public financing and mainly private delivery, have become increasingly popular around the world. Like other nations, Canada has implemented reforms to make the most of the health care dollars we do have. In this article, Susan MacPhee examines common approaches to health care reform.

  12. Reviewing and reforming policy in health enterprise information security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sostrom, Kristen; Collmann, Jeff R.

    2001-08-01

    Health information management policies usually address the use of paper records with little or no mention of electronic health records. Information Technology (IT) policies often ignore the health care business needs and operational use of the information stored in its systems. Representatives from the Telemedicine & Advanced Technology Research Center, TRICARE and Offices of the Surgeon General of each Military Service, collectively referred to as the Policies, Procedures and Practices Work Group (P3WG), examined military policies and regulations relating to computer-based information systems and medical records management. Using a system of templates and matrices created for the purpose, P3WG identified gaps and discrepancies in DoD and service compliance with the proposed Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Security Standard. P3WG represents an unprecedented attempt to coordinate policy review and revision across all military health services and the Office of Health Affairs. This method of policy reform can identify where changes need to be made to integrate health management policy and IT policy in to an organizational policy that will enable compliance with HIPAA standards. The process models how large enterprises may coordinate policy revision and reform across broad organizational and work domains.

  13. Belarus: health system review.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Erica; Malakhova, Irina; Novik, Irina; Famenka, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    This analysis of the Belarusian health system reviews the developments in organization and governance, health financing, healthcare provision, health reforms and health system performance since 2008. Despite considerable change since independence, Belarus retains a commitment to the principle of universal access to health care, provided free at the point of use through predominantly state-owned facilities, organized hierarchically on a territorial basis. Incremental change, rather than radical reform, has also been the hallmark of health-care policy, although capitation funding has been introduced in some areas and there have been consistent efforts to strengthen the role of primary care. Issues of high costs in the hospital sector and of weaknesses in public health demonstrate the necessity of moving forward with the reform programme. The focus for future reform is on strengthening preventive services and improving the quality and efficiency of specialist services. The key challenges in achieving this involve reducing excess hospital capacity, strengthening health-care management, use of evidence-based treatment and diagnostic procedures, and the development of more efficient financing mechanisms. Involving all stakeholders in the development of further reform planning and achieving consensus among them will be key to its success.

  14. What have health care reforms achieved in Turkey? An appraisal of the "Health Transformation Programme".

    PubMed

    Ökem, Zeynep Güldem; Çakar, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    Poor health status indicators, low quality care, inequity in the access to health services and inefficiency due to fragmented health financing and provision have long been problems in Turkey's health system. To address these problems a radical reform process known as the Health Transformation Programme (HTP) was initiated in 2003. The health sector reforms in Turkey are considered to have been among the most successful of middle-income countries undergoing reform. Numerous articles have been published that review these reforms in terms of, variously, financial sustainability, efficiency, equity and quality. Evidence suggests that Turkey has indeed made significant progress, yet these achievements are uneven among its regions, and their long-term financial sustainability is unresolved due to structural problems in employment. As yet, there is no comprehensive evidence-based analysis of how far the stated reform objectives have been achieved. This article reviews the empirical evidence regarding the outcomes of the HTP during 10 years of its implementation. Strengthening the strategic purchasing function of the Social Security Institution (SSI) should be a priority. Overall performance can be improved by linking resource allocation to provider performance. More emphasis on prevention rather than treatment, with an effective referral chain, can also bring better outcomes, greater efficiency gains and contribute to sustainability. PMID:26183890

  15. Coverage of genetic technologies under national health reform.

    PubMed Central

    Mehlman, M. J.; Botkin, J. R.; Scarrow, A.; Woodhall, A.; Kass, J.; Siebenschuh, E.

    1994-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which the technologies expected to emerge from genetic research are likely to be covered under Government-mandated health insurance programs such as those being proposed by advocates of national health reform. Genetic technologies are divided into three broad categories; genetic information services, including screening, testing, and counseling; experimental technologies; and gene therapy. This article concludes that coverage of these technologies under national health reform is uncertain. The basic benefits packages provided for in the major health reform plans are likely to provide partial coverage of experimental technologies; relatively broad coverage of information services; and varying coverage of gene therapies, on the basis of an evaluation of their costs, benefits, and the degree to which they raise objections on political and religious grounds. Genetic services that are not included in the basic benefits package will be available only to those who can purchase supplemental insurance or to those who can purchase the services with personal funds. The resulting multitiered system of access to genetic services raises serious questions of fairness. PMID:7977343

  16. Not-for-profits' role in a reformed system.

    PubMed

    Clinton, H R

    1994-06-01

    As head of the White House task force that helped to craft President Bill Clinton's healthcare reform proposal (the Health Security Act), First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton demonstrated her determination that reform result in a system that has caring and service at its center. In an address a year ago at the Catholic Health Association assembly, she stressed the administration's goal of providing the security of healthcare coverage to everyone in the United States. Saying the current complex, disjointed system "fragments the care people receive," the First Lady applauded programs that reach out to underserved populations and strengthen the country's healthcare infrastructure. In this interview with Health Progress, Mrs. Clinton discusses tough issues in achieving the system she envisions and the role of Catholic healthcare organizations in a reformed system. Here are her remarks.

  17. Not-for-profits' role in a reformed system.

    PubMed

    Clinton, H R

    1994-06-01

    As head of the White House task force that helped to craft President Bill Clinton's healthcare reform proposal (the Health Security Act), First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton demonstrated her determination that reform result in a system that has caring and service at its center. In an address a year ago at the Catholic Health Association assembly, she stressed the administration's goal of providing the security of healthcare coverage to everyone in the United States. Saying the current complex, disjointed system "fragments the care people receive," the First Lady applauded programs that reach out to underserved populations and strengthen the country's healthcare infrastructure. In this interview with Health Progress, Mrs. Clinton discusses tough issues in achieving the system she envisions and the role of Catholic healthcare organizations in a reformed system. Here are her remarks. PMID:10134185

  18. Does Australia have the appropriate health reform agenda to close the gap in Indigenous health?

    PubMed

    Donato, Ronald; Segal, Leonie

    2013-05-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the national Indigenous reform strategy - known as Closing the Gap - in the context of broader health system reforms underway to assess whether current attempts at addressing Indigenous disadvantage are likely to be successful. Drawing upon economic theory and empirical evidence, the paper analyses key structural features necessary for securing system performance gains capable of reducing health disparities. Conceptual and empirical attention is given to the features of comprehensive primary healthcare, which encompasses the social determinants impacting on Indigenous health. An important structural prerequisite for securing genuine improvements in health outcomes is the unifying of all funding and policy responsibilities for comprehensive primary healthcare for Indigenous Australians within a single jurisdictional framework. This would provide the basis for implementing several key mutually reinforcing components necessary for enhancing primary healthcare system performance. The announcement to introduce a long-term health equality plan in partnership with Aboriginal people represents a promising development and may provide the window of opportunity needed for implementing structural reforms to primary healthcare. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC? Notwithstanding the intention of previous policies, considerable health disparity exists between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Australia has now embarked on its most ambitious national Indigenous health reform strategy, but there has been little academic analysis of whether such reforms are capable of eliminating health disadvantage for Aboriginal people.WHAT DOES THE PAPER ADD? This paper provides a critical analysis of Indigenous health reforms to assess whether such policy initiatives are likely to be successful and outlines key structural changes to primary healthcare system arrangements that are necessary to secure genuine system performance gains and improve health

  19. Prescribing Patterns in Outpatient Clinics of Township Hospitals in China: A Comparative Study before and after the 2009 Health System Reform

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ding; Pan, Qingxia; Shan, Linghan; Liu, Chaojie; Gao, Lijun; Hao, Yanhua; Song, Jian; Ning, Ning; Cui, Yu; Li, Ye; Qi, Xinye; Liang, Chao; Wu, Qunhong; Liu, Guoxiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: China introduced a series of health reforms in 2009, including a national essential medicines policy and a medical insurance system for primary care institutions. This study aimed to determine the changing prescribing patterns associated with those reforms in township hospitals. Methods: A multi-stage stratified random cluster sampling method was adopted to identify 29 township hospitals from six counties in three provinces. A total of 2899 prescriptions were collected from the participating township hospitals using a systematic random sampling strategy. Seven prescribing indicators were calculated and compared between 2008 and 2013, assessing use of medicines (antibiotics and adrenal corticosteroids) and polypharmacy, administration route of medicines (injections), and affordability of medicines. Results: Significant changes in prescribing patterns were found. The average number of medicines and costs per-prescription dropped by about 50%. The percentage of prescriptions requiring antibiotics declined from 54% to 38%. The percentage of prescriptions requiring adrenal corticosteroid declined from 14% to 4%. The percentage of prescriptions requiring injections declined from 54% to 25%. Despite similar changing patterns, significant regional differences were observed. Conclusions: Significant changes in prescribing patterns are evident in township hospitals in China. Overprescription of antibiotics, injections and adrenal corticosteroids has been reduced. However, salient regional disparities still exist. Further studies are needed to determine potential shifts in the risk of the inappropriate use of medicines from primary care settings to metropolitan hospitals. PMID:27399732

  20. Moving towards universal health coverage: health insurance reforms in nine developing countries in Africa and Asia.

    PubMed

    Lagomarsino, Gina; Garabrant, Alice; Adyas, Atikah; Muga, Richard; Otoo, Nathaniel

    2012-09-01

    We analyse nine low-income and lower-middle-income countries in Africa and Asia that have implemented national health insurance reforms designed to move towards universal health coverage. Using the functions-of-health-systems framework, we describe these countries' approaches to raising prepaid revenues, pooling risk, and purchasing services. Then, using the coverage-box framework, we assess their progress across three dimensions of coverage: who, what services, and what proportion of health costs are covered. We identify some patterns in the structure of these countries' reforms, such as use of tax revenues to subsidise target populations, steps towards broader risk pools, and emphasis on purchasing services through demand-side financing mechanisms. However, none of the reforms purely conform to common health-system archetypes, nor are they identical to each other. We report some trends in these countries' progress towards universal coverage, such as increasing enrolment in government health insurance, a movement towards expanded benefits packages, and decreasing out-of-pocket spending accompanied by increasing government share of spending on health. Common, comparable indicators of progress towards universal coverage are needed to enable countries undergoing reforms to assess outcomes and make midcourse corrections in policy and implementation. PMID:22959390

  1. Health policy thoughtleaders' views of the health workforce in an era of health reform.

    PubMed

    Donelan, Karen; Buerhaus, Peter I; DesRoches, Catherine; Burke, Sheila P

    2010-01-01

    Although registered nurses rank similarly with physicians in the public's esteem, physicians are more visible than nurses in media coverage, public policy, and political spheres. Thus, nursing workforce issues are overshadowed by those of other health priorities, including Medicare and health reform. The purpose of this research was to understand the visibility and salience of the health workforce in general, gain an understanding about the effectiveness of messages concerning the nursing workforce in particular, and to understand why nursing workforce issues do not appear to have gained more traction in national health care policymaking. The National Survey of Thoughtleaders about the Health Workforce was administered via mail, telephone and online to health workforce and policy thoughtleaders from August 2009-October 2009. Of 301 thoughtleaders contacted, 123 completed questionnaires for a response rate of 41%. Thoughtleaders agree that nurses are critical to the quality and safety of our healthcare system, that there are current nursing shortages, and that nursing shortages will be intensified by health reform. Thoughtleaders reported that while they do hear about nursing issues frequently, they do not view most sources of information as proposing effective policy solutions. This study highlights a critical gap in effective policy advocacy and leadership to advance nurse workforce issues higher on the national health agenda. PMID:20637930

  2. US spending on complementary and alternative medicine during 2002-08 plateaued, suggesting role in reformed health system.

    PubMed

    Davis, Matthew A; Martin, Brook I; Coulter, Ian D; Weeks, William B

    2013-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine services in the United States are an approximately $9 billion market each year, equal to 3 percent of national ambulatory health care expenditures. Unlike conventional allopathic health care, complementary and alternative medicine is primarily paid for out of pocket, although some services are covered by most health insurance. Examining trends in demand for complementary and alternative medicine services in the United States reported in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey during 2002-08, we found that use of and spending on these services, previously on the rise, have largely plateaued. The higher proportion of out-of-pocket responsibility for payment for services may explain the lack of growth. Our findings suggest that any attempt to reduce national health care spending by eliminating coverage for complementary and alternative medicine would have little impact at best. Should some forms of complementary and alternative medicine-for example, chiropractic care for back pain-be proven more efficient than allopathic and specialty medicine, the inclusion of complementary and alternative medicine providers in new delivery systems such as accountable care organizations could help slow growth in national health care spending.

  3. [Cost effectiveness and health sector reform].

    PubMed

    Musgrove, P

    1995-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of a health intervention is an estimate of the relation between what it costs to be provided, and the improvement in health which results from such intervention. Health may improve because the incidence of illness or injury is reduced, because death is avoided or delayed, or because the duration or severity of disability is limited. The calculation of this health benefit combines objective factors, such as the age at incidence and whether or not the outcome is death, with subjective factors such as the severity of disability, the judgement as to the value of life lived at different ages, and the rate at which the future is discounted. The construction and interpretation of the estimate are explained. Also, the paper examines whether the concept of cost-effectiveness is consistent with ethical norms such as equity, and concludes that they are not in conflict. Finally, it addresses the question of how to incorporate cost-effectiveness into a health sector reform, and possible ways to implement it.

  4. Health Care Reform: America's Dilemma. Report on the National Meeting (Boston, Massachusetts, November 28-29, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labor/Higher Education Council, Washington, DC.

    Health care reform's direct effect on higher education and labor is the subject of this conference report. Individual, panel, and interactive work group presentations addressing the values and options on health care issues are included. Following an introduction, three papers discuss the U.S. health care system: (1) "National Health Care Reform:…

  5. The Gateway Paper--context and configuration of the proposed health reforms in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Nishtar, Sania

    2006-12-01

    As an opening of a dialogue on health reforms in Pakistan, the Gateway Paper presents a viewpoint on its proposed directions making a strong case for systems reforms, which need to scope beyond the healthcare system. Positioning the reform process to strengthen Pakistan's health policy cycle, the paper articulates a roadmap for a paradigm shift to achieve health outcomes in Pakistan with major structural reorganization within the health system. The proposed reform points in the four areas namely, reforms within the health sector, overarching measures, reconfiguration of health within an inter-sectoral scope and generating evidence for reforms. Reforms within the health sector focus on developing new models of service delivery and health financing which can enable the state to leverage the private sector outreach to deliver health-related public goods on the one hand and maximize the outreach of the State's health care delivery mechanisms through mainstreaming the role of the private sector on the other, albeit with safeguards. In addition, these call for strengthening the stewardship role to regulate these arrangements. The second area of reform focuses on overarching measures; these include developing frameworks for public-private partnerships which will enable the bringing together of organizations with the mandate to offer public goods and those that could facilitate this goal through the provision of resources, technical expertise or outreach; mainstreaming health into the country's social protection strategy in order to address issues of access and affordability for the poor and introducing civil service and public service reform focused on good governance, accountability, breakdown of institutional corruption which are critical to improving health outcomes. The third area of reform involves broadening health to its inter-sectoral scope, redefinition of objectives and targets within the health sector and garnering support from across the sectors to forester

  6. The Gateway Paper--context and configuration of the proposed health reforms in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Nishtar, Sania

    2006-12-01

    As an opening of a dialogue on health reforms in Pakistan, the Gateway Paper presents a viewpoint on its proposed directions making a strong case for systems reforms, which need to scope beyond the healthcare system. Positioning the reform process to strengthen Pakistan's health policy cycle, the paper articulates a roadmap for a paradigm shift to achieve health outcomes in Pakistan with major structural reorganization within the health system. The proposed reform points in the four areas namely, reforms within the health sector, overarching measures, reconfiguration of health within an inter-sectoral scope and generating evidence for reforms. Reforms within the health sector focus on developing new models of service delivery and health financing which can enable the state to leverage the private sector outreach to deliver health-related public goods on the one hand and maximize the outreach of the State's health care delivery mechanisms through mainstreaming the role of the private sector on the other, albeit with safeguards. In addition, these call for strengthening the stewardship role to regulate these arrangements. The second area of reform focuses on overarching measures; these include developing frameworks for public-private partnerships which will enable the bringing together of organizations with the mandate to offer public goods and those that could facilitate this goal through the provision of resources, technical expertise or outreach; mainstreaming health into the country's social protection strategy in order to address issues of access and affordability for the poor and introducing civil service and public service reform focused on good governance, accountability, breakdown of institutional corruption which are critical to improving health outcomes. The third area of reform involves broadening health to its inter-sectoral scope, redefinition of objectives and targets within the health sector and garnering support from across the sectors to forester

  7. The potential for nurse practitioners in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Mandy M; Fraser, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    In Canada, health care reform is underway to address escalating costs, access and quality of care issues, and existing personnel shortages in various health disciplines. One response of the nursing profession to these stimuli has been the development of the advanced practice nurse, namely, the nurse practitioner (NP). NPs are in an excellent position to address current shortcomings through increasing points of access to the health care system, providing an emphasis on education and disease prevention, and delivering high-quality, cost-effective care in a multitude of practice settings. With an emphasis on the social determinants of health, NPs are in a prime position to provide care to underserved and vulnerable populations across Canada. Despite the potential for NPs to be instrumental in health care reform, there is a lack of support and regulation necessary for their optimal use. Barriers to mobilizing NPs in Canada exist and impede the integration of NPs into the Canadian health care system, which has both quality of care and social justice implications.

  8. Policy Capacity for Health Reform: Necessary but Insufficient

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Forest and colleagues have persuasively made the case that policy capacity is a fundamental prerequisite to health reform. They offer a comprehensive life-cycle definition of policy capacity and stress that it involves much more than problem identification and option development. I would like to offer a Canadian perspective. If we define health reform as re-orienting the health system from acute care to prevention and chronic disease management the consensus is that Canada has been unsuccessful in achieving a major transformation of our 14 health systems (one for each province and territory plus the federal government). I argue that 3 additional things are essential to build health policy capacity in a healthcare federation such as Canada: (a) A means of "policy governance" that would promote an approach to cooperative federalism in the health arena; (b) The ability to overcome the "policy inertia" resulting from how Canadian Medicare was implemented and subsequently interpreted; and (c) The ability to entertain a long-range thinking and planning horizon. My assessment indicates that Canada falls short on each of these items, and the prospects for achieving them are not bright. However, hope springs eternal and it will be interesting to see if the July, 2015 report of the Advisory Panel on Healthcare Innovation manages to galvanize national attention and stimulate concerted action. PMID:26673650

  9. The new institutionalist approaches to health care reform: lessons from reform experiences in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Sitek, Michał

    2010-08-01

    This article discusses the applicability of the new institutionalism to the politics of health care reform in postcommunist Central Europe. The transition to a market economy and democracy after the fall of communism has apparently strengthened the institutional approaches. The differences in performance of transition economies have been critical to the growing understanding of the importance of institutions that foster democracy, provide security of property rights, help enforce contracts, and stimulate entrepreneurship. From a theoretical perspective, however, applying the new institutionalist approaches has been problematic. The transitional health care reform exposes very well some inherent weaknesses of existing analytic frameworks for explaining the nature and mechanisms of institutional change. The postcommunist era in Central Europe has been marked by spectacular and unprecedented radical changes, in which the capitalist system was rebuilt in a short span of time and the institutions of democracy became consolidated. Broad changes to welfare state programs were instituted as well. However, the actual results of the reform processes represent a mix of change and continuity, which is a challenge for the theories of institutional change.

  10. The new institutionalist approaches to health care reform: lessons from reform experiences in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Sitek, Michał

    2010-08-01

    This article discusses the applicability of the new institutionalism to the politics of health care reform in postcommunist Central Europe. The transition to a market economy and democracy after the fall of communism has apparently strengthened the institutional approaches. The differences in performance of transition economies have been critical to the growing understanding of the importance of institutions that foster democracy, provide security of property rights, help enforce contracts, and stimulate entrepreneurship. From a theoretical perspective, however, applying the new institutionalist approaches has been problematic. The transitional health care reform exposes very well some inherent weaknesses of existing analytic frameworks for explaining the nature and mechanisms of institutional change. The postcommunist era in Central Europe has been marked by spectacular and unprecedented radical changes, in which the capitalist system was rebuilt in a short span of time and the institutions of democracy became consolidated. Broad changes to welfare state programs were instituted as well. However, the actual results of the reform processes represent a mix of change and continuity, which is a challenge for the theories of institutional change. PMID:21057098

  11. Rural health care in Vietnam and China: conflict between market reforms and social need.

    PubMed

    Huong, Dang Boi; Phuong, Nguyen Khanh; Bales, Sarah; Jiaying, Chen; Lucas, Henry; Segall, Malcolm

    2007-01-01

    China and Vietnam have adopted market reforms in the health sector in the context of market economic reforms. Vietnam has developed a large private health sector, while in China commercialization has occurred mainly in the formal public sector, where user fees are now the main source of facility finance. As a result, the integrity of China's planned health service has been disrupted, especially in poor rural areas. In Vietnam the government has been an important financer of public health facilities and the pre-reform health service is largely intact, although user fees finance an increasing share of facility expenditure. Over-servicing of patients to generate revenue occurs in both countries, but more seriously in China. In both countries government health expenditure has declined as a share of total health expenditure and total government expenditure, while out-of-pocket health spending has become the main form of health finance. This has particularly affected the rural poor, deterring them from accessing health care. Assistance for the poor to meet public-sector user fees is more beneficial and widespread in Vietnam than China. China is now criticizing the degree of commercialization of its health system and considers its health reforms "basically unsuccessful." Market reforms that stimulate growth in the economy are not appropriate to reform of social sectors such as health.

  12. [Colombia: what has happened with its health reform?].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Arias, Rubén Darío; Nieto, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The health reform adopted in Colombia in 1993 was promoted by different agencies as the model to follow in matters of health policy. Following the guidelines of the Washington Consensus and the World Bank, the Government of Colombia, with the support of national political and economic elites, reorganized the management of health services based on market principles, dismantled the state system, increased finances of the sector, assigned the management of the system to the private sector, segmented the provision of services, and promoted interaction of actors in a competitive scheme of low regulation. After 20 years of implementation, the Colombian model shows serious flaws and is an object of controversy. The Government has weakened as the governing entity for health; private groups that manage the resources were established as strong centers of economic and political power; and violations of the right to health increased. Additionally, corruption and service cost overruns have put a strain on the sustainability of the system, and the state network is in danger of closing. Despite its loss of prestige at the internal level, various actors within and outside the country tend to keep the model based on contextual reforms. PMID:25597727

  13. [Colombia: what has happened with its health reform?].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Arias, Rubén Darío; Nieto, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The health reform adopted in Colombia in 1993 was promoted by different agencies as the model to follow in matters of health policy. Following the guidelines of the Washington Consensus and the World Bank, the Government of Colombia, with the support of national political and economic elites, reorganized the management of health services based on market principles, dismantled the state system, increased finances of the sector, assigned the management of the system to the private sector, segmented the provision of services, and promoted interaction of actors in a competitive scheme of low regulation. After 20 years of implementation, the Colombian model shows serious flaws and is an object of controversy. The Government has weakened as the governing entity for health; private groups that manage the resources were established as strong centers of economic and political power; and violations of the right to health increased. Additionally, corruption and service cost overruns have put a strain on the sustainability of the system, and the state network is in danger of closing. Despite its loss of prestige at the internal level, various actors within and outside the country tend to keep the model based on contextual reforms.

  14. Arbona system reengineered in the Garcia-Ariz Model: a national health reform plan from an orthopedics program perspective.

    PubMed

    García Ariz, Manuel; García-Peña, Enrique; Hernández-Polo, Víctor; Pino-Delgado, Franz; Pérez-Carrillo, Omar

    2010-01-01

    During the 1950's the healthcare system of Puerto Rico was maintained exclusively by the local government. The Arbona system, as it came to be known, although it provided health care professionals on the island with multiple educational experiences, presented substantial costs for the government. In the early 1990's a program of privatization known as "La Reforma" was implemented with the ultimate goal of providing a universal coverage system for the poor and the needy. At present this program has brought other issues regarding the quality of medical services and loss of academic centers. This is a preliminary report that analyzes various aspects of both systems through the search and analysis of background resources and literature, interviews, and physician/patient satisfaction surveys (on working conditions and quality of services). The main purpose of this report is to create a model that proves to be efficient and coherent with the island's idiosyncrasies.

  15. Why public health services? Experiences from profit-driven health care reforms in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, Göran

    2014-01-01

    Market-oriented health care reforms have been implemented in the tax-financed Swedish health care system from 1990 to 2013. The first phase of these reforms was the introduction of new public management systems, where public health centers and public hospitals were to act as private firms in an internal health care market. A second phase saw an increase of tax-financed private for-profit providers. A third phase can now be envisaged with increased private financing of essential health services. The main evidence-based effects of these markets and profit-driven reforms can be summarized as follows: efficiency is typically reduced but rarely increased; profit and tax evasion are a drain on resources for health care; geographical and social inequities are widened while the number of tax-financed providers increases; patients with major multi-health problems are often given lower priority than patients with minor health problems; opportunities to control the quality of care are reduced; tax-financed private for-profit providers facilitate increased private financing; and market forces and commercial interests undermine the power of democratic institutions. Policy options to promote further development of a nonprofit health care system are highlighted.

  16. Redesigning Teacher Salary Systems for Educational Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firestone, William A.

    1994-01-01

    How changes in teacher pay can contribute to systemic educational reform and school restructuring is discussed, focusing on knowledge- and skill-based pay, job enlargement, and collective incentives. These alternatives have the potential to improve teacher motivation and support other reforms. (SLD)

  17. The impact of state behavioral health reform on Native American individuals, families, and communities.

    PubMed

    Willging, Cathleen E; Goodkind, Jessica; Lamphere, Louise; Saul, Gwendolyn; Fluder, Shannon; Seanez, Paula

    2012-07-01

    In 2005, the State of New Mexico undertook a sweeping transformation of all publicly funded behavioral health services. The reform was intended to enhance the cultural responsiveness and appropriateness of these services. To examine achievement of this objective, we conducted a qualitative study of the involvement of Native Americans in reform efforts and the subsequent impacts of reform on services for Native Americans. We found that the reform was relatively unsuccessful at creating mechanisms for genuine community input or improving behavioral health care for this population. These shortcomings were related to limited understandings of administrators concerning how tribal governments and health care systems operate, and the structural limitations of a managed care system that does not allow flexibility for culturally appropriate utilization review, screening, or treatment. However, interaction between the State and tribes increased, and we conclude that aspects of the reform could be strengthened to achieve more meaningful involvement and service improvements.

  18. The Impact of State Behavioral Health Reform on Native American Individuals, Families, and Communities

    PubMed Central

    Willging, Cathleen E.; Goodkind, Jessica; Lamphere, Louise; Saul, Gwendolyn; Fluder, Shannon; Seanez, Paula

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the State of New Mexico undertook a sweeping transformation of all publicly funded behavioral health services. The reform was intended to enhance the cultural responsiveness and appropriateness of these services. To examine achievement of this objective, we conducted a qualitative study of the involvement of Native Americans in reform efforts and the subsequent impacts of reform on services for Native Americans. We found that the reform was relatively unsuccessful at creating mechanisms for genuine community input or improving behavioral health care for this population. These shortcomings were related to limited understandings of administrators concerning how tribal governments and health care systems operate, and the structural limitations of a managed care system that does not allow flexibility for culturally appropriate utilization review, screening, or treatment. However, interaction between the State and tribes increased, and we conclude that aspects of the reform could be strengthened to achieve more meaningful involvement and service improvements. PMID:22427455

  19. Latvia: Health system review.

    PubMed

    Mitenbergs, Uldis; Taube, Maris; Misins, Janis; Mikitis, Eriks; Martinsons, Atis; Rurane, Aiga; Quentin, Wilm

    2012-01-01

    This analysis of the Latvian health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health-system performance. Latvia has been constantly reforming its health system for over two decades. After independence in 1991, Latvia initially moved to create a social health insurance type system. However, problems with decentralized planning and fragmented and inefficient financing led to this being gradually reversed, and ultimately the establishment in 2011 of a National Health Service type system. These constant changes have taken place against a backdrop of relatively poor health and limited funding, with a heavy burden for individuals; Latvia has one of the highest rates of out-of-pocket expenditure on health in the European Union (EU). The lack of financial resources resulting from the financial crisis has posed an enormous challenge to the government, which struggled to ensure the availability of necessary health care services for the population and to prevent deterioration of health status. Yet this also provided momentum for reforms: previous efforts to centralise the system and to shift from hospital to outpatient care were drastically accelerated, while at the same time a social safety net strategy was implemented (with financial support from the World Bank) to protect the poor from the negative consequences of user charges. However, as in any health system, a number of challenges remain. They include: reducing smoking and cardiovascular deaths; increasing coverage of prescription pharmaceuticals; reducing the excessive reliance on out-of-pocket payments for financing the health system; reducing inequities in access and health status; improving efficiency of hospitals through implementation of DRG-based financing; and monitoring and improving quality. In the face of these challenges at a time of financial crisis, one further challenge emerges: ensuring adequate funding for the health

  20. Latvia: Health system review.

    PubMed

    Mitenbergs, Uldis; Taube, Maris; Misins, Janis; Mikitis, Eriks; Martinsons, Atis; Rurane, Aiga; Quentin, Wilm

    2012-01-01

    This analysis of the Latvian health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health-system performance. Latvia has been constantly reforming its health system for over two decades. After independence in 1991, Latvia initially moved to create a social health insurance type system. However, problems with decentralized planning and fragmented and inefficient financing led to this being gradually reversed, and ultimately the establishment in 2011 of a National Health Service type system. These constant changes have taken place against a backdrop of relatively poor health and limited funding, with a heavy burden for individuals; Latvia has one of the highest rates of out-of-pocket expenditure on health in the European Union (EU). The lack of financial resources resulting from the financial crisis has posed an enormous challenge to the government, which struggled to ensure the availability of necessary health care services for the population and to prevent deterioration of health status. Yet this also provided momentum for reforms: previous efforts to centralise the system and to shift from hospital to outpatient care were drastically accelerated, while at the same time a social safety net strategy was implemented (with financial support from the World Bank) to protect the poor from the negative consequences of user charges. However, as in any health system, a number of challenges remain. They include: reducing smoking and cardiovascular deaths; increasing coverage of prescription pharmaceuticals; reducing the excessive reliance on out-of-pocket payments for financing the health system; reducing inequities in access and health status; improving efficiency of hospitals through implementation of DRG-based financing; and monitoring and improving quality. In the face of these challenges at a time of financial crisis, one further challenge emerges: ensuring adequate funding for the health

  1. Solid oxide fuel cell steam reforming power system

    SciTech Connect

    Chick, Lawrence A.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Whyatt, Greg A.

    2013-03-12

    The present invention is a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Reforming Power System that utilizes adiabatic reforming of reformate within this system. By utilizing adiabatic reforming of reformate within the system the system operates at a significantly higher efficiency than other Solid Oxide Reforming Power Systems that exist in the prior art. This is because energy is not lost while materials are cooled and reheated, instead the device operates at a higher temperature. This allows efficiencies higher than 65%.

  2. Human resources: the Cinderella of health sector reform in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Homedes, Núria; Ugalde, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Human resources are the most important assets of any health system, and health workforce problems have for decades limited the efficiency and quality of Latin America health systems. World Bank-led reforms aimed at increasing equity, efficiency, quality of care and user satisfaction did not attempt to resolve the human resources problems that had been identified in multiple health sector assessments. However, the two most important reform policies – decentralization and privatization – have had a negative impact on the conditions of employment and prompted opposition from organized professionals and unions. In several countries of the region, the workforce became the most important obstacle to successful reform. This article is based on fieldwork and a review of the literature. It discusses the reasons that led health workers to oppose reform; the institutional and legal constraints to implementing reform as originally designed; the mismatch between the types of personnel needed for reform and the availability of professionals; the deficiencies of the reform implementation process; and the regulatory weaknesses of the region. The discussion presents workforce strategies that the reforms could have included to achieve the intended goals, and the need to take into account the values and political realities of the countries. The authors suggest that autochthonous solutions are more likely to succeed than solutions imported from the outside. PMID:15659241

  3. Netherlands: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    Kroneman, Madelon; Boerma, Wienke; van den Berg, Michael; Groenewegen, Peter; de Jong, Judith; van Ginneken, Ewout

    2016-03-01

    This analysis of the Dutch health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, healthcare provision, health reforms and health system performance. Without doubt, two major reforms implemented since the mid-2000s are among the main issues today. The newly implemented long-term care reform will have to realize a transition from publicly provided care to more self-reliance on the part of the citizens and a larger role for municipalities in its organization. A particular point of attention is how the new governance arrangements and responsibilities in long-term care will work together. The 2006 reform replaced the division between public and private insurance by one universal social health insurance and introduced managed competition as a driving mechanism in the healthcare system. Although the reform was initiated almost a decade ago, its stepwise implementation continues to bring changes in the healthcare system in general and in the role of actors in particular. In terms of performance, essential healthcare services are within easy reach and waiting times have been decreasing. The basic health insurance package and compensations for lower incomes protect citizens against catastrophic spending. Out-of-pocket payments are low from an international perspective. Moreover, the Dutch rate the quality of the health system and their health as good. International comparisons show that the Netherlands has low antibiotic use, a low number of avoidable hospitalizations and a relatively low avoidable mortality. National studies show that healthcare has made major contributions to the health of the Dutch population as reflected in increasing life expectancy. Furthermore, some indicators such as the prescription of generics and length of stay reveal improvements in efficiency over the past years. Nevertheless, the Netherlands still has one of the highest per capita health expenditures in Europe, although growth has slowed considerably after

  4. Hospitals, finance, and health system reform in Britain and the United States, c. 1910-1950: historical revisionism and cross-national comparison.

    PubMed

    Gorsky, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Comparative histories of health system development have been variously influenced by the theoretical approaches of historical institutionalism, political pluralism, and labor mobilization. Britain and the United States have figured significantly in this literature because of their very different trajectories. This article explores the implications of recent research on hospital history in the two countries for existing historiographies, particularly the coming of the National Health Service in Britain. It argues that the two hospital systems initially developed in broadly similar ways, despite the very different outcomes in the 1940s. Thus, applying the conceptual tools used to explain the U.S. trajectory can deepen appreciation of events in Britain. Attention focuses particularly on working-class hospital contributory schemes and their implications for finance, governance, and participation; these are then compared with Blue Cross and U.S. hospital prepayment. While acknowledging the importance of path dependence in shaping attitudes of British bureaucrats toward these schemes, analysis emphasizes their failure in pressure group politics, in contrast to the United States. In both countries labor was also crucial, in the United States sustaining employment-based prepayment and in Britain broadly supporting system reform.

  5. Tajikistan: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    Khodjamurodov, Ghafur; Sodiqova, Dilorom; Akkazieva, Baktygul; Rechel, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The pace of health reforms in Tajikistan has been slow and in many aspects the health system is still shaped by the countrys Soviet legacy. The country has the lowest total health expenditure per capita in the WHO European Region, much of it financed privately through out-of-pocket payments. Public financing depends principally on regional and local authorities, thus compounding regional inequalities across the country. The high share of private out-of-pocket payments undermines a range of health system goals, including financial protection, equity, efficiency and quality. The efficiency of the health system is also undermined by outdated provider payment mechanisms and lack of pooling of funds. Quality of care is another major concern, due to factors such as insufficient training, lack of evidence-based clinical guidelines, underuse of generic drugs, poor infrastructure and equipment (particularly at the regional level) and perverse financial incentives for physicians in the form of out-of-pocket payments. Health reforms have aimed to strengthen primary health care, but it still suffers from underinvestment and low prestige. A basic benefit package and capitation-based financing of primary health care have been introduced as pilots but have not yet been rolled out to the rest of the country. The National Health Strategy envisages substantial reforms in health financing, including nationwide introduction of capitation-based payments for primary health care and more than doubling public expenditure on health by 2020; it remains to be seen whether this will be achieved. PMID:27172509

  6. [The absence of stewardship in the Chilean health authority after the 2004 health reform].

    PubMed

    Herrera, Tania; Sánchez, Sergio

    2014-11-26

    Stewardship is the most important political function of a health system. It is a government responsibility carried out by the health authority. Among other dimensions, it is also a meta-function that includes conduction and regulation. The Health Authority and Management Act, which came about from the health reform of 2004, separated the functions of service provision and stewardship with the aim of strengthening the role of the health authority. However, the current structure of the health system contains overlapping functions between the different entities that leads to lack of coordination and inconsistencies, and a greater weight on individual health actions at the expense of collective ones. Consequently, a properly funded national health strategy to improve the health of the population is missing. Additionally, the components of citizen participation and governance are weak. It is necessary, therefore, to revisit the Chilean health structure in order to develop one that truly enables the exercise of the health authority’s stewardship role.

  7. Health care reform and people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Batavia, A I

    1993-01-01

    As a group, people with disabilities or chronic conditions experience higher-than-average health care costs and have difficulty gaining access to affordable private health insurance coverage. While the Americans with Disabilities Act will enhance access by prohibiting differential treatment without sound actuarial justification, it will not guarantee equal access for people in impairment groups with high utilization rates. Health care reform is needed to subsidize the coverage of such individuals. Such subsidization can be achieved under either a casualty insurance model, in which premiums based on expected costs are subsidized directly, or a social insurance model, in which low-cost enrollees cross-subsidize high-cost enrollees. Cost containment provisions that focus on the provider, such as global budgeting and managed competition, will adversely affect disabled people if providers do not have adequate incentives to meet these people's needs. Provisions focusing on the consumer, such as cost sharing, case management, and benefit reductions, will adversely affect disabled people if they unduly limit needed services or impose a disproportionate financial burden on disabled people.

  8. Slovenia: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    Albreht, Tit; Pribakovic Brinovec, Radivoje; Josar, Dusan; Poldrugovac, Mircha; Kostnapfel, Tatja; Zaletel, Metka; Panteli, Dimitra; Maresso, Anna

    2016-06-01

    This analysis of the Slovene health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. The health of the population has improved over the last few decades. While life expectancy for both men and women is similar to EU averages, morbidity and mortality data show persistent disparities between regions, and mortality from external causes is particularly high. Satisfaction with health care delivery is high, but recently waiting times for some outpatient specialist services have increased. Greater focus on preventive measures is also needed as well as better care coordination, particularly for those with chronic conditions. Despite having relatively high levels of co-payments for many services covered by the universal compulsory health insurance system, these expenses are counterbalanced by voluntary health insurance, which covers 95% of the population liable for co-payments. However, Slovenia is somewhat unique among social health insurance countries in that it relies almost exclusively on payroll contributions to fund its compulsory health insurance system. This makes health sector revenues very susceptible to economic and labour market fluctuations. A future challenge will be to diversify the resource base for health system funding and thus bolster sustainability in the longer term, while preserving service delivery and quality of care. Given changing demographics and morbidity patterns, further challenges include restructuring the funding and provision of long-term care and enhancing health system efficiency through reform of purchasing and provider-payment systems. PMID:27467813

  9. Where does the insurance industry stand on health reform today?

    PubMed

    Bodaken, Bruce G

    2008-01-01

    With another national health care debate on the horizon, many assume that health plans will present a major source of opposition to universal coverage and other reforms. But a closer look reveals signs of change. Some plans continue their reflexive opposition to increasing government's role in health care; other plans have stepped forward to advocate meaningful reform. Experience in Massachusetts, California, Minnesota, and elsewhere suggests a clear lesson for policymakers. Sensible proposals and a genuine commitment to cooperation can not only neutralize opposition from a potentially powerful opponent, but can actually bring health plans on board to support coverage mandates, guaranteed issue, and other reforms.

  10. Where does the insurance industry stand on health reform today?

    PubMed

    Bodaken, Bruce G

    2008-01-01

    With another national health care debate on the horizon, many assume that health plans will present a major source of opposition to universal coverage and other reforms. But a closer look reveals signs of change. Some plans continue their reflexive opposition to increasing government's role in health care; other plans have stepped forward to advocate meaningful reform. Experience in Massachusetts, California, Minnesota, and elsewhere suggests a clear lesson for policymakers. Sensible proposals and a genuine commitment to cooperation can not only neutralize opposition from a potentially powerful opponent, but can actually bring health plans on board to support coverage mandates, guaranteed issue, and other reforms. PMID:18474954

  11. Health Care Reform: A Caucus of Asian American Health Workers' Perspective.

    PubMed

    Lin-Fu, Jane S.

    1994-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE PAPER: The purpose of this paper is to offer an American Public Health Association (APHA)/Caucus of Asian American Health Workers' (CAAHW) perspective on health care reform. Dr. William Chen, the CAAHW Chair had asked the author, a Caucus member to present the Caucus' perspective on health care reform as part of a special session that was held during the 1993 APHA annual meeting in San Francisco. This paper is based on the oral presentation made. SUMMARY OF METHODS UTILIZED: The author reviewed the September 7, 1993 draft of the President's Health Care Reform proposal, other related papers, and the literature on Asian and Pacific Islander American health care needs. This was followed by a discussion of major issues and concerns with the CAAHW Chair and key members. This paper has undergone review by the Caucus chair and his reviewers whom he selected and thus is endorsed as the CAAHW's perspective on health care reform. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The CAAHW applauds President Clinton for his leadership in introducing much­needed reform in the U.S. health care system. However, the CAAHW wants to point out that access to medical care is not equivalent to utilizing and benefiting from services. Three issues of special concern to Asian Pacific Islander Americans are: (1) cultural sensitivity and relevancy of health services; (2) adequacy of racial/ethnic specific health data; and (3) due representation and input to key health policy­making and administrative bodies. CONCLUSIONS: The CAHW supports universal health insurance for all Americans and is particularly concerned that cultural sensitivity and appropriateness be assured for all populations. RELEVANCE TO ASIAN PACIFIC ISLANDER AMERICAN POPULATIONS: This paper calls attention to Asian Pacific Islander Americans as the nation's fastest growing minority that is largely foreign­born and extremely heterogenous and the need for culturally sensitive services

  12. Calls for Spain to reform research system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Ned

    2014-09-01

    The Spanish government needs to adopt a major programme of structural reforms to the country’s research system, according to a report from the EU’s European Research Area and Innovation Committee.

  13. Welfare Reform and Health Insurance of Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Neeraj; Kaestner, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) on the health insurance coverage of foreign- and U.S.-born families headed by low-educated women. Data Source Secondary data from the March series of the Current Population Surveys for 1994–2001. Study Design Multivariate regression methods and a pre- and post-test with comparison group research design (difference-in-differences) are used to estimate the effect of welfare reform on the health insurance coverage of low-educated, foreign- and U.S.-born unmarried women and their children. Heterogenous responses by states to create substitute Temporary Aid to Needy Families or Medicaid programs for newly arrived immigrants are used to investigate whether the estimated effect of PRWORA on newly arrived immigrants is related to the actual provisions of the law, or the result of fears engendered by the law. Principal Findings PRWORA increased the proportion of uninsured among low-educated, foreign-born, unmarried women by 9.9–10.7 percentage points. In contrast, the effect of PRWORA on the health insurance coverage of similar U.S.-born women is negligible. PRWORA also increased the proportion of uninsured among foreign-born children living with low-educated, single mothers by 13.5 percentage points. Again, the policy had little effect on the health insurance coverage of the children of U.S.-born, low-educated single mothers. There is some evidence that the fear and uncertainty engendered by the law had an effect on immigrant health insurance coverage. Conclusions This research demonstrates that PRWORA adversely affected the health insurance of low-educated, unmarried, immigrant women and their children. In the case of unmarried women, it may be partly because the jobs that they obtained in response to PRWORA were less likely to provide health insurance. The research also suggests that PRWORA may have engendered fear among immigrants and dampened their

  14. Health reform in New Zealand: short-term gain but long-term pain?

    PubMed

    Ashton, Toni; Tenbensel, Tim

    2012-10-01

    Following a period of quite radical structural reform during the 1990s, health reform in New Zealand is now more incremental and often 'under the radar' of public scrutiny and debate. However, many changes have been made to the roles and functions of key agencies and this could have a profound effect on the direction and performance of the public health system. In particular, the objective of reform at the national level has shifted away from improving population health and reducing health disparities towards improving the performance of service providers. This article describes some of the reforms that have been introduced in recent years and discusses some implications of these changes. We argue that policy settings that are concerned only with getting the right services to the right people at the right time are inherently short-sighted if they fail to tackle the long-term causes of increasing demand for future health services. PMID:23186398

  15. Online Simulation of Health Care Reform: Helping Health Educators Learn and Participate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jecklin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Young and healthy undergraduates in health education were not predisposed to learn the complex sprawl of topics in a required course on U.S. Health Care. An online simulation of health care reform was used to encourage student learning about health care and participating in health care reform. Students applied their understanding of high costs,…

  16. Can community hospitals survive without large scale health reform?

    PubMed

    Unland, James J

    2004-01-01

    This nation's not-for-profit community hospitals, numbering over 4000 and providing the largest percentage of all hospital services to the US population, are threatened as never before by erratic reimbursement, reduced capital access and, more recently, by physicians who now compete both by virtue of outpatient/ambulatory services and by starting "specialty hospitals." This article examines some of these trends and their implications, raising the issue of whether it is time for major restructuring of our reimbursement systems and other significant health reforms. PMID:15151196

  17. Health sector reforms for 21st century healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Darshan

    2015-01-01

    The form of the public health system in India is a three tiered pyramid-like structure consisting primary, secondary, and tertiary healthcare services. The content of India's health system is mono-cultural and based on western bio-medicine. Authors discuss need for health sector reforms in the wake of the fact that despite huge investment, the public health system is not delivering. Today, 70% of the population pays out of pocket for even primary healthcare. Innovation is the need of the hour. The Indian government has recognized eight systems of healthcare viz., Allopathy, Ayurveda, Siddha, Swa-rigpa, Unani, Naturopathy, Homeopathy, and Yoga. Allopathy receives 97% of the national health budget, and 3% is divided amongst the remaining seven systems. At present, skewed funding and poor integration denies the public of advantage of synergy and innovations arising out of the richness of India's Medical Heritage. Health seeking behavior studies reveal that 40–70% of the population exercise pluralistic choices and seek health services for different needs, from different systems. For emergency and surgery, Allopathy is the first choice but for chronic and common ailments and for prevention and wellness help from the other seven systems is sought. Integrative healthcare appears to be the future framework for healthcare in the 21st century. A long-term strategy involving radical changes in medical education, research, clinical practice, public health and the legal and regulatory framework is needed, to innovate India's public health system and make it both integrative and participatory. India can be a world leader in the new emerging field of “integrative healthcare” because we have over the last century or so assimilated and achieved a reasonable degree of competence in bio-medical and life sciences and we possess an incredibly rich and varied medical heritage of our own. PMID:25878456

  18. Generalism and the need for health professional educational reform.

    PubMed

    Bulger, R J

    1995-01-01

    Powerful forces are intensifying change in health care delivery: population-based thinking about health care, especially emphasis on prevention; the reemergence of the biopsychosocial mode of thinking in health care; the need to increase capacity for health services research; and the knowledge that reductions may be needed in the use of high-priced physicians, the number of acute-care hospital beds, and the duplication of expensive equipment. Academic health centers are being forced to adjust their educational offerings to these realities of the service sector. Yet, institutional obstacles stand in the way of needed education reform: fragmentation of the sense of community in health professions schools, turf-related forces that separate various health professions, inflexible institutional structures that prevent adequate responses to a changing environment, an increasingly acute shortage of money to support education, and the devalued status of teaching within our institutions. Universities must develop centers to determine regional and local workforce needs and subsequently establish regionally based educational networks of academic and community health centers. Further, academic centers must demonstrate a real commitment to multiprofessional, interdisciplinary team approaches to a patient-centered system. In parallel, the institution must create a student-centered value system. PMID:7826454

  19. Draft Clinton health reform proposal is circulated as alternatives surface.

    PubMed

    1993-09-20

    A brief summary is provided of the Clinton draft health reform proposal (a 240-page draft outline) that predated the presidential address before Congress on September 22, 1993, and the complete health reform plan. Hillary Rodham Clinton will present a statement before the Senate Finance Committee and the Labor and Human Resources Committee on September 28, as the chairperson of the President's Task Force on Health Care Reform. Top policy aide Ira Magaziner believes that a coalition of moderate Republicans, liberal Democrats, and moderate Democrats will be to pass the bill. Observers see the battle as one of the most difficult for the Clinton administration. The outlined plan would require employers to pay about 80% of health insurance coverage for their employees, including part-time workers and their dependents. Families would pay the remaining 20%. All individuals would be covered, and special subsidies would be available for those under a specified income threshold. Regional health alliances would mediate between consumer and health plans. Premiums would be paid to the alliances, which would have a discrete geographic territory. Alliances would negotiate with health insurance companies for the best care at the lowest prices. Preexisting medical conditions would not prevent coverage. A standard benefit package would be provided and there would be comparability across plans. For instance, covered care would include hospital care, physician and health professional services, clinical preventive services, mental health and substance abuse, family planning services, pregnancy-related services, and drugs. Prevention coverage would include prenatal and well-baby care and routine physical examinations, and reproductive health service procedures such as mammogram and pelvic examinations. Family planning and pregnancy-related services were not defined, and although contraceptive pills would be covered as prescriptions, it is unclear whether diaphragms or IUDs would be

  20. Draft Clinton health reform proposal is circulated as alternatives surface.

    PubMed

    1993-09-20

    A brief summary is provided of the Clinton draft health reform proposal (a 240-page draft outline) that predated the presidential address before Congress on September 22, 1993, and the complete health reform plan. Hillary Rodham Clinton will present a statement before the Senate Finance Committee and the Labor and Human Resources Committee on September 28, as the chairperson of the President's Task Force on Health Care Reform. Top policy aide Ira Magaziner believes that a coalition of moderate Republicans, liberal Democrats, and moderate Democrats will be to pass the bill. Observers see the battle as one of the most difficult for the Clinton administration. The outlined plan would require employers to pay about 80% of health insurance coverage for their employees, including part-time workers and their dependents. Families would pay the remaining 20%. All individuals would be covered, and special subsidies would be available for those under a specified income threshold. Regional health alliances would mediate between consumer and health plans. Premiums would be paid to the alliances, which would have a discrete geographic territory. Alliances would negotiate with health insurance companies for the best care at the lowest prices. Preexisting medical conditions would not prevent coverage. A standard benefit package would be provided and there would be comparability across plans. For instance, covered care would include hospital care, physician and health professional services, clinical preventive services, mental health and substance abuse, family planning services, pregnancy-related services, and drugs. Prevention coverage would include prenatal and well-baby care and routine physical examinations, and reproductive health service procedures such as mammogram and pelvic examinations. Family planning and pregnancy-related services were not defined, and although contraceptive pills would be covered as prescriptions, it is unclear whether diaphragms or IUDs would be

  1. Colombia and Cuba, contrasting models in Latin America's health sector reform.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Pol; De Ceukelaire, Wim; Van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    Latin American national health systems were drastically overhauled by the health sector reforms the 1990s. Governments were urged by donors and by the international financial institutions to make major institutional changes, including the separation of purchaser and provider functions and privatization. This article first analyses a striking paradox of the far-reaching reform measures: contrary to what is imposed on public health services, after privatization purchaser and provider functions are reunited. Then we compare two contrasting examples: Colombia, which is internationally promoted as a successful--and radical--example of 'market-oriented' health care reform, and Cuba, which followed a highly 'conservative' path to adapt its public system to the new conditions since the 1990s, going against the model of the international institutions. The Colombian reform has not been able to materialize its promises of universality, improved equity, efficiency and better quality, while Cuban health care remains free, accessible for everybody and of good quality. Finally, we argue that the basic premises of the ongoing health sector reforms in Latin America are not based on the people's needs, but are strongly influenced by the needs of foreign--especially North American--corporations. However, an alternative model of health sector reform, such as the Cuban one, can probably not be pursued without fundamental changes in the economic and political foundations of Latin American societies. PMID:17002735

  2. France: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    Chevreul, Karine; Berg Brigham, Karen; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Hernandez-Quevedo, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of the French health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. The French population has a good level of health, with the second highest life expectancy in the world for women. It has a high level of choice of providers, and a high level of satisfaction with the health system. However, unhealthy habits such as smoking and harmful alcohol consumption remain significant causes of avoidable mortality. Combined with the significant burden of chronic diseases, this has underscored the need for prevention and integration of services, although these have not historically been strengths of the French system. Although the French health care system is a social insurance system, it has historically had a stronger role for the state than other Bismarckian social insurance systems. Public financing of health care expenditure is among the highest in Europe and out-of-pocket spending among the lowest. Public insurance is compulsory and covers the resident population; it is financed by employee and employer contributions as well as increasingly through taxation. Complementary insurance plays a significant role in ensuring equity in access. Provision is mixed; providers of outpatient care are largely private, and hospital beds are predominantly public or private non-profit-making. Despite health outcomes being among the best in the European Union, social and geographical health inequities remain. Inequality in the distribution of health care professionals is a considerable barrier to equity. The rising cost of health care and the increasing demand for long-term care are also of concern. Reforms are ongoing to address these issues, while striving for equity in financial access; a long-term care reform including public coverage of long-term care is still pending. PMID:26766545

  3. France: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    Chevreul, Karine; Berg Brigham, Karen; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Hernandez-Quevedo, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of the French health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. The French population has a good level of health, with the second highest life expectancy in the world for women. It has a high level of choice of providers, and a high level of satisfaction with the health system. However, unhealthy habits such as smoking and harmful alcohol consumption remain significant causes of avoidable mortality. Combined with the significant burden of chronic diseases, this has underscored the need for prevention and integration of services, although these have not historically been strengths of the French system. Although the French health care system is a social insurance system, it has historically had a stronger role for the state than other Bismarckian social insurance systems. Public financing of health care expenditure is among the highest in Europe and out-of-pocket spending among the lowest. Public insurance is compulsory and covers the resident population; it is financed by employee and employer contributions as well as increasingly through taxation. Complementary insurance plays a significant role in ensuring equity in access. Provision is mixed; providers of outpatient care are largely private, and hospital beds are predominantly public or private non-profit-making. Despite health outcomes being among the best in the European Union, social and geographical health inequities remain. Inequality in the distribution of health care professionals is a considerable barrier to equity. The rising cost of health care and the increasing demand for long-term care are also of concern. Reforms are ongoing to address these issues, while striving for equity in financial access; a long-term care reform including public coverage of long-term care is still pending.

  4. African-American physicians' views on health reform: results of a survey.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, W. M.; Clayton, L. A.; Kinchen, K.; Richardson, D.; Lawrence, L.; Butcher, R.; Davidson, E.

    1994-01-01

    Little is known about African-American physicians' health system experience or their opinions on health reform. In an attempt to obtain socioculturally relevant data quantifying these experiences and opinions, the National Medical Association administered a 38-question, 80-item survey instrument in August 1993. The questionnaire was completed by 236 physicians. The results indicate that African-American physicians feel health care is a right and that the health system needs fundamental change. Although there was no consensus on the type of health reform needed, approximately 35% cited availability and access to care to be the greatest problem facing the system with high costs of care (18.2%) ranking second. Unique findings in the survey indicated respondents felt that the needs and concerns of most African Americans will not be fairly addressed in the reform of the health-care system, that African-African physicians are not included in the formation of health-care policies, and that African-American physicians are facing high levels of professional and healthcare system racial discrimination. More than 99% of African-American physicians reported some degree of racial discrimination in the practice of medicine including peer review, obtaining practice privileges at hospitals, hospital staff promotions, Medicaid and Medicare reimbursements, malpractice suits, private insurance oversight and reimbursements, and referral practices of white colleagues. These findings have profound health policy, health financing, and health service delivery implications and should be included in debates and deliberations on health reform. PMID:8189452

  5. What Is Reform in Health Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schorr, Alvin L.

    1992-01-01

    Contends that United States has fragmented health care system that was put together like collage and that produces gaps in coverage, prohibitively rising costs, and endless paperwork. Discusses competitive insurance system, physician reimbursement, and hospital competition as three qualities of the collage that are at the heart of the problem. (NB)

  6. The New Zealand health reforms: dividing the labour of care.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of care as it was practised and conceptualised within one hospital group in southern New Zealand during the health reforms. The paper argues that these reforms brought about a division in the labour of care between the broad group of managers, computer analysts, administration officers, and the clinical staff. Aspects of these two empirically derived categories of care are elaborated, as well as the problems associated with each style. While this division in the labour of care is argued to be an unintended local consequence of the New Zealand health reforms, it also represents a more global phenomenon-the abstraction of social life.

  7. 75 FR 24470 - Health Care Reform Insurance Web Portal Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary 45 CFR Part 159 RIN 0991-AB63 Health Care Reform Insurance Web... that may be available to them in their State. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)...

  8. Implementing insurance market reforms under the federal health reform law.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Len M

    2010-06-01

    Lost in the rhetoric about the supposed government takeover of health care is an appreciation of the inherently federalist approach of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. This federalist tradition, particularly with regard to health insurance, has a history that dates back at least to the 1940s. The new legislation broadens federal power and oversight considerably, but it also vests considerable new powers and responsibilities in the states. The precedents and examples it follows will guide federal and state policy makers, stakeholders, and ordinary citizens as they breathe life into the new law. The challenges ahead are formidable, and the greatest ones are likely to be political.

  9. A comprehensive approach to women’s health: lessons from the Mexican health reform

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper discusses the way in which women’s health concerns were addressed in Mexico as part of a health system reform. Discussion The first part sets the context by examining the growing complexity that characterizes the global health field, where women’s needs occupy center stage. Part two briefly describes a critical conceptual evolution, i.e. from maternal to reproductive to women’s health. In the third and last section, the novel “women and health” (W&H) approach and its translation into policies and programs in the context of a structural health reform in Mexico is discussed. W&H simultaneously focuses on women’s health needs and women’s critical roles as both formal and informal providers of health care, and the links between these two dimensions. Summary The most important message of this paper is that broad changes in health systems offer the opportunity to address women’s health needs through innovative approaches focused on promoting gender equality and empowering women as drivers of change. PMID:23228037

  10. Health sector reform in Brazil: a case study of inequity.

    PubMed

    Almeida, C; Travassos, C; Porto, S; Labra, M E

    2000-01-01

    Health sector reform in Brazil built the Unified Health System according to a dense body of administrative instruments for organizing decentralized service networks and institutionalizing a complex decision-making arena. This article focuses on the equity in health care services. Equity is defined as a principle governing distributive functions designed to reduce or offset socially unjust inequalities, and it is applied to evaluate the distribution of financial resources and the use of health services. Even though in the Constitution the term "equity" refers to equal opportunity of access for equal needs, the implemented policies have not guaranteed these rights. Underfunding, fiscal stress, and lack of priorities for the sector have contributed to a progressive deterioration of health care services, with continuing regressive tax collection and unequal distribution of financial resources among regions. The data suggest that despite regulatory measures to increase efficiency and reduce inequalities, delivery of health care services remains extremely unequal across the country. People in lower income groups experience more difficulties in getting access to health services. Utilization rates vary greatly by type of service among income groups, positions in the labor market, and levels of education.

  11. How health reform legislation will affect Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Guterman, Stuart; Davis, Karen; Stremikis, Kristof

    2010-03-01

    Despite criticism that health reform legislation will result in cuts to Medicare, the bills passed by the House of Representatives and the Senate, as well as President Obama's proposal, contain provisions that would strengthen the program by reducing costs for prescription drugs, expanding coverage for preventive care, providing more help for low-income beneficiaries, and supporting accessible, coordinated, and comprehensive care that effectively responds to patients' needs. The legislation also would help to extend the program's fiscal solvency--for nine years, under the Senate bill. This issue brief examines the provisions in the pending legislation and how each one would work to improve benefits, extend the fiscal solvency of the Medicare Hospital Insurance Trust Fund, reduce pressure on the federal budget, and contribute to moving the health care system toward better access to care, improved quality, and greater efficiency. PMID:20297561

  12. Challenging the neoliberal trend: the Venezuelan health care reform alternative.

    PubMed

    Muntaner, Carles; Salazar, René M Guerra; Rueda, Sergio; Armada, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    Throughout the 1990s, all Latin American countries but Cuba implemented to varying degrees health care sector reforms underpinned by a neoliberal paradigm that redefined health care as less of a social right and more of a market commodity. These health care sector reforms were couched in the broader structural adjustment of Latin American welfare states prescribed consistently by international financial institutions since the mid-1980s. However, since 2003, Venezuela has been developing an alternative to this neoliberal trend through its health care reform program called Misión Barrio Adentro (Inside the Neighbourhood). In this article, we introduce Misión Barrio Adentro in its historical, political, and economic contexts. We begin by analyzing Latin American neoliberal health sector reforms in their political economic context, with a focus on Venezuela. The analysis reveals that the major beneficiaries of both broader structural adjustment of Latin American welfare states and neoliberal health reforms have been transnational capital interests and domestic Latin American elites. We then provide a detailed description of Misión Barrio Adentro as a challenge to neoliberalism in health care in its political economic context, noting the role played in its development by popular resistance to neoliberalism and the unique international cooperation model upon which it is based. Finally, we suggest that the Venezuelan experience may offer valuable lessons not only to other low- to middle-income countries, but also to countries such as Canada.

  13. Opportunities in Reform: Bioethics and Mental Health Ethics.

    PubMed

    Williams, Arthur Robin

    2016-05-01

    Last year marks the first year of implementation for both the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act in the United States. As a result, healthcare reform is moving in the direction of integrating care for physical and mental illness, nudging clinicians to consider medical and psychiatric comorbidity as the expectation rather than the exception. Understanding the intersections of physical and mental illness with autonomy and self-determination in a system realigning its values so fundamentally therefore becomes a top priority for clinicians. Yet Bioethics has missed opportunities to help guide clinicians through one of medicine's most ethically rich and challenging fields. Bioethics' distancing from mental illness is perhaps best explained by two overarching themes: 1) An intrinsic opposition between approaches to personhood rooted in Bioethics' early efforts to protect the competent individual from abuses in the research setting; and 2) Structural forces, such as deinstitutionalization, the Patient Rights Movement, and managed care. These two themes help explain Bioethics' relationship to mental health ethics and may also guide opportunities for rapprochement. The potential role for Bioethics may have the greatest implications for international human rights if bioethicists can re-energize an understanding of autonomy as not only free from abusive intrusions but also with rights to treatment and other fundamental necessities for restoring freedom of choice and self-determination. Bioethics thus has a great opportunity amid healthcare reform to strengthen the important role of the virtuous and humanistic care provider. PMID:26424211

  14. Opportunities in Reform: Bioethics and Mental Health Ethics.

    PubMed

    Williams, Arthur Robin

    2016-05-01

    Last year marks the first year of implementation for both the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act in the United States. As a result, healthcare reform is moving in the direction of integrating care for physical and mental illness, nudging clinicians to consider medical and psychiatric comorbidity as the expectation rather than the exception. Understanding the intersections of physical and mental illness with autonomy and self-determination in a system realigning its values so fundamentally therefore becomes a top priority for clinicians. Yet Bioethics has missed opportunities to help guide clinicians through one of medicine's most ethically rich and challenging fields. Bioethics' distancing from mental illness is perhaps best explained by two overarching themes: 1) An intrinsic opposition between approaches to personhood rooted in Bioethics' early efforts to protect the competent individual from abuses in the research setting; and 2) Structural forces, such as deinstitutionalization, the Patient Rights Movement, and managed care. These two themes help explain Bioethics' relationship to mental health ethics and may also guide opportunities for rapprochement. The potential role for Bioethics may have the greatest implications for international human rights if bioethicists can re-energize an understanding of autonomy as not only free from abusive intrusions but also with rights to treatment and other fundamental necessities for restoring freedom of choice and self-determination. Bioethics thus has a great opportunity amid healthcare reform to strengthen the important role of the virtuous and humanistic care provider.

  15. OPPORTUNITIES IN REFORM: BIOETHICS AND MENTAL HEALTH ETHICS

    PubMed Central

    WILLIAMS, ARTHUR ROBINSON

    2015-01-01

    This year marks the first year of implementation for both the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act in the United States. Resultantly healthcare reform is moving in the direction of integrating care for physical and mental illness, nudging clinicians to consider medical and psychiatric comorbidity as the expectation rather than the exception. Understanding the intersections of physical and mental illness with autonomy and self-determination in a system realigning its values so fundamentally therefore becomes a top priority for clinicians. Yet Bioethics has missed opportunities to help guide clinicians through one of medicine’s most ethically rich and challenging fields. Bioethics’ distancing from mental illness is perhaps best explained by two overarching themes: 1) an intrinsic opposition between approaches to personhood rooted in Bioethics’ early efforts to protect the competent individual from abuses in the research setting; and 2) structural forces, such as deinstitutionalization, the Patient Rights Movement, and managed care. These two themes help explain Bioethics’ relationship to mental health ethics and may also guide opportunities for rapprochement. The potential role for Bioethics may have the greatest implications for international human rights if bioethicists can re-energize an understanding of autonomy as not only free from abusive intrusions but also with rights to treatment and other fundamental necessities for restoring freedom of choice and self-determination. Bioethics thus has a great opportunity amid healthcare reform to strengthen the important role of the virtuous and humanistic care provider. PMID:26424211

  16. [Governance and health: the rise of the managerialism in public sector reform].

    PubMed

    Denis, Jean L; Lamothe, Lise; Langley, Ann; Stéphane, Guérard

    2010-01-01

    The article examines various healthcare systems reform projects in Canada and some Canadian provinces and reveals some tendencies in governance renewal. The analisis is based on the hypothesis that reform is an exercise aiming at the renewal of governance conception and practices. In renewing governance, reform leaders hope to use adequate and effective levers to attain announced reform objectives. The article shows that the conceptions and operational modalities of governance have changed over time and that they reveal tensions inherent to the transformation and legitimation process of public healthcare systems. The first section discusses the relationships between reform and change. The second section defines the conception of gouvernance used for the analisis. Based on a content analisis of the various reform reports, the third section reveals the evolution of the conception of governance in healthcare systems in Canada. In order to expose the new tendencies, ideologies and operational principles at the heart of the reform projects are analysed. Five ideologies are identified: the democratic ideology, the "population health" ideology, the business ideology, the managerial ideology and the ideology of equity and humanism. This leads to a discussion on the dominant influence of the managerial ideology in the current reform projects. PMID:20963305

  17. COMMENTARY: GLOBALIZATION, HEALTH SECTOR REFORM, AND THE HUMAN RIGHT TO HEALTH: IMPLICATIONS FOR FUTURE HEALTH POLICY.

    PubMed

    Schuftan, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The author here distills his long-time personal experience with the deleterious effects of globalization on health and on the health sector reforms embarked on in many of the more than 50 countries where he has worked in the last 25 years. He highlights the role that the "human right to health" framework can and should play in countering globalization's negative effects on health and in shaping future health policy. This is a testimonial article.

  18. Reproductive health and health sector reform in developing countries: establishing a framework for dialogue.

    PubMed Central

    Lubben, Marianne; Mayhew, Susannah H.; Collins, Charles; Green, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    It is not clear how policy-making in the field of reproductive health relates to changes associated with programmes for the reform of the health sector in developing countries. There has been little communication between these two areas, yet policy on reproductive health has to be implemented in the context of structural change. This paper examines factors that limit dialogue between the two areas and proposes the following framework for encouraging it: the identification of policy groups and the development of bases for collaborative links between them; the introduction of a common understanding around relevant policy contexts; reaching agreement on compatible aims relating to reproductive health and health sector change; developing causal links between policy content in reproductive health and health sector change as a basis for evidence-based policy-making; and strengthening policy-making structures, systems, skills, and values. PMID:12219159

  19. [Psychiatric reform, federalism, and the decentralization of the public health in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Costa, Nilson do Rosário; Siqueira, Sandra Venâncio; Uhr, Deborah; Silva, Paulo Fagundes da; Molinaro, Alex Alexandre

    2011-12-01

    This study examines the relationships between Brazilian psychiatric reform, the adoption of the Centers for Psychosocial Care (CAPS) and the development of the Unified Health System (SUS). The adherence of municipal governments was a variable determinant for the spread of reform, especially due to the continental scale and fragmentation of the Brazilian federation. The article demonstrates the institutional stability of psychiatric reform in Brazil over two decades. The institutional nature of the decision-making process in the public arena has permitted the implementation of new organizational formats through imitation and financial incentives. The psychiatric reform was successful in defending the advantages of CAPS in relation to the asylum and hospital model dominant in past decades. The inductive policies, strengthened and upheld by Law 10.216/2001, transformed the agenda of psychiatric reform, limited to pioneering cities in a national public policy.

  20. Implementing Family Health Nursing in Tajikistan: from policy to practice in primary health care reform.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, Barbara Ann; Cornish, Flora

    2007-10-01

    The health systems of former Soviet Union countries are undergoing reform away from the highly centralised, resource-intensive, specialised and hierarchical Soviet system, towards a more generalist, efficient health service with greater focus on primary health care. Family Health Nursing is a new model designed by WHO Europe in which skilled generalist community nurses deliver primary health care to local communities. This paper presents a qualitative evaluation of the implementation of Family Health Nursing in Tajikistan. Using Stufflebeam's 'Context, Input, Process, and Product' model, the paper aims to evaluate the progress of this reform, and to understand the factors that help or hinder its implementation. A four-phase research design investigates the development of the Family Health Nurse role over time. In 5 rural areas, 6 focus groups and 18 interviews with Family Health Nurses, 4 observations of their practice, 7 interviews with families and 9 interviews with physicians were carried out. Data were analysed according to the components of Stufflebeam's model. Although the legacy of the Soviet health system did not set a precedent for a nurse who is capable of decision-making and who works in partnership with the physician, Family Health Nurses were successfully implementing new practices. Crucial to their ability to do so were the co-operation of physicians and families. Physicians were impressed by the nurses' development of knowledge, and families were impressed that the nurses could offer real solutions to their problems. However, failure to pay the nurses regular salaries had led to serious attrition of the workforce. We conclude that the success of the Family Health Nurse role in other countries will depend upon its position in relation to the historical health care system. PMID:17651876

  1. Energizing a Large Urban System: Reform through a Standards Driven Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Stephen B.

    This paper describes the District of Columbia Public School System (DCPS); articulates challenges it faced prior to standards based reform; presents strategies for reforming large urban systems' health and physical education (HPE) programs; and notes strategies for incorporating a standards-based performance-driven model. DCPS reading and math…

  2. Implications of health reform for retiree health benefits.

    PubMed

    Fronstin, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This Issue Brief examines how current health reform legislation being debated in Congress will impact the future of retiree health benefits. In general, the proposals' provisions will have a mixed impact on retiree health benefits: In the short term, the reinsurance provisions would help shore up early retiree coverage and Medicare Part D coverage would become more valuable to retirees. In the longer term, insurance reform combined with new subsidies for individuals enrolling for coverage through insurance exchanges, the maintenance-of-effort provision affecting early retiree benefits, increases to the cost of providing drug benefits to retirees, and enhanced Medicare Part D coverage, would all create significant incentives for employers to drop coverage for early retirees and drug coverage for Medicare-eligible retirees. REINSURANCE PROGRAM FOR EARLY RETIREES: Proposed legislation includes a provision to create a temporary reinsurance program for employers providing health benefits to retirees over age 55 and not yet eligible for Medicare. Given the temporary nature of the program, it is intended to provide employers an incentive to maintain benefits until the health insurance exchange is fully operational. At that point, employers will have less incentive to provide health benefits to early retirees, and retirees will have less need for former employers to maintain a program. MEDICARE DRUG BENEFITS: The House-passed bill would initially reduce the coverage gap (the so-called "doughnut hole") for individuals in the Medicare Part D program by $500 and eliminate it altogether by 2019. The bill currently before the Senate would also reduce the coverage gap by $500, but does not call for eliminating it. Both would also provide a 50 percent discount to brand-name drug coverage in the coverage gap. These provisions increase the value of the Medicare Part D drug program to Medicare-eligible beneficiaries relative to drug benefits provided by employers. TAX TREATMENT OF

  3. The implications of health sector reform for human resources development.

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Ala'; Hornby, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The authors argue that "health for all" is not achievable in most countries without health sector reform that incorporates a process of coordinated health and human resources development. They examine the situation in countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region of the World Health Organization. Though advances have been made, further progress is inhibited by the limited adaptation of traditional health service structures and processes in many of these countries. National reform strategies are needed. These require the active participation of health professional associations and academic training institutions as well as health service managers. The paper indicates some of the initiatives required and suggests that the starting point for many countries should be a rigorous appraisal of the current state of human resources development in health. PMID:11884974

  4. The effects of health care reforms on health inequalities: a review and analysis of the European evidence base.

    PubMed

    Gelormino, Elena; Bambra, Clare; Spadea, Teresa; Bellini, Silvia; Costa, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Health care is widely considered to be an important determinant of health. The health care systems of Western Europe have recently experienced significant reforms, under pressure from economic globalization. Similarly, in Eastern Europe, health care reforms have been undertaken in response to the demands of the new market economy. Both of these changes may influence equality in health outcomes. This article aims to identify the mechanisms through which health care may affect inequalities. The authors conducted a literature review of the effects on health inequalities of European health care reforms. Particular reference was paid to interventions in the fields of financing and pooling, allocation, purchasing, and provision of services. The majority of studies were from Western Europe, and the outcomes most often examined were access to services or income distribution. Overall, the quality of research was poor, confirming the need to develop an appropriate impact assessment methodology. Few studies were related to pooling, allocation, or purchasing. For financing and purchasing, the studies showed that publicly funded universal health care reduces the impact of ill health on income distribution, while insurance systems can increase inequalities in access to care. Out-of-pocket payments increase inequalities in access to care and contribute to impoverishment. Decentralizing health services can lead to geographic inequalities in health care access. Nationalized, publicly funded health care systems are most effective at reducing inequalities in access and reducing the effects on health of income distribution.

  5. The underlying theories of health care reform in the United States--strategy implications for hospitals.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Daniel B; Militello, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The United State Health Reform (Affordable Care Act) presents health provides with the goals that should be achieved in the reformed health care environment and rationale for those goals. Developing strategies to implement the act's policies by any health care organization must take into account the underlying theories of the act: managed change though payment design and funds flow. Market place competition. To execute strategy effective internal organizational management is a must and can be facilitated through a strong alignment between mission and opperating factors. The mission must relate to the organization's markets. Markets are best addressed through a local perspective where the ACA goals can be applied within a specific community or culture. The systems approach brings as many participants in the system to define their mutual success as it relates to reform. PMID:22235723

  6. Benefits for Infants and Toddlers in Health Care Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Routine health care can spell the difference between a strong beginning and a fragile start. After much public and Congressional debate, President Obama signed into law landmark health care reform legislation. Although many provisions will not go into effect this year, several important changes could benefit children within a few months. The…

  7. Report on Children's Mental Health Reform in Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petr, Christopher G.; Pierpont, John

    This study, which collected data through interviews and document review, was designed to identify strengths and weaknesses of Minnesota's Comprehensive Children's Mental Health Act (CCMHA) of 1989 and its implementation through December 1990. Three criteria for mental health reform were established for the study, including: care should be…

  8. Integrated specialty service readiness in health reform: connections in haemophilia comprehensive care.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, A M; Page, D

    2008-05-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified primary healthcare reform as a global priority whereby innovative practice changes are directed at improving health. This transformation to health reform in haemophilia service requires clarification of comprehensive care to reflect the WHO definition of health and key elements of primary healthcare reform. While comprehensive care supports effective healthcare delivery, comprehensive care must also be regarded beyond immediate patient management to reflect the broader system purpose in the care continuum with institutions, community agencies and government. Furthermore, health reform may be facilitated through integrated service delivery (ISD). ISD in specialty haemophilia care has the potential to reduce repetition of assessments, enhance care plan communication between providers and families, provide 24-h access to care, improve information availability regarding care quality and outcomes, consolidate access for multiple healthcare encounters and facilitate family self-efficacy and autonomy [1]. Three core aspects of ISD have been distinguished: clinical integration, information management and technology and vertical integration in local communities [2]. Selected examples taken from Canadian haemophilia comprehensive care illustrate how practice innovations are bridged with a broader system level approach and may support initiatives in other contexts. These innovations are thought to indicate readiness regarding ISD. Reflecting on the existing capacity of haemophilia comprehensive care teams will assist providers to connect and direct their existing strengths towards ISD and health reform. PMID:18331561

  9. Symposium on Systemic Reform in Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Arlene

    1997-11-01

    Although the Division of Undergraduate Education at NSF has undergone a shift in program emphasis, it has retained the Adapt and Adopt Program Initiative, which seeks to broaden the dissemination of the five Systemic Reform Initiatives that are currently being funded by NSF (http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE).

  10. Systemic Education Reform. ERIC Digest, Number 90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, James

    Economic forces and educational equity issues have combined to heighten calls for improved education for all students. Systemic reform calls for education to be reconceptualized from the ground up, beginning with the nature of teaching and learning, educational relationships, and school-community relationships. One of the assumptions made by…

  11. Systemic School Reform: A Guiding Hand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    In a school bent on systemic reform, teachers, students, and leaders rally around what is needed to improve student learning, understand the pervasiveness of their efforts, and support educators however possible. In recent years, many schools that demonstrate improvement in student learning have used technology as integral to their transformation,…

  12. Health Care Reform: Lessons From Canada

    PubMed Central

    Deber, Raisa Berlin

    2003-01-01

    Although Canadian health care seems to be perennially in crisis, access, quality, and satisfaction in Canada are relatively high, and spending is relatively well controlled. The Canadian model is built on a recognition of the limits of markets in distributing medically necessary care. Current issues in financing and delivering health care in Canada deserve attention. Key dilemmas include intergovernmental disputes between the federal and provincial levels of government and determining how to organize care, what to pay for (comprehensiveness), and what incentive structures to put in place for payment. Lessons for the United States include the importance of universal coverage, the advantages of a single payer, and the fact that systems can be organized on a subnational basis. PMID:12511378

  13. National Health Insurance or Incremental Reform: Aim High, or at Our Feet?

    PubMed Central

    Himmelstein, David U.; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2003-01-01

    Single-payer national health insurance could cover the uninsured and upgrade coverage for most Americans without increasing costs; savings on insurance overhead and other bureaucracy would fully offset the costs of improved care. In contrast, proposed incremental reforms are projected to cover a fraction of the uninsured, at great cost. Moreover, even these projections are suspect; reforms of the past quarter century have not stemmed the erosion of coverage. Despite incrementalists’ claims of pragmatism, they have proven unable to shepherd meaningful reform through the political system. While national health insurance is often dismissed as ultra left by the policy community, it is dead center in public opinion. Polls have consistently shown that at least 40%, and perhaps 60%, of Americans favor such reform. PMID:12511395

  14. National Health Insurance or Incremental Reform: Aim High, or at Our Feet?

    PubMed Central

    Himmelstein, David U.; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2008-01-01

    Single-payer national health insurance could cover the uninsured and upgrade coverage for most Americans without increasing costs; savings on insurance overhead and other bureaucracy would fully offset the costs of improved care. In contrast, proposed incremental reforms are projected to cover a fraction of the uninsured, at great cost. Moreover, even these projections are suspect; reforms of the past quarter century have not stemmed the erosion of coverage. Despite incrementalists’ claims of pragmatism, they have proven unable to shepherd meaningful reform through the political system. While national health insurance is often dismissed as ultra left by the policy community, it is dead center in public opinion. Polls have consistently shown that at least 40%, and perhaps 60%, of Americans favor such reform. PMID:18687624

  15. Health reform in the US: what will shape the future debate?

    PubMed

    Helms, Robert B

    2006-12-01

    The question has been asked about what kind of health reform will occur in the US. Will it be a radical transformation or muddling through? Muddling through in health policy is clearly the approach that is more consistent with American history and political traditions than radical reform. But how, and how fast, we muddle through is itself an interesting question. This paper explores the market and public policy forces that are likely to affect the future of health policy in the US. Will the US follow the example of the European countries by expanding public financing and control, or will it take a different approach based more on consumer choice and provider competition? As background, the paper reviews some important events that shaped the US healthcare system and explains why our current market situation complicates our ability to achieve efficient reform. It also discusses why the future of reform will be strongly influenced by how the market for health insurance develops over the next decade. If the new forms of high deductible, catastrophic plans combined with personal savings accounts meet the market test and are considered successful, this will give policy makers new options for expanding coverage to the uninsured and reforming Medicare and Medicaid. But, as we know from the history of other markets, much can go wrong. Some predictions about the future course of reform are offered. PMID:23389484

  16. The health care reform in Mexico: before and after the 1985 earthquakes.

    PubMed Central

    Soberón, G; Frenk, J; Sepúlveda, J

    1986-01-01

    The earthquakes that hit Mexico City in September 1985 caused considerable damage both to the population and to important medical facilities. The disaster took place while the country was undertaking a profound reform of its health care system. This reform had introduced a new principle for allocating and distributing the benefits of health care, namely, the principle of citizenship. Operationally, the reform includes an effort to decentralize the decision-making authority, to modernize the administration, to achieve greater coordination within the health sector and among sectors, and to extend coverage to the entire population through an ambitious primary care program. This paper examines the health context in which the reform was taking place when the September earthquakes hit. After presenting the damages caused by the quakes, the paper analyzes the characteristics of the immediate response by the health system. Since many facilities within the system were severely damaged, a series of options for reconstruction are posited. The main lesson to be learned from the Mexican case is that cuts in health care programs are not the inevitable response to economic or natural crises. On the contrary, it is precisely when the majority of the population is undergoing difficulties that a universal and equitable health system becomes most necessary. PMID:3706595

  17. The reorientation of market-oriented reforms in Swedish health-care.

    PubMed

    Harrison, M I; Calltorp, J

    2000-01-01

    Sweden was an important pioneer of market-oriented reform in publicly funded health-care systems. Yet by the mid-1990s the county councils, which fund and manage most health-care, had substantially scaled back reforms based on provider competition while continuing to constrain health budgets. As policy makers faced new issues, they turned increasingly to longer-term and more cooperative contracts to define relations between hospitals and the county councils. Growing regionalization of government and hospital mergers further reconfigured acute care and limited opportunities for competition between hospitals. We seek to explain this reorientation of market-oriented reforms between 1989 and 1996 in terms of shifts in the positions taken by powerful policy actors, and in particular by county council politicians. During this period, elections moved liberal and conservative politicians, who were the most enthusiastic supporters of market-oriented reform, in and out of control of most county governments. Meanwhile many Social Democratic politicians gradually turned from initial support of competitive reform toward opposition. Politicians and county administrators from all parties were particularly concerned about controlling health expenditures during a period of recession. In addition, the public, politicians in the counties and municipalities, and health professionals resisted steps that threatened health sector employment and would have allowed market mechanisms, rather than governments, to determine the prices and distribution of health services. During the years under study Sweden's market-oriented reforms followed a course of development similar to that taken by other management and policy fashions (Abrahamson E. Management fashion, Academy of Management Review 1996;21: 254-85). At first the reforms enjoyed uncritical support by a broad spectrum of stakeholders. Gradually participants in the reform process recognized inherent tensions among the goals of the reform

  18. Delivery system reform tracking: a framework for understanding change.

    PubMed

    Tollen, Laura; Enthoven, Alain; Crosson, Francis J; Taylor, Nancy; Audet, Anne-Marie; Schoen, Cathy; Ross, Murray

    2011-06-01

    The health care delivery system is changing rapidly, with providers forming patient-centered medical homes and exploring the creation of accountable care organizations. Enactment of the Affordable Care Act will likely accelerate these changes. Significant delivery system reforms will simultaneously affect the structures, capabilities, incentives, and outcomes of the delivery system. With so many changes taking place at once, there is a need for a new tool to track progress at the community level. Many of the necessary data elements for a delivery system reform tracking tool are already being collected in various places and by different stakeholders. The authors propose that all elements be brought together in a unified whole to create a detailed picture of delivery system change. This brief provides a rationale for creating such a tool and presents a framework for doing so. PMID:21638935

  19. The certitudes and uncertainties of health care reform.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Robert B

    2010-05-18

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) of 2010 was signed into law by President Obama on March 23. This legislation has elicited much debate among policy experts and the public alike. No one knows exactly how this new complex law will play out, and objective evaluation of its effects is important. The American College of Physicians hopes that the legislation will advance key priorities on coverage, workforce, and payment and delivery system reform. The goal of the PPACA is to help provide affordable health insurance coverage to most Americans, improve access to primary care, and lower costs. This article discusses what the chances are that it will accomplish these objectives. It also explains many of the key provisions in the legislation and how they will affect both physicians and patients. Despite considerable uncertainty about the effects of this act, when compared with the status quo, it is an extraordinary achievement that will continue to evolve through its implementation.

  20. Health in China. From Mao to market reform.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, T; Wei, X Z

    1997-05-24

    After the Liberation by Mao Ze Dong's Communist army in 1949, China experienced massive social and economic change. The dramatic reductions in mortality and morbidity of the next two decades were brought about through improvements in socioeconomic conditions, an emphasis on prevention, and almost universal access to basic health care. The economic mismanagement of the Great Leap Forward brought about a temporary reversal in these positive trends. During the Cultural Revolution there was a sustained attack on the privileged position of the medical profession. Most city doctors were sent to work in the countryside, where they trained over a million barefoot doctors. Deng Xiao Ping's radical economic reforms of the late 1970s replaced the socialist system with a market economy. Although average incomes have increased, the gap between rich and poor has widened. PMID:9183206

  1. Health in China. From Mao to market reform.

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, T.; Wei, X. Z.

    1997-01-01

    After the Liberation by Mao Ze Dong's Communist army in 1949, China experienced massive social and economic change. The dramatic reductions in mortality and morbidity of the next two decades were brought about through improvements in socioeconomic conditions, an emphasis on prevention, and almost universal access to basic health care. The economic mismanagement of the Great Leap Forward brought about a temporary reversal in these positive trends. During the Cultural Revolution there was a sustained attack on the privileged position of the medical profession. Most city doctors were sent to work in the countryside, where they trained over a million barefoot doctors. Deng Xiao Ping's radical economic reforms of the late 1970s replaced the socialist system with a market economy. Although average incomes have increased, the gap between rich and poor has widened. PMID:9183206

  2. Financing reforms of public health services in China: lessons for other nations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingzhu; Mills, Anne

    2002-06-01

    Financing reforms of China's public health services are characterised by a reduction in government budgetary support and the introduction of charges. These reforms have changed the financing structure of public health institutions. Before the financing reforms, in 1980, government budgetary support covered the full costs of public health institutions, while after the reforms by the middle of the 1990s, the government's contribution to the institutions' revenue had fallen to 30-50%, barely covering the salaries of health workers, and the share of revenue generated from charges had increased to 50-70%. These market-oriented financing reforms improved the productivity of public health institutions, but several unintended consequences became evident. The economic incentives that were built into the financing system led to over-provision of unnecessary services, and under-provision of socially desirable services. User fees reduced the take-up of preventive services with positive externalities. The lack of government funds resulted in under-provision of services with public goods' characteristics. The Chinese experience has generated important lessons for other nations. Firstly, a decline in the role of government in financing public health services is likely to result in decreased overall efficiency of the health sector. Secondly, levying charges for public health services can reduce demand for these services and increase the risk of disease transmission. Thirdly, market-oriented financing reforms of public health services should not be considered as a policy option. Once this step is made, the unintended consequences may outweigh the intended ones. Chinese experience strongly suggests that the government should take a very active role in financing public health services.

  3. Bulgaria health system review.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Antoniya; Rohova, Maria; Moutafova, Emanuela; Atanasova, Elka; Koeva, Stefka; Panteli, Dimitra; van Ginneken, Ewout

    2012-01-01

    sector represent a substantial part of total OOP payments (47.1% in 2006). The health system is economically unstable and health care establishments, most notably hospitals, are suffering from underfunding. Planning of outpatient health care is based on a territorial principle. Investment for state and municipal health establishments is financed from the state or municipal share in the establishments capital. In the first quarter of 2009, health workers accounted for 4.9% of the total workforce. Compared to other countries, the relative number of physicians and dentists is particularly high but the relative number of nurses remains well below the EU15, EU12 and EU27 averages. Bulgaria is faced with increased professional mobility, which is becoming particularly challenging. There is an oversupply of acute care beds and an undersupply of longterm care and rehabilitation services. Health care reforms after 1989 focused predominantly on ambulatory care and the restructuring of the hospital sector is still pending on the government agenda. Citizens as well as medical professionals are dissatisfied with the health care system and equity is a challenge not only because of differences in health needs, but also because of socioeconomic disparities and territorial imbalances. The need for further reform is pronounced, particularly in view of the low health status of the population. Structural reforms and increased competitiveness in the system as well as an overall support of reform concepts and measures are prerequisites for successful progress. PMID:22894828

  4. Bulgaria health system review.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Antoniya; Rohova, Maria; Moutafova, Emanuela; Atanasova, Elka; Koeva, Stefka; Panteli, Dimitra; van Ginneken, Ewout

    2012-01-01

    sector represent a substantial part of total OOP payments (47.1% in 2006). The health system is economically unstable and health care establishments, most notably hospitals, are suffering from underfunding. Planning of outpatient health care is based on a territorial principle. Investment for state and municipal health establishments is financed from the state or municipal share in the establishments capital. In the first quarter of 2009, health workers accounted for 4.9% of the total workforce. Compared to other countries, the relative number of physicians and dentists is particularly high but the relative number of nurses remains well below the EU15, EU12 and EU27 averages. Bulgaria is faced with increased professional mobility, which is becoming particularly challenging. There is an oversupply of acute care beds and an undersupply of longterm care and rehabilitation services. Health care reforms after 1989 focused predominantly on ambulatory care and the restructuring of the hospital sector is still pending on the government agenda. Citizens as well as medical professionals are dissatisfied with the health care system and equity is a challenge not only because of differences in health needs, but also because of socioeconomic disparities and territorial imbalances. The need for further reform is pronounced, particularly in view of the low health status of the population. Structural reforms and increased competitiveness in the system as well as an overall support of reform concepts and measures are prerequisites for successful progress.

  5. Designing HIGH-COST medicine: hospital surveys, health planning, and the paradox of progressive reform.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Barbara Bridgman

    2010-02-01

    Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas' hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs. PMID:20019312

  6. Designing HIGH-COST Medicine Hospital Surveys, Health Planning, and the Paradox of Progressive Reform

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas’ hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs. PMID:20019312

  7. Telemental health: responding to mandates for reform in primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kathleen M; Lieberman, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Telemental health (TMH) has established a niche as a feasible, acceptable, and effective service model to improve the mental healthcare and outcomes for individuals who cannot access traditional mental health services. The Accountability Care Act has mandated reforms in the structure, functioning, and financing of primary care that provide an opportunity for TMH to move into the mainstream healthcare system. By partnering with the Integrated Behavioral Healthcare Model, TMH offers a spectrum of tools to unite primary care physicians and mental health specialist in a mind-body view of patients' healthcare needs and to activate patients in their own care. TMH tools include video-teleconferencing to telecommute mental health specialists to the primary care setting to collaborate with a team in caring for patients' mental healthcare needs and to provide direct services to patients who are not progressing optimally with this collaborative model. Asynchronous tools include online therapies that offer an efficient first step to treatment for selected disorders such as depression and anxiety. Patients activate themselves in their care through portals that provide access to their healthcare information and Web sites that offer on-demand information and communication with a healthcare team. These synchronous and asynchronous TMH tools may move the site of mental healthcare from the clinic to the home. The evolving role of social media in facilitating communication among patients or with their healthcare team deserves further consideration as a tool to activate patients and provide more personalized care. PMID:23611641

  8. Telemental health: responding to mandates for reform in primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kathleen M; Lieberman, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Telemental health (TMH) has established a niche as a feasible, acceptable, and effective service model to improve the mental healthcare and outcomes for individuals who cannot access traditional mental health services. The Accountability Care Act has mandated reforms in the structure, functioning, and financing of primary care that provide an opportunity for TMH to move into the mainstream healthcare system. By partnering with the Integrated Behavioral Healthcare Model, TMH offers a spectrum of tools to unite primary care physicians and mental health specialist in a mind-body view of patients' healthcare needs and to activate patients in their own care. TMH tools include video-teleconferencing to telecommute mental health specialists to the primary care setting to collaborate with a team in caring for patients' mental healthcare needs and to provide direct services to patients who are not progressing optimally with this collaborative model. Asynchronous tools include online therapies that offer an efficient first step to treatment for selected disorders such as depression and anxiety. Patients activate themselves in their care through portals that provide access to their healthcare information and Web sites that offer on-demand information and communication with a healthcare team. These synchronous and asynchronous TMH tools may move the site of mental healthcare from the clinic to the home. The evolving role of social media in facilitating communication among patients or with their healthcare team deserves further consideration as a tool to activate patients and provide more personalized care.

  9. No theory of justice can ground health care reform.

    PubMed

    Trotter, Griffin

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues that no theory or single conception of justice can provide a fundamental grounding for health care reform in the United States. To provide such a grounding, (1) there would need to be widespread support among citizens for a particular conception of justice, (2) citizens would have to apprehend this common conception of justice as providing the strongest available rationale for health care reform, and (3) this rationale would have to overwhelm countervailing values. I argue that neither of the first two conditions is met.

  10. Romania: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    Vladescu, Cristian; Scintee, Silvia Gabriela; Olsavszky, Victor; Hernandez-Quevedo, Cristina; Sagan, Anna

    2016-08-01

    This analysis of the Romanian health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. The Romanian health care system is a social health insurance system that has remained highly centralized despite recent efforts to decentralize some regulatory functions. It provides a comprehensive benefits package to the 85% of the population that is covered, with the remaining population having access to a minimum package of benefits. While every insured person has access to the same health care benefits regardless of their socioeconomic situation, there are inequities in access to health care across many dimensions, such as rural versus urban, and health outcomes also differ across these dimensions. The Romanian population has seen increasing life expectancy and declining mortality rates but both remain among the worst in the European Union. Some unfavourable trends have been observed, including increasing numbers of new HIV/AIDS diagnoses and falling immunization rates. Public sources account for over 80% of total health financing. However, that leaves considerable out-of-pocket payments covering almost a fifth of total expenditure. The share of informal payments also seems to be substantial, but precise figures are unknown. In 2014, Romania had the lowest health expenditure as a share of gross domestic product (GDP) among the EU Member States. In line with the government's objective of strengthening the role of primary care, the total number of hospital beds has been decreasing. However, health care provision remains characterized by underprovision of primary and community care and inappropriate use of inpatient and specialized outpatient care, including care in hospital emergency departments. The numbers of physicians and nurses are relatively low in Romania compared to EU averages. This has mainly been attributed to the high rates of workers emigrating abroad over the

  11. [The absence of stewardship in the Chilean health authority after the 2004 health reform].

    PubMed

    Herrera, Tania; Sánchez, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Stewardship is the most important political function of a health system. It is a government responsibility carried out by the health authority. Among other dimensions, it is also a meta-function that includes conduction and regulation. The Health Authority and Management Act, which came about from the health reform of 2004, separated the functions of service provision and stewardship with the aim of strengthening the role of the health authority. However, the current structure of the health system contains overlapping functions between the different entities that leads to lack of coordination and inconsistencies, and a greater weight on individual health actions at the expense of collective ones. Consequently, a properly funded national health strategy to improve the health of the population is missing. Additionally, the components of citizen participation and governance are weak. It is necessary, therefore, to revisit the Chilean health structure in order to develop one that truly enables the exercise of the health authority’s stewardship role. PMID:25514550

  12. Efficiency and equity implications of the health care reforms.

    PubMed

    Carr-Hill, R A

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of the paper is to reflect on the recent health care reforms in both developed and developing countries, in the light of the evidence that has accumulated over the last few years about the efficiency and equity of different fiscal and organisational arrangements. The scene is set by a brief review of the definitions of efficiency and equity and of the confusions that often arise; and of the problems of making assessments in practice with real data. The evidence about effectiveness, efficiency and equity at the macro level are reviewed: among OECD countries, there is little evidence that variations in the levels and composition of health service expenditure actually affect levels of health; equity in financing and delivery appears to mirror equity in other sectors in the same countries; about the only solid--although rather limp--conclusion which is transferable is that costs can be contained best via global budgeting. The range of reforms in the North is sketched: despite calls to give people 'freedom' to opt out, public finances continues to be preferred among OECD countries; and the evidence that health care markets can actually function is 'weak'. Whilst geographical redistribution of finance has proved to be possible, inequalities in health remain in most countries. But the overwhelming impression is that the quality of the data base for many of these studies is appalling, and the analytice techniques used are simplistic. The move to introduce user charges in the South is discussed. It seems unlikely that they will raise a significant fraction of overall revenue; exemptions intended for the poor do not always work; and other trends are likely to exacerbate the patchy coverage of health care systems in the South. The final section reflects on the pressures for increased accountability. The emphasis on consumerism in the North has led to an increasing number of poorly designed 'patient satisfaction' surveys; in the South, there has been an increasing

  13. Health care reform in the new South Africa.

    PubMed

    Benatar, S R

    1997-03-20

    The social transition which must follow the political transition in South Africa will pose major challenges for many decades. While it clear that inequities must be reduced, it is less clear how to effectively and sustainably achieve that end, especially given current rapid population growth and minimal additional resources in an economy which is growing less rapidly than hoped for by the new government. Health care reform is one of the country's many challenges. This paper provides insight into the shift from the conventional biomedical model of health care to the primary health care approach within a fixed public health budget. Obstacles to change, threats to academic activities, the 1980s and 1990s, political and social transition, health care reform since 1994, academic medicine and medical education, choices facing society, movement from political apartheid to economic apartheid, and public awareness are described.

  14. Germany: Health system review.

    PubMed

    Busse, Reinhard; Blümel, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    This analysis of the German health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. In the German health care system, decision-making powers are traditionally shared between national (federal) and state (Land) levels, with much power delegated to self-governing bodies. It provides universal coverage for a wide range of benefits. Since 2009, health insurance has been mandatory for all citizens and permanent residents, through either statutory or private health insurance. A total of 70 million people or 85% of the population are covered by statutory health insurance in one of 132 sickness funds in early 2014. Another 11% are covered by substitutive private health insurance. Characteristics of the system are free choice of providers and unrestricted access to all care levels. A key feature of the health care delivery system in Germany is the clear institutional separation between public health services, ambulatory care and hospital (inpatient) care. This has increasingly been perceived as a barrier to change and so provisions for integrated care are being introduced with the aim of improving cooperation between ambulatory physicians and hospitals. Germany invests a substantial amount of its resources on health care: 11.4% of gross domestic product in 2012, which is one of the highest levels in the European Union. In international terms, the German health care system has a generous benefit basket, one of the highest levels of capacity as well as relatively low cost-sharing. However, the German health care system still needs improvement in some areas, such as the quality of care. In addition, the division into statutory and private health insurance remains one of the largest challenges for the German health care system, as it leads to inequalities. PMID:25115137

  15. Systemic Reform: Defining Education in the '90s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasser, Judith Davidson

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on systemic reform with regard to standards and equity. Emphasizes the places of technology and curriculum in this reform. Concludes that bringing together different players in the educational system to help change practice and support new educational goals is a common goal of many reform efforts. (ASK)

  16. Toward an Anthropology of Insurance and Health Reform: An Introduction to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Dao, Amy; Mulligan, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    This article introduces a special issue of Medical Anthropology Quarterly on health insurance and health reform. We begin by reviewing anthropological contributions to the study of financial models for health care and then discuss the unique contributions offered by the articles of this collection. The contributors demonstrate how insurance accentuates--but does not resolve tensions between granting universal access to care and rationing limited resources, between social solidarity and individual responsibility, and between private markets and public goods. Insurance does not have a single meaning, logic, or effect but needs to be viewed in practice, in context, and from multiple vantage points. As the field of insurance studies in the social sciences grows and as health reforms across the globe continue to use insurance to restructure the organization of health care, it is incumbent on medical anthropologists to undertake a renewed and concerted study of health insurance and health systems. PMID:26698645

  17. Health care reform? An American obsession with prescriptive incrementalism.

    PubMed

    Broyles, R W; Falcone, D J

    1996-01-01

    A rounded evaluation of the national health insurance proposals that now seem to be taken seriously by political elites requires conceptual organization. This article adopts a typology that describes each major proposal as a social, mixed or a private insurance scheme depending on the source(s) of funding, method of compensating hospitals and physicians, the unit of payment, and mechanism for financing capital. Not surprisingly, the analysis suggests that the social insurance model, closely resembling the Canadian system, is more likely to control inflation and redress distributional inequities than are other approaches. Why, then, has this approach not been adopted? The answer may be found in the widespread acceptance of disjointed incrementalism as a valid description of the policy process which yields an ideological orientation that can be termed "prescriptive incrementalism." This orientation is closely related to a belief in an "American exceptionalism," a belief that is not warranted by a cross-sectional examination of the political culture infusing issues about the proper role of government in health care financing and delivery. Unfortunately for advocates, the truly exceptional factor restricting the United States' ability to effect national health reform is a quite delberately obstruction-oriented political structure.

  18. Steering without navigation equipment: the lamentable state of Australian health policy reform

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Commentary on health policy reform in Australia often commences with an unstated logical error: Australians' health is good, therefore the Australian Health System is good. This possibly explains the disconnect between the options discussed, the areas needing reform and the generally self-congratulatory tone of the discussion: a good system needs (relatively) minor improvement. Results This paper comments on some issues of particular concern to Australian health policy makers and some areas needing urgent reform. The two sets of issues do not overlap. It is suggested that there are two fundamental reasons for this. The first is the failure to develop governance structures which promote the identification and resolution of problems according to their importance. The second and related failure is the failure to equip the health services industry with satisfactory navigation equipment - independent research capacity, independent reporting and evaluation - on a scale commensurate with the needs of the country's largest industry. These two failures together deprive the health system - as a system - of the chief driver of progress in every successful industry in the 20th Century. Conclusion Concluding comment is made on the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission (NHHRC). This continued the tradition of largely evidence free argument and decision making. It failed to identify and properly analyse major system failures, the reasons for them and the form of governance which would maximise the likelihood of future error leaning. The NHHRC itself failed to error learn from past policy failures, a key lesson from which is that a major - and possibly the major - obstacle to reform, is government itself. The Commission virtually ignored the issue of governance. The endorsement of a monopolised system, driven by benevolent managers will miss the major lesson of history which is illustrated by Australia's own failures. PMID:19948044

  19. Health reform in Germany. An American assesses the new operating efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Weil, T P

    1994-09-01

    In 1993, responding to a $5.7 billion deficit among the country's third-party payers, the German parliament imposed mandatory global budgets for physician, hospital, dental, and pharmaceutical services. Although Germany had been able to maintain health spending at a lower rate than the United States, an excessive supply of health resources was beginning to drive prices higher. During the three years the global budgets are in place, German third-party payers (the "sickness funds") and providers will implement several fundamental reforms. These include: Reducing excessive supply of specialists Constraining the acquisition and utilization of expensive medical technologies Reducing the annual number of physician visits per person Reducing average hospital length of stay Integrating community- and hospital-based physician services Reducing payroll deductions for mandated benefits The 1993 reforms also impose a budgetary cap at the 1991 expenditure level for drugs prescribed by community-based physicians. In addition, the reforms call for the implementation of community-rated premiums and stipulate that Germans be able to select their sickness fund each year. Although the reforms make important changes, they leave the basic German healthcare system intact. It is difficult to imagine, moreover, that any of the reforms being implemented will in the foreseeable future place any major element of the health system in serious financial peril; in fact, they will help preserve the system.

  20. The informatics of health care reform.

    PubMed Central

    Masys, D R

    1996-01-01

    Health care in the United States has entered a period of economic upheaval. Episodic, fee-for-service care financed by indemnity insurance is being replaced by managed care financed by fixed-price, capitated health plans. The resulting focus on reducing costs, especially in areas where there is competition fueled by oversupply of health services providers and facilities, poses new threats to the livelihood of medical libraries and medical librarians but also offers new opportunities. Internet services, consumer health education, and health services research will grow in importance, and organizational mergers will provide librarians with opportunities to assume new roles within their organizations. PMID:8938325

  1. Patients' rights to care under Clinton's Health Security Act: the structure of reform.

    PubMed Central

    Mariner, W K

    1994-01-01

    Like most reform proposals, President Clinton's proposed Health Security Act offers universal access to care but does not significantly alter the nature of patients' legal rights to services. The act would create a system of delegated federal regulation in which the states would act like federal administrative agencies to carry out reform. To achieve uniform, universal coverage, the act would establish a form of mandatory health insurance, with federal law controlling the minimum services to which everyone would be entitled. Because there is no constitutionally protected right to health care and no independent constitutional standard for judging what insurance benefits are appropriate, the federal government would retain considerable freedom to decide what services would and would not be covered. If specific benefits are necessary for patients, they will have to be stated in the legislation that produces reform. PMID:8059899

  2. On the path to healthcare reform. The 78th Annual Catholic Health Assembly.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    A healthcare revolution is at hand, and not just in Washington, DC. The 78th Annual Catholic Health Assembly, held June 6 to 9 in New Orleans, drew 1,300 Catholic health providers from across the nation to explore the progress of healthcare reform--at the federal level, in state initiatives, and in cities across the nation where providers are collaborating to provide more comprehensive, cost-effective care. Culminating in an affirming address by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, the assembly afforded attendees opportunities to discuss the operational opportunities ahead, innovative care approaches, and strategies to maintain their Catholic identity and values under a reformed system.

  3. On the path to healthcare reform. The 78th Annual Catholic Health Assembly.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    A healthcare revolution is at hand, and not just in Washington, DC. The 78th Annual Catholic Health Assembly, held June 6 to 9 in New Orleans, drew 1,300 Catholic health providers from across the nation to explore the progress of healthcare reform--at the federal level, in state initiatives, and in cities across the nation where providers are collaborating to provide more comprehensive, cost-effective care. Culminating in an affirming address by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, the assembly afforded attendees opportunities to discuss the operational opportunities ahead, innovative care approaches, and strategies to maintain their Catholic identity and values under a reformed system. PMID:10183912

  4. Electoral reform and public policy outcomes in Thailand: the politics of the 30-Baht health scheme.

    PubMed

    Selway, Joel Sawat

    2011-01-01

    How do changes in electoral rules affect the nature of public policy outcomes? The current evidence supporting institutional theories that answer this question stems almost entirely from quantitative cross-country studies, the data of which contain very little within-unit variation. Indeed, while there are many country-level accounts of how changes in electoral rules affect such phenomena as the number of parties or voter turnout, there are few studies of how electoral reform affects public policy outcomes. This article contributes to this latter endeavor by providing a detailed analysis of electoral reform and the public policy process in Thailand through an examination of the 1997 electoral reforms. Specifically, the author examines four aspects of policy-making: policy formulation, policy platforms, policy content, and policy outcomes. The article finds that candidates in the pre-1997 era campaigned on broad, generic platforms; parties had no independent means of technical policy expertise; the government targeted health resources to narrow geographic areas; and health was underprovided in Thai society. Conversely, candidates in the post-1997 era relied more on a strong, detailed national health policy; parties created mechanisms to formulate health policy independently; the government allocated health resources broadly to the entire nation through the introduction of a universal health care system, and health outcomes improved. The author attributes these changes in the policy process to the 1997 electoral reform, which increased both constituency breadth (the proportion of the population to which politicians were accountable) and majoritarianism.

  5. Parental education and child health: evidence from a schooling reform.

    PubMed

    Lindeboom, Maarten; Llena-Nozal, Ana; van der Klaauw, Bas

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of parental education on child health outcomes. To identify the causal effect we explore exogenous variation in parental education induced by a schooling reform in 1947, which raised the minimum school leaving age in the UK. Findings based on data from the National Child Development Study suggest that increasing the school leaving age by 1 year had little effect on the health of their offspring. Schooling did however improve economic opportunities by reducing financial difficulties among households.

  6. Stepwise expansion of evidence-based care is needed for mental health reform.

    PubMed

    McGorry, Patrick D; Hamilton, Matthew P

    2016-05-16

    Mortality from mental illnesses is increasing and, because they frequently occur early in the life cycle, they are the largest source of disability and reduced economic productivity of all non-communicable diseases. Successful mental health reform can reduce the mortality, morbidity, growing welfare costs and losses in economic productivity caused by mental illness. The government has largely adopted the recommendations of the National Mental Health Commission focusing on early intervention and stepwise care and will implement a reform plan that involves devolving commissioning of federally funded mental health services to primary health networks, along with a greater emphasis on e-mental health. Stepwise expanded investment in and structural support (data collection, evaluation, model fidelity, workforce training) for evidence-based care that rectifies high levels of undertreatment are essential for these reforms to succeed. However, the reforms are currently constrained by a cost-containment policy framework that envisages no additional funding. The early intervention reform aim requires financing for the next stage of development of Australia's youth mental health system, rather than redirecting funds from existing evidence-based programs. People with complex, enduring mental disorders need more comprehensive care. In the context of the National Disability Insurance Scheme, there is a risk that these already seriously underserved patients may paradoxically receive a reduction in coverage. E-health has a key role to play at all stages of illness but must be integrated in a complementary way, rather than as a barrier to access. Research and evaluation are the keys to cost-effective, sustainable reform. PMID:27169969

  7. Health human resource reform in Tajikistan: part of a masterplan for change.

    PubMed

    Reamy, J; Gedik, G

    2001-01-01

    Like many countries of the former Soviet Union, the Republic of Tajikistan inherited a poorly paid physician workforce dominated by specialists. This Central Asian republic has been forced to move slowly to change the physician workforce and to implement primary health care. Several years of civil war following independence in 1991 made reform of the struggling health system politically and economically difficult. The civil war also resulted in a loss of health personnel, with significant numbers of physicians leaving the country. The low pay of health professionals caused others to move to higher paying jobs in non-health related professions. A comprehensive masterplan for the reform of the health care system that has been developed through a participatory process is in the process of formal approval. The human resources component of the health care reform masterplan calls for a shift to emphasize the role of primary health care and the introduction of family physicians (FPs) as the cornerstone of the primary health care. With only 90 family practice physicians trained in 2000, the country faces a massive task in retraining existing physicians and training new FPs. The first 40 medical students to enter training as FPs are scheduled for 2001. Retraining at the Post Graduate Institute will be supplemented in 2002 by programs in the three oblasts. To overcome the shortage of FPs a comprehensive job analysis and workload assessment will be conducted to redefine the role of health professionals and involve others in the provision of care. Historically nurses have not been allowed to perform to their full capability and physicians have performed tasks more suitable for mid-level personnel. A strategy to solve maldistribution problems and to develop incentives to stem the loss of physicians will be also implemented. While circumstances have forced the Republic of Tajikistan to move slower than other countries to reform the inefficient health system inherited from the

  8. Uzbekistan: health system review.

    PubMed

    Ahmedov, Mohir; Azimov, Ravshan; Mutalova, Zulkhumor; Huseynov, Shahin; Tsoyi, Elena; Rechel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Uzbekistan is a central Asian country that became independent in 1991 with the break-up of the Soviet Union. Since then, it has embarked on several major health reforms covering health care provision, governance and financing, with the aim of improving efficiency while ensuring equitable access. Primary care in rural areas has been changed to a two-tiered system, while specialized polyclinics in urban areas are being transformed into general polyclinics covering all groups of the urban population. Secondary care is financed on the basis of past expenditure and inputs (and increasingly self-financing through user fees), while financing of primary care is increasingly based on capitation. There are also efforts to improve allocative efficiency, with a slowly increasing share of resources devoted to the reformed primary health care system. Health care provision has largely remained in public ownership but nearly half of total health care expenditure comes from private sources, mostly in the form of out-of-pocket expenditure. There is a basic benefits package, which includes primary care, emergency care and care for certain disease and population categories. Yet secondary care and outpatient pharmaceuticals are not included in the benefits package for most of the population, and the reliance on private health expenditure results in inequities and catastrophic expenditure for households. While the share of public expenditure is slowly increasing, financial protection thus remains an area of concern. Quality of care is another area that is receiving increasing attention.

  9. Uzbekistan: health system review.

    PubMed

    Ahmedov, Mohir; Azimov, Ravshan; Mutalova, Zulkhumor; Huseynov, Shahin; Tsoyi, Elena; Rechel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Uzbekistan is a central Asian country that became independent in 1991 with the break-up of the Soviet Union. Since then, it has embarked on several major health reforms covering health care provision, governance and financing, with the aim of improving efficiency while ensuring equitable access. Primary care in rural areas has been changed to a two-tiered system, while specialized polyclinics in urban areas are being transformed into general polyclinics covering all groups of the urban population. Secondary care is financed on the basis of past expenditure and inputs (and increasingly self-financing through user fees), while financing of primary care is increasingly based on capitation. There are also efforts to improve allocative efficiency, with a slowly increasing share of resources devoted to the reformed primary health care system. Health care provision has largely remained in public ownership but nearly half of total health care expenditure comes from private sources, mostly in the form of out-of-pocket expenditure. There is a basic benefits package, which includes primary care, emergency care and care for certain disease and population categories. Yet secondary care and outpatient pharmaceuticals are not included in the benefits package for most of the population, and the reliance on private health expenditure results in inequities and catastrophic expenditure for households. While the share of public expenditure is slowly increasing, financial protection thus remains an area of concern. Quality of care is another area that is receiving increasing attention. PMID:25689490

  10. Harry and Louise and health care reform: romancing public opinion.

    PubMed

    Goldsteen, R L; Goldsteen, K; Swan, J H; Clemeña, W

    2001-12-01

    The question whether the "Harry and Louise" campaign ads, sponsored by the Health Insurance Association of America (HIAA) during the 1993-1994 health care reform debate, influenced public opinion has particular relevance today since interest groups are increasingly choosing commercial-style mass media campaigns to sway public opinion about health policy issues. Our study revisits the issue of the Harry and Louise campaign's influence on public opinion, comparing the ad campaign's messages to changes in opinion about health care reform over a twenty-six-month period in Oklahoma. Looking at the overall trends just prior to the introduction of the Harry and Louise campaign, public opinion was going in the "wrong" direction, from the HIAA perspective. Moreover, public opinion continued in the wrong direction until the mid-point of the campaign. However, in either the turning point of the campaign in terms of message content and tone or in the lag period following it, public opinion reversed on each health reform issue and returned to pre-campaign levels. It appears from these findings that the campaign captured public opinion when support for issues that were unfavorable to HIAA members was increasing and turned public opinion back to pre-campaign levels. The campaign may result in many more such marriages of political interest groups and commercial advertisers for the purpose of demobilizing public support for health policy initiatives that are unfavorable to special interests. PMID:11831582

  11. Health Care Reform: Ethical Foundations, Policy, and Law

    PubMed Central

    Sade, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Health care system reform has enormous implications for the future of American society and economic life. Since the early days of the republic, 2 world views have vied for determination of this country’s political system: the view of the individual as sovereign vs government as sovereign. As they developed the foundations of our nation’s governance, the founders were heavily influenced by the Enlightenment philosophy of the late 17th and 18th centuries—the US Constitution sharply limited the power of central government to specific narrowly defined functions, and the economic system was largely laissez faire, that is, economic exchange was mostly free of government regulation and securing individual liberty was a high priority. This situation has slowly reversed—the federal government originally was narrowly limited, but now it dominates states and individuals. The economic system has followed, lagging by several decades, so although it still retains some features of laissez faire capitalism, federal and state regulation have produced a decidedly mixed economy. PMID:22626914

  12. Switzerland: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    De Pietro, Carlo; Camenzind, Paul; Sturny, Isabelle; Crivelli, Luca; Edwards-Garavoglia, Suzanne; Spranger, Anne; Wittenbecher, Friedrich; Quentin, Wilm

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of the Swiss health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. The Swiss health system is highly complex, combining aspects of managed competition and corporatism (the integration of interest groups in the policy process) in a decentralized regulatory framework shaped by the influences of direct democracy. The health system performs very well with regard to a broad range of indicators. Life expectancy in Switzerland (82.8 years) is the highest in Europe after Iceland, and healthy life expectancy is several years above the European Union (EU) average. Coverage is ensured through mandatory health insurance (MHI), with subsidies for people on low incomes. The system offers a high degree of choice and direct access to all levels of care with virtually no waiting times, though managed care type insurance plans that include gatekeeping restrictions are becoming increasingly important. Public satisfaction with the system is high and quality is generally viewed to be good or very good. Reforms since the year 2000 have improved the MHI system, changed the financing of hospitals, strengthened regulations in the area of pharmaceuticals and the control of epidemics, and harmonized regulation of human resources across the country. In addition, there has been a slow (and not always linear) process towards more centralization of national health policy-making. Nevertheless, a number of challenges remain. The costs of the health care system are well above the EU average, in particular in absolute terms but also as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP) (11.5%). MHI premiums have increased more quickly than incomes since 2003. By European standards, the share of out-of-pocket payments is exceptionally high at 26% of total health expenditure (compared to the EU average of 16%). Low and middle-income households contribute a greater share of their income to

  13. Switzerland: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    De Pietro, Carlo; Camenzind, Paul; Sturny, Isabelle; Crivelli, Luca; Edwards-Garavoglia, Suzanne; Spranger, Anne; Wittenbecher, Friedrich; Quentin, Wilm

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of the Swiss health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. The Swiss health system is highly complex, combining aspects of managed competition and corporatism (the integration of interest groups in the policy process) in a decentralized regulatory framework shaped by the influences of direct democracy. The health system performs very well with regard to a broad range of indicators. Life expectancy in Switzerland (82.8 years) is the highest in Europe after Iceland, and healthy life expectancy is several years above the European Union (EU) average. Coverage is ensured through mandatory health insurance (MHI), with subsidies for people on low incomes. The system offers a high degree of choice and direct access to all levels of care with virtually no waiting times, though managed care type insurance plans that include gatekeeping restrictions are becoming increasingly important. Public satisfaction with the system is high and quality is generally viewed to be good or very good. Reforms since the year 2000 have improved the MHI system, changed the financing of hospitals, strengthened regulations in the area of pharmaceuticals and the control of epidemics, and harmonized regulation of human resources across the country. In addition, there has been a slow (and not always linear) process towards more centralization of national health policy-making. Nevertheless, a number of challenges remain. The costs of the health care system are well above the EU average, in particular in absolute terms but also as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP) (11.5%). MHI premiums have increased more quickly than incomes since 2003. By European standards, the share of out-of-pocket payments is exceptionally high at 26% of total health expenditure (compared to the EU average of 16%). Low and middle-income households contribute a greater share of their income to

  14. The Impact of Health Care and Immigration Reform on Latino Support for President Obama and Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Gabriel R.; Medeiros, Jillian; Sanchez-Youngman, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    At the start of their term, the Obama administration pledged to reform two failing policy systems in the United States: immigration and health care. The Latino populations' attitudes toward these two critical policy areas are particularly relevant due to the large foreign born population in the Latino community and the large number of Latinos who…

  15. Health and health systems performance in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Blair, Iain; Sharif, Amer

    2013-01-01

    In the early 2000s, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) had good levels of health and its health system was ranked twenty-seventh in the world by the World Health Organization. Since that time, to further improve the situation and to address cost and quality challenges, the UAE has embarked on an ambitious programme of health system reform. These reforms have focused on the introduction of private health insurance and encouraging the growth of private health provision. In these areas there have been impressive achievements but while it is too early to say whether these reforms are succeeding some anxieties are emerging. These include the rising cost of services with no obvious improvement in outcomes, a growth in hospital provision that may not best meet the needs of the population, rising levels of chronic disease risk factors and an insuffcient focus on public health services, public health leadership, health work-force planning and research. PMID:24683809

  16. New Zealand's mental health legislation needs reform to avoid discrimination.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sarah E; O'Brien, Anthony

    2014-09-26

    New Zealand's Mental Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act (the Act) is now over 20 years old. As has occurred historically our conceptualisation of humane treatment of people with mental illness has altered significantly over the period in which the Act has been in force. The emergence of the philosophy of recovery, and its subsequent policy endorsement, has seen a significant shift in mental health service delivery towards a greater emphasis on autonomy. Human rights developments such as New Zealand's ratification of the 2006 United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities have resulted in compulsory treatment, where it is justified in whole or part by a person's mental illness, now being considered antithetical to best practice, and discriminatory. However the number of people subject to the Act is increasing, especially in community settings, and it is questionable how effective the mechanisms for challenging compulsion are in practice. Moreover, monitoring of the situation at the systemic level lacks critical analysis. Complacency, including no indication that review and reform of this now antiquated legislation is nigh, continues a pattern of old where the situation of people with experience of mental illness is largely ignored and neglected.

  17. Malta: Health system review.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi Muscat, Natasha; Calleja, Neville; Calleja, Antoinette; Cylus, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This analysis of the Maltese health system reviews the developments in its organization and governance, health financing, health-care provision, health reforms and health system performance. The health system in Malta consists of a public sector, which is free at the point of service and provides a comprehensive basket of health services for all its citizens, and a private sector, which accounts for a third of total health expenditure and provides the majority of primary care. Maltese citizens enjoy one of the highest life expectancies in Europe. Nevertheless, non-communicable diseases pose a major concern with obesity being increasingly prevalent among both adults and children. The health system faces important challenges including a steadily ageing population, which impacts the sustainability of public finances. Other supply constraints stem from financial and infrastructural limitations. Nonetheless, there exists a strong political commitment to ensure the provision of a healthcare system that is accessible, of high quality, safe and also sustainable. This calls for strategic investments to underpin a revision of existing processes whilst shifting the focus of care away from hospital into the community.

  18. Safety net in the era of health reform: a new vision of care.

    PubMed

    2012-03-01

    The collection of services and providers that making up the safety net system plays a crucial role in providing health care to the nearly 50 million uninsured adults and children nationwide (Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured 2011a). Passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) presents both opportunities and significant challenges for this system. The health reform law will extend health insurance coverage to more than 30 million individuals by 2014. At the same time, it will invest significantly in building provider and clinic capacity, as well as in more coordinated and integrated care delivery systems (Summer 2011). This influx of patients will place increased demands on a system that is already experiencing capacity, financial, and workforce stressors. This issue brief focuses on some of the daily challenges facing the safety net, as well as new challenges and opportunities that will emerge as health reform unfolds. Philanthropy has long supported many aspects of the safety net, including developing the business and clinical structure and infrastructure, such as health information technology and strengthening the primary care and paraprofessional workforce. Philanthropy has also helped increase the capacity of community clinics and other safety net providers and expand the services associated with patient-centered care models to include translation, transportation, health literacy support, and community prevention. This paper highlights some of these efforts, and outlines areas of opportunity for funder investment in the safety net in this era of health reform.

  19. Viewpoint: Prevention is missing: is China's health reform reform for health?

    PubMed

    Yang, Le; Zhang, Xiaoli; Tan, Tengfei; Cheng, Jingmin

    2015-02-01

    Ancient China emphasized disease prevention. As a Chinese saying goes, 'it is more important to prevent the disease than to cure it'. Traditional Chinese medicine posits that diseases can be understood, thus, prevented. In today's China, the state of people's health seems worse than in the past. Thus the Chinese government undertook the creation of a new health system. Alas, we believe the results are not very satisfactory. The government seems to have overlooked rational allocation between resources for treatment and prevention. Public investment has been gradually limited to the domain of treatment. We respond to this trend, highlighting the importance of prevention and call for government and policymakers to adjust health policy and work out a solution suitable for improving the health of China's people. PMID:25274124

  20. Experience of the Veterans Health Administration in Massachusetts after state health care reform.

    PubMed

    Chan, Stephanie H; Burgess, James F; Clark, Jack A; Mayo-Smith, Michael F

    2014-11-01

    Starting in 2006, Massachusetts enacted a series of health insurance reforms that successfully led to 96.6% of its population being covered by 2011. As the rest of the nation undertakes similar reforms, it is unknown how the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), one of many important Federal health care programs, will be affected. Our state-level study approach assessed the effects of health reform on utilization of VHA services in Massachusetts from 2005 to 2011. Models were adjusted for state-level demographic and economic characteristics, including health insurance rates, unemployment rates, median household income, poverty rates, and percent of population 65 years and older. No statistically significant associative change was observed in Massachusetts relative to other states over this time period. The findings raise important questions about the continuing role of VHA in American health care as health insurance coverage is one of many factors that influence decisions on where to seek health care. PMID:25373056

  1. Education and health knowledge: evidence from UK compulsory schooling reform.

    PubMed

    Johnston, David W; Lordan, Grace; Shields, Michael A; Suziedelyte, Agne

    2015-02-01

    We investigate if there is a causal link between education and health knowledge using data from the 1984/85 and 1991/92 waves of the UK Health and Lifestyle Survey (HALS). Uniquely, the survey asks respondents what they think are the main causes of ten common health conditions, and we compare these answers to those given by medical professionals to form an index of health knowledge. For causal identification we use increases in the UK minimum school leaving age in 1947 (from 14 to 15) and 1972 (from 15 to 16) to provide exogenous variation in education. These reforms predominantly induced adolescents who would have left school to stay for one additionally mandated year. OLS estimates suggest that education significantly increases health knowledge, with a one-year increase in schooling increasing the health knowledge index by 15% of a standard deviation. In contrast, estimates from instrumental-variable models show that increased schooling due to the education reforms did not significantly affect health knowledge. This main result is robust to numerous specification tests and alternative formulations of the health knowledge index. Further research is required to determine whether there is also no causal link between higher levels of education - such as post-school qualifications - and health knowledge. PMID:25459203

  2. Education and health knowledge: evidence from UK compulsory schooling reform.

    PubMed

    Johnston, David W; Lordan, Grace; Shields, Michael A; Suziedelyte, Agne

    2015-02-01

    We investigate if there is a causal link between education and health knowledge using data from the 1984/85 and 1991/92 waves of the UK Health and Lifestyle Survey (HALS). Uniquely, the survey asks respondents what they think are the main causes of ten common health conditions, and we compare these answers to those given by medical professionals to form an index of health knowledge. For causal identification we use increases in the UK minimum school leaving age in 1947 (from 14 to 15) and 1972 (from 15 to 16) to provide exogenous variation in education. These reforms predominantly induced adolescents who would have left school to stay for one additionally mandated year. OLS estimates suggest that education significantly increases health knowledge, with a one-year increase in schooling increasing the health knowledge index by 15% of a standard deviation. In contrast, estimates from instrumental-variable models show that increased schooling due to the education reforms did not significantly affect health knowledge. This main result is robust to numerous specification tests and alternative formulations of the health knowledge index. Further research is required to determine whether there is also no causal link between higher levels of education - such as post-school qualifications - and health knowledge.

  3. Public sector reform and demand for human resources for health (HRH).

    PubMed

    Lethbridge, Jane

    2004-11-23

    This article considers some of the effects of health sector reform on human resources for health (HRH) in developing countries and countries in transition by examining the effect of fiscal reform and the introduction of decentralisation and market mechanisms to the health sector.Fiscal reform results in pressure to measure the staff outputs of the health sector. Financial decentralisation often leads to hospitals becoming "corporatised" institutions, operating with business principles but remaining in the public sector. The introduction of market mechanisms often involves the formation of an internal market within the health sector and market testing of different functions with the private sector. This has immediate implications for the employment of health workers in the public sector, because the public sector may reduce its workforce if services are purchased from other sectors or may introduce more short-term and temporary employment contracts.Decentralisation of budgets and administrative functions can affect the health sector, often in negative ways, by reducing resources available and confusing lines of accountability for health workers. Governance and regulation of health care, when delivered by both public and private providers, require new systems of regulation.The increase in private sector provision has led health workers to move to the private sector. For those remaining in the public sector, there are often worsening working conditions, a lack of employment security and dismantling of collective bargaining agreements.Human resource development is gradually being recognised as crucial to future reforms and the formulation of health policy. New information systems at local and regional level will be needed to collect data on human resources. New employment arrangements, strengthening organisational culture, training and continuing education will also be needed. PMID:15560841

  4. Public sector reform and demand for human resources for health (HRH)

    PubMed Central

    Lethbridge, Jane

    2004-01-01

    This article considers some of the effects of health sector reform on human resources for health (HRH) in developing countries and countries in transition by examining the effect of fiscal reform and the introduction of decentralisation and market mechanisms to the health sector. Fiscal reform results in pressure to measure the staff outputs of the health sector. Financial decentralisation often leads to hospitals becoming "corporatised" institutions, operating with business principles but remaining in the public sector. The introduction of market mechanisms often involves the formation of an internal market within the health sector and market testing of different functions with the private sector. This has immediate implications for the employment of health workers in the public sector, because the public sector may reduce its workforce if services are purchased from other sectors or may introduce more short-term and temporary employment contracts. Decentralisation of budgets and administrative functions can affect the health sector, often in negative ways, by reducing resources available and confusing lines of accountability for health workers. Governance and regulation of health care, when delivered by both public and private providers, require new systems of regulation. The increase in private sector provision has led health workers to move to the private sector. For those remaining in the public sector, there are often worsening working conditions, a lack of employment security and dismantling of collective bargaining agreements. Human resource development is gradually being recognised as crucial to future reforms and the formulation of health policy. New information systems at local and regional level will be needed to collect data on human resources. New employment arrangements, strengthening organisational culture, training and continuing education will also be needed. PMID:15560841

  5. Integration of care systems in Portugal: anatomy of recent reforms

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Silvina; Szczygiel, Nina; Redondo, Patrícia

    2014-01-01

    Background Integrated care is increasingly present in the agenda of policy-makers, health professionals and researchers as a way to improve care services in relation to access, quality, user satisfaction and efficiency. These are overarching objectives of most sectoral reforms. However, health care and social care services and systems are more and more dependent on the performance of each other, imposing the logic of network. Demographic, epidemiologic and cultural changes result in pressure to increase efficiency and efficacy of services and organisations in both sectors and that is why integrated care has become so relevant in the last years. Methods We first used concept maps to organise and systematise information that we had gathered through deep literature review in order to set a framework where to base the subsequent work. Then, we interviewed informants at several levels of the health and social care systems and we built a list of major recent reforms addressing integrated care in Portugal. In a third step, we conducted two independent focus groups where those reforms were discussed and evaluated within the context of the concepts and frameworks identified from the literature. Results were confronted and reconciled, giving place to a list of requisites and guidelines that oriented further search for documentation on those reforms. Results Several important health reforms are in course in primary and hospital care in Portugal, while a so-called third level of care has been introduced with the launch of the National Network of Long-Term Integrated Care (RNCCI – Rede Nacional de Cuidados Continuados Integrados). The social care sector has itself been a subject of alternative models springing from opposite political orientations. All these changes are having repercussions on the way the systems work with each other as they are leading to ongoing and ill-evaluated reformulations on the way they are governed, financed, structured and operated. Conclusions Care

  6. Latin American health policy and additive reform: the case of Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, J L

    1985-01-01

    Until the mid-1960s, the market-based, dependent-development-conditioned structure of Latin American health systems reflected the skewed distribution of wealth in the region: most (including government) health resources were found in curative care medicine and were concentrated in the capital cities, where they primarily served the needs of the elite. But for many countries of the area, the 1964 PAHO-led efforts to introduce health planning, intended as a first step in rationalizing the health sector, marked a fundamental turning point in the structural development of their delivery systems. Since then, this commitment has been reaffirmed in the Latin American Ministers of Health's 1973 adoption of the primary care approach as the cornerstone of their national health plans, and their ongoing endorsement and pursuit of "Health For All by 2000." Guatemala, however, was and remains an exception. Guatemalan technocrats have proven unable to plan effectively. But, far more fundamentally, the Guatemalan oligarchy has proven unwilling to appropriate the resources necessary to effect change. The reforms that have been made have been the products of bilateral and multilateral agencies, which have conceptualized, promoted, designed, built, and underwritten them. Those changes have not altered the fundamental structure of the system, but instead have been tacked onto it, and exemplify what may be termed "additive reform." Evidence suggests that without the continued sponsorship, support, and guidance of the bilateral and multilateral agencies, even these "reforms" will prove evanescent.

  7. Progressive segmented health insurance: Colombian health reform and access to health services.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Fernando; Amaya, Liliana; Venegas, Stella

    2007-01-01

    Equal access for poor populations to health services is a comprehensive objective for any health reform. The Colombian health reform addressed this issue through a segmented progressive social health insurance approach. The strategy was to assure universal coverage expanding the population covered through payroll linked insurance, and implementing a subsidized insurance program for the poorest populations, those not affiliated through formal employment. A prospective study was performed to follow-up health service utilization and out-of-pocket expenses using a cohort design. It was representative of four Colombian cities (Cendex Health Services Use and Expenditure Study, 2001). A four part econometric model was applied. The model related medical service utilization and medication with different socioeconomic, geographic, and risk associated variables. Results showed that subsidized health insurance improves health service utilization and reduces the financial burden for the poorest, as compared to those non-insured. Other social health insurance schemes preserved high utilization with variable out-of-pocket expenditures. Family and age conditions have significant effect on medical service utilization. Geographic variables play a significant role in hospital inpatient service utilization. Both, geographic and income variables also have significant impact on out-of-pocket expenses. Projected utilization rates and a simulation favor a dual policy for two-stage income segmented insurance to progress towards the universal insurance goal. PMID:16929487

  8. Equity in health care access to: assessing the urban health insurance reform in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gordon G; Zhao, Zhongyun; Cai, Renhua; Yamada, Tetsuji; Yamada, Tadashi

    2002-11-01

    This study evaluates changes in access to health care in response to the pilot experiment of urban health insurance reform in China. The pilot reform began in Zhenjiang and Jiujiang cities in 1994, followed by an expansion to 57 other cities in 1996, and finally to a nationwide campaign in the end of 1998. Specifically, this study examines the pre- and post-reform changes in the likelihood of obtaining various health care services across sub-population groups with different socioeconomic status and health conditions, in an attempt to shed light on the impact of reform on both vertical and horizontal equity measures in health care utilization. Empirical estimates were obtained in an econometric model using data from the annual surveys conducted in Zhenjiang City from 1994 through 1996. The main findings are as follows. Before the insurance reform, the likelihood of obtaining basic care at outpatient setting was much higher for those with higher income, education, and job status at work, indicating a significant measure of horizontal inequity against the lower socioeconomic groups. On the other hand, there was no evidence suggesting vertical inequity against people of chronic disease conditions in access to care at various settings. After the reform, the new insurance plan led to a significant increase in outpatient care utilization by the lower socioeconomic groups, making a great contribution to achieving horizontal equity in access to basic care. The new plan also has maintained the measure of vertical equity in the use of all types of care. Despite reform, people with poor socioeconomic status continue to be disadvantaged in accessing expensive and advanced diagnostic technologies. In conclusion, the reform model has demonstrated promising advantages over pre-reform insurance programs in many aspects, especially in the improvement of equity in access to basic care provided at outpatient settings. It also appears to be more efficient overall in allocating health

  9. Oregon's experiment in health care delivery and payment reform: coordinated care organizations replacing managed care.

    PubMed

    Howard, Steven W; Bernell, Stephanie L; Yoon, Jangho; Luck, Jeff; Ranit, Claire M

    2015-02-01

    To control Medicaid costs, improve quality, and drive community engagement, the Oregon Health Authority introduced a new system of coordinated care organizations (CCOs). While CCOs resemble traditional Medicaid managed care, they have differences that have been deliberately designed to improve care coordination, increase accountability, and incorporate greater community governance. Reforms include global budgets integrating medical, behavioral, and oral health care and public health functions; risk-adjusted payments rewarding outcomes and evidence-based practice; increased transparency; and greater community engagement. The CCO model faces several implementation challenges. If successful, it will provide improved health care delivery, better health outcomes, and overall savings.

  10. Medical Malpractice Reform and Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance Premiums

    PubMed Central

    Morrisey, Michael A; Kilgore, Meredith L; Nelson, Leonard (Jack)

    2008-01-01

    Objective Tort reform may affect health insurance premiums both by reducing medical malpractice premiums and by reducing the extent of defensive medicine. The objective of this study is to estimate the effects of noneconomic damage caps on the premiums for employer-sponsored health insurance. Data Sources/Study Setting Employer premium data and plan/establishment characteristics were obtained from the 1999 through 2004 Kaiser/HRET Employer Health Insurance Surveys. Damage caps were obtained and dated based on state annotated codes, statutes, and judicial decisions. Study Design Fixed effects regression models were run to estimate the effects of the size of inflation-adjusted damage caps on the weighted average single premiums. Data Collection/Extraction Methods State tort reform laws were identified using Westlaw, LEXIS, and statutory compilations. Legislative repeal and amendment of statutes and court decisions resulting in the overturning or repealing state statutes were also identified using LEXIS. Principal Findings Using a variety of empirical specifications, there was no statistically significant evidence that noneconomic damage caps exerted any meaningful influence on the cost of employer-sponsored health insurance. Conclusions The findings suggest that tort reforms have not translated into insurance savings. PMID:18522666

  11. Federal mandatory spending caps vital for health care reform.

    PubMed

    Domenici, P V

    1992-01-01

    Rising health spending creates an increasing burden on families, businesses, and government. Federal health spending--chiefly on Medicare and Medicaid--is a major contributor to a budget deficit that threatens to exceed $400 billion. In order to control that deficit, the President and the Congress must cap mandatory spending, excluding Social Security. In turn, policymakers should adopt health reforms to fit spending within the cap including enrolling more consumers in managed care plans, resolving medical liability disputes in arbitration instead of courts, and increasing assessment of research into cost-effective new technology.

  12. Behavioral Health and Health Care Reform Models: Patient-Centered Medical Home, Health Home, and Accountable Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-01-01

    Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools – accountability measures and payment designs – to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs. PMID:23188486

  13. Turkey. Health system review.

    PubMed

    Tatar, Mehtap; Mollahaliloğlu, Salih; Sahin, Bayram; Aydin, Sabahattin; Maresso, Anna; Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Turkey has accomplished remarkable improvements in terms of health status in the last three decades, particularly after the implementation of the Health Transformation Program (HTP (Saglikta Donus, um Programi)). Average life expectancy reached 71.8 for men and 76.8 for women in 2010. The infant mortality rate (IMR) decreased to 10.1 per 1000 live births in 2010, down from 117.5 in 1980. Despite these achievements, there are still discrepancies in terms of infant mortality between rural and urban areas and different parts of the country, although these have been diminishing over the years. The higher infant mortality rates in rural areas can be attributed to low socioeconomic conditions, low female education levels and the prevalence of infectious diseases. The main causes of death are diseases of the circulatory system followed by malignant neoplasms. Turkeys health care system has been undergoing a far-reaching reform process (HTP) since 2003 and radical changes have occurred both in the provision and the financing of health care services. Health services are now financed through a social security scheme covering the majority of the population, the General Health Insurance Scheme (GHIS (Genel Saglik Sigortasi)), and services are provided both by public and private sector facilities. The Social Security Institution (SSI (Sosyal Guvenlik Kurumu)), financed through payments by employers and employees and government contributions in cases of budget deficit, has become a monopsonic (single buyer) power on the purchasing side of health care services. On the provision side, the Ministry of Health (Saglik Bakenligi) is the main actor and provides primary, secondary and tertiary care through its facilities across the country. Universities are also major providers of tertiary care. The private sector has increased its range over recent years, particularly after arrangements paved the way for private sector provision of services to the SSI. The most important reforms since

  14. The National Health Service reforms as an electoral issue in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Barraclough, S

    1993-01-01

    The implementation of National Health Service (NHS) reforms left the Conservative Government with a major electoral problem. As Britain approached the 1992 general election, opinion polls revealed a popular perception that the Conservatives were planning to privatise the NHS. This perception was both fuelled and acted upon by the Labour Opposition which, at its 1991 annual conference, signalled its intention to make the health service a major item on the electoral agenda. In this article several issues associated with popular perceptions of the health reforms are explored including increased levels of copayment, the language of commerce, entrepreneurial activities within the NHS, and 'opting out'. The ways in which the Labour Party sought to place health on the electoral agenda are examined, together with the response of the government. Labour sought to portray the reforms as creeping privatisation while the Conservatives dismissed this as a crude propaganda ploy and have stressed their commitment to a more effective NHS. It is argued that the British experience exemplifies the perennial problems for any government seeking to introduce substantive changes to a national health system in a partisan political environment: the need to explain changes and legitimize them, and the danger that reforms will be politicized by an opposition eager for issues with immediate popular impact.

  15. Health care reform in Portugal: an evaluation of the NHS experience.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Mónica Duarte; Pinto, Carlos Gouveia

    2005-09-01

    Since 1979, the Portuguese health care system has been based on a National Health Service structure that is expected to promote equity, efficiency, quality, accountability and the devolution of power. In this article, we analyse the content and impact of policies designed to reform the system between 1979 and 2002. This article differs from previous studies in that it uses a stage-based framework to evaluate the policy-making process and the impact of health care reform throughout different political cycles. We show that the NHS model has never been fully implemented and that many policies have diverted the system from its original objectives. Different governments have endorsed a progressive split between financing and provision and the institution of 'new public management' rules in public providers. We conclude that most policies put forward by Social Democratic governments have aimed at influencing demand, while Socialist governments have targeted the supply side. These policies have led to increases in health expenditure that have been comparatively more cost-shared by the State under Socialist governments. We show some overriding trends, namely as follows: despite huge improvements in health outcomes, the system is nonetheless lasting to meet its goals, particularly in terms of the equity of access and utilisation; accountability problems, inadequacies in the use of operational reforming tools (such as resource allocation mechanisms) and a lack of mechanisms to promote efficient behaviour, are all associated with cost containment problems. Structural reforms have been undertaken since 2002 and these have offered some potential for improving accountability and efficiency. Nonetheless, the success of these reforms calls for certain conditions that do not seem to have been fulfilled.

  16. Community Participation in New Mexico's Behavioral Health Care Reform

    PubMed Central

    Kano, Miria; Willging, Cathleen E.; Rylko-Bauer, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    In 2005, New Mexico implemented a unique reform in managed behavioral health services that seeks to ensure delivery of consumer-driven, recovery-oriented care to low-income individuals. Distinguishing features of the reform are the Local Collaboratives (LCs), regionally based community organizations designed by state government to represent behavioral health concerns of New Mexico's diverse cultural populations. We examine community response to the LCs, focusing on two broad sets of themes derived from 18 months of ethnographic fieldwork. The first set—structure and function—encompasses several issues: predominance of provider versus consumer voice; insufficient resources to support internal operations; imposition of state administrative demands; and perceived lack of state response to LC efforts. The second set—participation and collaboration—reveals how problems of information flow and other logistical factors impact involvement in LCs and how the construction of “community” introduced under this initiative exacerbates tensions across localities with varied histories and populations. PMID:19764315

  17. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010: reforming the health care reform for the new decade.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Caraway, David L; Parr, Allan T; Fellows, Bert; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2011-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (the ACA, for short) became law with President Obama's signature on March 23, 2010. It represents the most significant transformation of the American health care system since Medicare and Medicaid. It is argued that it will fundamentally change nearly every aspect of health care, from insurance to the final delivery of care. The length and complexity of the legislation and divisive and heated debates have led to massive confusion about the impact of ACA. It also became one of the centerpieces of 2010 congressional campaigns. Essentials of ACA include: 1) a mandate for individuals and businesses requiring as a matter of law that nearly every American have an approved level of health insurance or pay a penalty; 2) a system of federal subsidies to completely or partially pay for the now required health insurance for about 34 million Americans who are currently uninsured - subsidized through Medicaid and exchanges; 3) extensive new requirements on the health insurance industry; and 4) numerous regulations on the practice of medicine. The act is divided into 10 titles. It contains provisions that went into effect starting on June 21, 2010, with the majority of provisions going into effect in 2014 and later. The perceived major impact on practicing physicians in the ACA is related to growing regulatory authority with the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) and the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). In addition to these specifics is a growth of the regulatory regime in association with further discounts in physician reimbursement. With regards to cost controls and projections, many believe that the ACA does not fix the finances of our health care system - neither public nor private. It has been suggested that the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) and the administration have used creative accounting to arrive at an alleged deficit reduction; however, if everything is included appropriately and

  18. A conversation with Donald Berwick on implementing national health reform.

    PubMed

    Berwick, Donald

    2012-08-01

    Michael Birnbaum interviews Donald Berwick shortly after his departure from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services about the national health care landscape. Berwick discusses the strategic vision, policy levers, operational challenges, and political significance of federal health care reform. He rejects the notion that the Affordable Care Act represents a government takeover of health care financing or service delivery but says the law's Medicaid expansion and its creation of health benefit exchanges present a "watershed moment for American federalism." Berwick argues that the solution to Medicare's cost-containment challenge lies in quality improvement. He is optimistic that accountable care organizations can deliver savings and suggests that shifting risk downstream to providers throws the health insurance model into question. Finally, looking to the future, Berwick sees a race against time to make American health care more affordable.

  19. Health care reform and change in public-private mix of financing: a Korean case.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyoung-Sun

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the changes in the Korean health care system invoked by the reform (in the latter part of 2000) in regard to the separation of drug prescription and dispensation, especially from the point of view of the public-private financing mix. It seeks particularly to estimate and analyse the relative financing mix in terms of both modes of production and types of medical provider. The data used to estimate health care expenditure financed by out-of-pocket expenditure by were sourced from the National Health and Nutritional Survey (conducted by interviewing representatives of households) and the General Household Survey (a household diary survey). National Health Insurance data, etc. were used to estimate health expenditure financed by public sources. This study concentrates on the short-run empirical links between the reform and the public-private mix in finance. The reform increased remarkably the public share in total health expenditure. This public share increase has been prominent particularly in the case of expenditure on drugs since the reform has absorbed much of the previously uncovered drugs into the National Health Insurance coverage. However, a higher public share in medical goods than in out-patient care would raise an issue in terms of prioritization of benefit packages. The five-fold increase in the public share of expenditure at pharmacies reflects not only the fact that drugs previously not covered by NHI are covered now but also the fact that prescribed drugs are currently purchased mainly at pharmacies, as opposed to in doctors' clinics, as a result of the reform. PMID:16153474

  20. Failure of health care reform in the USA.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, D

    1996-01-01

    The failure of health reform in the USA reflects the individualism and lack of community responsibility of the American political culture, the power of interest groups, and the extraordinary process President Clinton followed in developing his highly elaborate plan. Despite considerable initial public support and a strong start, the reform effort was damaged by the cumbersome process, the complexity of the plan itself, and the unfamiliarity of key components such as alliances for pooled buying of health insurance. In addition, the alienation of important interest groups and the loss of presidential initiative in framing the public discussion as a result of international, domestic and personal issues contributed to the failure in developing public consensus. This paper considers an alternative strategy that would have built on the extension of the Medicare program as a way of exploring the possibilities and barriers to achieving health care reform. Such an approach would build on already familiar and popular pre-existing components. The massive losses in the most recent election and large budget cuts planned by the Republican majority makes it unlikely that gaps in insurance or comprehensiveness of coverage will be corrected in the foreseeable future.

  1. Adopting and adapting managed competition: health care reform in Southern Europe.

    PubMed

    Cabiedes, L; Guillén, A

    2001-04-01

    A new paradigm appeared in Europe in the early 1990 s regarding the reform of health care systems. This paradigm has come to be known as the managed competition paradigm, among other terms. First introduced in Great Britain, it entails the separation of the financing/purchasing and providing functions, so that competition among providers is enhanced, while maintaining universal access and public financing, at least in principle. This article explores to what extent such paradigm has been emulated within the Greek, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish health care systems. Reform in the direction of managed competition may be ascertained in all four countries. However, each country has emphasized different aspects of the paradigm, and the degree and rhythm of implementation of reform has varied. The article considers the circumstances under which the new paradigm was born, and its main characteristics; analyzes actual reforms in Southern European countries; and provides a tentative explanation of the diffusion mechanisms. It concludes that the crucial factor explaining the different paths of policy adoption and adaptation is the character of the initial health care system.

  2. [The health system of Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Bonvecchio, Anabelle; Becerril-Montekio, Victor; Carriedo-Lutzenkirchen, Angela; Landaeta-Jiménez, Maritza

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the Venezuelan health system, including its structure and coverage, financial sources, human and material resources and its stewardship functions. This system comprises a public and a private sector. The public sector includes the Ministry of Popular Power for Health (MS) and several social security institutions, salient among them the Venezuelan Institute for Social Security (IVSS). The MH is financed with federal, state and county contributions. The IVSS is financed with employer, employee and government contributions. These two agencies provide services in their own facilities. The private sector includes providers offering services on an out-of-pocket basis and private insurance companies. The Venezuelan health system is undergoing a process of reform since the adoption of the 1999 Constitution which calls for the establishment of a national public health system. The reform process is now headed by the Barrio Adentro program. PMID:21877092

  3. [The health system of Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Bonvecchio, Anabelle; Becerril-Montekio, Victor; Carriedo-Lutzenkirchen, Angela; Landaeta-Jiménez, Maritza

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the Venezuelan health system, including its structure and coverage, financial sources, human and material resources and its stewardship functions. This system comprises a public and a private sector. The public sector includes the Ministry of Popular Power for Health (MS) and several social security institutions, salient among them the Venezuelan Institute for Social Security (IVSS). The MH is financed with federal, state and county contributions. The IVSS is financed with employer, employee and government contributions. These two agencies provide services in their own facilities. The private sector includes providers offering services on an out-of-pocket basis and private insurance companies. The Venezuelan health system is undergoing a process of reform since the adoption of the 1999 Constitution which calls for the establishment of a national public health system. The reform process is now headed by the Barrio Adentro program.

  4. United States Health Care Reform Progress to Date and Next Steps

    PubMed Central

    Obama, Barack

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The Affordable Care Act is the most important health care legislation enacted in the United States since the creation of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. The law implemented comprehensive reforms designed to improve the accessibility, affordability, and quality of health care. OBJECTIVES To review the factors influencing the decision to pursue health reform, summarize evidence on the effects of the law to date, recommend actions that could improve the health care system, and identify general lessons for public policy from the Affordable Care Act. EVIDENCE Analysis of publicly available data, data obtained from government agencies, and published research findings. The period examined extends from 1963 to early 2016. FINDINGS The Affordable Care Act has made significant progress toward solving long-standing challenges facing the US health care system related to access, affordability, and quality of care. Since the Affordable Care Act became law, the uninsured rate has declined by 43%, from 16.0% in 2010 to 9.1% in 2015, primarily because of the law’s reforms. Research has documented accompanying improvements in access to care (for example, an estimated reduction in the share of nonelderly adults unable to afford care of 5.5 percentage points), financial security (for example, an estimated reduction in debts sent to collection of $600–$1000 per person gaining Medicaid coverage), and health (for example, an estimated reduction in the share of nonelderly adults reporting fair or poor health of 3.4 percentage points). The law has also begun the process of transforming health care payment systems, with an estimated 30% of traditional Medicare payments now flowing through alternative payment models like bundled payments or accountable care organizations. These and related reforms have contributed to a sustained period of slow growth in per-enrollee health care spending and improvements in health care quality. Despite this progress, major opportunities to

  5. Estonia: health system review.

    PubMed

    Lai, Taavi; Habicht, Triin; Kahur, Kristiina; Reinap, Marge; Kiivet, Raul; van Ginneken, Ewout

    2013-01-01

    This analysis of the Estonian health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health-care provision, health reforms and health system performance. Without doubt, the main issue has been the 2008 financial crisis. Although Estonia has managed the downturn quite successfully and overall satisfaction with the system remains high, it is hard to predict the longer-term effects of the austerity package. The latter included some cuts in benefits and prices, increased cost sharing for certain services, extended waiting times, and a reduction in specialized care. In terms of health outcomes, important progress was made in life expectancy, which is nearing the European Union (EU) average, and infant mortality. Improvements are necessary in smoking and alcohol consumption, which are linked to the majority of avoidable diseases. Although the health behaviour of the population is improving, large disparities between groups exist and obesity rates, particularly among young people, are increasing. In health care, the burden of out-of-pocket payments is still distributed towards vulnerable groups. Furthermore, the number of hospitals, hospital beds and average length of stay has decreased to the EU average level, yet bed occupancy rates are still below EU averages and efficiency advances could be made. Going forwards, a number of pre-crisis challenges remain. These include ensuring sustainability of health care financing, guaranteeing a sufficient level of human resources, prioritizing patient-centred health care, integrating health and social care services, implementing intersectoral action to promote healthy behaviour, safeguarding access to health care for lower socioeconomic groups, and, lastly, improving evaluation and monitoring tools across the health system. PMID:24334730

  6. Greece: Health system review.

    PubMed

    Economou, Charalambos

    2010-01-01

    financing and equity in access to health care services. Efficiency is in question due to the lack of incentives to improve performance in the public sector. Mechanisms for needs assessment and priority-setting are underdeveloped and, as a consequence, the regional distribution of health resources is unequal. Centralization of the system is coupled with a lack of planning and coordination, and limited managerial and administrative capacity. In addition, the oversupply of physicians, the absence of a referral system, and irrational pricing and reimbursement policies are factors encouraging under-the-table payments and the black economy. These shortcomings result in low satisfaction with the health care system expressed by citizens. The landmark in the development of the Greek health care system was the creation of the national health system (ESY) in 1983. This report describes the development of the ESY at the structural level and generally, the process of implementing reforms. The strategic targets of health reform initiatives have been to structure a unified health care sector along the lines of the original ESY proposal and to cope with current inefficiencies. However, the three reforms attempted in the 1990s were never fully implemented, while the ambitious reform project of the period 2000–2004, which provided for the regionalization of the system, new management structures, prospective reimbursement, new employment conditions for hospital doctors, modernization of public health services and reorganization of primary health care, was abolished after the elections of 2004 and a change in government. While the new strategy, launched in 2005 with the stated aims of securing the financial viability of the health care system in the short term and its sustainability in the long term, addressed specific weaknesses, it has been rather controversial: the introduction of a centralized administrative public procurement system, the development of public–private partnerships

  7. Benchmarks of fairness for health care reform: a policy tool for developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, N.; Bryant, J.; Castano, R. A.; Dantes, O. G.; Khan, K. S.; Pannarunothai, S.

    2000-01-01

    Teams of collaborators from Colombia, Mexico, Pakistan, and Thailand have adapted a policy tool originally developed for evaluating health insurance reforms in the United States into "benchmarks of fairness" for assessing health system reform in developing countries. We describe briefly the history of the benchmark approach, the tool itself, and the uses to which it may be put. Fairness is a wide term that includes exposure to risk factors, access to all forms of care, and to financing. It also includes efficiency of management and resource allocation, accountability, and patient and provider autonomy. The benchmarks standardize the criteria for fairness. Reforms are then evaluated by scoring according to the degree to which they improve the situation, i.e. on a scale of -5 to 5, with zero representing the status quo. The object is to promote discussion about fairness across the disciplinary divisions that keep policy analysts and the public from understanding how trade-offs between different effects of reforms can affect the overall fairness of the reform. The benchmarks can be used at both national and provincial or district levels, and we describe plans for such uses in the collaborating sites. A striking feature of the adaptation process is that there was wide agreement on this ethical framework among the collaborating sites despite their large historical, political and cultural differences. PMID:10916911

  8. Austria: health system review.

    PubMed

    Hofmarcher, Maria M; Quentin, Wilm

    2013-01-01

    This analysis of the Austrian health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health-care provision, health reforms and health-system performance. The Austrian health system provides universal coverage for a wide range of benefits and high-quality care. Free choice of providers and unrestricted access to all care levels (general practitioners, specialist physicians and hospitals) are characteristic features of the system. Unsurprisingly, population satisfaction is well above EU average. Income-related inequality in health has increased since 2005, although it is still relatively low compared to other countries. The health-care system has been shaped by both the federal structure of the state and a tradition of delegating responsibilities to self-governing stakeholders. On the one hand, this enables decentralized planning and governance, adjusted to local norms and preferences. On the other hand, it also leads to fragmentation of responsibilities and frequently results in inadequate coordination. For this reason, efforts have been made for several years to achieve more joint planning, governance and financing of the health-care system at the federal and regional level. As in any health system, a number of challenges remain. The costs of the health-care system are well above the EU15 average, both in absolute terms and as a percentage of GDP. There are important structural imbalances in healthcare provision, with an oversized hospital sector and insufficient resources available for ambulatory care and preventive medicine. This is coupled with stark regional differences in utilization, both in curative services (hospital beds and specialist physicians) and preventative services such as preventive health check-ups, outpatient rehabilitation, psychosocial and psychotherapeutic care and nursing. There are clear social inequalities in the use of medical services, such as preventive health check-ups, immunization or dentistry

  9. Health care in China: a rural-urban comparison after the socioeconomic reforms.

    PubMed

    Shi, L

    1993-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the current Chinese health care system with particular emphasis on rural-urban differences. China's post-1978 economic reforms, although they improved general living standards, created some unintended consequences, as evidenced by the disintegration of the rural cooperative medical system and the sharp reduction in the number of "barefoot doctors", both of which were essential elements in the improvement of health status in rural China. The increase in the elderly population and their lack of health insurance and pensions will also place enormous pressure on services for their care. These changes have disproportionately affected the rural health care system, leaving the urban system basically intact, and have contributed to the rural-urban disparity in health care. Based on recent data the article compares current rural-urban differences in health care policy, systems, resources, and outcomes, and proposes potential solutions to reduce them.

  10. The critical role of ERISA in state health reform.

    PubMed

    Chirba-Martin, M A; Brennan, T A

    Despite prominent roles for employers and state regulation in the Clinton administration's Health Security Act, relatively little attention has been accorded to the impact of federal preemption of state legislation through the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). As interpreted by the U.S. Supreme Court, ERISA permits state regulation of insured employee health plans but otherwise preempts analogous regulation relating to self-insured benefit plans. This has prompted lower courts to find that hospital rate-setting legislation, regulation of preferred provider organizations (PPOs), and medical malpractice suits for utilization review decisions are preempted by ERISA. Several issues with major implications for health reform remain unresolved, such as the availability of ERISA preemption to self-insured health alliances and health maintenance organizations (HMOs).

  11. Early appraisal of China's huge and complex health-care reforms.

    PubMed

    Yip, Winnie Chi-Man; Hsiao, William C; Chen, Wen; Hu, Shanlian; Ma, Jin; Maynard, Alan

    2012-03-01

    China's 3 year, CN¥850 billion (US$125 billion) reform plan, launched in 2009, marked the first phase towards achieving comprehensive universal health coverage by 2020. The government's undertaking of systemic reform and its affirmation of its role in financing health care together with priorities for prevention, primary care, and redistribution of finance and human resources to poor regions are positive developments. Accomplishing nearly universal insurance coverage in such a short time is commendable. However, transformation of money and insurance coverage into cost-effective services is difficult when delivery of health care is hindered by waste, inefficiencies, poor quality of services, and scarcity and maldistribution of the qualified workforce. China must reform its incentive structures for providers, improve governance of public hospitals, and institute a stronger regulatory system, but these changes have been slowed by opposition from stakeholders and lack of implementation capacity. The pace of reform should be moderated to allow service providers to develop absorptive capacity. Independent, outcome-based monitoring and evaluation by a third-party are essential for mid-course correction of the plans and to make officials and providers accountable. PMID:22386036

  12. EPIDEMIOLOGY and Health Care Reform The National Health Survey of 1935-1936

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The National Health Survey undertaken in 1935 and 1936 was the largest morbidity survey until that time. It was also the first national survey to focus on chronic disease and disability. The decision to conduct a survey of this magnitude was part of the larger strategy to reform health care in the United States. The focus on morbidity allowed reformers to argue that the health status of Americans was poor, despite falling mortality rates that suggested the opposite. The focus on chronic disease morbidity proved to be an especially effective way of demonstrating the poor health of the population and the strong links between poverty and illness. The survey, undertaken by a small group of reform-minded epidemiologists led by Edgar Sydenstricker, was made possible by the close interaction during the Depression of agencies and actors in the public health and social welfare sectors, a collaboration which produced new ways of thinking about disease burdens. PMID:21233434

  13. [Primary health care reform and implications for the organizational culture of Health Center Groups in Portugal].

    PubMed

    Leone, Claudia; Dussault, Gilles; Lapão, Luís Velez

    2014-01-01

    The health sector's increasing complexity poses major challenges for administrators. There is considerable consensus on workforce quality as a key determinant of success for any health reform. This study aimed to explore the changes introduced by an action-training intervention in the organizational culture of the 73 executive directors of Health Center Groups (ACES) in Portugal during the primary health care reform. The study covers two periods, before and after the one-year ACES training, during which the data were collected and analyzed. The Competing Values Framework allowed observing that after the ACES action-training intervention, the perceptions of the executive directors regarding their organizational culture were more aligned with the practices and values defended by the primary health care reform. The study highlights the need to continue monitoring results over different time periods to elaborate further conclusions.

  14. [Health maintenance organizations: starting point of a market economical reform of health care].

    PubMed

    Hauser, H

    1981-05-01

    The present work was based on the observations that, as regards health care costs, the major problem in most present systems is that those who are responsible for the treatment decision (physician and patient) do not bear a direct financial responsibility for it, and that the overall system is very fragmented, which leads to numerous externalities. In accordance with this diagnosis, a reform strategy should particularly aim at creating units which are responsible for the provision and the financial coverage of comprehensive health services to a given population. Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) are a private economy oriented solution in this direction. They have proved to be a real possibility in the USA over years, at least for part of the population, and show interesting performances as regards costs. They were able to develop and evolve in the largely open US institutional framework. In Switzerland, we have more strongly structured systems, which appear to stand in relative contradiction to the HMO solution. A potential adaptation of the concept to our country would therefore require a preliminary in depth discussion about the meaning of the present collective (insurance) contract structure, the position of hospitals in a private economy health care system as well as about the conditions of the sought for competition in the HMO model. PMID:7303928

  15. Croatia: health system review.

    PubMed

    Džakula, Aleksandar; Sagan, Anna; Pavić, Nika; Lonćčarek, Karmen; Sekelj-Kauzlarić, Katarina

    2014-01-01

    Croatia is a small central European country on the Balkan peninsula, with a population of approximately 4.3 million and a gross domestic product (GDP) of 62% of the European Union (EU) average (expressed in purchasing power parity; PPP) in 2012. On 1 July 2013, Croatia became the 28th Member State of the EU. Life expectancy at birth has been increasing steadily in Croatia (with a small decline in the years following the 1991 to 1995 War of Independence) but is still lower than the EU average. Prevalence of overweight and obesity in the population has increased during recent years and trends in physical inactivity are alarming. The Croatian Health Insurance Fund (CHIF), established in 1993, is the sole insurer in the mandatory health insurance (MHI) system that provides universal health coverage to the whole population. The ownership of secondary health care facilities is distributed between the State and the counties. The financial position of public hospitals is weak and recent reforms were aimed at improving this. The introduction of concessions in 2009 (public private partnerships whereby county governments organize tenders for the provision of specific primary health care services) allowed the counties to play a more active role in the organization, coordination and management of primary health care; most primary care practices have been privatized. The proportion of GDP spent on health by the Croatian government remains relatively low compared to western Europe, as does the per capita health expenditure. Although the share of public expenditure as a proportion of total health expenditure (THE) has been decreasing, at around 82% it is still relatively high, even by European standards. The main source of the CHIFs revenue is compulsory health insurance contributions, accounting for 76% of the total revenues of the CHIF, although only about a third of the population (active workers) is liable to pay full health care contributions. Although the breadth and scope

  16. Croatia: health system review.

    PubMed

    Džakula, Aleksandar; Sagan, Anna; Pavić, Nika; Lonćčarek, Karmen; Sekelj-Kauzlarić, Katarina

    2014-01-01

    Croatia is a small central European country on the Balkan peninsula, with a population of approximately 4.3 million and a gross domestic product (GDP) of 62% of the European Union (EU) average (expressed in purchasing power parity; PPP) in 2012. On 1 July 2013, Croatia became the 28th Member State of the EU. Life expectancy at birth has been increasing steadily in Croatia (with a small decline in the years following the 1991 to 1995 War of Independence) but is still lower than the EU average. Prevalence of overweight and obesity in the population has increased during recent years and trends in physical inactivity are alarming. The Croatian Health Insurance Fund (CHIF), established in 1993, is the sole insurer in the mandatory health insurance (MHI) system that provides universal health coverage to the whole population. The ownership of secondary health care facilities is distributed between the State and the counties. The financial position of public hospitals is weak and recent reforms were aimed at improving this. The introduction of concessions in 2009 (public private partnerships whereby county governments organize tenders for the provision of specific primary health care services) allowed the counties to play a more active role in the organization, coordination and management of primary health care; most primary care practices have been privatized. The proportion of GDP spent on health by the Croatian government remains relatively low compared to western Europe, as does the per capita health expenditure. Although the share of public expenditure as a proportion of total health expenditure (THE) has been decreasing, at around 82% it is still relatively high, even by European standards. The main source of the CHIFs revenue is compulsory health insurance contributions, accounting for 76% of the total revenues of the CHIF, although only about a third of the population (active workers) is liable to pay full health care contributions. Although the breadth and scope

  17. The current state of health care in the former Soviet Union: implications for health care policy and reform.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, D A; Field, M G

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Given the many profound health care problems facing Russia and the other former Soviet republics, there are a number of fundamental policy questions that deserve close attention as part of the reform process. METHODS. Summary data regarding Soviet health care issues were drawn from government agency reports, scholarly books and journals, recent press reports, and the authors' personal research. RESULTS. Smoking, alcohol, accidents, poor sanitation, inadequate nutrition, and extensive environmental pollution contribute to illness and premature mortality in Russia and the other newly independent states. Hospitals and clinics are poorly maintained and equipped; most physicians are poorly trained and inadequately paid; and there is essentially no system of quality management. While efforts at reform, which emphasize shifting to a system of "insurance medicine," have been largely unsuccessful, they have raised several important policy issues that warrant extensive research and discussion. CONCLUSIONS. Without considering the implications and consequences of alternative policy directions, Russia and the other states face the very real possibility of developing health care systems that improve the overall level of care but also incorporate limited access and escalating costs. Russian health care reform leaders can learn from the health care successes in the West and avoid repeating our mistakes. PMID:8604753

  18. Implementing health care reform in the United States: intergovernmental politics and the dilemmas of institutional design.

    PubMed

    Béland, Daniel; Rocco, Philip; Waddan, Alex

    2014-05-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was enacted, and continues to operate, under conditions of political polarization. In this article, we argue that the law's intergovernmental structure has amplified political conflict over its implementation by distributing governing authority to political actors at both levels of the American federal system. We review the ways in which the law's demands for institutional coordination between federal and state governments (and especially the role it preserves for governors and state legislatures) have created difficulties for rolling out health-insurance exchanges and expanding the Medicaid program. By way of contrast, we show how the institutional design of the ACA's regulatory reforms of the insurance market, which diminish the reform's political salience, has allowed for considerably less friction during the implementation process. This article thus highlights the implications of multi-level institutional designs for the post-enactment politics of major reforms. PMID:24508181

  19. Reforms in Pakistan: decisive times for improving maternal and child health.

    PubMed

    Mazhar, Arslan; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem

    2012-08-01

    Pakistan is a struggling economy with poor maternal and child health indicators that have affected attainment of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 (under-five child and maternal mortality). Recent health reforms have abolished the federal Ministry of Health and devolved administrative and financial powers to the provinces. Ideally, devolution tends to simplify a healthcare system's management structure and ensure more efficient delivery of health services to underserved populations, in this case women and children. In this time of transition, it is appropriate to outline prerequisites for the efficient management of maternal and child health (MCH) services. This paper examines the six building blocks of health systems in order to improve the utilization of MCH services in rural Pakistan. The targeted outcomes of recent reforms are devolved participatory decision-making regarding distribution of MCH-related services, improved deployment of the healthcare workforce, prioritization of pro-poor strategies for health financing and integration of various health information systems. Given this window of opportunity, the provinces need to guarantee fairness and equity through their stewardship of the healthcare system so as to protect vulnerable mothers and their children, especially in rural, remote and disadvantaged areas of Pakistan.

  20. Reforms in Pakistan: decisive times for improving maternal and child health.

    PubMed

    Mazhar, Arslan; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem

    2012-08-01

    Pakistan is a struggling economy with poor maternal and child health indicators that have affected attainment of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 (under-five child and maternal mortality). Recent health reforms have abolished the federal Ministry of Health and devolved administrative and financial powers to the provinces. Ideally, devolution tends to simplify a healthcare system's management structure and ensure more efficient delivery of health services to underserved populations, in this case women and children. In this time of transition, it is appropriate to outline prerequisites for the efficient management of maternal and child health (MCH) services. This paper examines the six building blocks of health systems in order to improve the utilization of MCH services in rural Pakistan. The targeted outcomes of recent reforms are devolved participatory decision-making regarding distribution of MCH-related services, improved deployment of the healthcare workforce, prioritization of pro-poor strategies for health financing and integration of various health information systems. Given this window of opportunity, the provinces need to guarantee fairness and equity through their stewardship of the healthcare system so as to protect vulnerable mothers and their children, especially in rural, remote and disadvantaged areas of Pakistan. PMID:23968601

  1. Norway: health system review.

    PubMed

    Ringard, Ånen; Sagan, Anna; Sperre Saunes, Ingrid; Lindahl, Anne Karin

    2013-01-01

    Norways five million inhabitants are spread over nearly four hundred thousand square kilometres, making it one of the most sparsely populated countries in Europe. It has enjoyed several decades of high growth, following the start of oil production in early 1970s, and is now one of the richest countries per head in the world. Overall, Norways population enjoys good health status; life expectancy of 81.53 years is above the EU average of 80.14, and the gap between overall life expectancy and healthy life years is around half the of EU average. The health care system is semi decentralized. The responsibility for specialist care lies with the state (administered by four Regional Health Authorities) and the municipalities are responsible for primary care. Although health care expenditure is only 9.4% of Norways GDP (placing it on the 16th place in the WHO European region), given Norways very high value of GDP per capita, its health expenditure per head is higher than in most countries. Public sources account for over 85% of total health expenditure; the majority of private health financing comes from households out-of-pocket payments.The number of practitioners in most health personnel groups, including physicians and nurses, has been increasing in the last few decades and the number of health care personnel per 100 000 inhabitants is high compared to other EU countries. However, long waiting times for elective care continue to be a problem and are cause of dissatisfaction among the patients. The focus of health care reforms has seen shifts over the past four decades. During the 1970s the focus was on equality and increasing geographical access to health care services; during the 1980s reforms aimed at achieving cost containment and decentralizing health care services; during the 1990s the focus was on efficiency. Since the beginning of the millennium the emphasis has been given to structural changes in the delivery and organization of health care and to policies

  2. Harnessing the Affordable Care Act to Catalyze Delivery System Reform and Strengthen Emergency Care in America

    PubMed Central

    Maa, John

    2015-01-01

    As health care reform in the US evolves beyond insurance reform to encompass delivery system reform, the opportunity arises to harness the Affordable Care Act to strengthen patient care in America. One area for dedicated individuals to lead this effort is by improving transitions in patient care across the continuum of team members, specialties, settings, and systems. This article will describe innovations of the surgicalist and acute care surgeon that have emerged in response to the challenges facing surgery in specialization, geography, and the need to comply with health care reform mandates. Three ways will be described to integrate these innovations with pilot programs in the Affordable Care Act: to promote teamwork, to reduce readmissions, and to strengthen emergency care because the key location where the joint efforts intersect most acutely with patient need is in our nation’s Emergency Departments. PMID:25663212

  3. Turning swords into plowshares: lessons from the military health system.

    PubMed

    Crowley, D D; Tough, S D

    1993-01-01

    Policymakers are searching everywhere for examples of how best to reform the nation's health care system. A major reform model from an unexpected quarter--the U.S. military--is making great strides forward and contains many of the ingredients in the national reform debate: global budgeting, pooled-payer funding, private industry competition, managed care, prevention, and reallocation of resources.

  4. Health sector reform in Brazil: impact on tuberculosis control.

    PubMed

    Kritski, A L; Ruffino-Netto, A

    2000-07-01

    This paper comments on the reform process of the health sector policies that took place after 1986 in Brazil, and its negative impact on the National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTP). Decentralisation was followed by a slow transition from a vertical programme to an integrated programme. In 1990, the NTP was dismantled due to fiscal constraints, and in 1992, the NTP component was reorganised, with national and regional coordinators and subsequent increased support to state programmes. In 1996, the health sector reform continued its process, but this consisted mainly of cuts in health budgets and rapid decentralisation from federal level to unprepared states and municipalities, leading to the weakening of local tuberculosis control programmes. Only recently has government commitment been secured, with a new National Plan on Tuberculosis Control which includes the World Health Organization strategy for TB control--the implementation of the DOTS strategy (directly-observed treatment, short-course)--and efforts are being concentrated in 5500 municipalities. The programme has a centralised administration which supports decentralised implementation through out-patient clinics, and resources will be focused on local service delivery. PMID:10907764

  5. Czech Republic: health system review.

    PubMed

    Alexa, Jan; Recka, Lukas; Votapkova, Jana; van Ginneken, Ewout; Spranger, Anne; Wittenbecher, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of the Czech health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health-care provision, health reforms and health system performance. The Czech health-care system is based on compulsory statutory health insurance providing virtually universal coverage and a broad range of benefits, and doing so at 7.7 % of GDP in 2012 - well below the EU average - of which a comparatively high 85 % was publicly funded. Some important health indicators are better than the EU averages (such as mortality due to respiratory disease) or even among the best in the world (in terms of infant mortality, for example). On the other hand, mortality rates for diseases of the circulatory system and malignant neoplasms are well above the EU average, as are a range of health-care utilization rates, such as outpatient contacts and average length of stay in acute care hospitals. In short, there is substantial potential in the Czech Republic for efficiency gains and to improve health outcomes. Furthermore, the need for reform in order to financially sustain the system became evident again after the global financial crisis, but there is as yet no consensus about how to achieve this. PMID:26106825

  6. Risk avoidance and missed opportunities in mental health reform: the case of Israel.

    PubMed

    Aviram, Uri; Guy, Dalia; Sykes, Israel

    2007-01-01

    political, economic and social context, on the other. Findings show that conflict of interests and risk avoidance of the major stakeholders were major obstacles to reaching agreement on a formula for implementation. The major risks were related to the inability to predict future demand for ambulatory services, uncertainty regarding future costs, and disagreements regarding the reliability and validity of data. Contextual factors that undermined the chances for successful implementation of the reform included lack of a strong political commitment and a coalition supporting the reform, a financial crisis in the health system resulting from early stages of implementation of the National Health Insurance Law, and social turmoil created by the Rabin government's attempts to implement the Oslo agreements. This turmoil ultimately culminated in the assassination of the Prime Minister Yitzchak Rabin, creating a climate far from conducive to generating public interest in mental health reform and facilitating the planned change. As a result the mental health system remained virtually unchanged.

  7. [Economic assessment of the epidemiological profile change: information for health care reforms].

    PubMed

    Arredondo, A

    1997-02-01

    Taking into account the information needed to implement the reform process of the health sector, we present the results of an analysis of costs and the financial consequences of the epidemiological change of four tracer diseases in Mexico, two chronic (diabetes and hypertension) and two infectious diseases (pneumonias and diarrheas). The hospital cost-case management of diabetes expected for 1998 represents the same amount of hospital and ambulatory case management of diarrheas and pneumonias for the same year. The internal competition for resource allocations that is expected, among other factors, is one of the results that permits the argument that changes in the epidemiological profile generate relevant financial consequences in the planning and implementing of structural reforms of the health systems, particularly with regards to the patterns of resource allocation for specific health programs. PMID:9430948

  8. [Economic assessment of the epidemiological profile change: information for health care reforms].

    PubMed

    Arredondo, A

    1997-02-01

    Taking into account the information needed to implement the reform process of the health sector, we present the results of an analysis of costs and the financial consequences of the epidemiological change of four tracer diseases in Mexico, two chronic (diabetes and hypertension) and two infectious diseases (pneumonias and diarrheas). The hospital cost-case management of diabetes expected for 1998 represents the same amount of hospital and ambulatory case management of diarrheas and pneumonias for the same year. The internal competition for resource allocations that is expected, among other factors, is one of the results that permits the argument that changes in the epidemiological profile generate relevant financial consequences in the planning and implementing of structural reforms of the health systems, particularly with regards to the patterns of resource allocation for specific health programs.

  9. Consumer subjectivity and U.S. health care reform.

    PubMed

    West, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Health care consumerism is an important frame in U.S. health care policy, especially in recent media and policy discourse about federal health care reform. This article reports on qualitative fieldwork with health care users to find out how people interpret and make sense of the identity of "health care consumer." It proposes that while the term consumer is normally understood as a descriptive label for users who purchase health care and insurance services, it should actually be understood as a metaphor, carrying with it a host of associations that shape U.S. health care policy debates in particular ways. Based on interviews with 36 people, patient was the dominant term people used to describe themselves, but consumer was the second most popular. Informants interpreted the health care consumer as being informed, proactive, and having choices, but there were also "semiotic traps," or difficult-to-resolve tensions for this identity. The discourse of consumerism functions in part as code for individual responsibility, and therefore as a classed moral discourse, with implications for U.S. health care policy. PMID:23631595

  10. Urban health insurance reform and coverage in China using data from National Health Services Surveys in 1998 and 2003

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ling; Wang, Yan; Collins, Charles D; Tang, Shenglan

    2007-01-01

    Background In 1997 there was a major reform of the government run urban health insurance system in China. The principal aims of the reform were to widen coverage of health insurance for the urban employed and contain medical costs. Following this reform there has been a transition from the dual system of the Government Insurance Scheme (GIS) and Labour Insurance Scheme (LIS) to the new Urban Employee Basic Health Insurance Scheme (BHIS). Methods This paper uses data from the National Health Services Surveys of 1998 and 2003 to examine the impact of the reform on population coverage. Particular attention is paid to coverage in terms of gender, age, employment status, and income levels. Following a description of the data between the two years, the paper will discuss the relationship between the insurance reform and the growing inequities in population coverage. Results An examination of the data reveals a number of key points: a) The overall coverage of the newly established scheme has decreased from 1998 to 2003. b) The proportion of the urban population without any type of health insurance arrangement remained almost the same between 1998 and 2003 in spite of the aim of the 1997 reform to increase the population coverage. c) Higher levels of participation in mainstream insurance schemes (i.e. GIS-LIS and BHIS) were identified among older age groups, males and high income groups. In some cases, the inequities in the system are increasing. d) There has been an increase in coverage of the urban population by non-mainstream health insurance schemes, including non-commercial and commercial ones. The paper discusses three important issues in relation to urban insurance coverage: institutional diversity in the forms of insurance, labour force policy and the non-mainstream forms of commercial and non-commercial forms of insurance. Conclusion The paper concludes that the huge economic development and expansion has not resulted in a reduced disparity in health insurance

  11. A retrospective content analysis of studies on factors constraining the implementation of health sector reform in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sakyi, E Kojo

    2008-01-01

    Ghana has undertaken many public service management reforms in the past two decades. But the implementation of the reforms has been constrained by many factors. This paper undertakes a retrospective study of research works on the challenges to the implementation of reforms in the public health sector. It points out that most of the studies identified: (1) centralised, weak and fragmented management system; (2) poor implementation strategy; (3) lack of motivation; (4) weak institutional framework; (5) lack of financial and human resources and (6) staff attitude and behaviour as the major causes of ineffective reform implementation. The analysis further revealed that quite a number of crucial factors obstructing reform implementation which are particularly internal to the health system have either not been thoroughly studied or overlooked. The analysis identified lack of leadership; weak communication and consultation; lack of stakeholder participation, corruption and unethical professional behaviour as some of the missing variables in the literature. The study, therefore, indicated that there are gaps in the literature that needed to be filled through rigorous reform evaluation based on empirical research particularly at district, sub-district and community levels. It further suggested that future research should be concerned with the effects of both systems and structures and behavioural factors on reform implementation.

  12. The Lessons of Historical Reform Movements: The Racism Mental Health Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lourie, Norman; Walden, Daniel

    The history of reform and the origins of unrest in America are briefly reviewed. Concurrent reform streams of the past are examined in terms of an emerging awareness of the relationship between racism and poverty and social environment. The mental health and social welfare movements paralleled this recognition, but did not lead the new reform.…

  13. A layman's guide to the U.S. health care system

    PubMed Central

    De Lew, Nancy; Greenberg, George; Kinchen, Kraig

    1992-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the U.S. health care system and recent proposals for health system reform. Prepared for a 15-nation comparative study for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the article summarizes descriptive data on the financing, utilization, access, and supply of U.S. health services; analyzes health system cost growth and trends; reviews health reforms adopted in the 1980s; and discusses proposals in the current health system reform debate. PMID:10124436

  14. Malaria control reinvented: health sector reform and strategy development in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Axel; Ordoñez-Gonzalez, José; Aviña, Ana Isabel

    2002-05-01

    The consequences of health sector reforms on control of malaria were analysed using Colombia as an example. One of the most complex health sector reform programmes in Latin America took place in the 1990s; it included transferring the vertical vector-borne disease control (VBDC) programme into health systems at state and district levels. A series of studies was undertaken in 1998-2000 at the national level (Ministry of Health Study), at the state level (Departamento Study) and at the health district level (District Study) using formal and informal interviews among control staff and document analysis as data collection tools. A government-financed national training programme for VBDC staff - which included direct observation of control operations - was also used to analyse health workers' performance in the postreform period (longitudinal study). The results showed that some shortcomings of the old vertical system, such as the negative aspects of trade union activity, have not been overcome while some positive aspects of the old system, such as capacity building, operational planning and supervision have been lost. This has contributed to a decrease in control activity which, in turn, has been associated with more malaria cases. Malaria control had to be reinvented at a much larger scale than anticipated by the reformers caused by a whole series of problems: complex financing of public health interventions in the new system, massive staff reductions, the difficulty of gaining access to district and state budgets, redefining entire organizations and - in addition to the reforms - introducing alternative strategies based on insecticide-treated materials and the growth of areas of general insecurity in many parts of Colombia itself. However, positive signs in the transformed system include: the strengthening of central control staff (albeit insufficient in numbers) when transferred from the Ministry of Health to the National Institute of Health, the opportunities

  15. Health sector reform and public sector health worker motivation: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Franco, Lynne Miller; Bennett, Sara; Kanfer, Ruth

    2002-04-01

    Motivation in the work context can be defined as an individual's degree of willingness to exert and maintain an effort towards organizational goals. Health sector performance is critically dependent on worker motivation, with service quality, efficiency, and equity, all directly mediated by workers' willingness to apply themselves to their tasks. Resource availability and worker competence are essential but not sufficient to ensure desired worker performance. While financial incentives may be important determinants of worker motivation, they alone cannot and have not resolved all worker motivation problems. Worker motivation is a complex process and crosses many disciplinary boundaries, including economics, psychology, organizational development, human resource management, and sociology. This paper discusses the many layers of influences upon health worker motivation: the internal individual-level determinants, determinants that operate at organizational (work context) level, and determinants stemming from interactions with the broader societal culture. Worker motivation will be affected by health sector reforms which potentially affect organizational culture, reporting structures, human resource management, channels of accountability, types of interactions with clients and communities, etc. The conceptual model described in this paper clarifies ways in which worker motivation is influenced and how health sector reform can positively affect worker motivation. Among others, health sector policy makers can better facilitate goal congruence (between workers and the organizations they work for) and improved worker motivation by considering the following in their design and implementation of health sector reforms: addressing multiple channels for worker motivation, recognizing the importance of communication and leadership for reforms, identifying organizational and cultural values that might facilitate or impede implementation of reforms, and understanding that reforms

  16. Health reform in Canada: Enabling perspectives for health leadership.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Graham

    2016-03-01

    Canadian healthcare leaders are experiencing unprecedented change. In Canada and worldwide, efforts are being made to create patient-centred service delivery models. In order to participate fully in that transformation, leaders must embrace the new leadership responsibilities vital to patient-centred change. To fail to do so will marginalize their role or render them irrelevant. This article reviews literature in the past 5 years to outline the change context for leaders and what they can do to enhance their effectiveness. Leaders are encouraged to redouble their efforts to develop their leadership capacity, engage physicians as partners, embrace complexity, engage the patient and public in reform efforts, and embrace appropriate technological trends within the consumer community. To reinvent leadership supportive of patient-centred change, healthcare leaders need to act individually to grow their own capacity and collectively to take control of the leadership needed in order to fulfill their role in change. PMID:26872798

  17. Evidence-based medicine in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Gordon B

    2011-10-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 mandates a national comparative outcomes research project agenda. Comparative effectiveness research includes both clinical trials and observational studies and is facilitated by electronic health records. A national network of electronic health records will create a vast electronic data "warehouse" with exponential growth of observational data. High-quality associations will identify research topics for pragmatic clinical trials, and systematic reviews of clinical trials will provide optimal evidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicine is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. Thus, health care reform will provide a robust environment for comparative effectiveness research, systematic reviews, and evidence-based medicine, and implementation of evidence-based medicine should lead to improved quality of care.

  18. The Role of Informatics in Health Care Reform

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yueyi I.

    2012-01-01

    Improving healthcare quality while simultaneously reducing cost has become a high priority of healthcare reform. Informatics is crucial in tackling this challenge. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 mandates adaptation and “meaningful use (MU)” of health information technology. In this review, we will highlight several areas in which informatics can make significant contributions, with a focus on radiology. We also discuss informatics related to the increasing imperatives of state and local regulations (such as radiation dose tracking) and quality initiatives. PMID:22771052

  19. [The democratic movement, cholera epidemic and public health reform in the Zurich canton (1867)].

    PubMed

    Condrau, F

    1996-01-01

    In the summer of 1867 Zurich, Switzerland, was struck by a severe Cholera outbreak. Recent research suggests that the Cholera epidemic had such an influence on the municipal policy makers that they pushed through a major reform of the public health system, namely of water supply and sewerage. This paper adopts a theoretical conception of crisis and social change to evaluate the plausibility of this hypothesis. The basic idea is that structural change can be usually understood as the consequence of a major social crisis. Exactly this was the case in Zurich during the 1860s. After a decade of economic stability and progress, a severe crisis simultaneously stuck Zurich's agriculture, textile industry and railway companies. The so called Democratic Movement threatened the existing political system; the old political establishment feared a political revolution. On top of all this, Cholera struck Zurich, precipitating a crisis in the public health system. Suddenly, old concepts and institutions were felt to be outdated. The democrats put through political reforms, the economic downswing ended and a large program to reshape the urban environment was initiated. It can be concluded that the Cholera epidemic alone did not cause the public health reform. But together with other crisis phenomena it played a major role in weakening the stability of the old system, and thus contributed to the society's ability to put in place new political, economic, and social structures. PMID:9092134

  20. School-Based Health Centers in an Era of Health Care Reform: Building on History

    PubMed Central

    Keeton, Victoria; Soleimanpour, Samira; Brindis, Claire D.

    2013-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide a variety of health care services to youth in a convenient and accessible environment. Over the past 40 years, the growth of SBHCs evolved from various public health needs to the development of a specific collaborative model of care that is sensitive to the unique needs of children and youth, as well as to vulnerable populations facing significant barriers to access. The SBHC model of health care comprises of on-school site health care delivery by an interdisciplinary team of health professionals, which can include primary care and mental health clinicians. Research has demonstrated the SBHCs’ impacts on delivering preventive care, such as immunizations; managing chronic illnesses, such as asthma, obesity, and mental health conditions; providing reproductive health services for adolescents; and even improving youths’ academic performance. Although evaluation of the SBHC model of care has been complicated, results have thus far demonstrated increased access to care, improved health and education outcomes, and high levels of satisfaction. Despite their proven success, SBHCs have consistently faced challenges in securing adequate funding for operations and developing effective financial systems for billing and reimbursement. Implementation of health care reform (The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act [P.L. 111-148]) will profoundly affect the health care access and outcomes of children and youth, particularly vulnerable populations. The inclusion of funding for SBHCs in this legislation is momentous, as there continues to be increased demand and limited funding for affordable services. To better understand how this model of care has and could further help promote the health of our nation’s youth, a review is presented of the history and growth of SBHCs and the literature demonstrating their impacts. It may not be feasible for SBHCs to be established in every school campus in the country. However, the lessons

  1. Health-care reform and its impact on African-American surgical specialists.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, E. B.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1960, numerous concepts of health-care reform have been submitted to the US Congress and the American public with different viewpoints and objectives. The priority for the US Congress to pass a bipartisan health-reform plan has been circumvented by the newly elected majority Republican Congress. Nevertheless, health-care cost containment, quality control, and health-care delivery concepts have been implemented gradually into the concept of competitive managerial health care. A few of the serious problems in the African-American community are the efficiency and quality of the health-care delivery system and the effects of managed care on African-American primary physicians and surgical specialists. The critical shortages of this group, especially the latter, may create a dilemma in the implementation of a quality surgical care delivery system. The Association of American Medical Colleges, the American College of Surgeons, and other affiliating organizations should become sensitized to the African-American community's health needs, deficiencies, and the rational institution of an equitable, efficient, comprehensive, and quality health-care plan coupled with a sustained and increasing supply of certified, diversified, and experienced African-American surgical manpower in company with family practice physicians and primary care physicians. PMID:8839031

  2. The politics of paying for health reform: zombies, payroll taxes, and the holy grail.

    PubMed

    Oberlander, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the politics of paying for health care reform. It surveys the political strengths and weaknesses of major options to fund universal coverage and explores obstacles to changing how the United States finances health care. Finding a politically viable means to finance universal coverage remains a central barrier to enacting health reform.

  3. 75 FR 62684 - Health Insurance Reform; Announcement of Maintenance Changes to Electronic Data Transaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... Register (65 FR 50312) entitled ``Health Insurance Reform: Standards for Electronic Transactions... the Federal Register (73 FR 49742) entitled ``Health Insurance Reform: Modifications to Electronic... January 16, 2009, we published a final rule in the Federal Register (74 FR 3296) entitled Health...

  4. The politics of paying for health reform: zombies, payroll taxes, and the holy grail.

    PubMed

    Oberlander, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the politics of paying for health care reform. It surveys the political strengths and weaknesses of major options to fund universal coverage and explores obstacles to changing how the United States finances health care. Finding a politically viable means to finance universal coverage remains a central barrier to enacting health reform. PMID:18940835

  5. [Impact of health care reform on human resources and employment management].

    PubMed

    Brito Quintana, P E

    2000-01-01

    According to those in charge of health sector reform, human resources are the key component of health sector reform processes and offer health services their greatest competitive advantage. With the help of the Observatory for Human Resources within Health Sector Reform promoted by the Pan American Health Organization and other groups, countries of the Region of the Americas have now begun to gather, in a methodical fashion, tangible evidence of the decisive importance of human resources within health sector reform initiatives and particularly of the impact of these initiatives on health personnel. This mutual influence is the main theme of this article, which explores the most disturbing aspects of health sector reform from a human resources perspective, including job instability and conflicting interests of employers and employees.

  6. [Impact of health care reform on human resources and employment management].

    PubMed

    Brito Quintana, P E

    2000-01-01

    According to those in charge of health sector reform, human resources are the key component of health sector reform processes and offer health services their greatest competitive advantage. With the help of the Observatory for Human Resources within Health Sector Reform promoted by the Pan American Health Organization and other groups, countries of the Region of the Americas have now begun to gather, in a methodical fashion, tangible evidence of the decisive importance of human resources within health sector reform initiatives and particularly of the impact of these initiatives on health personnel. This mutual influence is the main theme of this article, which explores the most disturbing aspects of health sector reform from a human resources perspective, including job instability and conflicting interests of employers and employees. PMID:11026774

  7. Privatization of Public Services: Organizational Reform Efforts in Public Education and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Gollust, Sarah E.; Jacobson, Peter D.

    2006-01-01

    The public health and the public education systems in the United States have encountered problems in quality of service, accountability, and availability of resources. Both systems are under pressure to adopt the general organizational reform of privatization. The debate over privatization in public education is contentious, but in public health, the shift of functions from the public to the private sector has been accepted with limited deliberation. We assess the benefits and concerns of privatization and suggest that shifting public health functions to the private sector raises questions about the values and mission of public health. Public health officials need to be more engaged in a public debate over the desirability of privatization as the future of public health. PMID:17008563

  8. Human resource solutions--the Gateway Paper proposed health reforms in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Nishtar, Sania

    2006-12-01

    The existence of appropriate institutional and human resource capacity underpins the viability and sustainability of a health reform process within a country. Building human resource capacity within the health sector involves building the capacity of health service providers, health managers and administers as well as the stewards of health. Although capacity building is linked to a generic process closely linked to the broader economic, social and developmental context, it has specific health system connotations which should be the focus of a concerted effort. These include quantitative issues, in-effective deployment and brain-drain, qualitative considerations which stem from gaps in the quality of undergraduate as well as discrepancies in the content and format of training and absence of this in service of training health professionals and gaps in regulation. As one of the fundamental corner stones of health reform the Gateway Paper calls attention to the need to avert these issues with the development of a well-defined policy in human resource development as an entry point. This should be based on an analysis of the human resource need and should clearly define career structures for all categories of healthcare providers, and articulate the mechanisms of their effective deployment. Creating a conducive an rewarding environment, institutionalizing personnel management reform which go beyond personnel actions and set standards of performance, and develop appropriate incentives around this, would be critical. It would also be important to pay due attention to the content and format of training at an undergraduate level, at a postgraduate level and with reference to ongoing education and the allied roles of continuing medical education programs and accreditation of health systems educational institutions. The Gateway Paper also lays stress on effective regulation to curb the practice of quackery.

  9. Healthcare financing reform in Latvia: switching from social health insurance to NHS and back?

    PubMed

    Mitenbergs, Uldis; Brigis, Girts; Quentin, Wilm

    2014-11-01

    In the 1990s, Latvia aimed at introducing Social Health Insurance (SHI) but later changed to a National Health Service (NHS) type system. The NHS is financed from general taxation, provides coverage to the entire population, and pays for a basic service package purchased from independent public and private providers. In November 2013, the Cabinet of Ministers passed a draft Healthcare Financing Law, aiming at increasing public expenditures on health by introducing Compulsory Health Insurance (CHI) and linking entitlement to health services to the payment of income tax. Opponents of the reform argue that linking entitlement to health services to the payment of income tax does not have the potential to increase public expenditures on health but that it can contribute to compromising universal coverage and access to health services of certain population groups. In view of strong opposition, it is unlikely that the law will be adopted before parliamentary elections in October 2014. Nevertheless, the discussion around the law is interesting because of three main reasons: (1) it can illustrate why the concept of SHI remains attractive - not only for Latvia but also for other countries, (2) it shows that a change from NHS to SHI does not imply major institutional reforms, and (3) it demonstrates the potential problems of introducing SHI, i.e. of linking entitlement to health services to the payment of contributions. PMID:25445111

  10. Healthcare financing reform in Latvia: switching from social health insurance to NHS and back?

    PubMed

    Mitenbergs, Uldis; Brigis, Girts; Quentin, Wilm

    2014-11-01

    In the 1990s, Latvia aimed at introducing Social Health Insurance (SHI) but later changed to a National Health Service (NHS) type system. The NHS is financed from general taxation, provides coverage to the entire population, and pays for a basic service package purchased from independent public and private providers. In November 2013, the Cabinet of Ministers passed a draft Healthcare Financing Law, aiming at increasing public expenditures on health by introducing Compulsory Health Insurance (CHI) and linking entitlement to health services to the payment of income tax. Opponents of the reform argue that linking entitlement to health services to the payment of income tax does not have the potential to increase public expenditures on health but that it can contribute to compromising universal coverage and access to health services of certain population groups. In view of strong opposition, it is unlikely that the law will be adopted before parliamentary elections in October 2014. Nevertheless, the discussion around the law is interesting because of three main reasons: (1) it can illustrate why the concept of SHI remains attractive - not only for Latvia but also for other countries, (2) it shows that a change from NHS to SHI does not imply major institutional reforms, and (3) it demonstrates the potential problems of introducing SHI, i.e. of linking entitlement to health services to the payment of contributions.

  11. Stuck in the middle?: A perspective on ongoing pro-competitive reforms in Dutch mental health care.

    PubMed

    Westra, Daan; Wilbers, Gloria; Angeli, Federica

    2016-04-01

    Pro-competitive reforms have been implemented in many Western healthcare systems, of which the Netherlands is a prominent example. While the pro-competitive reforms in the Dutch specialized care sector have drawn considerable academic attention, mental health care is often excluded. However, in line with other segments of specialized care, pro-competitive legislation has formed the core of mental health care reforms, albeit with several notable differences. Ever since mental health services were included in the Health Insurance Act in 2008, the Dutch mental healthcare sector has been in an ongoing state of reform. Numerous major and minor adaptations have continuously altered the services covered by the basic insurance package, the actors responsible for providing and contracting care, and definitions and measurements of quality. Most notably, insurers and municipalities, which are responsible for selectively contracting those providers that offer high value-for-money, seem insensitive to quality aspects. The question whether the Dutch mental health sector has inherited the best or the worst of a competitive and non-competitive system lingers and international policy makers contemplating reforming their mental health sector should take note. PMID:26994866

  12. Reform of "hogosha" system and psychiatric practice in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, H

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the author examines the current working and drawbacks of the "hogosha" system as set out in the Mental Health Law of 1988, and goes on to suggest a plan for reform. Critics point to two main problems with the current system. One is that the hogosha's powers infringe on the patient's human rights. The other is that the system places too heavy a burden on hogoshas in its efforts to protect the community from the patient. The author argues that the hogosha should retain the power to consent for admission for medical care and custody, but other responsibilities should be reduced. The author stresses that local mayors must be prepared to take their responsibilities seriously when they assume the role of the hogosha.

  13. The quest for equity in Latin America: a comparative analysis of the health care reforms in Brazil and Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Brazil and Colombia have pursued extensive reforms of their health care systems in the last couple of decades. The purported goals of such reforms were to improve access, increase efficiency and reduce health inequities. Notwithstanding their common goals, each country sought a very different pathway to achieve them. While Brazil attempted to reestablish a greater level of State control through a public national health system, Colombia embraced market competition under an employer-based social insurance scheme. This work thus aims to shed some light onto why they pursued divergent strategies and what that has meant in terms of health outcomes. Methods A critical review of the literature concerning equity frameworks, as well as the health care reforms in Brazil and Colombia was conducted. Then, the shortfall inequality values of crude mortality rate, infant mortality rate, under-five mortality rate, and life expectancy for the period 1960-2005 were calculated for both countries. Subsequently, bivariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed and controlled for possibly confounding factors. Results When controlling for the underlying historical time trend, both countries appear to have experienced a deceleration of the pace of improvements in the years following the reforms, for all the variables analyzed. In the case of Colombia, some of the previous gains in under-five mortality rate and crude mortality rate were, in fact, reversed. Conclusions Neither reform seems to have had a decisive positive impact on the health outcomes analyzed for the defined time period of this research. This, in turn, may be a consequence of both internal characteristics of the respective reforms and external factors beyond the direct control of health reformers. Among the internal characteristics: underfunding, unbridled decentralization and inequitable access to care seem to have been the main constraints. Conversely, international economic adversities

  14. The role of strategic health planning processes in the development of health care reform policies: a comparative study of Eritrea, Mozambique and Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Green, Andrew; Collins, Charles; Stefanini, Angelo; Ferrinho, Paulo; Chapman, Glyn; Hagos, Besrat; Adams, Yussuf; Omar, Mayeh

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on comparative analysis of health planning and its relationship with health care reform in three countries, Eritrea, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. The research examined strategic planning in each country focusing in particular on its role in developing health sector reforms. The paper analyses the processes for strategic planning, the values that underpin the planning systems, and issues related to resources for planning processes. The resultant content of strategic plans is assessed and not seen to have driven the development of reforms; whilst each country had adopted strategic planning systems, in all three countries a more complex interplay of forces, including influences outside both the health sector and the country, had been critical forces behind the sectoral changes experienced over the previous decade. The key roles of different actors in developing the plans and reforms are also assessed. The paper concludes that a number of different conceptions of strategic planning exist and will depend on the particular context within which the health system is placed. Whilst similarities were discovered between strategic planning systems in the three countries, there are also key differences in terms of formality, timeframes, structures and degrees of inclusiveness. No clear leadership role for strategic planning in terms of health sector reforms was discovered. Planning appears in the three countries to be more operational than strategic.

  15. Health Reform and Academic Health Centers: Commentary on an Evolving Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Wartman, Steven A; Zhou, Yingying; Knettel, Anthony J

    2015-12-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), both directly and indirectly, has had a demonstrable impact on academic health centers. Given the highly cross-subsidized nature of institutional funds flows, the impact of health reform is not limited to the clinical care mission but also extends to the research and education missions of these institutions. This Commentary discusses how public policy and market-based health reforms have played out relative to expectations. The authors identify six formidable challenges facing academic health centers in the post-ACA environment: finding the best mission balance; preparing for the era of no open-ended funding; developing an integrated, interprofessional vision; broadening the institutional perspective; addressing health beyond clinical care; and finding the right leadership for the times. Academic health centers will be well positioned for success if they can focus on 21st-century realities, reengineer their business models, and find transformational leaders to change institutional culture and behavior. PMID:26422592

  16. Health Reform and Academic Health Centers: Commentary on an Evolving Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Wartman, Steven A; Zhou, Yingying; Knettel, Anthony J

    2015-12-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), both directly and indirectly, has had a demonstrable impact on academic health centers. Given the highly cross-subsidized nature of institutional funds flows, the impact of health reform is not limited to the clinical care mission but also extends to the research and education missions of these institutions. This Commentary discusses how public policy and market-based health reforms have played out relative to expectations. The authors identify six formidable challenges facing academic health centers in the post-ACA environment: finding the best mission balance; preparing for the era of no open-ended funding; developing an integrated, interprofessional vision; broadening the institutional perspective; addressing health beyond clinical care; and finding the right leadership for the times. Academic health centers will be well positioned for success if they can focus on 21st-century realities, reengineer their business models, and find transformational leaders to change institutional culture and behavior.

  17. Health care reform and Connecticut's non-profit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeffrey R; Gerrish, William; Galvin, J Robert

    2010-01-01

    The recent federal Health Care Reform Act signed into law by President Obama is expected to lead to greater patient volumes at non-profit hospitals in Connecticut (and throughout the country). The financial implications for these hospitals depend on how the costs per patient are expected to change in response to the anticipated higher patient volumes. Using a regression analysis of costs with annual data on 30 Connecticut hospitals over the period 2006 to 2008, we find that there are considerable differences between outpatient and inpatient unit cost structures at these hospitals. Based on the results of our analysis, and assuming health care reform leads to an overall increase in the number of outpatients, we would expect Connecticut hospitals to experience lower costs per outpatient treated (economies of scale). On the other hand, an influx of additional inpatients would be expected to raise unit costs (diseconomies of scale). After controlling for other cost determinants, we find that the marginal cost of an inpatient is about $8,000 while the marginal cost of an outpatient is about $44. This disparity may provide an explanation for our finding that the effect of additional patient volumes overall (combining inpatient and outpatient) is an increase in hospitals' unit costs. PMID:21294435

  18. Health care reform and Connecticut's non-profit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeffrey R; Gerrish, William; Galvin, J Robert

    2010-01-01

    The recent federal Health Care Reform Act signed into law by President Obama is expected to lead to greater patient volumes at non-profit hospitals in Connecticut (and throughout the country). The financial implications for these hospitals depend on how the costs per patient are expected to change in response to the anticipated higher patient volumes. Using a regression analysis of costs with annual data on 30 Connecticut hospitals over the period 2006 to 2008, we find that there are considerable differences between outpatient and inpatient unit cost structures at these hospitals. Based on the results of our analysis, and assuming health care reform leads to an overall increase in the number of outpatients, we would expect Connecticut hospitals to experience lower costs per outpatient treated (economies of scale). On the other hand, an influx of additional inpatients would be expected to raise unit costs (diseconomies of scale). After controlling for other cost determinants, we find that the marginal cost of an inpatient is about $8,000 while the marginal cost of an outpatient is about $44. This disparity may provide an explanation for our finding that the effect of additional patient volumes overall (combining inpatient and outpatient) is an increase in hospitals' unit costs.

  19. The effect of health payment reforms on cost containment in Taiwan hospitals: the agency theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether the Taiwanese government's implementation of new health care payment reforms (the National Health Insurance with fee-for-service (NHI-FFS) and global budget (NHI-GB)) has resulted in better cost containment. Also, the question arises under the agency theory whether the monitoring system is effective in reducing the risk of information asymmetry. This study uses panel data analysis with fixed effects model to investigate changes in cost containment at Taipei municipal hospitals before and after adopting reforms from 1989 to 2004. The results show that the monitoring system does not reduce information asymmetry to improve cost containment under the NHI-FFS. In addition, after adopting the NHI-GB system, health care costs are controlled based on an improved monitoring system in the policymaker's point of view. This may suggest that the NHI's fee-for-services system actually causes health care resource waste. The GB may solve the problems of controlling health care costs only on the macro side. PMID:22043644

  20. The effect of health payment reforms on cost containment in Taiwan hospitals: the agency theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether the Taiwanese government's implementation of new health care payment reforms (the National Health Insurance with fee-for-service (NHI-FFS) and global budget (NHI-GB)) has resulted in better cost containment. Also, the question arises under the agency theory whether the monitoring system is effective in reducing the risk of information asymmetry. This study uses panel data analysis with fixed effects model to investigate changes in cost containment at Taipei municipal hospitals before and after adopting reforms from 1989 to 2004. The results show that the monitoring system does not reduce information asymmetry to improve cost containment under the NHI-FFS. In addition, after adopting the NHI-GB system, health care costs are controlled based on an improved monitoring system in the policymaker's point of view. This may suggest that the NHI's fee-for-services system actually causes health care resource waste. The GB may solve the problems of controlling health care costs only on the macro side.

  1. The World Bank, pharmaceutical policies, and health reforms in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Homedes, Núria; Ugalde, Antonio; Forns, Joan Rovira

    2005-01-01

    Health care systems spend a relatively high percentage of their resources on the purchase of medicines, and the poor spend a disproportionate amount of their income on pharmaceuticals. There is ample evidence in the literature that drugs are very poorly used. World Bank-led health reforms aim at improving equity, efficiency, quality, and users' satisfaction, and it will be difficult to achieve these goals without making medicines accessible and affordable. The purpose of this article is to examine the adequacy of World Bank pharmaceutical policies, as recommended in various Bank documents, for Latin America and to examine the implementation of the policy recommendations. The authors found that the World Bank identified and recommended a set of pharmaceutical policies that matched the needs of the region. But, as revealed through fieldwork and a review of the literature, the recommended pharmaceutical interventions were left out of the health reforms, and most of the loans that included pharmaceutical interventions allocated funds only to the purchase of drugs. The authors formulate four hypotheses that may explain the lack of congruence between the recommended policies and the strategies financed by World Bank health reform loans to the Latin American region.

  2. Equitable financing, out-of-pocket payments and the role of health care reform in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castano, Ramon A; Arbelaez, Jose J; Giedion, Ursula B; Morales, Luis G

    2002-12-01

    For a health care system to be considered equitable in its financing, the financial burden of contributions has to be progressive or at least proportional. Out-of-pocket financing takes a larger proportion of poor than of non-poor households' income. To remedy this regressive burden, among other goals, Colombia launched a health care reform based on social insurance as a means to reduce health care financing through out-of-pocket payments, and to reduce financial barriers to access. This paper analyzes the evolution of regressivity in out-of-pocket financing from 1984 to 1997, in order to detect if the 1993 health care reform had an impact on such regressivity. The Kakwani index of progressivity was estimated using three national household surveys. Kakwani indices showed a constant trend towards more regressivity (-0.126 in 1984, to -0.3498 in 1997) when using income to build the index, but a trend towards progressivity (-0.0092 in 1984, to 0.0026 in 1997) when using expenses. Our findings suggest that there was a progressive impact of the reform on out-of-pocket financing when household expenses are used to build the Kakwani index; however, due to issues of comparability between surveys, the findings are not conclusive. PMID:12477736

  3. Governance, transparency and alignment in the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) 2011 National Health Reform Agreement.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Gianluca; Harley, Kirsten; Dugdale, Paul; Short, Stephanie D

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE This article provides a policy analysis of the Australian government's National Health Reform Agreement (NHRA) by bringing to the foreground the governance arrangements underpinning the two arms of the national reforms, to primary health care and hospital services. METHODS The article analyses the NHRA document and mandate, and contextualises the changes introduced vis-à-vis the complex characteristics of the Australian health care system. Specifically, it discusses the coherence of the agreement and its underlying objectives, and the consistency and logic of the governance arrangements introduced. RESULTS The policy analysis highlights the rationalisation of the responsibilities between the Commonwealth and states and territories, the commitment towards a funding arrangement based on uniform measures of performance and the troubled emergence of a more decentralised nation-wide homogenisation of governance arrangements, plus efforts to improve transparency, accountability and statutory support to increase the standards of quality of care and safety. CONCLUSIONS It is suggested that the NHRA falls short of adequately supporting integration between primary, secondary and tertiary health care provision and facilitating greater integration in chronic disease management in primary care. Successfully addressing this will unlock further value from the reforms.

  4. Extended professional development for systemic curriculum reform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubitskey, Mary Elizabeth

    suggests a PD design model for long-term systemic change, incorporating teacher practice and student response, providing guidance for teachers making adaptations that maintain reform. This dissertation responds to the call for empirical research linking PD to learning outcomes. These models are unique because practice becomes a continuum of PD, rather than outcome and stresses the importance of addressing teachers' beliefs. This PD design provides mechanisms for maintaining equivalence between the written and enacted curriculum, sustaining the integrity of the reform.

  5. Using economic levers to change behaviour: the case of Thailand's universal coverage health care reforms.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David; Leethongdee, Songkramchai; Osiri, Sunantha

    2010-02-01

    Thailand's universal coverage health care policy has been presented as a knowledge-based reform involving substantial pre-planning, including expert economic analysis of the financing mechanism. This paper describes the new financing system introduced from 2001 in which the Ministry of Public Health allocated monies to local Contracted Units for Primary Care (CUPs) on the basis of population. It discusses the policy intention to use capitation funding to change incentive structures and engineer a transfer of professional staff from over-served urban areas to under-served rural areas. The paper utilises qualitative data from national policy makers and health service staff in three north-eastern provinces to tell the story of the reforms. We found that over time government moved away from the original capitation funding model as the result of (a) a macro-allocation problem arising from system disturbance and professional opposition, and (b) a micro-allocation problem that emerged when local budgets were not shared equitably. In many CUPs, the hospital directors controlling resource allocation channelled funds more towards curative services than community facilities. Taken together the macro and micro problems led to the dilution of capitation funding and reduced the re-distributive effects of the reforms. This strand of policy foundered in the face of structural and institutional barriers to change.

  6. Using economic levers to change behaviour: the case of Thailand's universal coverage health care reforms.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David; Leethongdee, Songkramchai; Osiri, Sunantha

    2010-02-01

    Thailand's universal coverage health care policy has been presented as a knowledge-based reform involving substantial pre-planning, including expert economic analysis of the financing mechanism. This paper describes the new financing system introduced from 2001 in which the Ministry of Public Health allocated monies to local Contracted Units for Primary Care (CUPs) on the basis of population. It discusses the policy intention to use capitation funding to change incentive structures and engineer a transfer of professional staff from over-served urban areas to under-served rural areas. The paper utilises qualitative data from national policy makers and health service staff in three north-eastern provinces to tell the story of the reforms. We found that over time government moved away from the original capitation funding model as the result of (a) a macro-allocation problem arising from system disturbance and professional opposition, and (b) a micro-allocation problem that emerged when local budgets were not shared equitably. In many CUPs, the hospital directors controlling resource allocation channelled funds more towards curative services than community facilities. Taken together the macro and micro problems led to the dilution of capitation funding and reduced the re-distributive effects of the reforms. This strand of policy foundered in the face of structural and institutional barriers to change. PMID:19914757

  7. Change of government: one more big bang health care reform in England's National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Hunter, David J

    2011-01-01

    Once again the National Health Service (NHS) in England is undergoing major reform, following the election of a new coalition government keen to reduce the role of the state and cut back on big government. The NHS has been undergoing continuous reform since the 1980s. Yet, despite the significant transaction costs incurred, there is no evidence that the claimed benefits have been achieved. Many of the same problems endure. The reforms follow the direction of change laid down by the last Conservative government in the early 1990s, which the recent Labour government did not overturn despite a commitment to do so. Indeed, under Labour, the NHS was subjected to further market-style changes that have paved the way for the latest round of reform. The article considers the appeal of big bang reform, questions its purpose and value, and critically appraises the nature and extent of the proposed changes in this latest round of reform. It warns that the NHS in its current form may not survive the changes, as they open the way to privatization and a weakening of its public service ethos.

  8. A miniature fuel reformer system for portable power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolanc, Gregor; Belavič, Darko; Hrovat, Marko; Hočevar, Stanko; Pohar, Andrej; Petrovčič, Janko; Musizza, Bojan

    2014-12-01

    A miniature methanol reformer system has been designed and built to technology readiness level exceeding a laboratory prototype. It is intended to feed fuel cells with electric power up to 100 W and contains a complete setup of the technological elements: catalytic reforming and PROX reactors, a combustor, evaporators, actuation and sensing elements, and a control unit. The system is engineered not only for performance and quality of the reformate, but also for its lightweight and compact design, seamless integration of elements, low internal electric consumption, and safety. In the paper, the design of the system is presented by focussing on its miniaturisation, integration, and process control.

  9. Implications of U.S. health care reform for the rural elderly.

    PubMed

    Vrabec, N J

    1995-01-01

    Health care services for elders living in rural areas have been limited by inadequate financing, lack of awareness of existing services, insufficient numbers of providers, and geographic dispersion of rural residents. Not all proposals for health care reform would help reduce these barriers, however. Nurses working in rural areas can facilitate the evolution of the health care system in several ways. A primary mechanism is the development and implementation of nurse-managed centers, networking with existing agencies and services to provide outreach programs to the underserved rural elders. Another mechanism is participation in professional organizations that lobby for rural health concerns. A third strategy is participation in program evaluation and intervention studies with policy-relevant implications. It is an exciting era for nurses involved in rural health and an opportune time to promote effective health care for older adults who live in rural areas.

  10. Health care reform and the role of public health agencies.

    PubMed

    Brumback, C L; Malecki, J M

    1996-01-01

    Experience in developing a local public health program, covering a period of approximately 45 years, is described. Included are the assessment and analysis of problems, policy formulation, plan development, and program implementation. A study of problems of seasonal farm workers, particularly those who migrate, is described, as well as a health services delivery program based on this study. Attention is given to incorporation of medical care with core public health services, and the use of a multidisciplinary team. Special features required to overcome cultural, language, educational, and other barriers are outlined. Adaption of knowledge gained from the migrant health project toward meeting needs of the county's medically underserved population is described. Involvement of the community, including representatives of private and public sectors, in the development and implementation of plans is emphasized. Maintaining appropriate emphasis on preventive aspects is discussed, together with mobilization of financial and other support. The importance of qualified public health staff is also emphasized: residency programs for physicians and dentists and training for other personnel are described. PMID:8764389

  11. [Reflections on health planning and on health reform in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Lana, F C; Gomes, E L

    1996-01-01

    The authors considered carefully the brazilian social policies at the regimes of populism and militarism as well as at the democratic transition following the presupposition that the social planning in Latin America emerged as an instrument for social policies formulation. The authors also considered some tendencies of the Latin America Planning, emphasizing the Strategic Focus of the Health Program formulated by the Public Health School of Medellin; the Strategic Thought elaborated by Mario Testa; and the Strategic Situational Planning developed by Carlos Matus. PMID:8807976

  12. Critical interactionism: an upstream-downstream approach to health care reform.

    PubMed

    Martins, Diane Cocozza; Burbank, Patricia M

    2011-01-01

    Currently, per capita health care expenditures in the United States are more than 20% higher than any other country in the world and more than twice the average expenditure for European countries, yet the United States ranks 37th in life expectancy. Clearly, the health care system is not succeeding in improving the health of the US population with its focus on illness care for individuals. A new theoretical approach, critical interactionism, combines symbolic interactionism and critical social theory to provide a guide for addressing health care problems from both an upstream and downstream approach. Concepts of meaning from symbolic interactionism and emancipation from critical perspective move across system levels to inform and reform health care for individuals, organizations, and societies. This provides a powerful approach for health care reform, moving back and forth between the micro and macro levels. Areas of application to nursing practice with several examples (patients with obesity; patients who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender; workplace bullying and errors), nursing education, and research are also discussed. PMID:22067231

  13. France: Health system review.

    PubMed

    Chevreul, Karine; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Bahrami, Stéphane Bahrami; Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina; Mladovsky, Philipa

    2010-01-01

    remained very stable until the mid 1990s, in the following decade many changes occurred and several new institutions were created. Concurrently, the respective power and involvement of the parliament, government, local authorities and SHI in the policy-making process have evolved. However, the Ministry of Health has retained substantial control over the health system, although ongoing reforms at both the regional and the national levels may challenge its traditional role. This edition of the French HiT was written concurrently with the vote and implementation of the 2009 Hospital, Patients, Health and Territories Act, which dramatically changed again the organizational structure and management of the health care system at the regional and local level. In order to ensure a comprehensive description and understanding of the system, the HiT, therefore, describes both the previous organization and the reorganization following the Act. However, the implementation process of the Act and its formal application was still a work in progress at the time of completing the French HiT.

  14. France: Health system review.

    PubMed

    Chevreul, Karine; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Bahrami, Stéphane Bahrami; Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina; Mladovsky, Philipa

    2010-01-01

    remained very stable until the mid 1990s, in the following decade many changes occurred and several new institutions were created. Concurrently, the respective power and involvement of the parliament, government, local authorities and SHI in the policy-making process have evolved. However, the Ministry of Health has retained substantial control over the health system, although ongoing reforms at both the regional and the national levels may challenge its traditional role. This edition of the French HiT was written concurrently with the vote and implementation of the 2009 Hospital, Patients, Health and Territories Act, which dramatically changed again the organizational structure and management of the health care system at the regional and local level. In order to ensure a comprehensive description and understanding of the system, the HiT, therefore, describes both the previous organization and the reorganization following the Act. However, the implementation process of the Act and its formal application was still a work in progress at the time of completing the French HiT. PMID:21406338

  15. Americans on Health Care Reform: Results from Polls Conducted with Zogby International, Inc.

    PubMed Central

    Casscells, S. Ward; Critchley, Hiliary P.; Herbst-Greer, Stephanie M.; Kaiser, Larry; Zogby, John

    2010-01-01

    During a time of uncertainty regarding the future of the American health care system, an assessment, over time, of Americans' opinion on different legislative or health policy directions is a valuable asset to decision makers. After polling over 10,000 Americans via three polls on these topics over four months, a few distinct trends have emerged. When it comes to health care reform, Americans want a “tune-up,” not a “trade-in” of their health care system by implementing reforms that allow the system to work more efficiently for the largest number of people possible, paying for it through savings found by reducing extraneous and wasteful spending and by increasing the quality of care. A clear sense of equity is also evident, as a majority do not agree with insurance companies using pre-existing health conditions as a metric in determining eligibility and believe in mandating that those who are employed, except for the smallest companies, should be covered. PMID:20697567

  16. Politics, class actors, and health sector reform in Brazil and Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Qamar; Muntaner, Carles

    2013-03-01

    Universal access to healthcare has assumed renewed importance in global health discourse, along with a focus on strengthening health systems. These developments are taking place in the backdrop of concerted efforts to advocate moving away from vertical, disease-based approaches to tackling health problems. While this approach to addressing public health problems is a step in the right direction, there is still insufficient emphasis on understanding the socio-political context of health systems. Reforms to strengthen health systems and achieve universal access to healthcare should be cognizant of the importance of the socio-political context, especially state-society relations. That context determines the nature and trajectory of reforms promoting universality or any pro-equity change. Brazil and Venezuela in recent years have made progress in developing healthcare systems that aim to achieve universal access. These achievements are noteworthy given that, historically, both countries had a long tradition of healthcare systems which were highly privatized and geared towards access to healthcare for a small segment of the population while the majority was excluded. These achievements are also remarkable since they took place in an era of neoliberalism when many states, even those with universally-based healthcare systems, were moving in the opposite direction. We analyze the socio-political context in each of these countries and look specifically at how the changing state-society relations resulted in health being constitutionally recognized as a social right. We describe the challenges that each faced in developing and implementing healthcare systems embracing universality. Our contention is that achieving the principle of universality in healthcare systems is less of a technical matter and more a political project. It involves opposition from the socially conservative elements in the society. Navigation to achieve this goal requires a political strategy that

  17. Politics, class actors, and health sector reform in Brazil and Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Qamar; Muntaner, Carles

    2013-03-01

    Universal access to healthcare has assumed renewed importance in global health discourse, along with a focus on strengthening health systems. These developments are taking place in the backdrop of concerted efforts to advocate moving away from vertical, disease-based approaches to tackling health problems. While this approach to addressing public health problems is a step in the right direction, there is still insufficient emphasis on understanding the socio-political context of health systems. Reforms to strengthen health systems and achieve universal access to healthcare should be cognizant of the importance of the socio-political context, especially state-society relations. That context determines the nature and trajectory of reforms promoting universality or any pro-equity change. Brazil and Venezuela in recent years have made progress in developing healthcare systems that aim to achieve universal access. These achievements are noteworthy given that, historically, both countries had a long tradition of healthcare systems which were highly privatized and geared towards access to healthcare for a small segment of the population while the majority was excluded. These achievements are also remarkable since they took place in an era of neoliberalism when many states, even those with universally-based healthcare systems, were moving in the opposite direction. We analyze the socio-political context in each of these countries and look specifically at how the changing state-society relations resulted in health being constitutionally recognized as a social right. We describe the challenges that each faced in developing and implementing healthcare systems embracing universality. Our contention is that achieving the principle of universality in healthcare systems is less of a technical matter and more a political project. It involves opposition from the socially conservative elements in the society. Navigation to achieve this goal requires a political strategy that

  18. Solar central receiver reformer system for ammonia plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-07-01

    An overview of a study to retrofit the Valley Nitrogen Producers, Inc., El Centro, California 600 ST/SD Ammonia Plant with Solar Central Receiver Technology is presented. The retrofit system consists of a solar central receiver reformer (SCRR) operating in parallel with the existing fossil fired reformer. Steam and hydrocarbon react in the catalyst filled tubes of the inner cavity receiver to form a hydrogen rich mixture which is the syngas feed for the ammonia production. The SCRR system will displace natural gas presently used in the fossil reformer combustion chamber.

  19. Pharmaceuticals--strategic considerations in health reforms in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Nishtar, Sania

    2006-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals are critical to the functioning of healthcare systems which require a sustainable supply of quality, efficacious, and safe essential medicines. With this as a context, the Gateway Paper in its capacity as a suggested roadmap for health reforms within Pakistan stressed on the need for a pharmaceutical policy to be directed towards improving people's access to medicines; within this framework a number of issues have been highlighted. Weaknesses in the current legislation on drugs, in particular gaps, which have emerged contemporaneously with reference to the post WTO situation and the technology boom, have been discussed and the incongruity between the drug policies and policies in the other sectors addressed. The Gateway Paper makes a strong case to establish a statutory semi-autonomous drug regulatory authority in order to ensure stricter implementation of the Drug Law, which needs to be amended to bridge the current gaps. The paper lays emphasis on a formal quality assurance mechanism and the need to build capacity to implement regulation in this regard. Lack of clarity in the current pricing formula has been flagged as a key issue and the need highlighted to develop a pricing formula that is predictable, transparent and acceptable to the stakeholders, yet one that does not create access and affordability issues for the poor and disadvantaged. The paper addresses gaps in the process of drug registration in Pakistan and stresses on the need to redefine its scope and ensure its stricter enforcement. Unethical market practices and irrational use of drugs have been discussed and the need for transparently implementing standard operating procedures for drug selecting, procurement, storage, dispensing and rational prescribing and the introduction of appropriate evidence based education, managerial and regulatory interventions in this regard, highlighted. The myriad of reasons which lead to the shortage of drugs and to the mushrooming of spurious

  20. Positioning advanced practice registered nurses for health care reform: consensus on APRN regulation.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Joan M; Werner, Kathryn E; Apple, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) have positioned themselves to serve an integral role in national health care reform. This article addresses both the policy and the process to develop this policy that has placed them in a strategic position. A successful transformation of the nation's health system will require utilization of all clinicians, particularly primary care providers, to the full extent of their education and scope of practice. APRNs are highly qualified clinicians who provide cost-effective, accessible, patient-centered care and have the education to provide the range of services at the heart of the reform movement, including care coordination, chronic care management, and wellness and preventive care. The APRN community faces many challenges amidst the opportunities of health reform. However, the APRN community's triumph in reaching consensus on APRN regulation signifies a cohesive approach to overcoming the obstacles. The consensus model for APRN regulation, endorsed by 44 national nursing organizations, will serve as a beacon for nursing, as well as a guidepost for consumers and policymakers, on titling, education, certification, accreditation, and licensing for all four APRN roles.

  1. Social solidarity and civil servants' willingness for financial cross-subsidization in South Africa: implications for health financing reform.

    PubMed

    Harris, Bronwyn; Nxumalo, Nonhlanhla; Ataguba, John E; Govender, Veloshnee; Chersich, Matthew; Goudge, Jane

    2011-01-01

    In South Africa, anticipated health sector reforms aim to achieve universal health coverage for all citizens. Success will depend on social solidarity and willingness to pay for health care according to means, while benefitting on the basis of their need. In this study, we interviewed 1330 health and education sector civil servants in four South African provinces, about potential income cross-subsidies and financing mechanisms for a National Health Insurance. One third was willing to cross-subsidize others and half favored a progressive financing system, with senior managers, black Africans, or those with tertiary education more likely to choose these options than lower-skilled staff, white, Indian or Asian respondents, or those with primary or less education. Insurance- and health-status were not associated with willingness to pay or preferred type of financing system. Understanding social relationships, identities, and shared meanings is important for any reform striving toward universal coverage.

  2. Women Ministers of Word and Sacrament within the United Reformed Church: A Health Check

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolph, Jenny; Francis, Leslie J.; Charlton, Rodger; Robbins, Mandy; Rolph, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This study draws on qualitative questionnaire data provided by 22 women ministers of word and sacrament serving within the United Reformed Church in England to provide a health check across the four conceptually distinct areas of physical health, psychological health, religious health, and spiritual health. Here spiritual health is defined in…

  3. Allied health deans' and program directors' perspectives of specialized accreditation effectiveness and reform.

    PubMed

    Baker, Sarah S; Morrone, Anastasia S; Gable, Karen E

    2004-01-01

    Criticisms, calls for change, and recommendations for specialized accreditation improvement have been made by individuals or groups external to the daily operations of allied health educational programs, frequently as opinion pieces or articles lacking a research foundation. While there is a great deal of concern related to specialized accreditation, little input has been provided from those within, and integral to, allied health educational programs affected by specialized accreditation standards. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of selected allied health deans and program directors regarding specialized accreditation effectiveness and reform. Survey research was used to study perspectives of allied health deans and program directors located in four-year colleges and universities and in academic health centers and medical schools. Surveys were mailed to program directors offering-programs in clinical laboratory sciences and medical technology, nuclear medicine technology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, radiation therapy, and radiography. Simultaneously, allied health deans located within these institutions were surveyed. A total of 773 surveys were mailed and 424 valid responses were received, yielding a response rate of 55%. The results affirmed the role of accreditation as an effective system for assuring quality in higher education. The role of specialized accreditation in improving the quality of allied health programs was clearly articulated by the respondents. Respondents voiced strong opposition to governmental or state-level requirements for accountability and emphasized the vital role of peer evaluators. Significant differences in deans' and program directors' perspectives related to specialized accreditation were evident. Whereas deans and program directors agreed with the purposes of specialized accreditation, they expressed less support for the process and effectiveness, and critique and reform, of specialized

  4. Canada: Health system review.

    PubMed

    Marchildon, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Canada is a high-income country with a population of 33 million people. Its economic performance has been solid despite the recession that began in 2008. Life expectancy in Canada continues to rise and is high compared with most OECD countries; however, infant and maternal mortality rates tend to be worse than in countries such as Australia, France and Sweden. About 70% of total health expenditure comes from the general tax revenues of the federal, provincial and territorial governments. Most public revenues for health are used to provide universal medicare (medically necessary hospital and physician services that are free at the point of service for residents) and to subsidise the costs of outpatient prescription drugs and long-term care. Health care costs continue to grow at a faster rate than the economy and government revenue, largely driven by spending on prescription drugs. In the last five years, however, growth rates in pharmaceutical spending have been matched by hospital spending and overtaken by physician spending, mainly due to increased provider remuneration. The governance, organization and delivery of health services is highly decentralized, with the provinces and territories responsible for administering medicare and planning health services. In the last ten years there have been no major pan-Canadian health reform initiatives but individual provinces and territories have focused on reorganizing or fine tuning their regional health systems and improving the quality, timeliness and patient experience of primary, acute and chronic care. The medicare system has been effective in providing Canadians with financial protection against hospital and physician costs. However, the narrow scope of services covered under medicare has produced important gaps in coverage and equitable access may be a challenge in these areas.

  5. Canada: Health system review.

    PubMed

    Marchildon, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Canada is a high-income country with a population of 33 million people. Its economic performance has been solid despite the recession that began in 2008. Life expectancy in Canada continues to rise and is high compared with most OECD countries; however, infant and maternal mortality rates tend to be worse than in countries such as Australia, France and Sweden. About 70% of total health expenditure comes from the general tax revenues of the federal, provincial and territorial governments. Most public revenues for health are used to provide universal medicare (medically necessary hospital and physician services that are free at the point of service for residents) and to subsidise the costs of outpatient prescription drugs and long-term care. Health care costs continue to grow at a faster rate than the economy and government revenue, largely driven by spending on prescription drugs. In the last five years, however, growth rates in pharmaceutical spending have been matched by hospital spending and overtaken by physician spending, mainly due to increased provider remuneration. The governance, organization and delivery of health services is highly decentralized, with the provinces and territories responsible for administering medicare and planning health services. In the last ten years there have been no major pan-Canadian health reform initiatives but individual provinces and territories have focused on reorganizing or fine tuning their regional health systems and improving the quality, timeliness and patient experience of primary, acute and chronic care. The medicare system has been effective in providing Canadians with financial protection against hospital and physician costs. However, the narrow scope of services covered under medicare has produced important gaps in coverage and equitable access may be a challenge in these areas. PMID:23628429

  6. Comparative effectiveness research: evidence-based medicine meets health care reform in the USA.

    PubMed

    Tanenbaum, Sandra J

    2009-12-01

    Rationale Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is the study of two or more approaches to a health problem to determine which one results in better health outcomes. It is viewed by some in the USA as a promising strategy for health care reform. Aims and Objectives In this paper, nascent US CER policy will be described and analysed in order to determine its similarities and differences with EBM and its chances of success. Methods Document review and process tracing Results CER shares the logic of policies promoting evidence-based medicine, but invites greater methodological flexibility to ensure external validity across a range of health care topics. Conclusions This may narrow the inferential distance from knowledge to action, but efforts to change the US health care system through CER will face familiar epistemological quandaries and 'patient-centred' politics on the left and right. PMID:20367695

  7. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mroz, Tracy M; Pitonyak, Jennifer S; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy's rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy's perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy's research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. PMID:26356651

  8. United Kingdom: Health System Review.

    PubMed

    Cylus, Jonathan; Richardson, Erica; Findley, Lisa; Longley, Marcus; O'Neill, Ciaran; Steel, David

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of the United Kingdom health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. It provides an overview of how the national health services operate in the four nations that make up the United Kingdom, as responsibility for organizing health financing and services was devolved from 1997. With devolution, the health systems in the United Kingdom have diverged in the details of how services are organized and paid for, but all have maintained national health services which provide universal access to a comprehensive package of services that are mostly free at the point of use. These health services are predominantly financed from general taxation and 83.5% of total health expenditure in the United Kingdom came from public sources in 2013. Life expectancy has increased steadily across the United Kingdom, but health inequalities have proved stubbornly resistant to improvement, and the gap between the most deprived and the most privileged continues to widen, rather than close. The United Kingdom faces challenges going forward, including how to cope with the needs of an ageing population, how to manage populations with poor health behaviours and associated chronic conditions, how to meet patient expectations of access to the latest available medicines and technologies, and how to adapt a system that has limited resources to expand its workforce and infrastructural capacity so it can rise to these challenges.

  9. The Affordable Care Act and the Medicare program: the engines of true health reform.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Eleanor D

    2013-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and its amendments by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 constitute landmark legislation known as the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA has made many changes in the Medicare program as part of comprehensive health reform for the U.S. health care sector. Title III of the ACA pertains to improving the efficiency and quality of health care. Title VI calls for greater program integrity for all federally funded health insurance programs. Collectively, the changes in Medicare in these two titles address the three major problems that the Medicare program has faced since its inception: cost and volume inflation, quality assurance, and fraud and abuse. These changes, if successfully implemented, will have a dramatic impact on the reform of the American health care sector. The policy-making process in the Medicare program is exemplary of the process of "muddling through," as described by the Yale economist Charles E. Lindblom. Nevertheless, these changes may also prepare the Medicare program to be transformed, through several incremental changes in upcoming years, into a single payer system.

  10. The Impact of Health Care Reform on Hospital and Preventive Care: Evidence from Massachusetts☆

    PubMed Central

    Kolstad, Jonathan T.; Kowalski, Amanda E.

    2012-01-01

    In April 2006, Massachusetts passed legislation aimed at achieving near-universal health insurance coverage. The key features of this legislation were a model for national health reform, passed in March 2010. The reform gives us a novel opportunity to examine the impact of expansion to near-universal coverage state-wide. Among hospital discharges in Massachusetts, we find that the reform decreased uninsurance by 36% relative to its initial level and to other states. Reform affected utilization by decreasing length of stay, the number of inpatient admissions originating from the emergency room, and preventable admissions. At the same time, hospital cost growth did not increase. PMID:23180894

  11. Allied health: untapped potential in the Australian health system.

    PubMed

    Philip, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Although comprising around 20 per cent ofAustralia's health care workforce, allied health and its contribution to improving health outcomes remains poorly understood and largely invisible in the Australian health policy and reform environment. There is strong evidence demonstrating the benefits of allied health in improving patient outcomes, minimising risk and harm from illness and improving health system efficiency and capacity to meet increased demand cost effectively. Despite this, the existing health model, funding and culture prevent us from effectively accessing these benefits at a system level. The untapped potential of allied health represents a major underutilised resource to address many of the challenges facing Australia's health system today. A transformational change in the Australian health system in how, where and by whom care is provided is necessary. Australia's health model and culture needs to shift, to genuinely involve the consumer and make fill use of all three pillars of the patient care workforce. PMID:26629583

  12. Key findings from HSC's 2010 site visits: health care markets weather economic downturn, brace for health reform.

    PubMed

    Felland, Laurie E; Grossman, Joy M; Tu, Ha T

    2011-05-01

    Lingering fallout--loss of jobs and employer coverage--from the great recession slowed demand for health care services but did little to slow aggressive competition by dominant hospital systems for well-insured patients, according to key findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2010 site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. Hospitals with significant market clout continued to command high payment rate increases from private insurers, and tighter hospital-physician alignment heightened concerns about growing provider market power. High and rising premiums led to increasing employer adoption of consumer-driven health plans and continued increases in patient cost sharing, but the broader movement to educate and engage consumers in care decisions did not keep pace. State and local budget deficits led to some funding cuts for safety net providers, but an influx of federal stimulus funds increased support to community health centers and shored up Medicaid programs, allowing many people who lost private insurance because of job losses to remain covered. Hospitals, physicians and insurers generally viewed health reform coverage expansions favorably, but all worried about protecting revenues as reform requirements phase in. PMID:21614861

  13. Shifting subjects of health-care: placing "medical tourism" in the context of Malaysian domestic health-care reform.

    PubMed

    Ormond, Meghann

    2011-01-01

    "Medical tourism" has frequently been held to unsettle naturalised relationships between the state and its citizenry. Yet in casting "medical tourism" as either an outside "innovation" or "invasion," scholars have often ignored the role that the neoliberal retrenchment of social welfare structures has played in shaping the domestic health-care systems of the "developing" countries recognised as international medical travel destinations. While there is little doubt that "medical tourism" impacts destinations' health-care systems, it remains essential to contextualise them. This paper offers a reading of the emergence of "medical tourism" from within the context of ongoing health-care privatisation reform in one of today's most prominent destinations: Malaysia. It argues that "medical tourism" to Malaysia has been mobilised politically both to advance domestic health-care reform and to cast off the country's "underdeveloped" image not only among foreign patient-consumers but also among its own nationals, who are themselves increasingly envisioned by the Malaysian state as prospective health-care consumers.

  14. Shifting subjects of health-care: placing "medical tourism" in the context of Malaysian domestic health-care reform.

    PubMed

    Ormond, Meghann

    2011-01-01

    "Medical tourism" has frequently been held to unsettle naturalised relationships between the state and its citizenry. Yet in casting "medical tourism" as either an outside "innovation" or "invasion," scholars have often ignored the role that the neoliberal retrenchment of social welfare structures has played in shaping the domestic health-care systems of the "developing" countries recognised as international medical travel destinations. While there is little doubt that "medical tourism" impacts destinations' health-care systems, it remains essential to contextualise them. This paper offers a reading of the emergence of "medical tourism" from within the context of ongoing health-care privatisation reform in one of today's most prominent destinations: Malaysia. It argues that "medical tourism" to Malaysia has been mobilised politically both to advance domestic health-care reform and to cast off the country's "underdeveloped" image not only among foreign patient-consumers but also among its own nationals, who are themselves increasingly envisioned by the Malaysian state as prospective health-care consumers. PMID:22216474

  15. One positive impact of health care reform to physicians: the computer-based patient record.

    PubMed

    England, S P

    1993-11-01

    The health care industry is an information-dependent business that will require a new generation of health information systems if successful health care reform is to occur. We critically need integrated clinical management information systems to support the physician and related clinicians at the direct care level, which in turn will have linkages with secondary users of health information such as health payors, regulators, and researchers. The economic dependence of health care industry on the CPR cannot be underestimated, says Jeffrey Ritter. He sees the U.S. health industry as about to enter a bold new age where our records are electronic, our computers are interconnected, and our money is nothing but pulses running across the telephone lines. Hence the United States is now in an age of electronic commerce. Clinical systems reform must begin with the community-based patient chart, which is located in the physician's office, the hospital, and other related health care provider offices. A community-based CPR and CPR system that integrates all providers within a managed care network is the most logical step since all health information begins with the creation of a patient record. Once a community-based CPR system is in place, the physician and his or her clinical associates will have a common patient record upon which all direct providers have access to input and record patient information. Once a community-level CPR system is in place with a community provider network, each physician will have available health information and data processing capability that will finally provide real savings in professional time and effort. Lost patient charts will no longer be a problem. Data input and storage of health information would occur electronically via transcripted text, voice, and document imaging. All electronic clinical information, voice, and graphics could be recalled at any time and transmitted to any terminal location within the health provider network. Hence

  16. Reforming Systems: Realizing the Fourth Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Alma

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines how the work of Andy Hargreaves has significantly and substantially informed our understanding of educational change, particularly systemwide change, by drawing upon his most recent research and writing to consider what is known about the process of successful, large-scale reform. It focuses on some of the "fallacies of…

  17. Change in Health Insurance Coverage in Massachusetts and Other New England States by Perceived Health Status: Potential Impact of Health Reform

    PubMed Central

    Zack, Matthew M.; Strine, Tara W.; Druss, Benjamin G.; Simoes, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the impact of Massachusetts health reform and its public health component (enacted in 2006) on change in health insurance coverage by perceived health. Methods. We used 2003–2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data. We used a difference-in-differences framework to examine the experience in Massachusetts to predict the outcomes of national health care reform. Results. The proportion of adults aged 18 to 64 years with health insurance coverage increased more in Massachusetts than in other New England states (4.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.5%, 5.6%). For those with higher perceived health care need (more recent mentally and physically unhealthy days and activity limitation days [ALDs]), the postreform proportion significantly exceeded prereform (P < .001). Groups with higher perceived health care need represented a disproportionate increase in health insurance coverage in Massachusetts compared with other New England states—from 4.3% (95% CI = 3.3%, 5.4%) for fewer than 14 ALDs to 9.0% (95% CI = 4.5%, 13.5%) for 14 or more ALDs. Conclusions. On the basis of the Massachusetts experience, full implementation of the Affordable Care Act may increase health insurance coverage especially among populations with higher perceived health care need. PMID:23597359

  18. US Health Care Reform and the Future of Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    THE PATIENT PROTECTION and Affordable Care Act has grand ambitions: to provide insurance coverage to more than 30 million currently uninsured Americans, to slow increases in health care costs, to reorganize the health care delivery system, and to improve the quality of care provided to all. Where does the oral health community fit in this initiative? Should dentists “scope up” to become a more active part of the primary care workforce? Or should dentists “scope down” and delegate parts of the traditional dental tool kit to midlevel practitioners? Our nation's public health largely depends on whether we can create a more integrated and public health–oriented delivery system. The oral health, physical health, and public health communities should address this challenge together. PMID:21852628

  19. Changing trends in mental health legislation: anatomy of reforming a civil commitment law.

    PubMed

    Aviram, U; Weyer, R A

    1996-01-01

    In this article, we discuss changing trends of mental health legislation in the United States using a case study of the process of reforming the civil commitment law in New Jersey. That state's new commitment law, commonly called the "screening law," was enacted after a thirteen-year legislative process. Changes in the orientation of the proposed legislation and the dynamics of the process of reforming the commitment law in the state exemplify changing national trends in civil commitment legislation. We consider how the proposed legislation shifted in emphasis from a strong civil libertarian orientation to a social service approach. We assess the role of various interest groups, their negotiations, and the compromises that emerged. Our analysis of the process shows that changes in the social and political environment were the decisive factors that stimulated the process of reforming the civil commitment laws. Many of these changes occurred outside the mental health system and could be neither anticipated nor controlled by the various parties. Our examination of the process and the final outcome of this legislation reveals how organizations and interest groups, in their efforts to adapt to changing conditions, shaped the legislative outcome according to their interests.

  20. Addiction treatment ultimatums and U.S. health reform: A case study.

    PubMed

    Weisner, Constance; Hinman, Agatha; Lu, Yun; Chi, Felicia W; Mertens, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: Increased access to health care, including addiction treatment, has long been a goal of health reform in the U.S. An unanswered question is whether reform will change the way people get to addiction treatment; when treatment is easily accessible, do individuals self-refer, or do they still enter treatment via ultimatums, and if so, from which sources? To begin examining this, we used a single case study of a U.S. health plan that provides access similar to that called for in health reform. METHOD: Using a case study method of data from studies conducted in a large, private non-profit, integrated managed care health plan which includes addiction services, we examined the prevalence and source of ultimatums to enter treatment, and the characteristics of those receiving them. The plan is highly representative of changes to U.S. health care and other countries due to health reform. RESULTS: Many individuals entering addiction treatment had received an ultimatum stemming from employment, legal, medical, and family sources. Having more employment problems, an occupation with public safety concerns, being older, male, and ethnicity predicted an employment ultimatum. Higher legal problem severity predicted a legal ultimatum. More men (and younger people) had family ultimatums, and more women (and older people) had medical ultimatums. Being younger, male, married, having higher employment and family problem severity, and being drug or combined drug/alcohol dependent rather than dependent on alcohol-only predicted an ultimatum from one's family. On the whole, an ultimatum from one source was not related to having one from another source. Those most likely to receive ultimatums from multiple sources were women, those separated/divorced, and those having higher psychiatric and legal problem severity. CONCLUSIONS: Even in an insured population with good access to addiction treatment, individuals often receive ultimatums to enter treatment rather than being self

  1. Reform and the politics of hybridization in mature health care states.

    PubMed

    Tuohy, Carolyn Hughes

    2012-08-01

    This article examines the cases of three health care states -- two of which (Britain and the Netherlands) have undergone major policy reform and one of which (Canada) has experienced only marginal adjustments. The British and Dutch reforms have variously altered the balance of power, the mix of instruments of control, and the organizing principles. As a result, mature systems representing the ideal-typical health care state categories of national health systems and social insurance (Britain and the Netherlands, respectively) were transformed into distinctive national hybrids. These processes have involved a politics of redesign that differs from the politics of earlier phases of establishment and retrenchment. In particular, the redesign phase is marked by the activity of institutional entrepreneurs who exploit specific opportunities afforded by public programs to combine public and private resources in innovative organizational arrangements. Canada stands as a counterpoint: no window of opportunity for major change occurred, and the bilateral monopoly created by its prototypical single-payer model provided few footholds for entrepreneurial activity. The increased significance of institutional entrepreneurs gives greater urgency to one of the central projects of health policy: the design of accountability frameworks to allow for an assessment of performance against objectives.

  2. Health care reform hinges on private-sector collaboration.

    PubMed

    Novelli, Bill

    2009-04-01

    America's health care system is characterized by rising costs, increasing numbers of Americans who lack health insurance coverage, and poor quality of health care delivery. The convergence of these factors is adversely affecting not only the health of Americans but also the ability of businesses to compete successfully in a global marketplace. AARP and other nonprofit organizations are collaborating with the private sector to have more people covered by health insurance and to educate them to make behavioral choices that prevent chronic disease and ultimately lower costs.

  3. Systems, Stakeholders, and Students: Including Students in School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Shelley D.

    2009-01-01

    The education system in the United States is under pressure from a variety of sources to reform and improve the delivery of educational services to students. Change across a system as complex and dynamic as the educational system requires a systemic approach and requires the participation or buy-in of all participants and stakeholders. This…

  4. Leadership Dynamics Promoting Systemic Reform for Inclusive Service Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a multicase study of two systems of schools striving to reform service delivery systems for students with special needs. Considering these systems as institutional actors, the study examines what promotes the understanding and implementation of special education service delivery within a system of schools in a manner that…

  5. Rents From the Essential Health Benefits Mandate of Health Insurance Reform.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Roger Lee

    2015-01-01

    The essential health benefits mandate constitutes one of the most controversial health care reforms introduced under the U.S. Affordable Care Act of 2010. It bears important theoretical and practical implications for health care risk and insurance management. These essential health benefits are examined in this study from a rent-seeking perspective, particularly in terms of three interrelated questions: Is there an economic rationale for standardized, minimum health care coverage? How is the scope of essential health services and treatments determined? What are the attendant and incidental costs and benefits of such determination/s? Rents offer ample incentives to business interests to expend considerable resources for health care marketing, particularly when policy processes are open to contestation. Welfare losses inevitably arise from these incentives. We rely on five case studies to illustrate why and how rents are created, assigned, extracted, and dissipated in equilibrium. We also demonstrate why rents depend on persuasive marketing and the bargained decisions of regulators and rentiers, as conditioned by the Tullock paradox. Insights on the intertwining issues of consumer choice, health care marketing, and insurance reform are offered by way of conclusion. PMID:26075546

  6. Rents From the Essential Health Benefits Mandate of Health Insurance Reform.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Roger Lee

    2015-01-01

    The essential health benefits mandate constitutes one of the most controversial health care reforms introduced under the U.S. Affordable Care Act of 2010. It bears important theoretical and practical implications for health care risk and insurance management. These essential health benefits are examined in this study from a rent-seeking perspective, particularly in terms of three interrelated questions: Is there an economic rationale for standardized, minimum health care coverage? How is the scope of essential health services and treatments determined? What are the attendant and incidental costs and benefits of such determination/s? Rents offer ample incentives to business interests to expend considerable resources for health care marketing, particularly when policy processes are open to contestation. Welfare losses inevitably arise from these incentives. We rely on five case studies to illustrate why and how rents are created, assigned, extracted, and dissipated in equilibrium. We also demonstrate why rents depend on persuasive marketing and the bargained decisions of regulators and rentiers, as conditioned by the Tullock paradox. Insights on the intertwining issues of consumer choice, health care marketing, and insurance reform are offered by way of conclusion.

  7. Support for National Health Insurance Seven Years Into Massachusetts Healthcare Reform: Views of Populations Targeted by the Reform.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Sonali; Zallman, Leah; Nardin, Rachel; Bor, David; Woolhandler, Steffie; Himmelstein, David U; McCormick, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Before the Affordable Care Act (ACA), many surveys showed majority support for national health insurance (NHI), also known as single payer; however, little is currently known about views of the ACA's targeted population. Massachusetts residents have had seven years of experience with state health care reform that became the model for the ACA. We surveyed 1,151 adults visiting safety-net emergency departments in Massachusetts in late 2013 on their preference for NHI or the Massachusetts reform and on their experiences with insurance. Most of the patients surveyed were low-income and non-white. The majority of patients (72.0%) preferred NHI to the Massachusetts reform. Support for NHI among those with public insurance, commercial insurance, and no insurance was 68.9%, 70.3%, and 86.3%, respectively (p < .001). Support for NHI was higher among patients dissatisfied with their insurance plan (83.3% vs. 68.9%, p = .014), who delayed medical care (81.2% vs. 69.6%, p < .001) or avoided purchasing medications due to cost (87.3% vs. 71.4%; p = .01). Majority support for NHI was observed in every demographic subgroup. Given the strong support for NHI among disadvantaged Massachusetts patients seven years after state health reform, a reappraisal of the ACA's ability to meet the needs of underserved patients is warranted. PMID:26536912

  8. Do the bishops have it right on health care reform?

    PubMed

    Sulmasy, Daniel P

    1996-01-01

    The National Conference of Catholic Bishops has argued for significant government involvement in health care in order to assure respect for what they regard as the right to health care. Critics charge that the bishops are wrong because health care is not a right. In this article, it is argued that these critics are correct in their claim that health care is not a right. However, it is also argued that the premise that health care is not a right does not imply that the market is the most equitable and just system for providing health care. Natural law arguments in the tradition of Roman Catholic social teaching lead to the conclusion that a just and prosperous society has a moral obligation to provide health care even if there is no such right. Further, there are strong moral grounds for concluding that the bishops are correct in their claim that health care ought not to be considered a market commodity. It is argued that if health care ought not to be considered a commodity, then national health insurance is the best available alternative for fulfilling the social obligation to distribute health care resources justly and fairly at this time in American history. The bishops' case for government involvement can be made on the strength of the Catholic tradition in theological argumentation, independent of the claim that health care is a right.

  9. Do the bishops have it right on health care reform?

    PubMed

    Sulmasy, Daniel P

    1996-01-01

    The National Conference of Catholic Bishops has argued for significant government involvement in health care in order to assure respect for what they regard as the right to health care. Critics charge that the bishops are wrong because health care is not a right. In this article, it is argued that these critics are correct in their claim that health care is not a right. However, it is also argued that the premise that health care is not a right does not imply that the market is the most equitable and just system for providing health care. Natural law arguments in the tradition of Roman Catholic social teaching lead to the conclusion that a just and prosperous society has a moral obligation to provide health care even if there is no such right. Further, there are strong moral grounds for concluding that the bishops are correct in their claim that health care ought not to be considered a market commodity. It is argued that if health care ought not to be considered a commodity, then national health insurance is the best available alternative for fulfilling the social obligation to distribute health care resources justly and fairly at this time in American history. The bishops' case for government involvement can be made on the strength of the Catholic tradition in theological argumentation, independent of the claim that health care is a right. PMID:11654657

  10. Foul weather friends: big business and health care reform in the 1990s in historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Peter; Greer, Scott

    2002-08-01

    Existing accounts of the Clinton health reform efforts of the early 1990s neglect to examine how the change in big business reform interests during the short period between the late 1980s and 1994 might have altered the trajectory of compulsory health insurance legislation in Congress. This article explores evidence that big employers lost their early interest in reform because they believed their private remedies for bringing down health cost inflation were finally beginning to work. This had a discouraging effect on reform efforts. Historical analysis shows how hard times during the Great Depression also aligned big business interests with those of reformers seeking compulsory social insurance. Unlike the present case, however, the economic climate did not quickly improve, and the social insurance reform of the New Deal succeeded. The article speculates, therefore, that had employer health expenditures not flattened out, continuing and even growing big business support might have neutralized small business and other opposition that contributed heavily to the failure of reform. Thus in light of the Clinton administration's demonstrated willingness to compromise with business on details of its plan, some kind of major reform might have succeeded.

  11. Health complaints and regulatory reform: Implications for vulnerable populations?

    PubMed

    Carney, Terry; Beaupert, Fleur; Chiarella, Mary; Bennett, Belinda; Walton, Merrilyn; Kelly, Patrick J; Satchell, Claudette S

    2016-03-01

    Complaints and disciplinary processes play a significant role in health professional regulation. Many countries are transitioning from models of self-regulation to greater external oversight through systems including meta-regulation, responsive (risk-based) regulation, and "networked governance". Such systems harness, in differing ways, public, private, professional and non-governmental bodies to exert influence over the conduct of health professionals and services. Interesting literature is emerging regarding complainants' motivations and experiences, the impact of complaints processes on health professionals, and identification of features such as complainant and health professional profiles, types of complaints and outcomes. This article concentrates on studies identifying vulnerable groups and their participation in health care regulatory systems. PMID:27323641

  12. The role of civil society in health care reforms: an arena for hegemonic struggles.

    PubMed

    Filc, Dani

    2014-12-01

    The present paper argues that current mainstream understandings of civil society as ontologically different from the state and essentially positive (either normative or functionally) are problematic in order to understand the development of health care reforms. The paper proposes to ground an explanation of the role of civil society in health care reforms in a Gramscian understanding of civil society as analytically different from the state, and as an arena for hegemonic struggles. The study of health care reform in Israel serves as a case study for this claim.

  13. Nursing's agenda for health care reform: policy, politics, and power through professional leadership.

    PubMed

    Betts, V T

    1996-01-01

    This article is an eye witness account of nursing's participation in the health care reform debate from 1991 to 1994. In that debate, the nursing profession achieved high visibility and recognition for the cogency of its policy positions as developed in Nursing's Agenda for Health Care Reform and for its united voice through the leadership of the American Nurses Association, the Tricouncil for Nursing, and the Nursing Organization Liaison Forum. While comprehensive health care reform failed to pass the 103rd Congress, nursing and nurses gained much in the process of their participation.

  14. Price elasticities in the German Statutory Health Insurance market before and after the health care reform of 2009.

    PubMed

    Pendzialek, Jonas B; Danner, Marion; Simic, Dusan; Stock, Stephanie

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the change in price elasticity of health insurance choice in Germany after a reform of health insurance contributions. Using a comprehensive data set of all sickness funds between 2004 and 2013, price elasticities are calculated both before and after the reform for the entire market. The general price elasticity is found to be increased more than 4-fold from -0.81 prior to the reform to -3.53 after the reform. By introducing a new kind of health insurance contribution the reform seemingly increased the price elasticity of insured individuals to a more appropriate level under the given market parameters. However, further unintended consequences of the new contribution scheme were massive losses of market share for the more expensive sickness funds and therefore an undivided focus on pricing as the primary competitive element to the detriment of quality. PMID:25670009

  15. Price elasticities in the German Statutory Health Insurance market before and after the health care reform of 2009.

    PubMed

    Pendzialek, Jonas B; Danner, Marion; Simic, Dusan; Stock, Stephanie

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the change in price elasticity of health insurance choice in Germany after a reform of health insurance contributions. Using a comprehensive data set of all sickness funds between 2004 and 2013, price elasticities are calculated both before and after the reform for the entire market. The general price elasticity is found to be increased more than 4-fold from -0.81 prior to the reform to -3.53 after the reform. By introducing a new kind of health insurance contribution the reform seemingly increased the price elasticity of insured individuals to a more appropriate level under the given market parameters. However, further unintended consequences of the new contribution scheme were massive losses of market share for the more expensive sickness funds and therefore an undivided focus on pricing as the primary competitive element to the detriment of quality.

  16. [Health reform and the creation of the Sistema Único de Saúde: notes on contexts and authors].

    PubMed

    Paiva, Carlos Henrique Assunção; Teixeira, Luiz Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Within the context of the return to democracy, the new constitution enacted in 1988 transformed health into an individual right and initiated the process of creating a public, universal and decentralized health system, profoundly altering the organization of public health in Brazil. This article discusses the main institutional, political and social aspects of this health reform, along with the changes, the continuities and the major initiatives, based on the literature published by the most widely read authors in this field of study. Without purporting to offer an exhaustive analysis, we discuss how the historiography written by authors who were also actors in the process assess its main features, along with the genesis of the process and the legacy of health reform in Brazil.

  17. Managed care in Latin America: the new common sense in health policy reform.

    PubMed

    Iriart, C; Merhy, E E; Waitzkin, H

    2001-04-01

    This article presents the results of the comparative research project, "Managed Care in Latin America: Its Role in Health System Reform." Conducted by teams in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, and the United States, the study focused on the exportation of managed care, especially from the United States, and its adoption in Latin American countries. Our research methods included qualitative and quantitative techniques. The adoption of managed care reflects the process of transnationalization in the health sector. Our findings demonstrate the entrance of the main multinational corporations of finance capital into the private sector of insurance and health services, and these corporations' intention to assume administrative responsibilities for state institutions and to secure access to medical social security funds. International lending agencies, especially the World Bank, support the corporatization and privatization of health care services, as a condition of further loans to Latin American countries. We conclude that this process of change, which involves the gradual adoption of managed care as an officially favored policy, reflects ideologically based discourses that accept the inexorable nature of managed care reforms.

  18. Scaling up global social health protection: prerequisite reforms to the International Monetary Fund.

    PubMed

    Ooms, Gorik; Hammonds, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    People living in low-income countries require protection from the economic and social impacts of global economic competition, yet, historically, the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) fiscal austerity programs have weakened the potential for redistribution both within poor countries and between rich and poor countries. The current development paradigm's focus on "sustainability" is an obstacle to developing systems of global social protection and an impediment to future progress. Reforming IMF policy conditionality and democratizing the IMF's decision-making processes will be necessary for offsetting growing inequalities in health financing among poor nations. PMID:19927417

  19. Health care policy reform: a microanalytic model for comparing hospitals in the United States and Germany.

    PubMed

    Parsons, R J; Woller, G M; Neubauer, G; Rothaemel, F T; Zelle, B

    1999-01-01

    Microcomparison, or single-component analysis, of health care systems offers a potentially better basis for reform than traditional macrocomparison analysis of aggregate elements. Using macroanalysis, available evidence shows that Germany provides cheaper but more effective hospital care than the United States. To find the causes for this outcome, we developed a microanalytic model of hospital administrators' perceptions, financial ratios, medical outcomes, and pharmaceutical costs. However, only data on pharmaceutical costs were available, and these were similar in both countries. Our significant outcome was development of a microcomparative model that gives world medical care providers new criteria for analyzing and improving cost to care ratios.

  20. Commentary: Health care reform and primary care: training physicians for tomorrow's challenges.

    PubMed

    Caudill, T Shawn; Lofgren, Richard; Jennings, C Darrell; Karpf, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Although Congress recently passed health insurance reform legislation, the real catalyst for change in the health care delivery system, the author's argue, will be changes to the reimbursement model. To rein in increasing costs, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid aims to move Medicare from the current fee-for-service model to a reimbursement approach that shifts the risk to providers and encourages greater accountability both for the cost and the quality of care. This level of increased accountability can only be achieved by clinical integration among health care providers. Central to this reorganized delivery model are primary care providers who coordinate and organize the care of their patients, using best practices and evidence-based medicine while respecting the patient's values, wishes, and dictates. Thus, the authors ask whether primary care physicians will be available in sufficient numbers and if they will be adequately and appropriately trained to take on this role. Most workforce researchers report inadequate numbers of primary care doctors today, a shortage that will only be exacerbated in the future. Even more ominously, the authors argue that primary care physicians being trained today will not have the requisite skills to fulfill their contemplated responsibilities because of a variety of factors that encourage fragmentation of care. If this training issue is not debated vigorously to determine new and appropriate training approaches, the future workforce may eventually have the appropriate number of physicians but inadequately trained individuals, a situation that would doom any effort at system reform.

  1. Australian Curriculum Reform II: Health and Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    It is implied by governing organizations that Australia is presently experiencing its first national curriculum reform, when as the title suggests it is the second. However, until now Australian states and territories have been responsible for the education curriculum delivered within schools. The present national curriculum reform promises one…

  2. "Diagnosing" Saudi health reforms: is NHIS the right "prescription"?

    PubMed

    Al-Sharqi, Omar Zayan; Abdullah, Muhammad Tanweer

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines the health context of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). It reviews health systems development in the KSA from 1925 through to contemporary New Health Insurance System (NHIS). It also examines the consistency of NHIS in view of the emerging challenges. This paper identifies the determinants and scope of contextual consistency. First, it indicates the need to evolve an indigenous, integrated, and comprehensive insurance system. Second, it highlights the access and equity gaps in service delivery across the rural and remote regions and suggests how to bring these under insurance coverage. Third, it suggests how inputs from both the public and private sectors should be harmonized - the "quality" of services in the private healthcare industry to be regulated by the state and international standards, its scope to be determined primarily by open-market dynamics and the public sector welfare-model to ensure "access" of all to essential health services. Fourth, it states the need to implement an evidence-based public health policy and bridge inherent gaps in policy design and personal-level lifestyles. Fifth, it points out the need to produce a viable infrastructure for health insurance. Because social research and critical reviews in the KSA health scenario are rare, this paper offers insights into the mainstream challenges of NHIS implementation and identifies the inherent weaknesses that need attention. It guides health policy makers, economists, planners, healthcare service managers, and even the insurance businesses, and points to key directions for similar research in future.

  3. "Diagnosing" Saudi health reforms: is NHIS the right "prescription"?

    PubMed

    Al-Sharqi, Omar Zayan; Abdullah, Muhammad Tanweer

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines the health context of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). It reviews health systems development in the KSA from 1925 through to contemporary New Health Insurance System (NHIS). It also examines the consistency of NHIS in view of the emerging challenges. This paper identifies the determinants and scope of contextual consistency. First, it indicates the need to evolve an indigenous, integrated, and comprehensive insurance system. Second, it highlights the access and equity gaps in service delivery across the rural and remote regions and suggests how to bring these under insurance coverage. Third, it suggests how inputs from both the public and private sectors should be harmonized - the "quality" of services in the private healthcare industry to be regulated by the state and international standards, its scope to be determined primarily by open-market dynamics and the public sector welfare-model to ensure "access" of all to essential health services. Fourth, it states the need to implement an evidence-based public health policy and bridge inherent gaps in policy design and personal-level lifestyles. Fifth, it points out the need to produce a viable infrastructure for health insurance. Because social research and critical reviews in the KSA health scenario are rare, this paper offers insights into the mainstream challenges of NHIS implementation and identifies the inherent weaknesses that need attention. It guides health policy makers, economists, planners, healthcare service managers, and even the insurance businesses, and points to key directions for similar research in future. PMID:23047768

  4. [Gender equity in health sector reform policies in Latin America and the Caribbean].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Elsa Gómez

    2002-01-01

    Gender equity is increasingly being acknowledged as an essential aspect of sustainable development and more specifically, of health development. The Pan American Health Organization's Program for Women, Health, and Development has been piloting for a year now a project known as Equidad de género en las políticas de reforma del sector de salud, whose objective is to promote gender equity in the health sector reform efforts in the Region. The first stage of the project is being conducted in Chile and Peru, along with some activities throughout the Region. The core of the project is the production and use of information as a tool for introducing changes geared toward achieving greater gender equity in health, particularly in connection with malefemale disparities that are unnecessary, avoidable, and unfair in health status, access to health care, and participation in decision-making within the health system. We expect that in three years the project will have brought about changes in the production of information and knowledge, advocacy, and information dissemination, as well as in the development, appropriation, and identification of intersectoral mechanisms that will make it possible for key figures in government and civil society to work together in setting and surveying policy on gender equity in health.

  5. Health care reform: understanding individuals' attitudes and information sources.

    PubMed

    Shue, Carolyn K; McGeary, Kerry Anne; Reid, Ian; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Fan, Maoyong

    2014-01-01

    Since passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law by President Barrack Obama, little is known about state-level perceptions of residents on the ACA. Perceptions about the act could potentially affect implementation of the law to the fullest extent. This 3-year survey study explored attitudes about the ACA, the types of information sources that individuals rely on when creating those attitudes, and the predictors of these attitudes among state of Indiana residents. The respondents were split between favorable and unfavorable views of the ACA, yet the majority of respondents strongly supported individual components of the act. National TV news, websites, family members, and individuals' own reading of the ACA legislation were identified as the most influential information sources. After controlling for potential confounders, the respondent's political affiliation, age, sex, and obtaining ACA information from watching national television news were the most important predictors of attitudes about the ACA and its components. These results mirror national-level findings. Implications for implementing health care reform at the state-level are discussed. PMID:25045705

  6. Applying Systems Theory to Systemic Change: A Generic Model for Educational Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Joe B.

    Although educational reformers frequently use the words "system,""systemic change," and "systemic approach," many lack a fundamental understanding of the systems concept. This paper describes the application of systems theory to the problems of educational reform and educational assessment. It introduces basic concepts and principles and describes…

  7. Health sector reform in the former Soviet Republics of Central Asia.

    PubMed

    McKee, M; Figueras, J; Chenet, L

    1998-01-01

    Health services in the former Soviet Republics of Central Asia face many challenges, not least a rising burden of disease and severe economic constraints. Each government has developed proposals for reform. This paper describes the key elements of the proposals developed in each country. They have many features in common, such as financing based on social insurance, although they also have many differences, reflecting national political, economic and historical circumstances. While most attention so far has concentrated on the design of the proposed systems, it is argued here that there has been inadequate attention to the obstacles to implementation. These stem from the many adverse factors in the context within which reforms are taking place, weaknesses in the process of reform, and failure to involve the groups whose actions will be necessary for success. It is argued that governments and those advising them must place greater emphasis on the challenges of implementation, including the development of a much better understanding of the context within which change must take place.

  8. Changing Labor Markets: A Systems Approach to Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plastrik, Peter; Seltzer, Marlene B.; Taylor, Judith Combes

    A systems approach to changing labor market performance requires a substantial and enduring commitment to the task of change. A systems reform framework has been developed that is based on a dual-customer approach, with a focus on improving labor market outcomes for both low-income people and their employers. The objective is to change the labor…

  9. Learning by Doing: Panasonic Partnerships and Systemic School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Terry A.; Lacey, Richard A.

    A diverse and growing body of research points to the need for an overhaul of America's public education systems. The Panasonic Foundation created its Partnership Program for systemic educational reform in 1987. Since then, the foundation has collaborated with 16 school districts and 3 state departments of education. This book informs others…

  10. Zimbabwe's Public Education System Reforms: Successes and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanyongo, Gibbs Y.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss Zimbabwe's public education system. First, the article provides a brief look at pre-independence education in Zimbabwe. Second, it discusses some of the reforms that took place in the Zimbabwe education system following independence. Third, it looks at the current structure of Zimbabwe's education system…

  11. [Health sector reform in Colombia and its effects on tuberculosis control and immunization programs].

    PubMed

    Ayala Cerna, Carlos; Kroeger, Axel

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of health reform in Colombia on public health programs at the local level, particularly the Expanded Program of Immunization (EPI) and the tuberculosis control program. The research was developed in three health districts in two States by analysis of documents, direct observation, and longitudinal follow-up of the transition process. The health districts were unprepared for the change, resulting in insufficient technical skills among staff as well as lack of awareness of important elements in the new system, associated with a reduction in immunization coverage and tuberculosis case detection. Structural problems in the new system included loss of immunization opportunities and lack of examination of tuberculosis contacts. The potentialities of the new system were the local development of a new organizational structure and the improvement of the information system; a limiting factor was exposure of the health system to local political interests. The general conclusion is that the transition period takes far longer than anticipated and requires a much greater information flow to both the local level and the community. There are transitory but also structural maladjustments that require a political response.

  12. Turning swords into plowshares: lessons from the military health system.

    PubMed

    Crowley, D D; Tough, S D

    1993-01-01

    Policymakers are searching everywhere for examples of how best to reform the nation's health care system. A major reform model from an unexpected quarter--the U.S. military--is making great strides forward and contains many of the ingredien