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Sample records for healthy life colon

  1. [The healthy life].

    PubMed

    Silva, A C; Luz, A; Medeiros, A; Macedo, E

    1997-01-01

    This study is based on a comparison of the habits and opinions of a group of pupils on entering the Damaia Preparatory School (5th and 6th years of education) and of the same group on leaving this School. Its aim is to contribute towards an adequate education for health at school in order to promote healthy living habits. The study was based on the comparison of data obtained from two random samples, chosen from the same group of pupils when entering (n1 = 36 out of a total of 368) and leaving (n2 = 32 out of a total of 164) the above mentioned school. The collection of data was carried out by means of a multiple-choice questionnaire given to a total of 532 pupils. The results demonstrated that the frequencies have changed in the following way: a) bathing has increased; b) tea drinking has decreased; c) the image of the teacher as a smoker has become less frequent; d) the number of pupils who have tried alcoholic beverages has increased; e) mother's smoking habits have increased. The other trends that were found in the study showed that there were no significant changes in either the behaviour or opinions that had been studied.

  2. Effects of bisacodyl on ascending colon emptying and overall colonic transit in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    MANABE, N.; CREMONINI, F.; CAMILLERI, M.; SANDBORN, W. J.; BURTON, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim The mechanism of action of bisacodyl in the unprepared human colon is unclear. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of oral bisacodyl on the overall and regional colonic transit in humans. \\ Methods In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study of 25 healthy participants, effects of oral bisacodyl (5mg p.o. per day) and placebo on colonic transit were compared. Validated scintigraphy using 111In-charcoal delivered to the ileocolonic region in a delayed-release capsule was used to measure colonic transit. The primary transit endpoints, ascending colon emptying (AC) t1/2 and geometric center (GC) of colon isotope at 24 hours (overall transit), were compared (Wilcoxon rank sum test). Results There were significant treatment effects on AC t1/2, with the bisacodyl group demonstrating accelerated emptying [median 6.5 h, interquartile range (IQR) 5.0 – 8.0 h] relative to the placebo group [11.0 h (7.0 – 17.1)], P=0.03]. Numerical differences in colonic GC 24 hours [bisacodyl median 3.0 (2.2 – 3.8), placebo 4.0 (3.1 – 4.6)] were not significant (P=0.19). There were no significant differences observed in GC 4 hours. Conclusion Oral 5mg bisacodyl accelerates AC in the unprepared colon in healthy adults; this action may contribute to the drug’s efficacy in constipation. PMID:19678812

  3. Oxytocin stimulates colonic motor activity in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, B; Ringström, G; Abrahamsson, H; Simrén, M; Björnsson, E S

    2004-04-01

    The effects of oxytocin in the gastrointestinal tract are unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of infusion of oxytocin on colonic motility and sensitivity in healthy women. Fourteen healthy women were investigated twice. A 6-channel perfusion catheter, with three recording points (2 cm apart) proximally and three recording points distally to a barostat balloon, was inserted to the splenic flexure. An intestinal feeding tube was placed in the mid-duodenum. A 90-min duodenal lipid infusion of 3 kcal min(-1) was administered. Thirty minutes after the start of the lipid infusion, the subject randomly received either 20 or 40 mU min(-1) of oxytocin, or isotonic saline as intravenous infusions for 90 min. Meanwhile, the colonic motility was recorded. During the last 30 min of oxytocin and saline infusion, the visceral sensitivity to balloon distensions was examined. During lipid infusion the number of antegrade contractions per hour was 0.7 +/- 0.3 after saline and 3.9 +/- 1.4 after oxytocin (P = 0.03), indicating more pronounced lumen-occlusive contractile activity after oxytocin administration. Some of these consisted of high-amplitude (> 103 mmHg in amplitude) antegrade contractions. Lipid infusion evoked a decrease of the balloon volume, reflecting increased colonic tone, but there was no difference between saline and oxytocin. Sensory thresholds did not differ significantly between saline and oxytocin. Infusion of oxytocin stimulates antegrade peristaltic contractions in stimulated colon in healthy women. The effects of oxytocin on colonic motor activity deserve to be further explored, especially in patients with colonic peristaltic dysfunction.

  4. [A healthy life style for toddlers].

    PubMed

    Hinneburg, Iris

    2014-04-01

    The first years of life are important for the development of a healthy life style. Therefore, parents should pay attention to nutrition and activity when caring for their toddlers. Current recommendations give advice about these issues and also address topics as vegan nutrition and food allergies.

  5. [The characteristics of motivation to follow healthy life-style].

    PubMed

    Karaseva, T V; Ruzhenskaia, E V

    2013-01-01

    The article specifies the notion of motivation to healthy life-style. The main factors developing this motivation are considered. The personal proposal of classification of motives to develop healthy life-style is presented.

  6. Colonization by Candida in children with cancer, children with cystic fibrosis, and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Gammelsrud, K W; Sandven, P; Høiby, E A; Sandvik, L; Brandtzaeg, P; Gaustad, P

    2011-12-01

    A longitudinal, prospective study was conducted intermittently in Norway, from 1999 to 2008, to investigate the Candida colonization rates and species distributions in the tonsillopharyngeal and faecal flora in: (i) children with cancer; (ii) children with cystic fibrosis (CF); and (iii) healthy children. The effect of antibiotic treatment on Candida colonization was also studied, and we looked for changes in antifungal susceptibility over time within each child and between the different groups of children. In total, 566 tonsillopharyngeal swabs and 545 faecal samples were collected from 45 children with cancer, 37 children with CF, and 71 healthy, age-matched controls. The overall colonization rate with Candida was not significantly higher in the two groups of children undergoing extensive treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics than in healthy controls. Approximately one-third of the cancer patients had a total lack of Candida colonization or had only one Candida-positive sample, despite multiple samples being taken, treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, long hospital stays, and periods with neutropenia. Children with CF had the highest prevalence of Candida albicans. Amoxycillin, azithromycin, third-generation cephalosporins and oral vancomycin resulted in a significantly increased Candida colonization rate. Phenoxymethylpenicillin, second-generation cephalosporins, metronidazole, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, penicillinase-resistant penicillins and inhaled tobramycin or colistin showed minimal effects on the Candida colonization rate. We found no evidence of development of antifungal resistance over time.

  7. Performance Analysis of Network Model to Identify Healthy and Cancerous Colon Genes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Tanusree; Barman, Soma

    2016-03-01

    Modeling of cancerous and healthy Homo Sapiens colon gene using electrical network is proposed to study their behavior. In this paper, the individual amino acid models are designed using hydropathy index of amino acid side chain. The phase and magnitude responses of genes are examined to screen out cancer from healthy genes. The performance of proposed modeling technique is judged using various performance measurement metrics such as accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, etc. The network model performance is increased with frequency, which is analyzed using the receiver operating characteristic curve. The accuracy of the model is tested on colon genes and achieved maximum 97% at 10-MHz frequency.

  8. Effect of a chloride channel activator, lubiprostone, on colonic sensory and motor functions in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sweetser, Seth; Busciglio, Irene A; Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E; Szarka, Lawrence A; Papathanasopoulos, Athanasios; Burton, Duane D; Eckert, Deborah J; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2009-02-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid chloride channel activator, is efficacious in treatment of chronic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. The study aim was to compare effects of lubiprostone and placebo on colonic sensory and motor functions in humans. In double-blind, randomized fashion, 60 healthy adults received three oral doses of placebo or 24 microg lubiprostone per day in a parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial. A barostat-manometry tube was placed in the left colon by flexible sigmoidoscopy and fluoroscopy. We measured treatment effects on colonic sensation and motility with validated methods, with the following end points: colonic compliance, fasting and postprandial tone and motility indexes, pain thresholds, and sensory ratings to distensions. Among participants receiving lubiprostone or placebo, 26 of 30 and 28 of 30, respectively, completed the study. There were no overall effects of lubiprostone on compliance, fasting tone, motility indexes, or sensation. However, there was a treatment-by-sex interaction effect for compliance (P = 0.02), with lubiprostone inducing decreased fasting compliance in women (P = 0.06) and an overall decreased colonic tone contraction after a standard meal relative to fasting tone (P = 0.014), with greater effect in women (P < 0.01). Numerical differences of first sensation and pain thresholds (P = 0.11 in women) in the two groups were not significant. We concluded that oral lubiprostone 24 microg does not increase colonic motor function. The findings of decreased colonic compliance and decreased postprandial colonic tone in women suggest that motor effects are unlikely to cause accelerated colonic transit with lubiprostone, although they may facilitate laxation. Effects of lubiprostone on sensitivity deserve further study.

  9. [Attitude of students to health and healthy life-style].

    PubMed

    Belova, N I; Burtsev, S P; Vorobtsova, E A; Martynenko, A V

    2006-01-01

    Results of sociological survey of attitude of academic first-year students to health and healthy life-style are presented. Concurrence of respondents' opinions with used in scientific literature notions "health and healthy life-style" is established. Respondents emphasized significance of dependence of health from such most vital medical social factors as bad habits, nutrition characteristics and passing leisure. Respondents expressed their opinions about means of health promotion, need of preventive check-ups, importance of being informed on issues of health maintenance. Need to include courses on healthy life-style into academic curriculum is emphasized.

  10. Healthy Diet May Mean Longer Life for Kidney Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Diet May Mean Longer Life for Kidney Patients Study found eating lots of fruit, vegetables, fish, ... available evidence to drive clinical decision-making by patients and doctors on whole dietary approaches in chronic ...

  11. Impact of humic acids on the colonic microbiome in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Swidsinski, Alexander; Dörffel, Yvonne; Loening-Baucke, Vera; Gille, Christoph; Reißhauer, Anne; Göktas, Onder; Krüger, Monika; Neuhaus, Jürgen; Schrödl, Wieland

    2017-01-01

    AIM To test the effects of humic acids on innate microbial communities of the colon. METHODS We followed the effects of oral supplementation with humic acids (Activomin®) on concentrations and composition of colonic microbiome in 14 healthy volunteers for 45 d. 3 × 800 mg Activomin® were taken orally for 10 d followed by 3 × 400 mg for 35 d. Colonic microbiota were investigated using multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of Carnoy fixated and paraffin embedded stool cylinders. Two stool samples were collected a week prior to therapy and one stool sample on days 10, 31 and 45. Forty-one FISH probes representing different bacterial groups were used. RESULTS The sum concentration of colonic microbiota increased from 20% at day 10 to 30% by day 31 and remained stable until day 45 (32%) of humic acid supplementation (P < 0.001). The increase in the concentrations in each person was due to growth of preexisting groups. The individual microbial profile of the patients remained unchanged. Similarly, the bacterial diversity remained stable. Concentrations of 24 of the 35 substantial groups increased from 20% to 96%. Two bacterial groups detected with Bac303 (Bacteroides) and Myc657 (mycolic acid-containing Actinomycetes) FISH probes decreased (P > 0.05). The others remained unaffected. Bacterial groups with initially marginal concentrations (< 0.1 × 109/mL) demonstrated no response to humic acids. The concentrations of pioneer groups of Bifidobacteriaceae, Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium difficile increased but the observed differences were statistically not significant. CONCLUSION Humic acids have a profound effect on healthy colonic microbiome and may be potentially interesting substances for the development of drugs that control the innate colonic microbiome. PMID:28223733

  12. [Healthy life expectancy to Brazilian elders, 2003].

    PubMed

    Camargos, Mirela Castro Santos; Rodrigues, Roberto do Nascimento; Machado, Carla Jorge

    2009-01-01

    The increase of the percentage of elderly population in Brazil and the increase in longevity incite a demand for information on the quantity of years spent in good health. The aim of the present study is to measure the life expectancy for the elderly of 60 years and above, by sex and age, in the year of 2003. The Sullivan method was used, which combined the life-table with the current experience of mortality and the self-perceived health. The mortality information was obtained from the life tables published by the IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics), 2003. The self-perceived health was used and it was dichotomized in good and bad. This information came from the National Research of Household Sample (PNAD), 2003. The results indicate that women live longer, but spend a higher number of years perceiving their health as bad, as compared to men. The results also highlights to the need of considering the differences between sexes in relation to the demand for health care. It is also important to consider the need to have policies designed to allow the increase in the number of years that the elderly can live in good health conditions.

  13. Scintigraphic evaluation of colon targeting pectin-HPMC tablets in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hodges, L A; Connolly, S M; Band, J; O'Mahony, B; Ugurlu, T; Turkoglu, M; Wilson, C G; Stevens, H N E

    2009-03-31

    The in vivo evaluation of colon-targeting tablets was conducted in six healthy male volunteers. A pectin-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose coating was compressed onto core tablets labelled with 4MBq (99m)Tc-DTPA. The tablets released in the colon in all subjects; three in the ascending colon (AC) and three in the transverse colon (TC). Tablets that released in the TC had reached the AC before or just after food (Group A). The other three tablets released immediately upon AC entry at least 1.5h post-meal (Group B). Release onset for Group B was earlier than Group A (343min vs 448min). Group B tablets exhibited a clear residence period at the ileocaecal junction (ICJ) which was not observed in Group A. Prolonged residence at the ICJ is assumed to have increased hydration of the hydrogel layer surrounding the core tablet. Forces applied as the tablets progressed through the ICJ may have disrupted the hydrogel layer sufficiently to initiate radiolabel release. Conversely, Group A tablets moved rapidly through the AC to the TC, possibly minimising contact times with water pockets. Inadequate prior hydration of the hydrogel layer preventing access of pectinolytic enzymes and reduced fluid availability in the TC may have retarded tablet disintegration and radiolabel diffusion.

  14. Healthy life behaviors and suicide probability in university students.

    PubMed

    Engin, Esra; Cuhadar, Dondu; Ozturk, Emel

    2012-02-01

    This study aims to determine the sociodemographic factors and healthy life behaviors affecting suicide and suicide probability of university students. The research was designed as a complementary study and conducted with 334 students from several faculties and colleges at Ege University, Turkey. The study findings indicated that suicide probability could be affected by the students' age, their problems at school, their troubled relations with friends, and a psychiatric disorder history within the last year. Moreover, it was concluded that the students with healthy life behaviors had significantly lower scores on the Suicide Probability Scale and its subscales.

  15. Twenty four hour manometric recording of colonic motor activity in healthy man.

    PubMed Central

    Narducci, F; Bassotti, G; Gaburri, M; Morelli, A

    1987-01-01

    The motor activity of the transverse, descending, and sigmoid colon was recorded for 24 hours in 14 healthy volunteers with a colonoscope positioned catheter. During the study the patients ate two 1000 kcal mixed meals and one continental breakfast. Colonic motor activity was low before meals and minimal during sleep; the motility index increased significantly after meals and at morning awakening. Most of the motor activity was represented by low amplitude contractions present singly or in bursts, which showed no recognisable pattern. All but two subjects also showed isolated high amplitude (up to 200 mmHg) contractions that propagated peristaltically over long distances at approximately 1 cm/sec. Most of these contractions occurred after morning awakening, and some in the late postprandial period, with a mean of 4.4/subject/24 h. The peristaltic contractions were often felt as an urge to defecate or preceded defecation, and could represent the manometric equivalent of the mass movements. PMID:3817580

  16. Lower Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status Associated with Reduced Diversity of the Colonic Microbiota in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Gregory E.; Engen, Phillip A.; Gillevet, Patrick M.; Shaikh, Maliha; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Mutlu, Ece; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, there are persistent and widening socioeconomic gaps in morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases. Although most disparities research focuses on person-level socioeconomic-status, mounting evidence suggest that chronic diseases also pattern by the demographic characteristics of neighborhoods. Yet the biological mechanisms underlying these associations are poorly understood. There is increasing recognition that chronic diseases share common pathogenic features, some of which involve alterations in the composition, diversity, and functioning of the gut microbiota. This study examined whether socioeconomic-status was associated with alpha-diversity of the colonic microbiota. Forty-four healthy adults underwent un-prepped sigmoidoscopy, during which mucosal biopsies and fecal samples were collected. Subjects’ zip codes were geocoded, and census data was used to form a composite indicator of neighborhood socioeconomic-status, reflecting household income, educational attainment, employment status, and home value. In unadjusted analyses, neighborhood socioeconomic-status explained 12–18 percent of the variability in alpha-diversity of colonic microbiota. The direction of these associations was positive, meaning that as neighborhood socioeconomic-status increased, so did alpha-diversity of both the colonic sigmoid mucosa and fecal microbiota. The strength of these associations persisted when models were expanded to include covariates reflecting potential demographic (age, gender, race/ethnicity) and lifestyle (adiposity, alcohol use, smoking) confounds. In these models neighborhood socioeconomic-status continued to explain 11–22 percent of the variability in diversity indicators. Further analyses suggested these patterns reflected socioeconomic variations in evenness, but not richness, of microbial communities residing in the sigmoid. We also found indications that residence in neighborhoods of higher socioeconomic-status was associated with

  17. [Healthy life style as part of strategy of active longevity].

    PubMed

    Golubeva, E Iu; Danilova, R I

    2011-01-01

    The contemporary approaches to the conception of healthy aging are discussed. The insufficient propaganda of healthy style of life of elderly population results in non-satisfaction of own health in old age; lack of information about opportunities to strengthen the health in the system of social services managing is also a problem. Weak skills and motivation of elder generation for taking care of the own health are registered. Gender and age features of health self-evaluation have been considered. Low meaning of spending spare time to use physical culture activity for strengthening health have been determinated.

  18. Luminal Microbes Promote Monocyte–Stem Cell Interactions Across a Healthy Colonic Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Skoczek, Dagmara A.; Walczysko, Petr; Horn, Nikki; Parris, Alyson; Clare, Simon; Williams, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms a vital barrier between luminal microbes and the underlying mucosal immune system. Epithelial barrier function is maintained by continuous renewal of the epithelium and is pivotal for gut homeostasis. Breaching of the barrier causes mobilization of immune cells to promote epithelial restitution. However, it is not known whether microbes at the luminal surface of a healthy epithelial barrier influence immune cell mobilization to modulate tissue homeostasis. Using a mouse colonic mucosal explant model, we demonstrate that close proximity of luminal microbes to a healthy, intact epithelium results in rapid mucus secretion and movement of Ly6C+7/4+ monocytes closer to epithelial stem cells. These early events are driven by the epithelial MyD88-signaling pathway and result in increased crypt cell proliferation and intestinal stem cell number. Over time, stem cell number and monocyte–crypt stem cell juxtapositioning return to homeostatic levels observed in vivo. We also demonstrate that reduced numbers of tissue Ly6C+ monocytes can suppress Lgr5EGFP+ stem cell expression in vivo and abrogate the response to luminal microbes ex vivo. The functional link between monocyte recruitment and increased crypt cell proliferation was further confirmed using a crypt–monocyte coculture model. This work demonstrates that the healthy gut epithelium mediates communication between luminal bacteria and monocytes, and monocytes can modulate crypt stem cell number and promote crypt cell proliferation to help maintain gut homeostasis. PMID:24907348

  19. Ex vivo photometric and polarimetric multilayer characterization of human healthy colon by multispectral Mueller imaging.

    PubMed

    Pierangelo, Angelo; Manhas, Sandeep; Benali, Abdelali; Fallet, Clément; Antonelli, Maria-Rosaria; Novikova, Tatiana; Gayet, Brice; Validire, Pierre; De Martino, Antonello

    2012-06-01

    Healthy human colon samples were analyzed ex vivo with a multispectral imaging Mueller polarimeter operating from 500 to 700 nm in a backscattering configuration with diffuse light illumination impinging on the innermost tissue layer, the mucosa. The intensity and polarimetric responses were taken on whole tissues first and after progressive exfoliation of the outer layers afterwards. Moreover, these measurements were carried out with two different substrates (one bright and the other dark) successively placed beneath each sample, allowing a reasonably accurate evaluation of the contributions to the overall backscattered light by the various layers. For the shorter investigated wavelengths (500 to 550 nm) the major contribution comes from mucosa and submucosa, while for the longer wavelengths (650 to 700 nm) muscular tissue and fat also contribute significantly. The depolarization has also been studied and is found to be stronger in the red part of the spectrum, mainly due to the highly depolarizing power of the muscular and fat layers.

  20. Dielectric characterization of healthy and malignant colon tissues in the 0.5-18 GHz frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornes-Leal, A.; Garcia-Pardo, C.; Frasson, M.; Pons Beltrán, V.; Cardona, N.

    2016-10-01

    Several reports over the last few decades have shown that the dielectric properties of healthy and malignant tissues of the same body organ usually show different values. However, no intensive dielectric studies of human colon tissue have been performed, despite colon cancer’s being one of the most common types of cancer in the world. In order to provide information regarding this matter, a dielectric characterization of healthy and malignant colon tissues is presented. Measurements are performed on ex vivo surgery samples obtained from 20 patients, using an open-ended coaxial probe in the 0.5-18 GHz frequency band. Results show that the dielectric constant of colon cancerous tissue is 8.8% higher than that of healthy tissues (p  =  0.002). Besides, conductivity is about 10.6% higher, but in this case measurements do not have statistical significance (p  =  0.038). Performing an analysis per patient, the differences in dielectric constant between healthy and malignant tissues appear systematically. Particularized results for specific frequencies (500 MHz, 900 MHz, 2.45 GHz, 5 GHz, 8.5 GHz and 15 GHz) are also reported. The findings have potential application in early-stage cancer detection and diagnosis, and can be useful in developing new tools for hyperthermia treatments as well as creating electromagnetic models of healthy and cancerous tissues.

  1. Effect of experimental stress on the small bowel and colon in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, SE; Garsed, KC; Hoad, CL; Lingaya, M; Banwait, R; Thongborisute, W; Roberts, E; Costigan, C; Marciani, L; Gowland, PA; Spiller, RC

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are frequently reported to be exacerbated by stress. Animal studies suggest that corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) mediates the effect of stress on the bowel. We have shown that stressed IBS patients with diarrhea have constricted small bowels. We hypothesized that we could mimic this effect by applying experimental stress in the form of either hand immersion in ice water or CRH injection in healthy volunteers (HV). Methods The postprandial effect of the cold pressor test (repeated hand immersion in ice cold water) and injection of CRH, were assessed vs control in two groups of 18 HVs. Key Results CRH produced a significant rise from baseline salivary cortisol levels (p = 0.004) not seen with the cold pressor test. Small bowel water content (SBWC) fell postprandially on all four treatments. SBWC was significantly reduced by both stressors but CRH caused a greater effect (anova, p < 0.003 vs p = 0.02). Ascending colon (AC) volume was greater after CRH injection compared with saline (p = 0.002) but no differences were seen with the cold pressor test vs warm water. Postprandial increase in colon volume was also reduced by CRH which also increased the sensations of distension and bloating. Conclusions & Inferences Two experimental stressors were shown to constrict the small bowel, mimicking the effect previously seen in IBS-D patients. CRH increased the volume of the AC. We speculate that stress accelerates transfer of water from the small bowel to the AC. PMID:25703609

  2. Characteristics of Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Colonizing Upper Respiratory Tract of Healthy Preschool Children in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Malm, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant and invasive pneumococci may spread temporally and locally in day care centers (DCCs). We examined 267 children attending four DCCs located in the same city and 70 children staying at home in three seasons (autumn, winter, and spring) to determine prevalence, serotype distribution, antibiotic resistance patterns, and transmission of pneumococcal strains colonizing upper respiratory tract of healthy children without antipneumococcal vaccination. By pheno- and genotyping, we determined clonality of pneumococci, including drug-resistant strains. The average carriage of pneumococci in three seasons was 38.2%. 73.4% and 80.4% of the isolates belonged to serotypes present in 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccine, respectively. Among the pneumococcal strains, 33.3% were susceptible to all antimicrobial tested and 39.2% had decreased susceptibility to penicillin. Multidrug resistance was common (35.7%); 97.5% of drug-resistant isolates represented serotypes included to 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccine. According to BOX-PCR, clonality definitely was observed only in case of serotype 14. Multivariate analysis determined DCC attendance as strongly related to pneumococcal colonization in all three seasons, but important seasonal differences were demonstrated. In children attending DCCs, we observed dynamic turnover of pneumococcal strains, especially penicillin nonsusceptible and multidrug resistant, which were mostly distributed among serotypes included to available pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. PMID:22927787

  3. Nasal colonization by four potential respiratory bacteria in healthy children attending kindergarten or elementary school in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Bae, Songmee; Yu, Jae-Yon; Lee, Kwangjun; Lee, Sunhwa; Park, Bohyun; Kang, Yeonho

    2012-05-01

    A longitudinal analysis was carried out of the colonization by four potential respiratory pathogens - Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Staphylococcus aureus - in 165 healthy children (aged 3-7 years) attending three kindergartens and 417 healthy children (aged 7-10 years) attending an elementary school in Seoul, Korea, by four consecutive examinations over 1 year. The prevalence of nasal carriers of one or more of four bacteria was found to be higher in younger children (≤7 years) (mean 68.6%) than that in older children (mean 46.8%). The mean rates of nasal carriage of Strep. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis and Staph. aureus were 16.8, 18.9, 20.2 and 18.2%, respectively. Colonization by Strep. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis was higher in pre-school children (28.6, 32.4 and 35.0%, respectively) than in school children (12.2, 13.6 and 14.3%, respectively). Carriage trends differed with age, with Strep. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis colonization decreasing with age but Staph. aureus colonization increasing. Positive associations of co-occurrence between Strep. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis were evident, with a significant negative association evident between Staph. aureus and the other three bacteria. A better understanding of the colonization and interaction of potential respiratory pathogens may be important for predicting changes in bacterial ecology and for designing control strategies that target bacterial colonization in upper respiratory tract infections.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius colonizing healthy dogs in Saskatoon, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Priyantha, Roshan; Gaunt, Mathew C.; Rubin, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius carried by healthy dogs in Saskatoon, and describes changes in antimicrobial resistance since a 2008 study. One hundred healthy dogs presenting to the wellness service at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine were screened for S. pseudintermedius by culturing rectal and pharyngeal swabs. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was identified biochemically and antimicrobial minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined by broth microdilution. Methicillin resistance was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of the mecA gene. Of 221 S. pseudintermedius isolates from 78 dogs, 7 were methicillin resistant. No resistance to the fluoroquinolones, nitrofurantoin, tigecycline, vancomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid, or daptomycin was identified. Of the 78 positive dogs, isolates resistant to penicillin were found in 78%, to ampicillin in 61% and to tetracycline in 26%; resistance to oxacillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, trimethoprim + sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, and gentamicin was found in < 10% of dogs. Compared to the 2008 study, the frequency of resistance to all drugs increased, and the frequency of colonization with pan-susceptible isolates decreased from 46% to 30%. PMID:26740701

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius colonizing healthy dogs in Saskatoon, Canada.

    PubMed

    Priyantha, Roshan; Gaunt, Mathew C; Rubin, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    This study reports antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius carried by healthy dogs in Saskatoon, and describes changes in antimicrobial resistance since a 2008 study. One hundred healthy dogs presenting to the wellness service at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine were screened for S. pseudintermedius by culturing rectal and pharyngeal swabs. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was identified biochemically and antimicrobial minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined by broth microdilution. Methicillin resistance was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of the mecA gene. Of 221 S. pseudintermedius isolates from 78 dogs, 7 were methicillin resistant. No resistance to the fluoroquinolones, nitrofurantoin, tigecycline, vancomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid, or daptomycin was identified. Of the 78 positive dogs, isolates resistant to penicillin were found in 78%, to ampicillin in 61% and to tetracycline in 26%; resistance to oxacillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, trimethoprim + sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, and gentamicin was found in < 10% of dogs. Compared to the 2008 study, the frequency of resistance to all drugs increased, and the frequency of colonization with pan-susceptible isolates decreased from 46% to 30%.

  6. Gut Colonization of Healthy Children and Their Mothers With Pathogenic Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gurnee, Emily A.; Ndao, I. Malick; Johnson, James R.; Johnston, Brian D.; Gonzalez, Mark D.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Hall-Moore, Carla M.; McGhee, Jessica E.; Mellmann, Alexander; Warner, Barbara B.; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The reservoir of pathogenic ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli remains unknown. Methods. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 80 healthy twins and their mothers to determine the frequency of excretion of ciprofloxacin-resistant, potentially pathogenic E. coli. Stool specimens were cultured selectively for ciprofloxacin-resistant gram-negative bacteria. Isolates were categorized on the basis of additional resistance and virulence profiles. We also prospectively collected clinical metadata. Results. Fifteen children (19%) and 8 mothers (20%) excreted ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli at least once. Overall, 33% of 40 families had at least 1 member whose stool specimen yielded ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli on culture. Fifty-seven submitted stool specimens (2.8%) contained such organisms; clones ST131-H30 and ST405 accounted for 52 and 5 of the positive specimens, respectively. Length of hospital stay after birth (P = .002) and maternal colonization (P = .0001) were associated with subsequent childhood carriage of ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli; antibiotic use, acid suppression, sex, mode of delivery, and maternal perinatal antibiotic use were not. Ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli were usually resistant to additional antibiotic classes, and all had virulence genotypes typical of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. Conclusions. Healthy children and their mothers commonly harbor ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli with pathogenic potential. PMID:25969564

  7. Developmental aspects of a life course approach to healthy ageing.

    PubMed

    Hanson, M A; Cooper, C; Aihie Sayer, A; Eendebak, R J; Clough, G F; Beard, J R

    2016-04-15

    We examine the mechanistic basis and wider implications of adopting a developmental perspective on human ageing. Previous models of ageing have concentrated on its genetic basis, or the detrimental effects of accumulated damage, but also have raised issues about whether ageing can be viewed as adaptive itself, or is a consequence of other adaptive processes, for example if maintenance and repair processes in the period up to reproduction are traded off against later decline in function. A life course model places ageing in the context of the attainment of peak capacity for a body system, starting in early development when plasticity permits changes in structure and function induced by a range of environmental stimuli, followed by a period of decline, the rate of which depends on the peak attained as well as the later life conditions. Such path dependency in the rate of ageing may offer new insights into its modification. Focusing on musculoskeletal and cardiovascular function, we discuss this model and the possible underlying mechanisms, including endothelial function, oxidative stress, stem cells and nutritional factors such as vitamin D status. Epigenetic changes induced during developmental plasticity, and immune function may provide a common mechanistic process underlying a life course model of ageing. The life course trajectory differs in high and low resource settings. New insights into the developmental components of the life course model of ageing may lead to the design of biomarkers of later chronic disease risk and to new interventions to promote healthy ageing, with important implications for public health.

  8. Quality of life in epileptic patients compared with healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Ali; Salarilak, Shaker; Lotfabadi, Pegah; Kiani, Fereshte; Rajabi, Abdolhalim; Mansori, Kamyar; Moosavi Jahromi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder that has a great impact on people’s lives. Patients with epilepsy are at increased risk for poor Quality of Life (QoL). The objective of this study was to evaluate the QoL of epileptic patients in comparison to healthy persons. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 52 epileptic patients from Golbu region in Neyshabur (a city in northeast of Iran). Using Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) scale, the data were collected between April and Jun 2012. Every patient were compared with two healthy persons. Epileptic and healthy persons were similar for age, sex and local residence. Pearson’s correlation coefficient and t-independent test applied for data analysis through SPSS v. 16 software. Results: Of 52 epileptic patients, 24 were female (46.2%) and 28 were male (53.8%). The mean±SD age of epileptic patients was 40.92±20.33yr (Rang: 15-86yr). The total mean score of SF- 36 in patient group was 55.88 and in healthy group 68.52and this difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Among the different subscales of SF-36 in epileptic patients, the highest and the lowest mean scores were found for social functioning and general health subscales, respectively. The mean scores in patient group in comparison to healthy group were lower in all subscales of SF-36 and these differences were statistically significant in all domains (except role limitations due to physical problems domain and role limitations due to emotional problems domain). Conclusion: The study showed that epilepsy disease has an important role in QoL of patients, thus some interventional programs are necessary to improve their QOL. PMID:27493932

  9. Effects of a healthy life exercise program on arteriosclerosis adhesion molecules in elderly obese women

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung-Taek; Min, Seok-Ki; Park, Hyuntae; Park, Jong-Hwan; Park, Jin-Kee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the change in the arteriosclerosis adhesion molecules after a healthy life exercise program that included aerobic training, anaerobic training, and traditional Korean dance. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 elderly women who were over 65 years of age and had 30% body fat. [Methods] The experimental group underwent a 12-week healthy life exercise program. To evaluate the effects of the healthy life exercise program, measurements were performed before and after the healthy life exercise program in all the subjects. [Results] After the healthy life exercise program, MCP-1 and the arteriosclerosis adhesion molecules sE-selectin and sVCAM-1 were statistically significantly decreased. [Conclusion] The 12-week healthy life exercise program reduced the levels of arteriosclerosis adhesion molecules. Therefore, the results of our study suggest that a healthy life exercise program may be useful in preventing arteriosclerosis and improving quality of life in elderly obese women. PMID:26157257

  10. Healthy colon, healthy life (colon sano, vida sana): colorectal cancer screening among Latinos in Santa Clara, California.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Judith M E; Salazar, René; Kaplan, Celia; Nguyen, Lamkieu; Hwang, Jimmy; Pasick, Rena J

    2010-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates are low among Latinos. To identify factors associated with CRC screening, we conducted a telephone survey of Latino primary care patients aged 50-79 years. Among 1,013 participants, 38% were up-to-date (UTD) with fecal occult blood test (FOBT); 66% were UTD with any CRC screening (FOBT, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy). Individuals less than 65, females, those less acculturated, and patients of female physicians were more likely to be UTD with FOBT. CRC screening among Latinos is low. Younger patients, women, and patients of female physicians receive more screening.

  11. Life as a planetary phenomenon: the colonization of Mars.

    PubMed

    Margulis, L; Guerrero, R

    1995-01-01

    Life is a planet-wide phenomenon in which its components incessantly move and interact. Life imperatively recycles its parts at the surface of the Earth in a chemical transformation and physical transport that depends utterly on the energy from a recent star, the Sun. Humanity, entirely dependent on other beings, plays a recent and relatively small part in the great phenomenon of life that transports and transforms the surface of the Earth. Our species accelerates but does not dominate the metabolism of the Earth system. Ironically, during the Apollo days of the sixties, fears were rampant that Martian or other extraterrestrial "germs" might "contaminate" our planet. After Viking, such fears are seen as the manifestation of cultural paranoia. The Viking missions complemented ground-based astronomical observation and yielded definitive evidence for the lack of life on the red planet. The Gaia hypothesis states that the surface temperature, composition of the reactive gases, oxidation state, alkalinity-acidity on today's Earth are kept homeorrhetically at values set by the sum of the activities of the current biota. Life, in other words, not only produces and maintains its immediate environment, but appears on Earth only as a planetary phenomenon. Since the natural tendency of all life is to grow exponentially to fill proximal volume, the question now "can life ecopoietically expand to Mars?" is entirely equivalent to the query of "can Gaia reproduce?"

  12. Life as a planetary phenomenon: the colonization of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Guerrero, R.

    1995-01-01

    Life is a planet-wide phenomenon in which its components incessantly move and interact. Life imperatively recycles its parts at the surface of the Earth in a chemical transformation and physical transport that depends utterly on the energy from a recent star, the Sun. Humanity, entirely dependent on other beings, plays a recent and relatively small part in the great phenomenon of life that transports and transforms the surface of the Earth. Our species accelerates but does not dominate the metabolism of the Earth system. Ironically, during the Apollo days of the sixties, fears were rampant that Martian or other extraterrestrial "germs" might "contaminate" our planet. After Viking, such fears are seen as the manifestation of cultural paranoia. The Viking missions complemented ground-based astronomical observation and yielded definitive evidence for the lack of life on the red planet. The Gaia hypothesis states that the surface temperature, composition of the reactive gases, oxidation state, alkalinity-acidity on today's Earth are kept homeorrhetically at values set by the sum of the activities of the current biota. Life, in other words, not only produces and maintains its immediate environment, but appears on Earth only as a planetary phenomenon. Since the natural tendency of all life is to grow exponentially to fill proximal volume, the question now "can life ecopoietically expand to Mars?" is entirely equivalent to the query of "can Gaia reproduce?".

  13. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in Healthy Pet Cats Kept in the City Households

    PubMed Central

    Płoneczka-Janeczko, Katarzyna; Rypuła, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), is a significant pathogen in both human medicine and veterinary medicine. The importance of pets as reservoirs of human infections is still poorly understood. This article provides detailed information of a cross-sectional study of a S. aureus colonization in clinically healthy indoor cats. The study systematically assessed a number of different anatomical locations for the S. aureus colonization and the influence of a range of potential risk factors on the value of the final S. aureus colonization rate. The incidence rates observed for cats with at least one site positive for S. aureus or MRSA were 17.5% and 6.63%, respectively. The following risk factors were identified: one or more owners working in the healthcare industry (human or veterinary); dogs being kept with the cat under investigation; treatment of the cat under investigation with antibiotics or chemotherapeutics during the previous year. In conclusion, this study revealed a higher prevalence of MRSA than what has previously been reported in healthy pets. A combination of anatomical locations from which the samples were collected had a major influence on the final value of the S. aureus colonization rate. PMID:27766257

  14. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in Healthy Pet Cats Kept in the City Households.

    PubMed

    Bierowiec, Karolina; Płoneczka-Janeczko, Katarzyna; Rypuła, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), is a significant pathogen in both human medicine and veterinary medicine. The importance of pets as reservoirs of human infections is still poorly understood. This article provides detailed information of a cross-sectional study of a S. aureus colonization in clinically healthy indoor cats. The study systematically assessed a number of different anatomical locations for the S. aureus colonization and the influence of a range of potential risk factors on the value of the final S. aureus colonization rate. The incidence rates observed for cats with at least one site positive for S. aureus or MRSA were 17.5% and 6.63%, respectively. The following risk factors were identified: one or more owners working in the healthcare industry (human or veterinary); dogs being kept with the cat under investigation; treatment of the cat under investigation with antibiotics or chemotherapeutics during the previous year. In conclusion, this study revealed a higher prevalence of MRSA than what has previously been reported in healthy pets. A combination of anatomical locations from which the samples were collected had a major influence on the final value of the S. aureus colonization rate.

  15. Comparison of contrast media for visualization of the colon of healthy dogs during computed tomography and ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Byunggyu; Moon, Sohyeon; Park, Seungjo; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Hong, Sunghwa; Cho, Hyun; Choi, Jihye

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate contrast agents for their ability to improve visualization of the colon wall and lumen during CT and ultrasonography. ANIMALS 10 healthy adult Beagles. PROCEDURES Food was withheld from dogs for 36 hours, after which dogs consumed 250 mL of polyethylene glycol solution. Dogs were then anesthetized, a contrast agent (tap water, diluted barium, or air; order randomly assigned) was administered rectally, iodine contrast medium (880 mg of I/kg) was administered IV, and CT and ultrasonography of the colon were performed. After a 1-week washout period, this process was repeated with a different contrast agent until all agents had been evaluated. Two investigators reviewed the CT and ultrasonographic images for colon wall thickness, conspicuity, artifacts, wall layering, and degree of lumen dilation at 4 sites. RESULTS Thickness of the colon wall was greatest in CT and ultrasonographic images with water used as contrast agent, followed by barium and then air. The CT images obtained after water administration had a smooth appearance that outlined the colonic mucosa and had the highest score of the 3 contrast agents for wall conspicuity. Although no substantial artifacts related to any of the contrast agents were identified on CT images, barium- and gas-induced shadowing and reverberation artifacts hindered wall evaluation during ultrasonography. For ultrasonography, the degree of conspicuity was highest with barium in the near-field wall and with water in the far-field wall. In contrast to CT, ultrasonography could be used to distinguish wall layering, and the mucosal and muscular layers were distinct with all contrast agents. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Use of water as a contrast agent for both CT and ultrasonography of the colon in dogs compensated for each imaging modality's disadvantages and could be beneficial in the diagnosis of colon disease.

  16. How colonization by microbiota in early life shapes the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Gensollen, Thomas; Iyer, Shankar S.; Kasper, Dennis L.; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial colonization of mucosal tissues during infancy plays an instrumental role in the development and education of the host mammalian immune system. These early-life events can have long-standing consequences: facilitating tolerance to environmental exposures or contributing to the development of disease in later life, including inflammatory bowel disease, allergy, and asthma. Recent studies have begun to define a critical period during early development in which disruption of optimal host-commensal interactions can lead to persistent and in some cases irreversible defects in the development and training of specific immune subsets. Here, we discuss the role of early-life education of the immune system during this “window of opportunity,” when microbial colonization has a potentially critical impact on human health and disease. PMID:27126036

  17. Oropharyngeal Colonization With Neisseria lactamica, Other Nonpathogenic Neisseria Species and Moraxella catarrhalis Among Young Healthy Children in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Raheleh; Amin, Mansour; Rostami, Soodabeh; Shoja, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Nasim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neisseria lactamica as one of the main commensal in oropharynx during the childhood is related to the induction of a natural immunity against meningococcal meningitis. Also Moraxella catarrhalis in oropharynx of children is a predisposing factor for otitis media infection. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the frequency of the N. lactamica, other nonpathogenic Neisseria spp. and M. catarrhalis in the oropharynx of young healthy children in Ahvaz, Iran by the two phenotypic tests and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: A total of 192 oropharyngeal swab samples of the young healthy children were studied during four months. Swabs were plated onto enriched selective media and non-selective media. Gram-negative and oxidase-positive diplococci were identified by several conventional biochemical tests. The PCR and sequencing were used to confirm the accuracy of laboratory diagnosis to identify N. lactamica and M. catarrhalis. Results: Among 192 young healthy children with the mean age of 5.93 ± 2.5903 years, authors identified: N. lactamica (21.9%) in the age group of one to nine years; N. mucosa (6.3%); N. sicca (7.8%); N. cinerea (1.6%); N. subflava (biovar subflava) (4.2%); N. subflava (biovar perflava) (28.1%); N. subflava (biovar flava) (7.3%) and M. catarrhalis (42.7%). Conclusions: The young healthy children screening by colonization of N. lactamica and other nonpathogenic Neisseria spp. in oropharynx was the first report in Ahvaz, Iran. The study results demonstrated the high frequency of colonization of M. catarrhalis in the studied young healthy children other than Neisseria spp. PMID:25964847

  18. Paradoxes of a Healthy Way of Life for Young People in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belova, Natal'ia Il'inichna

    2009-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the author and her colleagues conducted a survey among first-year students at Moscow State University of the Humanities titled "College Students' Attitudes Toward Health and a Healthy Way of Life," to determine students' perceptions and knowledge about a healthy way of life as well as habits fostering and promoting…

  19. Glycosylation and sulphation of colonic mucus glycoproteins in patients with ulcerative colitis and in healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Morita, H; Kettlewell, M G; Jewell, D P; Kent, P W

    1993-01-01

    Studies have been made of mucus glycoprotein biosynthesis in different regions of the lower gastrointestinal tract in normal patients and those with ulcerative colitis (UC), active or inactive, by means of 3H-glucosamine (3H-GlcNH2)--35S-sulphate double labelling of epithelial biopsy specimens under culture conditions. The time based rate of 3H-GlcNH2 labelling of mucus in rectal tissue was similar to that in active or inactive UC whereas the rate of 35SO4(2) labelling was significantly increased in active disease. The 3H specific activities measuring the amount of isotopic incorporation into surface and tissue mucus glycoproteins were increased in patients with active UC compared with normal or inactive subjects. The 35S specific activities did not differ significantly between patients with active UC and those in remission. In the rectum, glycosylation of mucus glycoproteins decreases with the increasing age of the patient. Regional differences in 3H-labelling of mucus components are reported for ascending colon, transverse colon, sigmoid colon, and rectum. Sulphation (35S-labelling) was higher in all parts of the colon in left sided UC. Results point to accelerated glycosylation of core proteins in the active phase of UC. PMID:8344580

  20. Detection and comparison of nitric oxide in clinically healthy horses and those with naturally acquired strangulating large colon volvulus

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the study was to determine whether nitric oxide (NO) is present in clinically healthy horses (control) under basal conditions, and if it increases secondary to naturally acquired strangulating large colon volvulus (affected). Eleven affected horses and 10 controls were studied. Jugular venous blood, abdominal fluid, and urine were collected. The NO concentrations were standardized to the creatinine concentration in the respective samples. A biopsy specimen collected from the large colon pelvic flexure at surgery was divided into subsections for processing for inducible nitric synthase (iNOS) and nitrotyrosine (NT) immunohistochemical staining and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase histochemical staining. There were no significant differences in plasma, abdominal fluid, or urine NO concentrations between affected and control horses. There was a significant decrease in submucosal arteriolar and venular endothelium, submucosal plexus, mucosal leukocyte, mucosal and musclaris vasculature, and myenteric plexus NADPH diaphorase staining in affected versus control horses. There was a significant increase in iNOS staining in mucosal leukocytes and vasculature in affected versus control horses. Other than a greater number of positively stained mucosal leukocytes in affected horses, there were no significant differences between affected and control horses for NT staining. The presence of NADPH diaphorase staining in the endothelium and submucosal neurons suggests endothelial and neuronal NOS are present under basal conditions in the large colon of horses. Increased iNOS and NT staining in mucosal leukocytes of affected horses suggests involvement of the NO pathway in large colon volvulus. The reasons for the lack of a significant difference in plasma, abdominal fluid, and urine NO concentrations between affected and control horses are unknown. PMID:15971674

  1. Interactions of Respiratory Viruses and the Nasal Microbiota during the First Year of Life in Healthy Infants

    PubMed Central

    Korten, Insa; Mika, Moana; Klenja, Shkipe; Kieninger, Elisabeth; Mack, Ines; Barbani, Maria Teresa; Gorgievski, Meri; Frey, Urs

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traditional culture techniques have shown that increased bacterial colonization is associated with viral colonization; however, the influence of viral colonization on the whole microbiota composition is less clear. We thus aimed to understand the interaction of viral infections and the nasal microbiota in early life to appraise their roles in disease development. Thirty-two healthy, unselected infants were included in this prospective longitudinal cohort study within the first year of life. Biweekly nasal swabs (n = 559) were taken, and the microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing, and 10 different viruses and 2 atypical bacteria were characterized by real-time PCR (combination of seven duplex samples). In contrast to asymptomatic human rhinovirus (HRV) colonization, symptomatic HRV infections were associated with lower alpha diversity (Shannon diversity index [SDI]), higher bacterial density (PCR concentration), and a difference in beta diversities (Jaccard and Bray-Curtis index) of the microbiota. In addition, infants with more frequent HRV infections had a lower SDI at the end of the study period. Overall, changes in the microbiota associated with symptomatic HRV infections were characterized by a loss of microbial diversity. The interaction between HRV infections and the nasal microbiota in early life might be of importance for later disease development and indicate a potential approach for future interventions. IMPORTANCE Respiratory viral infections are very frequent in infancy and of importance in acute and chronic disease development. Infections with human rhinovirus (HRV) are, e.g., associated with the later development of asthma. We found that only symptomatic HRV infections were associated with acute changes in the nasal microbiota, mainly characterized by a loss of microbial diversity. Infants with more frequent symptomatic HRV infections had a lower bacterial diversity at the end of the first year of life. Whether the interaction

  2. Oral Candida Isolates Colonizing or Infecting Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected and Healthy Persons in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio; Ortiz-López, Natalia Guadalupe; Villar, María; Moragues, María Dolores; Aguirre, José Manuel; Cashat-Cruz, Miguel; Lopez-Ribot, Jose Luis; Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Quindós, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    Oral yeast carriage was studied in 312 Mexican subjects. Candida albicans was the most frequent species, but other Candida spp. were isolated from 16.5 to 38.5% of patients. Colonization did not correlate with CD4+ number or viral load, but highly active antiretroviral therapy reduced the frequency of candidiasis. Most isolates were susceptible to fluconazole, but 10.8% were resistant to one or more azoles. PMID:16081965

  3. Oral Candida isolates colonizing or infecting human immunodeficiency virus-infected and healthy persons in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio; Ortiz-López, Natalia Guadalupe; Villar, María; Moragues, María Dolores; Aguirre, José Manuel; Cashat-Cruz, Miguel; Lopez-Ribot, Jose Luis; Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Quindós, Guillermo

    2005-08-01

    Oral yeast carriage was studied in 312 Mexican subjects. Candida albicans was the most frequent species, but other Candida spp. were isolated from 16.5 to 38.5% of patients. Colonization did not correlate with CD4+ number or viral load, but highly active antiretroviral therapy reduced the frequency of candidiasis. Most isolates were susceptible to fluconazole, but 10.8% were resistant to one or more azoles.

  4. [Hygienic aspects of healthy life style development in students].

    PubMed

    Kozhevnikova, N G; Kataeva, V A

    2011-01-01

    Medical students have shown a high prevalence of major behavioral factors of health risk, such as inadequate physical activity, changes in the routine, nutrition quality, study-and-rest regimens, as well as smoking and frequent alcohol use. Proposals to educate the students on the importance of living a healthy lifestyle are given.

  5. When Will Life Be Normal? The Healthy Beginnings Program for Parents of Premature Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sledden, Elizabeth

    The Healthy Beginnings program is designed to help parents of prematurely born infants adjust to parenting challenges and opportunities of the first 2 years of the infant's life. The Healthy Beginnings Program provides parents of premature infants with support and guidance by offering: (1) monthly education and support meetings; (2) evaluations…

  6. Bacillus subtilis and Enterobacter cloacae endophytes from healthy Theobroma cacao L. trees can systemically colonize seedlings and promote growth.

    PubMed

    Leite, Hianna Almeida Câmara; Silva, Anderson Barbosa; Gomes, Fábio Pinto; Gramacho, Karina Peres; Faria, José Cláudio; de Souza, Jorge Teodoro; Loguercio, Leandro Lopes

    2013-03-01

    Clonal genotypes resistant to fungal diseases are an important component of the cocoa production system in southeastern Bahia state (Brazil), so that technologies for faster production of stronger and healthier plantlets are highly desirable. In this study, the effects of inoculated bacterial endophytes isolated from healthy adult cacao plants on seedlings, and aspects related to inoculation methods, colonization patterns, and photosynthesis were investigated. Sequencing of 16S rRNA, hsp-60, and rpo-B genes placed the wild-type isolates within the species Enterobacter cloacae (isolates 341 and 344) and Bacillus subtilis (isolate 629). Spontaneous rifampicin-resistant (rif(R)) variants for 344 were also produced and tested. Endophytic application was either by immersion of surface sterilized seeds in bacterial suspensions or direct inoculation into soil, 20 days after planting non-inoculated seeds into pots. Results from in vitro recovery of inoculated isolates showed that the wild-type endophytes and rif(R) variants systemically colonized the entire cacao seedlings in 15-20 days, regardless of the inoculation method. Some endophytic treatments showed significant increases in seedlings' height, number of leaves, and dry matter. Inoculation methods affected the combined application of endophytes, which maintained the growth-promotion effects, but not in the same manner as in single applications. Interestingly, the 344-3.2 rif(R) variant showed improved performance in relation to both the wild type and another related variant. Photosynthetic rates and stomatal conductance increased significantly for some endophytic treatments, being partially associated with effects on growth and affected by the inoculation method. The results suggest that E. cloacae and B. subtilis endophytes from healthy adult plants (not transmitted by seeds) were able to promote vegetative growth on cacao seedlings. The development of products for large-scale use in seedlings

  7. Healthy soil as a necessary condition of human life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, M. S.; Dorodnykh, Yu. L.; Marchenko, A. I.

    2010-07-01

    The extent of soil degradation and soil pathology in Russia is discussed. The concept of a federal target program “National System of the Chemical and Biological Security of the Russian Federation (2009-2013)” is examined. A definition is given to healthy soil of agrocenoses and its main functional characteristic—ecological stability (including balanced biodiversity, self-cleaning capacity, and suppressive activity of the phytopedocenosis). Urgent applied scientific problems of regional soil sanitation are formulated. Criteria and modern methods of ecological monitoring and assessment of soil quality and health are considered. A systems approach to sanitation of soils infected by highly harmful phytopathogens—the causative agents of root rots of cereal crops—is demonstrated using the induction of soil suppressiveness as an example.

  8. [Effect of healthy life style in overweight and obese patients].

    PubMed

    Móczár, Csaba; Borda, Ferenc; Faragó, Katalin; Borgulya, Gábor; Braunitzer, Ferencné; Vörös, Vera

    2007-01-14

    Obesity is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Change of life style plays very important role for the management of overweight and obesity and related cardiovascular risk factors. Patients need to acquire and adopt these changes. The aim of this study was to screen practices for overweight and obese patients, to decrease their cardiovascular risk and prevent development of cardiovascular diseases. 2489 overweight patients were screened from 29 general practices since April of 2001. The authors surveyed their characteristics of life style: eating and exercise habits, body mass index, waist line, resting blood pressure, heart rate and plasma glucose, total cholesterin, triglyceride, HDL after a 12-hour fasting. A team, which consisted of an internist, a dietician and a physical instructor dealt with the patients. After ruling out secondary obesity the team tailored an individual life-style which focused on dietary interventions (low calorie diet) and increased physical activity. 12 months later the body mass index decreased significantly by 0.56 kg/m 2 on average and further 0.088 kg/m 2 by the end of the second year, the waist line first did not change significantly then decreased 0.04 cm. The rest systolic blood pressure cut down significantly on average 5.9 Hg mm in the first year, and more 0.11 Hg mm by the end of second year. The metabolic parameters also decreased significantly: total cholesterin 0.23 mmol/l in the first year, 0.07 mmol/l in the second year, triglyceride: 0.18 mmol/l; 0.08 mmol/l, blood glucose: 0.15 mmol/l; 0.19 mmol/l. The level of HDL did not change. It is very important for management of overweight and obesity that patients adopt changes of life style. The authors' results show that these patients must be followed very strictly.

  9. Wheat bran extract alters colonic fermentation and microbial composition, but does not affect faecal water toxicity: a randomised controlled trial in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Windey, Karen; De Preter, Vicky; Huys, Geert; Broekaert, Willem F; Delcour, Jan A; Louat, Thierry; Herman, Jean; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-01-28

    Wheat bran extract (WBE), containing arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides that are potential prebiotic substrates, has been shown to modify bacterial colonic fermentation in human subjects and to beneficially affect the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) in rats. However, it is unclear whether these changes in fermentation are able to reduce the risk of developing CRC in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of WBE on the markers of CRC risk in healthy volunteers, and to correlate these effects with colonic fermentation. A total of twenty healthy subjects were enrolled in a double-blind, cross-over, randomised, controlled trial in which the subjects ingested WBE (10 g/d) or placebo (maltodextrin, 10 g/d) for 3 weeks, separated by a 3-week washout period. At the end of each study period, colonic handling of NH3 was evaluated using the biomarker lactose[15N, 15N']ureide, colonic fermentation was characterised through a metabolomics approach, and the predominant microbial composition was analysed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. As markers of CRC risk, faecal water genotoxicity was determined using the comet assay and faecal water cytotoxicity using a colorimetric cell viability assay. Intake of WBE induced a shift from urinary to faecal 15N excretion, indicating a stimulation of colonic bacterial activity and/or growth. Microbial analysis revealed a selective stimulation of Bifidobacterium adolescentis. In addition, WBE altered the colonic fermentation pattern and significantly reduced colonic protein fermentation compared with the run-in period. However, faecal water cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were not affected. Although intake of WBE clearly affected colonic fermentation and changed the composition of the microbiota, these changes were not associated with the changes in the markers of CRC risk.

  10. 'Healthy viewing?': experiencing life and death through a voyeuristic gaze.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, K D; Costello, J

    2000-01-01

    Recent times have witnessed a groundswell in the number of British television programmes that deal with the 'real life' experiences of people in various health care settings. Such programmes tend to focus upon the two interrelated strands of the experience of those who deliver professional care and those who are at the receiving end of it. The usual rationale given for such programmes is that they offer insights about the delivery of health care that are not readily accessible to members of the public. This article will look beneath the rationale and reasons offered by programme makers for the existence of such documentaries. It will explore insidious and questionable elements that go beyond revealing the 'lived experience' of professional carers and those for whom they care. Emerging from this is the challenging notion that such programmes deliver the opportunity to experience the vulnerability, suffering and even death of others through a voyeuristic gaze.

  11. [Maternal bonding and a healthy life style during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Winkler, J; Hrdinová, J; Kukla, L

    2000-02-16

    Maternal bonding in pregnancy appears to be an important factor, which may influence psychical and physical development of the child both before and after the birth. One of the significant determining factors of such influence is change in the general life style of the pregnant woman, which correspond with the strength of the maternal bonding. The study brings information on the basis of an empirical research, which was done, in ninetieths at a Research Institute of the Child Health in Brno. The investigated group comprised of 481 pregnant women who were all living in Brno. Results of our research bring the information about relations between the strength of maternal bonding and occupational position of the pregnant women, intensity of working activities and the way of spending their leisure time. Beside it, out research informs about some health risk activities in pregnancy and their relations to the formation of the emotional bonding towards unborn child.

  12. Nutrition research to affect food and a healthy life span.

    PubMed

    Ohlhorst, Sarah D; Russell, Robert; Bier, Dennis; Klurfeld, David M; Li, Zhaoping; Mein, Jonathan R; Milner, John; Ross, A Catharine; Stover, Patrick; Konopka, Emily

    2013-08-01

    Proper nutrition offers one of the most effective and least costly ways to decrease the burden of many diseases and their associated risk factors, including obesity. Nutrition research holds the key to increasing our understanding of the causes of obesity and its related comorbidities and thus holds promise to markedly influence global health and economies. After outreach to 75 thought leaders, the American Society for Nutrition (ASN) convened a Working Group to identify the nutrition research needs whose advancement will have the greatest projected impact on the future health and well-being of global populations. ASN's Nutrition Research Needs focus on the following high priority areas: 1) variability in individual responses to diet and foods; 2) healthy growth, development, and reproduction; 3) health maintenance; 4) medical management; 5) nutrition-related behaviors; and 6) food supply/environment. ASN hopes the Nutrition Research Needs will prompt collaboration among scientists across all disciplines to advance this challenging research agenda given the high potential for translation and impact on public health. Furthermore, ASN hopes the findings from the Nutrition Research Needs will stimulate the development and adoption of new and innovative strategies that can be applied toward the prevention and treatment of nutrition-related diseases. The multidisciplinary nature of nutrition research requires stakeholders with differing areas of expertise to collaborate on multifaceted approaches to establish the evidence-based nutrition guidance and policies that will lead to better health for the global population. In addition to the identified research needs, ASN also identified 5 tools that are critical to the advancement of the Nutrition Research Needs: 1) omics, 2) bioinformatics, 3) databases, 4) biomarkers, and 5) cost-effectiveness analysis.

  13. The effect of different public health interventions on longevity, morbidity, and years of healthy life

    PubMed Central

    Diehr, Paula; Derleth, Ann; Cai, Liming; Newman, Anne B

    2007-01-01

    Background Choosing cost-effective strategies for improving the health of the public is difficult because the relative effects of different types of interventions are not well understood. The benefits of one-shot interventions may be different from the benefits of interventions that permanently change the probability of getting sick, recovering, or dying. Here, we compare the benefits of such types of public health interventions. Methods We used multi-state life table methods to estimate the impact of five types of interventions on mortality, morbidity (years of life in fair or poor health), and years of healthy life (years in excellent, very good, or good health). Results A one-shot intervention that makes all the sick persons healthy at baseline would increase life expectancy by 3 months and increase years of healthy life by 6 months, in a cohort beginning at age 65. An equivalent amount of improvement can be obtained from an intervention that either decreases the probability of getting sick each year by 12%, increases the probability of a sick person recovering by 16%, decreases the probability that a sick person dies by 15%, or decreases the probability that a healthy person dies by 14%. Interventions aimed at keeping persons healthy increased longevity and years of healthy life, while decreasing morbidity and medical expenditures. Interventions focused on preventing mortality had a greater effect on longevity, but had higher future morbidity and medical expenditures. Results differed for older and younger cohorts and depended on the value to society of an additional year of sick life. Conclusion Interventions that promote health and prevent disease performed well, but other types of intervention were sometimes better. The value to society of interventions that increase longevity but also increase morbidity needs further research. More comprehensive screening and treatment of new Medicare enrollees might improve their health and longevity without increasing

  14. Estimation of Life-Year Loss and Lifetime Costs for Different Stages of Colon Adenocarcinoma in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Chuan; Lee, Jenq-Chang; Wang, Jung-Der

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds and aims Life-expectancy of colon cancer patients cannot be accurately answered due to the lack of both large datasets and long-term follow-ups, which impedes accurate estimation of lifetime cost to treat colon cancer patients. In this study, we applied a method to estimate life-expectancy of colon cancer patients in Taiwan and calculate the lifetime costs by different stages and age groups. Methods A total of 17,526 cases with pathologically verified colon adenocarcinoma between 2002 and 2009 were extracted from Taiwan Cancer Registry database for analysis. All patients were followed-up until the end of 2011. Life-expectancy, expected-years-of-life-lost and lifetime costs were estimated, using a semi-parametric survival extrapolation method and borrowing information from life tables of vital statistics. Results Patients with more advanced stages of colon cancer were generally younger and less co-morbid with major chronic diseases than those with stages I and II. The LE of stage I was not significantly different from that of the age- and sex-matched general population, whereas those of stages II, III, and IV colon cancer patients after diagnosis were 16.57±0.07, 13.35±0.07, and 4.05±0.05 years, respectively; the corresponding expected-years-of-life-lost were 1.28±0.07, 5.93±0.07 and 16.42±0.06 years, significantly shorter than the general population after accounting for lead time bias. Besides, the lifetime cost of managing stage II colon cancer patients would be US $8,416±1939, 14,334±1,755, and 21,837±1,698, respectively, indicating a big saving for early diagnosis and treatment after stratification for age and sex. Conclusions Treating colon cancer at younger age and earlier stage saves more life-years and healthcare costs. Future studies are indicated to apply these quantitative results into the cost-effectiveness evaluation of screening program for colon cancers. PMID:26207912

  15. An antimethanogenic nutritional intervention in early life of ruminants modifies ruminal colonization by Archaea.

    PubMed

    Abecia, Leticia; Waddams, Kate E; Martínez-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Martín-García, A Ignacio; Ramos-Morales, Eva; Newbold, C Jamie; Yáñez-Ruiz, David R

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study whether feeding a methanogen inhibitor from birth of goat kids and their does has an impact on the archaeal population colonizing the rumen and to what extent the impact persists later in life. Sixteen goats giving birth to two kids were used. Eight does were treated (D+) with bromochloromethane after giving birth and over 2 months. The other 8 goats were not treated (D-). One kid per doe in both groups was treated with bromochloromethane (k+) for 3 months while the other was untreated (k-), resulting in four experimental groups: D+/k+, D+/k-, D-/k+, and D-/k-. Rumen samples were collected from kids at weaning and 1 and 4 months after (3 and 6 months after birth) and from does at the end of the treating period (2 months). Pyrosequencing analyses showed a modified archaeal community composition colonizing the rumen of kids, although such effect did not persist entirely 4 months after; however, some less abundant groups remained different in treated and control animals. The different response on the archaeal community composition observed between offspring and adult goats suggests that the competition occurring in the developing rumen to occupy different niches offer potential for intervention.

  16. The interaction between dietary and life goals: using goal systems theory to explore healthy diet and life goals.

    PubMed

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M; Wright, Julie A; Migneault, Jeffrey P; Quintiliani, Lisa; Friedman, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the types of life and dietary goals individuals report and how these goal domains interact as framed by goal systems theory. Methods: This work is a cross-sectional survey study. Measures included the incidence of common life and dietary goals and how these goals interact with and facilitate each other. Results: The results of a quantitative survey (n = 46 participants), which was informed by two focus groups (n = 17 participants), showed that participants are trying to achieve several different life (e.g. achieving financial success) and dietary goals (e.g. eating more fruits and vegetables, drinking more water, and losing weight) and that these two types of goals interact to both facilitate and conflict with each other. Having a life goal of exercising was significantly associated with healthy eating goals when compared with other life goals (p's < .05), suggesting these goals may be linked and help to facilitate one another. Being in the maintenance phase with the goal of healthy eating was associated with participants feeling like they were more successful in their other non-diet-related health goals (p < .05), suggesting maintenance of goals can facilitate success in achieving other goals. Conclusions: Life goals can have an impact on a person's ability to achieve and maintain dietary and other health goals. Health educators may help to facilitate long-term behavior change by examining a person's life goals as well as dietary goals.

  17. The interaction between dietary and life goals: using goal systems theory to explore healthy diet and life goals

    PubMed Central

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M.; Wright, Julie A.; Migneault, Jeffrey P.; Quintiliani, Lisa; Friedman, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the types of life and dietary goals individuals report and how these goal domains interact as framed by goal systems theory. Methods: This work is a cross-sectional survey study. Measures included the incidence of common life and dietary goals and how these goals interact with and facilitate each other. Results: The results of a quantitative survey (n = 46 participants), which was informed by two focus groups (n = 17 participants), showed that participants are trying to achieve several different life (e.g. achieving financial success) and dietary goals (e.g. eating more fruits and vegetables, drinking more water, and losing weight) and that these two types of goals interact to both facilitate and conflict with each other. Having a life goal of exercising was significantly associated with healthy eating goals when compared with other life goals (p's < .05), suggesting these goals may be linked and help to facilitate one another. Being in the maintenance phase with the goal of healthy eating was associated with participants feeling like they were more successful in their other non-diet-related health goals (p < .05), suggesting maintenance of goals can facilitate success in achieving other goals. Conclusions: Life goals can have an impact on a person's ability to achieve and maintain dietary and other health goals. Health educators may help to facilitate long-term behavior change by examining a person's life goals as well as dietary goals. PMID:25750817

  18. [Development of healthy life-style in growing-up generation].

    PubMed

    Babenko, A I; Tataurova, E A

    2005-01-01

    Pediatricians survey revealed that first and foremost role in development of healthy life-style in growing-up generation belongs to parents and family on the whole. In this process, medical personnel, educational process in schools and mass media also have particular significance. Various issues of development of healthy life-style in school-children and their impact on parents, teachers, elderly children and mass media are discussed. Conclusion is made that enhancement of preventive activities is needed and it should be put into practice via family physicians.

  19. [The healthy life-style as one of components of human safety].

    PubMed

    Vasendin, V N; Tchebotarkova, S A; Kobalyeva, D A

    2012-01-01

    The technique of single-step anonymous questionnaire was applied to sampling of students of technical university to study propagation of health risk factors. The very high propagation of behavioral factors of life-style among students is noted. The model of healthy life-style is considered with emphasis on internal and external aspects of its functioning. It is established that particular steps in implementation of this model are ultimately individual.

  20. The Role of Purpose in Life in Healthy Identity Formation: A Grounded Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronk, Kendall Cotton

    2011-01-01

    Researchers contend that committing to an inspiring purpose in life is an important component of healthy identity development for adolescents; however, little research has focused on how identity and purpose develop together. Therefore, the study followed a sample of eight adolescent purpose exemplars for five years in order to develop a grounded…

  1. The Relationship between Physical Activity Level and Healthy Life-Style Behaviors of Distance Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özkan, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the relationship between physical activity levels and healthy life-style behaviors in distance education students in Hoca Ahmet Yesevi University. In total, 526 distance education students in Hoca Ahmet Yesevi University participated in this study voluntarily. The short form of International Physical…

  2. [THE FORMATION OF HEALTHY LIFE-STYLE OF SOVIET YOUTH IN 1920S-1930s YEARS].

    PubMed

    Sakharov, V A; Sakharova, L G

    2015-01-01

    The article considers analysis of social pedagogical aspects of problem of formation of healthy life-style in youth in the Soviet Russia in 1920-1930s years in the course of public policy and as well as in theory and practice of national pedagogics.

  3. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression in the epithelium and stroma of normal colon in healthy individuals in an aspirin intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sushma S; Makar, Karen W; Li, Lin; Zheng, Yingye; Yang, Peiying; Levy, Lisa; Rudolph, Rebecca Y; Lampe, Paul D; Yan, Min; Markowitz, Sanford D; Bigler, Jeannette; Lampe, Johanna W; Potter, John D

    2015-12-01

    Regular aspirin use reduces colon adenoma and carcinoma incidence. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are involved in aspirin metabolism and clearance, and variant alleles in UGT1A6 have been shown to alter salicylic acid metabolism and risk of colon neoplasia. In a randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial of 44 healthy men and women, homozygous for UGT1A6*1 or UGT1A6*2, we explored differences between global epithelial and stromal expression, using Affymetrix U133 + 2.0 microarrays and tested effects of 60-day aspirin supplementation (325 mg/d) on epithelial and stromal gene expression and colon prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. We conducted a comprehensive study of differential gene expression between normal human colonic epithelium and stroma from healthy individuals. Although no statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed in response to aspirin or UGT1A6 genotype, we have identified the genes uniquely and reproducibly expressed in each tissue type and have analyzed the biologic processes they represent. Here we describe in detail how the data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) - accession number GSE71571 - was generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in BMC Medical Genetics with the PMID 25927723 (Thomas et al., 2015 [9]).

  4. Real-life conditions of use of sodium phosphate tablets for colon cleansing before colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hagège, Hervé; Laugier, René; Nahon, Stéphane; Coulom, Pierre; Isnard-Bagnis, Corinne; Albert-Marty, Annaïck

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: The purpose of this study was to describe the real-life conditions of use, efficacy, safety, and acceptability of sodium phosphate (NaP) tablets for colon cleansing in routine medical practice in France. Patients and methods: A total of 996 patients undergoing bowel preparation were enrolled by 108 gastroenterologists in this observational, longitudinal, prospective, multicenter study. The conditions of use of NaP tablets were assessed with a composite endpoint, which included six criteria for patient compliance with the recommended administration scheme and a criterion for the absence of contraindications to NaP use. Results: Adequate use of NaP was reported for 75.1 % of the patients. The main reasons for misuse were a smaller fluid intake than expected with a dose of 4 tablets and noncompliance with age-related contraindications. The quality of cleansing was satisfactory: the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS) total score was 7 or higher in 75.4 % of the patients. Gastroscopy associated with colonoscopy in 38.9 % of the patients revealed gastric lesions, which were considered as possibly related to the use of NaP tablets in 10.3 % of them. Vomiting occurred in 9.8 % of the patients, and 0.6 % discontinued bowel preparation after an adverse event. No electrolyte disorders or renal impairment was reported, even if not systematically sought. The acceptability of the NaP tablets was high, particularly among patients who previously had undergone other methods of bowel preparation. Conclusions: Despite being defined according to strict criteria, adequate use of NaP tablets was observed in a high percentage of patients. The quality of colon cleansing and the safety and acceptability of NaP tablets were satisfactory and consistent with data from randomized clinical studies. PMID:26357680

  5. Healthy life expectancy in the context of population health and ageing in India.

    PubMed

    Lau, Robin S; Johnson, Shanthi; Kamalanabhan, T J

    2012-01-01

    This study examines life expectancy (LE) and healthy life expectancy (HLE) in India longitudinally over the period 2007 to 2020, providing projections into the future. Specifically, the Indian Healthy Life Expectancy Projection model was developed based on epidemiological data (mortality, disability rates) obtained from the World Health Organization and the Government of India. The current model contributed to 4 key findings: decreases in mortality but not in all age and gender groups; increasing disability in the Indian population over time; increase in LE and HLE into the future in all age and gender groups; and the largest gains in LE and HLE are in the older age bands starting from the 70+ age band in women and 65+ age band in men. This study sheds some light on the population health measures needed to improve the understanding of the determinants of health for the efficient allocation of resources and to inform policy in the planning of health and social services.

  6. Healthy lifestyles and health-related quality of life among men living with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Uphold, Constance R; Holmes, Wanda; Reid, Kimberly; Findley, Kimberly; Parada, Jorge P

    2007-01-01

    Although healthy lifestyles are related to improved quality of life in the general population, little is known about the role of healthy lifestyles during HIV infection. The authors examined the relationships between health-promoting behaviors, risk behaviors, stress, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among 226 men with HIV infection who were attending three infectious disease clinics. As hypothesized, health-promoting behaviors were positively related and stress was negatively related with most of the HRQOL dimensions. Contrary to the hypothesis, tobacco use, recreational drug use, and unsafe sexual behaviors were not related to the HRQOL dimensions. Hazardous alcohol use was negatively associated with one HRQOL dimension--social functioning. The association of modifiable factors, such as health-promoting behaviors and stress, with HQROL offers opportunities for improving HIV-related health care. Relatively simple, straightforward changes in lifestyles such as eating well, remaining active, and avoiding stressful life events may result in improvements in HRQOL.

  7. Healthy life expectancy in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China.

    PubMed Central

    Law, C. K.; Yip, P. S. F.

    2003-01-01

    Sullivan's method and a regression model were used to calculate healthy life expectancy (HALE) for men and women in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong SAR) of China. These methods need estimates of the prevalence and information on disability distributions of 109 diseases and HALE for 191 countries by age, sex and region of the world from the WHO's health assessment of 2000. The population of Hong Kong SAR has one of the highest healthy life expectancies in the world. Sullivan's method gives higher estimates than the classic linear regression method. Although Sullivan's method accurately calculates the influence of disease prevalence within small areas and regions, the regression method can approximate HALE for all economies for which information on life expectancy is available. This paper identifies some problems of the two methods and discusses the accuracy of estimates of HALE that rely on data from the WHO assessment. PMID:12640475

  8. Analyses of the Temporal Dynamics of Fungal Communities Colonizing the Healthy Wood Tissues of Esca Leaf-Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Vines

    PubMed Central

    Bruez, Emilie; Vallance, Jessica; Gerbore, Jonathan; Lecomte, Pascal; Da Costa, Jean-Pierre; Guerin-Dubrana, Lucia; Rey, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Esca, a Grapevine Trunk Disease (GTD), is of major concern for viticulture worldwide. Our study compares the fungal communities that inhabit the wood tissues of vines that expressed or not foliar esca-symptoms. The trunk and rootstock tissues were apparently healthy, whether the 10 year-old plants were symptomatic or not. The only difference was in the cordon, which contained white rot, a typical form of esca, in 79% of symptomatic plants. Observations over a period of one year using a fingerprint method, Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP), and the ITS-DNA sequencing of cultivable fungi, showed that shifts occurred in the fungal communities colonizing the healthy wood tissues. However, whatever the sampling time, spring, summer, autumn or winter, the fungi colonizing the healthy tissues of asymptomatic or symptomatic plants were not significantly different. Forty-eight genera were isolated, with species of Hypocreaceae and Botryosphaeriaceae being the most abundant species. Diverse fungal assemblages, made up of potentially plant-pathogenic and -protective fungi, colonized these non-necrotic tissues. Some fungi, possibly involved in GTD, inhabited the non-necrotic wood of young plants, but no increase in necrosis areas was observed over the one-year period. PMID:24788412

  9. Analyses of the temporal dynamics of fungal communities colonizing the healthy wood tissues of esca leaf-symptomatic and asymptomatic vines.

    PubMed

    Bruez, Emilie; Vallance, Jessica; Gerbore, Jonathan; Lecomte, Pascal; Da Costa, Jean-Pierre; Guerin-Dubrana, Lucia; Rey, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Esca, a Grapevine Trunk Disease (GTD), is of major concern for viticulture worldwide. Our study compares the fungal communities that inhabit the wood tissues of vines that expressed or not foliar esca-symptoms. The trunk and rootstock tissues were apparently healthy, whether the 10 year-old plants were symptomatic or not. The only difference was in the cordon, which contained white rot, a typical form of esca, in 79% of symptomatic plants. Observations over a period of one year using a fingerprint method, Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP), and the ITS-DNA sequencing of cultivable fungi, showed that shifts occurred in the fungal communities colonizing the healthy wood tissues. However, whatever the sampling time, spring, summer, autumn or winter, the fungi colonizing the healthy tissues of asymptomatic or symptomatic plants were not significantly different. Forty-eight genera were isolated, with species of Hypocreaceae and Botryosphaeriaceae being the most abundant species. Diverse fungal assemblages, made up of potentially plant-pathogenic and -protective fungi, colonized these non-necrotic tissues. Some fungi, possibly involved in GTD, inhabited the non-necrotic wood of young plants, but no increase in necrosis areas was observed over the one-year period.

  10. Comparing Sexual Function and Quality of Life in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Healthy Women

    PubMed Central

    Shafti, Vida; Shahbazi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders that is associated with different metabolic, reproductive and psychological consequences. The main aim of this study was to compare the sexual function and quality of life in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and healthy women. Materials and methods: This is a causal-comparative study in which 129 women with polycystic ovary syndrome were qualified as the research group. The control group consisted of 125 healthy women. The sampling method was convenient and was done using Rotterdam criteria. Women of both research and control groups responded to the FSFI and WHOQOL-BREF questionnaires. Data were analyzed with SPSS software using MANOVA. Results: According to findings, all of quality of life subscales except environment domain were significantly lower in research group than healthy group (p < 0.01), but none of sexual function subscales were significantly different between two groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Women with PCOS in term of some quality of life parameters have lower performance than healthy women. Therefore, it seems to be essential to increase awareness about symptoms and psychological consequences and referring process in order to take advantage of the advisory services. PMID:27648099

  11. A life-course approach to healthy ageing: maintaining physical capability.

    PubMed

    Kuh, Diana; Karunananthan, Sathya; Bergman, Howard; Cooper, Rachel

    2014-05-01

    Research on healthy ageing lacks an agreed conceptual framework and has not adequately taken into account the growing evidence that social and biological factors from early life onwards affect later health. We conceptualise healthy ageing within a life-course framework, separating healthy biological ageing (in terms of optimal physical and cognitive functioning, delaying the onset of chronic diseases, and extending length of life for as long as possible) from changes in psychological and social wellbeing. We summarise the findings of a review of healthy ageing indicators, focusing on objective measures of physical capability, such as tests of grip strength, walking speed, chair rises and standing balance, which aim to capture physical functioning at the individual level, assessing the capacity to undertake the physical tasks of daily living. There is robust evidence that higher scores on these measures are associated with lower rates of mortality, and more limited evidence of lower risk of morbidity, and of age-related patterns of change. Drawing on a research collaboration of UK cohort studies, we summarise what is known about the influences on physical capability in terms of lifetime socioeconomic position, body size and lifestyle, and underlying physiology and genetics; the evidence to date supports a broad set of factors already identified as risk factors for chronic diseases. We identify a need for larger longitudinal studies to investigate age-related change and ethnic diversity in these objective measures, the dynamic relationships between them, and how they relate to other component measures of healthy ageing. Robust evidence across cohort studies, using standardised measures within a clear conceptual framework, will benefit policy and practice to promote healthy ageing.

  12. Healthy eating for life: rationale and development of an English as a second language (ESL) curriculum for promoting healthy nutrition.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Josefa L; Rivers, Susan E; Duncan, Lindsay R; Bertoli, Michelle; Domingo, Samantha; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E; Salovey, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Low health literacy contributes significantly to cancer health disparities disadvantaging minorities and the medically underserved. Immigrants to the United States constitute a particularly vulnerable subgroup of the medically underserved, and because many are non-native English speakers, they are pre-disposed to encounter language and literacy barriers across the cancer continuum. Healthy Eating for Life (HE4L) is an English as a second language (ESL) curriculum designed to teach English language and health literacy while promoting fruit and vegetable consumption for cancer prevention. This article describes the rationale, design, and content of HE4L. HE4L is a content-based adult ESL curriculum grounded in the health action process approach to behavior change. The curriculum package includes a soap opera-like storyline, an interactive student workbook, a teacher's manual, and audio files. HE4L is the first teacher-administered, multimedia nutrition-education curriculum designed to reduce cancer risk among beginning-level ESL students. HE4L is unique because it combines adult ESL principles, health education content, and behavioral theory. HE4L provides a case study of how evidence-based, health promotion practices can be implemented into real-life settings and serves as a timely, useful, and accessible nutrition-education resource for health educators.

  13. Antibiotics in early life alter the murine colonic microbiome and adiposity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ilseung; Yamanishi, Shingo; Cox, Laura; Methé, Barbara A; Zavadil, Jiri; Li, Kelvin; Gao, Zhan; Mahana, Douglas; Raju, Kartik; Teitler, Isabel; Li, Huilin; Alekseyenko, Alexander V; Blaser, Martin J

    2012-08-30

    Antibiotics administered in low doses have been widely used as growth promoters in the agricultural industry since the 1950s, yet the mechanisms for this effect are unclear. Because antimicrobial agents of different classes and varying activity are effective across several vertebrate species, we proposed that such subtherapeutic administration alters the population structure of the gut microbiome as well as its metabolic capabilities. We generated a model of adiposity by giving subtherapeutic antibiotic therapy to young mice and evaluated changes in the composition and capabilities of the gut microbiome. Administration of subtherapeutic antibiotic therapy increased adiposity in young mice and increased hormone levels related to metabolism. We observed substantial taxonomic changes in the microbiome, changes in copies of key genes involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates to short-chain fatty acids, increases in colonic short-chain fatty acid levels, and alterations in the regulation of hepatic metabolism of lipids and cholesterol. In this model, we demonstrate the alteration of early-life murine metabolic homeostasis through antibiotic manipulation.

  14. Enhancing a sustainable healthy working life: design of a clustered randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To improve a sustainable healthy working life, we have developed the intervention 'Staying healthy at work', which endeavours to enhance work participation of employees aged 45 years and older by increasing their problem-solving capacity and stimulating their awareness of their role and responsibility towards a healthy working life. This research study aims to evaluate the process and the effectiveness of the intervention compared with care as usual. Methods/design The study is a cluster-randomized controlled trial design (randomized at the supervisor level), with a 1-year follow-up. Workers aged 45 years and older have been enrolled in the study. Workers in the intervention group are receiving the intervention 'Staying healthy at work'. The main focus of the intervention is to promote a healthy working life of ageing workers by: (1) changing workers awareness and behaviour, by emphasizing their own decisive role in attaining goals; (2) improving the supervisors' ability to support workers in taking the necessary action, by means of enhancing knowledge and competence; and (3) enhancing the use of the human resource professionals and the occupational health tools available within the organization. The supervisors in the intervention group have been trained how to present themselves as a source of support for the worker. Workers in the control group are receiving care as usual; supervisors in the control group have not participated in the training. Measurements have been taken at baseline and will be followed up at 3, 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome measures are vitality, work ability and productivity. The secondary outcomes measures include fatigue, job strain, work attitude, self-efficacy and work engagement. A process evaluation will be conducted at both the supervisor and the worker levels, and satisfaction with the content of the intervention will be assessed. Discussion The intervention 'Staying healthy at work' has the potential to provide

  15. Quality of life and sexuality comparison between sexually active ovarian cancer survivors and healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Ik; Lee, Yumi; Joo, Jungnam; Park, KiByung; Lee, Dong Ock; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Objective compare quality of life (QoL) and sexual functioning between sexually active ovarian cancer survivors and healthy women. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in 103 successfully treated ovarian cancer survivors and 220 healthy women. All women had engaged in sexual activity within the previous 3 months, and ovarian cancer survivors were under surveillance after primary treatment without evidence of disease. QoL and sexual functioning were assessed using three questionnaires; the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), Ovarian Cancer Module (EORTC QLQ-OV28), and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Propensity score matching was used to adjust covariates between the ovarian cancer survivor and healthy women groups. In total, 73 ovarian cancer survivors and 73 healthy women were compared. Results Poorer social functioning (mean, 82.4 vs. 90.9; p=0.010) and more financial difficulties (mean, 16.4 vs. 7.8; p=0.019) were observed among ovarian cancer survivors than among healthy women. Sexuality, both in terms of desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain and in terms of interest in sex, sexual activity, and enjoyment of sex (EORTC QLQ-OV28) were similar between the groups. However, vaginal dryness was more problematic in ovarian cancer survivors, with borderline statistical significance (p=0.081). Conclusion Sexuality was not impaired in ovarian cancer survivors who were without evidence of disease after primary treatment and having sexual activities, compared with healthy women, whereas social functioning and financial status did deteriorate. Prospective cohort studies are needed. PMID:25686396

  16. Health Is Life in Balance: Students and Communities Explore Healthy Lifestyles in a Culturally Based Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Aho, Lynn; Ackerman, Joni; Bointy, Shelley; Cuch, Marilyn; Hindelang, Mary; Pinnow, Stephanie; Turnbull, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    From exploring knowledge from wise members of the community to investigating the science of homeostasis, students learn healthy ways of living through a new hands-on curriculum, Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools: Health Is Life in Balance. The curriculum integrates science and Native American traditions to educate students about science, diabetes and its risk factors, and the importance of nutrition and physical activity in maintaining health and balance in life. Applying an inquiry-based approach to learning, the curriculum builds skills in observation, measurement, prediction, experimentation, and communication, and provides healthy lifestyle messages and innovative science activities for all students. The curriculum is now available to teachers and health educators at no cost through a federal grant.Health Is life in Balance incorporates interdisciplinary standards as well as storytelling to help children understand important messages. Implementation evaluation of the curriculum indicated improved knowledge and attitudes about science and health, positive teacher and student comments, and culturally relevant content. The lessons highlighted in this article give a glimpse into this hands-on curriculum which integrates science and Native American traditions, looking to our past and listening to the wisdom of our Elders, to gain powerful information for healthy, holistic living. The circle of balance is a theme in many indigenous belief systems and is woven into the lessons, providing enduring understandings of health behaviours that can prevent type 2 diabetes in the context of Native American cultural themes.

  17. Leveraging Health-Related Quality of Life in Population Health Management: The Case for Healthy Days

    PubMed Central

    Slabaugh, S. Lane; Shah, Mona; Zack, Matthew; Cordier, Tristan; Havens, Eric; Davidson, Evan; Miao, Michael; Prewitt, Todd; Jia, Haomiao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Measuring population health with morbidity and mortality data, often collected at the site of care, fails to capture the individual's perspective on health and well-being. Because health happens outside the walls of medical facilities, a holistic and singular measure of health that can easily be captured for an entire population could aid in understanding the well-being of communities. This paper postulates that Healthy Days, a health-related quality of life measure developed and validated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is an ideal survey instrument to advance population health. A systematic literature review was conducted and revealed a strong evidence base using Healthy Days with significant correlations to chronic disease conditions. Building on the literature base and experience, methods for analyzing Healthy Days data are discussed, including stratified sampling techniques, statistical measures to account for variance, and modeling techniques for skewed distributions. Using such analytic techniques, Healthy Days has been used extensively in national health surveillance. As the health care system faces increasing costs and constrained resources, the Healthy Days survey instrument can be used to inform public policies and allocate health service resources. Because Healthy Days captures broad dimensions of health from the individual's perspective, it is a simple way to holistically measure the health and well-being of a population and its trend over time. Expanded use of Healthy Days can aid population health managers and contribute to the understanding of the broader determinants of the nation's and individual community's health and aid in evaluating progress toward health goals. PMID:27031869

  18. Long-Term Colonization by blaCTX-M-Harboring Escherichia coli in Healthy Japanese People Engaged in Food Handling

    PubMed Central

    Nakane, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Kumiko; Goto, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    The actual state of intestinal long-term colonization by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli in healthy Japanese people remains unclear. Therefore, a total of 4,314 fecal samples were collected from 2,563 food handlers from January 2010 to December 2011. Approximately 0.1 g of each fecal sample was inoculated onto a MacConkey agar plate containing cefotaxime (1 μg/ml). The bacterial colonies that grew on each plate were checked for ESBL production by the double-disk synergy test, as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The bacterial serotype, antimicrobial susceptibility, pulsotype, sequence type (ST), and ESBL genotype were checked, and the replicon types of plasmids harboring the ESBL gene were also determined after conjugation experiments. ESBL producers were recovered from 70 (3.1%) of 2,230 participants who were checked only once. On the other hand, ESBL producers were isolated at least once from 52 (15.6%) of 333 participants who were checked more than twice, and 13 of the 52 participants carried ESBL producers for from more than 3 months to up to 2 years. Fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant E. coli strains harboring blaCTX-M were repeatedly recovered from 11 of the 13 carriers of blaCTX-M-harboring E. coli. A genetically related FQ-resistant E. coli O25b:H4-ST131 isolate harboring blaCTX-M-27 was recovered from 4 of the 13 carriers for more than 6 months. Three FQ-resistant E. coli O1:H6-ST648 isolates that harbored blaCTX-M-15 or blaCTX-M-14 were recovered from 3 carriers. Moreover, multiple CTX-M-14- or CTX-M-15-producing E. coli isolates with different serotypes were recovered from 2 respective carriers. These findings predict a provable further spread of ESBL producers in both community and clinical settings. PMID:26746714

  19. Trends in healthy life expectancy among older Brazilian women between 1998 and 2008

    PubMed Central

    Nepomuceno, Marília Regina; Turra, Cássio Maldonado

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze conditional and unconditional healthy life expectancy among older Brazilian women. METHODS This cross-sectional study used the intercensal technique to estimate, in the absence of longitudinal data, healthy life expectancy that is conditional and unconditional on the individual’s current health status. The data used were obtained from the Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílios (National Household Sample Survey) of 1998, 2003, and 2008. This sample comprised 11,171; 13,694; and 16,259 women aged 65 years or more, respectively. Complete mortality tables from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics for the years 2001 and 2006 were also used. The definition of health status was based on the difficulty in performing activities of daily living. RESULTS The remaining lifetime was strongly dependent on the current health status of the older women. Between 1998 and 2003, the amount of time lived with disability for healthy women at age 65 was 9.8%. This percentage increased to 66.2% when the women already presented some disability at age 65. Temporal analysis showed that the active life expectancy of the women at age 65 increased between 1998-2003 (19.3 years) and 2003-2008 (19.4 years). However, life years gained have been mainly focused on the unhealthy state. CONCLUSIONS Analysis of conditional and unconditional life expectancy indicated that live years gained are a result of the decline of mortality in unhealthy states. This pattern suggests that there has been no reduction in morbidity among older women in Brazil between 1998 and 2008. PMID:25741653

  20. Stress and the healthy adolescent brain: evidence for the neural embedding of life events.

    PubMed

    Ganzel, Barbara L; Kim, Pilyoung; Gilmore, Heather; Tottenham, Nim; Temple, Elise

    2013-11-01

    Little is known about the long-term neural consequences of adverse life events for healthy adolescents, and this is particularly the case for events that occur after a putative stress-sensitive period in early childhood. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study of healthy adolescents, we found that prior exposure to severe adverse life events was associated with current anxiety and with increased amygdala reactivity to standardized emotional stimuli (viewing of fearful faces relative to calm ones). Conjunction analyses identified multiple regions, including the amygdala, insula, and prefrontal cortex, in which reactivity to emotional faces covaried with life events as well as with current anxiety. Our morphometric analyses suggest systemic alterations in structural brain development with an association between anxiety symptoms and global gray matter volume. No life events were reported for the period before 4 years of age, suggesting that these results were not driven by exposure to stress during an early sensitive period in development. Overall, these data suggest systemic effects of traumatic events on the dynamically developing brain that are present even in a nonclinical sample of adolescents.

  1. [Life cannot consist of dreams alone: reflections on advertising and a healthy diet].

    PubMed

    Villagelim, Andréa Siliveste Brasil; Prado, Shirley Donizete; Freitas, Ricardo Ferreira; Carvalho, Maria Claudia da Veiga Soares; Cruz, Claudia Olsieski da; Klotz, Juliana; Freire, Gesseldo de Brito

    2012-03-01

    In this essay we present some thoughts on advertising and a healthy diet in the contemporary world, where consumption plays a highly relevant role. We seek to emphasize two aspects, among many others yet to be explored in the scientific literature in the food and nutritional field: the hegemony of the biomedical paradigm and the fragmentation of human life when advertising campaigns associate food with the idea of a healthy diet. We believe that we cannot merely live through advertisements in which our desires are triggered constantly and where the world is only dreams and the main goal is to sell more and earn more, even using some strategies for dissemination of biomedical and nutritional information. In our opinion, the merger between diet and health, i.e. a healthy diet, must involve enlightenment of the individual including information on quality in the context of social life in order to achieve the ideal of happiness. Individuals whose identities are fully formed both in dreams and reality can boldly seek knowledge and think about themselves in the world context, as well as zeal for their diet and health.

  2. Comparison of Quality of Life and Sexuality between Cervical Cancer Survivors and Healthy Women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yumi; Lim, Myong Cheol; Kim, Se Ik; Joo, Jungnam; Lee, Dong Ock; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to compare quality of life (QoL) and sexual functioning between sexually active cervical cancer survivors and healthy women. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, propensity-score-matched cervical cancer survivors (n=104) and healthy women (n=104) were compared. All women had engaged in sexual activity within the previous 3 months, and cervical cancer survivors showed no evidence of disease after primary treatment. QoL and sexual functioning were assessed using three questionnaires; the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), Cervical Cancer Module (EORTC QLQ-CX24), and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Results Significantly higher scores for lymphedema were observed in the cervical cancer survivors group compared with the healthy women group (mean, 20.2 vs. 12.2; p < 0.05). Sexuality, both in terms of sexual activity, sexual enjoyment, and sexual worry (EORTC QLQ-CX24), and in terms of desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain (FSFI) were similar between the groups. When the scale of sexual/vaginal functioning in EORTC QLQ-CX24 was divided into individual questions, cervical cancer survivors reported shorter vaginal length than the control group, but without statistical significance (mean, 80.6 vs. 85.4; p=0.077). Conclusion Compared with healthy women, sexuality was not impaired in cervical cancer survivors who showed no evidence of disease after primary treatment and engaging in sexual activity. Further prospective cohort studies are warranted to confirm this finding. PMID:26875196

  3. Centella asiatica Improves Physical Performance and Health-Related Quality of Life in Healthy Elderly Volunteer

    PubMed Central

    Mato, Lugkana; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Tongun, Terdthai; Piyawatkul, Nawanant; Yimtae, Kwanchanok; Thanawirattananit, Panida; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

    2011-01-01

    Recently, oxidative stress has been reported to contribute an important role in the decline of physical function as age advances. Numerous antioxidants can improve both physical and psychological performances resulting in the increase of health-related quality of life (HQOL). Therefore, we hypothesized that Centella asiatica, a medicinal plant reputed for nerve tonic, strength improvement and antioxidant activity, could improve the physical performance and HQOL especially in the physical satisfaction aspect, of the healthy elderly volunteer. To test this hypothesis, a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was performed. Eighty healthy elderly were randomly assigned to receive placebo or standardized extract of C. asiatica at doses of 250, 500 and 750 mg once daily for 90 days. The subjects were evaluated to establish baseline data of physical performance using 30-s chair stand test, hand grip test and 6-min walk test. The health-related quality of life was assessed using SF-36. These assessments were repeated every month throughout the 3-month experimental period using the aforementioned parameters. Moreover, 1 month after the cessation of C. asiatica treatment, all subjects were also evaluated using these parameters again. The results showed that after 2 months of treatment, C. asiatica at doses of 500 and 750 mg per day increased lower extremity strength assessed via the 30-s chair stand test. In addition, the higher doses of C. asiatica could improve the life satisfaction subscale within the physical function subscale. Therefore, the results from this study appear to support the traditional reputation of C. asiatica on strength improvement, especially in the lower extremities of the elderly. C. asiatica also possesses the potential to be a natural resource for vigor and strength increase, in healthy elderly persons. However, further research is essential. PMID:19880441

  4. Cytokine levels in healthy and allergic mothers and their children during the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Prokesová, Ludmila; Lodinová-Zádníková, Raja; Zizka, Jan; Kocourková, Ingrid; Novotná, Olga; Petrásková, Petra; Sterzl, Ivan

    2006-05-01

    To assess the regulatory changes of immune system in children genetically pre-disposed to allergic diseases and in their mothers, we tested cytokines IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-gamma and TGF-beta in 21 healthy and 21 allergic mothers (serum at the time of delivery, colostrum and milk throughout the suckling period) and their children (cord blood, venous blood and stool filtrates) up to 1 yr of age. Samples were taken at the time of delivery, 4 days post-partum and then after 3, 6 and 12 months. Significant differences between the healthy and the allergic group were found in the levels of IL-4, IL-10, IL-13 and IFN-gamma. The levels of IL-4 in the allergic group were generally higher; the levels in the sera of children of allergic mothers during the post-natal life decreased, reaching levels typical for the healthy group at 1 yr of age. Allergic mothers exhibited markedly higher IL-10 levels in the serum at the time of delivery and in milk 3 months after delivery than healthy mothers while after 6 months the IL-10 levels in all samples from the allergic group were very low. Children from allergic group had lower intestinal content of IL-13 in comparison with the healthy counterparts. At 1 yr of age, the levels of IFN-gamma in sera and stool of children from the allergic group sharply increased. TGF-beta levels in the sera of both groups were high, while in the milk they were relatively low and substantially lower that in the children's stool. TGF-beta of mammary secretions is therefore unlikely to exert a decisive regulatory influence on the children's immunity. Long-term clinical monitoring of the children will be performed to evaluate the potential prognostic significance of these changes for the future development of allergies.

  5. Study on trace elements behaviour in cancerous and healthy tissues of colon, breast and stomach: Total reflection X-ray fluorescence applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, T.; Carvalho, M. L.; Von Bohlen, A.; Becker, M.

    2010-06-01

    In this work Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to analyse healthy and cancerous tissues of the same individual along several contiguous thin sections of each tissue. Thirty two samples (16 pairs) of breast tissue, 30 samples (15 pairs) of intestine tissue and 10 samples (5 pairs) of stomach tissue were analysed. The samples were obtained in Civil Hospitals of Germany (Dortmund) and Portugal (Lisbon). The elemental distribution of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Rb, Sr and Pb in these samples was studied. Descriptive statistics based on bar graphics and hypotheses tests and also an automatic classification based on hierarchical grouping analysis was used for the several analysed tissues. It was shown that the behaviour of the elements is tissue dependent. Some elements, like P and K exhibit the same behaviour in all the analysed tissue types. They have increased concentrations in all cancerous tissues. Unlike, other elements like Br show completely different behaviour depending on the tissue: similar concentration in healthy and cancerous stomach, decreased levels in colon cancerous tissues and enhanced concentrations in breast was observed. Moreover cancer tissues present decreased Se concentrations on colon and increased on breast.

  6. Building healthy bones throughout life: an evidence-informed strategy to prevent osteoporosis in Australia.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Peter R; Daly, Robin M; Kerr, Deborah A; Kimlin, Michael G

    2013-10-07

    Osteoporosis imposes a tremendous burden on Australia: 1.2 million Australians have osteoporosis and 6.3 million have osteopenia. In the 2007–08 financial year, 82 000 Australians suffered fragility fractures, of which > 17 000 were hip fractures. In the 2000–01 financial year, direct costs were estimated at $1.9 billion per year and an additional $5.6 billion on indirect costs. Osteoporosis was designated a National Health Priority Area in 2002; however, implementation of national plans has not yet matched the rhetoric in terms of urgency. Building healthy bones throughout life, the Osteoporosis Australia strategy to prevent osteoporosis throughout the life cycle, presents an evidence-informed set of recommendations for consumers, health care professionals and policymakers. The strategy was adopted by consensus at the Osteoporosis Australia Summit in Sydney, 20 October 2011. Primary objectives throughout the life cycle are: to maximise peak bone mass during childhood and adolescence to prevent premature bone loss and improve or maintain muscle mass, strength and functional capacity in healthy adults to prevent and treat osteoporosis in order to minimise the risk of suffering fragility fractures, and reduce falls risk, in older people. The recommendations focus on three affordable and important interventions — to ensure people have adequate calcium intake, vitamin D levels and appropriate physical activity throughout their lives. Recommendations relevant to all stages of life include: daily dietary calcium intakes should be consistent with Australian and New Zealand guidelines serum levels of vitamin D in the general population should be above 50nmol/L in winter or early spring for optimal bone health regular weight-bearing physical activity, muscle strengthening exercises and challenging balance/mobility activities should be conducted in a safe environment.

  7. Microbial colonization of Ca-sulfate crusts in the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert: implications for the search for life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Wierzchos, J; Cámara, B; de Los Ríos, A; Davila, A F; Sánchez Almazo, I M; Artieda, O; Wierzchos, K; Gómez-Silva, B; McKay, C; Ascaso, C

    2011-01-01

    The scarcity of liquid water in the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert makes this region one of the most challenging environments for life on Earth. The low numbers of microbial cells in the soils suggest that within the Atacama Desert lies the dry limit for life on our planet. Here, we show that the Ca-sulfate crusts of this hyperarid core are the habitats of lithobiontic micro-organisms. This microporous, translucent substrate is colonized by epilithic lichens, as well as endolithic free-living algae, fungal hyphae, cyanobacteria and non photosynthetic bacteria. We also report a novel type of endolithic community, "hypoendoliths", colonizing the undermost layer of the crusts. The colonization of gypsum crusts within the hyperarid core appears to be controlled by the moisture regime. Our data shows that the threshold for colonization is crossed within the dry core, with abundant colonization in gypsum crusts at one study site, while crusts at a drier site are virtually devoid of life. We show that the cumulative time in 1 year of relative humidity (RH) above 60% is the best parameter to explain the difference in colonization between both sites. This is supported by controlled humidity experiments, where we show that colonies of endolithic cyanobacteria in the Ca-sulfate crust undergo imbibition process at RH >60%. Assuming that life once arose on Mars, it is conceivable that Martian micro-organisms sought refuge in similar isolated evaporite microenvironments during their last struggle for life as their planet turned arid.

  8. [The social structure of behavior of physicians and patients in development of healthy life-style of patients].

    PubMed

    Pogodina, V A

    2011-01-01

    The questionnaire survey was applied to study the behavior of patients and physicians aged from 19 to 60 years in two polyclinics and one hospital of Novosibirsk concerning their awareness about proper implementation of healthy life-style from the position of evidence medicine. The questionnaire included sets of questions related to behavior of patient and physician in the process of implementation of activities of healthy life-style. The survey data permitted to formulate the conclusion that patient's health depends not only from the obtained knowledge about healthy lifestyle implementation but also from the level of inner and external control.

  9. Tips for a Healthy Long-Life Learned from Space Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shin; Matsuo, Tomoaki; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Mukai, Chiaki

    2013-02-01

    The field of space medicine is responsible for maintaining astronauts’ health and optimizing their performance. A prolonged stay in space with little gravity results in weakening of the bones and muscles that otherwise support body weight, which is precisely the problem faced by elderly people on Earth. Space medicine provides the means of alleviating such problems. Bone loss, muscle atrophy, and disturbed circadian rhythms are common issues for both astronauts and the elderly alike and can be prevented, if the risks are addressed correctly. To have a healthy long-life, it is important to practice effective health improvement techniques and take preventive measures. The space medicine technologies a for astronauts will provide helpful information to people living in a super aging society. and Japanese medical societies for health promotion. With the aids of the Japanese Society of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine, the Japanese Orthopaedic Association, and the Japanese Association of Rehabilitation Medicine, JAXA has made a leaflet titled for general citizen to show the tips for a healthy long-life learned from space medicine from the viewpoints of their respective expertise.

  10. Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria Colonization of Healthy US Military Personnel in the US and Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-05

    subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 05...30 days of specimen collection, and Afghanistan-based personnel were receiving doxycycline for malaria chemoprophylaxis at time of specimen...antimicrobial resistance and increased rates of MDR E. coli colonization needs further evaluation. Keywords Deployment, Malaria chemoprophylaxis

  11. Vitamin D Status and Quality of Life in Healthy Male High-Tech Employees.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Sigal; Dabush, Yael; Shahar, Danit R; Endevelt, Ronit; Geva, Diklah; Ish-Shalom, Sofia

    2016-06-15

    While low vitamin D status has been shown to be associated with decreased quality of life in unhealthy populations and women, only limited data are available regarding healthy adult men. Our aim was to evaluate the associations between health-related quality of life (QoL) and vitamin D status in adult men. High-tech employees aged 25-65 year were recruited from an occupational periodic examination clinic at Rambam Health Campus. QoL was assessed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Health-related quality of life questionnaire (HRQOL-4). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and Body Mass Index (BMI) were measured; further information was collected about physical activity, education, sun exposure, sick-days, and musculoskeletal pain severity (visual analog scale). Three hundred and fifty-eight men were enrolled in the study; mean serum 25(OH)D level was 22.1 ± 7.9 ng/mL (range 4.6-54.5 ng/mL). In a multivariate logistic regression model, 25(OH)D was a significant independent determinant of self-rated health; Odds Ratio (OR) for self-rated health was 0.91 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85-0.97, p = 0.004), adjusted for age, BMI, pain severity, physical activity, and sun exposure. Every 1 ng/mL increase of 25(OH)D was associated with 9% reduction in the odds of reporting self-rated health as fair or poor. Poisson regression model demonstrated an association between physically unhealthy days and 25(OH)D levels (rate ratio 0.95, p < 0.001). In conclusion, serum levels of 25(OH)D were associated with self-rated health and with physically unhealthy days of HRQOL in healthy high-tech male workers. Future intervention studies are required to test the impact of vitamin D supplementation on QoL.

  12. Gastrointestinal pH and Transit Time Profiling in Healthy Volunteers Using the IntelliCap System Confirms Ileo-Colonic Release of ColoPulse Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Jacoba M.; Schellekens, Reinout C. A.; van Rieke, Hèlen M.; Wanke, Christoph; Iordanov, Ventzeslav; Stellaard, Frans; Wutzke, Klaus D.; Dijkstra, Gerard; van der Zee, Margot; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ColoPulse tablets are an innovative development in the field of oral dosage forms characterized by a distal ileum and colon-specific release. Previous studies in humans showed release in the ileo-colonic region, but the relationship between gastrointestinal pH and release was not experimentally proven in vivo. This information will complete the in vivo release-profile of ColoPulse tablets. Materials and Methods Release from ColoPulse tablets was studied in 16 healthy volunteers using the dual label isotope strategy. To determine gastrointestinal pH profiles and transit times the IntelliCap system was used. A ColoPulse tablet containing 13C-urea and an uncoated, immediate release tablet containing 15N2-urea were taken simultaneously followed by a standardized breakfast after three hours. Five minutes after intake of the tablets the IntelliCap capsule was swallowed and pH was measured until excretion in the feces. Breath and urine samples were collected for isotope analysis. Results Full analysis could be performed in 12 subjects. Median bioavailability of 13C -urea was 82% (95% CI 74–94%, range 61–114%). The median lag time (5% release of 13C) was 5:42 h (95% CI 5:18–6:18 h, range 2:36–6:36 h,) There was no statistically significant difference between lag time based on isotope signal and colon arrival time (CAT) based on pH (median 5:42 vs 5:31 h p = 0.903). In all subjects an intestinal pH value of 7.0 was reached before release of 13C from the ColoPulse tablet occurred. Discussion and Conclusions From the combined data from the IntelliCap system and the 13C -isotope signal it can be concluded that release from a ColoPulse tablet in vivo is not related to transit times but occurs in the ileo-colonic region after pH 7.0 is reached. This supports our earlier findings and confirms that the ColoPulse system is a promising delivery system for targeting the distal ileum and colon. Trial Registration ISRCTN Registry 18301880 PMID:26177019

  13. Colonization of native Andean grasses by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Puna: a matter of altitude, host photosynthetic pathway and host life cycles.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Mónica A; Negritto, María A; Jofré, Mariana; Anton, Ana; Galetto, Leonardo

    2012-08-01

    The relationships of altitude, host life cycle (annual or perennial) and photosynthetic pathway (C(3) or C(4) ) with arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) root colonization were analysed in 35 species of Andean grasses. The study area is located in north-western Argentina along altitudinal sites within the Puna biogeographical region. Twenty-one sites from 3320 to 4314 m were sampled. Thirty-five grasses were collected, and the AM root colonization was quantified. We used multivariate analyses to test emerging patterns in these species by considering the plant traits and variables of AM colonization. Pearson's correlations were carried out to evaluate the specific relationships between some variables. Most grasses were associated with AM, but the colonization percentages were low in both C(3) and C(4) grasses. Nevertheless, the AM root colonization clearly decreased as the altitude increased. This distinctive pattern among different species was also observed between some of the populations of the same species sampled throughout the sites. An inverse relationship between altitude and AM colonization was found in this Southern Hemisphere Andean system. The effect of altitude on AM colonization seems to be more related to the grasses' photosynthetic pathway than to life cycles. This study represents the first report for this biogeographical region.

  14. Metabolically healthy obesity across the life course: epidemiology, determinants, and implications.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Catherine M

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, different subphenotypes of obesity have been described, including metabolically healthy obesity (MHO), in which a proportion of obese individuals, despite excess body fat, remain free of metabolic abnormalities and increased cardiometabolic risk. In the absence of a universally accepted set of criteria to classify MHO, the reported prevalence estimates vary widely. Our understanding of the determinants and stability of MHO over time and the associated cardiometabolic and mortality risks is improving, but many questions remain. For example, whether MHO is truly benign is debatable, and whether risk stratification of obese individuals on the basis of their metabolic health status may offer new opportunities for more personalized approaches in diagnosis, intervention, and treatment of diabetes remains speculative. Furthermore, as most of the research to date has focused on MHO in adults, little is known about childhood MHO. In this review, we focus on the epidemiology, determinants, stability, and health implications of MHO across the life course.

  15. The role of purpose in life in healthy identity formation: a grounded model.

    PubMed

    Bronk, Kendall Cotton

    2011-01-01

    Researchers contend that committing to an inspiring purpose in life is an important component of healthy identity development for adolescents; however, little research has focused on how identity and purpose develop together. Therefore, the study followed a sample of eight adolescent purpose exemplars for five years in order to develop a grounded model of the way these two constructs interact. Findings suggest that for adolescent purpose exemplars, the processes of identity formation and purpose development reinforce one another; the development of purpose supports the development of identity, and the development of identity reinforces purposeful commitments. Furthermore, in the adolescent purpose exemplars' lives, the purpose and identity constructs largely overlap in such a way that what individuals hope to accomplish in their lives serves as the basis of the adults they hope to become. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  16. The Healthy Migrant Effect: New Findings From the Mexican Family Life Survey

    PubMed Central

    Rubalcava, Luis N.; Teruel, Graciela M.; Thomas, Duncan; Goldman, Noreen

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. We used nationally representative longitudinal data from the Mexican Family Life Survey to determine whether recent migrants from Mexico to the United States are healthier than other Mexicans. Previous research has provided little scientific evidence that tests the “healthy migrant” hypothesis. Methods. Estimates were derived from logistic regressions of whether respondents moved to the United States between surveys in 2002 and 2005, by gender and urban versus rural residence. Covariates included physical health measurements, self-reported health, and education measured in 2002. Our primary sample comprised 6446 respondents aged 15 to 29 years. Results. Health significantly predicted subsequent migration among females and rural males. However, the associations were weak, few health indicators were statistically significant, and there was substantial variation in the estimates between males and females and between urban and rural dwellers. Conclusions. On the basis of recent data for Mexico, the largest source of migrants to the United States, we found generally weak support for the healthy migrant hypothesis. PMID:18048791

  17. Healthy Life-Years Lost and Excess Bed-Days Due to 6 Patient Safety Incidents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaolin; Vincent, Charles; Smith, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is little satisfactory evidence on the harm of safety incidents to patients, in terms of lost potential health and life-years. Objective: To estimate the healthy life-years (HLYs) lost due to 6 incidents in English hospitals between the years 2005/2006 and 2009/2010, to compare burden across incidents, and estimate excess bed-days. Research Design: The study used cross-sectional analysis of the medical records of all inpatients treated in 273 English hospitals. Patients with 6 types of preventable incidents were identified. Total attributable loss of HLYs was estimated through propensity score matching by considering the hypothetical remaining length and quality of life had the incident not occurred. Results: The 6 incidents resulted in an annual loss of 68 HLYs and 934 excess bed-days per 100,000 population. Preventable pressure ulcers caused the loss of 26 HLYs and 555 excess bed-days annually. Deaths in low-mortality procedures resulted in 25 lost life-years and 42 bed-days. Deep-vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolisms cost 12 HLYs, and 240 bed-days. Postoperative sepsis, hip fractures, and central-line infections cost <6 HLYs and 100 bed-days each. Discussion: The burden caused by the 6 incidents is roughly comparable with the UK burden of Multiple Sclerosis (80 DALYs per 100,000), HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis (63 DALYs), and Cervical Cancer (58 DALYs). There were marked differences in the harm caused by the incidents, despite the public attention all of them receive. Decision makers can use the results to prioritize resources into further research and effective interventions. PMID:27753744

  18. Skin Barrier Function and Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in Vestibulum Nasi and Fauces in Healthy Infants and Infants with Eczema: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Berents, Teresa Løvold; Carlsen, Karin Cecilie Lødrup; Mowinckel, Petter; Skjerven, Håvard Ove; Kvenshagen, Bente; Rolfsjord, Leif Bjarte; Bradley, Maria; Lieden, Agne; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Gaustad, Peter; Gjersvik, Petter

    2015-01-01

    Atopic eczema (AE) is associated with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonization and skin barrier dysfunction, often measured by increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL). In the present study, the primary aim was to see whether S. aureus colonization in the vestibulum nasi and/or fauces was associated with increased TEWL in infants with healthy skin and infants with eczema. Secondarily, we aimed to investigate whether TEWL measurements on non-lesional skin on the lateral upper arm is equivalent to volar forearm in infants. In 167 of 240 infants, recruited from the general population, TEWL measurements on the lateral upper arm and volar forearm, using a DermaLab USB, fulfilled our environmental requirements. The mean of three TEWL measurements from each site was used for analysis. The infants were diagnosed with no eczema (n = 110), possible AE (n = 28) or AE (n = 29). DNA samples were analysed for mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG). Bacterial cultures were reported positive with the identification of at least one culture with S. aureus from vestibulum nasi and/or fauces. S. aureus colonization, found in 89 infants (53%), was not associated with increased TEWL (i.e. TEWL in the upper quartile), neither on the lateral upper arm or volar forearm (p = 0.08 and p = 0.98, respectively), nor with AE (p = 0.10) or FLG mutation (p = 0.17). TEWL was significantly higher on both measuring sites in infants with AE compared to infants with possible AE and no eczema. FLG mutation was significantly associated with increased TEWL, with a 47% difference in TEWL. We conclude that S. aureus in vestibulum nasi and/or fauces was not associated with TEWL, whereas TEWL measurements on the lateral upper arm and volar forearm appear equally appropriate in infants.

  19. Asymtomatic carriage of Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria lactamica in relation to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae colonization in healthy children: apropos of 1400 children sampled.

    PubMed

    Bakir, M; Yagci, A; Ulger, N; Akbenlioglu, C; Ilki, A; Soyletir, G

    2001-01-01

    Meningococcal disease is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality among children in many parts of the world. Main reservoir of carriage and site of meningococcal dissemination appears to be the upper respiratory tract. Colonization of Neisseria meningitidis and lactamica and factors affecting this carriage were determined in a group of healthy children aged 0-10 years. Meningococcus and N. lactamica carriage were detected in 17 (1.23%) and 245 (17.7%) of 1382 subjects, respectively. Number (%) of serogroups for meningococci was 1 (6), 5 (29), 0 (0), 1 (6), 1 (6), and 9 (53) for A, B, C, D, W135, and Y, respectively. Having more than three household members, elementary school attendance, pharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae were associated with carriage of meningococci, whereas age less than 24-month was associated with carriage of N. lactamica. There was a reverse carriage rate between N. meningitidis and N. lactamica by age which may suggest a possible protective role of N. lactamica against meningococcal colonization among pre-school children.

  20. Vitamin D Status and Quality of Life in Healthy Male High-Tech Employees

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Sigal; Dabush, Yael; Shahar, Danit R.; Endevelt, Ronit; Geva, Diklah; Ish-Shalom, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    While low vitamin D status has been shown to be associated with decreased quality of life in unhealthy populations and women, only limited data are available regarding healthy adult men. Our aim was to evaluate the associations between health-related quality of life (QoL) and vitamin D status in adult men. High-tech employees aged 25–65 year were recruited from an occupational periodic examination clinic at Rambam Health Campus. QoL was assessed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Health-related quality of life questionnaire (HRQOL-4). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and Body Mass Index (BMI) were measured; further information was collected about physical activity, education, sun exposure, sick-days, and musculoskeletal pain severity (visual analog scale). Three hundred and fifty-eight men were enrolled in the study; mean serum 25(OH)D level was 22.1 ± 7.9 ng/mL (range 4.6–54.5 ng/mL). In a multivariate logistic regression model, 25(OH)D was a significant independent determinant of self-rated health; Odds Ratio (OR) for self-rated health was 0.91 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85–0.97, p = 0.004), adjusted for age, BMI, pain severity, physical activity, and sun exposure. Every 1 ng/mL increase of 25(OH)D was associated with 9% reduction in the odds of reporting self-rated health as fair or poor. Poisson regression model demonstrated an association between physically unhealthy days and 25(OH)D levels (rate ratio 0.95, p < 0.001). In conclusion, serum levels of 25(OH)D were associated with self-rated health and with physically unhealthy days of HRQOL in healthy high-tech male workers. Future intervention studies are required to test the impact of vitamin D supplementation on QoL. PMID:27314386

  1. Personalized Proteome Profiles of Healthy and Tumor Human Colon Organoids Reveal Both Individual Diversity and Basic Features of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cristobal, Alba; van den Toorn, Henk W P; van de Wetering, Marc; Clevers, Hans; Heck, Albert J R; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2017-01-03

    Diseases at the molecular level are complex and patient dependent, necessitating development of strategies that enable precision treatment to optimize clinical outcomes. Organoid technology has recently been shown to have the potential to recapitulate the in vivo characteristics of the original individual's tissue in a three-dimensional in vitro culture system. Here, we present a quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomic analysis and a comparative transcriptomic analysis of human colorectal tumor and healthy organoids derived, in parallel, from seven patients. Although gene and protein signatures can be derived to distinguish the tumor organoid population from healthy organoids, our data clearly reveal that each patient possesses a distinct organoid signature at the proteomic level. We demonstrate that a personalized patient-specific organoid proteome profile can be related to the diagnosis of a patient and with future development contribute to the generation of personalized therapies.

  2. A Comparison of Type II Diabetic Patients With Healthy People: Coping Strategies, Hardiness, and Occupational Life Quality

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Safdar; Jaafari, Asghar; Ghamari, Mohammad; Esfandiary, Maryam; Salehi Mazandarani, Foroozan; Daneshvar, Sahar; Ajami, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the epidemiologic transition and a rise in the prevalence of non-communicable diseases different coping strategies have been studied and developed. These strategies may help the affected people to conduct a normal life style. Objectives This research was conducted in Qazvin, Iran to determine the relationship between coping strategies, hardiness, and occupational life quality in Type II diabetic patients and healthy people. Patients and Methods Questionnaires such as Valton’s on “occupational life quality,” Billings and Moos’ examination of “Coping strategies,” and Kobasa’s investigation of “hardiness” were applied to collect the data needed for the present study. In this regard, 80 people were randomly selected from employees of offices in Qazvin, Iran. Results The results of this research indicated that there is a significant relationship between problem-focused strategies, emotion-focused strategies, hardiness, and occupational life quality in people suffering from Type II diabetes and healthy people (P ≤ 0.05). These results also indicated that hardiness does not predict occupational life quality of people suffering from Type II diabetes. Conclusions The results of the present study give some evidence that allows us to conclude that hardiness and coping strategies affect occupational life quality for both people suffering from Type II diabetes and healthy people. Therefore, it is proposed that people strengthen their hardiness and coping strategies, in order to improve their occupational life quality. PMID:27162758

  3. The Genetic Basis of Quality of Life in Healthy Swedish Women: A Candidate Gene Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schoormans, Dounya; Li, Jingmei; Darabi, Hatef; Brandberg, Yvonne; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Eriksson, Mikael; Zwinderman, Koos H.; Hall, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) is an increasingly important parameter in clinical practice as it predicts mortality and poor health outcomes. It is hypothesized that one may have a genetic predisposition for QoL. We therefore related 139 candidate genes, selected through a literature search, to QoL in healthy females. Methods In 5,142 healthy females, background characteristics (i.e. demographic, clinical, lifestyle, and psychological factors) were assessed. QoL was measured by the EORTC QLQ-C30, which consists of 15 domains. For all women genotype information was available. For each candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified based on their functional (n = 2,663) and physical annotation (n = 10,649). SNPs were related to each QoL-domain, while controlling for background characteristics and population stratification. Finally, gene-based analyses were performed relating the combined effect of 10,649 SNPs (selected based on physical annotation) for each gene, to QoL using the statistical software package VEGAS. Results Overall, we found no relation between genetic variations (SNPs and genes) and 14 out of 15 QoL-domains. The strongest association was found between cognitive functioning and the top SNP rs1468951 (p = 1.21E-05) in the GSTZ1 gene. Furthermore, results of the gene-based test showed that the combined effect of 11 SNPs within the GSTZ1 gene is significantly associated with cognitive functioning (p = 2.60E-05). Conclusion If validated, the involvement of GSTZ1 in cognitive functioning underscores its heritability which is likely the result of differences in the dopamine pathway, as GSTZ1 contributes to the equilibrium between dopamine and its neurotoxic metabolites via the glutathione redox cycle. PMID:25675377

  4. Genetic hitchhiking associated with life history divergence and colonization of North America in the European corn borer moth.

    PubMed

    Dopman, Erik B

    2011-05-01

    A primary goal for evolutionary biology is to reveal the genetic basis for adaptive evolution and reproductive isolation. Using Z and E pheromone strains the European corn borer (ECB) moth, I address this problem through multilocus analyses of DNA polymorphism. I find that the locus Triose phosphate isomerase (Tpi) is a statistically significant outlier in coalescent simulations of demographic histories of population divergence, including strict allopatric isolation, restricted migration, secondary contact, and population growth or decline. This result corroborates a previous QTL study that identified the Tpi chromosomal region as a repository for gene(s) contributing to divergence in life history. Patterns of nucleotide polymorphism at Tpi suggest a recent selective sweep and genetic hitchhiking associated with colonization of North America from Europe ~200 generations ago. These results indicate that gene genealogies initially diverge during speciation because of selective sweeps, but differential introgression may play a role in the maintenance of differentiation for sympatric populations.

  5. Metagenomic and ecophysiological analysis of biofilms colonizing coral substrates: "Life after death of coral"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, A., Sr.; Cerqueda-Garcia, D.; Falcón, L. I.; Iglesias-Prieto, R., Sr.

    2015-12-01

    Coral reefs are the most productive ecosystems on the planet and are the most important carbonated structures of biological origin. However, global warming is affecting the health and functionality of these ecosystems. Specifically, most of the Acropora sp. stony corals have declined their population all over the Mexican Caribbean in more than ~80% of their original coverage, resulting in vast extensions of dead coral rubble. When the coral dies, the skeleton begins to be colonized by algae, sponges, bacteria and others, forming a highly diverse biofilm. We analyzed the metagenomes of the dead A. palmata rubbles from Puerto Morelos, in the Mexican Caribbean. Also, we quantified the elemental composition of biomass and measured nitrogen fixation and emission of greenhouse gases over 24 hrs. This works provides information on how the community is composed and functions after the death of the coral, visualizing a possible picture for a world without coral reefs.

  6. Effects of Healthy Life Practice Education on Reported Health Behaviors among Fourth-Grade Elementary School Students in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Shin-Jeong; Cho, Haeryun; Baek, Seong-Sook

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effects of healthy life practice (HLP) education on reported health behaviors, including health promotion, disease prevention, and safety among fourth-grade elementary school students. A quasi-experimental, pretest/posttest design was used. The 101 recruited participants from two schools were assigned to…

  7. Investigation of the Relationship between Physical Activity Level and Healthy Life-Style Behaviors of Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkmen, Mutlu; Ozkan, Ali; Kul, Murat; Bozkus, Taner

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the relationship of physical activity (PA) level and healthy life-style behaviors in academic staff in Bartin University, Turkey. The short form of International Physical Activity Questionnaire was administered for the determination of physical activity level of academic staff. Their PA levels were…

  8. Exposure to Prenatal Smoking and Early-life Body Composition: The Healthy Start Study

    PubMed Central

    Harrod, Curtis S; Fingerlin, Tasha E; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Reynolds, Regina M; Glueck, Deborah H; Dabelea, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine associations between exposure to prenatal smoking and early-life changes in fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM) and anthropometrics. Design and Methods We analyzed 670 mother-offspring pairs in the longitudinal Healthy Start study. Maternal smoking data were collected during prenatal research visits. Offspring body composition and size were measured by air displacement plethysmography at delivery and postnatal follow-up (5 months) visits. Results Comparing exposed and unexposed offspring, exposure to prenatal smoking was significantly associated with reduced neonatal FM (P = 0.007) and FFM (P = 0.02). In contrast, at 5 months, exposed offspring had comparable FM (P = 0.61) and FFM (P = 0.41). After subsequent adjustment for birth weight, offspring exposed to prenatal smoking had significantly greater FFM (154.7 g, 0.5, 309.0; P = 0.049) and sum of skinfolds (2.7 mm: 0.06, 5.3; P = 0.04). From delivery to follow-up, exposed offspring had significantly greater increases in FFM (156.4 g, 2.8, 310.1; P = 0.046) and sum of skinfolds (2.7 mm, 0.06, 5.3; P = 0.04), even after adjustment for respective delivery measures. Conclusions Exposure to prenatal smoking was significantly associated with rapid postnatal growth, which may increase the offspring’s risk of metabolic diseases. PMID:25385660

  9. A lesson program for schoolchildren about a clean and healthy life-style: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hollander, C

    1997-05-01

    A health education project is underway in primary schools in the Wonogiri district of Indonesia. This project, implemented by the Yayasan Indonesia Sejahtera (YIS), is related to the Perilaku Hidup Bersih dan Sehat (PHBS) campaign developed by the Provincial Health Office of central Java to promote a healthy life-style. The PHBS campaign, which will eventually target households, industry, and schools, is currently promoting only 10 household-level indicators. Thus, YIS developed a curriculum for PHBS that includes those indicators that are relevant to primary school students. The longterm YIS project group includes the fifth-grade (11- and 12-year-old students) at every elementary school in the district. A single class in a village school is serving as the target group for the pilot study. Development of the pilot curriculum involved a pre/post test as well as a field test, and an evaluation is planned. The health topics chosen for the project are: clean water, use of family sanitation facilities, garbage disposal, mosquitoes, personal hygiene, dental hygiene, nutrition, smoking and alcohol, and family planning. The curriculum consists of seven lessons and is taught using visual aids and a participatory approach. Post-test results were disappointing because answers improved over pretest answers for only 5 out of 21 questions. One of the reasons may have been that the project had to begin before all of the supporting materials were ready. Evaluation is currently ongoing, and plans are underway to expand the program.

  10. High ampicillin resistance in different biotypes and serotypes of Haemophilus influenzae colonizing the nasopharynx of healthy school-going Indian children.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amita; Kumar, Pradeep; Awasthi, Shally

    2006-02-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is one of the main causes of otitis media, sinusitis, meningitis, pneumonia and septicaemia in children, and the development of ampicillin resistance in H. influenzae is a cause of serious concern. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of ampicillin resistance in H. influenzae colonizing the nasopharynx of school-going healthy North Indian children, and to compare the distribution of different biotypes and serotype b in this population. A total of 2400 school-going healthy children from 45 rural and 45 urban schools were enrolled. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from the children and cultured. H. influenzae was isolated from 1001 (41.7 %) of the 2400 nasopharyngeal swabs collected. All these H. influenzae isolates were biotyped and serotyped, and their antibiotic susceptibility tested. All eight biotypes were present in this population. The most prevalent biotypes were I (19.6 %), II (16.8 %) and III (25.0 %). Of the 1001 isolates, 316 (31.6 %) were H. influenzae type b and 685 (68.4 %) were non-type b H. influenzae, and 22.9 % were resistant to ampicillin, 41.9 % to chloramphenicol, 27.5 % to erythromycin and 67.3 % to co-trimoxazole. Of the 316 H. influenzae type b isolates, 44.0 % were ampicillin resistant, while only 13.1 % non-type b H. influenzae isolates were ampicillin resistant. Of the 229 ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae isolates, 196 (85.6 %) were positive for beta-lactamase; 93.4 % (214/229) were biotypes I, II and III, of which 49 % were biotype I, 27.9 % were type II and 16.6 % were type III. Most of the strains belonging to biotypes III-VIII were ampicillin sensitive. Ampicillin resistance is significantly more common in biotype I and serotype b than in other biotypes and serotypes.

  11. Polyethylene glycol plus an oral sulfate solution as a bowel cleansing regimen for colon capsule endoscopy: a prospective, single-arm study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Ravit

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: As with colonoscopy, adequate bowel cleansing is essential prior to colon capsule endoscopy (CCE). Because CCE requires that the capsule traverse the entire gastrointestinal tract during the examination, laxative ‘boosters’ are used. The objective of this prospective, single-center, single-arm study was to evaluate the safety of a bowel preparation consisting of polyethylene glycol (PEG) plus an oral sulfate solution. Methods: Subjects were healthy volunteers aged 50–75 years old with normal baseline serum chemistry. The bowel preparation consisted of 4 Senna tablets, 4 liters of PEG (split dose), 10 mg metoclopramide, 2 oral sulfate solution boosters (6 oz. and 3 oz.), and 10 mg bisacodyl. Serum chemistry was performed at baseline, following PEG intake, 24 hours after bisacodyl administration, and at 7 days post procedure (in subjects with abnormal 24 hour results). The primary endpoints were the percentage of subjects with a clinically significant change in serum chemistry at the last test and the adverse event (AE) rate. Results: A total of 25 subjects were enrolled. The serum chemistry was normal in all subjects at the final evaluation. One subject showed a slight elevation in creatinine (1.08 mg/dl 7 days post procedure from 0.84 mg/dl at baseline), deemed not clinically significant. Another subject had a transient elevation in serum creatinine (from 1.01 mg/dl at baseline to 1.45 mg/dl at 24 hours after the bowel preparation); values returned to near baseline at 7 days post procedure (1.06 mg/dl). There were no serious AEs, three moderate AEs related to the bowel preparation (nausea, headache, elevated creatinine) and two mild unrelated AEs (chills, abdominal cramping). Conclusions: A bowel cleansing regimen of PEG plus an oral sulfate solution can be used in healthy volunteers. These data provide support for the continued study of this regimen in future CCE clinical trials and in medical practice. PMID:26327914

  12. [The study of healthy life-style risk factors and health status for cardiovascular diseases for employees in Kaohsiung area].

    PubMed

    Chiou, C J; Ho, C K

    1998-06-01

    To understand the healthy life style, health status and risk factors of employees, institutional employees in Kaohsiung area were studied by using questionnaire investigation and blood specimen examination. One-thousand-four hundred-fifty subjects were used, but 1147 questionnaires were completed. The complete rate was 79.1%. The reliability and validity of the healthy life style scale achieved an acceptable level. The results are as follows: 1. The mean total score of healthy life-style scale was 63.9. Four healthy behavior scored lowest: "consulted health professional about health information", "monitored self of blood pressure and blood sugar", did moderate exercise at least three times per week", "took leisure activities". 2. The severity of risk factor was as follows: (1) 32.2% of employees had abnormal value for blood cholesterol (> or = 200 mg/dl); (2) 22.9% of employees had abnormal blood pressure value; (3) 22.6% of employees were overweight or obese; (4) 16.7% of employees often smoked; (5) 13.6% of employees had abnormal values for blood triglyceride. (6) 2.1% of employees had abnormal blood sugar values. 3. 10.8% of subjects were perceieved to have a worsing health status; 14.5% of the subjects had chronic disease with physicians diagnosis and most of their (71%) were hypertersion. 4. The findings of demographic data showed that people who were male, aged over forty, had education below junior high school and those of blue collar class should be screened and monitored, for the risk factors at regular intervals. Similarly, People who are male, age below forty and blue-collar class should be encouraged to develop the healthy life-styles.

  13. Idiopathic Neonatal Colonic Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Oğuz; Melek, Mehmet; Kaba, Sultan; Bulan, Keziban; Peker, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Though the perforation of the colon in neonates is rare, it is associated with more than 50% mortality in high-risk patients. We report a case of idiopathic neonatal perforation of the sigmoid colon in an 8-day-old, healthy, male neonate without any demonstrable cause. PMID:26023477

  14. Colonization of later life? Laypersons' and users' agency regarding anti-aging medicine in Germany.

    PubMed

    Schweda, Mark; Pfaller, Larissa

    2014-10-01

    Anti-aging medicine is regarded as a significant trend in contemporary Western societies. Foucauldian gerontology provides some of the dominant theoretical perspectives on this trend in social and cultural theory. Proceeding from its interpretation and critique of anti-aging in terms of medicalization and responsibilization of aging, we explore by means of qualitative socio-empirical research how interested laypersons as well as non-professional users in the German context actually perceive of and deal with the medical claims and moral imperatives surrounding anti-aging medicine. The study is based on 12 focus groups and 20 narrative interviews (96 participants all included). They were conducted in Germany between 2011 and 2012, and analyzed by qualitative content analysis as well as comparative sequence analysis. The empirical findings indicate that in everyday life, interested laypersons and non-professional users employ different strategies for dealing with anti-aging products and services, corresponding to different degrees of affirmation and rejection. Four strategies could be identified: (a) medical optimism, (b) preventive maximalism, (c) ritualized well-being, and (d) considerate rejection. Also, each type was problematized and arguments against it were expressed. Overall, these findings show how our participants develop viable strategies to put the relevance of medical knowledge and moral imperatives for their own lives into perspective. This sheds light on laypersons' and users' agency-that is, their active role and deliberative space in the uptake, adaptation, and integration of anti-aging into their personal life. These empirical findings contribute to an enriched picture of the actual practice of anti-aging in concrete national and socio-cultural settings. This can help to differentiate the evaluation and thus make its critique more context sensitive, adequate, and targeted.

  15. Biological approaches to mechanistically understand the healthy life span extension achieved by calorie restriction and modulation of hormones.

    PubMed

    Barzilai, Nir; Bartke, Andrzej

    2009-02-01

    Calorie restriction and reduced somatotropic (growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1) signaling have a widespread though not universal ability to extend life. These interventions are considered central tools to understanding the downstream events that lead to the increase in healthy life span. As these approaches have been validated, the animals phenotyped, and the mechanisms proposed, many challenges have emerged. In this article, we give several examples and propose several considerations, opportunities, and approaches that may identify major mechanisms through which these interventions exert their effects, and which may lead to drug therapy to increase "health span."

  16. Spontaneous transverse colon volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Sana, Landolsi; Ali, Gassara; Kallel, Helmi; Amine, Baklouti; Ahmed, Saadaoui; Mohamed Ali, Elouer; Wajdi, Chaeib; Saber, Mannaï

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous transverse colon volvulus in a young healthy woman. It constitutes an unusual case since it occurred in a young healthy woman with a subacute onset and no aetiological factor has been found. Its diagnosis is still challenging. Prompt recognition with emergency intervention constitutes the key to successful outcome. PMID:23785565

  17. Spontaneous transverse colon volvulus.

    PubMed

    Sana, Landolsi; Ali, Gassara; Kallel, Helmi; Amine, Baklouti; Ahmed, Saadaoui; Ali, Elouer Mohamed; Wajdi, Chaeib; Saber, Mannaï

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous transverse colon volvulus in a young healthy woman. It constitutes an unusual case since it occurred in a young healthy woman with a subacute onset and no aetiological factor has been found. Its diagnosis is still challenging. Prompt recognition with emergency intervention constitutes the key to successful outcome.

  18. M1-like monocytes are a major immunological determinant of severity in previously healthy adults with life-threatening influenza

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Suzanne L.; Dunning, Jake; Kok, Wai Ling; Benam, Kambez Hajipouran; Benlahrech, Adel; Martinez, Fernando O.; Drumright, Lydia; Powell, Timothy J.; Bennett, Michael; Elderfield, Ruth; Thomas, Catherine; Dong, Tao; McCauley, John; Liew, Foo Y.; Taylor, Stephen; Zambon, Maria; Barclay, Wendy; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Openshaw, Peter J.; McMichael, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    In each influenza season, a distinct group of young, otherwise healthy individuals with no risk factors succumbs to life-threatening infection. To better understand the cause for this, we analyzed a broad range of immune responses in blood from a unique cohort of patients, comprising previously healthy individuals hospitalized with and without respiratory failure during one influenza season, and infected with one specific influenza A strain. This analysis was compared with similarly hospitalized influenza patients with known risk factors (total of n = 60 patients recruited). We found a sustained increase in a specific subset of proinflammatory monocytes, with high TNF-α expression and an M1-like phenotype (independent of viral titers), in these previously healthy patients with severe disease. The relationship between M1-like monocytes and immunopathology was strengthened using murine models of influenza, in which severe infection generated using different models (including the high-pathogenicity H5N1 strain) was also accompanied by high levels of circulating M1-like monocytes. Additionally, a raised M1/M2 macrophage ratio in the lungs was observed. These studies identify a specific subtype of monocytes as a modifiable immunological determinant of disease severity in this subgroup of severely ill, previously healthy patients, offering potential novel therapeutic avenues.

  19. Research on the Factors of College Students' Healthy Way of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panachev, V. D.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a sociological survey carried out by the associates of the departments of sociology, political science, and physical education at Perm State Technical University in 1998 to 2003. The purpose of the survey was to study the social and cultural characteristics of the students and their attitudes toward sports and a healthy way…

  20. Healthy Eating for Life English as a second language curriculum: primary outcomes from a nutrition education intervention targeting cancer risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Lindsay R; Martinez, Josefa L; Rivers, Susan E; Latimer, Amy E; Bertoli, Michelle C; Domingo, Samantha; Salovey, Peter

    2013-07-01

    We conducted a pre-post feasibility trial of Healthy Eating for Life, a theory-based, multimedia English as a second language curriculum that integrates content about healthy nutrition into an English language learning program to decrease cancer health disparities. Teachers in 20 English as a second language classrooms delivered Healthy Eating for Life to 286 adult English as a second language students over one semester. Postintervention data are available for 227 students. The results indicated that Healthy Eating for Life is effective for increasing fruit and vegetable intake as well as knowledge, action planning, and coping planning related to healthy eating. Participants also achieved higher reading scores compared to the state average.

  1. Clinical holistic medicine: prevention through healthy lifestyle and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Morad, Mohammed; Merrick, Joav

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical prevention of diseases seems very difficult, but we believe that holistic medicine offers a simple and seemingly efficient solution that is useful for both physicians and dentists in their clinics, with a focus on improvement of quality of life as an important supplement to improving their patients' lifestyles. Quality of life is improved when the patient's personal philosophy of life is adjusted in accordance with life and its fundamental purpose. The relevant concept of personal growth can be introduced to the motivated patient in the clinic, during the conversation with the dentist. To prevent health problems in the future, personal development must focus on improving the quality of life of the patient by: 1) increasing self insight to obtain knowledge and understanding of the purpose of life; 2) recovery of character to be the good person the patient really is; and 3) full expression of talent in private and professional life in order to be optimally valuable to the patient and others. It is also important to work on the ethics of the patient to prevent the patient from destroying personal relationships and harm others, because such deeds will almost always also damage the patient. Parallel to clinical work, we believe that dentists can make an impact on their patients and inspire an improvement in their quality of life. The dentist, who sees the patient at shorter intervals, can coach his patient and often efficiently help him/her to improve intimacy and personal relationships, consciousness of responsibility, and quality of life which might be highly beneficial for the patient's health.

  2. Evaluation of the psychoeducation given to the elderly at nursing homes for a healthy lifestyle and developing life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Tambağ, Hatice; Öz, Fatma

    2013-12-01

    The research was carried out as a pre-test, post-test patterned intervention with one group in order to evaluate the psychoeducation given to older people at nursing homes for a healthy lifestyle and developing life satisfaction. The research was done with 21 female and 21 male older people staying at the state-owned Seyran Bağlari Nursing Home/Elderly Caring Rehabilitation Center and the Ümitköy Nursing Home. In the psychoeducation program, each session was conducted for a duration of 60-90 min in the nursing homes' education classrooms. After the psychoeducation program, the life satisfaction index, the health promotion lifestyle profile total, and the subscale (nutrition, health responsibility, self realization, stress management, interpersonal support, and exercise) mean scores, significantly increased statistically. It is suggested that the nursing homes' health workers, and especially nurses who work full-time, should promote such psychoeducation.

  3. RANDOMIZED, CONTROLLED, SIX-MONTH TRIAL OF YOGA IN HEALTHY SENIORS: EFFECTS ON COGNITION AND QUALITY OF LIFE

    PubMed Central

    Oken, Barry S.; Zajdel, Daniel; Kishiyama, Shirley; Flegal, Kristin; Dehen, Cathleen; Haas, Mitchell; Kraemer, Dale F.; Lawrence, Julie; Leyva, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    Context There are potential benefits of mind-body techniques on cognitive function because the techniques involve an active attentional or mindfulness component, but this has not been fully explored. Objective To determine the effect of yoga on cognitive function, fatigue, mood, and quality of life in seniors. Design Randomized, controlled trial comparing yoga, exercise, and wait-list control groups. Participants One hundred thirty-five generally healthy men and women aged 65–85 years. Intervention Participants were randomized to 6 months of Hatha yoga class, walking exercise class, or wait-list control. Subjects assigned to classes also were asked to practice at home. Main Outcome Measures Outcome assessments performed at baseline and after the 6-month period included a battery of cognitive measures focused on attention and alertness, the primary outcome measures being performance on the Stroop Test and a quantitative electroencephalogram (EEC) measure of alertness; SF-36 health-related quality of life; Profile of Mood States; Multi-Dimensional Fatigue Inventory; and physical measures related to the interventions. Results One hundred thirty-five subjects were recruited and randomized. Seventeen subjects did not finish the 6-month intervention. There were no effects from either of the active interventions on any of the cognitive and alertness outcome measures. The yoga intervention produced improvements in physical measures (eg, timed 1-legged standing, forward flexibility) as well as a number of quality-of-life measures related to sense of well-being and energy and fatigue compared to controls. Conclusions There were no relative improvements of cognitive function among healthy seniors in the yoga or exercise group compared to the wait-list control group. Those in the yoga group showed significant improvement in quality-of-life and physical measures compared to exercise and wait-list control groups. PMID:16454146

  4. Reduced energy intake: the secret to a long and healthy life?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Bronwen; Golden, Erin; Egan, Josephine M; Mattson, Mark P; Maudsley, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    Reduced energy intake, or caloric restriction (CR), is known to extend life-span and to retard age-related health decline in a myriad of species, including nematode worms, flies, fish, mice and rats. The exact mechanism whereby CR exerts its life-extending and health-extending effects is unclear. CR however has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity, reduce oxidative stress and alter neuroendocrine responses and central nervous system (CNS) function in animals. In this review article we provide a comprehensive overview of the effects of CR on animal physiology and we discuss some of the potential molecular mechanisms and pathways whereby reduced energy intake can increase health-span and life-span. A better understanding of how energy intake can influence the aging process could lead to new strategies and therapeutics to reduce age-related decline and increase health-span. PMID:18985162

  5. Serbian KINDL questionnaire for quality of life assessments in healthy children and adolescents: reproducibility and construct validity

    PubMed Central

    Stevanovic, Dejan

    2009-01-01

    Background The KINDL questionnaire is frequently used to evaluate quality of life (QOL) and the impacts of health conditions on children's everyday living. The objectives of this study were to assess the reproducibility and construct validity of the Serbian KINDL for QOL assessments in healthy children and adolescents. Methods Five hundred and sixty-four healthy children and adolescents completed the KINDL. Reproducibility was analyzed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed to assess the structure of the KINDL - construct validity. Results The intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.03 to 0.84 for the subscales and total score. A second order CFA model as originally hypothesized was tested: items (24), primary factors (six subscales), and one secondary factor (QOL). The fit indexes derived from a CFA failed to yield appropriate fit between the data and the hypothesized model. Conclusion Majority of the subscales and total KINDL possess appropriate reproducibility for group comparisons. However, a CFA failed to confirm the structure of the original measurement model, indicating that the Serbian version should be revised before wider use for QOL assessments in healthy children and adolescent. PMID:19715576

  6. Relationship between eating behaviours and food and drink consumption in healthy postmenopausal women in a real-life context.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Julie; Provencher, Véronique; Piché, Marie-Eve; Lapointe, Annie; John Weisnagel, S; Nadeau, André; Bergeron, Jean; Lemieux, Simone

    2008-10-01

    Associations between eating behaviours and dietary variables have not been thoroughly investigated in healthy postmenopausal women in a real life uncontrolled context. To investigate how eating behaviours (cognitive dietary restraint, disinhibition and susceptibility to hunger) were associated with food and drink consumption, energy density and meal pattern in 112 healthy postmenopausal women (age 56.8 (SD 4.4) years) not on.hormonal therapy. Women completed a 3 d weighed food record and filled out the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire. The sample was divided according to the median of the distribution of cognitive dietary restraint and disinhibition (9 and 6 respectively). Both subgroups of women with high restraint level (presenting either high or low disinhibition) consumed a diet with a lower energy density than subgroups of women with lower restraint level. Women with high restraint-low disinhibition had a lower consumption of red meat and processed meat and a lower consumption of diet soft drinks than women with low restraint-high disinhibition. They were also characterised by a higher intake of whole grains than women with high restraint-high disinhibition and than women with lower restraint level (with either high or low disinhibition). Women with high restraint-high disinhibition levels showed differences in dietary variables when compared with subgroups of women with lower restraint level, namely for refined grains and diet soft drinks. We conclude that in healthy postmenopausal women, dietary consumption of specific food and drink may be related to particular eating behaviours. Women with high restraint and low disinhibition levels generally showed the most healthy dietary pattern.

  7. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  8. Age trajectories of physiological indices in relation to healthy life course.

    PubMed

    Arbeev, Konstantin G; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V; Akushevich, Igor; Kulminski, Alexander M; Arbeeva, Liubov S; Akushevich, Lucy; Culminskaya, Irina V; Yashin, Anatoliy I

    2011-03-01

    We analysed relationship between the risk of onset of "unhealthy life" (defined as the onset of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, or diabetes) and longitudinal changes in body mass index, diastolic blood pressure, hematocrit, pulse pressure, pulse rate, and serum cholesterol in the Framingham Heart Study (Original Cohort) using the stochastic process model of human mortality and aging. The analyses demonstrate how decline in resistance to stresses and adaptive capacity accompanying human aging can be evaluated from longitudinal data. We showed how these components of the aging process, as well as deviation of the trajectories of physiological indices from those minimising the risk at respective ages, can lead to an increase in the risk of onset of unhealthy life with age. The results indicate the presence of substantial gender difference in aging related decline in stress resistance and adaptive capacity, which can contribute to differences in the shape of the sex-specific patterns of incidence rates of aging related diseases.

  9. Healthy bodies, social bodies: men's and women's concepts and practices of health in everyday life.

    PubMed

    Saltonstall, R

    1993-01-01

    Using interview data from white, middle-class men and women, ages 35-55, the research explores the phenomenological, embodied aspects of health. Health is found to be grounded in a sense of self and a sense of body, both of which are tied to conceptions of past and future actions. Gender is a leitmotif. The body, as the focal point of self-construction as well as health construction, implicates gender in the everyday experience of health. The interplay between health, self, body, and gender at the individual level is linked to the creation of a sense of healthiness in the body politic of society. If social psychological theories of health are to reflect adequately the everyday experience of health, they must begin to take into account the body as individually and socially problematic.

  10. Life Course Impact of School-Based Promotion of Healthy Eating and Active Living to Prevent Childhood Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Ohinmaa, Arto; Kuhle, Stefan; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Veugelers, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Alberta Project Promoting active Living and healthy Eating in Schools (APPLE Schools) is a comprehensive school health program that is proven feasible and effective in preventing obesity among school aged children. To support decision making on expanding this program, evidence on its long-term health and economic impacts is particularly critical. In the present study we estimate the life course impact of the APPLE Schools programs in terms of future body weights and avoided health care costs. Method We modeled growth rates of body mass index (BMI) using longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey collected between 1996–2008. These growth rate characteristics were used to project BMI trajectories for students that attended APPLE Schools and for students who attended control schools (141 randomly selected schools) in the Canadian province of Alberta. Results Throughout the life course, the prevalence of overweight (including obesity) was 1.2% to 2.8% (1.7 on average) less among students attending APPLE Schools relative to their peers attending control schools. The life course prevalence of obesity was 0.4% to 1.4% (0.8% on average) less among APPLE Schools students. If the APPLE Schools program were to be scaled up, the potential cost savings would be $33 to 82 million per year for the province of Alberta, or $150 to 330 million per year for Canada. Conclusions These projected health and economic benefits seem to support broader implementation of school-based health promotion programs. PMID:25025581

  11. Bacterial Colonization and Antibiotic Resistance in a Prospective Cohort of Newborn Infants During the First Year of Life

    PubMed Central

    Stange, Kurt C.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Weiss, Judith K.; Bajaksouzian, Saralee; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Infants are virtually sterile at birth and frequently use antibiotics; our objective was to (1) characterize the longitudinal colonization with bacterial pathogens and associated antibiotic resistance in a cohort of community-dwelling infants in Northeast Ohio and (2) describe longitudinal concurrent antibiotic and daycare exposures. Methods. For 35 newborns, nasopharyngeal swabs were cultured for Streptococcus pneumoniae, anterior nasal for Staphylococcus aureus, and perirectal for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Gram-negative enteric bacteria, at 3-month intervals for 12 months. Infant and household antibiotics and daycare exposure were assessed longitudinally. Results. Thirteen infants received perinatal or nursery antibiotics. By 3 months, at least 22 were colonized with Gram-negative bacteria; 2 with S pneumoniae (type 19A, resistant; 15C, susceptible), 5 with methicillin-susceptible S aureus. By 12 months, at least 22 of 35 infants received antibiotics, 20 had household members with antibiotics, and 12 attended daycare; 7 more had household members with daycare exposure. The ESBL-producing organisms were not identified. At least 10 infants were colonized at some time with an antibiotic-resistant organism, 3 more with pathogens displaying intermediate resistance. Pathogen colonization and resistance were intermittent and inconsistent. Conclusions. In a community-based cohort followed from birth, early antibiotic and daycare exposures are common, especially considering perinatal maternal exposures. Colonization patterns of Gram-negative bacteria, S pneumoniae, S aureus, and resistant pneumococci are strikingly dynamic. Further research can identify key areas for potential interventions to maximize clinical antibiotic outcomes while minimizing future resistance. PMID:27957505

  12. Early-Life Predictors of Higher Body Mass Index in Healthy Children

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Molly M.; Dabelea, Dana; Yin, Xiang; Ogden, Lorraine G.; Klingensmith, Georgeanna J.; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Childhood obesity tracks into adulthood, and may increase diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk in adulthood. Prospective analyses may better define the pathways between early life factors and greater childhood body mass index (BMI), a measure of obesity. Methods The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) prospectively follows children from birth that are at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes. We examined longitudinal data for 1,178 DAISY subjects (mean age at last follow-up: 6.59 years (range: 2.0–11.5 years). Birth size and diabetes exposure in utero were collected in the enrollment interview. Infant diet information was collected via interviews throughout infancy. Infant weight gain and childhood BMI were measured at clinic visits. Results Female gender, diabetes exposure in utero, larger size for gestational age, shorter breastfeeding duration, and more rapid infant weight gain predicted higher childhood BMI. Formal mediation analysis suggests the effect of shorter breastfeeding duration on childhood BMI may be mediated by more rapid infant weight gain. Also, the effect of diabetes exposure in utero on childhood BMI may be mediated by larger size for gestational age. Conclusion We identified strong interrelationships between early life factors and childhood BMI. Understanding these pathways may aid childhood obesity prevention efforts. PMID:19940472

  13. Berries: improving human health and healthy aging, and promoting quality life--a review.

    PubMed

    Paredes-López, Octavio; Cervantes-Ceja, Martha L; Vigna-Pérez, Mónica; Hernández-Pérez, Talía

    2010-09-01

    The importance of the diet in relation to human health has increased the interest of consumers on nutraceuticals rich foods, and especially on fruits and vegetables. Berries are rich sources of a wide variety of antioxidant phenolics; these phytochemicals include flavonoids, stilbenes, tannins, and phenolic acids. Reactive oxidant species and free radicals are produced in an extensive range of physiological processes. In addition to the antioxidant defenses produced in the body, there are exogenous sources supplied by the diet; this is the case of berry fruits, among others. The insufficiency of antioxidant defense mechanisms is associated to the pathology of chronic disorders such as cardiovascular diseases, inflammation, and diabetes. Therefore, the enforcement of the latter mechanisms is of the utmost importance. The isolation and characterization of compounds that may delay the onset of aging is receiving intense research attention; some berry phenolics are being associated with this functional performance. Berry phenolics may also act as antimicrobials which may be of help in the control of the wild spectra of pathogens, in view of recent problems associated with antibiotic resistance. Most of the research works on the antioxidant activity of bioactive constituents of berries has been carried out using in vitro assays. In view of this, the human studies investigating the bioavailability and potential toxicity of phenolics are receiving more attention. Finally, we would like to emphasize the necessity of associating new plant breeding and genetic studies of berries with the expression and overexpression of compounds for human health and healthy aging.

  14. [Promotion of healthy life style and growth in primary school children (OKkio alla SALUTE)].

    PubMed

    Spinelli, A; Baglio, G; Cattaneo, C; Fontana, G; Lamberti, A

    2008-01-01

    In October 2007, the Italian Ministry of Health, the Centre for Disease Control and the Regions entrusted the National Institute of Health with the coordination of the initiative "Okkio alla Salute"--Promotion of healthy lifestyle and growth in primary school children. This programme is linked to the European programme "Gaining health" and the National Plan for Prevention. The objective of the project was to develop and maintain a monitoring system for both the health services and the schools that could also be used to better target public health interventions. The first national survey to estimate the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and to collect information on diet and physical activity has been conducted in close collaboration with the individual regions. In the first nine months of the project, 1025 health workers and approximately 1500 school teachers have received training, and, using standardised methods, they have collected data and weighed and measured nearly 45000 third grade students (median age 8.8 years) in 2000 schools throughout the country. Participation rates have exceeded 95%. The results obtained to date indicate that the methodology is sustainable using existing health and educational resources and can be adopted as a national surveillance system.

  15. Social Determinants of Active Aging: Differences in Mortality and the Loss of Healthy Life between Different Income Levels among Older Japanese in the AGES Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hiroshi; Kondo, Katsunori; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    We examined the relationship between income, mortality, and loss of years of healthy life in a sample of older persons in Japan. We analyzed 22,829 persons aged 65 or older who were functionally independent at baseline as a part of the Aichi Gerontological Evaluation Study (AGES). Two outcome measures were adopted, mortality and loss of healthy life. Independent variables were income level and age. The occurrence of mortality and need for care during these 1,461 days were tracked. Cox regressions were used to calculate the hazard ratio for mortality and loss of healthy life by income level. We found that people with lower incomes were more likely than those with higher incomes to report worse health. For the overall sample, using the governmental administrative data, the hazard ratios of mortality and loss of healthy life-years comparing the lowest to the highest income level were 3.50 for men and 2.48 for women for mortality and 3.71 for men and 2.27 for women for loss of healthy life. When only those who responded to questions about income on the mail survey were included in the analysis, the relationships became weaker and lost statistical significance.

  16. Differential associations between types of verbal memory and prefrontal brain structure in healthy aging and late life depression.

    PubMed

    Lamar, Melissa; Charlton, Rebecca; Zhang, Aifeng; Kumar, Anand

    2012-07-01

    Verbal memory deficits attributed to late life depression (LLD) may result from executive dysfunction that is more detrimental to list-learning than story-based recall when compared to healthy aging. Despite these behavioral dissociations, little work has been done investigating related neuroanatomical dissociations across types of verbal memory performance in LLD. We compared list-learning to story-based memory performance in 24 non-demented individuals with LLD (age ~ 66.1 ± 7.8) and 41 non-demented/non-depressed healthy controls (HC; age ~ 67.6 ± 5.3). We correlated significant results of between-group analyses across memory performance variables with brain volumes of frontal, temporal and parietal regions known to be involved with verbal learning and memory. When compared to the HC group, the LLD group showed significantly lower verbal memory performance for spontaneous recall after repeated exposure and after a long-delay but only for the list-learning task; groups did not differ on story-based memory performance. Despite equivalent brain volumes across regions, only the LLD group showed brain associations with verbal memory performance and only for the list-learning task. Specifically, frontal volumes important for subjective organization and response monitoring correlated with list-learning performance in the LLD group. This study is the first to demonstrate neuroanatomical dissociations across types of verbal memory performance in individuals with LLD. Results provide structural evidence for the behavioral dissociations between list-learning and story-based recall in LLD when compared to healthy aging. More specifically, it points toward a network of predominantly anterior brain regions that may underlie the executive contribution to list-learning in older adults with depression.

  17. “ . . . I Should Maintain a Healthy Life Now and Not Just Live as I Please . . . ”

    PubMed Central

    Hosegood, Victoria; Richter, Linda; Clarke, Lynda

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the social context of men’s health and health behaviors in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, particularly in relationship to fathering and fatherhood. Individual interviews and focus groups were conducted with 51 Zulu-speaking men. Three themes related to men’s health emerged from the analysis of transcripts: (a) the interweaving of health status and health behaviors in descriptions of “good” and “bad” fathers, (b) the dominance of positive accounts of health and health status in men’s own accounts, and (c) fathers’ narratives of transformations and positive reinforcement in health behaviors. The study reveals the pervasiveness of an ideal of healthy fathers, one in which the health of men has practical and symbolic importance not only for men themselves but also for others in the family and community. The study also suggests that men hold in esteem fathers who manage to be involved with their biological children who are not coresident or who are playing a fathering role for nonbiological children (social fathers). In South Africa, men’s health interventions have predominantly focused on issues related to HIV and sexual health. The new insights obtained from the perspective of men indicate that there is likely to be a positive response to health interventions that incorporate acknowledgment of, and support for, men’s aspirations and lived experiences of social and biological fatherhood. Furthermore, the findings indicate the value of data on men’s involvement in families for men’s health research in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26008734

  18. A Unique Patient Population? Health-Related Quality of Life in Adolescent Athletes Versus General, Healthy Adolescent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kenneth C.; Valier, Alison R. Snyder; Bay, R. Curtis; McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich

    2013-01-01

    Context: Normative scores for patient-rated outcome (PRO) instruments are important for providing patient-centered, whole-person care and making informed clinical decisions. Although normative values for the Pediatric Quality of Life Generic Core Scale (PedsQL) have been established in the general, healthy adolescent population, whether adolescent athletes demonstrate similar values is unclear. Objective: To compare PedsQL scores between adolescent athletes and general, healthy adolescent individuals. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Secondary schools. Patients or Other Participants: A convenience sample of 2659 interscholastic athletes (males = 2059, females = 600, age = 15.7 ± 1.1 years) represented the athlete group (ATH), and a previously published normative dataset represented the general, healthy adolescent group (GEN). Intervention(s): All participants completed the PedsQL during 1 testing session. Main Outcome Measure(s): The PedsQL consists of 2 summary scores (total, psychosocial) and 4 subscale scores (physical, emotional, social, school), with higher scores indicating better health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Groups were stratified by age (14, 15, or 16 years old). Independent-samples t tests were conducted to compare between-groups and sex differences. Results: The ATH group scored higher than the GEN group across all ages for total and psychosocial summary scores and for emotional and social functioning subscale scores (P ≤ .005). For physical functioning, scores of the 15-year-old ATH were higher than for their GEN counterparts (P = .001). Both 14- and 15-year-old ATH scored higher than their GEN counterparts for the school functioning subscale (P ≤ .013), but differences between 16-year olds were not significant (P = .228). Male adolescent athletes reported higher scores than female adolescent athletes across all scores (P ≤ .001) except for social functioning (P = .229). Conclusions: Adolescent athletes reported better HRQOL than

  19. Decreased Default Network Connectivity is Associated with Early Life Stress in Medication-Free Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Noah S.; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Tyrka, Audrey R.; Price, Lawrence H.; Bloom, Rachel F.; Carpenter, Linda L.

    2012-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is a significant risk factor for psychopathology, although there are few functional imaging studies investigating its effects. Previous literature suggests that ELS is associated with changes in structure and function in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), which forms the main anterior node of the default network (DN). This study investigated the impact of ELS history on resting state DN connectivity, using seed-based correlation analyses (SCA) involving the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Data were analyzed from 22 adult subjects without psychiatric or medical illness (13 with and 9 without ELS); none were taking psychotropic medication. Relative to controls, the ELS group had significant decreases in DN connectivity, observed between the PCC seed and the MPFC and inferior temporal cortex. Further analyses revealed a trend-level increase in connectivity between the amygdala and MPFC associated with ELS history. In conclusion, this study found that subjects with ELS, in the absence of psychiatric illness and medication exposure, demonstrated decreased DN connectivity, and trend-level increases in connectivity between the amygdala and MPFC. These findings suggest that altered resting state connectivity is a correlate of stress exposure, rather than a product of medication or psychiatric morbidity. PMID:23141153

  20. The Impact of the Broadcasting Mistake Management Culture in a Healthy Organization on the Quality of the Personnel Work Life

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Alireza; Mortazavi, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Background: Today, healthy organizations such as hospital have found out the importance of quality of work life (QWL) of their personnel. QWL direct to increase job satisfaction, improve the quality of services to patient of hospital, and create high performance. One of factors that impact QWL is mistake management culture (MMC) when contribute different organization aspects such as QWL and cover its needs and finally promote job performance. Material and Method: A questionnarie was designed with items involve five-item Likert-type scale items and it distribute samong a sample of 207 nurses of four hospitals that voluntarily participated in research plan in Mashhad city. Two hospitals were private and two hospitals were public. Result: There are significant relationships between MMC, QWL and performance. Conclusion: According to importance of enhancement of QWL and job performance in organizations such as hospital, broadcasting culture of mistake management plays positive role and promotes quality level of work life of employees. Therefore, we can improve job satisfaction by changing and manipulating QWL factors, and thus move toward the development of the organization. PMID:23634407

  1. Point prevalence, microbiology and antifungal susceptibility patterns of oral Candida isolates colonizing or infecting Mexican HIV/AIDS patients and healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio; Ortiz-López, Natalia Guadalupe; Villar, María; Moragues, María Dolores; Aguirre, José Manuel; Cashat-Cruz, Miguel; Lopez-Ribot, Jose Luis; Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Quindós, Guillermo

    2005-06-01

    We have conducted a longitudinal study over a 3-year period to address the point prevalence, microbiological characteristics and antifungal susceptibility patterns of yeast isolates colonizing or infecting the oral cavities of 111 HIV-infected (51 adults, 60 children) and 201 non HIV-infected (109 adults, 92 children) Mexican persons. Regarding the epidemiology of oral candidiasis, Candida albicans was the most frequent species isolated. Seventy-one out of 85 isolates from colonized persons were C. albicans (83.5%), 27 isolates of them were from HIV-infected children and 44 from non HIV-infected patients. Sixty-two isolates belonged to serotype A which was the most prevalent serotype of C. albicans. Non-albicans species (Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilosis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were isolated from 16.5% of colonized patients and from 38.5% patients with candidiasis or Candida-related lesions. There were nine episodes of infection or colonization by at least 2 different yeast species. In the case of HIV/AIDS patients, it was determined that yeast carriage was not associated with the number of CD4+ cells or the viral load, but HAART reduced the prevalence of oral candidiasis. Overall, most patients harbored strains in vitro susceptible to fluconazole, however 10.8% of the yeasts were resistant to one or more azole antifungal agents and 29% were intermediate susceptible to them. On the contrary, 5-fluorocytosine was very active against all isolates tested, and amphotericin B was active against 97.9% of them.

  2. Quality of Life Is Related to Fecal Calprotectin Concentrations in Colonic Crohn Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, but not in Ileal Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Gauss, Annika; Geib, Thomas; Hinz, Ulf; Schaefert, Rainer; Zwickel, Philipp; Zawierucha, Anna; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Klute, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    To formulate therapy goals, we aimed to define the relationship between fecal calprotectin and health-related quality of life in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). This retrospective single-center cross-sectional study included ambulatory IBD patients who had completed standardized questionnaires comprising items of health-related quality of life (Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire) and clinical disease activity scores, and who had provided stool samples for calprotectin determination within 30 days of questionnaire completion. Correlation analyses were performed between the indicated parameters. Post hoc analysis was conducted, taking into account only data from patients with fecal calprotectin concentrations measured within 3 days of questionnaire completion. One hundred ninety-seven patients with Crohn disease and 111 patients with ulcerative colitis were enrolled in the study. Lower fecal calprotectin concentrations were associated with better health-related quality of life. The correlations were weak, but stronger if only fecal calprotectin concentrations measured within 3 days of questionnaire completion were included (results for 3 days; Crohn disease: n = 86, rS = -0.419, P < 0.001; ulcerative colitis: n = 43, rS = -0.432, P = 0.004). In Crohn disease, a significant correlation between fecal calprotectin concentration and health-related quality of life was found in patients with colonic involvement (n = 59, rS = -0.470, P < 0.001), but not in patients with purely ileal disease (n = 27, rS = -0.268, P = 0.18). Correlations between fecal calprotectin concentrations and clinical disease activity were also only weak to moderate. Owing to its moderate correlation with fecal calprotectin concentrations in IBD patients with colonic involvement, health-related quality of life should be used in combination with other markers for IBD management. This is even more important in isolated ileal Crohn disease

  3. Quality of Life Is Related to Fecal Calprotectin Concentrations in Colonic Crohn Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, but not in Ileal Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gauss, Annika; Geib, Thomas; Hinz, Ulf; Schaefert, Rainer; Zwickel, Philipp; Zawierucha, Anna; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Klute, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To formulate therapy goals, we aimed to define the relationship between fecal calprotectin and health-related quality of life in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). This retrospective single-center cross-sectional study included ambulatory IBD patients who had completed standardized questionnaires comprising items of health-related quality of life (Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire) and clinical disease activity scores, and who had provided stool samples for calprotectin determination within 30 days of questionnaire completion. Correlation analyses were performed between the indicated parameters. Post hoc analysis was conducted, taking into account only data from patients with fecal calprotectin concentrations measured within 3 days of questionnaire completion. One hundred ninety-seven patients with Crohn disease and 111 patients with ulcerative colitis were enrolled in the study. Lower fecal calprotectin concentrations were associated with better health-related quality of life. The correlations were weak, but stronger if only fecal calprotectin concentrations measured within 3 days of questionnaire completion were included (results for 3 days; Crohn disease: n = 86, rS = −0.419, P < 0.001; ulcerative colitis: n = 43, rS = −0.432, P = 0.004). In Crohn disease, a significant correlation between fecal calprotectin concentration and health-related quality of life was found in patients with colonic involvement (n = 59, rS = −0.470, P < 0.001), but not in patients with purely ileal disease (n = 27, rS = −0.268, P = 0.18). Correlations between fecal calprotectin concentrations and clinical disease activity were also only weak to moderate. Owing to its moderate correlation with fecal calprotectin concentrations in IBD patients with colonic involvement, health-related quality of life should be used in combination with other markers for IBD management. This is even more important in isolated ileal

  4. Association between physical activity, sedentary behavior, and fitness with health related quality of life in healthy children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo-Cantarero, Alberto; Álvarez-Bueno, Celia; Martinez-Vizcaino, Vicente; García-Hermoso, Antonio; Torres-Costoso, Ana Isabel; Sánchez-López, Mairena

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Health related quality of life (HRQoL) is a subjective, multidimensional and changing over time construct. When HRQoL is decreased, a child is less likely to be able to develop normally and mature into a healthy adult. Physical inactivity is a priority public health problem. Evidence suggests how even moderate levels of physical activity or high fitness levels are associated with benefits for the health in children and adolescents. The aims of this systematic review are to examine the evidence about the relationship between physical activity, sedentary behavior, and fitness with HRQoL, and estimate the effects of interventions that have tested the effectiveness of the increase of the physical activity, the improvement of the physical fitness or the avoidance of sedentary behaviors in HRQoL in healthy subjects aged under 18 years old. Methods: This systematic review and meta-analysis protocol was conducted following the preferred reporting items for systematic review and meta-analysis protocols (PRISMA-P) statement. To identify relevant studies, the following electronic databases will be searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database, Web of Science, and PEDro. Reference lists of relevant studies will be examined for links to potential related articles. The methodological quality of the observational included studies will be scored using a quality assessment checklist. For the intervention studies, the risk of bias will be estimated using The Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias. Reviewers will determine whether a meta-analysis is possible when data have been extracted. If it is, subgroup analyses will be carried out by age and socioeconomic status, and by the different dimensions of the HRQoL. If is not possible, a descriptive analysis will be conducted. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this systematic review and meta-analysis will be the first that synthesizes the existing results about the relationship between physical activity

  5. "Healthy" Human Development Indices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineer, Merwan; Roy, Nilanjana; Fink, Sari

    2010-01-01

    In the Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy is the only indicator used in modeling the dimension "a long and healthy life". Whereas life expectancy is a direct measure of quantity of life, it is only an indirect measure of healthy years lived. In this paper we attempt to remedy this omission by introducing into the HDI the morbidity…

  6. Impacts of dance on non-motor symptoms, participation, and quality of life in Parkinson disease and healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    McNeely, ME; Duncan, RP; Earhart, GM

    2015-01-01

    Evidence indicates exercise is beneficial for motor and non-motor function in older adults and people with chronic diseases including Parkinson disease (PD). Dance may be a relevant form of exercise in PD and older adults due to social factors and accessibility. People with PD experience motor and non-motor symptoms, but treatments, interventions, and assessments often focus more on motor symptoms. Similar non-motor symptoms also occur in older adults. While it is well-known that dance may improve motor outcomes, it is less clear how dance affects non-motor symptoms. This review aims to describe the effects of dance interventions on non-motor symptoms in older adults and PD, highlights limitations of the literature, and identifies opportunities for future research. Overall, intervention parameters, study designs, and outcome measures differ widely, limiting comparisons across studies. Results are mixed in both populations, but evidence supports the potential for dance to improve mood, cognition, and quality of life in PD and healthy older adults. Participation and non-motor symptoms like sleep disturbances, pain, and fatigue have not been measured in older adults. Additional well-designed studies comparing dance and exercise interventions are needed to clarify the effects of dance on non-motor function and establish recommendations for these populations. PMID:26318265

  7. Longitudinal Invariance and Construct Validity of the Abbreviated Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Amanda N.; Mullen, Sean P.; White, Siobhan M.; Wojcicki, Thomas R.; Mailey, Emily L.; Gothe, Neha; Olson, Erin A.; Fanning, Jason; Kramer, Arthur F.; McAuley, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Objective To cross-validate the psychometric properties of the abbreviated Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument (LL-FDI), a measure of perceived functional limitations and disability. Design Baseline and 12-month follow-up assessments conducted across the course of a 12-month exercise program. Setting University research community. Participants Older healthy adults (N=179; mean ± SD age, 66.43±5.67y) at baseline; 145 were retained at follow-up. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures LL-FDI and functional performance measures. Results Factor analyses confirmed the factor structure of the abbreviated LL-FDI, and all subscales met minimal criteria for temporal invariance. Significant correlations also were found between functional limitations subscales and an array of physical function performance measures, supporting the scale’s construct validity. Conclusions The abbreviated LL-FDI with some modifications appears to be temporally invariant in community-dwelling older adults. Additionally, moderate relationships between functional limitations and functional performance provide further support for these being conceptually distinct constructs. PMID:21458777

  8. Impacts of dance on non-motor symptoms, participation, and quality of life in Parkinson disease and healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    McNeely, M E; Duncan, R P; Earhart, G M

    2015-12-01

    Evidence indicates exercise is beneficial for motor and non-motor function in older adults and people with chronic diseases including Parkinson disease (PD). Dance may be a relevant form of exercise in PD and older adults due to social factors and accessibility. People with PD experience motor and non-motor symptoms, but treatments, interventions, and assessments often focus more on motor symptoms. Similar non-motor symptoms also occur in older adults. While it is well-known that dance may improve motor outcomes, it is less clear how dance affects non-motor symptoms. This review aims to describe the effects of dance interventions on non-motor symptoms in older adults and PD, highlights limitations of the literature, and identifies opportunities for future research. Overall, intervention parameters, study designs, and outcome measures differ widely, limiting comparisons across studies. Results are mixed in both populations, but evidence supports the potential for dance to improve mood, cognition, and quality of life in PD and healthy older adults. Participation and non-motor symptoms like sleep disturbances, pain, and fatigue have not been measured in older adults. Additional well-designed studies comparing dance and exercise interventions are needed to clarify the effects of dance on non-motor function and establish recommendations for these populations.

  9. Sodium Intake of Special Populations in the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity Across the Life Span (HANDLS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Cotugna, Nancy; Fanelli-Kuczmarksi, Marie; Clymer, Julie; Hotchkiss, Lawrence; Zonderman, Alan B.; Evans, Michele K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The sodium intake of participants of the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span study who were in three of the special population groups identified by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 (those with hypertension, African Americans, and those ≥51 years) was analyzed to determine if they met sodium recommendations. Methods The sample included 2152 African American and White subjects, aged 30-64 years. Major dietary sources of sodium for each group were determined from two 24-hour dietary recalls, and dietary intakes were compared with sodium recommendations. Dietary potassium was also evaluated. Results The intakes of the groups studied exceeded 1500 mg sodium while their potassium intakes were lower than the Adequate Intake of 4700 mg. The major contributors of sodium included “cold cuts, sausage, and franks,” “protein foods”, and yeast breads. Conclusions Excessive sodium intake characterized the diet of an urban, socioeconomically diverse population who are hypertensive or at risk for having hypertension. These findings have implications for health professionals and the food industry. PMID:23769900

  10. The effects of neuroticism, extraversion, and positive and negative life events on a one-year course of depressive symptoms in euthymic previously depressed patients versus healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Spinhoven, Philip; Elzinga, Bernet; Roelofs, Karin; Hovens, Jacqueline G F M; van Oppen, Patricia; Zitman, Frans G; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2011-09-01

    We investigated a) the concurrent impact of positive and negative life events on the course of depressive symptoms in persons remitted from depression and healthy controls, b) whether the impact of life events on symptom course is moderated by the history of depression and the personality traits of neuroticism and extraversion, and c) whether life events mediate possible relationships of history of depression and personality traits with symptom course. Using data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety, we examined 239 euthymic participants with a previous depressive disorder based on DSM-IV and 450 healthy controls who completed a) baseline assessments of personality dimensions (NEO Five-Factor Inventory) and depression severity (Inventory of Depressive Symptoms [IDS]) and b) 1-year follow-up assessments of depression severity and the occurrence of positive and negative life events during the follow-up period (List of Threatening Events Questionnaire). Remitted persons reported higher IDS scores at 1-year follow-up than did the controls. Extraversion and positive and negative life events independently predicted the course of depressive symptoms. The impact of life events on symptom course was not moderated by history of depression or personality traits. The effect of extraversion on symptom course was partly caused by differential engagement in positive life events.

  11. Barriers and Facilitators to the Uptake and Maintenance of Healthy Behaviours by People at Mid-Life: A Rapid Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Sarah; Martin, Steven; Kuhn, Isla; Cowan, Andy; Brayne, Carol; Lafortune, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Background With an ageing population, there is an increasing societal impact of ill health in later life. People who adopt healthy behaviours are more likely to age successfully. To engage people in health promotion initiatives in mid-life, a good understanding is needed of why people do not undertake healthy behaviours or engage in unhealthy ones. Methods Searches were conducted to identify systematic reviews and qualitative or longitudinal cohort studies that reported mid-life barriers and facilitators to healthy behaviours. Mid-life ranged from 40 to 64 years, but younger adults in disadvantaged or minority groups were also eligible to reflect potential earlier disease onset. Two reviewers independently conducted reference screening and study inclusion. Included studies were assessed for quality. Barriers and facilitators were identified and synthesised into broader themes to allow comparisons across behavioural risks. Findings From 16,426 titles reviewed, 28 qualitative studies, 11 longitudinal cohort studies and 46 systematic reviews were included. Evidence was found relating to uptake and maintenance of physical activity, diet and eating behaviours, smoking, alcohol, eye care, and other health promoting behaviours and grouped into six themes: health and quality of life, sociocultural factors, the physical environment, access, psychological factors, evidence relating to health inequalities. Most of the available evidence was from developed countries. Barriers that recur across different health behaviours include lack of time (due to family, household and occupational responsibilities), access issues (to transport, facilities and resources), financial costs, entrenched attitudes and behaviours, restrictions in the physical environment, low socioeconomic status, lack of knowledge. Facilitators include a focus on enjoyment, health benefits including healthy ageing, social support, clear messages, and integration of behaviours into lifestyle. Specific issues

  12. Stress system dynamics during "life as it is lived": an integrative single-case study on a healthy woman.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Christian; Geser, Willi; Noisternig, Bianca; Fuchs, Dietmar; Welzenbach, Natalie; König, Paul; Schüßler, Gerhard; Ocaña-Peinado, Francisco M; Lampe, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the dynamic characteristics of stress system activity during "life as it is lived". Using as representative a study design as possible, this investigation sought to gain insights into this area. A healthy 25-year-old woman collected her entire urine over a period of 63 days in 12-h intervals (126 measurements) to determine cortisol and neopterin (immune activation marker) levels. In addition, she filled out questionnaires on emotional state and daily routine in 12-h intervals, and was interviewed weekly to identify emotionally negative and positive everyday incidents. Adjusted cross-correlational analyses revealed that stressful incidents were associated with cyclic response patterns in both urinary cortisol and urinary neopterin concentrations. Urinary cortisol levels first decreased 12-24 h after stressful incidents occurred (lag 1: -.178; p = 0.048) and then increased a total of 72-84 h later (lag 6: +.224; p = 0.013). Urinary neopterin levels first increased 0-12 h before the occurrence of stressful incidents (-lag 1: +.185; p = 0.040) and then decreased a total of 48-60 h following such stressors (lag 4: -.181; p = 0.044). Decreases in urinary neopterin levels were also found 24-36 and 48-60 h after increases in pensiveness (lag 2: -.215; p = 0.017) and depressiveness (lag 4: -.221; p = 0.014), respectively. Findings on emotionally positive incidents sharply contrasted with those dealing with negative experiences. Positive incidents were followed first by urinary cortisol concentration increases within 12 h (lag 0: +.290; p = 0.001) and then by decreases after a total of 60-72 h (lag 5: -.186; p = 0.039). Urinary neopterin levels first decreased 12-24 h before positive incidents occurred (-lag 2: -.233; p = 0.010) and then increased a total of 12-24 h following these incidents (lag 1: +.222; p = 0.014). As with previous investigations on patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), this study showed that stress system response can be

  13. Characterisation of Early-Life Fecal Microbiota in Susceptible and Healthy Pigs to Post-Weaning Diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Dou, Samir; Gadonna-Widehem, Pascale; Rome, Véronique; Hamoudi, Dounia; Rhazi, Larbi; Lakhal, Lyes; Larcher, Thibaut; Bahi-Jaber, Narges; Pinon-Quintana, Arturo; Guyonvarch, Alain; Huërou-Luron, Isabelle L E; Abdennebi-Najar, Latifa

    2017-01-01

    Early-life microbial exposure is of particular importance to growth, immune system development and long-lasting health. Hence, early microbiota composition is a promising predictive biomarker for health and disease but still remains poorly characterized in regards to susceptibility to diarrhoea. In the present study, we aimed to assess if gut bacterial community diversity and composition during the suckling period were associated with differences in susceptibility of pigs to post-weaning diarrhoea. Twenty piglets from 5 sows (4 piglets / litter) were weaned in poor housing conditions to challenge their susceptibility to post-weaning diarrhoea. Two weeks after weaning, 13 pigs exhibited liquid faeces during 2 or 3 days and were defined as diarrhoeic (D) pigs. The other 7 pigs did not have diarrhea during the whole post-weaning experimental periodand were defined as healthy (H) pigs. Using a molecular characterisation of fecal microbiota with CE-SSCP fingerprint, Next Generation Sequencing and qPCR, we show that D and H pigs were mainly discriminated as early as postnatal day (PND) 7, i.e. 4 weeks before post-weaning diarrhoea occurence. At PND 7 H pigs displayed a lower evenness and a higher abundance of Prevotellaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Ruminocacaceae and Lactobacillaceae compared to D pigs. The sPLS regression method indicates that these bacterial families were strongly correlated to a higher Bacteroidetes abundance observed in PND 30 H pigs one week before diarrhoea. These results emphasize the potential of early microbiota diversity and composition as being an indicator of susceptibility to post-weaning diarrhoea. Furthermore, they support the health promoting strategies of pig herds through gut microbiota engineering.

  14. Characterisation of Early-Life Fecal Microbiota in Susceptible and Healthy Pigs to Post-Weaning Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Samir; Gadonna-Widehem, Pascale; Rome, Véronique; Hamoudi, Dounia; Rhazi, Larbi; Lakhal, Lyes; Larcher, Thibaut; Bahi-Jaber, Narges; Pinon-Quintana, Arturo; Guyonvarch, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Early-life microbial exposure is of particular importance to growth, immune system development and long-lasting health. Hence, early microbiota composition is a promising predictive biomarker for health and disease but still remains poorly characterized in regards to susceptibility to diarrhoea. In the present study, we aimed to assess if gut bacterial community diversity and composition during the suckling period were associated with differences in susceptibility of pigs to post-weaning diarrhoea. Twenty piglets from 5 sows (4 piglets / litter) were weaned in poor housing conditions to challenge their susceptibility to post-weaning diarrhoea. Two weeks after weaning, 13 pigs exhibited liquid faeces during 2 or 3 days and were defined as diarrhoeic (D) pigs. The other 7 pigs did not have diarrhea during the whole post-weaning experimental periodand were defined as healthy (H) pigs. Using a molecular characterisation of fecal microbiota with CE-SSCP fingerprint, Next Generation Sequencing and qPCR, we show that D and H pigs were mainly discriminated as early as postnatal day (PND) 7, i.e. 4 weeks before post-weaning diarrhoea occurence. At PND 7 H pigs displayed a lower evenness and a higher abundance of Prevotellaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Ruminocacaceae and Lactobacillaceae compared to D pigs. The sPLS regression method indicates that these bacterial families were strongly correlated to a higher Bacteroidetes abundance observed in PND 30 H pigs one week before diarrhoea. These results emphasize the potential of early microbiota diversity and composition as being an indicator of susceptibility to post-weaning diarrhoea. Furthermore, they support the health promoting strategies of pig herds through gut microbiota engineering. PMID:28072880

  15. Colonization to aquifers and adaptations to subterranean interstitial life by a water beetle clade (Noteridae) with description of a new Phreatodytes species.

    PubMed

    Kato, Makoto; Kawakita, Atsushi; Kato, Toru

    2010-09-01

    Due to its tectonically uplifted, mountainous landscape and copious rainfall, the Japanese archipelago possesses plentiful, persistent groundwater in alluvial plains. However, Phreatodytes, an endemic water beetle genus found in groundwater, is now critically endangered due to the devastation of subterranean water ecosystems. Phreatodytes beetles were collected from driven wells near the Ooi River estuary in central Japan. The beetles were distinguished from all described species by their thoracic and genital morphologies, and described as a new species, Phreatodytes haibaraensis. The unique habitat of this species is the hyporheic zone of a gravelly riverbed in an estuary, and the habitat represents the eastern limit of the known distribution range of the genus. Molecular phylogenetic analysis based on mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences revealed that Phreatodytes is a member of the Noteridae and forms a clade with Notomicrus. This suggests that the genus colonized the hyporheic zone from surface waters, and that it adapted to subterranean interstitial life by becoming minute and slender, by losing its eyes, pigmentation, as well as its ability to fly and swim, and by developing a permanent underwater life cycle, and erect hairlike setae on the thorax and elytra. In addition to the beetle, several stygobiontic species, including mollusks and fishes, were found in pumped groundwater. These results suggest that the gravelly riverbed of a rapid river estuary in Central Japan harbors biodiverse, locally differentiated hyporheic organisms comprising a unique subterranean interstitial ecosystem.

  16. Identification of dominant bacteria in feces and colonic mucosa from healthy Spanish adults by culturing and by 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Susana; Suárez, Adolfo; Mayo, Baltasar

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this work was to examine by culturing the changes in the total and indicator populations of the feces of two individuals over 1 year and to identify the dominant microbial components of a single sample of feces from each donor. Populations and dominant bacteria from a sample of colonic mucosa from a further individual were also assessed. The culture results were then compared to those obtained with the same samples by 16S rDNA cloning and sequencing. High interindividual variation in representative microbial populations of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) was revealed by both the culture and the culture-independent techniques. Species belonging to Clostridium clusters (XIVa, IV, and XVIII) predominated in both the fecal and the mucosal samples (except in the mucose cultured isolates), members of Clostridium coccoides cluster XIVa being the most numerous microorganisms. Species of gamma-proteobacteria (Escherichia coli and Shigella spp.), bifidobacteria, and actinobacteria appeared in lower numbers than those of clostridia. From the mucosal cultured sample, only facultative anaerobes and bifidobacteria were recovered, suggesting destruction of the anaerobe population during processing. In accordance with this, the microbial diversity revealed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis was greater than that revealed by culturing. Despite large interindividual differences, distinct human communities may have group-associated GIT microbiota characteristics, such as the low number of Bacteroides seen in the subjects in this study.

  17. [Effects of a Four-Week Rehabilitation Program on Motor Performance, Quality of Life and Fatigue in Childhood Cancer Patients and Healthy Siblings].

    PubMed

    Däggelmann, J; Krauth, K A; Mailand, P; Nopper, S; Renniger, M; Bündgen, L; Rustler, V; Bloch, W; Baumann, F T

    2017-04-01

    Aim In Germany all childhood cancer patients and their families are offered the opportunity to participate in a four-week, family-oriented, inpatient rehabilitation program in order to facilitate (re-)integration into everyday life. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of this rehabilitation program on motor performance, quality of life (QoL) and fatigue. Methods Motor performance, QoL and fatigue were assessed in 22 childhood cancer patients and 20 healthy siblings at the beginning (t1) and the end (t2) of the four-week rehabilitation program, as well as 6 months later (t3). Results At t1 significant differences between groups were found in motor performance and physical well-being. Improvements in motor performance, QoL and fatigue were found in both groups. Conclusion Different preconditions must be considered. Childhood cancer patients as well as healthy siblings benefit from a family-oriented rehabilitation program.

  18. Surveillance of healthy cats and cats with inflammatory skin disease for colonization of the skin by methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococci and Staphylococcus schleiferi ssp. schleiferi.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Jill L; Morris, Daniel O; Griffeth, Gregory C; Shofer, Frances S; Rankin, Shelley C

    2007-08-01

    In this study, bacterial cultures were collected from five sites on each of 50 healthy cats and 48 cats with inflammatory skin disease (ISD), to determine prevalence of carriage and relative frequency of methicillin resistance in coagulase-positive staphylococci and Staphylococcus schleiferi ssp. schleiferi. Latex agglutination testing for penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed on all methicillin-resistant (MR) isolates. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the mecA gene was performed on MR S. intermedius and S. schleiferi isolates. Staphylococcal chromosomal cassette (SCCmec) typing was performed on all MR S. aureus isolates. Coagulase-positive staphylococci and S. schleiferi ssp. schleiferi were isolated from 24 of 48 cats with ISD: Staphylococcus aureus (14 of 24, 58%), Staphylococcus intermedius (11 of 24, 46%), Staphylococcus schleiferi ssp. schleiferi (1 of 24, 4%), and Staphylococcus hyicus (1 of 24, 4%). Prevalence of MR was 7% for S. aureus, 0% for S. intermedius, 100% for S. schleiferi ssp. schleiferi, and 0% for S. hyicus. Coagulase-positive staphylococci were isolated from 17 of 50 healthy cats: S. aureus (10 of 17, 59%), S. intermedius (11 of 17, 65%), and S. schleiferi ssp. coagulans (1 of 17, 6%). Prevalence of MR was 20% for S. aureus, 18% for S. intermedius, and 0% for S. schleiferi ssp. coagulans. All MR isolates were positive for PBP2a via latex agglutination. Methicillin-resistant S. intermedius and S. schleiferi ssp. schleiferi isolates were also positive for the mecA gene via PCR. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates were identified as SCCmec type II. Results of PFGE indicated heterogeneity among isolates. There was no significant difference in staphylococcal isolation or methicillin resistance between study groups. While present, MR coagulase-positive staphylococci are significantly less common in these study populations.

  19. Evaluation of medical and psychological parameters of quality of life in supraventricular tachyarrhythmia children. A comparison with healthy children

    PubMed Central

    Baszko, Artur; Bukowska-Posadzy, Anna; Moszura, Tomasz; Werner, Bożena; Siwińska, Aldona; Banach, Maciej; Walkowiak, Jarosław; Bobkowski, Waldemar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are only a few available studies evaluating quality of life (QoL) in pediatric patients with cardiac arrhythmia. The aim of the study was to evaluate medical and psychological parameters of the QoL in children with a diagnosed supraventricular tachyarrhythmia (SVT) and to compare the obtained data with a group of healthy children (HC). Material and methods Inclusion criteria: children aged 7–18 with SVT, treated at Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pediatric Cardiology. The evaluation tools were the WHOQOL-BREF instrument and a questionnaire related to the patient's feelings and observations concerning arrhythmia (Pediatric Arrhythmia Related Score – PARS), developed by the authors and adjusted to the group of arrhythmia patients. Results The study included 180 SVT children and 83 HC. On the basis of WHOQOL-BREF the SVT group was found to have lower assessment values of QoL within the physical domain (Phd) (mean ± SD: 65.7 ±15.8 vs. 81.6 ±12.8; p < 0.0001) and psychological domain (Psd) (mean ± SD: 75.8 ±15.2 vs. 81.3 ±14.1; p < 0.005). No significant differences were found within the social relationships domain or the environment domain. On the basis of PARS in the SVT group the patients reported significantly increased symptoms within Phd (mean ± SD: 2.3 ±0.7 vs. 1.6 ± 0.3; p < 0.0001) as well as increased negative feelings within Psd (mean ± SD: 2.3 ±0.7 vs. 2.1 ± 0.6; p < 0.005). Conclusions Medical and psychological parameters of the QoL in SVT children are significantly lower in comparison with HC. A diagnosis of SVT has no influence on the social and environmental areas of QoL. The PARS appears to be a useful tool to supplement the generic questionnaire for QoL evaluation in SVT children. PMID:27695497

  20. Quality of life among parents of children with congenital heart disease, parents of children with other diseases and parents of healthy children.

    PubMed

    Lawoko, S; Soares, J J F

    2003-09-01

    We compared quality of life among parents of children with congenital heart disease (PCCHD, n = 1092), parents of children with other diseases (PCOD, n = 112) and parents of healthy children (PHC, n = 293). We also identified determinants of quality of life among the parents. The parents completed a questionnaire about such areas as quality of life and financial situation. The design was cross-sectional and data were collected during 20 consecutive days. The univariate analyses showed that PCCHD tended to report lower quality of life than PHC. Mothers reported lower quality of life than fathers, with the lowest levels among mothers of children with CHD. The multivariate analyses revealed however that variables such as distress, hopelessness and financial situation were more important in explaining the reduced quality of life than parental gender and the presence/severity of the children's heart diseases. We corroborated previous findings and may have provided new insights into the quality of life experiences of parents of children with CHD that may be important when considering interventions to improve their situation.

  1. LIFE experiment: isolation of cryptoendolithic organisms from Antarctic colonized sandstone exposed to space and simulated Mars conditions on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Scalzi, Giuliano; Selbmann, Laura; Zucconi, Laura; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Albertano, Patrizia; Onofri, Silvano

    2012-06-01

    Desiccated Antarctic rocks colonized by cryptoendolithic communities were exposed on the International Space Station (ISS) to space and simulated Mars conditions (LiFE-Lichens and Fungi Experiment). After 1.5 years in space samples were retrieved, rehydrated and spread on different culture media. Colonies of a green alga and a pink-coloured fungus developed on Malt-Agar medium; they were isolated from a sample exposed to simulated Mars conditions beneath a 0.1 % T Suprasil neutral density filter and from a sample exposed to space vacuum without solar radiation exposure, respectively. None of the other flight samples showed any growth after incubation. The two organisms able to grow were identified at genus level by Small SubUnit (SSU) and Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) rDNA sequencing as Stichococcus sp. (green alga) and Acarospora sp. (lichenized fungal genus) respectively. The data in the present study provide experimental information on the possibility of eukaryotic life transfer from one planet to another by means of rocks and of survival in Mars environment.

  2. LIFE Experiment: Isolation of Cryptoendolithic Organisms from Antarctic Colonized Sandstone Exposed to Space and Simulated Mars Conditions on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalzi, Giuliano; Selbmann, Laura; Zucconi, Laura; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Albertano, Patrizia; Onofri, Silvano

    2012-06-01

    Desiccated Antarctic rocks colonized by cryptoendolithic communities were exposed on the International Space Station (ISS) to space and simulated Mars conditions (LiFE— Lichens and Fungi Experiment). After 1.5 years in space samples were retrieved, rehydrated and spread on different culture media. Colonies of a green alga and a pink-coloured fungus developed on Malt-Agar medium; they were isolated from a sample exposed to simulated Mars conditions beneath a 0.1 % T Suprasil neutral density filter and from a sample exposed to space vacuum without solar radiation exposure, respectively. None of the other flight samples showed any growth after incubation. The two organisms able to grow were identified at genus level by Small SubUnit (SSU) and Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) rDNA sequencing as Stichococcus sp. (green alga) and Acarospora sp. (lichenized fungal genus) respectively. The data in the present study provide experimental information on the possibility of eukaryotic life transfer from one planet to another by means of rocks and of survival in Mars environment.

  3. Healthy Water, Healthy People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etgen, John

    2002-01-01

    Describes a hands-on activity, Hitting the Mark, which is found in the "Healthy Water, Healthy People Water Quality Educators Guide" in terms of its objectives, materials, background, procedures, activities, and assessment. (KHR)

  4. Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death from cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating cancer cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are starting to understand. Infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds, and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue, are key steps for metastatic colonization. These obstacles make metastasis a highly inefficient process, but once metastases are established current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. A better understanding of the mechanistic determinants of metastatic colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  5. Cost-effectiveness and quality of life in surgeon versus general practitioner-organised colon cancer surveillance: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Augestad, Knut Magne; Norum, Jan; Dehof, Stefan; Aspevik, Ranveig; Ringberg, Unni; Nestvold, Torunn; Vonen, Barthold; Skrøvseth, Stein Olav; Lindsetmo, Rolv-Ole

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess whether colon cancer follow-up can be organised by general practitioners (GPs) without a decline in the patient's quality of life (QoL) and increase in cost or time to cancer diagnoses, compared to hospital follow-up. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Northern Norway Health Authority Trust, 4 trusts, 11 hospitals and 88 local communities. Participants Patients surgically treated for colon cancer, hospital surgeons and community GPs. Intervention 24-month follow-up according to national guidelines at the community GP office. To ensure a high follow-up guideline adherence, a decision support tool for patients and GPs were used. Main outcome measures Primary outcomes were QoL, measured by the global health scales of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QoL Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ C-30) and EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D). Secondary outcomes were cost-effectiveness and time to cancer diagnoses. Results 110 patients were randomised to intervention (n=55) or control (n=55), and followed by 78 GPs (942 follow-up months) and 70 surgeons (942 follow-up months), respectively. Compared to baseline, there was a significant improvement in postoperative QoL (p=0.003), but no differences between groups were revealed (mean difference at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24-month follow-up appointments): Global Health; Δ−2.23, p=0.20; EQ-5D index; Δ−0.10, p=0.48, EQ-5D VAS; Δ−1.1, p=0.44. There were no differences in time to recurrent cancer diagnosis (GP 35 days vs surgeon 45 days, p=0.46); 14 recurrences were detected (GP 6 vs surgeon 8) and 7 metastases surgeries performed (GP 3 vs surgeon 4). The follow-up programme initiated 1186 healthcare contacts (GP 678 vs surgeon 508), 1105 diagnostic tests (GP 592 vs surgeon 513) and 778 hospital travels (GP 250 vs surgeon 528). GP organised follow-up was associated with societal cost savings (£8233 vs £9889, p<0.001). Conclusions GP-organised follow-up was associated with no

  6. Life Satisfaction, Happiness, and the Growth Mindset of Healthy and Unhealthy Perfectionists among Hong Kong Chinese Gifted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This study used clustering to classify Chinese gifted students based on their scores on the High Standards and Discrepancy subscales of the Almost Perfect Scale--Revised (APS-R). The interpretation of the three clusters as nonperfectionists, unhealthy perfectionists, and healthy perfectionists was supported by results comparing these groups on…

  7. Colon Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... polyps important? Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2012. Elmunzer BJ. Endoscopic resection of sessile colon polyps. Gastroenterology. 2013;144:30. Baron TH, et al. Recommended intervals between screening and surveillance colonoscopies. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. ...

  8. Effects of Estrogen or Venlafaxine on Menopause Related Quality of Life in Healthy Postmenopausal Women with Hot Flashes: A Placebo-Controlled Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Caan, Bette; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Joffe, Hadine; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Larson, Joseph C.; Carpenter, Janet S.; Cohen, Lee S.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Newton, Katherine; Reed, Susan; Rexrode, Kathy; Shifren, Jan; Sternfeld, Barbara; Ensrud, Kris

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of low-dose estradiol (ET) or venlafaxine on menopause-related quality of life and associated symptoms in healthy peri- and postmenopausal women with hot flashes. METHODS A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial of low-dose oral 17-beta-estradiol 0.5-mg/day, venlafaxine XR 75-mg/day, vs. identical placebo was conducted among 339 women ages 40–62 years with ≥2 (mean 8.07, SD 5.29) daily VMS recruited at 3 clinical sites from November 2011 to October 2012. The primary trial outcome, reported previously, was the frequency of VMS at 8 weeks. Here, we report on secondary endpoints of total and domain scores from the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MENQOL) and measures of pain (PEG), depression (PHQ-9), anxiety (GAD-7) and perceived stress (PSS). RESULTS Treatment with both estradiol and venlafaxine resulted in significantly greater improvement in quality of life, as measured by total MENQOL scores compared to placebo (mean difference for ET at 8 weeks of −0.4; 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.7 to −0.2; p<0.001 and for venlafaxine of −0.2; 95% CI −0.5 to 0.0; p 0.04). Quality of life (QOL) domain analyses revealed that ET had beneficial treatment effects in all domains of the MENQOL except psychosocial, while venlafaxine benefits were observed only in the psychosocial domain. Neither ET nor venlafaxine improved pain, anxiety or depressive symptoms, although baseline symptom levels were low. Modest benefits were observed for perceived stress with venlafaxine. CONCLUSIONS Both low-dose estradiol and venlafaxine are effective pharmacologic agents for improving menopause-related quality of life in healthy women with vasomotor symptoms. PMID:25405571

  9. Long circulating half-life and high tumor selectivity of the photosensitizer meta-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin conjugated to polyethylene glycol in nude mice grafted with a human colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Westerman, P; Glanzmann, T; Andrejevic, S; Braichotte, D R; Forrer, M; Wagnieres, G A; Monnier, P; van den Bergh, H; Mach, J P; Folli, S

    1998-06-10

    In a mode of nude mice bearing a human colon carcinoma xenograft, the biodistribution and tumor localization of metatetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (m-THPC) coupled to polyethylene glycol (PEG) were compared with those of the free form of this photosensitizer used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). At different times after i.v. injection of both forms of 125I-labeled photosensitizer, m-THPC-PEG gave on average a 2-fold higher tumor uptake than free m-THPC. In addition, at early times after injection, m-THPC-PEG showed a 2-fold longer blood circulating half-life and a 4-fold lower liver uptake than free m-THPC. The tumor to normal tissue ratios of radioactivity concentrations were always higher for m-THPC-PEG than for free m-THPC at any time point studied from 2 to 96 hr post-injection. Significant coefficients of correlation between direct fluorescence measurements and radioactivity counting were obtained within each organ tested. Fluorescence microscopy studies showed that m-THPC-PEG was preferentially localized near the tumor vessels, whereas m-THPC was more diffusely distributed inside the tumor tissue. To verify whether m-THPC-PEG conjugate remained phototoxic in vivo, PDT experiments were performed 72 hr after injection and showed that m-THPC-PEG was as potent as free m-THPC in the induction of tumor regression provided that the irradiation does for m-THPC-PEG conjugate was adapted to a well-tolerated 2-fold higher level. The overall results demonstrate first the possibility of improving the in vivo tumor localization of a hydrophobic dye used for PDT by coupling it to PEG and second that a photosensitizer conjugated to a macromolecule can remain phototoxic in vivo.

  10. [The development of mass physical culture and sports in the constituent entities of the Russian Federation as a factor of formation of the healthy life style].

    PubMed

    Kakorina, E P; Rudiakova, S E

    2011-01-01

    Provision of proper conditions for the creation of healthy life style is a priority of the state policy in this country with special attention given to the development of the mass physical culture and sports. The present paper contains information on the proportion of the population of the Russian Federation regularly engaged in physical culture and sports, provision of necessary sport facilities, and budgetary expenditures for the purpose in different constituent entities of the country. Public satisfaction with the conditions available for mass physical education and sports is discussed. Taking into account the low average life expectancy of the country's population and the increasing morbidity and traumaticity rates among the younger generation, it appears impossible to address the global challenge of improving the health of the nation without promotion of mass physical culture and sports and renewal of interest in these activities among the general population.

  11. Health-related quality of life among adolescents: A comparison between subjects at ultra-high risk for psychosis and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Nitka, Freya; Richter, Julia; Parzer, Peter; Resch, Franz; Henze, Romy

    2016-01-30

    At risk status for psychosis has been robustly associated with decreased health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among adults. However, this relationship has not been examined in adolescents with ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis in comparison to healthy controls. Twenty-seven subjects with UHR and thirty healthy controls (14-18 years of age) were recruited in a multiphase screening and accessed with a HRQoL scale of KIDSCREEN-27. Comparisons indicated that subjects with UHR had poorer mean scores at a statistically significant level in the following scales: physical well-being, psychological well-being and school environment. In a logistic regression analysis, lower scores in the scale school environment explained at risk status for psychosis. Adolescents with UHR show significantly poorer HRQoL scores than healthy peers, identified predominantly by the evaluation of the school environment. These results might be interpreted as a self-perception of early mental and social functioning impairments, which seem to be recognized initially based on school demands. Considering these findings, institutes of education should be a good starting point to promote the awareness of the psychosis-risk state.

  12. Effects of mood and rumination on cortisol levels in daily life: an ambulatory assessment study in remitted depressed patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Huffziger, Silke; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich; Zamoscik, Vera; Reinhard, Iris; Kirsch, Peter; Kuehner, Christine

    2013-10-01

    The influence of naturally occurring emotional and cognitive experiences on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) activity is still underinvestigated, particularly in clinical populations. The present study examined effects of mood and rumination on cortisol levels in daily life in remitted depressed patients with recurrent episodes or a chronic precourse (n=31) and healthy controls (n=32). Ambulatory assessment of subjective variables (valence, calmness, energetic-arousal, ruminative self-focus), daily stressors, and saliva cortisol samples was performed five times a day on two consecutive workdays, whereby cortisol was collected 20min after the subjective assessments. In addition, depressive symptoms and trait rumination (brooding, reflection) were measured retrospectively. Multilevel models revealed that remitted depressed patients showed lower cortisol activity compared to healthy controls. Depressive symptoms and trait rumination did not predict HPAA activity, whereas, by controlling for daily stressors, higher daily means of ruminative self-focus and lower daily means of valence, energetic arousal and calmness were associated with higher daily cortisol levels. Separate analyses per group revealed that mean daily ruminative self-focus predicted higher cortisol in both samples. In contrast, lower daily means of calmness, but also of valence and energetic arousal, were significantly linked to higher cortisol output only in healthy controls, but not in the patient sample. These findings indicate that naturally occurring rumination and low mood are associated with increased activation of the HPAA in daily life. Moreover, our data revealed a potentially reduced mood-cortisol coupling in remitted recurrent depression, possibly indicating that during the course of recurrent depression HPAA activation might become less responsive toward subtle emotional experiences in natural contexts.

  13. Effects of Compression Stockings on Elevation of Leg Lymph Pumping Pressure and Improvement of Quality of Life in Healthy Female Volunteers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sugisawa, Ryota; Saito, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Naoto; Inuzuka, Kazunori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Sano, Masaki; Katahashi, Kazuto; Uranaka, Hironori; Marumo, Tomohiko; Konno, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Lymph is pumped through the collecting lymphatic vessels by both intrinsic and extrinsic forces. The intrinsic pump relies on spontaneous lymphatic contraction, which generates the pumping lymph pressure (Plp). Among healthy people with daily leg edema, a considerable number of cases are accompanied with low leg Plp. Herein, a double-blinded controlled trial was conducted in healthy female volunteers with reduced leg Plp to compare the effectiveness of a 15–29 mmHg compression stocking (Stocking A) and a 8–16 mmHg stocking (Stocking B) on elevating Plp. Method and Results: Among 219 healthy female volunteers who underwent measurement of leg Plp, 80 participants (36.5%) had unilateral or bilateral legs with Plp < 20 mmHg (122 legs with Plp < 20 mmHg and 38 legs with Plp ≧ 20 mmHg). These 80 participants were assigned to wear either Stocking A (n = 40) or Stocking B (n = 40) for 16 weeks. Leg Plp was measured using indocyanine green fluorescence lymphography and an occlusion cuff technique while sitting. At 16 weeks, both Stockings A and B resulted in significantly elevated leg Plp, with the effect on elevating Plp being superior for Stocking A. Only Stocking A resulted in decreased prevalence of leg edema and improved Short Form-36 scores. Conclusion: Compression stockings may represent a therapeutic option to elevate leg Plp and ameliorate leg edema, thereby leading to improved quality of life in healthy females with low leg Plp. PMID:26824795

  14. Effects of Escitalopram on Menopause-specific Quality of Life and Pain in Healthy Menopausal Women with Hot Flashes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Larson, Joseph; Carpenter, Janet S.; Joffe, Hadine; Reed, Susan D.; Newton, Katherine M.; Seguin, Rebecca A.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Cohen, Lee; Ensrud, Kristine E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of escitalopram 10-20 mg/day on menopause-related quality of life and pain in healthy menopausal women with hot flashes. Study Design A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial of escitalopram 10-20 mg/day vs. identical placebo was conducted among 205 women ages 40-62 years with an average of > 4 daily hot flashes recruited at 4 clinical sites from July 2009 - June 2010. Main Outcome Measures The primary trial outcomes, reported previously, were the frequency and severity of vasomotor symptoms at 8 weeks. Here, we report on the pre-specified secondary endpoints of total and domain scores from the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MENQOL) and the Pain Intensity and Interference Scale (PEG). Results Outcome data were collected on 97% of randomized women and 87% of women took at least 70% of their study medication. Treatment with escitalopram resulted in significantly greater improvement in total MENQOL scores (mean difference at 8 weeks of −0.41; 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.71 to −0.11; p<0.001), as well as Vasomotor, Psychosocial, and Physical domain scores with the largest difference seen in the Vasomotor domain (mean difference −0.75; 95% CI −1.28 to −0.22; p=0.02). There was no significant treatment group difference for the Sexual Function domain. Escitalopram treatment resulted in statistically significant improvements in PEG scores compared to placebo (mean treatment group difference at 8 weeks of −0.33; 95% CI - 0.81 to 0.15; p=0.045). Conclusions Treatment with escitalopram 10-20 mg/day in healthy women with vasomotor symptoms significantly improved menopause-related quality of life and pain. PMID:23031421

  15. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid corticotropin-releasing factor and perceived early-life stress in depressed patients and healthy control subjects.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Linda L; Tyrka, Audrey R; McDougle, Christopher J; Malison, Robert T; Owens, Michael J; Nemeroff, Charles B; Price, Lawrence H

    2004-04-01

    Previous studies have reported elevated concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in patients with major depression. Elevations of CSF CRF have also been reported in adult laboratory animals exposed to the stress of brief maternal deprivation or maternal neglect in the neonatal or preweaning period. The present study was designed to determine whether major depression and a history of perceived early adversity in childhood are independently associated with elevated CSF CRF concentrations in adults. In this case-control study, 27 medication-free adults with major depression and 25 matched controls underwent standardized lumbar puncture for collection of a single CSF sample at 1200. Subjects provided data about significant adverse early-life experiences and rated their global perceived level of stress during pre-school and preteen years on a six-point Likert scale. The mean difference in CSF CRF between depressed patients and controls did not reach statistical significance. In a regression model, perceived early-life stress was a significant predictor of CSF CRF, but depression was not. Perinatal adversity and perceived adversity in the preteen adversity years (ages 6-13 years) were both independently associated with decreasing CSF CRF concentrations. The relationship observed between perceived early-life stress and adult CSF CRF concentrations in this study closely parallels recent preclinical findings. More work is needed to elucidate the critical nature and timing of early events that may be associated with enduring neuroendocrine changes in humans.

  17. Healthy Living, Healthy Vision

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Emergencies How to Jump Start a Car Battery Safely Electronic Screens and Your Eyes Nutrition and ... External Resources The Cost of Vision Problems The Future of Vision Vision Problems in the U.S. Healthy ...

  18. Healthy Places for Healthy People

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes the Healthy Places for Healthy People technical assistance program that helps communities create walkable, healthy, economically vibrant places by engaging with local health care facility partners

  19. Evaluation of an in vitro faecal degradation method for early assessment of the impact of colonic degradation on colonic absorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Tannergren, Christer; Borde, Anders; Boreström, Cecilia; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Lindahl, Anders

    2014-06-16

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate an in vitro method to investigate bacterial-mediated luminal degradation of drugs in colon in humans. This would be a valuable tool for the assessment of drug candidates during early drug development, especially for compounds intended to be developed as oral extended release formulations. Freshly prepared faecal homogenate from healthy human volunteers (n=3-18), dog (n=6) and rat (colon and caecal content, n=3) was homogenised with 3.8 parts (w/w) physiological saline under anaerobical conditions. Four model compounds (almokalant, budesonide, ximelagatran and metoprolol) were then incubated (n=3-18) separately in the human faecal homogenate for up to 120min at 37°C. In addition, ximelagatran was also incubated in the faecal or colonic content from dog and rat. The mean (±SD) in vitro half-life for almokalant, budesonide and ximelagatran was 39±1, 68±21 and 26±12min, respectively, in the human faecal homogenate. Metoprolol was found to be stable in the in vitro model. The in vitro degradation data was then compared to literature data on fraction absorbed after direct colon administration in humans. The percentage of drug remaining after 60min of in vitro incubation correlated (R(2)=0.90) with the fraction absorbed from colon in humans. The mean in vitro half-life of ximelagatran was similar in human faeces (26±12min) and rat colon content (34±31min), but significantly (p<0.05) longer in rat caecum content (50±11min) and dog faeces (126±17min). The in vitro method is in vivo relevant both qualitatively as all the model drugs that undergoes colonic degradation in vivo was rapidly degraded in the faecal homogenates as well as quantitatively since a correlation was established between percentage degraded in vitro at 60min and fraction absorbed in the colon for the model drugs, which have no other absorption limiting properties. Also, the method is easy to use from a technical point of view, which suggests

  20. Healthy Eating for Life English as a second language curriculum: applying the RE-AIM framework to evaluate a nutrition education intervention targeting cancer risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Martinez, J L; Duncan, L R; Rivers, S E; Bertoli, M C; Latimer-Cheung, A E; Salovey, P

    2017-03-08

    Medically underserved US immigrants are at an increased risk for death from preventable or curable cancers due to economic, cultural, and/or linguistic barriers to medical care. The purpose of this study was to describe the evaluation of the pilot study of the Healthy Eating for Life (HE4L) English as a second language curriculum. The Reach, Effectiveness Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance (RE-AIM) model was used to design a mixed-methods approach to the evaluation of the HE4L curriculum. Successful implementation was dependent upon enthusiastic teacher and manager support of the curriculum, teachers' ability to flexibly apply the curriculum to meet student needs, and researcher provision of curriculum workbooks. HE4L can be implemented successfully in various adult education settings to teach healthy eating behaviors and English language principles. Scale-up of HE4L may depend on the development of an online version of the curriculum to avoid the costs associated with printing and distributing curriculum materials.

  1. A novel exendin-4 human serum albumin fusion protein, E2HSA, with an extended half-life and good glucoregulatory effect in healthy rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling; Wang, Lin; Meng, Zhiyun; Gan, Hui; Gu, Ruolan; Wu, Zhuona; Gao, Lei; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Sun, Wenzhong; Li, Jian; Zheng, Ying; Dou, Guifang

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • E2HSA has an extended half-life and good plasma stability. • E2HSA could improve glucose-dependent insulin secretion. • E2HSA has excellent glucoregulatory effects in vivo. • E2HSA could potentially be used as a new long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist for type 2 diabetes management. - Abstract: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has attracted considerable research interest in terms of the treatment of type 2 diabetes due to their multiple glucoregulatory functions. However, the short half-life, rapid inactivation by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) and excretion, limits the therapeutic potential of the native incretin hormone. Therefore, efforts are being made to develop the long-acting incretin mimetics via modifying its structure. Here we report a novel recombinant exendin-4 human serum albumin fusion protein E2HSA with HSA molecule extends their circulatory half-life in vivo while still retaining exendin-4 biological activity and therapeutic properties. In vitro comparisons of E2HSA and exendin-4 showed similar insulinotropic activity on rat pancreatic islets and GLP-1R-dependent biological activity on RIN-m5F cells, although E2HSA was less potent than exendin-4. E2HSA had a terminal elimation half-life of approximate 54 h in healthy rhesus monkeys. Furthermore, E2HSA could reduce postprandial glucose excursion and control fasting glucose level, dose-dependent suppress food intake. Improvement in glucose-dependent insulin secretion and control serum glucose excursions were observed during hyperglycemic clamp test (18 h) and oral glucose tolerance test (42 h) respectively. Thus the improved physiological characterization of E2HSA make it a new potent anti-diabetic drug for type 2 diabetes therapy.

  2. Early Events in the Life of Apple Roots: Variation in Root Growth Rate is Linked to Mycorrhizal and Nonmycorrhizal Fungal Colonization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to characterize early events of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal fungal colonization in newly-emerging roots of mature apple (Malus domestica) trees and to determine the relationship to fine root growth rate and development. New roots were traced on root windows to measure growt...

  3. Uncommon cause of life-threatening retroperitoneal hemorrhage in a healthy young hispanic patient: Splenic artery aneurysm rupture

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Jiménez, Luis A.; González-Márquez, Amy Lee; Negrón-García, Luis; Rodríguez-Cruz, Edwin; Cáceres-Perkins, William; Santiago-Casiano, Mónica; Rosas, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysms (SAA) are a rare life threatening clinical diagnosis. They may either be due to congenital defects or acquired conditions such as secondary to atherosclerosis formation. SAA are important to recognize and to consider in acute settings. Patients who present with ruptured or symptomatic SAA, are exposed to a life-threatening condition with hemodynamic collapse and high mortality. We present a case of a 19-year-old woman without history of any systemic illness, who was brought to the urgency room complaining of diffuse abdominal pain of 24 hours of evolution. Abdominopelvic CT-scan revealed the presence of a large left retroperitoneal space hematoma causing severe mass effect upon the adjacent celiac trunk, splenic artery and vein, pancreas, spleen and left kidney. An abdominal arteriogram was performed revealing an aneurysm of the middle branch of the splenic artery with active leakage. The defect was embolized with complete resolution of the retroperitoneal bleeding. We would like to draw attention to the importance of early recognition of SAA rupture in women presenting with hypovolemic shock and abdominal pain. Rupture is the most fatal clinical presentation of a SAA. Patients are exposed to a high mortality rate of 70% to 90%. The favored method of treatment at present of this rare entity is embolization. Future directions must continue to focus on risk factors for rapid growth and further delineation of SAA natural history, which could ultimately identify patients who benefit most from early prophylactic intervention. Physicians should be aware of this rare entity, especially when patients present to the emergency department complaining of severe epigastric pain with associated hypovolemic shock more concerning in the female population. PMID:26035985

  4. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of MEDI8897, the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Prefusion F-Targeting Monoclonal Antibody with an Extended Half-Life, in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Anis A.; Esser, Mark T.; Jensen, Kathryn; Takas, Therese; Kankam, Martin K.; Villafana, Tonya; Dubovsky, Filip

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) illness in infants is a major public health priority, but there is no approved vaccine. Palivizumab is a monoclonal antibody that provides RSV prophylaxis but requires 5 monthly injections and is approved only for infants who experience the greatest morbidity and mortality from RSV. Thus, there remains a significant unmet medical need for prevention of RSV disease in healthy infants. MEDI8897 is a recombinant human RSV monoclonal antibody with a modified Fc region that extends its half-life and is being developed as RSV prophylaxis for all infants. In this phase 1, first-in-human, placebo-controlled study, 136 healthy adults were randomized to receive a single dose of MEDI8897 (n = 102) or placebo (n = 34) in 1 of 5 cohorts (300, 1,000, or 3,000 mg intravenously or 100 or 300 mg intramuscularly [i.m.]) and were monitored for 360 days. The mean half-life of MEDI8897 was 85 to 117 days across dose groups, and bioavailability after 300-mg i.m. dose administration was 77%. Time to maximum concentration following i.m. dosing was 5 to 9 days. Antidrug antibody (ADA) responses were detected in a similar proportion of placebo (15.2%) and MEDI8897 (13.7%) recipients. The safety profile of MEDI8897 was similar to that of the placebo. These results support clinical studies of the i.m. administration of a single dose of MEDI8897 in the target population of infants to provide protection for the duration of the RSV season. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT02114268.) PMID:27956428

  5. Improving health-related quality of life through an evidence-based obesity reduction program: the Healthy Weights Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Lemstra, Mark E; Rogers, Marla R

    2016-01-01

    When evaluating any health intervention, it is critical to include the impact of the intervention on health-related quality of life (HRQL). Among those who are obese, HRQL is often lower than the general population and even more when considering obesity-related comorbidities and bodily pain. The objectives of this paper were to determine the impact of a multidisciplinary, community-based obesity reduction program on HRQL and to determine the independent risk factors for lack of improvement from baseline to follow-up. HRQL was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) at baseline and follow-up (24 weeks). To date, 84.5% of those who completed the program had improvements in their overall SF-36 score. Significant increases in the mean scores on eight dimensions of health were also observed. Lack of improvement was independently affected by smoking status (odds ratio 3.75; 95% confidence interval 1.44–9.78; P=0.007) and not having a buddy to attend the program (odds ratio 3.70; 95% confidence interval 1.28–10.68; P=0.015). Obesity reduction programs that target increasing exercise, improving diet, and cognitive behavioral therapy can positively impact HRQL in obese adults. Social support has a strong role to play in improving outcomes. PMID:27022273

  6. Growing Strong and Healthy with Mister Bone: An Educational Program to Have Strong Bones Later in Life

    PubMed Central

    Pampaloni, Barbara; Cianferotti, Luisella; Gronchi, Giorgio; Bartolini, Elisa; Fabbri, Sergio; Tanini, Annalisa; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Optimal peak bone mass and bone health later in life are favored by a sufficient calcium intake in infancy, childhood and adolescence. The purpose of this study was to test a new educational program created to monitor and to improve calcium and vitamin D intake in children. Nutritional habits in children were evaluated through a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to assess the intake of calcium, vitamin D, dairy products, and total caloric energy at baseline and after seven months of exposure to a unique educational program applied between November 2013 and May 2014 in 176 schoolchildren (48% male, 52% female) attending the fourth and fifth grades of two selected primary schools in Florence, Italy. A significant increase of calcium (from 870 ± 190 to 1100 ± 200 mg/day, p < 0.05), and vitamin D (from 3.6 ± 1.53 to 4.1 ± 2 µg/day) intake in children was documented after the educational program. The amount of specific foods important for bone health consumed, such as milk and vegetables, increased significantly, both in male and female children (p < 0.05). The proposed educational program appears to be effective in modifying calcium intake in children, with a significant increase in the consumption of dairy products and vegetables, but without a significant change in the total caloric intake. PMID:26633485

  7. Growing Strong and Healthy with Mister Bone: An Educational Program to Have Strong Bones Later in Life.

    PubMed

    Pampaloni, Barbara; Cianferotti, Luisella; Gronchi, Giorgio; Bartolini, Elisa; Fabbri, Sergio; Tanini, Annalisa; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-12-02

    Optimal peak bone mass and bone health later in life are favored by a sufficient calcium intake in infancy, childhood and adolescence. The purpose of this study was to test a new educational program created to monitor and to improve calcium and vitamin D intake in children. Nutritional habits in children were evaluated through a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to assess the intake of calcium, vitamin D, dairy products, and total caloric energy at baseline and after seven months of exposure to a unique educational program applied between November 2013 and May 2014 in 176 schoolchildren (48% male, 52% female) attending the fourth and fifth grades of two selected primary schools in Florence, Italy. A significant increase of calcium (from 870 ± 190 to 1100 ± 200 mg/day, p < 0.05), and vitamin D (from 3.6 ± 1.53 to 4.1 ± 2 µg/day) intake in children was documented after the educational program. The amount of specific foods important for bone health consumed, such as milk and vegetables, increased significantly, both in male and female children (p < 0.05). The proposed educational program appears to be effective in modifying calcium intake in children, with a significant increase in the consumption of dairy products and vegetables, but without a significant change in the total caloric intake.

  8. Early traumatic life events, parental attitudes, family history, and birth risk factors in patients with borderline personality disorder and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Bandelow, Borwin; Krause, Joana; Wedekind, Dirk; Broocks, Andreas; Hajak, Göran; Rüther, Eckart

    2005-04-15

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) were compared with a healthy control group with regard to traumatic life events during childhood. The patients (n=66) and controls (n=109) were investigated using a comprehensive retrospective interview with 203 questions about childhood traumatic life events, parental attitudes, family history of psychiatric disorders and birth risk factors. The frequency of reports of traumatic childhood experiences was significantly higher in patients than in controls, including sexual abuse, violence, separation from parents, childhood illness, and other factors. On a 0- to 10-point "severe trauma scale," patients had significantly more severe traumatic events (mean score=3.86, SD=1.77) than control subjects (0.61, SD=0.93). Only four (6.1%) of the BPD patients, but 67 (61.5%) of the controls did not report any severe traumatic events at all. Compared with controls, patients described the attitude of their parents as significantly more unfavorable in all aspects. Patients reported significantly higher rates of psychiatric disorders in their families in general, especially anxiety disorders, depression, and suicidality. Among birth risk factors, premature birth was reported more often in BPD subjects. In a logistic regression model of all possible etiological factors examined, the following factors showed a significant influence: familial neurotic spectrum disorders, childhood sexual abuse, separation from parents and unfavorable parental rearing styles. The present data support the hypothesis that the etiology of BPD is multifactorial and that familial psychiatric disorders and sexual abuse are contributing factors.

  9. Family Functioning and Quality of Life among Families in Eating Disorders: A Comparison with Substance-related Disorders and Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadou, Dimitra; Sepulveda, Ana R; Sánchez, Julio César; Parks, Melissa; Álvarez, Tamara; Graell, Montserrat

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the family functioning of Spanish parents of patients with an eating disorder (ED) with that of carers of patients with substance-related disorders (SRDs) and families of healthy controls (HC). This cross-sectional study included 48 mothers and 45 fathers of 48 adolescent patients with an ED, 47 mothers and 37 fathers of 47 patients with an SRD and 66 mothers and 50 fathers of 68 HCs. Families of ED patients reported lower levels of criticism, symptom accommodation and negative caregiving experience than families of SRD patients. However, relatives of both ED and SRD patients reported similar levels of quality of life related to their mental health. Furthermore, families of HCs generally exhibited better scores on all scales assessing their caregiving experiences. Regarding gender differences, there was a tendency in mothers, primarily those from the ED group, to report more adverse experiences as caregivers compared with fathers. Symptoms characteristic to each disorder may be associated with differential patterns of family functioning and may require specifically tailored family interventions. Early family intervention in adolescence is crucial, as relatives' quality of life does not seem to have been badly affected at this point in the course of the illness. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  10. Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Healthy Aging This information in Spanish ( en español ) A healthy ... Aging email updates. Enter email address Submit Healthy Aging news Accessibility | Privacy policy | Disclaimers | FOIA | Link to ...

  11. Staying Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 > Staying Healthy Font: What is Alpha-1? Emphysema Alpha-1 Symptoms Diagnosing Alpha-1 Current Treatments ... Healthy What can people with Alpha-1-related emphysema do to stay as healthy as possible? First ...

  12. Difficult colon polypectomy

    PubMed Central

    Vormbrock, Klaus; Mönkemüller, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of death from cancer in the world. We now know that 90% of CRC develop from adenomatous polyps. Polypectomy of colon adenomas leads to a significant reduction in the incidence of CRC. At present most of the polyps are removed endoscopically. The vast majority of colorectal polyps identified at colonoscopy are small and do not pose a significant challenge for resection to an appropriately trained and skilled endoscopist. Advanced polypectomy techniques are intended for the removal of difficult colon polyps. We have defined a “difficult polyp” as any lesion that due to its size, shape or location represents a challenge for the colonoscopist to remove. Although many “difficult polyps” will be an easy target for the advanced endoscopist, polyps that are larger than 15 mm, have a large pedicle, are flat and extended, are difficult to see or are located in the cecum or any angulated portion of the colon should be always considered difficult. Although very successful, advanced resection techniques can potentially cause serious, even life-threatening complications. Moreover, post polypectomy complications are more common in the presence of difficult polyps. Therefore, any endoscopist attempting advanced polypectomy techniques should be adequately supervised by an expert or have an excellent training in interventional endoscopy. This review describes several useful tips and tricks to deal with difficult polyps. PMID:22816006

  13. Combined Impact of Traditional and Non-Traditional Healthy Behaviors on Health-Related Quality of Life: A Prospective Study in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Bayán-Bravo, Ana; Pérez-Tasigchana, Raúl F; Sayón-Orea, Carmen; Martínez-Gómez, David; López-García, Esther; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Combined exposure to several healthy behaviors (HB) is associated with reduced mortality in older adults but its impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) is uncertain. This is a cohort study of 2,388 individuals aged ≥60 recruited in 2000–2001, whose data were updated in 2003 and 2009. At baseline, participants reported both traditional HB (non-smoking, being very or moderately active, healthy diet) and non-traditional HB (sleeping 7–8 h/d, being seated <8 h/d, and seeing friends every day). HRQL was measured with the SF-36 questionnaire at baseline, in 2003 (short-term) and in 2009 (long-term); a higher score on the SF-36 represents better HRQL. Linear regression models were used to assess the association between HB at baseline and HRQL in 2003 and 2009, with adjustment for the main confounders including baseline HRQL. In the short-term, being physically active, sleeping 7–8 h/d, and being seated <8 h/d was associated with better HRQL. Compared to having ≤1 of these HB, the β (95% confidence interval) for the score on the physical component summary of the SF-36 in 2003 was 1.42 (0.52–2.33) for 2 HB, and 2.06 (1.09–3.03) for 3 HB, p-trend <0.001. Corresponding figures for the mental component summary score were 1.89 (0.58–3.21) for 2 HB and 3.35 (1.95–4.76) for 3 HB, p-trend <0.001. Non-smoking, a healthy diet or seeing friends did not show an association with HRQL. In the long-term, being physically active was the only HB associated with better physical HRQL. As a conclusion, a greater number of HB, particularly more physical activity, adequate sleep duration, and sitting less, were associated with better short-term HRQL in older adults. However, in the long-term, being physically active was the only HB associated with better physical HRQL. PMID:28122033

  14. Allergy immunotherapy across the life cycle to promote active and healthy ageing: from research to policies: An AIRWAYS Integrated Care Pathways (ICPs) programme item (Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on active and healthy ageing) and the Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD), a World Health Organization GARD research demonstration project.

    PubMed

    Calderon, M A; Demoly, P; Casale, T; Akdis, C A; Bachert, C; Bewick, M; Bilò, B M; Bohle, B; Bonini, S; Bush, A; Caimmi, D P; Canonica, G W; Cardona, V; Chiriac, A M; Cox, L; Custovic, A; De Blay, F; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Di Lorenzo, G; Du Toit, G; Durham, S R; Eng, P; Fiocchi, A; Fox, A T; van Wijk, R Gerth; Gomez, R M; Haathela, T; Halken, S; Hellings, P W; Jacobsen, L; Just, J; Tanno, L K; Kleine-Tebbe, J; Klimek, L; Knol, E F; Kuna, P; Larenas-Linnemann, D E; Linneberg, A; Matricardi, M; Malling, H J; Moesges, R; Mullol, J; Muraro, A; Papadopoulos, N; Passalacqua, G; Pastorello, E; Pfaar, O; Price, D; Del Rio, P Rodriguez; Ruëff, R; Samolinski, B; Scadding, G K; Senti, G; Shamji, M H; Sheikh, A; Sisul, J C; Sole, D; Sturm, G J; Tabar, A; Van Ree, R; Ventura, M T; Vidal, C; Varga, E M; Worm, M; Zuberbier, T; Bousquet, J

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases often occur early in life and persist throughout life. This life-course perspective should be considered in allergen immunotherapy. In particular it is essential to understand whether this al treatment may be used in old age adults. The current paper was developed by a working group of AIRWAYS integrated care pathways for airways diseases, the model of chronic respiratory diseases of the European Innovation Partnership on active and healthy ageing (DG CONNECT and DG Santé). It considered (1) the political background, (2) the rationale for allergen immunotherapy across the life cycle, (3) the unmet needs for the treatment, in particular in preschool children and old age adults, (4) the strategic framework and the practical approach to synergize current initiatives in allergen immunotherapy, its mechanisms and the concept of active and healthy ageing.

  15. Early-Life Stress Affects Stress-Related Prefrontal Dopamine Activity in Healthy Adults, but Not in Individuals with Psychotic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kasanova, Zuzana; Hernaus, Dennis; Vaessen, Thomas; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse; Winz, Oliver; Heinzel, Alexander; Pruessner, Jens; Mottaghy, Felix M; Collip, Dina; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    2016-01-01

    Early life stress may have a lasting impact on the developmental programming of the dopamine (DA) system implicated in psychosis. Early adversity could promote resilience by calibrating the prefrontal stress-regulatory dopaminergic neurotransmission to improve the individual's fit with the predicted stressful environment. Aberrant reactivity to such match between proximal and distal environments may, however, enhance psychosis disease risk. We explored the combined effects of childhood adversity and adult stress by exposing 12 unmedicated individuals with a diagnosis of non-affective psychotic disorder (NAPD) and 12 healthy controls (HC) to psychosocial stress during an [18F]fallypride positron emission tomography. Childhood trauma divided into early (ages 0-11 years) and late (12-18 years) was assessed retrospectively using a questionnaire. A significant group x childhood trauma interaction on the spatial extent of stress-related [18F]fallypride displacement was observed in the mPFC for early (b = -8.45, t(1,23) = -3.35, p = .004) and late childhood trauma (b = -7.86, t(1,23) = -2.48, p = .023). In healthy individuals, the spatial extent of mPFC DA activity under acute psychosocial stress was positively associated with the severity of early (b = 7.23, t(11) = 3.06, p = .016) as well as late childhood trauma (b = -7.86, t(1,23) = -2.48, p = .023). Additionally, a trend-level main effect of early childhood trauma on subjective stress response emerged within this group (b = -.7, t(11) = -2, p = .07), where higher early trauma correlated with lower subjective stress response to the task. In the NAPD group, childhood trauma was not associated with the spatial extent of the tracer displacement in mPFC (b = -1.22, t(11) = -0.67), nor was there a main effect of trauma on the subjective perception of stress within this group (b = .004, t(11) = .01, p = .99). These findings reveal a potential mechanism of neuroadaptation of prefrontal DA transmission to early life stress

  16. Health-related quality of life of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder versus children with diabetes and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Coghill, David; Hodgkins, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The impact of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is reported to be similar to that of other mental health and physical disorders. In this cross-sectional study, we hypothesized that children with ADHD and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) would have significantly worse HRQoL compared with healthy children, and that better clinical status in ADHD and T1DM would be associated with better HRQoL. Children were recruited from three outpatient services in Scotland. Responses to two frequently used validated HRQoL instruments, the Paediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) and Child Health and Illness Profile-child edition (CHIP-CE), were obtained from parents/carers and children (6-16 years) with/without ADHD or T1DM. Child and parent/carer-completed HRQoL measurements were evaluated for 213 children with ADHD, 58 children with T1DM and 117 healthy children (control group). Significantly lower self and parent/carer ratings were observed across most PedsQL (P < 0.001) and CHIP-CE (P < 0.05) domains (indicating reduced HRQoL) for the ADHD group compared with the T1DM and control groups. Parent/carer and child ratings were significantly correlated for both measures of HRQoL (PedsQL total score: P < 0.001; CHIP-CE all domains: P < 0.001), but only with low-to-moderate strength. Correlation between ADHD severity and HRQoL was significant with both PedsQL and CHIP-CE for all parent/carer (P < 0.01) and most child (P < 0.05) ratings; more ADHD symptoms were associated with poorer HRQoL. These data demonstrate that ADHD has a significant impact on HRQoL (as observed in both parent/carer and child ratings), which seems to be greater than that for children with T1DM.

  17. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  18. Sudarshan Kriya yoga improves quality of life in healthy people living with HIV (PLHIV): results from an open label randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Mawar, N.; Katendra, T.; Bagul, R.; Bembalkar, S.; Vedamurthachar, A.; Tripathy, S.; Srinivas, K.; Mandar, K.; Kumar, N.; Gupte, N.; Paranjape, R.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Improving quality of life (QOL) of healthy people living with HIV (PLHIV) is critical needing home-based, long-term strategy. Sudarshan Kriya yoga (SKY) intervention is acknowledged for its positive impact on health. It is hypothesised that SKY would improve PLHIV's QOL, justifying an evaluation. Methods: In this open label randomized controlled pilot trial, 61 adult PLHIV with CD4 count more than 400 cells/µl and Karnofsky scale score above 70 were enrolled. Those with cardiac disease, jaundice, tuberculosis, or on antiretroviral therapy/yoga intervention were excluded. All were given standard care, randomized to SKY intervention (31: I-SKY) and only standard of care in control (30: O-SOC) arms. The I-SKY participants were trained for six days to prepare for daily practice of SKY at home for 30 min. A validated 31-item WHOQOL-HIVBREF questionnaire was used to document effect in both arms from baseline to three visits at 4 wk interval. Results: Baseline QOL scores, hypertension and CD4 count were similar in both arms. An overall 6 per cent improvement of QOL scores was observed in I-SKY group as compared to O-SOC group, after controlling for baseline variables like age, gender, education and occupation (P =0.016); 12 per cent for physical (P =0.004), 11 per cent psychological (P =0.023) and 9 per cent level of independence (P =0.001) domains. Improvement in I-SKY observed at post-training and in the SKY adherence group showed increase in these two domains. Conclusions: A significant improvement in QOL scores was observed for the three health related QOL domains in SKY intervention arm. This low cost strategy improved physical and psychological state of PLHIV calling for upscaling with effective monitoring for sustainability of quality of life. PMID:25857500

  19. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Clyde F

    2003-12-01

    A series of workshops were sponsored by the Physical Science Division of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research to address operational gravity-compliant in-situ resource utilization and life support techologies. Workshop participants explored a Mars simulation study on Devon Island, Canada; the processing of carbon dioxide in regenerative life support systems; space tourism; rocket technology; plant growth research for closed ecological systems; and propellant extraction of planetary regoliths.

  20. Osteoporosis in healthy South Indian males and the influence of life style factors and vitamin d status on bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Sahana; Kapoor, Nitin; Naik, Dukhabandhu; Asha, Hesarghatta Shyamasunder; Prabu, Suresh; Thomas, Nihal; Seshadri, Mandalam Subramaniam; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study the prevalence of osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency in healthy men and to explore the influence of various life style factors on bone mineral density (BMD) and also to look at number of subjects warranting treatment. Methods. Ambulatory south Indian men aged above 50 were recruited by cluster random sampling. The physical activity, risk factors in the FRAX tool, BMD, vitamin D, and PTH were assessed. The number of people needing treatment was calculated, which included subjects with osteoporosis and osteopenia with 10-year probability of major osteoporotic fracture >20 percent and hip fracture >3 percent in FRAX India. Results. A total of 252 men with a mean age of 58 years were studied. The prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia at any one site was 20% (50/252) and 58%, respectively. Vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/dL) was seen in 53%. On multiple logistic regression, BMI (OR 0.3; P value = 0.04) and physical activity (OR 0.4; P value < 0.001) had protective effect on BMD. Twenty-five percent warranted treatment. Conclusions. A significantly large proportion of south Indian men had osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency. Further interventional studies are needed to look at reduction in end points like fractures in these subjects.

  1. Quality of Life, Stress, and Mental Health in Parents of Children with Parentally Diagnosed Food Allergy Compared to Medically Diagnosed and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background. Food allergy is related to poorer quality of life (QoL) and mental health of caregivers. Many parents diagnose food allergy in their child without seeking medical care and there is limited research on this group. This study investigated parental QoL and mental health in parents of children with parent-diagnosed food allergy (PA), medically diagnosed food allergy (MA), and a control group with no allergy (NA). Methods. One hundred and fifty parents from a general population completed validated measures of QoL, anxiety, depression, and stress. Results. Parents of children with food allergy (PA or MA) reported higher stress, anxiety, and depression than the control group (all p < 0.05). Parents of children with MA reported poorer food allergy related QoL compared to parents of children with PA (p < 0.05); parents of children with PA reported poorer general QoL compared to parents of children with MA (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Parents of children with food allergy have significantly poorer mental health compared to healthy controls, irrespective of whether food allergy is medically diagnosed or not. It is important to encourage parents to have their child medically tested for food allergy and to recognise and refer for psychological support where needed. PMID:27429624

  2. The life and adventures of an eight-legged castaway: Colonization and diversification of Philisca ghost spiders on Robinson Crusoe Island (Araneae, Anyphaenidae).

    PubMed

    Soto, Eduardo M; Labarque, Facundo M; Ceccarelli, F Sara; Arnedo, Miquel A; Pizarro-Araya, Jaime; Ramírez, Martín J

    2017-02-01

    Oceanic archipelagoes, by their young origin and isolation, provide privileged settings to study the origin and diversification of species. Here, we study the anyphaenid spider genus Philisca, endemic to the Valdivian temperate rainforest, which includes species living both on the mainland as well as on the Robison Crusoe Island in the Juan Fernández archipelago. Anyphaenids, as many spiders, are potentially good colonizers due their ability for ballooning, an airborne dispersal mediated by strands of silk that are caught in the wind. We use a molecular approach to estimate both the phylogenetic relationships and the timeframe of species diversification of Philisca, with the aim to infer its evolutionary history. We further estimate the rates of speciation on both the insular and continental Philisca species and score the microhabitat used by each species and their sizes as a proxy to evaluate ecological niche diversification within the island. Most analyses support the monophyly of Philisca, with the exclusion of Philisca tripunctata. Our results reveal colonization from a single lineage that postdated the origin of the island, followed by rapid (∼2Ma) diversification. The ancestral microhabitat was most likely leaf-dwelling but we identify two independent microhabitat shifts. Our data provides evidence that Philisca has undergone an adaptive radiation on the Robison Crusoe Island.

  3. Healthy world, healthy people.

    PubMed

    Mcmichael, T

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the challenges to human health from environmental degradation. The environment includes the social environment as well as the physical and chemical environment. Housing quality, recreation, population growth, density and mobility, social networks, and political and distributive equity also impact on health. There are well known examples of man-made disasters, such as in Bhopal, Chernobyl, and the Love Canal. What are less understood are the general conditions of poor health, low life expectancy, and early death due to polluted air, contaminated drinking water, and pesticide and other chemical contamination. An estimated 66% of diarrhea episodes are attributed to contaminated food or water. Health and vital statistics do not measure public health problems, such as declines in intelligence from lead ingestion from auto emissions. Epidemiological tracking of cause and effect of environmental contaminants is elusive. Some key features of environmental impact are the threshold effect, indirect pathways, and long-term and systems effects. Environmental hazards may deplete or disrupt natural biophysical processes that are the basic source of sustained good health. These basic systems include the food production system, the vector borne disease routes, global hydrological cycles, and the stratosphere. Gains in life expectancy have been due to declines in infectious disease mortality in early life, food security, improved hygiene and water sanitation, vaccination, and antibiotics and other medical treatments. Rapid technological change, acquisitive consumerism, ignorance of distant and deferred environmental impacts, and a free market ethic limit social advancement and ignore public health and environmental stresses. The scale of today's environmental problems requires priority setting and socially and ecologically sustainable ways of living.

  4. Healthy Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... openings visit HHS USAJobs Home > Healthy Eyes Healthy Vision Diabetes Diabetes Home How Much Do You Know? ... seeing your best. Read more. What are common vision problems? Some of the most common vision problems ...

  5. Healthy Eating

    MedlinePlus

    ... Under Control Nutrition Guide for Toddlers Healthy Food Shopping What Should Preschoolers Drink? Healthy Drinks for Kids ... to Eating Right Learning About Calories Smart Supermarket Shopping Go, Slow, and Whoa! A Quick Guide to ...

  6. Stress System Dynamics during “Life As It Is Lived”: An Integrative Single-Case Study on a Healthy Woman

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Christian; Geser, Willi; Noisternig, Bianca; Fuchs, Dietmar; Welzenbach, Natalie; König, Paul; Schüßler, Gerhard; Ocaña-Peinado, Francisco M.; Lampe, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the dynamic characteristics of stress system activity during “life as it is lived”. Using as representative a study design as possible, this investigation sought to gain insights into this area. A healthy 25-year-old woman collected her entire urine over a period of 63 days in 12-h intervals (126 measurements) to determine cortisol and neopterin (immune activation marker) levels. In addition, she filled out questionnaires on emotional state and daily routine in 12-h intervals, and was interviewed weekly to identify emotionally negative and positive everyday incidents. Adjusted cross-correlational analyses revealed that stressful incidents were associated with cyclic response patterns in both urinary cortisol and urinary neopterin concentrations. Urinary cortisol levels first decreased 12–24 h after stressful incidents occurred (lag 1: −.178; p = 0.048) and then increased a total of 72–84 h later (lag 6: +.224; p = 0.013). Urinary neopterin levels first increased 0–12 h before the occurrence of stressful incidents (−lag 1: +.185; p = 0.040) and then decreased a total of 48–60 h following such stressors (lag 4: −.181; p = 0.044). Decreases in urinary neopterin levels were also found 24–36 and 48–60 h after increases in pensiveness (lag 2: −.215; p = 0.017) and depressiveness (lag 4: −.221; p = 0.014), respectively. Findings on emotionally positive incidents sharply contrasted with those dealing with negative experiences. Positive incidents were followed first by urinary cortisol concentration increases within 12 h (lag 0: +.290; p = 0.001) and then by decreases after a total of 60–72 h (lag 5: −.186; p = 0.039). Urinary neopterin levels first decreased 12–24 h before positive incidents occurred (−lag 2: −.233; p = 0.010) and then increased a total of 12–24 h following these incidents (lag 1: +.222; p = 0.014). As with previous investigations on patients with systemic

  7. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of MEDI4893, an Investigational, Extended-Half-Life, Anti-Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Toxin Human Monoclonal Antibody, in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiang-Qing; Robbie, Gabriel J.; Wu, Yuling; Esser, Mark T.; Jensen, Kathryn; Schwartz, Howard I.; Bellamy, Terramika; Hernandez-Illas, Martha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MEDI4893 is an investigational immunoglobulin G1(κ) monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to and neutralizes alpha-toxin, a key Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor. A triple-amino-acid substitution, M252Y/S254T/T256E, was engineered into the MEDI4893 Fc region to extend its serum half-life. A phase 1, double-blind, dose escalation study was designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, anti-alpha-toxin-neutralizing activity, and antidrug antibody (ADA) response of MEDI4893 following a single intravenous infusion in healthy adults 18 to 65 years of age. Thirty-three subjects were randomly assigned to receive MEDI4893 at 225 mg (n = 3), 750 mg (n = 3), 2,250 mg (n = 8), or 5,000 mg (n = 12) or placebo (n = 7) and were followed for 360 days. Adverse events were mild or moderate in severity; none were serious. The MEDI4893 peak serum concentration increased dose proportionally from 77.2 μg/ml (225-mg dose) to 1,784 μg/ml (5,000-mg dose). The area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 360 days also increased dose proportionally, from 4,840 μg · day/ml (225-mg dose) to 91,493 μg · day/ml (5,000-mg dose), indicating linear pharmacokinetics. MEDI4893's terminal half-life was estimated to be 80 to 112 days, which is approximately 4-fold longer than the half-lives of other human immunoglobulin G antibodies. The alpha-toxin-neutralizing activity in serum correlated highly with the MEDI4893 concentrations in serum. Three adults transiently tested positive for ADA on day 151, but this did not have an impact on MEDI4893 serum concentrations or the MEDI4893 safety profile; no subjects exhibited serum ADA at the study end. These data support the continued development of MEDI4893 for the prevention of S. aureus-mediated pneumonia. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT02296320.) PMID:27795368

  8. Disability, Physical Inactivity, and Impaired Health-Related Quality of Life Are Not Different in Metabolically Healthy vs. Unhealthy Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Donini, Lorenzo M.; Merola, Gianluca; Poggiogalle, Eleonora; Lubrano, Carla; Gnessi, Lucio; Mariani, Stefania; Migliaccio, Silvia; Lenzi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity represents a major health hazard, affecting morbidity, psychological status, physical functionality, quality of life, and mortality. The aim of the present study was to explore the differences between metabolically healthy (MHO) and metabolically unhealthy (MUO) obese subjects with regard to physical activity, disability, and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL). Methods: All subjects underwent a multidimensional evaluation, encompassing the assessment of body composition, metabolic biomarkers and inflammation, physical activity level (IPAQ questionnaire), disability (TSD-OC test), and HR-QoL (SF-36 questionnaire). MHO and MUO were defined based on the absence or the presence of the metabolic syndrome, respectively. Results: 253 subjects were included (54 men and 199 women; age: 51.7 ± 12.8 vs. 50.3 ± 11.7 years, p = 0.46; BMI: 38.1 ± 5.7 vs. 38.9 ± 6.7 kg/m2, p = 0.37). No significant difference was observed in body composition. There was no difference between MHO and MUO considering inflammation (hs-CRP: 6517.1 ± 11,409.9 vs. 5294.1 ± 5612.2 g/L; p = 0.37), physical inactivity (IPAQ score below 3000 METs-min/week in 77.6% of MHO vs. 80% of MUO subjects; p = 0.36), obesity-related disability (TSD-OC score > 33%, indicating a high level of obesity-related disability, in 20.2% of MHO vs. 26.5% of MUO subjects; p = 0.28), and the HR-QoL (SF-36 total score: 60 ± 20.8 vs. 62.8 ± 18.2, p = 0.27). Discussion and Conclusion: The metabolic comorbidity and the impairment of functional ability and psycho-social functioning may have a different timing in the natural history of obesity. Alterations in the physical activity level and mobility disabilities may precede the onset of metabolic abnormalities. (Trial registration 2369 prot 166/12—registered 23 February 2012; Amendment 223/14—registered 13 February 2014). PMID:27897994

  9. Recruitment and Retention Strategies for Minority or Poor Clinical Research Participants: Lessons From the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity Across the Life Span Study

    PubMed Central

    Ejiogu, Ngozi; Norbeck, Jennifer H.; Mason, Marc A.; Cromwell, Bridget C.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Evans, Michele K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Investigating health disparities requires studies designed to recruit and retain racially and socioeconomically diverse cohorts. It is critical to address the barriers that disproportionately affect participation in clinical research by minorities and the socioeconomically disadvantaged. This study sought to identify and rectify these barriers to recruit and retain a biracial (African American and non-Hispanic White) and socioeconomically diverse cohort for a longitudinal study. Design and Method: The Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span study is a 20-year longitudinal examination of how race and socioeconomic status influence the development of age-related health disparities. One goal was to create a multifactorial recruitment and retention strategy. The recruitment paradigm targeted known barriers and identified those unique to the study's urban environment. The retention paradigm mirrored the recruitment plan but was based on specifically developed approaches. Results: This cohort recruitment required attention to developing community partnerships, designing the research study to meet the study hypotheses and to provide benefit to participants, providing a safe community-based site for the research and creating didactics to develop staff cultural proficiency. These efforts facilitated study implementation and enhanced recruitment resulting in accrual of a biracial and socioeconomically diverse cohort of 3,722 participants. Implications: Recruiting and retaining minority or poor research participants is challenging but possible. The essential facets include clear communication of the research hypothesis, focus on providing a direct benefit for participants, and selection of a hypothesis that is directly relevant to the community studied PMID:21565817

  10. Social role participation and the life course in healthy adults and individuals with osteoarthritis: are we overlooking the impact on the middle-aged?

    PubMed

    Gignac, Monique A M; Backman, Catherine L; Davis, Aileen M; Lacaille, Diane; Cao, Xingshan; Badley, Elizabeth M

    2013-03-01

    Little is known about life course differences in social role participation among those with chronic diseases. This study examined role salience (i.e., importance), role limitations, and role satisfaction among middle- and older-aged adults with and without osteoarthritis (OA) and its relationship to depression, stress, role conflict, health care utilization and coping behaviours. Participants were middle- and older-aged adults with OA (n = 177) or no chronic disabling conditions (n = 193), aged ≥40 years. Respondents were recruited through community advertising and clinics in Ontario, Canada (2009-2010). They completed a 45-50 min telephone interview and 20 min self-administered questionnaire assessing demographics (e.g., age, gender); health (e.g., pain, functional limitations, health care utilization); the Social Role Participation Questionnaire (SRPQ) (role salience, limitations, satisfaction in 12 domains), and psychological variables (e.g., depression, stress, role conflict, behavioural coping). Analyses included two-way ANOVAs, correlations, and linear regression. Results indicated that middle-aged adults (40-59 years) reported greater role salience than older-aged adults (60 + years). Middle-aged adults with OA reported significantly greater role limitations and more health care utilization than all other groups. Middle-aged adults and those with OA also reported greater depression, stress, role conflict, and behavioural coping efforts than older adults or healthy controls. Controlling for age and OA, those with higher role salience and greater role limitations reported more health care utilization. Those with greater role limitations and lower role satisfaction reported greater depression, stress, role conflict, and behavioural coping. This study has implications for research and interventions, highlighting the need to characterize role participation as multidimensional. It points to the importance of taking into account the meaning of roles at

  11. Evolution of phenotypic plasticity in colonizing species.

    PubMed

    Lande, Russell

    2015-05-01

    I elaborate an hypothesis to explain inconsistent empirical findings comparing phenotypic plasticity in colonizing populations or species with plasticity from their native or ancestral range. Quantitative genetic theory on the evolution of plasticity reveals that colonization of a novel environment can cause a transient increase in plasticity: a rapid initial increase in plasticity accelerates evolution of a new optimal phenotype, followed by slow genetic assimilation of the new phenotype and reduction of plasticity. An association of colonization with increased plasticity depends on the difference in the optimal phenotype between ancestral and colonized environments, the difference in mean, variance and predictability of the environment, the cost of plasticity, and the time elapsed since colonization. The relative importance of these parameters depends on whether a phenotypic character develops by one-shot plasticity to a constant adult phenotype or by labile plasticity involving continuous and reversible development throughout adult life.

  12. Relations between breast and cervical cancer prevention behaviour of female students at a school of health and their healthy life style.

    PubMed

    Malak, Arzu Tuna; Yilmaz, Derya; Tuna, Aslan; Gümüs, Aysun Babacan; Turgay, Ayse San

    2010-01-01

    Regular breast self-examination (BSE) and pap-smear tests are the two of the positive heath behaviors for improving, promoting and protecting the health of adolescent girls. The present quasi-experimental research was carried out with the purpose of analyzing the relations between breast and cervical cancer prevention behavior of female students at a School of Health and their health lifestyle. The research was conducted at Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University School of Health between November 2008 and February 2009. A total of 77 female students attending the first and second grades were included in the sample. Education pertinent to the matter was provided and evaluation was made three months later. A knowledge evaluation form for breast and gynecological examination, the Healthy Life-Style Behavior Scale (HPLP), was used in data collection. Number percentages, the McNemar Bowker test, the t test and the Mann Whitney U test were used in the evaluation. Despite the information they had received, not all of the students performed regular breast self-examination (BSE) prior to the education. For 24.7% (n=19) the reason for not doing regular BSE was their having no symptoms and for 29.9% (n=23) it was due to thinking that they would not have breast cancer. The reason for not having pap smear test was a virgin status. Three months after the education, knowledge level scores of the students increased approximately three and a half times (from 23.8-9.8) to 81.2-8.0). The rate of having regular BSE was 88.3% after three months, however; there was no pap smear test probably due to the fact that it was a taboo. When the rate of having regular BSE three months after the education and HLPL scores were compared, the scores of those having it regularly and the scores of those not having it regularly were found to be close and no statistically significant difference was detected (p> 0.05). In conclusion, consultancy service units should be established to comprehend the barriers

  13. Stages of Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... for information about colorectal cancer in children. Health history affects the risk of developing colon cancer. Anything ... colorectal cancer include the following: Having a family history of colon or rectal cancer in a first- ...

  14. Relationship Between Microbiota of the Colonic Mucosa vs Feces and Symptoms, Colonic Transit, and Methane Production in Female Patients With Chronic Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Gopanandan; Chen, Jun; Chen, Xianfeng; Chia, Nicholas; O'Connor, Helen M.; Wolf, Patricia G.; Gaskins, H. Rex; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims In fecal samples from patients with chronic constipation, the microbiota differs from that of healthy subjects. However, the profiles of fecal microbiota only partially replicate those of the mucosal microbiota. It is not clear whether these differences are caused by variations in diet or colonic transit, or are associated with methane production (measured by breath tests). We compared the colonic mucosal and fecal microbiota in patients with chronic constipation and in healthy subjects to investigate the relationships between microbiota and other parameters. Methods Sigmoid colonic mucosal and fecal microbiota samples were collected from 25 healthy women (controls) and 25 women with chronic constipation and evaluated by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing (average of 49,186 reads/sample). We assessed associations between microbiota (overall composition and operational taxonomic units) and demographic variables, diet, constipation status, colonic transit, and methane production (measured in breath samples after oral lactulose intake). Results Fourteen patients with chronic constipation had slow colonic transit. The profile of the colonic mucosal microbiota differed between constipated patients and controls (P<.05). The overall composition of the colonic mucosal microbiota was associated with constipation, independent of colonic transit (P<.05) and discriminated between patients with constipation and controls with 94% accuracy. Genera from Bacteroidetes were more abundant in the colonic mucosal microbiota of patients with constipation. The profile of the fecal microbiota was associated with colonic transit before adjusting for constipation, age, body mass index, and diet; genera from Firmicutes (Faecalibacterium, Lactococcus, and Roseburia) correlated with faster colonic transit. Methane production was associated with the composition of the fecal microbiota, but not with constipation or colonic transit. Conclusions After adjusting for diet and

  15. Rapid and repeatable shifts in life-history timing of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) following colonization of novel host plants in the Pacific Northwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Monte; Hood, Glen R; Feder, Jeffrey L; Ruedas, Luis A

    2015-12-01

    Host shifts of phytophagous insect specialists to novel plants can result in divergent ecological adaptation, generating reproductive isolation and potentially new species. Rhagoletis pomonella fruit flies in eastern North America underwent a host shift ~160 ya from native downy hawthorn (Crataegus mollis) to introduced, domesticated apple (Malus domestica). Divergent selection on diapause phenology related to the earlier fruiting time of apples versus downy hawthorns resulted in partial allochronic reproductive isolation between the fly races. Here, we test for how rapid and repeatable shifts in life-history timing are driving ecological divergence of R. pomonella in the Pacific Northwestern USA. The fly was introduced into the region via larval-infested apples 40-65 ya and now attacks native black hawthorn (Crataegus douglasii) and introduced ornamental hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna), in addition to early- and late-maturing apple varieties in the region. To investigate the life-history timing hypothesis, we used a field-based experiment to characterize the host-associated eclosion and flight activity patterns of adults, and the feeding times of larvae at a field site in Vancouver, Washington. We also assessed the degree to which differences in host-fruiting time generate allochronic isolation among apple-, black hawthorn-, and ornamental hawthorn-associated fly populations. We conclude that host-associated fly populations are temporally offset 24.4% to 92.6% in their seasonal distributions. Our results imply that R. pomonella possesses the capacity for rapid and repeatable shifts in diapause life history to match host-fruiting phenology, which can generate ecologically based reproductive isolation, and potentially biodiversity in the process.

  16. Healthy Children, Healthy Minds: Creating a Brighter Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebrun, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Children struggle with life today. Being children in the 21st century is both taxing and exciting, and yet trying to cope with all of the technology and media that surrounds them. How do we as adults provide good models? Mindfulness, exercise, focus and attention, and healthy living strategies need to play a role in shaping healthy children.…

  17. Lucilia sericata strain from Colombia: Experimental colonization, life tables and evaluation of two artificial diets of the blowfly Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), Bogotá, Colombia strain.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Luis C; Ortega, Luis G; Segura, Nidya A; Acero, Víctor M; Bello, Felio

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to establish, under experimental laboratory conditions, a colony of Lucilia sericata, Bogotá-Colombia strain, to build life tables and evaluate two artificial diets. This blowfly is frequently used in postmortem interval studies and in injury treatment. The parental adult insects collected in Bogotá were maintained in cages at 22°C±1 average temperature, 60%±5 relative humidity and 12 h photoperiodicity. The blowflies were fed on two artificial diets that were evaluated over seven continuous generations. Reproductive and population parameters were assessed. The life cycle of the species was expressed in the number of days of the different stages: egg = 0.8±0.1, larvae I = 1.1±0.02, larvae II = 1.94±0.16, larvae III = 3.5±0.54, pupae = 6.55±0.47, male adult = 28.7±0.83 and female adult = 33.5±1.0. Total survival from egg stage to adult stage was 91.2% for diet 1, while for diet 2 this parameter was 40.5%. The lifetime reproductive output was 184.51±11.2 eggs per female. The population parameters, as well as the reproductive output of the blowflies that were assessed, showed relatively high values, giving evidence of the continuous increase of the strain over the different generations and making possible its maintenance as a stable colony that has lasted for more than two years.

  18. Health-related quality of life and psychosocial functioning in children with Tourette syndrome: parent-child agreement and comparison to healthy norms.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Colina, Ana M; Eaton, Cyd K; Lee, Jennifer L; LaMotte, Julia; Blount, Ronald L

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the degree of agreement between parent proxy- and child self-report on measures of child psychosocial functioning and health-related quality of life in children with Tourette syndrome. Participants included 28 children with Tourette syndrome and their parents. All participants provided ratings of children's level of quality of life and psychosocial functioning. Results revealed strong, positive relationships between child self- and parent proxy-reports on all quality of life and psychosocial functioning domains. Parents perceived significantly higher levels of depression compared to their children, whereas children reported significantly lower Physical quality of life compared to their parents. Results suggest that assessment of quality of life and psychosocial functioning should include multiple reporters whenever feasible. Caution should be used when exclusively relying on parent proxy-reports of quality of life and psychosocial functioning, as these reports may not accurately reflect children's difficulties or perceptions of their functioning.

  19. Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for 306 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 188 countries, 1990–2013: quantifying the epidemiological transition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) aims to bring together all available epidemiological data using a coherent measurement framework, standardised estimation methods, and transparent data sources to enable comparisons of health loss over time and across causes, age–sex groups, and countries. The GBD can be used to generate summary measures such as disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and healthy life expectancy (HALE) that make possible comparative assessments of broad epidemiological patterns across countries and time. These summary measures can also be used to quantify the component of variation in epidemiology that is related to sociodemographic development. Methods We used the published GBD 2013 data for age-specific mortality, years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLLs), and years lived with disability (YLDs) to calculate DALYs and HALE for 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2013 for 188 countries. We calculated HALE using the Sullivan method; 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs) represent uncertainty in age-specific death rates and YLDs per person for each country, age, sex, and year. We estimated DALYs for 306 causes for each country as the sum of YLLs and YLDs; 95% UIs represent uncertainty in YLL and YLD rates. We quantified patterns of the epidemiological transition with a composite indicator of sociodemographic status, which we constructed from income per person, average years of schooling after age 15 years, and the total fertility rate and mean age of the population. We applied hierarchical regression to DALY rates by cause across countries to decompose variance related to the sociodemographic status variable, country, and time. Findings Worldwide, from 1990 to 2013, life expectancy at birth rose by 6·2 years (95% UI 5·6–6·6), from 65·3 years (65·0–65·6) in 1990 to 71·5 years (71·0–71·9) in 2013, HALE at birth rose by 5·4 years (4·9–5·8), from 56·9 years (54·5–59·1) to 62·3 years (59·7

  20. Colonic butyrate- algesic or analgesic?

    PubMed

    Kannampalli, P; Shaker, R; Sengupta, J N

    2011-11-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common health issue that is characterized by abdominal pain, abnormal bowel movements, and altered visceral perception. The complexity and variability in symptoms pose serious challenges in treating IBS. Current therapy for IBS is primarily focused on reducing the abdominal pain, thereby improving the quality of life to a significant extent. Although the use of fiber rich diet is widely recommended in treating IBS, some studies have questioned its use. Intra-colonic butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid, is primarily produced by the fermentation of dietary fibers in the colon. In the existing literature there are conflicting reports about the function of butyrate. In rats it is known to induce visceral hypersensitivity without altered pathology, whereas in humans it has been reported to reduce visceral pain. Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for this contrasting effect of butyrate is important before recommending fiber rich diet to IBS patients.

  1. Effects of endophyte colonization of Vicia faba (Fabaceae) plants on the life-history of leafminer parasitoids Phaedrotoma scabriventris (hymenoptera: braconidae) and Diglyphus isaea (hymenoptera: eulophidae).

    PubMed

    Akutse, Komivi S; Fiaboe, Komi K M; Van den Berg, Johnnie; Ekesi, Sunday; Maniania, Nguya K

    2014-01-01

    Effects of the fungal endophytes Beauveria bassiana (isolates ICIPE 279, G1LU3, S4SU1) and Hypocrea lixii (isolate F3ST1) on the life-history of Phaedrotoma scabriventris and Diglyphus isaea, parasitoids of the pea leafminer Liriomyza huidobrensis, were studied in the laboratory. Parasitoids were allowed to parasitize 2(nd) and 3(rd) instar L. huidobrensis larvae reared on endophytically-inoculated faba bean, Vicia faba. In the control, parasitoids were reared on non-inoculated host plants. Parasitism, pupation, adult emergence and survival were recorded. No significant difference was observed between the control and the endophyte-inoculated plants in terms of parasitism rates of P. scabriventris (p = 0.68) and D. isaea (p = 0.45) and adult' survival times (p = 0.06). The survival period of the F1 progeny of P. scabriventris was reduced (p<0.0001) in B. bassiana S4SU1 to 28 days as compared to more than 40 days for B. bassiana G1LU3, ICIPE 279 and H. lixii F3ST1. However, no significant difference (p = 0.54) was observed in the survival times of the F1 progeny of D. isaea. This study has demonstrated that together, endophytes and parasitoids have beneficial effects in L. huidobrensis population suppression.

  2. Healthy Life Style Behaviors of University Students of School of Physical Education and Sports in Terms of Body Mass Index and Other Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozlar, Volkan; Arslanoglu, Cansel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors of students in the Schools of Physical Education and Sport (SPES) utilizing Body Mass Index (BMI) and other various variables. The study is composed of 1,695 students studying in SPES, in 14 different universities across Turkey. It is made up of 1,067 male and 624 female students.…

  3. Healthy Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The Natural World Games Brainteasers Puzzles Riddles Songs Activities Be a Scientist Coloring Science Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU ...

  4. Healthy Schools

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Nutrition Environment Physical Activity Obesity Prevention Chronic Conditions Data & Statistics State Programs Professional Development & Training Tools & Resources Multimedia INFOGRAPHICS Parents for Healthy ...

  5. Healthy Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local ... it comes to weight loss, there's no lack of fad diets promising fast results. But such diets limit your nutritional intake, can be unhealthy, and tend to fail ...

  6. Healthy Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... a sexual experience is safe, healthy, and enjoyable. Sexual health is a vital part of a person’s total well-being. Of course, sex is essential for reproduction, but it can also build intimacy in relationships ...

  7. Healthy Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Healthy Eyes Maintaining Your Vision Click for more information Taking ... have a comprehensive dilated eye exam. Who Performs Eye Exams? An eye care professional is either an ...

  8. Housing characteristics and their influence on health-related quality of life in persons living with HIV in Ontario, Canada: results from the positive spaces, healthy places study.

    PubMed

    Rourke, Sean B; Bekele, Tsegaye; Tucker, Ruthann; Greene, Saara; Sobota, Michael; Koornstra, Jay; Monette, LaVerne; Bacon, Jean; Bhuiyan, Shafi; Rueda, Sergio; Watson, James; Hwang, Stephen W; Dunn, James; Hambly, Keith

    2012-11-01

    Although lack of housing is linked with adverse health outcomes, little is known about the impacts of the qualitative aspects of housing on health. This study examined the association between structural elements of housing, housing affordability, housing satisfaction and health-related quality of life over a 1-year period. Participants were 509 individuals living with HIV in Ontario, Canada. Regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships between housing variables and physical and mental health-related quality of life. We found significant cross-sectional associations between housing and neighborhood variables-including place of residence, housing affordability, housing stability, and satisfaction with material, meaningful and spatial dimensions of housing-and both physical and mental health-related quality of life. Our analyses also revealed longitudinal associations between housing and neighborhood variables and health-related quality of life. Interventions that enhance housing affordability and housing satisfaction may help improve health-related quality of life of people living with HIV.

  9. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the gut.

    PubMed

    Roager, Henrik M; Hansen, Lea B S; Bahl, Martin I; Frandsen, Henrik L; Carvalho, Vera; Gøbel, Rikke J; Dalgaard, Marlene D; Plichta, Damian R; Sparholt, Morten H; Vestergaard, Henrik; Hansen, Torben; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Pedersen, Oluf; Lauritzen, Lotte; Kristensen, Mette; Gupta, Ramneek; Licht, Tine R

    2016-06-27

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism and its importance for host health, although a firm stool consistency, a proxy for a long colonic transit time, has recently been positively associated with gut microbial richness. Here, we show that colonic transit time in humans, assessed using radio-opaque markers, is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. We find that a long colonic transit time associates with high microbial richness and is accompanied by a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation to protein catabolism as reflected by higher urinary levels of potentially deleterious protein-derived metabolites. Additionally, shorter colonic transit time correlates with metabolites possibly reflecting increased renewal of the colonic mucosa. Together, this suggests that a high gut microbial richness does not per se imply a healthy gut microbial ecosystem and points at colonic transit time as a highly important factor to consider in microbiome and metabolomics studies.

  10. Triclosan promotes Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Syed, Adnan K; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-04-08

    The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. IMPORTANCE Triclosan has been used as a biocide for over 40 years, but the broader effects that it has on the human microbiome have not been investigated. We demonstrate that triclosan is present in nasal secretions of a large portion of a test population and its presence correlates with Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization. Triclosan also promotes the binding of S. aureus to human proteins and increases the susceptibility of rats to nasal colonization by S. aureus. These findings are significant because S. aureus colonization is a known risk factor for the development of several types of infections. Our data demonstrate the unintended consequences of unregulated triclosan use and contribute to the growing body of research demonstrating inadvertent effects of triclosan on the environment and human health.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus colonization related to severity of hand eczema.

    PubMed

    Mernelius, S; Carlsson, E; Henricson, J; Löfgren, S; Lindgren, P-E; Ehricht, R; Monecke, S; Matussek, A; Anderson, C D

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge on Staphylococcus aureus colonization rates and epidemiology in hand eczema is limited. The aim of this study was to clarify some of these issues. Samples were collected by the "glove juice" method from the hands of 59 patients with chronic hand eczema and 24 healthy individuals. Swab samples were taken from anterior nares and throat from 43 of the 59 patients and all healthy individuals. S. aureus were spa typed and analysed by DNA-microarray-based genotyping. The extent of the eczema was evaluated by the hand eczema extent score (HEES). The colonization rate was higher on the hands of hand eczema patients (69 %) compared to healthy individuals (21 %, p < 0.001). This was also seen for bacterial density (p = 0.002). Patients with severe hand eczema (HEES ≥ 13) had a significantly higher S. aureus density on their hands compared to those with milder eczema (HEES = 1 to 12, p = 0.004). There was no difference between patients and healthy individuals regarding colonization rates in anterior nares or throat. spa typing and DNA-microarray-based genotyping indicated certain types more prone to colonize eczematous skin. Simultaneous colonization, in one individual, with S. aureus of different types, was identified in 60-85 % of the study subjects. The colonization rate and density indicate a need for effective treatment of eczema and may have an impact on infection control in healthcare.

  12. Crohn's Disease of the Colon, Rectum, and Anus.

    PubMed

    Harb, William J

    2015-12-01

    There is no cure for Crohn disease. Newer treatments, such as biological therapy, have led to an improved quality of life. This article focuses on the surgical management of Crohn disease of the colon, rectum, and anus. Restorative and nonrestorative surgical options for colonic Crohn disease are discussed. Treatment options for perianal Crohn disease are also reviewed.

  13. [The becoming of public medicine in the second half of XVIII-first half of XIX centuries. Report IV. The state-run activities supporting healthy conditions of life, nutrition and occupational activities].

    PubMed

    Stochik, A M; Zatravkin, S N; Stochik, A A

    2013-01-01

    The present report considers the activities of governmental authorities of European countries in the area of implementation of the concept of medical police. The target was to apply concrete activities concerning support of healthy conditions of life, nutrition and occupational activities of population of particular countries. The article considers the issues of application of sanitary education, sanitation and improvement of cities, liquidation of dumps, cemeteries and cesspits within the city limits, provision of population with sufficient amount of food and establishment of control of food quality, development and application of factory legislation, limitation of quarantine measures, implementation of specific measures of preventing diseases of smallpox and syphilis.

  14. [Surveillance system OKkio alla SALUTE: the role of primary school in the promotion of healthy life style--results in 2008].

    PubMed

    Lamberti, A; Spinelli, A; Baglio, G; Nardone, P; Silani, M T; Mastantuono, E; Teti, S; Menzano, M T; Galeone, D

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 the Italian Ministry of Health/CCM promoted and funded the project "System of surveys of behavioral risks in ages 6-17", coordinated by the National Institute of Health. One of the aims of the project is the definition and implementation of a data collection system on the weight of primary school children, their eating habits, physical activity and school initiatives favoring the healthy growth of children, called "OKkio alla SALUTE". In 2008 the first survey of OKkio was conducted in 18 Italian regions. 45,590 third grade school children in 2610 classes participated. Information was collected from 2461 schools. The responses of the head teachers showed that 64% of the schools have a canteen, used by 70% of children. Only 12% of schools include the provision of a balanced mid-morning snack. Frequently there are educational activities related to physical activity and healthy eating that, in some cases, also involve the families of the children. 29% of the schools cannot guarantee two hours of physical activity as suggested by the school curriculum because of the lack or inadequacy of the gym or the structure of the timetables. The information gathered through the cooperation of school administrators, teachers and health workers, has helped to describe the major health educational activities of the school, that is confirmed to be the ideal venue for promoting healthy lifestyles in young people.

  15. End of Life (Hospice Care)

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle End of life Hospice care might be an option if you or a loved one has ... 28, 2016 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/end-of-life/in-depth/hospice-care/art- ...

  16. Importance of neural mechanisms in colonic mucosal and muscular dysfunction in adult rats following neonatal colonic irritation.

    PubMed

    Chaloner, A; Rao, A; Al-Chaer, E D; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, B

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that early life trauma induced by maternal separation or colonic irritation leads to hypersensitivity to colorectal distension in adulthood. We tested the hypothesis that repetitive colorectal distension in neonates leads to abnormalities in colonic permeability and smooth muscle function in the adult rat. In neonatal rats, repetitive colorectal distension was performed on days 8, 10, and 12. As adults, stool consistency was graded from 0 (formed stool) to 3 (liquid stool). Colonic tissue was isolated for histology and myeloperoxidase levels. The colonic mucosa was placed in modified Ussing chambers for measurements of permeability and short-circuit current responses to forskolin, electrical field stimulation, and carbachol. Segments of colonic musculature were placed in organ baths and contractile response to potassium chloride, electrical field stimulation, and carbachol were determined. In adult rats that experienced neonatal colonic irritation, no significant changes in colonic histology or myeloperoxidase activity were observed; however, stool consistency scores were increased. Mucosal permeability, measured as an increase in basal conductance, was significantly increased but no changes in short-circuit current responses were observed. In adulthood, rats that underwent colorectal distension as neonates exhibited an elevated smooth muscle contractile response to potassium chloride, but no changes in response to electrical field stimulation or carbachol. In summary, neonatal colonic irritation, shown previously to produce colonic hypersensitivity, leads to significant alterations in colonic mucosal and smooth muscle function characterized by loose stools, increased mucosal permeability, and increased smooth muscle contractility in the absence of colon inflammation in adulthood.

  17. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  18. Galactosyltransferase in fetal, neonatal, and adult colon: relationship to differentiation.

    PubMed

    LaMont, J T; Ventola, A

    1978-08-01

    Microsomal galactosyltransferase activity of fetal rat colon increased fourfold between 18 and 22 days of gestation and then more slowly during neonatal life reaching adult levels after 14 days. The Km for uridinediphosphate- (UDP) galactose, pH optimum, cation, and detergent requirements were identical in fetal and adult galactosyltransferase. Cytidine 5'-diphosphate-choline stimulated the adult but not fetal colonic galactosyltrasferase activity by inhibition of UDP-galactose pyrophosphatase. The increase in colonic galactosyltransferase in late fetal development is correlated with our previous observation that incorporation of [3H]galactose is markedly increased during differentiation of the fetal colon.

  19. Dairy cattle serum and milk factors contributing to the risk of colon and breast cancers.

    PubMed

    zur Hausen, Harald; de Villiers, Ethel-Michele

    2015-08-15

    The analysis of published epidemiological data on colon and breast cancer reveals a remarkable concordance for most regions of the world. A low incidence for both cancers has been recorded in Mongolia and Bolivia. Discrepant data, however, have been reported for India, Japan and Korea. In India, the incidence of breast cancer is significantly higher than for colon cancer, in Japan and Korea colon cancer exceeds by far the rate of breast cancer. Here, studies are summarized pointing to a species-specific risk for colon cancer after consumption of beef originating from dairy cattle. Uptake of dairy products of Bos taurus-derived milk cattle, particularly consumed at early age, is suggested to represent one of the main risk factors for the development of breast cancer. A recent demonstration of reduced breast cancer rates in individuals with lactose intolerance (Ji et al., Br J Cancer 2014; 112:149-52) seems to be in line with this interpretation. Species-specific risk factors for these cancers are compatible with the transmission of different infectious factors transferred via meat or dairy products. Countries with discordant rates of colon and breast cancer reveal a similar discordance between meat and milk product consumption of dairy cattle. The recent isolation of a larger number of novel presumably viral DNAs from serum, meat and dairy products of healthy dairy cows, at least part of them infectious for human cells, deserves further investigation. Systemic infections early in life, resulting in latency and prevention of subsequent infections with the same agent by neutralizing antibodies, would require reconsideration of ongoing prospective studies conducted in the adult population.

  20. Healthy Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2003-01-01

    Offers ten suggestions for schools and universities to help maintain a healthy indoor environment: proper flooring, sanitary washrooms, consistent maintenance, indoor air quality, preventing mold, daylighting, good acoustics, avoiding volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ergonomic furniture, and well-maintained roofs. (EV)

  1. CT findings of colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang-Jin

    2010-01-01

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

  2. Early stage colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2013-12-14

    Evidence has now accumulated that colonoscopy and removal of polyps, especially during screening and surveillance programs, is effective in overall risk reduction for colon cancer. After resection of malignant pedunculated colon polyps or early stage colon cancers, long-term repeated surveillance programs can also lead to detection and removal of asymptomatic high risk advanced adenomas and new early stage metachronous cancers. Early stage colon cancer can be defined as disease that appears to have been completely resected with no subsequent evidence of involvement of adjacent organs, lymph nodes or distant sites. This differs from the clinical setting of an apparent "curative" resection later pathologically upstaged following detection of malignant cells extending into adjacent organs, peritoneum, lymph nodes or other distant sites, including liver. This highly selected early stage colon cancer group remains at high risk for subsequent colon polyps and metachronous colon cancer. Precise staging is important, not only for assessing the need for adjuvant chemotherapy, but also for patient selection for continued surveillance. With advanced stages of colon cancer and a more guarded outlook, repeated surveillance should be limited. In future, novel imaging technologies (e.g., confocal endomicroscopy), coupled with increased pathological recognition of high risk markers for lymph node involvement (e.g., "tumor budding") should lead to improved staging and clinical care.

  3. A longitudinal study of the impact of chronic psychological stress on health-related quality of life and clinical biomarkers: protocol for the Australian Healthy Aging of Women Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite advancements in our understanding of the importance of stress reduction in achieving good health, we still only have limited insight into the impact of stress on cellular function. Recent studies have suggested that exposure to prolonged psychological stress may alter an individual’s physiological responses, and contribute to morbidity and mortality. This paper presents an overview of the study protocol we are using to examine the impact of life stressors on lifestyle factors, health-related quality of life and novel and established biomarkers of stress in midlife and older Australian women. The primary aim of this study is to explore the links between chronic psychological stress on both subjective and objective health markers in midlife and older Australian women. The study examines the extent to which exposure frightening, upsetting or stressful events such as natural disasters, illness or death of a relative, miscarriage and relationship conflict is correlated with a variety of objective and subjective health markers. Methods/Design This study is embedded within the longitudinal Healthy Aging of Women’s study which has collected data from midlife and older Australian women at 5 yearly intervals since 2001, and uses the Allostastic model of women’s health by Groër and colleagues in 2010. The current study expands the focus of the HOW study and will assess the impact of life stressors on quality of life and clinical biomarkers in midlife and older Australian women to explain the impact of chronic psychological stress in women. Discussion The proposed study hypothesizes that women are at increased risk of exposure to multiple or repeated stressors, some being unique to women, and the frequency and chronicity of stressors increases women’s risk of adverse health outcomes. This study aims to further our understanding of the relationships between stressful life experiences, perceived quality of life, stress biomarkers, chronic illness, and

  4. Understanding your colon cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    Colon cancer - prevention; Colon cancer - screening ... We do not know what causes colon cancer, but we do know some of the things that may increase the risk of getting it, such as: Age. Your risk increases after ...

  5. Differences in Sleep Quality and Health-Related Quality of Life in Young Adults with Allergies and Asthma and Their Healthy Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molzon, Elizabeth S.; Bonner, Margaret S.; Hullmann, Stephanie E.; Ramsey, Rachelle R.; Suorsa, Kristina I.; Chaney, John M.; Mullins, Larry L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The current study examined the relationship between sleep quality and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Participants: Participants were 501 undergraduate students with allergies (167), asthma + allergies (167), or with no history of a chronic illness (167) completed study measures from August 2011 to April 2012. Methods: The…

  6. Wisconsin's Lifecourse Initiative for Healthy Families: application of the maternal and child health life course perspective through a regional funding initiative.

    PubMed

    Frey, Catherine A; Farrell, Philip M; Cotton, Quinton D; Lathen, Lorraine S; Marks, Katherine

    2014-02-01

    National experts are calling for more integrated approaches such as the life course perspective to reduce health disparities and achieve greater health equity. The translation and application of the life course perspective is therefore of great interest to public health planners, policy makers and funders to promote community-wide improvements in maternal and child health. However, few organizations have applied the life course perspective in designing strategic funding initiatives. For over three decades, Wisconsin has observed persistent racial disparities in birth outcomes. This complex public health issue led to the development of the Lifecourse Initiative for Health Families, a regional multi-million dollar funding initiative created and supported by the Wisconsin Partnership Program of the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (Created by the UW SMPH from an endowment following the conversion of Blue Cross Blue Shield United of Wisconsin, the Partnership Program makes investments in research, education, and public health and prevention initiatives that improve health and reduce health disparities in the state.). Over a 2-year period, the program funded four collaboratives to adopt a life course perspective and develop strategic plans for improving African American birth outcomes. The Twelve-point plan to close the black-white gap in birth outcomes provided the framework for the planning process. Despite the conceptual challenges, the life course perspective was embraced by the collaboratives, challenged community assumptions on the root causes of poor birth outcomes and provided a unifying funding construct for organizing and planning complementary individual-level interventions with social and physical environmental change strategies. These integrated and complimentary approaches provide a long-term opportunity to address the persistent racial birth outcome disparity in Wisconsin.

  7. Colonic casts: unexpected complications of colonic ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Mantas, D; Damaskos, C; Bamias, G; Dimitroulis, D

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Extensive colonic ischaemia can result in passage of a colonic 'cast' (CC) through the rectum. Case Study We report a 69-year-old male who initially underwent surgery to remove a sessile polyp. On postoperative day (POD)15, he was febrile, suffering from diarrhoea, and was treated conservatively. On POD18, the patient returned to our hospital with a CC that presented after defaecation. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a CC extending from the descending colon to the anal orifice with presentation of air between the affected colonic wall and the CC. The patient was treated conservatively and discharged on POD20 without complications having passed the CC (≈80cm) completely and becoming afebrile. Conclusions In most cases, the cause of CC passage is surgery for colorectal cancer or repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. A mild-to-severe presentation is dependent upon the bowel-wall layers affected by ischaemia and which therefore are included in the CC.

  8. Detection of viruses in weekly stool specimens collected during the first 2 years of life: A pilot study of five healthy Australian infants in the rotavirus vaccine era.

    PubMed

    Ye, Suifang; Whiley, David M; Ware, Robert S; Sloots, Theo P; Kirkwood, Carl D; Grimwood, Keith; Lambert, Stephen B

    2017-05-01

    Several viruses are associated with gastroenteritis in infants. This pilot study, nested within a larger community-based project of early childhood infections, collected daily symptom data and 511 weekly stool samples from five healthy, fully vaccinated, term infants from birth until their second birthday. Real-time PCR assays were used to detect six enteric viruses. Frequent, silent shedding of one or more of the six viruses was observed, particularly involving adenovirus where shedding could be for up to 3 months without gastrointestinal symptoms. These pilot data demonstrate that a positive PCR result for enteric viruses may not always indicate the cause of childhood gastroenteritis. J. Med. Virol. 89:917-921, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Life-threatening MRSA sepsis with bilateral pneumonia, osteomyelitis, and septic arthritis of the knee in a previously healthy 13-year-old boy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Michala; Jurik, Anne Grethe; Petersen, Klaus K

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and severity of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are increasing and cause high mortality and morbidity. We describe the first pediatric case in Scandinavia with Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) positive MRSA septicemia who developed bilateral pneumonia, arthritis of the knee, and osteomyelitis of the tibia. Radiological investigation and interpretation directed the treatment, especially the surgical debridement, and combined with clinical and biochemical findings lead to close interdisciplinary treatment with frequent surgical interventions and antimicrobial combination therapy. The outcome was a healthy patient without sequelae, a favorable course unlike those previously described in the literature. This case underlines the necessity of a close interdisciplinary cooperation in children with severe MRSA infection encompassing pneumonia, septic arthritis, and osteomyelitis, using different imaging modalities to guide the surgical and antibiotic treatment. PMID:27867536

  10. Diversity of the human skin microbiome early in life.

    PubMed

    Capone, Kimberly A; Dowd, Scot E; Stamatas, Georgios N; Nikolovski, Janeta

    2011-10-01

    Within days after birth, rapid surface colonization of infant skin coincides with significant functional changes. Gradual maturation of skin function, structure, and composition continues throughout the first years of life. Recent reports have revealed topographical and temporal variations in the adult skin microbiome. Here we address the question of how the human skin microbiome develops early in life. We show that the composition of cutaneous microbial communities evolves over the first year of life, showing increasing diversity with age. Although early colonization is dominated by Staphylococci, their significant decline contributes to increased population evenness by the end of the first year. Similar to what has been shown in adults, the composition of infant skin microflora appears to be site specific. In contrast to adults, we find that Firmicutes predominate on infant skin. Timely and proper establishment of healthy skin microbiome during this early period might have a pivotal role in denying access to potentially infectious microbes and could affect microbiome composition and stability extending into adulthood. Bacterial communities contribute to the establishment of cutaneous homeostasis and modulate inflammatory responses. Early microbial colonization is therefore expected to critically affect the development of the skin immune function.

  11. Diversity of the Human Skin Microbiome Early in Life

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Kimberly A; Dowd, Scot E; Stamatas, Georgios N; Nikolovski, Janeta

    2011-01-01

    Within days after birth, rapid surface colonization of infant skin coincides with significant functional changes. Gradual maturation of skin function, structure, and composition continues throughout the first years of life. Recent reports have revealed topographical and temporal variations in the adult skin microbiome. Here we address the question of how the human skin microbiome develops early in life. We show that the composition of cutaneous microbial communities evolves over the first year of life, showing increasing diversity with age. Although early colonization is dominated by Staphylococci, their significant decline contributes to increased population evenness by the end of the first year. Similar to what has been shown in adults, the composition of infant skin microflora appears to be site specific. In contrast to adults, we find that Firmicutes predominate on infant skin. Timely and proper establishment of healthy skin microbiome during this early period might have a pivotal role in denying access to potentially infectious microbes and could affect microbiome composition and stability extending into adulthood. Bacterial communities contribute to the establishment of cutaneous homeostasis and modulate inflammatory responses. Early microbial colonization is therefore expected to critically affect the development of the skin immune function. PMID:21697884

  12. Laparoscopic Colon Resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... inches to complete the procedure. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Colon Resection? Results may vary depending ... type of procedure and patient’s overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain May shorten hospital stay ...

  13. Colon cancer - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100157.htm Colon cancer - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  14. Healthy carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional foods include dietary fiber consisting of health-promoting carbohydrates. We have produced novel prebiotics from orange peel and observed that they extend the shelf life of probiotic bacteria in synbiotics. Some pectic-oligosaccharides and xyloglucan-oligosaccharides also have anti-adhesi...

  15. Nutrition as a part of healthy aging and reducing cardiovascular risk: improving functionality in later life using quality protein, with optimized timing and distribution.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Beryl M; Axford, Samantha

    2014-09-01

    Aging is associated with many physiological changes, which may in time lead to numerous pathophysiological outcomes, including adverse vascular events. For example, senescence of the immune system and cellular senescence both contribute to rising inflammation with age, potentially induced by the overall burden of comorbid illness, adipose tissue mass, diet, socioeconomic status, and physical activity. In turn, this chronic inflammation decreases physical and cognitive performance, and promotes sarcopenia and the syndrome of frailty. These events and others decrease the functionality of life as we age and include an increased risk of thrombosis and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In this review, we aim to overview the aging process primarily as related to functional impairment, and provide evidence for the role of protein, and specifically differential quality protein, in particular whey protein, and timing and distribution of intake, to help reduce some of the morbid effects of aging, including reducing obesity, improving glycemic control, and improving vascular function.

  16. Mid-life environmental enrichment increases synaptic density in CA1 in a mouse model of Aβ-associated pathology and positively influences synaptic and cognitive health in healthy ageing.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Kimberley E; King, Anna E; Fernandez-Martos, Carmen M; Dittmann, Justin; Summers, Mathew J; Vickers, James C

    2016-12-17

    Early-life cognitive enrichment may reduce the risk of experiencing cognitive deterioration and dementia in later-life. However, an intervention to prevent or delay dementia is likely to be taken up in mid to later-life. Hence, we investigated the effects of environmental enrichment in wildtype mice and in a mouse model of Aβ neuropathology (APPSWE /PS1dE9 ) from 6 months of age. After 6 months of housing in standard laboratory cages, APPSWE /PS1dE9 (n = 27) and healthy wildtype (n = 21) mice were randomly assigned to either enriched or standard housing. At 12 months of age, wildtype mice showed altered synaptic protein levels and relatively superior cognitive performance afforded by environmental enrichment. Environmental enrichment was not associated with alterations to Aβ plaque pathology in the neocortex or hippocampus of APPSWE /PS1dE9 mice. However, a significant increase in synaptophysin immunolabelled puncta in the hippocampal subregion, CA1, in APPSWE /PS1dE9 mice was detected, with no significant synaptic density changes observed in CA3, or the Fr2 region of the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, a significant increase in hippocampal BDNF was detected in APPSWE /PS1dE9 mice exposed to EE, however no changes were detected in neocortex or between Wt animals. These results demonstrate that mid to later-life cognitive enrichment has the potential to promote synaptic and cognitive health in ageing, and to enhance compensatory capacity for synaptic connectivity in pathological ageing associated with Aβ deposition. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Real-life versus package insert: a post-marketing study on adverse-event rates of the virosomal hepatitis A vaccine Epaxal® in healthy travellers.

    PubMed

    Hatz, Christoph; Beck, Bernhard; Steffen, Robert; Genton, Blaise; d'Acremont, Valérie; Loutan, Louis; Hartmann, Katharina; Herzog, Christian

    2011-07-12

    There are various methods to collect adverse events (AEs) in clinical trials. The methods how AEs are collected in vaccine trials is of special interest: solicited reporting can lead to over-reporting events that have little or no biological relationship to the vaccine. We assessed the rate of AEs listed in the package insert for the virosomal hepatitis A vaccine Epaxal(®), comparing data collected by solicited or unsolicited self-reporting. In an open, multi-centre post-marketing study, 2675 healthy travellers received single doses of vaccine administered intramuscularly. AEs were recorded based on solicited and unsolicited questioning during a four-day period after vaccination. A total of 2541 questionnaires could be evaluated (95.0% return rate). Solicited self-reporting resulted in significantly higher (p<0.0001) rates of subjects with AEs than unsolicited reporting, both at baseline (18.9% solicited versus 2.1% unsolicited systemic AEs) and following immunization (29.6% versus 19.3% local AEs; 33.8% versus 18.2% systemic AEs). This could indicate that actual reporting rates of AEs with Epaxal(®) may be substantially lower than described in the package insert. The distribution of AEs differed significantly between the applied methods of collecting AEs. The most common AEs listed in the package insert were reported almost exclusively with solicited questioning. The reporting of local AEs was more likely than that of systemic AEs to be influenced by subjects' sex, age and study centre. Women reported higher rates of AEs than men. The results highlight the need for detailing the methods how vaccine tolerability was reported and assessed.

  18. [A new immuno-PCR format for serological diagnosis of colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Nikitina, I G; Sabirova, E Iu; Solopova, O N; Surzhikov, S A; Grineva, E N; Karpov, V L; Lisitsyn, N A; Beresten', S F

    2014-01-01

    Anew immuno-PCR format is described that is based on detection of membrane protein CDH17 in serum exosomes. Format application allows distinction between sera samples of healthy donors and colon cancer patients. Obtained results open a possibility of serological colon cancer diagnosis in high risk groups.

  19. Products of the colonic microbiota mediate the effects of diet on colon cancer risk.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Stephen J D; Ou, Junhai; Aufreiter, Susanne; O'Connor, Deborah; Sharma, Sumit; Sepulveda, Jorge; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi; Mawhinney, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    It is estimated that most colon cancers can be attributed to dietary causes. We have hypothesized that diet influences the health of the colonic mucosa through interaction with the microbiota and that it is the milieu interior that regulates mucosal proliferation and therefore cancer risk. To validate this further, we compared colonic contents from healthy 50- to 65-y-old people from populations with high and low risk, specifically low risk Native Africans (cancer incidence <1:100,000; n = 17), high risk African Americans (risk 65:100,000; n = 17), and Caucasian Americans (risk 50:100,000; n = 18). Americans typically consume a high-animal protein and -fat diet, whereas Africans consume a staple diet of maize meal, rich in resistant starch and low in animal products. Following overnight fasting, rapid colonic evacuation was performed with 2 L polyethylene glycol. Total colonic evacuants were analyzed for SCFA, vitamins, nitrogen, and minerals. Total SCFA and butyrate were significantly higher in Native Africans than in both American groups. Colonic folate and biotin content, measured by Lactobacillus rhamnoses and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014 bioassay, respectively, exceeded normal daily dietary intakes. Compared with Africans, calcium and iron contents were significantly higher in Caucasian Americans and zinc content was significantly higher in African Americans, but nitrogen content did not differ among the 3 groups. In conclusion, the results support our hypothesis that the microbiota mediates the effect diet has on colon cancer risk by their generation of butyrate, folate, and biotin, molecules known to play a key role in the regulation of epithelial proliferation.

  20. Comparative optimism about healthy eating.

    PubMed

    Sproesser, Gudrun; Klusmann, Verena; Schupp, Harald T; Renner, Britta

    2015-07-01

    The present study investigated people's perception of their own as compared to their peers' healthy eating and related these perceptions to actual healthy eating, BMI, and subsequent healthy eating behavior. Data were collected within the framework of the longitudinal cohort study Konstanz Life Study (T1: N = 770; T2: N = 510). Our results demonstrated an optimistic bias on the group level. Specifically, people rated their own eating behavior as healthier on average than that of their average peers. This comparative optimism occurred even when actual healthy eating was unfavorable and BMI was high. However, it increased with actual healthy eating behavior. Importantly, optimistic perceptions were positively related to the intention to eat healthily and healthy eating six months later. Hence, the results suggest that an optimistic comparative view of one's own healthy eating is grounded in reality and boosts rather than deters subsequent health behavior. This implies that there might not be a need to reduce optimistic perceptions of healthy eating behavior.

  1. Current treatment options for colon cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Terracina, Krista P; Raza, Ali; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC), the dissemination of cancer cells throughout the lining of the abdominal cavity, is the second most common presentation of colon cancer distant metastasis. Despite remarkable advances in cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy for colon cancer over the last 15 years, it has been repeatedly shown that these therapies remain ineffective for colon cancer PC. Recently, there has been a rapid accumulation of reports that cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC) prolongs the life of colon cancer PC patients. Here, we will review the clinical presentation, the mechanisms of disease progression, and current treatment options for colon cancer PC, with a focus on the benefits and limitations of CRS-HIPEC. PMID:25253949

  2. Current treatment options for colon cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Terracina, Krista P; Raza, Ali; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-09-21

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC), the dissemination of cancer cells throughout the lining of the abdominal cavity, is the second most common presentation of colon cancer distant metastasis. Despite remarkable advances in cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy for colon cancer over the last 15 years, it has been repeatedly shown that these therapies remain ineffective for colon cancer PC. Recently, there has been a rapid accumulation of reports that cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC) prolongs the life of colon cancer PC patients. Here, we will review the clinical presentation, the mechanisms of disease progression, and current treatment options for colon cancer PC, with a focus on the benefits and limitations of CRS-HIPEC.

  3. Diagnose human colonic tissues by terahertz near-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua; Ma, Shihua; Wu, Xiumei; Yang, Wenxing; Zhao, Tian

    2015-03-01

    Based on a terahertz (THz) pipe-based near-field imaging system, we demonstrate the capability of THz imaging to diagnose freshly surgically excised human colonic tissues. Through THz near-field scanning the absorbance of the colonic tissues, the acquired images can clearly distinguish cancerous tissues from healthy tissues fast and automatically without pathological hematoxylin and eosin stain diagnosis. A statistical study on 58 specimens (20 healthy tissues and 38 tissues with tumor) from 31 patients (mean age: 59 years; range: 46 to 79 years) shows that the corresponding diagnostic sensitivity and specificity on colonic tissues are both 100%. Due to its capability to perform quantitative analysis, our study indicates the potential of the THz pipe-based near-field imaging for future automation on human tumor pathological examinations.

  4. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which mod...

  5. Healthy Water Healthy People Field Monitoring Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project WET Foundation, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This 100-page manual serves as a technical reference for the "Healthy Water, Healthy People Water Quality Educators Guide" and the "Healthy Water Healthy People Testing Kits". Yielding in-depth information about ten water quality parameters, it answers questions about water quality testing using technical overviews, data interpretation guidelines,…

  6. Inflammation and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Terzić, Janos; Grivennikov, Sergei; Karin, Eliad; Karin, Michael

    2010-06-01

    The connection between inflammation and tumorigenesis is well-established and in the last decade has received a great deal of supporting evidence from genetic, pharmacological, and epidemiological data. Inflammatory bowel disease is an important risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Inflammation is also likely to be involved with other forms of sporadic as well as heritable colon cancer. The molecular mechanisms by which inflammation promotes cancer development are still being uncovered and could differ between colitis-associated and other forms of colorectal cancer. Recent work has elucidated the role of distinct immune cells, cytokines, and other immune mediators in virtually all steps of colon tumorigenesis, including initiation, promotion, progression, and metastasis. These mechanisms, as well as new approaches to prevention and therapy, are discussed in this review.

  7. Hierarchical spatial structure of stream fish colonization and extinction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitt, N.P.; Roberts, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial variation in extinction and colonization is expected to influence community composition over time. In stream fish communities, local species richness (alpha diversity) and species turnover (beta diversity) are thought to be regulated by high extinction rates in headwater streams and high colonization rates in downstream areas. We evaluated the spatiotemporal structure of fish communities in streams originally surveyed by Burton and Odum 1945 (Ecology 26: 182-194) in Virginia, USA and explored the effects of species traits on extinction and colonization dynamics. We documented dramatic changes in fish community structure at both the site and stream scales. Of the 34 fish species observed, 20 (59%) were present in both time periods, but 11 (32%) colonized the study area and three (9%) were extirpated over time. Within streams, alpha diversity increased in two of three streams but beta diversity decreased dramatically in all streams due to fish community homogenization caused by colonization of common species and extirpation of rare species. Among streams, however, fish communities differentiated over time. Regression trees indicated that reproductive life-history traits such as spawning mound construction, associations with mound-building species, and high fecundity were important predictors of species persistence or colonization. Conversely, native fishes not associated with mound-building exhibited the highest rates of extirpation from streams. Our results demonstrate that stream fish colonization and extinction dynamics exhibit hierarchical spatial structure and suggest that mound-building fishes serve as keystone species for colonization of headwater streams.

  8. Keep Colon Cancer At Bay

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164231.html Keep Colon Cancer at Bay Colonoscopy best way to detect disease ... 22, 2017 WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Colon cancer can be treated and cured if it's diagnosed ...

  9. Colon diverticula - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100158.htm Colon diverticula - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 6 Go to slide 2 ...

  10. Early-Life Events, Including Mode of Delivery and Type of Feeding, Siblings and Gender, Shape the Developing Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cetinyurek Yavuz, Aysun; Ben-Amor, Kaouther; Roelofs, Mieke; Ishikawa, Eiji; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Swinkels, Sophie; Sakai, Takafumi; Oishi, Kenji; Kushiro, Akira; Knol, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Colonization of the infant gut is believed to be critically important for a healthy growth as it influences gut maturation, metabolic, immune and brain development in early life. Understanding factors that influence this process is important, since an altered colonization has been associated with a higher risk of diseases later in life. Fecal samples were collected from 108 healthy neonates in the first half year of life. The composition and functionality of the microbiota was characterized by measuring 33 different bacterial taxa by qPCR/RT qPCR, and 8 bacterial metabolites. Information regarding gender, place and mode of birth, presence of siblings or pets; feeding pattern and antibiotic use was collected by using questionnaires. Regression analysis techniques were used to study associations between microbiota parameters and confounding factors over time. Bacterial DNA was detected in most meconium samples, suggesting bacterial exposure occurs in utero. After birth, colonization by species of Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus and Bacteroides was influenced by mode of delivery, type of feeding and presence of siblings, with differences found at species level and over time. Interestingly, infant-type bifidobacterial species such as B. breve or B. longum subsp infantis were confirmed as early colonizers apparently independent of the factors studied here, while B. animalis subsp. lactis presence was found to be dependent solely on the type of feeding, indicating that it might not be a common infant gut inhabitant. One interesting and rather unexpected confounding factor was gender. This study contributes to our understanding of the composition of the microbiota in early life and the succession process and the evolution of the microbial community as a function of time and events occurring during the first 6 months of life. Our results provide new insights that could be taken into consideration when selecting nutritional supplementation strategies to support the

  11. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... collection below explain colon cancer risk factors, screening tests, and treatments. There are also personal stories from ... Colon Cancer Risk Play Play Colon Cancer: Screening Tests Play Play Colon Cancer Screening Tests: Colonoscopy Play ...

  12. Healthy Communities Grant Program | Urban Environmental ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-04-10

    The Healthy Communities Grant Program is EPA New England's main competitive grant program to work directly with communities to reduce environmental risks to protect and improve human health and the quality of life.

  13. 2017 Healthy Communities Grant Program: Project ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-02-22

    The 2017 Healthy Communities Grant Program is EPA New England's main competitive grant program to work directly with communities to reduce environmental risks, protect and improve human health and improve the quality of life.

  14. Streptococcus Adherence and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Nobbs, Angela H.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Streptococci readily colonize mucosal tissues in the nasopharynx; the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts; and the skin. Each ecological niche presents a series of challenges to successful colonization with which streptococci have to contend. Some species exist in equilibrium with their host, neither stimulating nor submitting to immune defenses mounted against them. Most are either opportunistic or true pathogens responsible for diseases such as pharyngitis, tooth decay, necrotizing fasciitis, infective endocarditis, and meningitis. Part of the success of streptococci as colonizers is attributable to the spectrum of proteins expressed on their surfaces. Adhesins enable interactions with salivary, serum, and extracellular matrix components; host cells; and other microbes. This is the essential first step to colonization, the development of complex communities, and possible invasion of host tissues. The majority of streptococcal adhesins are anchored to the cell wall via a C-terminal LPxTz motif. Other proteins may be surface anchored through N-terminal lipid modifications, while the mechanism of cell wall associations for others remains unclear. Collectively, these surface-bound proteins provide Streptococcus species with a “coat of many colors,” enabling multiple intimate contacts and interplays between the bacterial cell and the host. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated direct roles for many streptococcal adhesins as colonization or virulence factors, making them attractive targets for therapeutic and preventive strategies against streptococcal infections. There is, therefore, much focus on applying increasingly advanced molecular techniques to determine the precise structures and functions of these proteins, and their regulatory pathways, so that more targeted approaches can be developed. PMID:19721085

  15. The Superior Sleep of Healthy Elderly Nuns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoch, Carolyn C.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Compared nocturnal sleep structure of 10 healthy elderly nuns to that of 10 healthy age-matched female controls. The nuns fell asleep more quickly and had less early morning awakening, as well as greater rapid eye movement sleep time. These differences may reflect the more highly entrained life style of the nuns, including modest habitual sleep…

  16. Colon preneoplasia after carcinogen exposure is enhanced and colonic serotonergic system is suppressed by food deprivation.

    PubMed

    Kannen, Vinicius; Fernandes, Cleverson R; Stopper, Helga; Zanette, Dalila L; Ferreira, Frederico R; Frajacomo, Fernando T; Carvalho, Milene C; Brandão, Marcus L; Elias Junior, Jorge; Jordão Junior, Alceu Afonso; Uyemura, Sérgio Akira; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Garcia, Sérgio B

    2013-10-04

    Calorie restriction regimens usually promote health and extend life-span in mammals. This is partially related to their preventive effects against malignancies. However, certain types of nutritional restriction failed to induce beneficial effects. The American Institute of Nutrition defines calorie restriction as diets which have only 40% fewer calories, but provide normal amounts of necessary food components such as protein, vitamins and minerals; whereas, food restriction means 40% less of all dietary ingredients plus 40% less calories. Our study aimed to test the hypothesis that the latter type of food deprivation (40% less food than consumed by standard fed rats) might increase cancer risk instead of reducing it, as is generally assumed for all dietary restrictive regimens. Since the endogenous modulation of the colon serotonergic system has been observed to play a role during the early steps of carcinogenesis we also investigated whether the serotoninergic system could be involved in the food intake modulation of cancer risk. For this, rats were exposed to a carcinogen and subjected to food deprivation for 56 days. Triglyceride levels and visceral adipose tissue were reduced while hepatic and colonic lipid peroxidation was increased. This dietary restriction also decreased serotonin levels in colon, and gene expression of its intestinal transporter and receptors. Finally, the numbers of preneoplastic lesions in the colon tissue of carcinogen-exposed rats were increased. Our data suggest that food deprivation enhances formation of early tumorigenic lesions by suppressing serotonergic activity in colon tissue.

  17. Healthy Places for Healthy People 2016 Application

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Application form for the 2016 round of Healthy Places for Healthy People technical assistance to help communities work with health care partners to revitalize downtowns and neighborhoods while helping residents live healthier lives.

  18. Healthy Family 2009: Assuring Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Assuring Healthy Aging Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... for steady, modest loss. Seek emotional support from family and friends. Expect setbacks; forgive yourself. Make physical ...

  19. Healthy Aging with Go4Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... activity: Can help maintain and improve your physical strength and fitness. Can help improve your ability to ... physical activity fall into four basic categories—endurance, strength, balance, and flexibility. Each type is different, though. ...

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Colonizing and Infecting Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rebekah M.; Cao, Jie; Brisse, Sylvain; Passet, Virginie; Wu, Weisheng; Zhao, Lili; Malani, Preeti N.; Rao, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is among the most common causes of hospital-acquired infections and has emerged as an urgent threat to public health due to carbapenem antimicrobial resistance. K. pneumoniae commonly colonizes hospitalized patients and causes extraintestinal infections such as urinary tract infection, bloodstream infection (septicemia), and pneumonia. If colonization is an intermediate step before infection, then detection and characterization of colonizing isolates could enable strategies to prevent or empirically treat K. pneumoniae infections in hospitalized patients. However, the strength of the association between colonization and infection is unclear. To test the hypothesis that hospitalized patients become infected with their colonizing strain, 1,765 patients were screened for rectal colonization with K. pneumoniae, and extraintestinal isolates from these same patients were collected over a 3-month period in a cohort study design. The overall colonization prevalence was 23.0%. After adjustment for other patient factors, colonization was significantly associated with subsequent infection: 21 of 406 (5.2%) colonized patients later had extraintestinal infection, compared to 18 of 1,359 (1.3%) noncolonized patients (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 4.01; 95% confidence interval, 2.08 to 7.73; P < 0.001). Despite a high diversity of colonizing isolates, 7/7 respiratory, 4/4 urinary, and 2/5 bloodstream isolates from colonized patients matched the patient corresponding rectal swab isolates, based on wzi capsular typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and whole-genome sequence analysis. These results suggest that K. pneumoniae colonization is directly associated with progression to extraintestinal infection. IMPORTANCE K. pneumoniae commonly infects hospitalized patients, and these infections are increasingly resistant to carbapenems, the antibiotics of last resort for life-threatening bacterial infections. To prevent and treat these infections, we

  1. Man and his spaceships: Vehicles for extraterrestrial colonization?

    PubMed

    Siefert, Janet L

    2012-11-01

    The resiliency and adaptive ability of microbial life in real time on Earth relies heavily upon horizontal gene transfer. Based on that knowledge, how likely is earth based microbial life to colonize extraterrestrial targets such as Mars? To address this question, we consider manned and unmanned space exploration, the resident microbiota that is likely to inhabit those vehicles, the adaptive potential of that microbiota in an extraterrestrial setting especially with regards to mobile genetic elements, and the likelihood that Mars like environments could initiate and sustain colonization.

  2. Colonic Spirochetosis in a 60-Year-Old Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Taiwo; Peng, Jennifer L.; Choi, Euna; Tayarachakul, Sucharat; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2016-01-01

    Spirochetes, a genetically and morphologically distinct group of bacteria, are thin, spiral-shaped, and highly motile. They are known causes of several human diseases such as syphilis, Lyme disease, relapsing fever, and leptospirosis. We report a case of colonic spirochetosis in a healthy patient presenting for surveillance colonoscopy. The diagnosis of intestinal spirochetosis was made accidentally during the histological examination of colonic polyps, which were removed during colonoscopy. We also performed an extensive review on intestinal spirochetosis with a focus on clinical presentation and outcomes of reported cases from the past two decades. PMID:27570780

  3. Eating Healthy Ethnic Food

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can! ) Health Professional Resources Tipsheet: Eating Healthy Ethnic Food Trying different ethnic cuisines to give yourself a ... Looking for tips on how to order healthy foods when dining out? The Aim for a Healthy ...

  4. Healthy food trends -- quinoa

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy food trends - goosefoot; Healthy snacks - quinoa; Weight loss - quinoa; Healthy diet - quinoa; Wellness - quinoa ... Quinoa is rich in protein . It has almost twice the amount of protein found in oats, and ...

  5. Healthy Lifestyle: Children's Health

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Children's health You want your child to eat healthy foods, but do you know which nutrients ... 16, 2016 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/childrens-health/in-depth/nutrition-for-kids/art- ...

  6. Having a Healthy Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Having a Healthy Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Teens > Having a Healthy Pregnancy A ... or she can help you to get treatment. Pregnancy Discomforts Pregnancy can cause some uncomfortable side effects. ...

  7. Healthy Vision Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... NEI for Kids > Healthy Vision Tips All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Healthy Vision Tips Healthy vision starts with you! Use these ...

  8. Long-range scaling behaviours of human colonic pressure activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Rongguo; Yan, Guozheng; Zhang, Wenqiang; Wang, Long

    2008-11-01

    The long-range scaling behaviours of human colonic pressure activities under normal physiological conditions are studied by using the method of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The DFA is an effective period representation with a single quantitative scaling exponent α to accurately quantify long-range correlations naturally presented in a complex non-stationary time series. The method shows that the colonic activities of the healthy subjects exhibit long-range power-law correlations; however such correlations either will be destroyed if we randomly shuffle the original data or will cease to be of a power-law form if we chop some high-amplitude spikes off. These facts indicate that the colonic tissue or enteric nervous system (ENS) with a good functional motility has a good memory to its past behaviours and generates well-organized colonic spikes; however such good memory becomes too long to be remembered for the colonic activity of the slow transit constipation (STC) patient and colonic dysmotility occurs.

  9. Colonic intussusception in descending colon: An unusual presentation of colon lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Bagherzadeh Saba, Reza; Sadeghi, Amir; Rad, Neda; Safari, Mohammad Taghi; Barzegar, Farnoush

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas of the colon are relatively rare benign soft tissue tumors derived from mature adipocytes of mesenchymatic origin. During colonoscopy, surgery or autopsy they are generally discovered incidentally. Most cases are asymptomatic, with a small tumor size, and do not need any special treatment. However, in the cases with larger in size of tumor some symptoms such as anemia, abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, bleeding, or intussusception may be presented. We reported a 47-year-old woman with colonic intussusception in the descending colon caused by colonic lipoma and diagnosed after surgical exploration for obstructive colonic mass. PMID:28224035

  10. Plant interspecific differences in arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization as a result of soil carbon addition.

    PubMed

    Eschen, René; Müller-Schärer, Heinz; Schaffner, Urs

    2013-01-01

    Soil nutrient availability and colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are important and potentially interacting factors shaping vegetation composition and succession. We investigated the effect of carbon (C) addition, aimed at reducing soil nutrient availability, on arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization. Seedlings of 27 plant species with different sets of life-history traits (functional group affiliation, life history strategy and nitrophilic status) were grown in pots filled with soil from a nutrient-rich set-aside field and amended with different amounts of C. Mycorrhizal colonization was progressively reduced along the gradient of increasing C addition in 17 out of 27 species, but not in the remaining species. Grasses had lower colonization levels than forbs and legumes and the decline in AM fungal colonization was more pronounced in legumes than in other forbs and grasses. Mycorrhizal colonization did not differ between annual and perennial species, but decreased more rapidly along the gradient of increasing C addition in plants with high Ellenberg N values than in plants with low Ellenberg N values. Soil C addition not only limits plant growth through a reduction in available nutrients, but also reduces mycorrhizal colonization of plant roots. The effect of C addition on mycorrhizal colonization varies among plant functional groups, with legumes experiencing an overproportional reduction in AM fungal colonization along the gradient of increasing C addition. We therefore propose that for a better understanding of vegetation succession on set-aside fields one may consider the interrelationship between plant growth, soil nutrient availability and mycorrhizal colonization of plant roots.

  11. Empowering communities: action research through healthy cities.

    PubMed

    Flynn, B C; Ray, D W; Rider, M S

    1994-01-01

    The Healthy Cities process uses action research to empower communities to take action for health. Five concepts that link community empowerment and action research are: focus on community, citizen participation, information and problem solving, sharing of power, and quality of life. Two city examples from Healthy Cities Indiana, a pilot program of CITYNET Healthy Cities, provide illustrations of these concepts. The dynamics of community participation in action research and the successes and barriers to community participation are presented. Outcomes that empowered the community are suggested: the extent to which Healthy City projects are initiated, their progress monitored, continued action in health supported, resources obtained, and policies promoted that contribute equity in health.

  12. Quality of life in adult patients with Familial Mediterranean fever living in Germany or Turkey compared to healthy subjects: a study evaluating the effect of disease severity and country of residence.

    PubMed

    Giese, Arnd; Kurucay, Mustafa; Kilic, Levent; Örnek, Ahmet; Şendur, Süleyman Nahit; Lainka, Elke; Henning, Bernhard Ferdinand

    2013-07-01

    We assessed quality of life (QOL) and disease activity in patients with Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) of Turkish ancestry living in Germany or Turkey and conducted a correlation with FMF disease activity. 40 FMF patients in Turkey (TR), 40 FMF patients in Germany (G) and 40 healthy controls in Germany (C) were included. QOL was evaluated with the short form of the World Health Organisation Quality of Life scale (WHOQOL-BREF). FMF disease activity was examined with the Pras score. Mean age was TR 30.5 ± 10.6, G 35.2 ± 10.2, C 34.6 ± 10.7. Of the 120 participants, 77 were female. FMF patients in TR and G had a significantly decreased QOL physical health domain compared to controls (TR 59.7 ± 18.8, G 60.4 ± 19.4, C 76.5 ± 14.6). Turkish FMF patients had a lower QOL environment domain compared to controls (TR 62.3 ± 17.5, G 69.7 ± 16.5, C 72.3 ± 13.5). In the other QOL domains, no significant differences were found. The differences in QOL were robust to a regression analysis. No significant correlation between QOL and FMF disease activity was found. German FMF patients had longer duration of disease, younger age at onset and longer delay from disease onset to colchicine treatment. A total of 5 of 40 German FMF patients were not taking colchicine (TR:0). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was lowest in TR with significant difference between TR and G as well as G and C (TR 13.2 ± 10.3, G 27.8 ± 19.4, C 16.3 ± 12.8 mm/h). C-reactive protein did not differ between TR and G. FMF has an important impact on QOL physical health domain. No correlation between FMF disease activity and the WHOQOL-BREF could be found.

  13. Aberrant repair of etheno-DNA adducts in leukocytes and colon tissue of colon cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Obtułowicz, Tomasz; Winczura, Alicja; Speina, Elzbieta; Swoboda, Maja; Janik, Justyna; Janowska, Beata; Cieśla, Jarosław M; Kowalczyk, Paweł; Jawien, Arkadiusz; Gackowski, Daniel; Banaszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Krasnodebski, Ireneusz; Chaber, Andrzej; Olinski, Ryszard; Nair, Jagadesaan; Bartsch, Helmut; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean; Tudek, Barbara

    2010-09-15

    To assess the role of lipid peroxidation-induced DNA damage and repair in colon carcinogenesis, the excision rates and levels of 1,N(6)-etheno-2'-deoxyadenosine (epsilondA), 3,N(4)-etheno-2'-deoxycytidine (epsilondC), and 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine (1,N(2)-epsilondG) were analyzed in polymorphic blood leukocytes (PBL) and resected colon tissues of 54 colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients and PBL of 56 healthy individuals. In PBL the excision rates of 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (epsilonAde) and 3,N(4)-ethenocytosine (epsilonCyt), measured by the nicking of oligodeoxynucleotide duplexes with single lesions, and unexpectedly also the levels of epsilondA and 1,N(2)-epsilondG, measured by LC/MS/MS, were lower in CRC patients than in controls. In contrast the mRNA levels of repair enzymes, alkylpurine- and thymine-DNA glycosylases and abasic site endonuclease (APE1), were higher in PBL of CRC patients than in those of controls, as measured by QPCR. In the target colon tissues epsilonAde and epsilonCyt excision rates were higher, whereas the epsilondA and epsilondC levels in DNA, measured by (32)P-postlabeling, were lower in tumor than in adjacent colon tissue, although a higher mRNA level was observed only for APE1. This suggests that during the onset of carcinogenesis, etheno adduct repair in the colon seems to be under a complex transcriptional and posttranscriptional control, whereby deregulation may act as a driving force for malignancy.

  14. High prevalence of obesity among women who enrolled in HIV prevention trials in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: healthy diet and life style messages should be integrated into HIV prevention programs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In South Africa, poverty and the dual epidemics of HIV and tuberculosis underscore the need for prevention efforts for obesity. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of obesity in a cohort of South African women and discuss the implications for public health practices. Methods A total of 5,495 HIV-negative women from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa enrolled in three microbicide trials during the period of 2002–2008 were categorised as normal weight (body mass index (BMI: 18.6-<25), overweight (BMI: 25-<30) or obese (BMI: 30+). Incidence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections such as Chlamydia and gonorrhoea were also estimated and compared by BMI groups. Combined data was analysed using STATA 10.0. Results Approximately 70% of the sample population was classified as being overweight or obese. Older age and lack of education were determined to be significant predictors of obesity. Women who were 35 years or older were more than three times as likely to be overweight and more than 12 times as likely to be obese compared to the youngest group. The highest HIV and STI incidence rates were observed among those with BMI <25 kg/m2 (normal weight) compared to women with BMI more than 25 kg/m2 (8.1 and 19.8 per 100 person-year respectively, P<0.001, both). Conclusion Effective obesity prevention strategies are needed to re-formulate HIV prevention programmes by incorporating healthy diet and life style messages to target those who are at highest risk not just for HIV infection but also for non-communicable diseases. PMID:23432964

  15. End of Life Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... difficult. But by deciding what end-of-life care best suits your needs when you are healthy, ... making choices about the following: The goals of care (for example, whether to use certain medicines during ...

  16. Fluorescence labeling and microscopic imaging of colonic mucosal transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlamazoglou, Vassilis; Yova, Dido M.; Kavantzas, Nikolaos; Loukas, Spyros

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an efficient fluorescence microscopic technique and selective fluoroprobes for cancer diagnosis in colon tissue sections, as well as to determine the morphological components where selective dye accumulation has occurred. For this purpose a novel fluorescence probe, Rh-B - phenyl boronic acid was synthesized and examined. This derivative distinguished clearly and consistently, healthy form neoplastic human colon tissue sections. Intense accumulation was observed at the amorphous material in the lumen of neoplastic crypts, of the colonic epithelium. To gain insight into the localization pattern of this fluoroprobe and to correlate it with mucin alterations, mucicarmine and the blue-fluorescent conjugate of wheat germ agglutinin with Alexa 350 were used. Alexa 350-WGA reacted primarily with mucin secreted in the malignant crypt lumen suggesting that this materia is rich in cialic acid and N-acetylglucosaminyl residues.

  17. Fungal infection of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Praneenararat, Surat

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are pathogens that commonly infect immunocompromised patients and can affect any organs of the body, including the colon. However, the literature provides limited details on colonic infections caused by fungi. This article is an intensive review of information available on the fungi that can cause colon infections. It uses a comparative style so that its conclusions may be accessible for clinical application. PMID:25364269

  18. Gaia and the colonization of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; West, O.

    1993-01-01

    The Gaia hypothesis states that the atmosphere, hydrosphere, surface sediments, and life on Earth behave dynamically as a single integrated physiological system. What has been traditionally viewed as the passive environment is a highly active, integral part of the gaian system. Aspects of the surface temperature and chemistry are regulated by the sum of life, the biota. Formulated first by James E. Lovelock, in the late 1960s, the Gaia hypothesis has been in the scientific literature for more than 25 years. Because of its properties of exponential growth and propagation, life is a powerful geologic force. A useful aspect of the Gaia idea is that it requires integration of scientific disciplines for the study of Earth. The recently touted Earth system science is broadly parallel with the gaian concept of the physiochemical regulation of Earth's surface. We discuss here, in a gaian context, the colonization of Mars by Earth organisms. Although colonizing Mars may be impossible, its accomplishment would be exactly equivalent to "the reproduction of Gaia by budding.".

  19. Gaia and the colonization of Mars.

    PubMed

    Margulis, L; West, O

    1993-11-01

    The Gaia hypothesis states that the atmosphere, hydrosphere, surface sediments, and life on Earth behave dynamically as a single integrated physiological system. What has been traditionally viewed as the passive environment is a highly active, integral part of the gaian system. Aspects of the surface temperature and chemistry are regulated by the sum of life, the biota. Formulated first by James E. Lovelock, in the late 1960s, the Gaia hypothesis has been in the scientific literature for more than 25 years. Because of its properties of exponential growth and propagation, life is a powerful geologic force. A useful aspect of the Gaia idea is that it requires integration of scientific disciplines for the study of Earth. The recently touted Earth system science is broadly parallel with the gaian concept of the physiochemical regulation of Earth's surface. We discuss here, in a gaian context, the colonization of Mars by Earth organisms. Although colonizing Mars may be impossible, its accomplishment would be exactly equivalent to "the reproduction of Gaia by budding."

  20. Advances in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Levin, Mark

    2003-06-01

    From May 29 to June 5, 2003, the American Society of Clinical Oncology held its 39th Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. The meeting was devoted to the presentation of advances in clinical sciences, diagnosis, prevention and management of malignant disorders, and brings together investigators, clinicians, policy makers and other professionals interested in the science and impact of cancer worldwide. This report will be presented in two parts, the first focusing of colon cancer, and the second on breast cancer will be published in the next issue of Drug News & Perspectives.

  1. Pathways to Colonization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, David V., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The steps required for space colonization are many to grow from our current 3-person International Space Station, now under construction, to an infrastructure that can support hundreds and eventually thousands of people in space. This paper will summarize the author's findings from numerous studies and workshops on related subjects and identify some of the critical next steps toward space colonization. Findings will be drawn from the author s previous work on space colony design, space infrastructure workshops, and various studies that addressed space policy. In conclusion, this paper will note that significant progress has been made on space facility construction through the International Space Station program, and that significant efforts are needed in the development of new reusable Earth to Orbit transportation systems. The next key steps will include reusable in space transportation systems supported by in space propellant depots, the continued development of inflatable habitat and space elevator technologies, and the resolution of policy issues that will establish a future vision for space development.

  2. Primary colonic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Quintín H; Heslin, Martin J; Dávila-Cervantes, Andrea; Alvarez-Tostado, Javier; de los Monteros, Antonio Espinosa; Shore, Gregg; Vickers, Selwyn M

    2008-03-01

    Surgical resection of primary colonic lymphoma can be an important therapeutic tool. We performed a nonrandomized retrospective descriptive study at the University hospital tertiary care center. From January 1990 to June 2002, a total of 15 patients with primary colonic lymphoma were identified from the tumor registry at University of Alabama at Birmingham and retrospectively reviewed under Institutional Review Board approved protocol. Demographic data, clinical features, treatment method (surgery and/or chemotherapy), recurrence rate, and survival were analyzed. The results are presented as mean +/- standard deviation or median and range. Differences in survival were evaluated by the log-rank test and the interval of disease-free survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Main outcome measures included surgical results, morbidity, mortality, and recurrence rate. Mean age was 51.5 years (standard deviation 16.4), 33 per cent were male and 67 per cent were female. Presenting symptoms were diarrhea (53.5%), lower gastrointestinal bleeding (13.3%), and nausea and vomiting (46.7%) secondary to low-grade obstruction. Concomitant colorectal disease was present in one patient with ulcerative colitis. Preoperative diagnosis of lymphoma was made in 13 patients (87%) with colonoscopy and biopsy. CT scan was performed in all patients; and none had radiographic evidence of systemic extension. Only one patient had a history of lymphoproliferative disease and exposure to radiation. The most common disease location was the cecum (60%), followed by the right colon (27%), and the sigmoid colon (13%). The mean lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) value was 214.9 u/L (range 129-309). Thirty-three per cent of the patients had an LDH value that was above the upper normal limit. LDH returned to normal after treatment in all patients. Operations performed consisted of right hemicolectomy (13), total proctocolectomy with ileal

  3. The transport of colonic contents in the irritable colon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, J A

    1970-08-01

    The mean distance of travel and hourly incidence of propulsive and retropulsive movements of colonic contents have been assessed by means of time-lapse cinefluorography and compared in 98 patients with the irritable colon syndrome and in 90 control subjects.Net propulsion in patients with the irritable colon syndrome was less than in the controls at rest, similar to the controls after feeding, and greater than in the controls after an injection of carbachol. In both clinical groups, food and carbachol increased the incidence of propulsive and retropulsive movements but did not alter the average distance over which they travelled.The figures suggest that at least two-thirds of all net propulsion of colonic contents in the irritable colon syndrome takes place under circumstances not reproduced in the present study.

  4. Heightened colon motor activity measured by a wireless capsule in patients with constipation: relation to colon transit and IBS.

    PubMed

    Hasler, William L; Saad, Richard J; Rao, Satish S; Wilding, Gregory E; Parkman, Henry P; Koch, Kenneth L; McCallum, Richard W; Kuo, Braden; Sarosiek, Irene; Sitrin, Michael D; Semler, John R; Chey, William D

    2009-12-01

    Relationships of regional colonic motility to transit in health, constipation, and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (C-IBS) are poorly characterized. This study aimed to 1) characterize regional differences in colon pressure, 2) relate motor differences in constipation to colon transit, and 3) quantify the role of IBS in altered contractility with constipation. Colon pH and pressure were measured by wireless capsules in 53 healthy and 36 constipated subjects. Numbers of contractions >25 mmHg and areas under curves (AUC) were calculated for colon transit quartiles by time. Constipation was classified as normal transit (<59 h), moderate slow transit (STC) (59-100 h), and severe STC (>100 h). Twelve out of 36 constipated subjects had C-IBS; 24 had functional constipation. Numbers of contractions and AUCs increased from the first to the fourth quartile in health (P < 0.0001). Mean numbers of contractions in constipated subjects were similar to controls. Mean AUCs with normal transit (P = 0.01) and moderate STC (P = 0.004) but not severe STC (P = NS) were higher than healthy subjects. IBS was associated with greater mean numbers of contractions (P = 0.05) and AUCs (P = 0.0006) vs. controls independent of transit. Numbers of contractions increased from the first to fourth quartiles in moderate STC, C-IBS, and functional constipation; AUCs increased from the first to fourth quartiles in all groups (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, colon pressure activity is greater distally than proximally in health. Constipated patients with normal or moderately delayed transit show increased motor activity that is partly explained by IBS. These findings emphasize differential effects on transit and motility in different constipation subtypes.

  5. The first thousand days - intestinal microbiology of early life: establishing a symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Wopereis, Harm; Oozeer, Raish; Knipping, Karen; Belzer, Clara; Knol, Jan

    2014-08-01

    The development of the intestinal microbiota in the first years of life is a dynamic process significantly influenced by early-life nutrition. Pioneer bacteria colonizing the infant intestinal tract and the gradual diversification to a stable climax ecosystem plays a crucial role in establishing host-microbe interactions essential for optimal symbiosis. This colonization process and establishment of symbiosis may profoundly influence health throughout life. Recent developments in microbiologic cultivation-independent methods allow a detailed view of the key players and factors involved in this process and may further elucidate their roles in a healthy gut and immune maturation. Aberrant patterns may lead to identifying key microbial signatures involved in developing immunologic diseases into adulthood, such as asthma and atopic diseases. The central role of early-life nutrition in the developmental human microbiota, immunity, and metabolism offers promising strategies for prevention and treatment of such diseases. This review provides an overview of the development of the intestinal microbiota, its bidirectional relationship with the immune system, and its role in impacting health and disease, with emphasis on allergy, in early life.

  6. [Site-specific drug delivery systems. I. Colon targeted delivery].

    PubMed

    Szente, Virág; Zelkó, Romána

    2007-01-01

    Colon specific drug delivery has gained increased importance not just for the delivery of the drugs for the treatment of local diseases associated with the colon like Chron's disease, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, cancer or infections, but also for the potential it holds for the systemic delivery of proteins (e.g. insulin) and therapeutic peptides. These systems enable the protection of healthy tissues from the side effects of drugs and the drug intake of targeted cells, as well. The formulation of colon specific drug delivery systems is of great impact in the case of diseases having circadian rhythm (midnight gerd). Such circadian rhythm release drug delivery systems are designed to provide a plasma concentration--time profile, which varies according to physiological need at different times during the dosing period, i.e., mimicking the circadian rhythm and severity/manifestation of gastric acid secretion (and/or midnight gerd). In general four primary approaches have been proposed for colon targeted delivery namely pH-dependent systems, time dependent systems, colonic microflora activated systems and prodrugs.

  7. Proteins and an Inflammatory Network Expressed in Colon Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenhong; Fang, Changming; Gramatikoff, Kosi; Niemeyer, Christina C.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein is crucial to homeostasis of normal intestinal epithelia because it suppresses the β-catenin/TCF pathway. Consequently, loss or mutation of the APC gene causes colorectal tumors in humans and mice. Here, we describe our use of Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) to compare protein expression in colon tumors to that of adjacent healthy colon tissue from ApcMin/+ mice. Twenty-seven proteins were found to be up-regulated in colon tumors and twenty-five down-regulated. As an extension of the proteomic analysis, the differentially expressed proteins were used as “seeds” to search for co-expressed genes. This approach revealed a co-expression network of 45 genes that is up-regulated in colon tumors. Members of the network include the antibacterial peptide cathelicidin (CAMP), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), IL-8, and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM1). The co-expression network is associated with innate immunity and inflammation, and there is significant concordance between its connectivity in humans versus mice (Friedman: p value = 0.0056). This study provides new insights into the proteins and networks that are likely to drive the onset and progression of colon cancer. PMID:21366352

  8. Distension-stimulated propagated contractions in human colon.

    PubMed

    Bassotti, G; Gaburri, M; Imbimbo, B P; Morelli, A; Whitehead, W E

    1994-09-01

    To investigate the mechanisms for elicitation of peristaltic activity in the human colon, we studied the effect of balloon distension of the transverse, descending, and sigmoid colon and the rectum. Fifteen healthy subjects were studied by means of a colonoscopically positioned probe carrying a 5-cm latex balloon. After positioning of the probe, stepwise distension was performed for each colonic segment (transverse, descending, sigmoid, rectum), and the onset of large (> 50 mm Hg) and small (< 50 mm Hg) propagated waves was observed. Analysis of the tracings showed: (1) In 8/15 subjects (53.3%), balloon distension elicited propagated contractions, but these contractions were qualitatively different from the spontaneously occurring high-amplitude propagated contractions previously found to occur in association with defecation. Therefore, intraluminal distension is probably not the cause of defecation-associated high-amplitude propagated contractions. (2) Pain reports were poorly correlated with propagated contractions elicited by balloon distension, suggesting that these contractions are not the cause of the pain produced by balloon distension. (3) The transverse colon shows lower pressures, fewer pain reports, and fewer large propagated contractions in response to balloon distension as compared to the descending and the sigmoid colon.

  9. An autoantibody in narcolepsy disrupts colonic migrating motor complexes.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael W; Reed, Joanne H; Smith, Anthony J F; Gordon, Tom P

    2008-12-03

    Despite strong circumstantial evidence for the autoimmune hypothesis of narcolepsy, conventional immunological methods have failed to detect an autoantibody. This study investigated the real-time effects of narcoleptic immunoglobulins on a spontaneous colonic migrating motor complex (CMMC) preparation. IgG from patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy or healthy controls was added directly to isolated mouse colons undergoing CMMC activity to test for autoantibodies that disrupt colonic motility. The effect of immunoglobulins prepared for clinical intravenous treatment (IVIg) on autoantibody-mediated colonic disruption was also assessed. Narcoleptic IgGs markedly reduced the frequency of CMMCs or irreversibly abolished them. Abrogation of CMMCs was followed by an increase in the resting tension of the colon preparation and appearance of atropine-sensitive phasic smooth muscle contractions. IVIg partially neutralized the inhibitory effect of narcoleptic IgG on the CMMCs. The dramatic effect of narcoleptic IgG on CMMC generation is consistent with an autoantibody-mediated disruption of enteric neural pathways. The ex vivo whole-organ approach allows real-time examination of the physiological effects of the narcoleptic autoantibody and offers a new avenue for exploring the autoimmune basis of narcolepsy. The neutralizing effect of IVIg on the autoantibody provides a rationale for the reported clinical improvement in cataplexy when IVIg are given at disease onset.

  10. Neonatal Colonization of Mice with LGG Promotes Intestinal Development and Decreases Susceptibility to Colitis in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fang; Liu, Liping; Cao, Hailong; Moore, Daniel J.; Washington, M. Kay; Wang, Bangmao; Peek, Richard M.; Acra, Sari A.; Polk, D. Brent

    2016-01-01

    Development of the intestinal microbiota during early life serves a key regulatory stage in establishing the host-microbial relationship. This symbiotic relationship contributes to developing host immunity and maintaining health throughout the life span. This study was to develop an approach to colonize conventionally raised mice with a model probiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), and determine the effects of LGG colonization on intestinal development and prevention of colitis in adulthood. LGG colonization in conventionally raised was established by administering LGG to pregnant mice starting at gestational day 18 and pups at postnatal day 1 to day 5. LGG colonization promoted bodyweight gain and increased diversity and richness of the colonic mucosa-associated microbiota prior to weaning. Intestinal epithelial cell proliferation, differentiation, tight junction formation and mucosal IgA production were all significantly enhanced in LGG colonized mice. Adult mice colonized with LGG showed increased IgA production and decreased susceptibility to intestinal injury and inflammation induced in the dextran sodium sulphate model of colitis. Thus, neonatal colonization of mice with LGG enhances intestinal functional maturation and IgA production and confers life long health consequences on protection from intestinal injury and inflammation. This strategy might be applied for benefiting health in the host. PMID:27095077

  11. Cystic lumphangioma of the colon

    SciTech Connect

    Agha, F.P.; Francis, I.R.; Simms, S.M.

    1983-10-01

    Cystic lymphangioma is a rare benign lesion of the gastrointestinal tract, in which the colon is the least frequntly involved site. A case is reported displaying the characteristic radiographic features of an extramucosal intramural mass lesion in a patient with concurrent cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas, in whom the possibility of a metastatic lesion to the colon could not be excluded except by surgical resection.

  12. Extracellular matrix mediators of metastatic cell colonization characterized using scaffold mimics of the pre-metastatic niche

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Caffe, Jordan R.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Azarin, Samira M.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic tumor cells colonize the pre-metastatic niche, which is a complex microenvironment consisting partially of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. We sought to identify and validate novel contributors to tumor cell colonization using ECM coated poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds as mimics of the pre-metastatic niche. Utilizing orthotopic breast cancer mouse models, fibronectin and collagen IV-coated scaffolds implanted in the subcutaneous space captured colonizing tumor cells, showing a greater than 2-fold increase in tumor cell accumulation at the implant site compared to uncoated scaffolds. As a strategy to identify additional ECM colonization contributors, decellularized matrix (DCM) from lungs and livers containing metastatic tumors were characterized. In vitro, metastatic cell adhesion was increased on DCM coatings from diseased organs relative to healthy DCM. Furthermore, in vivo implantations of diseased DCM-coated scaffolds had increased tumor cell colonization relative to healthy DCM coatings. Mass-spectrometry proteomics was performed on healthy and diseased DCM to identify candidates associated with colonization. Myeloperoxidase was identified as abundantly present in diseased organs and validated as a contributor to colonization using myeloperoxidase-coated scaffold implants. This work identified novel ECM proteins associated with colonization using decellularization and proteomics techniques and validated candidates using a scaffold to mimic the pre-metastatic niche. PMID:26844426

  13. Evaluating Maori community initiatives to promote healthy eating, healthy action.

    PubMed

    Hamerton, Heather; Mercer, Christine; Riini, Denise; McPherson, Brighid; Morrison, Laurie

    2014-03-01

    Māori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand, experience poorer health than non-Māori across a range of health measures. Interventions focused at an individual level have proved largely ineffective; 'bottom-up' approaches where communities determine their own priorities may be more sustainable than 'top-down' approaches where goals are determined by health authorities. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate an innovative health promotion programme aimed at improving Māori health and to discuss the importance of ownership and control of health initiatives by Māori. Evaluators conducted a comprehensive evaluation of a Healthy Eating Healthy Action programme in six small Māori health agencies, gathering information from programme managers and co-ordinators, participants and wider community members about what changes were occurring at individual, family and community levels. Effective interventions built on cultural values and practices and were delivered by Māori with close connections to the community. Changes in nutrition and physical activity made by participants also benefitted their wider families and community. The changes demonstrated subtle but important shifts in thinking about healthy eating and healthy activity that in the longer term could lead to more measurable change towards improved quality of life for people within communities.

  14. Hydroxy-α sanshool induces colonic motor activity in rat proximal colon: a possible involvement of KCNK9

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Kunitsugu; Ohtake, Nobuhiro; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Mase, Akihito; Imamura, Sachiko; Sudo, Yuka; Miyano, Kanako; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Various colonic motor activities are thought to mediate propulsion and mixing/absorption of colonic content. The Japanese traditional medicine daikenchuto (TU-100), which is widely used for postoperative ileus in Japan, accelerates colonic emptying in healthy humans. Hydroxy-α sanshool (HAS), a readily absorbable active ingredient of TU-100 and a KCNK3/KCNK9/KCNK18 blocker as well as TRPV1/TRPA1 agonist, has been investigated for its effects on colonic motility. Motility was evaluated by intraluminal pressure and video imaging of rat proximal colons in an organ bath. Distribution of KCNKs was investigated by RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. Current and membrane potential were evaluated with use of recombinant KCNK3- or KCNK9-expressing Xenopus oocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Defecation frequency in rats was measured. HAS dose dependently induced strong propulsive “squeezing” motility, presumably as long-distance contraction (LDC). TRPV1/TRPA1 agonists induced different motility patterns. The effect of HAS was unaltered by TRPV1/TRPA1 antagonists and desensitization. Lidocaine (a nonselective KCNK blocker) and hydroxy-β sanshool (a geometrical isomer of HAS and KCNK3 blocker) also induced colonic motility as a rhythmic propagating ripple (RPR) and a LDC-like motion, respectively. HAS-induced “LDC,” but not lidocaine-induced “RPR,” was abrogated by a neuroleptic agent tetrodotoxin. KCNK3 and KCNK9 were located mainly in longitudinal smooth muscle cells and in neural cells in the myenteric plexus, respectively. Administration of HAS or TU-100 increased defecation frequency in normal and laparotomy rats. HAS may evoke strong LDC possibly via blockage of the neural KCNK9 channel in the colonic myenteric plexus. PMID:25634809

  15. Hydroxy-α sanshool induces colonic motor activity in rat proximal colon: a possible involvement of KCNK9.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Kunitsugu; Ohtake, Nobuhiro; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Mase, Akihito; Imamura, Sachiko; Sudo, Yuka; Miyano, Kanako; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2015-04-01

    Various colonic motor activities are thought to mediate propulsion and mixing/absorption of colonic content. The Japanese traditional medicine daikenchuto (TU-100), which is widely used for postoperative ileus in Japan, accelerates colonic emptying in healthy humans. Hydroxy-α sanshool (HAS), a readily absorbable active ingredient of TU-100 and a KCNK3/KCNK9/KCNK18 blocker as well as TRPV1/TRPA1 agonist, has been investigated for its effects on colonic motility. Motility was evaluated by intraluminal pressure and video imaging of rat proximal colons in an organ bath. Distribution of KCNKs was investigated by RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. Current and membrane potential were evaluated with use of recombinant KCNK3- or KCNK9-expressing Xenopus oocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Defecation frequency in rats was measured. HAS dose dependently induced strong propulsive "squeezing" motility, presumably as long-distance contraction (LDC). TRPV1/TRPA1 agonists induced different motility patterns. The effect of HAS was unaltered by TRPV1/TRPA1 antagonists and desensitization. Lidocaine (a nonselective KCNK blocker) and hydroxy-β sanshool (a geometrical isomer of HAS and KCNK3 blocker) also induced colonic motility as a rhythmic propagating ripple (RPR) and a LDC-like motion, respectively. HAS-induced "LDC," but not lidocaine-induced "RPR," was abrogated by a neuroleptic agent tetrodotoxin. KCNK3 and KCNK9 were located mainly in longitudinal smooth muscle cells and in neural cells in the myenteric plexus, respectively. Administration of HAS or TU-100 increased defecation frequency in normal and laparotomy rats. HAS may evoke strong LDC possibly via blockage of the neural KCNK9 channel in the colonic myenteric plexus.

  16. Comparison and correlation of candidal colonization in diabetic patients and normal individuals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a common universal endocrine disorder with decreased host immunity towards infections. In these people the most common opportunistic infection is oral candidiasis. Oral candidiasis is most commonly caused by yeast like fungus Candida albicans. In healthy individuals these microorganisms are believed to be commensals but in diabetic patients, it forms severe colonization, even in the absence of any clinically evident oral candidiasis. This type of subclinical colonization can make them more prone to develop deeper mucosal colonization with further dissemination via blood. The aim of this study is to compare the frequency and severity of oral candidal colonization in diabetic patients with normal individuals through cytological method. Methods 30 cases of diabetic patients and 30 cases of normal healthy individuals were examined to determine the oral candidal colonization through oral exfoliative cytological methods. Statistical analysis was done using the Chi - square test. Results A statistically significant increase in the candidal colonization was observed in diabetic patients as compared to normal individuals. Conclusions Oral exfoliative cytological method is an easy and effective chair side technique to assess the oral candidal colonization in the diabetic group. PMID:24991533

  17. [Colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and dark septate endophytes in Panax notoginseng].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihui; Chen, Di; Zhao, Dandan; Jin, Hang; Li, Lingfei

    2011-09-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and dark septate endophytes (DSE) colonizing Panax notoginseng in three main producing areas in Wenshan Prefecture of Yunan province were investigated. The fungal colonization of 144 roots samples including healthy and rot roots of P. notoginseng with different age were observed by means of acid fuchsin stain. The results showed that P. notoginseng was the typical arbuscular mycorrhizal plant. Although there was no significant difference in AMF and DSE colonization among three sites, the total colonization of AMF was significantly higher than that of DSE. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the fresh weight of P. notoginseng root was positively significantly correlated with the colonization of AMF, but not with the colonization of DSE. These results suggest that AMF may play more important role than DSE in improving the yield and quality of P. notoginseng. Furthermore, AMF colonization of healthy P. notoginseng was higher than that of plant with root rot, which suggested that AMF could defend P. notoginseng against root rot pathogens. AMF have great potentiality and broad prospect to control root rot of P. notoginseng.

  18. Healthy Watersheds Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... habitat loss from warmer water temperatures associated with climate change already has been observed in the southern ... altered water flow and availability, invasive species and climate change. Healthy Watersheds EPA Awards Healthy Watersheds Consortium ...

  19. Healthy Environments for Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... OUTSIDE, THEY NEED CARE AND AFFECTION IN A HEALTHY ENVIRONMENT! ...AT SCHOOL... 2 ...AT HOME... ...EVEN IN THEIR ... CAN WE DO? HOW CAN WE GUARANTEE A HEALTHY FUTURE FOR ... PROTECTING THE ENVIRONMENT, ESPECIALLY RIVERS AND FORESTS, WE CAN IMPROVE THE ...

  20. Healthy Eating and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional ...

  1. Live Healthy, Live Longer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Human Services. More Health News on: Exercise and Physical Fitness Health Screening Healthy Living Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Exercise and Physical Fitness Health Screening Healthy Living About MedlinePlus Site Map ...

  2. Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People.

    PubMed

    Simopoulos, Artemis P; Bourne, Peter G; Faergeman, Ole

    2013-03-01

    The Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy 30 October-1 November, 2012. The meeting was science-based but policy-oriented. The role and amount of healthy and unhealthy fats, with attention to the relative content of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, sugar, and particularly fructose in foods that may underlie the epidemics of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) worldwide were extensively discussed. The report concludes that sugar consumption, especially in the form of high energy fructose in soft drinks, poses a major and insidious health threat, especially in children, and most diets, although with regional differences, are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids and too high in omega-6 fatty acids. Gene-nutrient interactions in growth and development and in disease prevention are fundamental to health, therefore regional Centers on Genetics, Nutrition and Fitness for Health should be established worldwide. Heads of state and government must elevate, as a matter of urgency, nutrition as a national priority, that access to a healthy diet should be considered a human right and that the lead responsibility for nutrition should be placed in Ministries of Health rather than agriculture so that the health requirements drive agricultural priorities, not vice versa. Nutritional security should be given the same priority as food security.

  3. Bellagio report on healthy agriculture, healthy nutrition, healthy people.

    PubMed

    Simopoulos, Artemis P; Bourne, Peter G; Faergeman, Ole

    2013-02-05

    The Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October-2 November 2012. The meeting was science-based but policy-oriented. The role and amount of healthy and unhealthy fats, with attention to the relative content of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, sugar, and particularly fructose in foods that may underlie the epidemics of non-communicable diseases (NCD's) worldwide were extensively discussed. The report concludes that sugar consumption, especially in the form of high energy fructose in soft drinks, poses a major and insidious health threat, especially in children, and most diets, although with regional differences, are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids and too high in omega-6 fatty acids. Gene-nutrient interactions in growth and development and in disease prevention are fundamental to health, therefore regional Centers on Genetics, Nutrition and Fitness for Health should be established worldwide. Heads of state and government must elevate, as a matter of urgency, Nutrition as a national priority, that access to a healthy diet should be considered a human right and that the lead responsibility for Nutrition should be placed in Ministries of Health rather than agriculture so that the health requirements drive agricultural priorities, not vice versa. Nutritional security should be given the same priority as food security.

  4. Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People

    PubMed Central

    Simopoulos, Artemis P.; Bourne, Peter G.; Faergeman, Ole

    2013-01-01

    The Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October–2 November 2012. The meeting was science-based but policy-oriented. The role and amount of healthy and unhealthy fats, with attention to the relative content of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, sugar, and particularly fructose in foods that may underlie the epidemics of non-communicable diseases (NCD’s) worldwide were extensively discussed. The report concludes that sugar consumption, especially in the form of high energy fructose in soft drinks, poses a major and insidious health threat, especially in children, and most diets, although with regional differences, are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids and too high in omega-6 fatty acids. Gene-nutrient interactions in growth and development and in disease prevention are fundamental to health, therefore regional Centers on Genetics, Nutrition and Fitness for Health should be established worldwide. Heads of state and government must elevate, as a matter of urgency, Nutrition as a national priority, that access to a healthy diet should be considered a human right and that the lead responsibility for Nutrition should be placed in Ministries of Health rather than agriculture so that the health requirements drive agricultural priorities, not vice versa. Nutritional security should be given the same priority as food security. PMID:23385371

  5. [Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People].

    PubMed

    Simopoulos, Artemis P; Bourne, Peter G; Faergeman, Ole

    2013-11-01

    The Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October-2 November 2012. The meeting was science-based but policy-oriented. The role and amount of healthy and unhealthy fats, with attention to the relative content of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, sugar, and particularly fructose in foods that may underlie the epidemics of non-communicable diseases (NCD's) worldwide were extensively discussed. The report concludes that sugar consumption, especially in the form of high energy fructose in soft drinks, poses a major and insidious health threat, especially in children, and most diets, although with regional differences, are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids and too high in omega-6 fatty acids. Gene-nutrient interactions in growth and development and in disease prevention are fundamental to health, therefore regional Centers on Genetics, Nutrition and Fitness for Health should be established worldwide. Heads of state and government must elevate, as a matter of urgency, Nutrition as a national priority, that access to a healthy diet should be considered a human right and that the lead responsibility for Nutrition should be placed in Ministries of Health rather than agriculture so that the health requirements drive agricultural priorities, not vice versa. Nutritional security should be given the same priority as food security.

  6. [Colon cancer after colon interposition for oesophageal replacement].

    PubMed

    Sikorszki, László; Horváth, Ors Péter; Papp, András; Cseke, László; Pavlovics, Gábor

    2010-08-01

    The authors report the case of a colon adenocarcinoma developed on the neck at the anastomosis of the skin tube and colon 44 years following a corrosive oesophageal injury. This patient suffered a moderately severe oesophageal, stomach and laryngeal injuries due to drinking hydrochloric acid 44 years ago. He underwent serial laryngoplasties, then needed a tracheostomy, oesophagectomy, pyloroplasty and ileocolon transposition. An antethoracal oesophagus formation was performed with ileocolon and skin tube amendment. 44 years later an ulcerated adenocarcinoma developed in the transposed colon, which was resected and the ability to swallow was reinstated by the transplantation of an isolated jejunal segment using microvascular anastomosis.

  7. Surveillance and Survivorship after Treatment for Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Makhoul, Rami; Alva, Suraj; Wilkins, Kirsten B.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in the United States. Majority of patients have localized disease that is amenable to curative resection. Disease recurrence remains a major concern after resection. In addition, patients are at an increased risk for developing a second or metachronous colon cancer. The principal goal of surveillance following treatment of colon cancer is to improve disease-free and overall survival. Survivorship is a distinct phase following surveillance to help improve quality of life and promote longevity. PMID:26648797

  8. Single Dose Pharmacokinetics of Oral Tenofovir in Plasma, Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, Colonic Tissue, and Vaginal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Louissaint, Nicolette A.; Cao, Ying-Jun; Skipper, Paul L.; Liberman, Rosa G.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Anderson, Jean R.; Everts, Stephanie; Bakshi, Rahul; Fuchs, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract HIV seroconversion outcomes in preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trials of oral tenofovir (TFV)-containing regimens are highly sensitive to drug concentration, yet less-than-daily dosing regimens are under study. Description of TFV and its active moiety, TFV diphosphate (TFV-DP), in blood, vaginal tissue, and colon tissue may guide the design and interpretation of PrEP clinical trials. Six healthy women were administered a single oral dose of 300 mg tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and 4.3 mg (12.31 MBq, 333 μCi) 14C-TDF slurry. Blood was collected every 4 h for the first 24 h, then at 4, 8, 11, and 15 days postdosing. Colonic and vaginal samples (tissue, total and CD4+ cells, luminal fluid and cells) were collected 1, 8 and 15 days postdose. Samples were analyzed for TFV and TFV-DP. Plasma TFV demonstrated triphasic decay with terminal elimination half-life median [interquartile range (IQR)] 69 h (58–77). Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) TFV-DP demonstrated biphasic peaks (median 12 h and 96 h) followed by a terminal 48 h (38–76) half-life; Cmax was 20 fmol/million cells (2–63). One day postdose, the TFV-DP paired colon:vaginal tissue concentration ratio was 1 or greater in all subjects' tissue homogenates, median 124 (range 1–281), but was not sustained. The ratio was lower and more variable in cells extracted from tissue. Among all sample types, TFV and TFV-DP half-life ranged from 23 to 139 h. PBMC TFV-DP rose slowly in the hours after dosing indicating that success with exposure-driven dosing regimens may be sensitive to timing of the dose prior to exposure. Colonic tissue homogenate TFV-DP concentrations were greater than in vaginal homogenate at 24 h, but not in cells extracted from tissue. These and the other pharmacokinetic findings will guide the interpretation and design of future PrEP trials. PMID:23600365

  9. Fungal colonization of an Ordovician impact-induced hydrothermal system

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Sturkell, Erik; Ormö, Jens; Siljeström, Sandra; van Zuilen, Mark; Bengtson, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Impacts are common geologic features on the terrestrial planets throughout the solar system, and on at least Earth and Mars impacts have induced hydrothermal convection. Impact-generated hydrothermal systems have been suggested to possess the same life supporting capability as hydrothermal systems associated with volcanic activity. However, evidence of fossil microbial colonization in impact-generated hydrothermal systems is scarce in the literature. Here we report of fossilized microorganisms in association with cavity-grown hydrothermal minerals from the 458 Ma Lockne impact structure, Sweden. Based on morphological characteristics the fossilized microorganisms are interpreted as fungi. We further infer the kerogenization of the microfossils, and thus the life span of the fungi, to be contemporaneous with the hydrothermal activity and migration of hydrocarbons in the system. Our results from the Lockne impact structure show that hydrothermal systems associated with impact structures can support colonization by microbial life. PMID:24336641

  10. Fungal colonization of an Ordovician impact-induced hydrothermal system.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Sturkell, Erik; Ormö, Jens; Siljeström, Sandra; van Zuilen, Mark; Bengtson, Stefan

    2013-12-16

    Impacts are common geologic features on the terrestrial planets throughout the solar system, and on at least Earth and Mars impacts have induced hydrothermal convection. Impact-generated hydrothermal systems have been suggested to possess the same life supporting capability as hydrothermal systems associated with volcanic activity. However, evidence of fossil microbial colonization in impact-generated hydrothermal systems is scarce in the literature. Here we report of fossilized microorganisms in association with cavity-grown hydrothermal minerals from the 458 Ma Lockne impact structure, Sweden. Based on morphological characteristics the fossilized microorganisms are interpreted as fungi. We further infer the kerogenization of the microfossils, and thus the life span of the fungi, to be contemporaneous with the hydrothermal activity and migration of hydrocarbons in the system. Our results from the Lockne impact structure show that hydrothermal systems associated with impact structures can support colonization by microbial life.

  11. Fungal colonization of an Ordovician impact-induced hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Sturkell, Erik; Ormö, Jens; Siljeström, Sandra; van Zuilen, Mark; Bengtson, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    Impacts are common geologic features on the terrestrial planets throughout the solar system, and on at least Earth and Mars impacts have induced hydrothermal convection. Impact-generated hydrothermal systems have been suggested to possess the same life supporting capability as hydrothermal systems associated with volcanic activity. However, evidence of fossil microbial colonization in impact-generated hydrothermal systems is scarce in the literature. Here we report of fossilized microorganisms in association with cavity-grown hydrothermal minerals from the 458 Ma Lockne impact structure, Sweden. Based on morphological characteristics the fossilized microorganisms are interpreted as fungi. We further infer the kerogenization of the microfossils, and thus the life span of the fungi, to be contemporaneous with the hydrothermal activity and migration of hydrocarbons in the system. Our results from the Lockne impact structure show that hydrothermal systems associated with impact structures can support colonization by microbial life.

  12. Healthy behavior change in practical settings.

    PubMed

    Young, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The core principle of implementing healthy behavior change is making the healthy choice the easy choice. Putting this motto into practice requires us to remove the barriers that individuals face when trying to live a healthy lifestyle. It is important to look at the bigger picture when helping our patients reach optimal health, looking closely at exercise levels and home life. Environmental factors can cause strain and present challenges for people trying to develop and maintain good health. At the Care Management Institute and at Kaiser Permanente, we are making strides to change default behaviors so optimal lifestyles become the norm, rather than the exception.

  13. Prehistoric human colonization of India.

    PubMed

    Misra, V N

    2001-11-01

    Human colonization in India encompasses a span of at least half-a-million years and is divided into two broad periods, namely the prehistoric (before the emergence of writing) and the historic (after writing). The prehistoric period is divided into stone, bronze and iron ages. The stone age is further divided into palaeolithic, mesolithic and neolithic periods. As the name suggests, the technology in these periods was primarily based on stone. Economically, the palaeolithic and mesolithic periods represented a nomadic, hunting-gathering way of life, while the neolithic period represented a settled, food-producing way of life. Subsequently copper was introduced as a new material and this period was designated as the chalcolithic period. The invention of agriculture, which took place about 8000 years ago, brought about dramatic changes in the economy, technology and demography of human societies. Human habitat in the hunting-gathering stage was essentially on hilly, rocky and forested regions, which had ample wild plant and animal food resources. The introduction of agriculture saw it shifting to the alluvial plains which had fertile soil and perennial availability of water. Hills and forests, which had so far been areas of attraction, now turned into areas of isolation. Agriculture led to the emergence of villages and towns and brought with it the division of society into occupational groups. The first urbanization took place during the bronze age in the arid and semi-arid region of northwest India in the valleys of the Indus and the Saraswati rivers, the latter represented by the now dry Ghaggar-Hakra bed. This urbanization is known as the Indus or Harappan civilization which flourished during 3500-1500 B.C. The rest of India during this period was inhabited by neolithic and chalcolithic farmers and mesolithic hunter-gatherers. With the introduction of iron technology about 3000 years ago, the focus of development shifted eastward into the Indo-Gangetic divide and

  14. Biotic mortality factors affecting emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) are highly dependent on life stage and host tree crown condition.

    PubMed

    Jennings, D E; Duan, J J; Shrewsbury, P M

    2015-10-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is a serious invasive forest pest in North America responsible for killing tens to hundreds of millions of ash trees since it was accidentally introduced in the 1990 s. Although host-plant resistance and natural enemies are known to be important sources of mortality for EAB in Asia, less is known about the importance of different sources of mortality at recently colonized sites in the invaded range of EAB, and how these relate to host tree crown condition. To further our understanding of EAB population dynamics, we used a large-scale field experiment and life-table analyses to quantify the fates of EAB larvae and the relative importance of different biotic mortality factors at 12 recently colonized sites in Maryland. We found that the fates of larvae were highly dependent on EAB life stage and host tree crown condition. In relatively healthy trees (i.e., with a low EAB infestation) and for early instars, host tree resistance was the most important mortality factor. Conversely, in more unhealthy trees (i.e., with a moderate to high EAB infestation) and for later instars, parasitism and predation were the major sources of mortality. Life-table analyses also indicated how the lack of sufficient levels of host tree resistance and natural enemies contribute to rapid population growth of EAB at recently colonized sites. Our findings provide further evidence of the mechanisms by which EAB has been able to successfully establish and spread in North America.

  15. Probiotics in early life: a preventative and treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Ashkan; Villa, Christopher R; Comelli, Elena M

    2016-04-01

    Microbial colonization of the infant gut plays a key role in immunological and metabolic pathways impacting human health. Since the maturation of the gut microbiota coincides with early life development, failure to develop a health compatible microbiota composition may result in pathology and disease in later life. Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Maternal transfer of microorganisms is possible during pregnancy and lactation, and the mother's diet and microbiota can influence that of her offspring. Furthermore, pre-term birth, Caesarean section birth, formula feeding, antibiotic use, and malnutrition have been linked to dysbiosis, which in turn is associated with several pathologies such as necrotizing enterocolitis, inflammatory bowel diseases, antibiotic associated diarrhea, colic, and allergies. Thus, early life should represent a preferred stage of life for probiotic interventions. In this context, they could be regarded as a means to 'program' the individual for health maintenance, in order to prevent pathologies associated with dysbiosis. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the benefits of probiotic administration, pre-clinical studies have been conducted and found an array of positive results such as improved microbial composition, intestinal maturation, decreased pathogenic load and infections, and improved immune response. Moreover, specific probiotic strains administered during the perinatal period have shown promise in attenuating severity of necrotizing enterocolitis. The mechanisms elucidated suggest that probiotic interventions in early life can be envisaged for disease prevention in both healthy offspring and offspring at risk of chronic disease.

  16. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE—the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease. PMID:27668227

  17. The healthy aged

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, Marshall; Pike, Andrea; McCrate, Farah; Parsons, Karen; Parsons, Wanda; Pitcher, Heather; Buehler, Sharon; Gadag, Veeresh; Miller, Robert; Sclater, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe a population of cognitively functioning seniors aged 80 years and older who are living independently in the community. Design Descriptive cross-sectional study based on the enrolment cohort of a randomized controlled trial. Setting St John’s, Nfld. Participants A total of 236 cognitively functioning seniors aged 80 years and older living independently in the community. Main outcome measures Demographic characteristics including age, sex, marital status, and education; health status and quality of life measured by the Short Form–36 and the CASP-19 (control, autonomy, self-realization, and pleasure); use of formal and informal community services; satisfaction with family physician care as measured by the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire–18; and use of health care resources (family physician visits, emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and laboratory and diagnostic imaging tests). Results Overall, 66.5% of those in the group were women and the average age was 85.5 years. A quarter had postsecondary diplomas or degrees; 54.7% were widowed (69.4% of women and 25.3% of men). The cohort scored well in terms of health status and quality of life, with a range of scores on the Short Form–36 from 57.5 to 93.5 out of 100, and a score of 44 out of 57 on the CASP-19; they were satisfied with the care received from family physicians, with scores between 3.8 and 4.3 out of 5 on the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire–18; and use of health services was low—70% had no emergency department visits in the previous year and 80% had not used any laboratory or diagnostic services. Conclusion Seniors aged 80 years and older living independently are involved in the social fabric of society. They are generally well educated, slightly more than half are widowed, and two-thirds are female. They score well on scales that measure well-being and quality of life, and they use few health services. They are the healthy aged. Trial registration

  18. Subserosal hematoma of the sigmoid colon after vaginal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bacalbașa, N; Bohîlțea, RE; Dumitru, M; Turcan, N; Cîrstoiu, MM

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage is an obstetrical emergency that represents the leading cause of maternal mortality. Severe hemorrhagic complications that could appear postpartum are the abdomino-pelvic hematomas, which result from the rupture of the pelvic vessels. We reported a very rare case of puerperal retroperitoneal subserosal hematoma of sigmoid colon following vaginal delivery, which was successfully managed by conservative methods. As far as we know, there are only a few case reports of intramural hematoma of sigmoid colon in literature, having other etiologies than vaginal delivery trauma. The particularities of the case consisted in the association of hemangiomas and the low risk thrombophilia. Diagnosis was based on the clinical exam and the paraclinical founding. Laparotomy is generally considered the last choice, in life threatening cases with hemodynamic instability, compression signs, and presence of contrast leakage on noninvasive imaging methods, but avoiding colonic resection after dissection represented the true challenge of the case. PMID:28255383

  19. Linear Discriminant Functions in Connection with the micro-RNA Diagnosis of Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nikas, Jason B; Low, Walter C

    2012-01-01

    Early detection (localized stage) of colon cancer is associated with a five-year survival rate of 91%. Only 39% of colon cancers, however, are diagnosed at that early stage. Early and accurate diagnosis, therefore, constitutes a critical need and a decisive factor in the clinical treatment of colon cancer and its success. In this study, using supervised linear discriminant analysis, we have developed three diagnostic biomarker models that-based on global micro-RNA expression analysis of colonic tissue collected during surgery-can discriminate with a perfect accuracy between subjects with colon cancer (stages II-IV) and normal healthy subjects. We developed our three diagnostic biomarker models with 57 subjects [40 with colon cancer (stages II-IV) and 17 normal], and we validated them with 39 unknown (new and different) subjects [28 with colon cancer (stages II-IV) and 11 normal]. For all three diagnostic models, both the overall sensitivity and specificity were 100%. The nine most significant micro-RNAs identified, which comprise the input variables to the three linear discriminant functions, are associated with genes that regulate oncogenesis, and they play a paramount role in the development of colon cancer, as evidenced in the tumor tissue itself. This could have a significant impact in the fight against this disease, in that it may lead to the development of an early serum or blood diagnostic test based on the detection of those nine key micro-RNAs.

  20. Cholesterol metabolism and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Broitman, S A; Cerda, S; Wilkinson, J

    1993-01-01

    While epidemiologic and concordant experimental data indicate a direct relationship between dietary fat (and presumably caloric) intake and the development of colon cancer, the effect of dietary cholesterol on this disease is still not clear. However, there appears to be a developing literature concerning an inverse relationship between serum and plasma cholesterol levels, and the risk for colon cancer. Findings that low serum cholesterol levels are apparent as early as ten years prior to the detection of colon cancer implies that sub clinical disease is probably not involved initially in this process. The possibility of low serum cholesterol as a bio-marker was considered in epidemiologic studies which focused upon obese men with lower than normal serum cholesterol levels who were found to be at increased risk to colon cancer. While the relationship between low serum cholesterol and colonic or intestinal cholesterol metabolism is presently not understood, current genetic studies provide a promising though as yet unexplored potential association. Alterations which occur during the developmental progression of colonic cancer include changes in chromosome 5, which also carries two genes vital to the biosynthesis and regulation of systemic and cellular cholesterol metabolism, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCoA R). Regulation of cholesterol metabolism in intestinal cells in vivo and in vitro varies from that seen in normal fibroblasts or hepatocytes in terms of exogenous sources of cholesterol and how these sources regulate internal synthesis. Colonic cancer cells have been used to assess small bowel enterocyte cholesterol metabolism, which has been possible because of their ability to differentiate in culture, however information regarding true colonic enterocyte cholesterol metabolism is relatively scarce. Colonic cancer cells have been shown to possess a diminished or nonexistent ability to use

  1. Small bowel and colon perforation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carlos V R

    2014-04-01

    For patients with small bowel and colonic perforations, a definitive diagnosis of the cause of perforation is not necessary before operation. Bowel obstruction and inflammatory bowel disease are the most common causes of nontraumatic intestinal perforations in industrialized countries, whereas infectious causes of intestinal perforations are more common in developing countries. Treatment of small bowel and colonic perforations generally includes intravenous antibiotics and fluid resuscitation, but the specific management of the bowel depends on the underlying cause of the perforation.

  2. [Extramedullary plasmacytoma of the colon].

    PubMed

    Amo Trillo, Víctor; Vera García, Pilar; Pinto, Isabel; Olmedo Martín, Raúl; Romero Blasco, Bartolomé

    2007-05-01

    We report the case of a 68 year-old man in whom a tumour of the colon was identified by colonoscopy, during diagnostic studies for lower gastrointestinal bleeding as an outpatient. Histological examination showed clonal proliferation of plasma cells IgG-K. No other location was affected (including bone marrow). Diagnosis of plasmacytoma of the colon was made. We have carried out a review of the literature in relation to this unusual disorder.

  3. Selenium, Folate, and Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Connelly-Frost, Alexandra; Poole, Charles; Satia, Jessie A.; Kupper, Lawrence L.; Millikan, Robert C.; Sandler, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Selenium is an essential trace element which has been implicated in cancer risk; however, study results have been inconsistent with regard to colon cancer. Our objectives were to 1) investigate the association between selenium and colon cancer 2) evaluate possible effect measure modifiers and 3) evaluate potential biases associated with the use of post-diagnostic serum selenium measures Methods The North Carolina Colon Cancer Study is a large population-based, case-control study of colon cancer in North Carolina between 1996 and 2000 (n=1,691). Nurses interviewed patients about diet and lifestyle and drew blood specimens which were used to measure serum selenium. Results Individuals who had both high serum selenium (>140 mcg/L) and high reported folate (>354 mcg/day), had a reduced relative risk of colon cancer (OR=0.5, 95% CI=0.4,0.8). The risk of colon cancer for those with high selenium and low folate was approximately equal to the risk among those with low selenium and low folate (OR=1.1, 95% CI=0.7,1.5) as was the risk for those with low selenium and high folate (OR=0.9, 95% CI=0.7–1.2). We did not find evidence of bias due to weight loss, stage at diagnosis, or time from diagnosis to selenium measurement. Conclusion High levels of serum selenium and reported folate jointly were associated with a substantially reduced risk of colon cancer. Folate status should be taken into account when evaluating the relation between selenium and colon cancer in future studies. Importantly, weight loss, stage at diagnosis, or time from diagnosis to blood draw did not appear to produce strong bias in our study. PMID:19235033

  4. Terahertz pulsed imaging of freshly excised human colonic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Caroline B.; Fitzgerald, Anthony; Reese, George; Goldin, Robert; Tekkis, Paris; O'Kelly, P. S.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma; Gibson, Adam P.; Wallace, Vincent P.

    2011-07-01

    We present the results from a feasibility study which measures properties in the terahertz frequency range of excised cancerous, dysplastic and healthy colonic tissues from 30 patients. We compare their absorption and refractive index spectra to identify trends which may enable different tissue types to be distinguished. In addition, we present statistical models based on variations between up to 17 parameters calculated from the reflected time and frequency domain signals of all the measured tissues. These models produce a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 77% in distinguishing between healthy and all diseased tissues and a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 71% in distinguishing between dysplastic and healthy tissues. The contrast between the tissue types was supported by histological staining studies which showed an increased vascularity in regions of increased terahertz absorption.

  5. [Lactobacilli and colon carcinoma--A review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shumei; Zhang, Lanwei; Shan, Yujuan

    2015-06-04

    Epidemiological studies showed that incidence of colon carcinoma is increased in the world. There are many difficulties to inhibit colon carcinoma because the causes of inducing colon carcinoma were various and interactive each other. Previous evidence supported the balance of the colonic microflora was critical in inhibiting colon carcinoma and the protection by colonic microflora could be improved by ingesting lactobacilli. Therefore, the biological functions and anticancer effects of lactobacilli attract attention of researchers. In this review we discussed the causes of colon carcinoma; the anticancer mechanisms of lactobacilli on the basis of our own studies. Eventually, we summarized the effects of anticancer of different components and metabolic products extracted from lactobacilli.

  6. Microbial pathways in colonic sulfur metabolism and links with health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Carbonero, Franck; Benefiel, Ann C.; Alizadeh-Ghamsari, Amir H.; Gaskins, H. Rex

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur is both crucial to life and a potential threat to health. While colonic sulfur metabolism mediated by eukaryotic cells is relatively well studied, much less is known about sulfur metabolism within gastrointestinal microbes. Sulfated compounds in the colon are either of inorganic (e.g., sulfates, sulfites) or organic (e.g., dietary amino acids and host mucins) origin. The most extensively studied of the microbes involved in colonic sulfur metabolism are the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which are common colonic inhabitants. Many other microbial pathways are likely to shape colonic sulfur metabolism as well as the composition and availability of sulfated compounds, and these interactions need to be examined in more detail. Hydrogen sulfide is the sulfur derivative that has attracted the most attention in the context of colonic health, and the extent to which it is detrimental or beneficial remains in debate. Several lines of evidence point to SRB or exogenous hydrogen sulfide as potential players in the etiology of intestinal disorders, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) and colorectal cancer in particular. Generation of hydrogen sulfide via pathways other than dissimilatory sulfate reduction may be as, or more, important than those involving the SRB. We suggest here that a novel axis of research is to assess the effects of hydrogen sulfide in shaping colonic microbiome structure. Clearly, in-depth characterization of the microbial pathways involved in colonic sulfur metabolism is necessary for a better understanding of its contribution to colonic disorders and development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:23226130

  7. Are there healthy obese?

    PubMed

    Griera Borrás, José Luis; Contreras Gilbert, José

    2014-01-01

    It is currently postulated that not all obese individuals have to be considered as pathological subjects. From 10% to 20% of obese people studied do not show the metabolic changes common in obese patients. The term "healthy obese" has been coined to refer to these patients and differentiate them from the larger and more common group of pathological obese subjects. However, the definition of "healthy obese" is not clear. Use of "healthy obese" as a synonym for obese without metabolic complications is risky. Clinical markers such as insulin resistance are used to identify this pathology. It is not clear that healthy obese subjects have lower morbidity and mortality than pathologically obese patients. According to some authors, healthy obese would represent an early stage in evolution towards pathological obesity. There is no agreement as to the need to treat healthy obese subjects.

  8. [Healthy Cities projects].

    PubMed

    Takano, Takehito

    2002-05-01

    This is a review article on "Healthy Cities". The Healthy Cities programme has been developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) to tackle urban health and environmental issues in a broad way. It is a kind of comprehensive policy package to carry out individual projects and activities effectively and efficiently. Its key aspects include healthy public policy, vision sharing, high political commitment, establishment of structural organization, strategic health planning, intersectoral collaboration, community participation, setting approach, development of supportive environment for health, formation of city health profile, national and international networking, participatory research, periodic monitoring and evaluation, and mechanisms for sustainability of projects. The present paper covered the Healthy Cities concept and approaches, rapid urbanization in the world, developments of WHO Healthy Cities, Healthy Cities developments in the Western Pacific Region, the health promotion viewpoint, and roles of research.

  9. Healthy Mouth for Your Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research A Healthy Mouth For Your Baby Healthy teeth are important—even ... fact sheet can help you keep your baby’s mouth healthy and give him a healthy start! 1. ...

  10. Mucosal colonic tube fistula with antireflux wrap for antegrade colonic enema.

    PubMed

    Bowkett, Brendon Douglas; Kelly, E W

    2009-06-01

    Antegrade enemas can provide children with excellent faecal continence in situations where adequate control has been compromised because of underlying congential anomaly or poor surgical outcome in their treatment. The enema is often delivered through an appendicostomy. If the appendix is absent or utilized for another purpose, then placement of a chait tube or caecostomy button can provide access to the colon for the enema. However, these devices may be associated with breakages, accidental removal and leakage and replacement may require another operative procedure under a general anaesthetic. Full thickness colonic tubes can also be constructed at any point along the colon but in the author's experience, they can be associated with significant leakage of both gas and faecal material. The construction of a mucosal colonic tube with anti-reflux wrap is a technique that avoids the above problems and offers a distinctive advantage in selected situations. The technique relies on tabularising mucosa alone to create a continent fistula. Six children with severe soiling underwent the technique. The outcomes were evaluated using a modified quality of life score (QOLI). The score included assessment of soiling, staining, odour, self-esteem and socialization measure. Technical evaluation included analysis of the ease of catheterization and continence of the mucosal fistula site. All six patients had dramatic improvement in their faecal continence with complete resolution of soiling in all six. Follow up median is 42 months and the range is 6-48 months. QOLI scores improved from a total of 4.75 to 18.5. Possible range is 0-21. All the six fistula sites catheterize easily and no stenosis or faecal leakage has occurred. Two patients required treatment of minor granulations at the entry site of the fistula during the early healing phase.

  11. Gastrointestinal hormone mRNA expression in human colonic adenocarcinomas, hepatic metastases and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Monges, G; Biagini, P; Cantaloube, J F; De Micco, P; Parriaux, D; Seitz, J F; Delpero, J R; Hassoun, J

    1996-01-01

    Aims—(1) To investigate the expression of the four main hormones of the digestive tract by performing reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on a series of samples, comprising tumoral and healthy colonic tissues, hepatic metastases and colonic cell line samples; and (2) to study the patterns of labelling obtained with serological and morphological markers. Methods—After extraction and reverse transcription, gastrin, somatostatin, cholecystokinin (CCK) and transforming growth factor α (TGFα) mRNAs were detected by PCR and nested PCR using specific primers. The corresponding proteins were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results—The cell lines expressed all four mRNAs. Gastrin mRNA was present in most tumoral and metastatic samples, while the somatostatin transcript was detected in all samples and was frequently overexpressed in the normal colon. TGFα mRNA was expressed systematically in tumours of the right and transverse colon, but not in those located in the left colon; the expression of CCK mRNA was systematically absent in the left colon. Conclusions—The data presented here shed some light on the transcriptional events involved in the production of the various hormones present in the gastrointestinal tract, in both healthy and tumoral tissues. The various mRNAs expressed in cell lines are therefore not systematically expressed in the human pathology. Images PMID:16696065

  12. Colonic response to dietary fibre from carrot, cabbage, apple, bran.

    PubMed

    Cummings, J H; Branch, W; Jenkins, D J; Southgate, D A; Houston, H; James, W P

    1978-01-07

    Approximately 20 g/day of concentrated dietary fibre from carrot, cabbage, apple, bran, and guar gum was added to the controlled basal diet of nineteen healthy volunteers. Faecal weight increased by 12% on bran, 69% on cabbage, 59% on carrot, 40% on apple, and 20% on guar gum. These changes in faecal weight were correlated with an increased intake of pentose-containing polysaccharides from the fibre. On the basal diet there were pronounced individual differences in faecal weight, and from these the response of subjects to the fibre preparations could be predicted. Addition of fibre shortened mean transit-time through the gut and significantly diluted an inert marker in the faeces. Diet-induced changes in colonic function may explain international differences in the prevalence of colonic disease, whilst personal variation in the response to dietary fibre may determine individual susceptibility to large-bowel disease within a community.

  13. Antimicrobial Use, Human Gut Microbiota and Clostridium difficile Colonization and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Caroline; Manges, Amee R.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Broad-spectrum antimicrobials have profound detrimental effects on the structure and diversity of the indigenous intestinal microbiota. These alterations often impair colonization resistance, allowing the establishment and proliferation of C. difficile in the gut. Studies involving animal models have begun to decipher the precise mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota mediates colonization resistance against C. difficile and numerous investigations have described gut microbiota alterations associated with C. difficile colonization or infection in human subjects. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective approach for the treatment of recurrent CDI that allows the restoration of a healthy intestinal ecosystem via infusion of fecal material from a healthy donor. The recovery of the intestinal microbiota after FMT has been examined in a few reports and work is being done to develop custom bacterial community preparations that could be used as a replacement for fecal material. PMID:27025623

  14. Healthy Birth Practices Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Budin, Wendy C.

    2014-01-01

    In this column, the editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education describes this special issue where distiguished authors provide updated evidence-based reviews of the Lamaze International Six Healthy Birth Practices that promote, support, and protect natural, safe, and healthy birth. This issue is dedicated to Elisabeth Bing on the occasion of her 100th birthday.

  15. Pregnancy and Healthy Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Profiles Multimedia Pregnancy & Healthy Weight Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content New research shows that maintaining a healthy weight before and during pregnancy can reduce the likelihood of negative effects for mothers and babies We’ve heard the ...

  16. Promoting Healthy Dietary Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Cheryl L.; Story, Mary; Lytle, Leslie A.

    This chapter reviews the research on promoting healthy dietary behaviors in all youth, not just those who exhibit problems such as obesity or eating disorders. The first section of this chapter presents a rationale for addressing healthy dietary behavior with children and adolescents, on the basis of the impact of these behaviors on short- and…

  17. Active and Healthy Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Kovarik, Jessica; Leidy, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The Active and Healthy School Program (AHS) can be used to alter the culture and environment of a school to help children make healthier choices. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of AHS to increase physical activity while decreasing total screen time, increase healthy food choices, and improve knowledge about physical…

  18. Healthy Homes Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peek, Gina; Lyon, Melinda; Russ, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Extension is focusing on healthy homes programming. Extension educators are not qualified to diagnose consumers' medical problems as they relate to housing. We cannot give medical advice. Instead, we can help educate consumers about home conditions that may affect their well-being. Extension educators need appropriate healthy homes tools to…

  19. A Case of Meningococcal Pyomyositis in an Otherwise Healthy Adult

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Monique T.; Gajurel, Kiran; Fischer, Katrina; Stevens, Kathryn; Ozdalga, Errol; Montoya, José G.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of Neisseria meningitidis can range from nasopharyngeal colonization to life-threatening invasive diseases such as meningitis. However, its etiologic role in invasive pyomyositis (PM) has never been reported before in the English language. In this study, we report the first case of PM in the English language and the second case in the literature caused by N meningitidis. PMID:27703989

  20. Bacterial oncogenesis in the colon

    PubMed Central

    Dejea, Christine; Wick, Elizabeth; Sears, Cynthia L

    2013-01-01

    The human colon plays host to a diverse and metabolically complex community of microorganisms. While the colonic microbiome has been suggested to contribute to the development of colorectal cancer (CRC), a definitive link has not been made. The role in which the colon microflora could contribute to the initiation and/or progression of CRC is explored in this review. Potential mechanisms of bacterial oncogenesis are presented, along with lines of evidence derived from animal models of microbially induced CRC. Particular focus is given to the oncogenic capabilities of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis. Recent progress in defining the microbiome of CRC in the human population is evaluated, and the future challenges of linking specific etiologic agents to CRC are emphasized. PMID:23534358

  1. Crenarchaeota colonize terrestrial plant roots.

    PubMed

    Simon, H M; Dodsworth, J A; Goodman, R M

    2000-10-01

    Microorganisms that colonize plant roots are recruited from, and in turn contribute substantially to, the vast and virtually uncharacterized phylogenetic diversity of soil microbiota. The diverse, but poorly understood, microorganisms that colonize plant roots mediate mineral transformations and nutrient cycles that are central to biosphere functioning. Here, we report the results of epifluorescence microscopy and culture-independent recovery of small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences showing that members of a previously reported clade of soil Crenarchaeota colonize both young and senescent plant roots at an unexpectedly high frequency, and are particularly abundant on the latter. Our results indicate that non-thermophilic members of the Archaea inhabit an important terrestrial niche on earth and direct attention to the need for studies that will determine their possible roles in mediating root biology.

  2. Physical stress and bacterial colonization

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial surface colonizers are subject to a variety of physical stresses. During the colonization of human epithelia such as on the skin or the intestinal mucosa, bacteria mainly have to withstand the mechanical stress of being removed by fluid flow, scraping, or epithelial turnover. To that end, they express a series of molecules to establish firm attachment to the epithelial surface, such as fibrillar protrusions (pili) and surface-anchored proteins that bind to human matrix proteins. In addition, some bacteria – in particular gut and urinary tract pathogens – use internalization by epithelial cells and other methods such as directed inhibition of epithelial turnover to ascertain continued association with the epithelial layer. Furthermore, many bacteria produce multi-layered agglomerations called biofilms with a sticky extracellular matrix, providing additional protection from removal. This review will give an overview over the mechanisms human bacterial colonizers have to withstand physical stresses with a focus on bacterial adhesion. PMID:25212723

  3. Dietary fibre and colonic neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, H J

    1979-01-01

    Dietary plant fibre, or plantix, is thought to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of colon cancer in humans. It is a complex polymeric substance that has several distinct components resistant to hydrolysis by the digestive enzymes of humans. These components include cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, lignin, gums, mucilages and, in certain instances, algal polysaccharides. These polymers have different physicochemical properties, and recent evidence from experimental studies in animals treated with carcinogens suggests that some may exert protective effects in the intestine and others may enhance colon carcinogenesis. This review synthesizes information on the chemical composition, methods of analysis and physicochemical properties of dietary plant fibre and reviews available studies examining the role of fibre in colonic neoplasia in animals and humans. PMID:466603

  4. Acquisition and adaptation of the airway microbiota in the early life of cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Sébastien; Dalpke, Alexander H

    2017-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease in which bacterial infections of the airways play a major role in the long-term clinical outcome. In recent years, a number of next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based studies aimed at deciphering the structure and composition of the airways' microbiota. It was shown that the nasal cavity of CF patients displays dysbiosis early in life indicating a failure in the first establishment of a healthy microbiota. In contrast, within the conducting and lower airways, the establishment occurs normally first, but is sensitive to future dysbiosis including chronic infections with classical pathogens in later life. The objective of this mini-review is to give an update on the current knowledge about the development of the microbiota in the early life of CF patients. Microbial acquisition in the human airways can be described by the island model: Microbes found in the lower airways of CF patients represent "islands" that are at first populated from the upper airways reflecting the "mainland." Colonization can be modeled following the neutral theory in which the most abundant bacteria in the mainland are also frequently found in the lower airways initially. At later times, however, the colonization process of the lower airways segregates by active selection of specific microbes. Future research should focus on those processes of microbial and host interactions to understand how microbial communities are shaped on short- and long-term scales. We point out what therapeutic consequences arise from the microbiome data obtained within ecological framework models.

  5. Enteral-tube-feeding diarrhoea: manipulating the colonic microbiota with probiotics and prebiotics.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Kevin

    2007-08-01

    Diarrhoea is a common and serious complication of enteral tube feeding. Its pathogenesis involves antibiotic prescription, enteropathogenic colonization and abnormal colonic responses, all of which involve an interaction with the colonic microbiota. Alterations in the colonic microbiota have been identified in patients receiving enteral tube feeding and these changes may be associated with the incidence of diarrhoea. Preventing negative alterations in the colonic microbiota has therefore been investigated as a method of reducing the incidence of diarrhoea. Probiotics and prebiotics may be effective because of their suppression of enteropathogenic colonization, stimulation of immune function and modulation of colonic metabolism. Randomized controlled trials of probiotics have produced contrasting results, although Saccharomyces boulardii has been shown to reduce the incidence of diarrhoea in patients in the intensive care unit receiving enteral tube feeding. Prebiotic fructo-oligosaccharides have been shown to increase the concentration of faecal bifidobacteria in healthy subjects consuming enteral formula, although this finding has not yet been confirmed in patients receiving enteral tube feeding. Furthermore, there are no clinical trials investigating the effect of a prebiotic alone on the incidence of diarrhoea. Further trials of the efficacy of probiotics and prebiotics, alone and in combination, in preventing diarrhoea in this patient group are warranted.

  6. The Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities national program.

    PubMed

    Strunk, Sarah L; Bussel, Jamie B

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation announced a bold and unprecedented commitment of $500 million to reverse the epidemic of childhood obesity by 2015, especially in communities at greatest risk based on income, race, ethnicity, and geographic location. To support this work, the foundation launched an array of complementary initiatives aimed at building the evidence base, testing advocacy approaches, and supporting on-the-ground action to reverse the childhood obesity epidemic. Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities (HKHC), a 5-year $33.4 million national program, was one of the foundation's earliest such investments. Building on previous successes, HKHC was designed to address the policies, systems, and environments that make it easier for low-income children and their families to engage in physical activity and play and to access healthy food in their communities. As part of its strategy, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded 50 multidisciplinary partnerships across the country, with a special focus on 15 southern states where health disparities were most significant. The selection of Active Living By Design to lead the HKHC National Program Office and Transtria, LLC, to lead the evaluation leveraged these organizations' experience in addressing the systemic issues that contribute to physical inactivity and unhealthy eating, using a broader healthy community lens. Key elements of HKHC included funding, ongoing technical assistance and consultation, a peer learning network, and participatory evaluation. The successes of the HKHC grant program are well documented in this journal as well as through case studies and case reports, spotlights, leadership profiles, and other products available at www.healthykidshealthycommunities.org and http://www.transtria.com/hkhc.php.

  7. Specialized mycorrhizal colonization pattern in achlorophyllous Epirixanthes spp. (Polygalaceae).

    PubMed

    Imhof, S

    2007-11-01

    Roots of the achlorophyllous Epirixanthes papunana and E. elongata were sectioned in complete series in order to reconstruct the three-dimensional mycorrhizal colonization pattern within their tissues. Hyphal morphology, vesicles, as well as the exclusively intracellular mode of colonization indicate a PARIS-type of arbuscular mycorrhiza showing a hitherto unknown colonization pattern: (1) the outer cortex is colonized by persistent straight-growing hyphae which branch in a cascading manner, (2) a specific layer (called layer 2) is inhabited by persistent hyphal coils, (3) in the cells of the anatomically distinct inner cortex parenchyma layer (called layer 1) the hyphae immediately degenerate, and (4) the layer outside to layer 2 (called layer 3) is either transitional layer 2 when penetrated from the outer cortex or the fungal material degenerates when colonized from the layer 2. This complex colonization pattern is a reasonable adaptation to the particular demands of Epirixanthes as a myco-heterotrophic plant. It not only allows a sustained benefit from the fungal symbiont but also provides a two-level distribution system of hyphae within the roots. The outer cortex hyphae function as a permanent intraradical resource of living fungi providing connection to the external mycelium as well as a coarse distribution of hyphae within the root. Layer 2 represents the fine scale distribution of hyphae, having access to all potentially digesting cells of the layers 1 and 3. Common structural features of mycorrhizae in myco-heterotrophic plants are pointed out in order to find putative prerequisites for their heterotrophic mode of life.

  8. Acidic microenvironment and bone pain in cancer-colonized bone

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hiasa, Masahiro; Nagata, Yuki; Okui, Tatsuo; White, Fletcher A

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers and hematologic cancers frequently colonize bone and induce skeletal-related complications. Bone pain is one of the most common complications associated with cancer colonization in bone and a major cause of increased morbidity and diminished quality of life, leading to poor survival in cancer patients. Although the mechanisms responsible for cancer-associated bone pain (CABP) are poorly understood, it is likely that complex interactions among cancer cells, bone cells and peripheral nerve cells contribute to the pathophysiology of CABP. Clinical observations that specific inhibitors of osteoclasts reduce CABP indicate a critical role of osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are proton-secreting cells and acidify extracellular bone microenvironment. Cancer cell-colonized bone also releases proton/lactate to avoid intracellular acidification resulting from increased aerobic glycolysis known as the Warburg effect. Thus, extracellular microenvironment of cancer-colonized bone is acidic. Acidosis is algogenic for nociceptive sensory neurons. The bone is densely innervated by the sensory neurons that express acid-sensing nociceptors. Collectively, CABP is evoked by the activation of these nociceptors on the sensory neurons innervating bone by the acidic extracellular microenvironment created by bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-colonizing cancer cells. As current treatments do not satisfactorily control CABP and can elicit serious side effects, new therapeutic interventions are needed to manage CABP. Understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism by which the acidic extracellular microenvironment is created in cancer-colonized bone and by which the expression and function of the acid-sensing nociceptors on the sensory neurons are regulated would facilitate to develop novel therapeutic approaches for the management of CABP. PMID:25987988

  9. Effects of Vitamin E Supplements and Diet on Colonic α- and γ-tocopherol Concentrations In Persons at Increased Colon Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiting; Sen, Ananda; Ren, Jianwei; Askew, Leah M.; Sidahmed, ElKhansa; Brenner, Dean E.; Ruffin, Mack T.; Turgeon, D. Kim; Djuric, Zora

    2014-01-01

    The available evidence indicates that γ-tocopherol has more potential for colon cancer prevention than α-tocopherol, but little is known about the effects of foods and supplements on tocopherol levels in human colon. This study randomized 120 subjects at increased colon cancer risk to either a Mediterranean or a Healthy Eating diet for six months. Supplement use was reported by 39% of the subjects, and vitamin E intake from supplements was 2-fold higher than that from foods. Serum α-tocopherol at baseline was positively predicted by dietary intakes of synthetic vitamin E in foods and supplements but not by natural α-tocopherol from foods. For serum γ-tocopherol, dietary γ-tocopherol was not a predictor, but dietary α-tocopherol was a negative predictor. Unlike with serum, the data supported a role for metabolic factors, and not a direct effect of diet, in governing concentrations of both α- and γ-tocopherol in colon. The Mediterranean intervention increased intakes of natural α-tocopherol, which is high in nuts, and decreased intakes of γ-tocopherol, which is low in olive oil. These dietary changes had no significant effects on colon tocopherols. The impact of diet on colon tocopherols therefore appears to be limited. PMID:25372556

  10. Effects of vitamin E from supplements and diet on colonic α- and γ-tocopherol concentrations in persons at increased colon cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiting; Sen, Ananda; Ren, Jianwei; Askew, Leah M; Sidahmed, Elkhansa; Brenner, Dean E; Ruffin, Mack T; Turgeon, D Kim; Djuric, Zora

    2015-01-01

    The available evidence indicates that γ-tocopherol has more potential for colon cancer prevention than α-tocopherol, but little is known about the effects of foods and supplements on tocopherol levels in human colon. This study randomized 120 subjects at increased colon cancer risk to either a Mediterranean or a Healthy Eating diet for 6 mo. Supplement use was reported by 39% of the subjects, and vitamin E intake from supplements was twofold higher than that from foods. Serum α-tocopherol at baseline was positively predicted by dietary intakes of synthetic vitamin E in foods and supplements but not by natural α-tocopherol from foods. For serum γ-tocopherol, dietary γ-tocopherol was not a predictor, but dietary α-tocopherol was a negative predictor. Unlike with serum, the data supported a role for metabolic factors, and not a direct effect of diet, in governing concentrations of both α- and γ-tocopherol in colon. The Mediterranean intervention increased intakes of natural α-tocopherol, which is high in nuts, and decreased intakes of γ-tocopherol, which is low in olive oil. These dietary changes had no significant effects on colon tocopherols. The impact of diet on colon tocopherols therefore appears to be limited.

  11. Promoting a healthy workplace for nursing faculty and staff.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Dorrie K; Koh, Elyta H; Carroll, Theresa

    2012-12-01

    Promoting a healthy workplace in academic nursing settings is vital to recruit new faculty and enhance the work life of all faculty and staff for retention and happiness. When a healthy work environment is fostered, incivility becomes unacceptable, and individuals embrace a culture where all can flourish. This article addresses the imperative of a healthy workplace, with practical suggestions for making the academic setting in schools of nursing one of optimism and confidence where future generations of nurse leaders are developed.

  12. 65Zn kinetics as a biomarker of DMH induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Vijayta Dani; Dhawan, Davinder

    2010-01-01

    Dietary factors are considered crucial for the prevention of initiating events in the multistep progression of colon carcinoma. There is substantial evidence that zinc may play a pivotal role in host defense against several malignancies, including colon cancer. The present study was conducted to evaluate the kinetics of (65)Zn utilization following experimental colon carcinogenesis in rat model. Twenty rats were segregated into two groups viz., untreated control and dimethylhydrazine (DMH) treated. Colon carcinogenesis was established through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for 16 weeks. Whole body (65)Zn kinetics followed two compartment kinetics, with Tb(1) representing the initial fast component of the biological half-life and Tb(2), the slower component. The present study revealed a significant depression in the Tb(1) and Tb(2) components of (65)Zn in DMH treated rats. Further, DMH treatment caused a significant increase in the percent uptake values of (65)Zn in the colon, small intestine, kidney and blood, whereas a significant decrease was observed in the liver. Subcellular distribution revealed a significant increase in (65)Zn uptake in the mitochondrial and microsomal fractions following 16 weeks of DMH supplementation. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated a slow mobilization of (65)Zn during promotion of experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis and provides a physiological basis for the role of (65)Zn in colon tumorigenesis, which may have clinical implications in the management of colon cancer.

  13. Psoriasis and staphylococcus aureus skin colonization in Moroccan patients

    PubMed Central

    Elfatoiki, Fatima Zahra; El Azhari, Mohamed; El Kettani, Assiya; Serhier, Zineb; Othmani, Mohamed Bennani; Timinouni, Mohamed; Benchikhi, Hakima; Chiheb, Soumiya; Fellah, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic lesions are rarely complicated by recurrent infections. The aim of our study is to determine skin colonisation and nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with psoriasis and in healthy persons. Patients and methods: a comparative study that include 33 patients with psoriasis and 33 healthy persons. Samples were taken from lesional and non lesional psoriatic skin and from healthy skin of control group. For S. aureus nasal carriage, we used sterile cotton tipped swabs. Out of165 samples (66 skin samples and 33 nasal swabs), 26 S. Aureus strains were isolated in 26 persons, 57.69% in the control group and 42.3% in the psoriasisgroup. S. aureus skin colonization was found in one case (3%) inlesional psoriatic skin vs 9 cases (27.3%) in control skin OR=0.08 IC 95% (0.01-0.70) p=0.02 and in 12,1% in non lesional soriatic skin vs 27, 3% in control skin (p =0,13). This colonization was less important in lesional psoriatic skin (3%) than in non lesional psoriatic skin (12.1%) p= 0.20. Nasal screening identified (7/33) 21, 21% S. aureus carriers in psoriasis group and in control group. Our results are in consensus withliterature findings. They have confirmed the importance of antimicrobial peptides in Innateimmunity of human skin. These peptides are normally produced bykeratinocytes in response to inflammatory stimuli such as psoriasis. Their high expression in psoriasis skin reduces the risk of skin infection and skin colonization with S. Aureus. PMID:27200138

  14. Segmentation and segment connection of obstructed colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medved, Mario; Truyen, Roel; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2004-05-01

    Segmentation of colon CT images is the main factor that inhibits automation of virtual colonoscopy. There are two main reasons that make efficient colon segmentation difficult. First, besides the colon, the small bowel, lungs, and stomach are also gas-filled organs in the abdomen. Second, peristalsis or residual feces often obstruct the colon, so that it consists of multiple gas-filled segments. In virtual colonoscopy, it is very useful to automatically connect the centerlines of these segments into a single colon centerline. Unfortunately, in some cases this is a difficult task. In this study a novel method for automated colon segmentation and connection of colon segments' centerlines is proposed. The method successfully combines features of segments, such as centerline and thickness, with information on main colon segments. The results on twenty colon cases show that the method performs well in cases of small obstructions of the colon. Larger obstructions are mostly also resolved properly, especially if they do not appear in the sigmoid part of the colon. Obstructions in the sigmoid part of the colon sometimes cause improper classification of the small bowel segments. If a segment is too small, it is classified as the small bowel segment. However, such misclassifications have little impact on colon analysis.

  15. Education in Healthy Lifestyles: Curriculum Implications. Fastback 216.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seffrin, John R.; Torabi, Mohammad R.

    The nature of a healthy lifestyle and its significance to quality of life is examined. Following a discussion on what is involved in a healthy lifestyle, major health problems are described: (1) smoking; (2) alcohol and drug abuse; (3) sexually transmitted diseases; (4) diet and obesity; (5) stress; and (6) inadequate sleep. Recommendations are…

  16. Future perspective and healthy lifestyle choices in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Tasdemir-Ozdes, Aylin; Strickland-Hughes, Carla M; Bluck, Susan; Ebner, Natalie C

    2016-09-01

    Regardless of age, making healthy lifestyle choices is prudent. Despite that, individuals of all ages sometimes have difficulty choosing the healthy option. We argue that individuals' view of the future and position in the life span affects their current lifestyle choices. We capture the multidimensionality of future thinking by assessing 3 types of future perspective. Younger and older men and women (N = 127) reported global future time perspective, future health perspective, and perceived importance of future health-related events. They also rated their likelihood of making healthy lifestyle choices. As predicted, older participants indicated greater intention to make healthy choices in their current life than did younger participants. Compared to younger participants, older participants reported shorter global future time perspective and anticipated worse future health but perceived future health-related events as more important. Having a positive view of one's future health and seeing future health-related events as important were related to greater intention to make healthy lifestyle choices, but greater global future time perspective was not directly related to healthy choices. However, follow-up analyses suggested that greater global future time perspective indirectly affected healthy choices via a more positive view of future health. None of these relations were moderated by age. Individuals' perspective on the future is shown to be an important multidimensional construct affecting everyday healthy lifestyle choices for both younger and older adults. Implications for encouraging healthy choices across the adult life span are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  18. Teaching about the Colonization of Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Jay S.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate course, The Colonization of Space, which introduces nonscience majors at the University of North Florida to current topics in the exploration, industrialization, and colonization of space. References to the audiovisual resources and literature are also included. (HM)

  19. Colonic mucosal pseudolipomatosis: disinfectant colitis?

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jin; Baek, Il Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Colonic pseudolipomatosis is rare and its pathogenesis is still unclear. A number of mechanisms, including mechanical injury during an endoscopic procedure or chemical injury by disinfectant, seem to contribute to its pathogenesis. In our endoscopy unit, pseudolipomatosis occurred in an epidemic pattern after changing the endoscopic disinfectant from 2% glutaraldehyde to peracetic acid compound to decrease the length of endoscope reprocessing time. We assumed that pseudolipomatosis could be a type of chemical colitis produced by the residual disinfectant solution that remained on the surface or in a channel of the endoscope after reprocessing. The aim of this report was to highlight a series of 12 cases of colonic pseudolipomatosis in order to describe the endoscopic and pathological features and discuss the harmful effect of disinfectants as a possible cause of pseudolipomatosis. To identify the cause of the lesions, we systematically reviewed each patient history and the endoscopic and histological features. From March 2004 to February 2005, 1276 colonoscopies were performed and 12 cases (0.94%) of colonic pseudolipomatosis were diagnosed at the Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital of Hallym University. The pathogenesis of colonic pseudolipomatosis is not well-known, but our experience indicates the endoscopic disinfectant as the probable cause of pseudolipomatosis rather than either mechanical traumatic injury or intraluminal air pressure-related injury.

  20. Healthy Muscles Matter

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep my muscles more healthy? Definitions What can go wrong? Injuries Almost everyone has had sore muscles ... If you have been inactive, “start low and go slow” by gradually increasing how often and how ...

  1. Healthy Bones Matter

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep my bones more healthy? Definitions What can go wrong? Reprinted from The Surgeon General’s Report on ... women who don’t smoke, and they often go through menopause earlier. Smokers also may absorb less ...

  2. Thalassemia: Healthy Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe anemia and possible organ damage from iron overload, respectively. Healthy Choices for People Living with Thalassemia ... Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities Related Information UDC System About Us File Formats Help: How ...

  3. Having a Healthy Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Am I in a Healthy Relationship? Who ... undercooked meat and fish processed meats, such as hot dogs and deli meats soft, unpasteurized cheeses, such ...

  4. Healthy Dining Hall Eating

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... with healthy foods will help fuel both your body and your mind. Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD Date reviewed: ...

  5. Healthy Living after Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... look to maintain health and wellness. Subscribe to Stroke Connection Get quarterly digital issues plus our monthly ...

  6. Healthy Watersheds Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... habitat loss from warmer water temperatures associated with climate change already has been observed in the southern Appalachians ( ... altered water flow and availability, invasive species, and climate change. Top of Page How is a Healthy Watershed ...

  7. Healthy Eating for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... whole grains, fruits, vegetables, healthy fats, low-fat dairy and lean protein. But women also have special ... Three servings of low-fat or fat-free dairy products including low-fat or fat-free milk, ...

  8. Healthy Aging -- Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Aging This information in Spanish ( en español ) Sexual health More information on sexual health Many older women ... Protecting yourself Return to top More information on Sexual health Read more from womenshealth.gov Sexually Transmitted Infections ...

  9. Healthy grocery shopping

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000336.htm Healthy grocery shopping To use the sharing features on this page, ... a conscious decision about eating that food. Smart Shopping Avoid buying snack foods in bulk and shopping ...

  10. Essentials of Healthy Eating: A Guide

    PubMed Central

    Skerrett, Patrick J.; Willett, Walter C.

    2012-01-01

    Enough solid evidence now exists to offer women several fundamental strategies for healthy eating. They include emphasizing healthful unsaturated fats, whole grains, good protein “packages,” and fruits and vegetables; limiting consumption of trans and saturated fats, highly refined grains, and sugary beverages; and taking a multivitamin with folic acid and extra vitamin D as a nutritional safety net. A diet based on these principles is healthy through virtually all life stages, from young adulthood through planning for pregnancy, pregnancy, and on into old age. PMID:20974411

  11. Survivorship: Healthy Lifestyles, Version 2.2014

    PubMed Central

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J.; O’Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D.; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Raza, Muhammad; Rodriguez, M. Alma; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole R.; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Healthy lifestyle habits have been associated with improved health outcomes and quality of life and, for some cancers, a reduced risk of recurrence and death. The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship therefore recommend that cancer survivors be encouraged to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, with attention to weight management, physical activity, and dietary habits. This section of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on recommendations regarding physical activity in survivors, including assessment for the risk of exercise-induced adverse events, exercise prescriptions, guidance for resistance training, and considerations for specific populations (eg, survivors with lymphedema, ostomies, peripheral neuropathy). In addition, strategies to encourage health behavioral change in survivors are discussed. PMID:25190692

  12. Initial intestinal colonization in the human infant and immune homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Walker, W Allan

    2013-01-01

    The paradigm of disease burden in the developed world has changed drastically in the last few decades from predominately infections to immune-mediated diseases (autoimmunity and allergy) because of alterations in the Western lifestyle (improved sanitation, immunizations, antibiotic usage and altered dietary intake). A diverse balanced microbiota is necessary for the development of an appropriate innate and adaptive immune response. There is strong evidence that disruption of the normal colonization process can lead to alterations in the important symbiotic relationship that is necessary for immune homeostasis. For example, infants born by cesarean section or receiving excessive perinatal antibiotics have inadequate initial colonization and aberrant mucosal immune function. As a result, later in childhood, they express an increased incidence in asthma and autoimmune diseases (e.g. celiac disease). An important component of initial colonization is the infant's diet. Breast milk contains a variety of nondigestible oligosaccharides which function as prebiotics preferentially stimulating proliferation of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli, important health-promoting bacteria, and cause fermentation of the oligosaccharides into short-chain fatty acids. In the absence of breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life, formula containing pre- and probiotics may overcome an initial inadequate colonization process and help establish a normal mucosal immune system.

  13. Colonization of steelhead in a natal stream after barrier removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weigel, Dana E.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Martens, Kyle D.; Powell, Madison S.

    2013-01-01

    Colonization of vacant habitats is an important process for supporting the long-term persistence of populations and species. We used a before–after experimental design to follow the process of colonization by steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss (anadromous Rainbow Trout) at six monitoring sites in a natal stream, Beaver Creek, after the modification or removal of numerous stream passage barriers. Juvenile O. mykiss were collected at monitoring sites by using a backpack electrofisher. Passive integrated transponder tags and instream tag reading stations were used in combination with 16 microsatellite markers to determine the source, extent, and success of migrant O. mykiss after implementation of the barrier removal projects. Steelhead migrated into the study area during the first spawning season after passage was established. Hatchery steelhead, although comprising more than 80% of the adult returns to the Methow River basin, constituted a small proportion (23%) of the adult O. mykiss colonizing the study area. Adult steelhead and fluvial Rainbow Trout entered the stream during the first spawning season after barrier removal and were passing the uppermost tag reader (12 km upstream from the mouth) 3–4 years later. Parr that were tagged in Beaver Creek returned as adults, indicating establishment of the anadromous life history in the study area. Population genetic measures at the lower two monitoring sites (lower 4 km of Beaver Creek) significantly changed within one generation (4–5 years). Colonization and expansion of steelhead occurred more slowly than expected due to the low number of adults migrating into the study area.

  14. Effects of a Mediterranean Diet Intervention on Anti- and Pro-Inflammatory Eicosanoids, Epithelial Proliferation, and Nuclear Morphology in Biopsies of Normal Colon Tissue.

    PubMed

    Djuric, Zora; Turgeon, D Kim; Ren, Jianwei; Neilson, Andrew; Plegue, Missy; Waters, Ian G; Chan, Alexander; Askew, Leah M; Ruffin, Mack T; Sen, Ananda; Brenner, Dean E

    2015-01-01

    This randomized trial evaluated the effects of intervention with either a Healthy Eating or a Mediterranean diet on colon biomarkers in 120 healthy individuals at increased colon cancer risk. The hypothesis was that eicosanoids and markers of proliferation would be favorably affected by the Mediterranean diet. Colon epithelial biopsy tissues and blood samples were obtained at baseline and after 6 mo of intervention. Colonic eicosanoid concentrations were evaluated by HPLC-MS-MS, and measures of epithelial proliferation and nuclear morphology were evaluated by image analysis of biopsy sections. There was little change in proinflammatory eicosanoids and in plasma cytokine concentrations with either dietary intervention. There was, however, a 50% increase in colonic prostaglandin E3 (PGE3), which is formed from eicosapentanoic acid, in the Mediterranean arm. Unlike PGE2, PGE3, was not significantly affected by regular use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at baseline, and normal weight subjects had significantly higher colon PGE3 than overweight or obese subjects. Increased proliferation in the colon at baseline, by Ki67 labeling, was associated with morphological features that defined smaller nuclei in the epithelial cells, lower colon leukotriene concentrations and higher plasma cytokine concentrations. Dietary intervention had little effect on measures of epithelial proliferation or of nuclear morphology. The increase in PGE3 with a Mediterranean diet indicates that in normal colon, diet might affect protective pathways to a greater extent than proinflammatory and proliferative pathways. Hence, biomarkers from cancer models might not be relevant in a true prevention setting.

  15. Healthy Sperm: Improving Your Fertility

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Getting pregnant Healthy sperm aren't always a given. Understand how lifestyle factors can affect your ... as a laptop, might enhance sperm quality. Adopting healthy lifestyle practices to promote your fertility — and avoiding things ...

  16. Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index of Water-Related Topics Featured Partners Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global WASH Other Uses of Water WASH-related Emergencies & Outbreaks Water, Sanitation, & Environmentally-related ...

  17. ALTERATIONS IN MUCOSAL IMMUNITY IDENTIFIED IN THE COLON OF PATIENTS WITH IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Aerssens, Jeroen; Camilleri, Michael; Talloen, Willem; Thielemans, Leen; Göhlmann, Hinrich W. H.; Wyngaert, Ilse Van den; Thielemans, Theo; de Hoogt, Ronald; Andrews, Christopher N.; Bharucha, Adil E.; Carlson, Paula J.; Busciglio, Irene; Burton, Duane D.; Smyrk, Thomas; Urrutia, Raul; Coulie, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been associated with mucosal dysfunction,, mild inflammation, and altered colonic bacteria. We used microarray expression profiling of sigmoid colon mucosa to assess whether there are stably expressed sets of genes that suggest there are objective molecular biomarkers associated with IBS. METHODS Gene expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix GeneChips with RNA from sigmoid colon mucosal biopsies from 36 IBS patients and 25 healthy control subjects. RTQ-PCR was used to confirm the data in 12 genes of interest. Statistical methods for microarray data were applied to search for differentially expressed genes, and to assess the stability of molecular signatures in IBS patients. RESULTS Mucosal gene expression profiles were consistent across different sites within the sigmoid colon and were stable on repeat biopsy over ~3 months. Differentially expressed genes suggest functional alterations of several components of the host mucosal immune response to microbial pathogens. The most strikingly increased expression involved a yet uncharacterized gene, DKFZP564O0823. Identified specific genes suggest the hypothesis that molecular signatures may enable distinction of a subset of IBS patients from healthy controls. Using 75% of the biopsies as a validation set to develop a gene profile, the test set (25%) was correctly predicted with ~70% accuracy. CONCLUSIONS Mucosal gene expression analysis shows there are relatively stable alterations in colonic mucosal immunity in IBS. These molecular alterations provide the basis to test the hypothesis that objective biomarkers may be identified in IBS and enhance understanding of the disease. PMID:18237869

  18. Anatomic modifications in the enteric nervous system of piebald mice and physiological consequences to colonic motor activity.

    PubMed

    Ro, Seungil; Hwang, Sung Jin; Muto, Melodie; Jewett, William Keith; Spencer, Nick J

    2006-04-01

    It has been assumed that in piebald lethal mice that develop megacolon, impaired colonic motor activity is restricted to the aganglionic distal colon. Peristaltic mechanical recordings, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative PCR were used to investigate whether regions of the colon, other than the aganglionic segment, may also show anatomical modifications and dysfunctional colonic motor activity. Contrary to expectations, colonic migrating motor complexes (MMCs) were absent along the whole colon of piebald lethal homozygote mice and severely impaired in heterozygote siblings. Aganglionosis was detected not only in the distal colon of piebald homozygote lethal mice (mean length: 20.4 +/- 2.1 mm) but also surprisingly in their heterozygote siblings (mean length: 12.4 +/- 1.1 mm). Unlike homozygote lethal mice, piebald heterozygotes showed no signs of megacolon. Interestingly, mRNA expression for PGP 9.5 was also dramatically reduced (by 71-99%) throughout the entire small and large bowel in both homozygote lethal and heterozygous littermates (by 67-87%). Histochemical staining confirmed a significant reduction in myenteric ganglia along the whole colon. In summary, the piebald mutation in homozygote lethal and heterozygote siblings is associated with dramatic reductions in myenteric ganglia throughout the entire colon and not limited to the distal colon as originally thought. Functionally, this results in an absence or severe impairment of colonic MMC activity in both piebald homozygote lethal and heterozygote siblings, respectively. The observation that piebald heterozygotes have an aganglionic distal colon (mean length: 12 mm) but live a normal murine life span without megacolon suggests that aganglionosis >12 mm and the complete absence of colonic MMCs may be required before any symptoms of megacolon arise.

  19. Tools for Healthy Tribes

    PubMed Central

    Fleischhacker, Sheila; Byrd, Randi R.; Ramachandran, Gowri; Vu, Maihan; Ries, Amy; Bell, Ronny A.; Evenson, Kelly R.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing recognition that policymakers can promote access to healthy, affordable foods within neighborhoods, schools, childcare centers, and workplaces. Despite the disproportionate risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes among American Indian children and adults, comparatively little attention has been focused on the opportunities tribal policymakers have to implement policies or resolutions to promote access to healthy, affordable foods. This paper presents an approach for integrating formative research into an action-oriented strategy of developing and disseminating tribally led environmental and policy strategies to promote access to and consumption of healthy, affordable foods. This paper explains how the American Indian Healthy Eating Project evolved through five phases and discusses each phase’s essential steps involved, outcomes derived, and lessons learned. Using community-based participatory research and informed by the Social Cognitve Theory and ecologic frameworks, the American Indian Healthy Eating Project was started in fall 2008 and has evolved through five phases: (1) starting the conversation; (2) conducting multidisciplinary formative research; (3) strengthening partnerships and tailoring policy options; (4) disseminating community-generated ideas; and (5) accelerating action while fostering sustainability. Collectively, these phases helped develop and disseminate Tools for Healthy Tribes—a toolkit used to raise awareness among participating tribal policymakers of their opportunities to improve access to healthy, affordable foods. Formal and informal strategies can engage tribal leaders in the development of culturally appropriate and tribe-specific sustainable strategies to improve such access, as well as empower tribal leaders to leverage their authority toward raising a healthier generation of American Indian children. PMID:22898161

  20. Colonic catabolism of dietary phenolic and polyphenolic compounds from Concord grape juice.

    PubMed

    Stalmach, Angelique; Edwards, Christine A; Wightman, Jolynne D; Crozier, Alan

    2013-01-01

    After acute ingestion of 350 ml of Concord grape juice, containing 528 μmol of (poly)phenolic compounds, by healthy volunteers, a wide array of phase I and II metabolites were detected in the circulation and excreted in urine. Ingestion of the juice by ileostomists resulted in 40% of compounds being recovered intact in ileal effluent. The current study investigated the fate of these undigested (poly)phenolic compounds on reaching the colon. This was achieved through incubation of the juice using an in vitro model of colonic fermentation and through quantification of catabolites produced after colonic degradation and their subsequent absorption prior to urinary excretion by healthy subjects and ileostomy volunteers. A total of 16 aromatic and phenolic compounds derived from colonic metabolism of Concord grape juice (poly)phenolic compounds were identified by GC-MS in the faecal incubation samples. Thirteen urinary phenolic acids and aromatic compounds were excreted in significantly increased amounts after intake of the juice by healthy volunteers, whereas only two of these compounds were excreted in elevated amounts by ileostomists. The production of phenolic acids and aromatic compounds by colonic catabolism contributed to the bioavailability of Concord grape (poly)phenolic compounds to a much greater extent than phase I and II metabolites originating from absorption in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Catabolic pathways are proposed, highlighting the impact of colonic microbiota and subsequent phase II metabolism prior to excretion of phenolic compounds derived from (poly)phenolic compounds in Concord grape juice, which pass from the small to the large intestine.

  1. Transverse Colon Diverticulitis with Calcified Fecalith

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Aynur; Solak, Ilhami; Genç, Berhan; Sahin, Neslin; Yalaz, Seyhan

    2013-01-01

    Left colonic diverticula are common in Western populations, whereas right colonic diverticulosis primarily occurs in Oriental populations. Diverticulitis of the transverse colon is very rare, with very few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of transverse colon diverticulitis caused by a calcified stone in a 69-year-old female. This was a solitary diverticulum. The signs and symptoms of the disease are similar to acute pancreatitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI findings of a patient with trans-verse colon diverticulitis caused by a calcified stone. PMID:25610254

  2. Human colon-derived soluble factors modulate gut microbiota composition.

    PubMed

    Hevia, Arancha; Bernardo, David; Montalvillo, Enrique; Al-Hassi, Hafid O; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Garrote, Jose A; Milani, Christian; Ventura, Marco; Arranz, Eduardo; Knight, Stella C; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2015-01-01

    The commensal microbiota modulates immunological and metabolic aspects of the intestinal mucosa contributing to development of human gut diseases including inflammatory bowel disease. The host/microbiota interaction often referred to as a crosstalk, mainly focuses on the effect of the microbiota on the host neglecting effects that the host could elicit on the commensals. Colonic microenvironments from three human healthy controls (obtained from the proximal and distal colon, both in resting conditions and after immune - IL-15- and microbiota - LPS-in vitro challenges) were used to condition a stable fecal population. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene-based analyses were performed to study the effect induced by the host on the microbiota composition and function. Non-supervised principal component analysis (PCA) showed that all microbiotas, which had been conditioned with colonic microenvironments clustered together in terms of relative microbial composition, suggesting that soluble factors were modulating a stable fecal population independently from the treatment or the origin. Our findings confirmed that the host intestinal microenvironment has the capacity to modulate the gut microbiota composition via yet unidentified soluble factors. These findings indicate that an appropriate understanding of the factors of the host mucosal microenvironment affecting microbiota composition and function could improve therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota composition.

  3. Human Colon-Derived Soluble Factors Modulate Gut Microbiota Composition

    PubMed Central

    Hevia, Arancha; Bernardo, David; Montalvillo, Enrique; Al-Hassi, Hafid O.; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Garrote, Jose A.; Milani, Christian; Ventura, Marco; Arranz, Eduardo; Knight, Stella C.; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2015-01-01

    The commensal microbiota modulates immunological and metabolic aspects of the intestinal mucosa contributing to development of human gut diseases including inflammatory bowel disease. The host/microbiota interaction often referred to as a crosstalk, mainly focuses on the effect of the microbiota on the host neglecting effects that the host could elicit on the commensals. Colonic microenvironments from three human healthy controls (obtained from the proximal and distal colon, both in resting conditions and after immune – IL-15- and microbiota – LPS-in vitro challenges) were used to condition a stable fecal population. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene-based analyses were performed to study the effect induced by the host on the microbiota composition and function. Non-supervised principal component analysis (PCA) showed that all microbiotas, which had been conditioned with colonic microenvironments clustered together in terms of relative microbial composition, suggesting that soluble factors were modulating a stable fecal population independently from the treatment or the origin. Our findings confirmed that the host intestinal microenvironment has the capacity to modulate the gut microbiota composition via yet unidentified soluble factors. These findings indicate that an appropriate understanding of the factors of the host mucosal microenvironment affecting microbiota composition and function could improve therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota composition. PMID:25918688

  4. Microbiological toxicity of tilmicosin on human colonic microflora in chemostats.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haihong; Yao, Junping; Wu, Qinghua; Wei, Yajing; Dai, Menghong; Iqbal, Zahid; Wang, Xu; Wang, Yulian; Huang, Lingli; Chen, Dongmei; Tao, Yanfei; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the microbiological safety of tilmicosin on human intestinal microflora, four chemostat models of healthy human colonic ecosystems were exposed to tilmicosin (0, 0.436, 4.36, and 43.6 μg/mL) for 7 days. Prior to and during drug exposure, three microbiological endpoints were monitored daily including short-chain fatty acids, bacterial counts and macrolide susceptibility. Colonization resistance of each community was determined by 3 successive daily challenges of Salmonella typhimurium. Genes associated with virulence and macrolide resistance in Enterococcus faecalis were determined by PCR. Transcriptional expression of the virulence gene (gelE) in E. faecalis was determined by real-time RT-PCR. Our results showed that different concentrations of tilmicosin did not disrupt the colonization resistance in each chemostat. During exposure to 4.36 and 43.6 μg/mL tilmicosin, the Bacteroides fragilis population was significantly decreased while the proportion of resistant Enterococci increased. After long-term exposure to the highest concentration (43.6 μg/mL) of tilmicosin, the gelE gene was significantly up-regulated in the high-level macrolide resistant strains that also contained the ermB resistance gene. This study was the first of its kind to evaluate the microbiological toxicity of tilmicosin using a chemostat model. These findings also provide new insight into the co-occurrence of macrolide resistance and virulence in E. faecalis under tilmicosin selective pressure.

  5. Colonization Resistance of the Gut Microbiota against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cobas, Ana Elena; Moya, Andrés; Gosalbes, María José; Latorre, Amparo

    2015-08-07

    Antibiotics strongly disrupt the human gut microbiota, which in consequence loses its colonization resistance capacity, allowing infection by opportunistic pathogens such as Clostridium difficile. This bacterium is the main cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and a current problem in developed countries, since its incidence and severity have increased during the last years. Furthermore, the emergence of antibiotic resistance strains has reduced the efficiency of the standard treatment with antibiotics, leading to a higher rate of relapses. Here, we review recent efforts focused on the impact of antibiotics in the gut microbiome and their relationship with C. difficile colonization, as well as, in the identification of bacteria and mechanisms involved in the protection against C. difficile infection. Since a healthy gut microbiota is able to avoid pathogen colonization, restoration of the gut microbiota seems to be the most promising approach to face C. difficile infection, especially for recurrent cases. Therefore, it would be possible to design probiotics for patients undergoing antimicrobial therapies in order to prevent or fight the expansion of the pathogen in the gut ecosystem.

  6. Healthy human gut phageome

    PubMed Central

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M.; Young, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of humans, we analyzed a deep DNA sequence dataset of active bacteriophages and available metagenomic datasets of the gut bacteriophage community from healthy individuals. We found 23 shared bacteriophages in more than one-half of 64 healthy individuals from around the world. These shared bacteriophages were found in a significantly smaller percentage of individuals with gastrointestinal/irritable bowel disease. A network analysis identified 44 bacteriophage groups of which 9 (20%) were shared in more than one-half of all 64 individuals. These results provide strong evidence of a healthy gut phageome (HGP) in humans. The bacteriophage community in the human gut is a mixture of three classes: a set of core bacteriophages shared among more than one-half of all people, a common set of bacteriophages found in 20–50% of individuals, and a set of bacteriophages that are either rarely shared or unique to a person. We propose that the core and common bacteriophage communities are globally distributed and comprise the HGP, which plays an important role in maintaining gut microbiome structure/function and thereby contributes significantly to human health. PMID:27573828

  7. Longitudinal changes in lifestyle behaviors and health status in colon cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Satia, Jessie A; Campbell, Marci K; Galanko, Joseph A; James, Aimee; Carr, Carol; Sandler, Robert S

    2004-06-01

    Lifestyle changes in persons diagnosed with cancer are important because they may impact prognosis, co-morbidities, and survival. This report describes longitudinal changes in lifestyle behaviors and health status among colon cancer survivors (n = 278) and population-based controls (n = 459) in North Carolina (39% African American), and examines demographic and psychosocial correlates of healthy lifestyle changes following a colon cancer diagnosis. Data are from surveys of a population-based cohort of colon cancer patients on diagnosis (the North Carolina Colon Cancer Study, NCCCS) and approximately 2 years post-diagnosis [the North Carolina Strategies to Improve Diet, Exercise, and Screening Study (NC STRIDES)], and population-based controls. Both studies collected information on demographic/lifestyle characteristics and medical history. The NCCCS reflects pre-diagnosis or pre-interview patterns, whereas NC STRIDES queried on current practices. Between the NCCCS and NC STRIDES, colon cancer survivors reported significant increases in vegetable intake, physical activity, and supplement use (all P <0.01) and a non-statistically significant increase in fruit/juice consumption (0.1 serving), with larger fruit/vegetable changes in African Americans than Whites. Controls increased physical activity and supplement use and fewer reported arthritic symptoms (P < 0.05). Survivors who were older and female had an almost 3 times higher likelihood of having used at least one new dietary supplement post-diagnosis, whereas being retired correlated with increased vegetable intake, all P < 0.05. Having more barriers to increasing fruit/vegetable intake was inversely associated with taking a new supplement (P < 0.05 only in controls). Colon cancer survivors reported making significant improvements in multiple health-related behaviors. Health care providers should communicate with persons diagnosed with colon cancer to ensure that they are making healthy lifestyle changes.

  8. Effect of Malnutrition on Colonic Healing

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Thomas T.; Hunt, Thomas K.

    1974-01-01

    It has been suggested that colonic healing is impaired in malnourished subjects, but there have been no biochemical studies of the effect of malnutrition on colonic healing. The effects of malnutrition on the colon and the healing of colonic anastomoses were studied in rats fed a protein-free diet. Test animals were compared with control animals of similar age, and control animals of similar weight. There was a significant reduction in the body weight, total serum proteins and serum albumin of animals starved of protein. Malnutrition resulted in a reduction in the weight of the uninjured colon, and an increase in the colonic collagen concentration. There was a significant reduction in the collagen content of the colon in animals starved of protein for seven weeks, and the collagen content of anastomoses in these animals was significantly lower than the value in control animals. Anastomotic edema occurred during colon healing in animals starved for seven weeks. Measurements of colonic bursting pressure were an inaccurate guide to colonic healing. It is concluded that severe malnutrition resulting in 34% loss of body weight had an adverse effect on colonic healing. PMID:4418508

  9. Polysaccharides in colon-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, V R; Kumria, R

    2001-08-14

    Natural polysaccharides are now extensively used for the development of solid dosage forms for delivery of drug to the colon. The rationale for the development of a polysaccharide based delivery system for colon is the presence of large amounts of polysaccharidases in the human colon as the colon is inhabited by a large number and variety of bacteria which secrete many enzymes e.g. beta-D-glucosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, amylase, pectinase, xylanase, beta-D-xylosidase, dextranase, etc. Various major approaches utilizing polysaccharides for colon-specific delivery are fermentable coating of the drug core, embedding of the drug in biodegradable matrix, formulation of drug-saccharide conjugate (prodrugs). A large number of polysaccharides have already been studied for their potential as colon-specific drug carrier systems, such as chitosan, pectin, chondroitin sulphate, cyclodextrin, dextrans, guar gum, inulin, amylose and locust bean gum. Recent efforts and approaches exploiting these polysaccharides in colon-specific drug delivery are discussed.

  10. Colonic and colorectal cancer stem cells: progress in the search for putative biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Naomi D; Przyborski, Stefan A; Hutchison, Christopher J; Wilson, Robert G

    2008-01-01

    The maintenance of healthy colonic crypts is dependent on the integrity of the adult epithelial stem cells located within them. Perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the first step towards colorectal tumorigenesis. Experimental manipulation of intestinal stem cells has greatly increased our understanding of them, but further progress has been slowed due to the absence of a reliable stem cell biomarker. In this review we discuss the candidate colonic stem cell biomarkers which have been proposed. Furthermore, we investigate the putative biomarkers for so-called colorectal cancer stem cells, a highly aggressive subpopulation of cells considered to drive tumour development. PMID:18638071

  11. Colonization and infection in the newborn infant: Does chlorhexidine play a role in infection prevention?

    PubMed

    Ortegón, Lizeth; Puentes-Herrera, Marcela; Corrales, Ivohne F; Cortés, Jorge A

    2017-02-01

    Healthcare-associated infections are a major problem in newborn infants, considering their high morbidity, mortality, and long-term sequelae. In preterm infants, it has been shown that skin and gastrointestinal tract colonization undergoes variations compared to healthy term infants, and that preterm infants are more exposed to nosocomial microorganisms given their higher probability of being admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit where they are cared for. This document reviews normal colonization, the changes observed during hospitalization, prematurity, and the potential role of chlorhexidine in the prevention of resistant microorganism transmission, as well as its side effects in newborn infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit.

  12. Interaction of Streptococcus agalactiae and Cellular Innate Immunity in Colonization and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Landwehr-Kenzel, Sybille; Henneke, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS) is highly adapted to humans, where it is a normal constituent of the intestinal and vaginal flora. Yet, GBS has highly invasive potential and causes excessive inflammation, sepsis, and death at the beginning of life, in the elderly and in diabetic patients. Thus, GBS is a model pathobiont that thrives in the healthy host, but has not lost its potential virulence during coevolution with mankind. It remains incompletely understood how the innate immune system contains GBS in the natural niches, the intestinal and genital tracts, and which molecular events underlie breakdown of mucocutaneous resistance. Newborn infants between days 7 and 90 of life are at risk of a particularly striking sepsis manifestation (late-onset disease), where the transition from colonization to invasion and dissemination, and thus from health to severe sepsis is typically fulminant and not predictable. The great majority of late-onset sepsis cases are caused by one clone, GBS ST17, which expresses HvgA as a signature virulence factor and adhesin. In mice, HvgA promotes the crossing of both the mucosal and the blood–brain barrier. Expression levels of HvgA and other GBS virulence factors, such as pili and toxins, are regulated by the upstream two-component control system CovR/S. This in turn is modulated by acidic epithelial pH, high glucose levels, and during the passage through the mouse intestine. After invasion, GBS has the ability to subvert innate immunity by mechanisms like glycerinaldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase-dependent induction of IL-10 and β-protein binding to the inhibitory phagocyte receptors sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 5 and 14. On the host side, sensing of GBS nucleic acids and lipopeptides by both Toll-like receptors and the inflammasome appears to be critical for host resistance against GBS. Yet, comprehensive models on the interplay between GBS and human immune cells at the colonizing site are

  13. Dermoid cyst of the colon.

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Akiyama, N; Ishizaki, M; Tanaka, S; Ohsawa, K; Sugiyama, H; Kanoh, K; Toki, F; Asao, T; Kuwano, H

    2001-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are benign cystic teratomas lined by skin and epidermal appendages. We report a dermoid cyst occurring in a 26-year-old female whose chief complaint was irregular vaginal bleeding. Abdominal magnetic resonance image demonstrated a space-occupying lesion in the right lower abdomen. The mass showed hyperintensity on the T2 image and the signal was homogeneous for the interior. During abdominal surgery we made the diagnosis of subserous tumor of the colon and resected the ileocecal portion of the colon. The tumor measured 5.4 x 4.8 x 3.5 cm and was soft and elastic. On cross section, a unilocular cyst filled with atheromatous material was found. Pathological examination revealed a dermoid cyst. In the view of this diagnosis, a simple excision would have been an adequate treatment.

  14. [Molecular targets in colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Borner, M M

    2006-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in Switzerland. The nihilism that dominated the treatment of these patients for decades has been replaced by a measure of enthusiasm, given recent therapeutic advances. New anticancer drugs such as irinotecan and oxaliplatin have changed the standard chemotherapy treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, the real hype has come from molecular targeted therapy. Identification of cellular processes characteristic of colon cancer has permitted therapeutic targeting with favorable therapeutic index. Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor in the clinic has provided proof of principle that interruption of signal transduction cascades in patients has therapeutic potential. Angiogenesis, especially the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway, has been proven to be another highly successful molecular target. In this article, we will review molecular targets, which are under active clinical investigation in colon cancer.

  15. Uremic solutes from colon microbes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Timothy W; Hostetter, Thomas H

    2012-05-01

    There is renewed interest in identifying organic waste solutes that are normally excreted by the kidneys and must be removed by renal replacement therapy when the kidneys fail. A large number of these waste solutes are produced by colon microbes. Mass spectrometry is expanding our knowledge of their chemical identity, and DNA sequencing technologies are providing new knowledge of the microbes and metabolic pathways by which they are made. There is evidence that the most extensively studied of the colon-derived solutes, indoxyl sulfate and p-cresol sulfate, are toxic. Much more study is required to establish the toxicity of other solutes in this class. Because they are made in an isolated compartment by microbes, their production may prove simpler to suppress than the production of other waste solutes. To the extent that they are toxic, suppressing their production could improve the health of renal failure patients without the need for more intensive or prolonged dialysis.

  16. Late colonization of Easter Island.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Terry L; Lipo, Carl P

    2006-03-17

    Easter Island (Rapa Nui) provides a model of human-induced environmental degradation. A reliable chronology is central to understanding the cultural, ecological, and demographic processes involved. Radiocarbon dates for the earliest stratigraphic layers at Anakena, Easter Island, and analysis of previous radiocarbon dates imply that the island was colonized late, about 1200 A.D. Substantial ecological impacts and major cultural investments in monumental architecture and statuary thus began soon after initial settlement.

  17. Cholesterol excretion and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Broitman, S A

    1981-09-01

    Populations consuming diets high in fat and cholesterol exhibit a greater incidence of colon cancer than those consuming less fat and cholesterol. Lowering elevated serum cholesterol levels experimentally or clinically is associated with increased large-bowel tumorigenesis. Thus, cholesterol lost to the gut, either dietary or endogenously synthesized, appears to have a role in large-bowel cancer. Whether the effect(s) is mediated by increases in fecal bile acid excretion or some other mechanism is not clear.

  18. [Gallstone ileus of the colon].

    PubMed

    Avlund, Tue Højslev; Thomsen, Henrik

    2011-12-12

    Gallstone is a rare cause of large bowel obstruction. The condition is mainly reported in elderly women with considerable comorbidity and hence with high morbidity and mortality. We describe a case of a 75 year-old woman, with known gallbladder stone, presenting with symptoms of large bowel obstruction. Computed tomography of the abdomen confirmed a large gallstone obstructing the colon. The gallstone was subsequent removed by cololithotomi and the patient made a full recovery.

  19. Colonic perforation in Behcet's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Catherine-M; Hill, Arnold-Dk; Malone, Carmel; Sheehan, John-J; Tormey, Shona; Sheahan, Kieran; McDermott, Enda; O'Higgins, Niall-J

    2008-11-14

    A 17-year-old gentleman was admitted to our hospital for headache, the differential diagnosis of which included Behcet's syndrome (BS). He developed an acute abdomen and was found to have air under the diaphragm on erect chest X-ray. Subsequent laparotomy revealed multiple perforations throughout the colon. This report describes an unusual complication of Behcets syndrome occurring at the time of presentation and a review of the current literature of reported cases.

  20. Healthy ageing, narrative method and research ethics.

    PubMed

    Sarvimäki, Anneli

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe research and teaching activities related to healthy ageing, narrative methods and research ethics at the Nordic School of Public Health NHV during 1999 - 2012. Healthy ageing was conceived in terms of The World Health Organization's (WHO) model of active ageing and of quality of life defined as a sense of well-being, meaning and value. Qualitative research on ageing and health conducted at NHV showed how elderly people themselves experience health and what they perceive to be health promoting. Narrative method was one the qualitative methods used in research at NHV. By adopting holistic and categorical content analysis the life stories of elderly Finnish migrants, the stories of home-dwelling persons about falls, and working persons' stories of alcohol use were studied. The courses on research ethics took their point of departure in a model that describes the role of scientific, economic, aesthetic and ethical values in research.

  1. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Rute; Simões-Silva, Liliana; Garro, Sofia; Silva, Mário-Jorge; Azevedo, Álvaro

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with non-pregnant women. Material and Methods The oral yeast colonization was assessed in saliva of 30 pregnant and non-pregnant women longitudinally over a 6-months period. Demographic information was collected, a non-invasive intra-oral examination was performed and saliva flow and pH were determined. Results Pregnant and non-pregnant groups were similar regarding age and level of education. Saliva flow rate did not differ, but saliva pH was lower in pregnant than in non-pregnant women. Oral yeast prevalence was higher in pregnant than in non-pregnant women, either in the first or in the third trimester, but did not attain statistical significance. In individuals colonized with yeast, the total yeast quantification (Log10CFU/mL) increase from the 1st to the 3rd trimester in pregnant women, but not in non-pregnant women. Conclusions Pregnancy may favour oral yeast growth that may be associated with an acidic oral environment. Key words:Oral yeast, fungi, pregnancy, saliva pH. PMID:28160578

  2. [Esophagectomy and colonic orthotopic transposition by video-assisted thoracoscopy (VATS)].

    PubMed

    Lau Torres, Víctor Eduardo; Salazar Tantaleán, Víctor Augusto

    2009-01-01

    The esophagectomy and colonic transposition by video-assisted thoracoscopy (VATS), still not recommended as a technique of choice for the treatment of benign and malignant esophagus despite good results in hospitalization, morbidity and mortality. This case describes a 24 year old male patient who swallowed muriatic acid, causing severe injuries to the esophagus and stomach. Initially, he performed jejunal transposition which subsequently are causing progressive dysphagia, readmitted 2 years later. This time surgery is performed in 2 stages: (1) rise of the ascending colon and jejunum distal to oesophageal vasculature itself, by open surgery (2) esophagectomy and colonic orthotopic transposition by VATS and posterior hypopharyngeal anastomosis in colon anterior cervical region. Patient was discharged without complications and shorter hospital stay. Currently no evidence of dysphagia, improved nutritional status and ultimately better quality of life.

  3. Measurement of eosinophil kinetics in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Farahi, Neda; Loutsios, Chrystalla; Simmonds, Rosalind P; Porter, Linsey; Gillett, Daniel; Heard, Sarah; Peters, A Michael; Condliffe, Alison M; Chilvers, Edwin R

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabelled leukocyte scans are widely used in nuclear medicine to locate sites of infection and inflammation. Radiolabelling of leukocyte subpopulations can also yield valuable information on cell trafficking and kinetics in vivo, but care must be taken to minimize inadvertent cell activation ex vivo. Here, we describe the use of autologous indium(111)-labelled eosinophils to measure eosinophil intravascular life-span and monitor their distribution and fate using gamma camera imaging in healthy non-atopic individuals.

  4. Healthy Schools Network, 2011 Yearbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the 2011 Yearbook of the Healthy Schools Network. This yearbook contains: (1) Tough Time To Be a Child: Parents and Taxpayers Should Be Enraged; (2) National Coalition For Healthier Schools: Healthy Schools 2015--Sustaining Momentum In Tough Times; (3) Healthy Schools Heroes Award Program; (4) National Healthy Schools Day…

  5. Gastrointestinal transit and prolonged ambulatory colonic motility in health and faecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, F; Kamm, M; Morris, G; Britton, K; Woloszko, J; Nicholls, R

    1997-01-01

    Background—Colonic motor function has not been studied in the ambulatory setting over a prolonged period in the unprepared state. Furthermore, the disturbance of this function in patients with faecal incontinence is unknown. 
Aim—To study colonic function over two to three days in the ambulatory, unprepared state in health and in patients with idiopathic faecal incontinence. 
Methods—Six healthy women and six women with faecal incontinence and a structurally intact anal sphincter ingested a dual radioisotope meal, and had a six sensor, solid state manometric probe colonoscopically inserted into the left colon. Scanning was performed until radioisotope left the gut and pressure was recorded for a median of 44hours. 
Results—Three of six patients showed abnormal gastric emptying. Patients showed no disturbance of colonic radioisotope transit. Controls had a median of 12, whereas patients had a median of 16, high amplitude propagated waves per 24 hours. In three patients urge incontinence was associated with high amplitude (up to 500 cm water) propagated waves which often reached the rectum. These high pressure waves were identical to those occuring in healthy subjects, the only difference being the lack of adequate sphincter response. Passive incontinence was not associated with colonic motor activity. Defaecation in all subjects was associated with identical propagated waves, and distal movement of 13% (median) of right colonic content and excretion of 32% from the left colon and rectum. The urge to defaecate was associated with either propagated waves (45%) or non-propagated contractions (55%). Rectal motor complexes were recorded in both groups of subjects, but similar rhythmic activity was also recorded in the sigmoid and descending colon. 
Conclusions—Normal colonic function consists of frequent high pressure propagated waves. Rhythmic activity occurs both proximal to and in the rectum. Defaecation is characterised by high pressure propagated

  6. Methylene blue MMX tablets for chromoendoscopy. Safety tolerability and bioavailability in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Repici, A; Di Stefano, A F D; Radicioni, M M; Jas, V; Moro, L; Danese, S

    2012-03-01

    Methylene blue-MMX tablets are proposed as colonic diagnostic staining. Methylene blue taken prior to colonoscopy is expected to provide an effective staining of colonic and rectal mucosa leaving unstained the dysplastic or polypoid areas. The present single dose, open-label study investigated the safety of methylene blue after single oral doses of 200 and 400mg in healthy volunteers. The absolute bioavailability was also investigated after the intake of 2L of bowel cleansing preparation in 2h and by comparing the dose of 200mg with a single iv dose of 100mg in the same subjects. Only non-serious adverse events occurred. Related events occurred to 8/22 subjects. Most of the events were mild and transient. Abnormal transaminases, gastrointestinal disorders and dysuria frequency were 13.6%. After intake of the laxative and the oral dose of 200mg, systemic exposure to methylene blue was shown in all subjects with concentrations increasing for 12h. The peak was reached in a median of 16 h. Peak blood concentration did not increase proportionally with the dose. AUC(0-t) was 32.94 μg/mL × h after 200mg and 38.08 μg/mL × h after 400mg. Half life ranged between 14 and 27 h after the lower dose and between 6 and 26 h after the higher dose. The cumulative excretion was about 40% of the injected dose, 39.67% after 200mg and 23.48% after 400mg. Absolute bioavailability of methylene blue calculated as ratio between AUC(0-t) oral/iv corrected for the dose was on average F(abs)=139.19 ± 52.00%.

  7. Keeping Kids Healthy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, Sharon; And Others

    This pamphlet offers a collection of items relating to child health in the day care setting. Included is an overview of a collaborative project to develop a comprehensive set of national standards for health, nutrition, safety, and sanitation in child care programs. Contents of the project's resource kit, "Keeping Kids Healthy and Parents at…

  8. Healthy Cooking Techniques

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cooking spray for this cooking method. Using herbs and spices Creating meals with herbs, spices and other natural flavorings is one of ... salt or fat. Healthy flavor boosts include: Fresh herbs. Choose herbs that look bright and aren't ...

  9. Healthy Air Outdoors

    MedlinePlus

    ... families and can even shorten their lives. Outdoor Air Pollution and Health Outdoor air pollution continues to threaten the lives and health of ... sources such as fires and dust contribute to air pollution. Learn more Fighting for Healthy Air The American ...

  10. Healthy People 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angotti, Catherine M.

    2001-01-01

    Major Healthy People (HP) 2000 goals closely tied to prevention were not met nationally: physical activity did not improve; evidence that it actually decreased; obesity did not decrease but instead increased in all groups, actually doubling in children; and incidence of type 2 diabetes did not decrease, but instead evidence showed that it increased in all age groups.

  11. Motility and chemotaxis mediate the preferential colonization of gastric injury sites by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Eitaro; Closson, Chet; Matthis, Andrea L; Schumacher, Michael A; Engevik, Amy C; Zavros, Yana; Ottemann, Karen M; Montrose, Marshall H

    2014-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a pathogen contributing to peptic inflammation, ulceration, and cancer. A crucial step in the pathogenic sequence is when the bacterium first interacts with gastric tissue, an event that is poorly understood in vivo. We have shown that the luminal space adjacent to gastric epithelial damage is a microenvironment, and we hypothesized that this microenvironment might enhance H. pylori colonization. Inoculation with 106 H. pylori (wild-type Sydney Strain 1, SS1) significantly delayed healing of acetic-acid induced ulcers at Day 1, 7 and 30 post-inoculation, and wild-type SS1 preferentially colonized the ulcerated area compared to uninjured gastric tissue in the same animal at all time points. Gastric resident Lactobacillus spp. did not preferentially colonize ulcerated tissue. To determine whether bacterial motility and chemotaxis are important to ulcer healing and colonization, we analyzed isogenic H. pylori mutants defective in motility (ΔmotB) or chemotaxis (ΔcheY). ΔmotB (10(6)) failed to colonize ulcerated or healthy stomach tissue. ΔcheY (10(6)) colonized both tissues, but without preferential colonization of ulcerated tissue. However, ΔcheY did modestly delay ulcer healing, suggesting that chemotaxis is not required for this process. We used two-photon microscopy to induce microscopic epithelial lesions in vivo, and evaluated accumulation of fluorescently labeled H. pylori at gastric damage sites in the time frame of minutes instead of days. By 5 min after inducing damage, H. pylori SS1 preferentially accumulated at the site of damage and inhibited gastric epithelial restitution. H. pylori ΔcheY modestly accumulated at the gastric surface and inhibited restitution, but did not preferentially accumulate at the injury site. H. pylori ΔmotB neither accumulated at the surface nor inhibited restitution. We conclude that bacterial chemosensing and motility rapidly promote H. pylori colonization of injury sites, and thereby

  12. A Microbiological Map of the Healthy Equine Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Philip J.; Lopes, Marco A.; Perry, Sonja C.; Lanter, Hannah R.

    2016-01-01

    Horses are exquisitely sensitive to non-specific gastrointestinal disturbances as well as systemic and extraintestinal conditions related to gut health, yet minimal data are available regarding the composition of the microbiota present in the equine stomach, small intestine, and cecum and their relation to fecal microbiota. Moreover, there is minimal information regarding the concordance of the luminal and mucosal microbial communities throughout the equine gut. Illumina-based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of the luminal and mucosal microbiota present in seven regions of the gastrointestinal tract of nine healthy adult horses revealed a distinct compositional divide between the small and large intestines. This disparity in composition was more pronounced within the luminal contents, but was also detected within mucosal populations. Moreover, the uniformity of the gut microbiota was much higher in the cecum and colon relative to that in the stomach, jejunum and ileum, despite a significantly higher number of unique sequences detected in the colon. Collectively, the current data suggest that while colonic samples (a proxy for feces) may provide a reasonable profile of the luminal contents of the healthy equine large intestine, they are not informative with regard to the contents of the stomach or small intestine. In contrast to the distinct difference between the highly variable upper gastrointestinal tract microbiota and relatively uniform large bowel microbiota present within the lumen, these data also demonstrate a regional continuity present in mucosal microbial communities throughout the length of the equine gut. PMID:27846295

  13. Healthy People 2000 Final Review: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHHS/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    This report completes the series of "Healthy People 2000 Reviews" published to monitor and evaluate U.S. progress toward year 2000 targets. It examines Healthy People 2000 goals (to increase the span of healthy life, reduce health disparities, and achieve access to preventive services); discusses health indicators and priority data…

  14. Modeling human colon cancer in rodents using a food-borne carcinogen, PhIP.

    PubMed

    Nakagama, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Masako; Ochiai, Masako

    2005-10-01

    Animal models provide researchers with powerful tools to elucidate multistage mechanisms for cancer development and to gain further insights into the biological roles of various cancer-related genes in in vivo situations. As for colon cancer models in rodents, Apc-disrupted mice, including ApcMin, have been one of the most widely utilized animal models to dissect the molecular events implicated in the development of intestinal tumors. In rats, several models have been established using chemical carcinogens, including azoxymethane and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo-[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). The former is a representative colon carcinogenic alkylating agent, and the latter a heterocyclic amine produced while cooking meat and fish, which people are exposed to in ordinary life. It is of great importance to note that PhIP preferentially targets the colon and prostate gland in male rats, and the mammary glands in female rats. Cancers in these three organs are common in Western countries and are currently increasing in Japan, where modern dietary habits are rapidly becoming more like those of the West. In the present article, the history of PhIP-induced colon cancer models in rodents, activation/detoxification mechanisms of PhIP with regard to the formation of PhIP-DNA adducts, mechanistic approaches to dissect the molecular events involved in the development of colon cancer by PhIP, and epidemiological evidence of human exposure to PhIP are overviewed. The induction of Paneth cell maturation/differentiation in PhIP-induced colon cancers, genetic traits affecting susceptibility to colon carcinogenesis, and the biological relevance of colon cancer models in rodents to studying human colon carcinogenesis are also discussed.

  15. Chemopreventive effects of nobiletin and its colonic metabolites on colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xian; Song, Mingyue; Wang, Minqi; Zheng, Jinkai; Gao, Zili; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Guodong; Xiao, Hang

    2015-01-01

    Scope Nobiletin (NBT) is a major citrus flavonoid with various health benefits. Herein, we investigated the colon cancer chemopreventive effects of NBT and its colonic metabolites in a colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis mouse model as well as in human colon cancer cell models. Methods and results In azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-treated mice, oral administration of NBT effectively decreased both incidence and multiplicity of colonic tumors. NBT showed significant anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects in the mouse colon. HPLC analysis revealed that oral administration of NBT resulted in high levels of metabolites, i.e. 3′-demethylnobiletin (M1), 4′-demethylnobiletin (M2), and 3′, 4′-didemethylnobiletin (M3) in the colonic mucosa. In contrast, the colonic level of NBT was about 20-fold lower than the total colonic level of three metabolites. Cell culture studies demonstrated that the colonic metabolites of NBT significantly inhibited the growth of human colon cancer cells, caused cell cycle arrest, induced apoptosis, and profoundly modulated signaling proteins related with cell proliferation and cell death. All of these effects were much stronger than those produced by NBT alone. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that oral administration of NBT significantly inhibited colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis in mice, and this chemopreventive effect was strongly associated with its colonic metabolites. PMID:26445322

  16. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Caroline H.; Dejea, Christine M.; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T.; Santidrian, Antonio F.; Felding, Brunhilde H.; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A.; Pardoll, Drew M.; White, James R.; Patti, Gary J.; Sears, Cynthia L.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N1, N12-diacetylspermine in both biofilm positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N1, N12-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome, to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression. PMID:25959674

  17. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Caroline H; Dejea, Christine M; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T; Santidrian, Antonio F; Felding, Brunhilde H; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; White, James R; Patti, Gary J; Sears, Cynthia L; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-06-02

    Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine in both biofilm-positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm-negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression.

  18. Historical and Current Trends in Colon Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Causey, Marlin Wayne; Rivadeneira, David E.; Steele, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    The authors discuss the evolution of the evaluation and management of colonic trauma, as well as the debate regarding primary repair versus fecal diversion. Their evidence-based review covers diagnosis, management, surgical approaches, and perioperative care of patients with colon-related trauma. The management of traumatic colon injuries has evolved significantly over the past 50 years; here the authors describe a practical approach to the treatment and management of traumatic injuries to the colon based on the most current research. However, management of traumatic colon injuries remains a challenge and continues to be associated with significant morbidity. Familiarity with the different methods to the approach and management of colonic injuries will allow surgeons to minimize unnecessary complications and mortality. PMID:24294119

  19. Tubular Colonic Duplication Presenting as Rectovestibular Fistula.

    PubMed

    Karkera, Parag J; Bendre, Pradnya; D'souza, Flavia; Ramchandra, Mukunda; Nage, Amol; Palse, Nitin

    2015-09-01

    Complete colonic duplication is a very rare congenital anomaly that may have different presentations according to its location and size. Complete colonic duplication can occur in about 15% of all gastrointestinal duplications. Double termination of tubular colonic duplication in the perineum is even more uncommon. We present a case of a Y-shaped tubular colonic duplication which presented with a rectovestibular fistula and a normal anus. Radiological evaluation and initial exploration for sigmoidostomy revealed duplicated colons with a common vascular supply. Endorectal mucosal resection of theduplicated distal segment till the colostomy site with division of the septum of the proximal segment and colostomy closure proved curative without compromise of the continence mechanism. Tubular colonic duplication should always be ruled out when a diagnosis of perineal canal is considered in cases of vestibular fistula alongwith a normal anus.

  20. Tubular Colonic Duplication Presenting as Rectovestibular Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Bendre, Pradnya; D'souza, Flavia; Ramchandra, Mukunda; Nage, Amol; Palse, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Complete colonic duplication is a very rare congenital anomaly that may have different presentations according to its location and size. Complete colonic duplication can occur in about 15% of all gastrointestinal duplications. Double termination of tubular colonic duplication in the perineum is even more uncommon. We present a case of a Y-shaped tubular colonic duplication which presented with a rectovestibular fistula and a normal anus. Radiological evaluation and initial exploration for sigmoidostomy revealed duplicated colons with a common vascular supply. Endorectal mucosal resection of theduplicated distal segment till the colostomy site with division of the septum of the proximal segment and colostomy closure proved curative without compromise of the continence mechanism. Tubular colonic duplication should always be ruled out when a diagnosis of perineal canal is considered in cases of vestibular fistula alongwith a normal anus. PMID:26473141

  1. Does self-regulation and autonomic regulation have an influence on survival in breast and colon carcinoma patients? results of a prospective outcome study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer Related Fatigue (CRF) and circadian rhythm have a great impact on the quality of life (HRQL) of patients with breast (BC) and colon cancer (CRC). Other patient related outcomes in oncology are measured by new instruments focusing on adaptive characteristics such as sense of coherence or self-regulation, which could be more appropriate as a prognostic tool than classical HRQL. The aim of this study was to assess the association of autonomic regulation (aR) and self-regulation (SR) with survival. Methods 146 cancer patients and 120 healthy controls took part in an initial evaluation in 2000/2001. At a median follow up of 5.9 years later, 62 of 95 BC, 17 of 51 CRC patients, and 85 of 117 healthy controls took part in the follow-up study. 41 participants had died. For the follow-up evaluation, participants were requested to complete the standardized aR and SR questionnaires. Results On average, cancer patients had survived for 10.1 years with the disease. Using a Cox proportional hazard regression with stepwise variables such as age, diagnosis group, Charlson co-morbidity index, body mass index (BMI)) aR and SR. SR were identified as independent parameters with potential prognostic relevance on survival While aR did not significantly influence survival, SR showed a positive and independent impact on survival (OR = 0.589; 95%-CI: 0.354 - 0.979). This positive effect persisted significantly in the sensitivity analysis of the subgroup of tumour patients and in the subscale 'Achieve satisfaction and well-being' and by tendency in the UICC stages nested for the different diagnoses groups. Conclusions Self-regulation might be an independent prognostic factor for the survival of breast and colon carcinoma patients and merits further prospective studies. PMID:21961625

  2. Fluorescence diagnosis of colon cancer using two novel Rhodamine B derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlamazoglou, Vassilis; Yova, Dido M.; Kavantzas, Nikolaos; Loukas, Spyros

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is a promising technique for the early detection of neoplastic changes in the human body. Investigation of the microscopic origin of tissue fluorescence can provide important information about the histology of tissue. In this study we report the synthesis and use of two novel Rhodamine B derivatives in an efficient microscopic technique for colon cancer diagnosis. Another important objective is the examination of the morphological structures on which the fluorescence analogs bind and the correlation of the fluorescence images with their underlying microstructural origin. Rh B-Leucine amide and Rh B-phenyl boronic acid distinguish clearly healthy from neoplastic colon tissue sections. Both derivatives accumulate mainly in the of neoplastic crypts. This finding can be exploited for colon cancer diagnosis using fluorescence microscopy as well as for a fluorescence-based optical biopsy method.

  3. Spatio-temporal registration in multiplane MRI acquisitions for 3D colon motiliy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Oliver; Kirchhoff, Sonja; Berkovich, Marina; Reiser, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for analyzing and visualizing dynamic peristaltic motion of the colon in 3D from two series of differently oriented 2D MRI images. To this end, we have defined an MRI examination protocol, and introduced methods for spatio-temporal alignment of the two MRI image series into a common reference. This represents the main contribution of this paper, which enables the 3D analysis of peristaltic motion. The objective is to provide a detailed insight into this complex motion, aiding in the diagnosis and characterization of colon motion disorders. We have applied the proposed spatio-temporal method on Cine MRI data sets of healthy volunteers. The results have been inspected and validated by an expert radiologist. Segmentation and cylindrical approximation of the colon results in a 4D visualization of the peristaltic motion.

  4. [The formation of the basis for the health life style of school children].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, L A; Abdukadyrova, L K; Sharipova, S A; Iuldashbaev, I T

    2002-01-01

    Sanitary knowledge of graduates of the Tashkent schools on healthy life style was studied. Poor knowledge and understanding of the value of health and role of healthy life style in health preservation were revealed. The majority of graduates just vaguely know the main components of a healthy life style, as a result of which their actual life style cannot help them preserve their health. The authors suggest that a curriculum for the formation of a healthy life style be developed for schoolchildren, which will determine the priorities and the most rational forms of a healthy life style.

  5. Jaundice in Healthy Newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... common condition in newborns, refers to the yellow color of the skin and whites of the eyes ...

  6. Developmental pathways in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Fred E.; Angus, C. William; Partis, William J.; Sigounas, George

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of cancer is reactivation/alteration of pathways that control cellular differentiation during developmental processes. Evidence indicates that WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways have a role in normal epithelial cell differentiation, and that alterations in these pathways accompany establishment of the tumorigenic state. Interestingly, there is recent evidence that these pathways are intertwined at the molecular level, and these nodes of intersection may provide opportunities for effective targeted therapies. This review will highlight the role of the WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways in colon cancer. PMID:23032367

  7. Treatment of Colonic Injury During Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Colonic injury during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) persists despite the advances in technical equipment and interventional radiology techniques. According to the Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications, colonic injury is regarded as a stage IVa complication. Currently, the rate of colonic injury ranges between 0.3% and 0.5%, with an unremarkable difference in incidence between supine and prone PCNL procedures. Colon injury is the most significant complication of PCNL. Colonic injury can result in more complicated open exploration of the abdomen, involving colostomy construction. The necessity of a second operation for the closure of the colostomy causes financial and emotional burden on the patients, patients’ relatives, and surgeons. Currently, the majority of colonic injuries occurring during PCNL are retroperitoneal. The primary treatment option is a conservative approach. It must be kept in mind that the time of diagnosis is as important as the diagnosis itself in colonic injury. Surgeons performing PCNL are advised to be conservative when considering exploratory laparotomy and colostomy construction during treatment of colonic injury. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who underwent left prone PCNL that resulted in retroperitoneal colonic injury, along with a review of the current literature. PMID:26543436

  8. Treatment of Colonic Injury During Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Colonic injury during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) persists despite the advances in technical equipment and interventional radiology techniques. According to the Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications, colonic injury is regarded as a stage IVa complication. Currently, the rate of colonic injury ranges between 0.3% and 0.5%, with an unremarkable difference in incidence between supine and prone PCNL procedures. Colon injury is the most significant complication of PCNL. Colonic injury can result in more complicated open exploration of the abdomen, involving colostomy construction. The necessity of a second operation for the closure of the colostomy causes financial and emotional burden on the patients, patients' relatives, and surgeons. Currently, the majority of colonic injuries occurring during PCNL are retroperitoneal. The primary treatment option is a conservative approach. It must be kept in mind that the time of diagnosis is as important as the diagnosis itself in colonic injury. Surgeons performing PCNL are advised to be conservative when considering exploratory laparotomy and colostomy construction during treatment of colonic injury. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who underwent left prone PCNL that resulted in retroperitoneal colonic injury, along with a review of the current literature.

  9. Staphylococcal superantigens in colonization and disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Stacey X; McCormick, John K

    2012-01-01

    Superantigens (SAgs) are a family of potent immunostimulatory exotoxins known to be produced by only a few bacterial pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus. More than 20 distinct SAgs have been characterized from different S. aureus strains and at least 80% of clinical strains harbor at least one SAg gene, although most strains encode many. SAgs have been classically associated with food poisoning and toxic shock syndrome (TSS), for which these toxins are the causative agent. TSS is a potentially fatal disease whereby SAg-mediated activation of T cells results in overproduction of cytokines and results in systemic inflammation and shock. Numerous studies have also shown a possible role for SAgs in other diseases such as Kawasaki disease (KD), atopic dermatitis (AD), and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). There is also now a rich understanding of the mechanisms of action of SAgs, as well as their structures and function. However, we have yet to discover what purpose SAgs play in the life cycle of S. aureus, and why such a wide array of these toxins exists. This review will focus on recent developments within the SAg field in terms of the molecular biology of these toxins and their role in both colonization and disease.

  10. Paying for healthy rivers.

    PubMed

    Pigram, J J J

    2002-01-01

    Concerted efforts are being made at state and federal levels to restore Australia's rivers and waterways to a healthy condition. Yet, there is little consensus on what constitutes a "healthy river" and even less on how to achieve this, or how far to go towards restoration. Some advocate removal of storages and weirs along rivers to revert to some natural state. Others, particularly water users, question the trade-offs involved in leaving more water in the rivers and how the costs of restoration are to be met. At present it seems that the major share of the costs is borne by irrigators, with the wider community essentially enjoying a "free-ride". This situation is justified on the basis of the impactor pays principle whereby water diversions, primarily for irrigation, are held to have contributed most to degradation of the river systems. The altemative-beneficiary pays principle--is of more relevance where demands are made on resource users to mitigate environmental impacts or bring about environmental improvements, eg. healthy rivers, where the beneficiaries are the wider public and the general community. Many resource users are voluntarily undertaking action on private land to conserve biodiversity and achieve sustainability. In these circumstances, the cost-sharing principle should apply, with governments, interest groups and the community contributing to the investment required to attain the desired resource condition objectives.

  11. Healthy Aging in China.

    PubMed

    Smith, James P; Strauss, John; Zhao, Yaohui

    2014-12-01

    China has aged rapidly and the rate is accelerating in decades to come. We review positive and negative forces for healthy aging in China now and in the future. The most positive force is the spectacular growth in education over time especially for Chinese women, which should improve all dimensions of cognitive and physical health and eliminate vast gender disparities in healthy aging that currently exist. Other positive forces include increasing detection and treatment of disease and the availability of health insurance and health services so that diseases like hypertension and diabetes do not remain silent killers in China. Transparency is eased on the research level by publicly available data such as CHARLS, a sharp departure from prior scientific norm in China. Negative forces center on disturbing trends in personal health behaviors such as growing rates of smoking (among men) and obesity (for both genders), and pollution-,especially in urban centers. Public health campaigns and incentives are needed on all these fronts so that predictable long-term consequences of these behaviors on older age disease are not realized. There will not be a simple demographic fix to healthy aging in China as fertility rates are unlikely to rise much, while migration will likely continue to rise leaving growing numbers of elderly parents geographically separated from their adult children. Government policy will have to allow migration of elderly parents to live with their adult children while reducing the rigid connection of policy (health insurance and health services) with place of residence.

  12. Healthy Aging in China

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James P.; Strauss, John; Zhao, Yaohui

    2014-01-01

    China has aged rapidly and the rate is accelerating in decades to come. We review positive and negative forces for healthy aging in China now and in the future. The most positive force is the spectacular growth in education over time especially for Chinese women, which should improve all dimensions of cognitive and physical health and eliminate vast gender disparities in healthy aging that currently exist. Other positive forces include increasing detection and treatment of disease and the availability of health insurance and health services so that diseases like hypertension and diabetes do not remain silent killers in China. Transparency is eased on the research level by publicly available data such as CHARLS, a sharp departure from prior scientific norm in China. Negative forces center on disturbing trends in personal health behaviors such as growing rates of smoking (among men) and obesity (for both genders), and pollution—,especially in urban centers. Public health campaigns and incentives are needed on all these fronts so that predictable long-term consequences of these behaviors on older age disease are not realized. There will not be a simple demographic fix to healthy aging in China as fertility rates are unlikely to rise much, while migration will likely continue to rise leaving growing numbers of elderly parents geographically separated from their adult children. Government policy will have to allow migration of elderly parents to live with their adult children while reducing the rigid connection of policy (health insurance and health services) with place of residence. PMID:25621202

  13. Therapeutic opportunities from tumour biology in metastatic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    McLeod, H L; McKay, J A; Collie-Duguid, E S; Cassidy, J

    2000-08-01

    Tumour metastasis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer. While improvements in quality of life and patient survival have been made over the past 10 years, the majority of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer will die from their disease. As knowledge of the biology of colon cancer and its invasion/metastasis programme evolve, this presents new therapeutic opportunities for pharmacological and genetic intervention. This review discusses the current approaches to metastatic colorectal cancer therapy, details genomic and biological variance between primary and metastatic tumours, and highlights approaches for harnessing these differences to improve therapy.

  14. Empowering a healthy practice environment.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Jodi; Ruffin, Tasha

    2015-03-01

    This article provides frontline nurses a tool kit so they can advocate a healthy practice environment. The healthy nurse, healthy work hours, job satisfaction, adequate sleep, power naps at work, and balancing family/work are discussed. The overweight nurse, nurse fatigue, compassion fatigue, shift work sleep disorder, and role strain are discussed as barriers to a healthy practice environment. Case reports with analysis and recommendations are discussed to overcome these barriers. Resources are presented for frontline nurses to develop a tool kit for transforming their environment to a healthy practice environment and to empower them to become healthy nurses.

  15. The association of maternal vitamin D status with infant birth outcomes, postnatal growth and adiposity in the first 2 years of life in a multi-ethnic Asian population: the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ong, Yi Lin; Quah, Phaik Ling; Tint, Mya Thway; Aris, Izzuddin M; Chen, Ling Wei; van Dam, Rob M; Heppe, Denise; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Chong, Yap Seng; Yap, Fabian; Lee, Yung Seng; Foong-Fong Chong, Mary

    2016-08-01

    Maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy has been associated with infant birth and postnatal growth outcomes, but reported findings have been inconsistent, especially in relation to postnatal growth and adiposity outcomes. In a mother-offspring cohort in Singapore, maternal plasma vitamin D was measured between 26 and 28 weeks of gestation, and anthropometric measurements were obtained from singleton offspring during the first 2 years of life with 3-month follow-up intervals to examine birth, growth and adiposity outcomes. Associations were analysed using multivariable linear regression. Of a total of 910 mothers, 13·2 % were vitamin D deficient (<50 nmol/l) and 26·5 % were insufficient (50-75 nmol/l). After adjustment for potential confounders and multiple testing, no statistically significant associations were observed between maternal vitamin D status and any of the birth outcomes - small for gestational age (OR 1·00; 95 % CI 0·56, 1·79) and pre-term birth (OR 1·16; 95 % CI 0·64, 2·11) - growth outcomes - weight-for-age z-scores, length-for-age z-scores, circumferences of the head, abdomen and mid-arm at birth or postnatally - and adiposity outcomes - BMI, and skinfold thickness (triceps, biceps and subscapular) at birth or postnatally. Maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy did not influence infant birth outcomes, postnatal growth and adiposity outcomes in this cohort, perhaps due to the low prevalence (1·6 % of the cohort) of severe maternal vitamin D deficiency (defined as of <30·0 nmol/l) in our population.

  16. Diagnosis of colon cancer by attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and soft independent modeling of class analogy.

    PubMed

    Khanmohammadi, Mohammadreza; Garmarudi, Amir Bagheri; Ghasemi, Keyvan; Jaliseh, Hadigheh Kazemi; Kaviani, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    This study tries to demonstrate that attenuated total reflectance-fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) microspectroscopy in combination with chemometric methods can reliably distinguish malignant colon tissues from healthy ones. It is important to explore a noninvasive and rapid method for detection of colon cancer biopsies. Initially, principal component analysis was applied to examine the degree of separation between tissue samples. Soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) was also employed to evaluate the prediction accuracy of ATR-FTIR microspectroscopy for the diagnosis of colon cancer. There were significant differences in the fourier transform infrared spectra of normal and cancerous colon biopsies in the 1,800-900 cm(-1) spectral region. The SIMCA results demonstrated that the accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity of the proposed diagnostic method were 93.3, 100, and 88.2%, respectively, which could help satisfy clinical diagnostic requirements.

  17. Complete tubular duplication of colon in an adult: a rare cause of colovaginal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Il; Lee, Hyoung Uk; Ahn, Tae Sung; Lee, Jong Eun; Lee, Hyun Yong; Mun, Seong Taek; Baek, Moo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Alimentary tract duplications are uncommon congenital anomalies that usually present during the first decade of life. Complete duplication of the colon in adults is very rare and difficult to diagnose preoperatively. We report a case of a 40-year-old female with complete tubular duplication which was initially misdiagnosed as a salpingeal abscess due to colovaginal fistula. PMID:27757399

  18. White and dark kidney beans reduce colonic mucosal damage and inflammation in response to dextran sodium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Monk, Jennifer M; Zhang, Claire P; Wu, Wenqing; Zarepoor, Leila; Lu, Jenifer T; Liu, Ronghua; Pauls, K Peter; Wood, Geoffrey A; Tsao, Rong; Robinson, Lindsay E; Power, Krista A

    2015-07-01

    Common beans are a rich source of nondigestible fermentable components and phenolic compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects. We assessed the gut-health-promoting potential of kidney beans in healthy mice and their ability to attenuate colonic inflammation following dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) exposure (via drinking water, 2% DSS w/v, 7 days). C57BL/6 mice were fed one of three isocaloric diets: basal diet control (BD), or BD supplemented with 20% cooked white (WK) or dark red kidney (DK) bean flour for 3 weeks. In healthy mice, anti-inflammatory microbial-derived cecal short chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels (acetate, butyrate and propionate), colon crypt height and colonic Mucin 1 (MUC1) and Resistin-like Molecule beta (Relmβ) mRNA expression all increased in WK- and DK-fed mice compared to BD, indicative of enhanced microbial activity, gut barrier integrity and antimicrobial defense response. During colitis, both bean diets reduced (a) disease severity, (b) colonic histological damage and (c) increased mRNA expression of antimicrobial and barrier integrity-promoting genes (Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4), MUC1-3, Relmβ and Trefoil Factor 3 (TFF3)) and reduced proinflammatory mediator expression [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1], which correlated with reduced colon tissue protein levels. Further, bean diets exerted a systemic anti-inflammatory effect during colitis by reducing serum levels of IL-17A, IFNγ, TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6. In conclusion, both WK and DK bean-supplemented diets enhanced microbial-derived SCFA metabolite production, gut barrier integrity and the microbial defensive response in the healthy colon, which supported an anti-inflammatory phenotype during colitis. Collectively, these data demonstrate a beneficial colon-function priming effect of bean consumption that mitigates colitis severity.

  19. Maternal Antibiotic-Induced Early Changes in Microbial Colonization Selectively Modulate Colonic Permeability and Inducible Heat Shock Proteins, and Digesta Concentrations of Alkaline Phosphatase and TLR-Stimulants in Swine Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Arnal, Marie-Edith; Zhang, Jing; Erridge, Clett; Smidt, Hauke; Lallès, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Elevated intake of high energy diets is a risk factor for the development of metabolic diseases and obesity. High fat diets cause alterations in colonic microbiota composition and increase gut permeability to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and subsequent low-grade chronic inflammation in mice. Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases are increasing worldwide and may involve alterations in microbiota-host dialog. Metabolic disorders appearing in later life are also suspected to reflect changes in early programming. However, how the latter affects the colon remains poorly studied. Here, we hypothesized that various components of colonic physiology, including permeability, ion exchange and protective inducible heat shock proteins (HSP) are influenced in the short- and long-terms by early disturbances in microbial colonization. The hypothesis was tested in a swine model. Offspring were born to control mothers (n = 12) or mothers treated with the antibiotic (ATB) amoxicillin around parturition (n = 11). Offspring were slaughtered between 14 and 42 days of age to study short-term effects. For long-term effects, young adult offspring from the same litters consumed a normal or a palm oil-enriched diet for 4 weeks between 140 and 169 days of age. ATB treatment transiently modified maternal fecal microbiota although the minor differences observed for offspring colonic microbiota were nonsignificant. In the short-term, consistently higher HSP27 and HSP70 levels and transiently increased horseradish peroxidase permeability in ATB offspring colon were observed. Importantly, long-term consequences included reduced colonic horseradish peroxidase permeability, and increased colonic digesta alkaline phosphatase (AP) and TLR2- and TLR4-stimulant concentrations in rectal digesta in adult ATB offspring. Inducible HSP27 and HSP70 did not change. Interactions between early ATB treatment and later diet were noted for paracellular permeability and concentrations of colonic digesta AP. In

  20. Bacterial colonization of laryngectomy stomas.

    PubMed

    Wild, D C; Mehta, D; Conboy, P J

    2004-09-01

    Infections with organisms resistant to conventional antibiotics are of increasing concern. This observational study investigates the bacterial colonization of the peristomal area of laryngectomy patients. Thirty-two consecutive patients who had previously undergone laryngectomy were recruited from the Head and Neck Clinic of a teaching hospital. Swabs were taken from the laryngectomy stoma site, the mouth and both nasal cavities. Microbiological culture and isolation were performed following standard procedures. Despite no clinical sign of infection, 27 patients were found to be carriers of one or more organism (84.4 per cent). Staphylococcus aureus was detected in the peristomal area of 15 patients (46.9 per cent). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated in seven (21.9 per cent) cases. In this series the authors found a high incidence of colonization with potentially pathogenic bacteria in laryngectomy stomas with no clinical signs of infection. In a significant number of patients, Gram positive organisms were identified that could potentially cause cellulitis or wound infections.

  1. [Ion transport in the colon].

    PubMed

    Caprilli, R; Frieri, G; Marchetti, G; Giambartolomei, S

    1995-12-01

    The large bowel daily absorbs passively 1500 ml of water down an osmotic gradient created by active electrolyte transports. The system is sustained by the enzyme Na(+)-K+ ATPase, the so called sodium-pump, present on the basolateral membrane of colonocytes. Some pathologic conditions may increase the amount of intraluminal water by inhibiting fluid absorbtion or enhancing fluid secretion. Diarrhoea represents the clinical counterpart of these alterations. Three forms of diarrhoea can be recognized on the basis of pathophysiological alterations. Diarrhoea is due to reduced ionic absorbtion, increased secretion or increased endoluminal osmolality. The drugs used to induce bowel actions or gut lavage increase also intraluminal water content by modifying transmural ionic transports. Laxatives or purges act by increasing either water secretion on endoluminal osmolality and therefore may produce systemic idro-electrolyte imbalance. To avoid this inconvenient an isosmotic electrolyte balanced polyethylene glicol solution (PEG-ELS) has been achieved. In addition orally administred PEG-ELS solution cleans the colon during its intestinal transit without producing relevant transmural water-ionic movements. Aim of this article was to describe the normal ionic transport, and its alterations in pathologic and pharmacologic conditions. Details on PEG-ELS were also given. This solution provides for an effective colon preparation for endoscopic or surgical procedures and resulted to be safe for patients with delicate fluid-electrolyte balance.

  2. Dietary iron does not impact the quality of life of patients with quiescent ulcerative colitis: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In animal models, excess luminal iron exacerbates colonic inflammation and cancer development. Moreover, in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients with mild to moderate disease activity dietary fortificant iron intake is inversely related to quality of life. Here we sought to determine whether dietary iron intakes were also related to quality of life in IBD patients in remission. Methods Forty eight patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 42 of which had quiescent disease during this observational study, and 53 healthy control subjects completed quality of life questionnaires and 7-day food diaries. For comparative analysis, 34/group were matched and the linear relationship between dietary iron intakes (total, haem, non-haem or fortificant) and EuroQol quality of life measures was investigated. For UC patients the linear relationship between dietary iron intakes and the scores from the disease specific inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ) was also considered. Results The intake of dietary iron, and its various sub-fractions, were not associated with quality of life (EuroQol) in patients with quiescent disease or in healthy control subjects. The picture was similar for the 42 quiescent UC patients when disease-specific IBDQ was used. However, the 6 patients who relapsed during the study again showed an inverse association between IBDQ and dietary iron intake (p = 0.03). Conclusions Our data suggest that dietary iron does not impact on quality of life in quiescent UC patients but support that, once the disease is triggered, luminal iron may be a permissive factor for exacerbation of disease activity resulting in lower quality of life. PMID:24267915

  3. Recovery After Stroke: Healthy Eating

    MedlinePlus

    Recovery After Stroke: Healthy Eating Eating well after stroke is key to your recovery. Choosing healthy foods can help you keep up ... get the nutrition you need for your stroke recovery.  Eat your biggest meal early in the day ...

  4. Vitamin Supplements: Healthy or Hoax?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recognition & Awards Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Vitamin Supplements: Healthy or Hoax? Updated:Jun 12,2015 Can vitamin and mineral supplements really make you healthier? Overwhelmed ...

  5. Altered Innate Defenses in the Neonatal Gastrointestinal Tract in Response to Colonization by Neuropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Birchenough, George M. H.; Johansson, Malin E. V.; Stabler, Richard A.; Dalgakiran, Fatma; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Wren, Brendan W.; Luzio, J. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Two-day-old (P2), but not 9-day-old (P9), rat pups are susceptible to systemic infection following gastrointestinal colonization by Escherichia coli K1. Age dependency reflects the capacity of colonizing K1 to translocate from gastrointestinal (GI) tract to blood. A complex GI microbiota developed by P2, showed little variation over P2 to P9, and did not prevent stable K1 colonization. Substantial developmental expression was observed over P2 to P9, including upregulation of genes encoding components of the small intestinal (α-defensins Defa24 and Defa-rs1) and colonic (trefoil factor Tff2) mucus barrier. K1 colonization modulated expression of these peptides: developmental expression of Tff2 was dysregulated in P2 tissues and was accompanied by a decrease in mucin Muc2. Conversely, α-defensin genes were upregulated in P9 tissues. We propose that incomplete development of the mucus barrier during early neonatal life and the capacity of colonizing K1 to interfere with mucus barrier maturation provide opportunities for neuropathogen translocation into the bloodstream. PMID:23798529

  6. Tumor suppressive role of sestrin2 during colitis and colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Seung-Hyun; Xue, Xiang; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Cho, Chun-Seok; Namkoong, Sim; Jang, Insook; Semple, Ian A; Ho, Allison; Park, Hwan-Woo; Shah, Yatrik M; Lee, Jun Hee

    2016-01-01

    The mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathways are critical regulators of intestinal inflammation and colon cancer growth. Sestrins are stress-inducible proteins, which suppress both mTORC1 and ER stress; however, the role of Sestrins in colon physiology and tumorigenesis has been elusive due to the lack of studies in human tissues or in appropriate animal models. In this study, we show that human SESN2 expression is elevated in the colon of ulcerative colitis patients but is lost upon p53 inactivation during colon carcinogenesis. In mouse colon, Sestrin2 was critical for limiting ER stress and promoting the recovery of epithelial cells after inflammatory injury. During colitis-promoted tumorigenesis, Sestrin2 was shown to be an important mediator of p53’s control over mTORC1 signaling and tumor cell growth. These results highlight Sestrin2 as a novel tumor suppressor, whose downregulation can accelerate both colitis and colon carcinogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12204.001 PMID:26913956

  7. Pharmacokinetic studies of antipsychotics in healthy volunteers versus patients.

    PubMed

    Cutler, N R

    2001-01-01

    In clinical trials of dopamine-blocking antipsychotics, significant adverse events may occur in healthy volunteers at dose levels that are well tolerated by schizophrenic patients. Because of these differences in tolerability, bioequivalence and pharmacokinetic studies of antipsychotics should be performed in schizophrenic patients rather than in healthy volunteers. When clozapine is the drug being investigated, pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies should be carried out in real-life dosage conditions because the half-life of clozapine increases with multiple doses. Under real-life conditions, the evaluation of multiple doses of clozapine in a population of schizophrenic patients can provide direct therapeutic relevance to bioavailability findings. This article discusses patient recruitment and informed consent in pharmacokinetic trials of schizophrenia, issues in studying antipsychotic agents in healthy volunteers versus schizophrenic patients, and a bioequivalency study of Clozaril (Novartis Pharmaceuticals) and generic clozapine (Creighton [Sandoz]) in schizophrenic patients.

  8. [In vitro and in vivo effects of mango pulp (Mangifera indica cv. Azucar) in colon carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Corrales-Bernal, Andrea; Amparo Urango, Luz; Rojano, Benjamín; Maldonado, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Mango pulp contains ascorbic acid, carotenoids, polyphenols, terpenoids and fiber which are healthy and could protect against colon cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative and preventive capacity of an aqueous extract of Mangifera indica cv. Azúcar on a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (SW480) and in a rodent model of colorectal cancer, respectively. The content of total phenolics, flavonoids and carotenoids were also analyzed in the extract. SW480 cell growth was inhibited in a dose and time dependent manner by 22.3% after a 72h exposure to the extract (200 µg/ mL). Colon carcinogenesis was initiated in Balb/c mice by two intra-peritoneal injections of azoxymethane (AOM) at the third and fourth week of giving mango in drinking water (0.3%, 0.6%, 1.25%). After 10 weeks of treatment, in the colon of mice receiving 0.3% mango, aberrant crypt foci formation was inhibited more than 60% (p=0,05) and the inhibition was dose-dependent when compared with controls receiving water. These results show that mango pulp, a natural food, non toxic, part of human being diet, contains bioactive compounds able to reduce growth of tumor cells and to prevent the appearance of precancerous lesions in colon during carcinogenesis initiation.

  9. Optical coherence tomography imaging of colonic crypts in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welge, Weston A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2016-03-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are abnormal epithelial lesions that precede development of colonic polyps. As the earliest morphological change in the development of colorectal cancer, ACF is a highly studied phenomenon. The most common method of imaging ACF is chromoendoscopy using methylene blue as a contrast agent. Narrow- band imaging is a contrast-agent-free modality for imaging the colonic crypts. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an attractive alternative to chromoendoscopy and narrow-band imaging because it can resolve the crypt structure at sufficiently high sampling while simultaneously providing depth-resolved data. We imaged in vivo the distal 15 mm of colon in the azoxymethane (AOM) mouse model of colorectal cancer using a commercial swept-source OCT system and a miniature endoscope designed and built in-house. We present en face images of the colonic crypts and demonstrate that different patterns in healthy and adenoma tissue can be seen. These patterns correspond to those reported in the literature. We have previously demonstrated early detection of colon adenoma using OCT by detecting minute thickening of the mucosa. By combining mucosal thickness measurement with imaging of the crypt structure, OCT can be used to correlate ACF and adenoma development in space and time. These results suggest that OCT may be a superior imaging modality for studying the connection between ACF and colorectal cancer.

  10. Colonization with the enteric protozoa Blastocystis is associated with increased diversity of human gut bacterial microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Audebert, Christophe; Even, Gaël; Cian, Amandine; Safadi, Dima El; Certad, Gabriela; Delhaes, Laurence; Pereira, Bruno; Nourrisson, Céline; Poirier, Philippe; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Delbac, Frédéric; Morelle, Christelle; Bastien, Patrick; Lachaud, Laurence; Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Botterel, Françoise; Candolfi, Ermanno; Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Morio, Florent; Pomares, Christelle; Rabodonirina, Meja; Loywick, Alexandre; Merlin, Sophie; Viscogliosi, Eric; Chabé, Magali

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of commensal bacterial populations, a phenomenon known as dysbiosis, are linked to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, or to infections by diverse enteric pathogens. Blastocystis is one of the most common single-celled eukaryotes detected in human faecal samples. However, the clinical significance of this widespread colonization remains unclear, and its pathogenic potential is controversial. To address the issue of Blastocystis pathogenicity, we investigated the impact of colonization by this protist on the composition of the human gut microbiota. For that purpose, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 48 Blastocystis-colonized patients and 48 Blastocystis-free subjects and performed an Ion Torrent 16S rDNA gene sequencing to decipher the Blastocystis-associated gut microbiota. Here, we report a higher bacterial diversity in faecal microbiota of Blastocystis colonized patients, a higher abundance of Clostridia as well as a lower abundance of Enterobacteriaceae. Our results contribute to suggesting that Blastocystis colonization is usually associated with a healthy gut microbiota, rather than with gut dysbiosis generally observed in metabolic or infectious inflammatory diseases of the lower gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27147260

  11. EFFECT OF MEAL INGESTION ON ILEOCOLONIC AND COLONIC TRANSIT IN HEALTH AND IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Deiteren, Annemie; Camilleri, Michael; Burton, Duane; McKinzie, Sanna; Rao, Archana; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Postprandial symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have been associated with increased bowel contractility. Aim To compare ileocolonic and colonic responses to feeding in health and IBS. Methods We prospectively analyzed data from separate research trials in122 IBS patients and 41 healthy volunteers. Ileocolonic transit (ICT) was evaluated before [colonic filling (CF)3h] and immediately after (CF4h) a standard lunch at 3h45min, and 2h thereafter. Colonic geometric center (GC) was calculated 2h (GC6h) after lunch ingested at 4h (GC4h) and directly after (GC8h) a standard dinner ingested at 7h45min. Results ICT immediately after eating was higher in IBS-D than health (23.1±2.4% vs. 17.5±2.8%, p=0.059). ICT 2h after lunch was similar between groups (p=0.55). There was significant overall group difference in colonic transit 2h post-lunch (p=0.045), particularly in IBS-C (GC6-GC4, Δ 0.29±0.08) vs. health (Δ 0.56±0.12 GC units). Conclusions After feeding, ICT is increased in IBS-D, whereas colonic transit is blunted in IBS-C. PMID:19949866

  12. Microbial colonization in orthodontic mini-implants.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Amanda Osório Ayres; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Alviano, Daniela Sales; Siqueira, José Freitas; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu; Nojima, Matilde da Cunha Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Peri-implant inflammation contributes for loss of secondary stability of orthodontic mini-implants. The investigation of microbial colonization in this area would benefit its control, and consequently favor the long-term success of mini-implants. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the establishment and the evolution of microbial colonization process in orthodontic mini-implants for 3 months, since the time of their installation. One-hundred and fifty samples collected from 15 mini-implants were investigated from baseline up to 3 months. The biological material was obtained from peri-implant area using paper points. Nonspecific, Streptococcus spp, Lactobacillus casei and Candida spp colonizations were analyzed by cell growth methods. Porphyromonas gingivalis colonization was observed by 16S rDNA-directed polymerase chain reaction. Data from cell growth were submitted to the Wilcoxon sign rank test and results from molecular analysis were presented in a descriptive way. There was no significant difference in the microbial colonization among the examined time intervals, except for Streptococcus spp, between baseline and 24 h, which characterized the initial colonization in this time interval. Lactobacillus casei and Candida spp colonizations were insignificant. No Porphyromonas gingivalis was detected among the analyzed samples. The microbial colonization of mini-implants did not significantly change during the study. However, it should be monitored by orthodontists, since it is an important factor for mini-implants success.

  13. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  14. Promoting healthy sleep.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    2016-03-09

    Nurses are accustomed to helping others with their sleep problems and dealing with issues such as pain that may delay or interrupt sleep. However, they may be less familiar with what constitutes a healthy night's sleep. This article examines what is known about the process and purpose of sleep, and examines the ways in which factors that promote wakefulness and sleep combine to help establish a normal circadian rhythm. Theories relating to the function of sleep are discussed and research is considered that suggests that sleep deficit may lead to metabolic risks, including heart disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and several types of cancer.

  15. The Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on the Colon in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiannan; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Wenlong; Chai, Wei; Wu, Jiuping; Guo, Shuai; Fang, Gang; Zhou, Xulong; Zhang, Jianhua; Xu, Kecheng; Zeng, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a method of targeted cell ablation which has been suggested as a potential cancer therapy as it leaves structures such as blood vessels and the extracellular matrix intact, thereby allowing the rapid recovery of healthy tissue. Here, we investigated the effects of IRE on the colon in vivo in a porcine model. Methods IRE ablation was performed on the colon walls of 12 female Tibet mini-pigs, creating a total of 24 lesions. Lesions were monitored periodically by endoscopy. The pigs were euthanized 7, 14, 21 or 28 days after IRE ablation and the colons harvested for gross and histological analysis. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Masson’s trichrome (MT) stain and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results All pigs tolerated the ablation procedure without serious clinical symptoms or complications. There was no evidence of perforation by endoscopy or gross postmortem examination. All lesions were characterized by necrotic cell death with mild inflammation and hyperemia, with a sharp demarcation between ablated and adjacent normal tissue. A fibrous scar was observed in the ablated colon tissue. Histological analysis revealed damage to each layer of the colon. Histopathology findings also showed the preservation of extracellular structures and the recovery of the ablated colon. Conclusions The complete ablation of the target area, its rapid recovery and the lack of posttreatment symptoms suggest that IRE ablation may be a promising therapy for tumors located adjacent to or violating the colon wall. PMID:27907057

  16. Proportion of Colon Cancer Attributable to Lifestyle in a Cohort of US Women

    PubMed Central

    Giovannucci, Edward; Willett, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Background Many modifiable lifestyle factors have been associated with colon cancer risk, but less is known about their effect on disease when considered together. Estimating the proportion of colon cancer cases that could be prevented by the adoption of combined modifiable lifestyle behaviors will provide important insights into disease prevention. Methods In the Nurses’ Health Study, we defined a low-risk group according to a combination of six factors: body-mass index < 25kg/m2, physical activity of ≥ 21 metabolic equivalent of task per week, alcohol consumption ≤ 30g/day, cigarette smoking <10 pack years before the age of 30, current use of multivitamins for ≥ 15 years, and total calcium intake ≥700mg/day. A composite risk score index was created and the population attributable risk(PAR%) was calculated after accounting for other known risk or protective factors. Results We documented 1,127 colon cancer cases among 81,092 over 24 years of follow-up. Compared to women in the lowest-risk category, the women at all other exposure levels had a hazard ratio of colon cancer of 1.81(95% confidence interval, 1.15-2.85). The score index was significantly and linearly related to an increasing risk of colon cancer (P-value for trend <0.0001). The PAR% of the six risk factors considered together in relation to colon cancer was 0.37(95%CI: 0.09-0.60). When regular aspirin use(two tablets/week for 6 or more years) was included with the other low-risk behaviors, the PAR% increased to 0.43(95%CI: 0.14-0.65). Conclusions Beyond the known benefit from colonoscopy/sigmoidoscopy, key behavior modifications and adherence to a healthy lifestyle could avoid approximately 37% of colon cancer cases among women. PMID:26092381

  17. Alterations of the Ileal and Colonic Mucosal Microbiota in Canine Chronic Enteropathies

    PubMed Central

    Cassmann, Eric; White, Robin; Atherly, Todd; Wang, Chong; Sun, Yaxuan; Khoda, Samir; Mosher, Curtis; Ackermann, Mark; Jergens, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background The intestinal microbiota is increasingly linked to the pathogenesis of chronic enteropathies (CE) in dogs. While imbalances in duodenal and fecal microbial communities have been associated with mucosal inflammation, relatively little is known about alterations in mucosal bacteria seen with CE involving the ileum and colon. Aim To investigate the composition and spatial organization of mucosal microbiota in dogs with CE and controls. Methods Tissue sections from endoscopic biopsies of the ileum and colon from 19 dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 6 dogs with granulomatous colitis (GC), 12 dogs with intestinal neoplasia, and 15 controls were studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on a quantifiable basis. Results The ileal and colonic mucosa of healthy dogs and dogs with CE is predominantly colonized by bacteria localized to free and adherent mucus compartments. CE dogs harbored more (P < 0.05) mucosal bacteria belonging to the Clostridium-coccoides/Eubacterium rectale group, Bacteroides, Enterobacteriaceae, and Escherichia coli versus controls. Within the CE group, IBD dogs had increased (P < 0.05) Enterobacteriaceae and E. coli bacteria attached onto surface epithelia or invading within the intestinal mucosa. Bacterial invasion with E. coli was observed in the ileal and colonic mucosa of dogs with GC (P < 0.05). Dogs with intestinal neoplasia had increased (P < 0.05) adherent (total bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli) and invasive (Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli, and Bacteroides) bacteria in biopsy specimens. Increased numbers of total bacteria adherent to the colonic mucosa were associated with clinical disease severity in IBD dogs (P < 0.05). Conclusion Pathogenic events in canine CE are associated with different populations of the ileal and colonic mucosal microbiota. PMID:26840462

  18. Nuclear Matrix Proteins in Human Colon Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesee, Susan K.; Meneghini, Marc D.; Szaro, Robert P.; Wu, Ying-Jye

    1994-03-01

    The nuclear matrix is the nonchromatin scaffolding of the nucleus. This structure confers nuclear shape, organizes chromatin, and appears to contain important regulatory proteins. Tissue specific nuclear matrix proteins have been found in the rat, mouse, and human. In this study we compared high-resolution two-dimensional gel electropherograms of nuclear matrix protein patterns found in human colon tumors with those from normal colon epithelia. Tumors were obtained from 18 patients undergoing partial colectomy for adenocarcinoma of the colon and compared with tissue from 10 normal colons. We have identified at least six proteins which were present in 18 of 18 colon tumors and 0 of 10 normal tissues, as well as four proteins present in 0 of 18 tumors and in 10 of 10 normal tissues. These data, which corroborate similar findings of cancer-specific nuclear matrix proteins in prostate and breast, suggest that nuclear matrix proteins may serve as important markers for at least some types of cancer.

  19. The role of colonization in the dynamics of patchy populations of a cyclic vole species.

    PubMed

    Glorvigen, Petter; Gundersen, Gry; Andreassen, Harry P; Ims, Rolf A

    2013-09-01

    The crash phase of vole populations with cyclic dynamics regularly leads to vast areas of uninhabited habitats. Yet although the capacity for cyclic voles to re-colonize such empty space is likely to be large and predicted to have become evolved as a distinct life history trait, the processes of colonization and its effect on the spatio-temporal dynamics have been little studied. Here we report from an experiment with root voles (Microtus oeconomus) specifically targeted at quantifying the process of colonization of empty patches from distant source patches and its resultant effect on local vole deme size variation in a patchy landscape. Three experimental factors: habitat quality, predation risk and inter-patch distance were employed among 24 habitat patches in a 100 × 300-m experimental area. The first-born cohort in the spring efficiently colonized almost all empty patches irrespective of the degree of patch isolation and predation risk, but this was dependent on habitat quality. Just after the initial colonization wave the deme sizes in patches of the same quality were underdispersed relative to Poisson variance, indicating regulated (density-dependent) settlement. Towards the end of the breeding season local demographic processes acted to smooth out the initial post-colonization differences among source and colonization patches, and among patches of initially different quality. However, at this time demographic stochasticity had also given rise to a large (overdispersed) variation in deme sizes that may have contributed to an overshadowing of the effect of other factors. The results of this experiment confirmed our expectation that the space-filling capacity of voles is large. The costs associated with transience appeared to be so low, at least at the spatial scale considered in this experiment, that such costs are not likely to substantially constrain habitat selection and colonization in the increase phase of cyclic patchy populations.

  20. Proteases of an early colonizer can hinder Streptococcus mutans colonization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, B-Y; Deutch, A; Hong, J; Kuramitsu, H K

    2011-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary cariogen that produces several virulence factors that are modulated by a competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) signaling system. In this study, we sought to determine if proteases produced by early dental plaque colonizers such as Streptococcus gordonii interfere with the subsequent colonization of S. mutans BM71 on the existing streptococcal biofilms. We demonstrated that S. mutans BM71 colonized much less efficiently in vitro on streptococcal biofilms than on Actinomyces naeslundii biofilms. Several oral streptococci, relative to A. naeslundii, produced proteases that inactivated the S. mutans CSP. We further demonstrated that cell protein extracts from S. gordonii, but not from A. naeslundii, interfered with S. mutans BM71 colonization. In addition, S. mutans BM71 colonized more efficiently on the sgc protease knockout mutant of S. gordonii than on the parent biofilms. In conclusion, proteases of early colonizers can interfere with subsequent colonization by S. mutans in vitro.

  1. [Mesocolic excision for colonic adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Debove, Clotilde; Lefèvre, Jérémie H; Parc, Yann

    2017-02-01

    On the same principle than total mesorectal excision in rectal cancer, the effect of complete mesocolic excision on short and long-term outcomes is actually evaluated for colonic adenocarcinoma. This method, usually performed for left colectomy, offers a surgical specimen of higher quality, with a larger number of lymph nodes harvested. For right colectomy, surgical specifications make it less common complete mesocolic excision and conventional surgery offer comparable outcomes, as regards to postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. No differences are identified between laparoscopic and open surgery. On oncologic outcomes, only two studies report a higher free-disease survival after complete mesocolic excision. Then, there is evidence that complete mesocolic excision offers a higher rate of specimen with extensive lymph node resection, without increased morbidity rate. However, there is limited evidence that it leads to improve long-term oncological outcomes.

  2. Microbes, microbiota, and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Sears, Cynthia L; Garrett, Wendy S

    2014-03-12

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) presents a considerable disease burden worldwide. The human colon is also an anatomical location with the largest number of microbes. It is natural, therefore, to anticipate a role for microbes, particularly bacteria, in colorectal carcinogenesis. The increasing accessibility of microbial meta'omics is fueling a surge in our understanding of the role that microbes and the microbiota play in CRC. In this review, we will discuss recent insights into contributions of the microbiota to CRC and explore conceptual frameworks for evaluating the role of microbes in cancer causation. We also highlight new findings on candidate CRC-potentiating species and current knowledge gaps. Finally, we explore the roles of microbial metabolism as it relates to bile acids, xenobiotics, and diet in the etiology and therapeutics of CRC.

  3. Microbes, Microbiota and Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Cynthia L.; Garrett, Wendy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Colorectal cancer (CRC) presents a considerable disease burden worldwide. The human colon is also an anatomical location with the largest number of microbes. It is natural therefore to anticipate a role for microbes, particularly bacteria, in colorectal carcinogenesis. The increasing accessibility of microbial meta’omics is fueling a surge in our understanding of the role that microbes and the microbiota play in CRC. In this review, we will discuss recent insights into contributions of the microbiota to CRC and explore conceptual frameworks for evaluating the role of microbes in cancer causation. We also highlight new findings on candidate CRC-potentiating species and current knowledge gaps. Finally, we explore the roles of microbial metabolism as it relates to bile acids, xenobiotics, and diet in the etiology and therapeutics of CRC. PMID:24629338

  4. Developmental origins of colon smooth muscle dysfunction in IBS-like rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingjie; Winston, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that subsets of adult and pediatric patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have prior exposures to psychological or inflammatory stress. We investigated the cellular mechanisms of colonic smooth muscle dysfunction in adult rats subjected to neonatal inflammation. Ten-day-old male rat pups received 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid to induce colonic inflammation. Colonic circular smooth muscle strips were obtained 6 to 8 wk later. We found that about half of the neonate pups subjected to inflammatory insult showed a significant increase in expression of the pore-forming α1C-subunit of Cav1.2b channels in adult life. These were the same rats in whom Vip mRNA increased in the colon muscularis externae. Additional experiments showed reduced interaction of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 3 with α1C1b promoter that increased the acetylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) in the core promoter region. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) treatment of naïve muscularis externae swiftly recruited CREB-binding protein (CBP) to the α1C1b promoter and dissociated HDAC3 from this region to initiate transcription. The CBP interaction with the α1C1b promoter was transient, but the dissociation of HDAC3 persisted to sustain H3K9 hyperacetylation and increase in transcription. Intraperitoneal treatment of adult naïve rats with butyrate mimicked the effects of neonatal colon inflammation. We concluded that neonatal inflammation upregulates VIP in the colon muscularis externae, which modulates epigenetic events at the α1C1b promoter to activate α1C1b gene transcription. Inflammatory insult in early life may be one of the etiologies of smooth muscle dysfunction in adult life, which contributes to the altered motility function in patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS. PMID:23886858

  5. Correlation between colonic secretion and colonic motility in rats: Role of ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsien-Hao; Ting, Ching-Heng; Syu, Yu-Fong; Chang, Shi-Chuan; Chen, Chih-Yen

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the relationship between colonic secretory function and colonic motility. METHODS Using a rat model chronically implanted with intracerebroventricular (ICV) and cecal catheters, we validated the correlation between colonic secretion and colonic motor functions, as well as the role of ICV injection volume. RESULTS Compared to saline controls (5 μL/rat), ICV acyl ghrelin at 1 nmol/5 μL enhanced the total fecal weight, accelerated the colonic transit time, and increased the fecal pellet output during the first hour post-injection, while ICV des-acyl ghrelin at 1 nmol/5 μL only accelerated the colonic transit time. These stimulatory effects on colonic motility and/or secretion from acyl ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin disappeared when the ICV injection volume increased to 10 μL compared with saline controls (10 μL/rat). Additionally, the ICV injection of 10 μL of saline significantly shortened the colonic transit time compared with the ICV injection of 5 μL of saline. The total fecal weight during the first hour post-injection correlated with the colonic transit time and fecal pellet output after the ICV injection of acyl ghrelin (1 nmol/5 μL), whereas the total fecal weight during the first hour post-injection correlated with the fecal pellet output but not the colonic transit time after the ICV injection of des-acyl ghrelin (1 nmol/5 μL). CONCLUSION Colonic secretion does not always correlate with colonic motility in response to different colonic stimulations. Acyl ghrelin stimulates colonic secretion. PMID:28028362

  6. Destination Mars: Colonization via Initial One-way Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze-Makuch, D.; Davies, P.

    Earth is located in a dangerous part of the universe. Threats to life on Earth are manifold and range from asteroid impacts to supernova explosions and from supervolcano eruptions to human-induced disasters. If the survival of the human species is to be ensured for the long term, then life on Earth has to spread to other planetary bodies. Mars is the most Earth-like planet we currently know and is the second closest planet; further it possesses a moderate surface gravity, an atmosphere, abundant water and carbon dioxide, together with a range of essential minerals. Thus, Mars is ideally suited to be a first colonization target. Here we argue that the most practical way that this can be accomplished is via a series of initial one-way human missions.

  7. Chicken Caecal Microbiome Modifications Induced by Campylobacter jejuni Colonization and by a Non-Antibiotic Feed Additive

    PubMed Central

    Thibodeau, Alexandre; Fravalo, Philippe; Yergeau, Étienne; Arsenault, Julie; Lahaye, Ludovic; Letellier, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important zoonotic foodborne pathogen causing acute gastroenteritis in humans. Chickens are often colonized at very high numbers by C. jejuni, up to 109 CFU per gram of caecal content, with no detrimental effects on their health. Farm control strategies are being developed to lower the C. jejuni contamination of chicken food products in an effort to reduce human campylobacteriosis incidence. It is believed that intestinal microbiome composition may affect gut colonization by such undesirable bacteria but, although the chicken microbiome is being increasingly characterized, information is lacking on the factors affecting its modulation, especially by foodborne pathogens. This study monitored the effects of C. jejuni chicken caecal colonization on the chicken microbiome in healthy chickens. It also evaluated the capacity of a feed additive to affect caecal bacterial populations and to lower C. jejuni colonization. From day-0, chickens received or not a microencapsulated feed additive and were inoculated or not with C. jejuni at 14 days of age. Fresh caecal content was harvested at 35 days of age. The caecal microbiome was characterized by real time quantitative PCR and Ion Torrent sequencing. We observed that the feed additive lowered C. jejuni caecal count by 0.7 log (p<0.05). Alpha-diversity of the caecal microbiome was not affected by C. jejuni colonization or by the feed additive. C. jejuni colonization modified the caecal beta-diversity while the feed additive did not. We observed that C. jejuni colonization was associated with an increase of Bifidobacterium and affected Clostridia and Mollicutes relative abundances. The feed additive was associated with a lower Streptococcus relative abundance. The caecal microbiome remained relatively unchanged despite high C. jejuni colonization. The feed additive was efficient in lowering C. jejuni colonization while not disturbing the caecal microbiome. PMID:26161743

  8. Chicken Caecal Microbiome Modifications Induced by Campylobacter jejuni Colonization and by a Non-Antibiotic Feed Additive.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Alexandre; Fravalo, Philippe; Yergeau, Étienne; Arsenault, Julie; Lahaye, Ludovic; Letellier, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important zoonotic foodborne pathogen causing acute gastroenteritis in humans. Chickens are often colonized at very high numbers by C. jejuni, up to 10(9) CFU per gram of caecal content, with no detrimental effects on their health. Farm control strategies are being developed to lower the C. jejuni contamination of chicken food products in an effort to reduce human campylobacteriosis incidence. It is believed that intestinal microbiome composition may affect gut colonization by such undesirable bacteria but, although the chicken microbiome is being increasingly characterized, information is lacking on the factors affecting its modulation, especially by foodborne pathogens. This study monitored the effects of C. jejuni chicken caecal colonization on the chicken microbiome in healthy chickens. It also evaluated the capacity of a feed additive to affect caecal bacterial populations and to lower C. jejuni colonization. From day-0, chickens received or not a microencapsulated feed additive and were inoculated or not with C. jejuni at 14 days of age. Fresh caecal content was harvested at 35 days of age. The caecal microbiome was characterized by real time quantitative PCR and Ion Torrent sequencing. We observed that the feed additive lowered C. jejuni caecal count by 0.7 log (p<0.05). Alpha-diversity of the caecal microbiome was not affected by C. jejuni colonization or by the feed additive. C. jejuni colonization modified the caecal beta-diversity while the feed additive did not. We observed that C. jejuni colonization was associated with an increase of Bifidobacterium and affected Clostridia and Mollicutes relative abundances. The feed additive was associated with a lower Streptococcus relative abundance. The caecal microbiome remained relatively unchanged despite high C. jejuni colonization. The feed additive was efficient in lowering C. jejuni colonization while not disturbing the caecal microbiome.

  9. Does chronic supplementation of the diet with dietary fibre extracted from pea or carrot affect colonic motility in man?

    PubMed

    Guédon, C; Ducrotté, P; Antoine, J M; Denis, P; Colin, R; Lerebours, E

    1996-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess, in healthy volunteers and under physiological conditions, the acceptability, clinical tolerance and effects on colonic motility of chronic supplementation of the usual diet with new dietary fibre sources. Three studies were carried out, one after a period of habitual diet, and two after randomized 3-week periods of supplementation with fibre extracted either from pea hulls or carrots, added to the meals as a fine powder. The 24 h motility was recorded on an unprepared colon at five levels to determine the initiation site and the number of high amplitude propagated contractions (HAPC) and to quantify motor activity every 30 min, particularly in the two periods following lunch and breakfast. With the habitual diet the motility pattern was an irregular alternation of quiescence and sporadic non-propagated contractions. HAPC always started from the ascending colon and occurred mainly after breakfast. With either type of fibre the 24 h motor profiles, the 24 h variations and the number of HAPC were not significantly modified but a more distal initiation of HAPC was found. The colonic postprandial motor response was more diffuse after dietary enrichment with carrot fibre than after enrichment with pea-hull fibre. In healthy volunteers the long-term addition of fibre extracted from pea hulls and carrots to the usual diet was easy and well-tolerated without clinical side-effects, but with limited colonic motor effects. However, the more distal initiation of HAPC observed could be deleterious.

  10. Reversible Projection Technique for Colon Unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianhua; Chowdhury, Ananda S.; Aman, Javed; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Colon unfolding provides an efficient way to navigate the colon in CT colonography. Most existing unfolding techniques only computed forward projections. When radiologists find abnormalities or conduct measurements on the unfolded view (which is often quicker and easier), it is difficult to locate the corresponding region on the 3D view for further examination (which is more accurate and reliable). To address this, we propose a reversible projection technique for colon unfolding. The method makes use of advanced algorithms including rotation-minimizing frames, recursive ring sets, mesh skinning and cylindrical projection. Both forward and reverse transformations are computed for points on the colon surface. Therefore, it allows for detecting and measuring polyps on the unfolded view and mapping them back to the 3D surface. We generated realistic colon simulation incorporating most colon characteristics such as curved centerline, variable distention, haustral folds, teniae coli and colonic polyps. Our method was tested on both the simulated data and 110 clinical CT colonography data. Comparison of polyp size measurements on the unfolded view and the 3D view clearly demonstrates the importance of our reversible projection technique. PMID:20542756

  11. Colonic protein fermentation and promotion of colon carcinogenesis by thermolyzed casein

    PubMed Central

    Corpet, Denis E.; Yin, Y.; Zhang, X. M.; Rémésy, C.; Stamp, D.; Medline, A.; Thompson, L.U.; Bruce, W. R.; Archer, M. C.

    1995-01-01

    Thermolyzed casein is known to promote the growth of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and colon cancer when it is fed to rats that have been initiated with azoxymethane. We speculated that the promotion was a consequence of increased colonic protein fermentation (i.e., that the thermolysis of the casein decreases its digestibility, increases the amount of protein reaching the colon, and increases colonic protein fermentation and that the potentially toxic products of this fermentation promote colon carcinogenesis). We found that the thermolysis of casein reduces its digestibility and increases colonic protein fermentation, as assessed by fecal ammonium and urinary phenol, cresol, and indol-3-ol. Thermolysis of two other proteins, soy and egg white protein, also increases colonic protein fermentation with increased fecal ammonia and urinary phenols, and thermolysis of all three proteins increases the levels of ammonia and butyric, valeric, and i-valeric acids in the cecal contents. We found, however, that the increased protein fermentation observed with thermolysis is not associated with promotion of colon carcinogenesis. With casein, the kinetics of protein fermentation with increasing thermolysis time are clearly different from the kinetics of promotion of ACF growth. The formation of the fermentation products was highest when the protein was thermolyzed for one hour, whereas promotion was highest for protein that had been thermolyzed for two or more hours. With soy and egg white, thermolysis increased colonic protein fermentation but did not promote colon carcinogenesis. Thus, although thermolysis of dietary casein increases colonic protein fermentation, products of this fermentation do not appear to be responsible for the promotion of colon carcinogenesis. Indeed, the results suggest that protein fermentation products do not play an important role in colon cancer promotion. PMID:7603887

  12. Healthy Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Ong, Ken K

    2017-01-01

    Observational and experimental studies indicate a remarkably consistent association between rapid growth and weight gain during infancy and higher risks for obesity in later childhood and adult life. This association appears to be equally relevant to breastfed and formula milk-fed infants, and infants small for gestational age and with normal birth weight. The type of infant milk feeding, energy intake, and milk nutrient composition are important determinants of infant growth and weight gain. There is also accumulating evidence that genetic factors related to adult obesity susceptibility act in the central nervous system to regulate intrinsic levels of infant appetite and satiety, and they impact on infant dietary behaviors to influence growth and weight gain. These genetic factors indicate an early life trajectory to later obesity that starts with rapid infancy gains in weight, length, and fat and lean mass, before the subsequent emergence of high BMI and adiposity. Better understanding of the anthropometric, metabolic and behavioral correlates of this trajectory will help to enable early-life prediction and preventive strategies against obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  13. Neuropilin-1 in Human Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Alexander A.; Fan, Fan; Liu, Wen Biao; Ahmad, Syed A.; Stoeltzing, Oliver; Reinmuth, Niels; Bielenberg, Diane; Bucana, Corazon D.; Klagsbrun, Michael; Ellis, Lee M.

    2004-01-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1), a recently identified co-receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor, is expressed by several nongastrointestinal tumor types and enhances prostate cancer angiogenesis and growth in preclinical models. We investigated the expression and regulation of NRP-1 and the effect of NRP-1 overexpression on angiogenesis and growth of human colon adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. NRP-1 was expressed in 20 of 20 human colon adenocarcinoma specimens but not in the adjacent nonmalignant colonic mucosa. By reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis, NRP-1 mRNA was expressed in seven of seven colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Subcutaneous xenografts of stably transfected KM12SM/LM2 human colon cancer cells overexpressing NRP-1 led to increased tumor growth and angiogenesis in nude mice. In in vitro assays, conditioned medium from NRP-1-transfected cell lines led to an increase in endothelial cell migration, but did not affect endothelial cell growth. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) led to induction of NRP-1 in human colon adenocarcinoma cells and selective blockade of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) decreased constitutive and EGF-induced NRP-1 expression. Blockade of the Erk 1/2 and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways also led to a decrease in constitutive and EGF-induced NRP-1 expression. These findings demonstrate the ubiquitous expression of NRP-1 in human colon cancer and suggest that NRP-1 may contribute to colon cancer angiogenesis and growth. This study also suggests that EGF and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways play an important role in NRP-1 regulation in colon cancer cells. PMID:15161648

  14. Healthy communities must also be sustainable communities.

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, T

    2000-01-01

    The author contends that healthy communities must be both environmentally and socially sustainable, given that health depends on the quality of the built and natural environments, and that global change resulting from the industrial economy is affecting the web of life. He argues that suburban sprawl wastes scarce resources and disproportionately places those resources in the hands of suburban dwellers. Urban areas can be made more environmentally sustainable, especially with respect to energy consumption, which will help reduce air pollution and climate change and contribute in other ways to improved health. Images p155-a PMID:10968747

  15. PARP-1 expression is increased in colon adenoma and carcinoma and correlates with OGG1.

    PubMed

    Dziaman, Tomasz; Ludwiczak, Hubert; Ciesla, Jaroslaw M; Banaszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Winczura, Alicja; Chmielarczyk, Mateusz; Wisniewska, Ewa; Marszalek, Andrzej; Tudek, Barbara; Olinski, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    The ethiology of colon cancer is largely dependent on inflammation driven oxidative stress. The analysis of 8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) level in leukocyte DNA of healthy controls (138 individuals), patients with benign adenomas (AD, 137 individuals) and with malignant carcinomas (CRC, 169 individuals) revealed a significant increase in the level of 8-oxodGuo in leukocyte DNA of AD and CRC patients in comparison to controls. The counteracting mechanism is base excision repair, in which OGG1 and PARP-1 play a key role. We investigated the level of PARP-1 and OGG1 mRNA and protein in diseased and marginal, normal tissues taken from AD and CRC patients and in leukocytes taken from the patients as well as from healthy subjects. In colon tumors the PARP-1 mRNA level was higher than in unaffected colon tissue and in polyp tissues. A high positive correlation was found between PARP-1 and OGG1 mRNA levels in all investigated tissues. This suggests reciprocal influence of PARP-1 and OGG1 on their expression and stability, and may contribute to progression of colon cancer. PARP-1 and OGG1 proteins level was several fold higher in polyps and CRC in comparison to normal colon tissues. Individuals bearing the Cys326Cys genotype of OGG1 were characterized by higher PARP-1 protein level in diseased tissues than the Ser326Cys and Ser326Ser genotypes. Aforementioned result may suggest that the diseased cells with polymorphic OGG1 recruit more PARP protein, which is necessary to remove 8-oxodGuo. Thus, patients with decreased activity of OGG1/polymorphism of the OGG1 gene and higher 8-oxodGuo level may be more susceptible to treatment with PARP-1 inhibitors.

  16. Terra Incognita - Cosmological Theory and Space Colonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolkowsky, G.

    Philosophical and scientific cosmological theory may impact human motivation to colonize space. Isotropic theories regarding cosmic structure and function offer no a-priori advantages to the habitation of any given cosmic zone, and therefore deprive colonization ideology of a cosmological motive. In contrast, certain aniso- tropic theories, which assign superior qualities to some cosmic zones over others, provide such motives. It follows that future space colonization may partially depend on the emergence of anisotropic cosmological theories, some of which are already contained in Western intellectual tradition but are not currently accepted.

  17. Leadership and Work-Life Balance.

    PubMed

    Mattock, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Simply stated, work-life balance is something that is both difficult to define and difficult to achieve. Leaders, throughout the continuum of trauma care, need to have a sound understanding of what work-life balance means and set an example of a healthy work-life balance for those they lead. This article offers strategies for enhancing work-life balance and challenges individuals to use self-reflection as a means to furthering their personal and professional growth.

  18. Starship Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2009-01-01

    The design and mass cost of a starship and its life support system are investigated. The mission plan for a multi generational interstellar voyage to colonize a new planet is used to describe the starship design, including the crew habitat, accommodations, and life support. Only current technology is assumed. Highly reliable life support systems can be provided with reasonably small additional mass, suggesting that they can support long duration missions. Bioregenerative life support, growing crop plants that provide food, water, and oxygen, has been thought to need less mass than providing stored food for long duration missions. The large initial mass of hydroponics systems is paid for over time by saving the mass of stored food. However, the yearly logistics mass required to support a bioregenerative system exceeds the mass of food solids it produces, so that supplying stored dehydrated food always requires less mass than bioregenerative food production. A mixed system that grows about half the food and supplies the other half dehydrated has advantages that allow it to breakeven with stored dehydrated food in about 66 years. However, moderate increases in the hydroponics system mass to achieve high reliability, such as adding spares that double the system mass and replacing the initial system every 100 years, increase the mass cost of bioregenerative life support. In this case, the high reliability half food growing, half food supplying system does not breakeven for 389 years. An even higher reliability half and half system, with three times original system mass and replacing the system every 50 years, never breaks even. Growing food for starship life support requires more mass than providing dehydrated food, even for multigeneration voyages of hundreds of years. The benefits of growing some food may justify the added mass cost. Much more efficient recycling food production is wanted but may not be possible. A single multigenerational interstellar voyage to

  19. [Oropharyngeal dysphagia as a first manifestation of dermatomyositis associated with colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Cobos, J C; Pérez-Figueroa, J; Zúñiga-Ahuet, G; Dorantes, M A; Grube-Pagola, P; Ruíz-Juárez, I; Remes-Troche, J M

    2010-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy associated with characteristic skin manifestations. In 15-20% of patients present with dysphagia, it is associated with nutritional deficiency, predisposition to aspiration pneumonia, decreased quality of life and a poor prognosis. There is a well-recognized association between DM and malignancies, including ovarian, breast, lung, and colon cancer. We report a case of a male patient aged 85 with DM associated with colon adenocarcinoma; progressive dysphagia was the first manifestation, and subsequently proximal muscle weakness and typical skin lesions were present. Given the clinical suspicion of DM as a paraneoplastic syndrome, tumor markers were order and a high carcinoembryonic antigen was found. A colonoscopy study and histopathologic examination revealed the presence of adenocarcinoma of the colon.

  20. Colon Capsule Endoscopy for the Detection of Colorectal Polyps: An Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Palimaka, Stefan; Blackhouse, Gord; Goeree, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Ontario. Most cases of colorectal cancer are preventable through early diagnosis and the removal of precancerous polyps. Colon capsule endoscopy is a non-invasive test for detecting colorectal polyps. Objectives The objectives of this analysis were to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and the impact on the Ontario health budget of implementing colon capsule endoscopy for detecting advanced colorectal polyps among adult patients who have been referred for computed tomographic (CT) colonography. Methods We performed an original cost-effectiveness analysis to assess the additional cost of CT colonography and colon capsule endoscopy resulting from misdiagnoses. We generated diagnostic accuracy data from a clinical evidence-based analysis (reported separately), and we developed a deterministic Markov model to estimate the additional long-term costs and life-years lost due to false-negative results. We then also performed a budget impact analysis using data from Ontario administrative sources. One-year costs were estimated for CT colonography and colon capsule endoscopy (replacing all CT colonography procedures, and replacing only those CT colonography procedures in patients with an incomplete colonoscopy within the previous year). We conducted this analysis from the payer perspective. Results Using the point estimates of diagnostic accuracy from the head-to-head study between colon capsule endoscopy and CT colonography, we found the additional cost of false-positive results for colon capsule endoscopy to be $0.41 per patient, while additional false-negatives for the CT colonography arm generated an added cost of $116 per patient, with 0.0096 life-years lost per patient due to cancer. This results in an additional cost of $26,750 per life-year gained for colon capsule endoscopy compared with CT colonography. The total 1-year cost to replace all CT colonography procedures with colon capsule