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Sample records for heart disease screening

  1. Critical congenital heart disease screening.

    PubMed

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a heart lesion for which neonates require early surgical intervention to survive. Without intervention, the rates of mortality and survival with significant disability are extremely high. Early diagnosis can potentially improve health outcomes in newborns with CCHD. Until recent years, no routine screening protocol existed. In the last few years, pulse oximetry screening for CCHD in newborns has been added to the list of recommended uniform screening panels and advocated by several health-care authorities. A positive screening test result warrants an echocardiogram to evaluate for CCHD. Newborn screens do not usually require parental consent. However, most of the states mandates in the United States include a statement allowing exemption from the screen on the basis of parental religious or personal beliefs. PMID:27390667

  2. Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... recommendations on Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography . These recommendations are for adult men and women ...

  3. Screening for rheumatic heart disease: current approaches and controversies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kathryn; Colquhoun, Samantha; Steer, Andrew; Reményi, Bo; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a leading cause of cardiac disease among children in developing nations, and in indigenous populations of some industrialized countries. In endemic areas, RHD has long been a target of screening programmes that, historically, have relied on cardiac auscultation. The evolution of portable echocardiographic equipment has changed the face of screening for RHD over the past 5 years, with greatly improved sensitivity. However, concerns have been raised about the specificity of echocardiography, and the interpretation of minor abnormalities poses new challenges. The natural history of RHD in children with subclinical abnormalities detected by echocardiographic screening remains unknown, and long-term follow-up studies are needed to evaluate the significance of detecting these changes at an early stage. For a disease to be deemed suitable for screening from a public health perspective, it needs to fulfil a number of criteria. RHD meets some, but not all, of these criteria. If screening programmes are to identify additional cases of RHD, parallel improvements in the systems that deliver secondary prophylaxis are essential.

  4. An Intelligent Phonocardiography for Automated Screening of Pediatric Heart Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Amir A; Kocharian, Armen; Janani, Azin; Gharehbaghi, Arash

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a robust device for automated screening of pediatric heart diseases based on our unique processing method in murmur characterization; the Arash-Band method. The present study modifies the Arash-Band method and employs output of the modified method in conjunction with the two other original techniques to extract indicative feature vectors for the screening. The extracted feature vectors are classified by using the support vector machine method. Results show that the proposed modifications significantly enhances performance of the Arash-Band in terms of the both accuracy and sensitivity as the corresponding effect sizes are sufficiently large. The proposed algorithm has been incorporated into an Android-based tablet to constitute an intelligent phonocardiogram with the automatic screening capability. In order to obtain confidence interval of the accuracy and sensitivity, an inferable statistical test is applied on our database containing the phonocardiogram signals recorded from 263 of the referrals to a hospital. The expected value of the accuracy/sensitivity is estimated to be 87.45 % / 87.29 % with a 95 % confidence interval of (80.19 % - 92.47 %) / (76.01 % - 95.78 %) exhibiting superior performance than a pediatric cardiologist who relies on conventional or even computer-assisted auscultation.

  5. Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    The number one cause of death in the U.S. is coronary heart disease (CHD). It is probably a major cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial mathematical formula from the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population that required medical evaluation for job certification. Those assessed to be high-risk probabilities will be targeted for intervention. Every year, several thousand KSC employees require medical evaluations for job related certifications. Most medical information for these evaluations is gathered on-site at one of the KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) medical clinics. The formula used in the Framingham Heart Study allows calculation of a person's probability of acquiring CHD within 10 years. The formula contains the following variables: Age, Diabetes, Smoking, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Blood Pressure (Systolic or Diastolic), Cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol. The formula is also gender specific. It was used to calculate the 10-year probabilities of CHD in KSC employees who required medical evaluations for job certifications during a one-year time frame. This KSC population was profiled and CHD risk reduction interventions could be targeted to those at high risk. Population risk could also be periodically reevaluated to determine the effectiveness of intervention. A 10-year CHD risk probability can be calculated for an individual quite easily while gathering routine medical information. An employee population's CHD risk probability can be profiled graphically revealing high risk segments of the population which can be targeted for risk reduction intervention. The small audience of NASA/contractor physicians, nurses and exercise/fitness professionals at the breakout session received the lecture very well. Approximately one third indicated by a show of hands that they would be

  6. Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the number one cause of death in the U.S. It is a likely cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial formula developed by the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population who require medical evaluation for job certification. Those individuals assessed to have a high risk probability will be targeted for intervention.

  7. Fetal echocardiographic screening of diabetic pregnancies for congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gladman, G; McCrindle, B W; Boutin, C; Smallhorn, J F

    1997-02-01

    This study sought to assess pregnant diabetic women for the presence of fetal cardiac anomalies and to determine whether better diabetic control was associated with a reduced risk to the fetus. Between 1988 and 1995, pregnant type I and II diabetic women routinely underwent fetal echocardiography. Hemoglobin A1c values were used as an indicator of maternal diabetic control and any relation between congenital heart disease in the fetus and maternal hemoglobin A1c levels was sought. Cardiac defects were identified in 7 of 328 pregnancies assessed, for an incidence of congenital heart disease of 2.1% (95% confidence interval: 0.6-3.6%). A review of the postnatal cardiac database did not reveal any undetected major malformations. The mean hemoglobin A1c level was 7.6% +/- 2.0% obtained at a mean gestational age of 12 +/- 7 weeks. Hemoglobin A1c levels of mothers carrying a fetus with congenital heart disease did not significantly differ from those with a normal fetus: 8.1% +/- 3.4% versus 7.6% +/- 1.9% (p = 0.48). Mothers with an affected fetus demonstrated a wide range of HbA1c levels (4.1 to 13.7%). Thus, the incidence of significant fetal cardiac abnormalities is low and not significantly related to maternal diabetic control. PMID:9259899

  8. Screening Tests for Women Who Have Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... women with this condition have insufficient blood and oxygen flow to the heart muscle, a standard angiogram (which ... a scan using magnets and computers to create high-quality images of the heart's ... flow to the heart. ASPIRIN: TAKE WITH CAUTION This ...

  9. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... about genetic counseling and screening if you have a family history of cogenital heart disease. ... Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  10. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  11. Implications of Using Pulse Oximetry to Screen for Critical Congenital Heart Disease in Newborns.

    PubMed

    Andrea, Joan

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, pulse oximetry screening for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) in newborns has been added to the list of recommended uniform screening panels and recommended by several health care organizations. Most states use pulse oximetry to screen for CCHD. Studies have identified problems with compliance and higher failure rate at moderate altitudes than at sea level, suggesting the need for alternate algorithms. Altitude, time, health status of newborns and type of cardiac defect appear to affect results. Early detection of CCHD improves health outcomes and reduces morbidity and mortality. Barriers to screening include out-of-hospital births, cost and knowledge deficits among health care professionals.

  12. Legal and Ethical Considerations in Allowing Parental Exemptions From Newborn Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD) Screening.

    PubMed

    Hom, Lisa A; Silber, Tomas J; Ennis-Durstine, Kathleen; Hilliard, Mary Anne; Martin, Gerard R

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) screening is rapidly becoming the standard of care in the United States after being added to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel (RUSP) in 2011. Newborn screens typically do not require affirmative parental consent. In fact, most states allow parents to exempt their baby from receiving the required screen on the basis of religious or personally held beliefs. There are many ethical considerations implicated with allowing parents to exempt their child from newborn screening for CCHD. Considerations include the treatment of religious exemptions in our current legal system, as well as medical and ethical principles in relation to the rights of infants. Although there are significant benefits to screening newborns for CCHD, when a parent refuses for religious or personal beliefs, in the case of CCHD screening, the parental decision should stand.

  13. Newborn Critical Congenital Heart Disease Screening Using Pulse Oximetry: Nursing Aspects.

    PubMed

    Hom, Lisa A; Martin, Gerard R

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart disease (CCHD) is the most common birth defect. Screening for the most critical forms (CCHD) using pulse oximetry was added to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in the United States in 2011. Since then, CCHD screening has become nearly universal in the United States. Nurses are ideally situated to contribute to the development of best practices for implementation and provide education to families on CCHD screening. Much of the standardization, advocacy, and development of national recommendations occurred with key input from nurses. Nurses often have responsibility for educating parents, performing the screening, interpreting the screening algorithm, and the documentation of results. The nurse role often includes implementing follow-up quality improvement initiatives to ensure that systematic and accurate screening occurs. Smooth implementation can be achieved by identifying champions early, obtaining input from a multidisciplinary team including both physician and nursing leaders, and identifying ways to integrate screening into already existing workflow. By knowing the basics of why screening is important, how to screen, current recommendations on the follow-up for positive screens and the limitations of CCHD screening, nurses can advocate for their patients and positively impact outcomes for infants born with CCHD through early identification before discharge. PMID:27603538

  14. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with heart disease? What do my cholesterol and triglyceride numbers mean? How can I lower my cholesterol? ... weight Know your numbers (blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglycerides) You can reduce your chances of getting heart ...

  15. Development of a Newborn Screening Program for Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD) in Taipei

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Szu-Hui; Ho, Hui-Chen; Liu, Yu-Ling; Chung, Yuan-Fang; Lin, Li-Ju; Chen, Ming-Ren; Chang, Jia-Kan; Soong, Wen-Jue; Lin, Hsiu-Lian; Hwang, Betau; Hsiao, Kwang-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Early detection of critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality among newborns. We investigate the feasibility of implementing a community-based newborn CCHD screening program in Taipei. Methods Twelve birthing facilities in Taipei participated in a trial screening program between October 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014. Newborns underwent pulse oximetry at 24–36 h old, with probes attached to the right hand and one lower limb. Any screening saturation ≥95% in either extremity, with an absolute difference of ≤3% between the right hand and foot, was accepted as a screening pass. A screening result was considered as a fail if the oxygen saturation was <95% at either probe site, on 3 separate occasions, each separated by 30 min or the first result was <95% at either probe site, and any subsequent oxygen saturation measurement was <90%. Public health nurses would follow up all missed or refused cases. Results Of the 6,387 live births, 6,296 newborns (coverage rate: 6,296/6,387 = 98.6%) underwent appropriate pulse oximetry screening. Sixteen newborns (0.25%) were reported to have a failed screening result. Five of these screen positive newborns were confirmed with CCHD; two of them were diagnosed solely attributed to the failed screening results. The false-positive rate was 0.18%. Implementing a 6-month screening program for CCHD produced good case detection rate, while using efficient screening and referral systems. Conclusion This program was successful in integrating screening, referral and public health tracking systems. The protocol outlined in this report could provide a community-based model for worldwide implementation. PMID:27073996

  16. Is Pulse Oximetry Useful for Screening Neonates for Critical Congenital Heart Disease at High Altitudes?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Julien I E

    2016-06-01

    Now that pulse oximetry is used widely to screen for critical congenital heart disease, it is time to consider whether this screening method is applicable to those who live at high altitudes. Consideration of basic physical principles and reports from the literature indicate that not only is the 95 % cutoff point for arterial oxygen saturation incorrect at high altitudes, but the lower saturations are accompanied by greater variability and therefore there is the possibility of a greater percentage of false-positive screening tests at high altitudes. Because of ethnic differences in response to high altitudes, normative data will have to be collected separately in different countries and perhaps for different ethnic groups.

  17. Screening for Congenital Heart Disease in Infants with Down Syndrome: Is Universal Echocardiography Necessary?

    PubMed

    Bogarapu, Soujanya; Pinto, Nelangi M; Etheridge, Susan P; Sheng, Xiaoming; Liesemer, Kirk N; Young, Paul C; Saarel, Elizabeth V

    2016-10-01

    Current guidelines recommend that all neonates with Down syndrome (DS) be screened for congenital heart disease (CHD) with an echocardiogram. We sought to determine the effectiveness of a more accessible and less expensive screening strategy consisting of physical examination, electrocardiogram (ECG), and chest X-ray. The Intermountain Healthcare Enterprise Data Warehouse was used to identify infants with a positive karyotype for DS who were born between January 1, 2000, and June 30, 2012. Infants with the results of an echocardiogram, physical examination, ECG, and chest X-ray documented at age ≤6 months were included. Infants with an abnormality on physical examination, ECG, or chest X-ray were considered to have a positive screen. Echocardiography was the gold standard for calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for major CHD, defined as any heart defect that would typically require intervention during early childhood. Of 408 eligible infants, 240 (59 %) had major CHD, of whom 228 (95 %) had a positive screen. Screening missed eight infants with moderate/large patent ductus arteriosus and four infants with a moderate/large atrial septal defect. In 11 of these infants, the defect resolved spontaneously by age ≤4 months. One infant had a moderate atrial septal defect persisting at 2-year follow-up. Sensitivity and specificity of the screening for detecting CHD were 95 % (CI 92-98 %) and 41 % (CI 32-47 %); positive and negative predictive values were 69 % (CI 63-73 %) and 85 % (CI 75-92 %). Screening with physical examination, ECG, and chest X-ray is an effective method of identifying which infants with DS should have an echocardiogram. This method would have resulted in 69 (17 %) fewer echocardiograms without missing infants with major CHD. PMID:27278630

  18. Echocardiographic screening for rheumatic heart disease-some answers, but questions remain.

    PubMed

    Rémond, Marc G W; Maguire, Graeme P

    2015-07-01

    Despite being preventable, rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains a significant global cause of cardiovascular disease. Echocardiographic screening for early detection of RHD has the potential to enable timely commencement of treatment (secondary prophylaxis) to halt progression to severe valvular disease. However, a number of issues remain to be addressed regarding its feasibility. The natural history of Definite RHD without a prior history of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and Borderline RHD are both unclear. Even if they are variants of RHD it is not known whether secondary antibiotic prophylaxis will prevent disease progression as it does in "traditionally" diagnosed RHD. False positives can also have a detrimental impact on individuals and their families as well as place substantial burdens on health care systems. Recent research suggests that handheld echocardiography (HAND) may offer a cheaper and more convenient alternative to standard portable echocardiography (STAND) in RHD screening. However, while HAND is sensitive for the detection of Definite RHD, it is less sensitive for Borderline RHD and is relatively poor at detecting mitral stenosis (MS). Given its attendant limited specificity, potential cases detected with HAND would require re-examination by standard echocardiography. For now, echocardiographic screening for RHD should remain a subject of research rather than routine health care. PMID:26835376

  19. Pulse oximetry screening: a review of diagnosing critical congenital heart disease in newborns

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Melissa S; Kochilas, Lazaros K

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common birth defects, with an incidence of nine out of every 1,000 live births. The mortality of infants with CHD has decreased over the past 3 decades, but significant morbidity and mortality continue to occur if not diagnosed shortly after birth. Pulse oximetry was recommended as a screening tool to detect critical CHD in 2011 by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association. Pulse oximetry is a tool to measure oxygen saturation, and based on the presence of hypoxemia, many cardiac lesions are detected. Due to its ease of application to the patient, providing results in a timely manner and without the need for calibrating the sensor probe, pulse oximetry offers many advantages as a screening tool. However, pulse oximetry has also important limitations of which physicians should be aware to be able to assess the significance of the pulse oximetry measurement for a given patient. This review aims to highlight the benefits and shortcomings of pulse oximetry within the context of screening for critical CHD and suggests future avenues to cover existing gaps in current practices. PMID:27468253

  20. Universal Pulse Oximetry Screening for Early Detection of Critical Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a major cause of infant death and morbidity worldwide. An early diagnosis and timely intervention can significantly reduce the likelihood of an adverse outcome. However, studies from the United States and other developed countries have shown that as many as 30%–50% of infants with CCHD are discharged after birth without being identified. This diagnostic gap is likely to be even higher in low-resource countries. Several large randomized trials have shown that the use of universal pulse-oximetry screening (POS) at the time of discharge from birth hospital can help in early diagnosis of these infants. The objective of this review is to share data to show that the use of POS for early detection of CCHD meets the criteria necessary for inclusion to the universal newborn screening panel and could be adopted worldwide. PMID:27279759

  1. Identification of coronary heart disease in asymptomatic individuals with diabetes mellitus: to screen or not to screen.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Paco E; Psaty, Bruce M; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Branch, Kelley R

    2015-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is highly prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), and remains the single most common cause of death among this population. Regrettably, a significant percentage of diabetics fail to perceive the classic symptoms associated with myocardial ischemia. Among asymptomatic diabetics, the prevalence of abnormal cardiac testing appears to be high, ranging between 10% and 62%, and mortality is significantly higher in those with abnormal scans. Hence, the potential use of screening for CHD detection among asymptomatic DM individuals is appealing and has been recommended in certain circumstances. However, it was not until recently, that this question was addressed in clinical trials. Two studies randomized a total of 2,023 asymptomatic diabetics to screening or not using cardiac imaging with a mean follow up of 4.4 ± 1.4 years. In combination, both trials showed lower than expected annual event rates, and failed to reduce major cardiovascular events in the screened group compared to the standard of care alone. The results of these trials do not currently support the use of screening tools for CHD detection in asymptomatic DM individuals. However, these studies have important limitations, and potential explanations for their negative results that are discussed in this manuscript.

  2. The cost-effectiveness of prenatal detection for congenital heart disease using telemedicine screening.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Hema; Gardiner, Helena M

    2013-06-01

    We estimated the longer-term cost-effectiveness of using telemedicine screening for prenatal detection of congenital heart disease (CHD). One hospital in south-east England with a telemedicine service was connected to a fetal cardiology unit in London. A UK health service perspective was adopted. Evidence on costs and outcomes for standard-risk pregnant women during the antenatal period was based on patient-level data. Extrapolation beyond the end of the study (just after delivery) was carried out for the lifetime of children born with and without CHD. Expert opinion and data from published sources was used to populate a decision model. Future costs and benefits were discounted. The main outcome was quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and results were expressed as cost per QALY gained. Various one-way sensitivity analyses were conducted. The model showed that offering telemedicine screening by specialists to all standard-risk pregnant women was the dominant strategy (i.e. cheaper and more effective). The sensitivity analyses found that the model was robust, and that telemedicine remained the most cost-effective strategy. The study showed that it would be cost-effective to provide telemedicine examinations as part of an antenatal screening programme for all standard-risk women.

  3. Effect of screening and lifestyle counselling on incidence of ischaemic heart disease in general population: Inter99 randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Rikke Kart; Toft, Ulla; Aadahl, Mette; Glümer, Charlotte; Pisinger, Charlotta

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of systematic screening for risk factors for ischaemic heart disease followed by repeated lifestyle counselling on the 10 year development of ischaemic heart disease at a population level. Design Randomised controlled community based trial. Setting Suburbs of Copenhagen, Denmark Participants 59 616 people aged 30-60 years randomised with different age and sex randomisation ratios to an intervention group (n=11 629) and a control group (n=47 987). Intervention The intervention group was invited for screening, risk assessment, and lifestyle counselling up to four times over a five year period. All participants with an unhealthy lifestyle had individually tailored lifestyle counselling at all visits (at baseline and after one and three years); those at high risk of ischaemic heart disease, according to predefined criteria, were furthermore offered six sessions of group based lifestyle counselling on smoking cessation, diet, and physical activity. After five years all were invited for a final counselling session. Participants were referred to their general practitioner for medical treatment, if relevant. The control group was not invited for screening. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measure was incidence of ischaemic heart disease in the intervention group compared with the control group. Secondary outcome measures were stroke, combined events (ischaemic heart disease, stroke, or both), and mortality. Results 6091 (52.4%) people in the intervention group participated at baseline. Among 5978 people eligible at five year follow-up (59 died and 54 emigrated), 4028 (67.4%) attended. A total of 3163 people died in the 10 year follow-up period. Among 58 308 without a history of ischaemic heart disease at baseline, 2782 developed ischaemic heart disease. Among 58 940 without a history of stroke at baseline, 1726 developed stroke. No significant difference was seen between the intervention and control groups in the

  4. Prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in Senegalese school children: a clinical and echocardiographic screening

    PubMed Central

    Ngaïdé, Aliou Alassane; Mbaye, Alassane; Kane, Adama; Ndiaye, Mouhamadou Bamba; Jobe, Modou; Bodian, Malick; Dioum, Momar; Sarr, Simon Antoine; Aw, Fatou; Mbakop, Prisca Sede; Ba, Fatimata Gatta; Gaye, Ngoné Diaba; Tabane, Alioune; Bah, Mamadou Bassirou; Coly, Sarah Mouna; Diagne, Dior; Diack, Bouna; Diao, Maboury; Kane, Abdoul

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in schools (locally referred to as ‘daaras’) located in the city of Dakar and its suburbs using both clinical examination and echocardiography. Methods This is a cross-sectional study conducted from 9 August to 24 December 2011 involving 2019 pupils, aged between 5 and 18 years selected from the 16 ‘daaras’ of the Academic Inspectorate (Inspection d'Académie) of the city of Dakar and its suburbs. Anamnestic, clinical and echocardiographic data were collected and entered into a questionnaire designed for the study. The World Heart Federation criteria for echocardiographic diagnosis were used to diagnose RHD. p<0.05 was considered statistically significant in bivariate analysis. Results About 60.1% of the pupils were men and the mean age was 9.7±3.3 years. 10 cases of definite RHD were detected, prevalence being 4.96 per 1000 (95% CI 2.4 to 9.1). This prevalence was five times higher with echocardiographic screening compared with clinical screening. 23 cases (11.4 per 1000) of borderline forms were detected. The populations at risk of definite RHD identified in our study were children over 14 years (p<0.001), those with recurrent sore throat (p=0.003) and those residing in the suburbs of the city of Dakar (p<0.001). Conclusion Our study shows a relatively high prevalence of RHD. Reducing its prevalence should focus on the implementation of appropriate policies, targeting at-risk populations and focusing on raising awareness and early detection. PMID:27326219

  5. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... down or stop. A risk factor for heart disease is something that increases your chance of getting ...

  6. Is population coronary heart disease risk screening justified? A discussion of the National Service Framework for coronary heart disease (Standard 4).

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, A; Adab, P

    2001-01-01

    Standard 4 of the National Service Framework (NSF) for coronary heart disease (CHD) describes population cardiovascular risk screening at primary care level. General practitioners (GPs) are expected to deliver this standard and have their performance monitored as part of their clinical governance programme. Although CHD is an important preventable health problem in the United Kingdom (UK), the effectiveness of primary prevention screening programmes are minimal, even within clinical trial settings, and their cost-effectiveness is not clear. The National Screening Committee has identified clear standards for establishing a screening programme in the UK and the activities described in Standard 4 do not fulfill many of these criteria. Specifically, there are no plans for central organisation and co-ordination, no agreed quality assurance standards, and no uniform system for performance management. The clinical, social, and ethical acceptability of the interventions mandated have not been established, and GPs are left to consider how to redirect resources to achieve the standard. We argue that the benefits of population cardiovascular screening must be established through properly conducted trials and, if a programme is introduced, adequate resources and management structures must first be identified. PMID:11677709

  7. Should We Screen for Coronary Heart Disease in Asymptomatic Persons?: Grand Rounds Discussion From Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Gerald W; Cutlip, Donald E; Pinto, Duane S

    2016-04-01

    In March 2015, the American College of Physicians (ACP) released a clinical guideline on the value of screening for coronary heart disease (CHD) in asymptomatic persons. The guideline authors found that results of screening studies are unlikely to change patient management or the intensity of risk factor reduction strategies. Most events occur in patients who are at low to intermediate risk for CHD; and in low-risk asymptomatic patients, percutaneous coronary intervention in "screen-positive" patients does not improve outcomes and creates unnecessary risks. As a result, the ACP recommended against screening for asymptomatic patients who are at low risk for CHD. Instead, it recommended a focus on proven strategies, such as treatment of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, to reduce risk in appropriately selected asymptomatic persons. Two discussants weigh the evidence for and against screening for CHD in asymptomatic patients with varying degrees of risk and provide recommendations for a specific patient who is uncertain whether to proceed to screening. PMID:27043981

  8. MedlinePlus: Heart Diseases--Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Tests Cholesterol Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Heart-Health Screenings (American Heart Association) hs-CRP Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease ...

  9. Engineered heart tissues and induced pluripotent stem cells: Macro- and microstructures for disease modeling, drug screening, and translational studies.

    PubMed

    Tzatzalos, Evangeline; Abilez, Oscar J; Shukla, Praveen; Wu, Joseph C

    2016-01-15

    Engineered heart tissue has emerged as a personalized platform for drug screening. With the advent of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology, patient-specific stem cells can be developed and expanded into an indefinite source of cells. Subsequent developments in cardiovascular biology have led to efficient differentiation of cardiomyocytes, the force-producing cells of the heart. iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) have provided potentially limitless quantities of well-characterized, healthy, and disease-specific CMs, which in turn has enabled and driven the generation and scale-up of human physiological and disease-relevant engineered heart tissues. The combined technologies of engineered heart tissue and iPSC-CMs are being used to study diseases and to test drugs, and in the process, have advanced the field of cardiovascular tissue engineering into the field of precision medicine. In this review, we will discuss current developments in engineered heart tissue, including iPSC-CMs as a novel cell source. We examine new research directions that have improved the function of engineered heart tissue by using mechanical or electrical conditioning or the incorporation of non-cardiomyocyte stromal cells. Finally, we discuss how engineered heart tissue can evolve into a powerful tool for therapeutic drug testing.

  10. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  11. U.S. international efforts on critical congenital heart disease screening: can we have a uniform recommendation for Europe?

    PubMed

    Hom, Lisa A; Martin, Gerard R

    2014-09-01

    An estimated 90% of births or more in the United States will be screened for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) by the end of 2014. Europe has made less progress despite providing the population-based studies that were critical in driving support for efforts within the United States. Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) advocacy groups, investigators in screening for CCHD and international health organizations have been meeting with health care providers and government officials on a country by country basis. Countries that are implementing or have pilot projects have been identified to track global implementation. The Nordic countries, the United States, Switzerland and the United Arab Emirates are closest to universal screening for CCHD in newborns. Significant pilot projects tailored to unique care delivery systems screen through the use of midwives in the Netherlands, on maternity wards in the United Kingdom and while developing newborn care infrastructure in China. In Africa, South and Central America, individual countries are in the early stages of organization. Screening for CCHD is spreading across the globe. Early recognition has the ability to improve care in countries providing CHD treatment and prepare parents for adverse events in countries where care is not accessible. Impact of screening in regions with less access to intervention will be important to track.

  12. Frailty and heart disease.

    PubMed

    von Haehling, Stephan; Anker, Stefan D; Doehner, Wolfram; Morley, John E; Vellas, Bruno

    2013-10-01

    Frailty is emerging as a syndrome of pre-disability that can identify persons at risk for negative outcomes. Its presence places the individual at risk for rapid deterioration when a major event such as myocardial infarction or hospitalization occurs. In patients with cardiovascular disease, frailty is about three times more prevalent than among elderly persons without. Screening for frailty in heart disease is important not only because of its prognostic value, but also because a variety of therapeutic interventions are available.

  13. Targeted Echocardiographic Screening for Latent Rheumatic Heart Disease in Northern Uganda: Evaluating Familial Risk Following Identification of an Index Case

    PubMed Central

    Aliku, Twalib; Sable, Craig; Scheel, Amy; Tompsett, Alison; Lwabi, Peter; Okello, Emmy; McCarter, Robert; Summar, Marshall; Beaton, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background Echocardiographic screening for detection of latent RHD has shown potential as a strategy to decrease the burden of disease. However, further research is needed to determine optimal implementation strategies. RHD results from a complex interplay between environment and host susceptibility. Family members share both and relatives of children with latent RHD may represent a high-risk group. The objective of this study was to use echocardiographic family screening to determine the relative risk of RHD among first-degree relatives of children with latent RHD compared to the risk in first-degree relatives of healthy peers. Methodology/Principal Findings Previous school-based screening data were used to identify RHD positive children and RHD negative peers. All first-degree relatives ≥ 5 years were invited for echocardiography screening (2012 World Heart Federation Criteria). Sixty RHD positive cases (30 borderline/30 definite RHD) and 67 RHD negative cases were recruited. A total of 455/667 (68%) family members were screened. Definite RHD was more common in childhood siblings of RHD positive compared to RHD negative (p = 0.05). Children with any RHD were 4.5 times as likely to have a sibling with definite RHD, a risk that increased to 5.6 times when considering only cases with definite RHD. Mothers of RHD positive and RHD negative cases had an unexpectedly high rate of latent RHD (9.3%). Conclusions/Significance Siblings of RHD positive cases with RHD are more likely to have definite RHD and the relative risk is highest if the index case has definite RHD. Future screening programs should consider implementation of sibling screening following detection of an RHD positive child. Larger screening studies of adults are needed, as data on prevalence of latent RHD outside of childhood are sparse. Future studies should prioritize implementation research to answer questions of how RHD screening can best be integrated into existing healthcare structures, ensuring

  14. Beyond Critical Congenital Heart Disease: Newborn Screening Using Pulse Oximetry for Neonatal Sepsis and Respiratory Diseases in a Middle-Income Country

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Hak-Lee; Omar, Asma

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies on pulse oximetry screening for neonatal sepsis and respiratory disease in a middle-income country are lacking. Newborn screening for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) using pulse oximetry is an effective and life-saving strategy in developed countries. While most studies have reported false-positive results during CCHD screening, they have not elaborated on the detected disease types. We studied the effectiveness and outcomes of pulse oximetry newborn screening for non-cardiac hypoxemic diseases such as neonatal sepsis, respiratory diseases, and CCHD in a middle-income country. Methods and Findings In a pilot study performed at the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Malaysia, all apparently healthy term newborns, delivered at UMMC were screened pre-discharge using pulse oximetry. Echocardiography was performed for newborns that had positive screening results on two separate occasions, 1-h apart. Newborns with normal echocardiograms were evaluated and treated for other non-cardiac diseases. Fifteen of 5247 term newborns had positive screening results. The median age at screening was 20 h. Thirteen newborns (0.24%) had significant non-cardiac diseases: sepsis (n = 2) and respiratory diseases (n = 11) that required hospitalization and treatment. The remaining two newborns with normal antenatal ultrasonograms had positive screening test and confirmed to have CCHD. Another 18 newborns with negative screening test were later admitted for treatment of sepsis (n = 16) and penumonia (n = 2). All newborns were treated and alive at the end of the study. The sensitivity and specificity of pulse oximetry screening for non-cardiac diseases were 42% and 99.9% respectively, and 100% and 99.7% for CCHD, respectively. Conclusions Routine pulse oximetry screening test was effective in identifying newborns with CCHD and other hypoxemia illnesses, which may led to potential life-threatening condition. This study showed that the expanded use of pulse

  15. Evaluation of fetal echocardiography as a routine antenatal screening tool for detection of congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Krishnananda; Shetty, Ranjan; Narayan, Pratap Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background Fetal echocardiography plays a pivotal role in identifying the congenital heart defects (CHDs) in utero. Though foetal echocardiography is mostly reserved for high risk pregnant women, its role as a routine prenatal screening tool still needs to be defined. Performing foetal echocardiography based on only these indications can lead to a significant numbers of CHD cases going undetected who will be deprived of further management leading to increased early neonatal mortalities. The aim of this study is to assess the incidence of CHDs by fetal echocardiography in an unselected population of pregnant women in comparison with pregnant women with conventional high risk factors for CHD. Methods This study enrolled consecutive pregnant women who attended antenatal clinic between 2008 and 2012 in a tertiary care hospital. These pregnant women were categorized into two groups: high risk group included pregnant women with traditional risk factors for CHD as laid down by Pediatric Council of the American Society of Echocardiography and low risk group. Detailed fetal 2 D echocardiography was done. Results A total of 1,280 pregnant women were included in study. The 118 women were categorized as the high risk group while remaining 1,162 were included in the low risk group. Twenty six cases of CHDs were detected based on abnormal foetal echocardiography (20.3 per 1,000). Two of the 26 cases of CHD occurred in high risk group whereas the remaining 24 occurred in low risk pregnancy. The difference in the incidence of CHDs between the two groups was not significant statistically (P=0.76). Conclusions Our study shows no difference in incidence of CHDs between pregnancies associated with high risk factors compared to low risk pregnancies. So we advocate foetal echocardiography should be included as a part of routine antenatal screening and all pregnant women irrespective of risk factors for CHDs. PMID:26885491

  16. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  17. Men and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  18. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Balance › Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease January 2014 Download PDFs English ... nervous system, body temperature, and weight. What is hypothyroidism and what are its symptoms? Hypothyroidism, also called ...

  19. Aspirin and heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the diagnosis and management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology ... NE, et al. Antithrombotic and thrombolytic therapy for ischemic ... of coronary heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, et ...

  20. Length to width ratio of the ductus venosus in simple screening for fetal congenital heart diseases in the second trimester.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wei-Hsiu; Lee, Shy-Ming; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Tang, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Chen, Ran-Chou

    2016-09-01

    Antenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD) is still low even though screening was first introduced over 25 years ago. The purpose of our study was to determine the efficacy of a second-trimester prenatal ultrasonographic method of screening for CHD.From September 2012 to September 2013, the length and width of the fetal ductus venosus were measured sonographically in 1006 singleton fetuses, and the ratio of length to width was calculated. The accuracy of each fetal measurement and Doppler ultrasonography were determined. The standard fetal echocardiographic evaluations including 2-dimensional gray-scale imaging, color, and Doppler color flow mapping were performed. The transducer was aligned to the long axis of the fetal trunk to view the ductus venosus in its full length, including the inlet (isthmus) and outlet portions of the vessel. The diameters of the vessel inner wall and mid-point of the ductus venosus were measured using calipers. All scans and fetal measurements were conducted by a registered sonographer with more than 20 years of perinatal ultrasound screening experience.Of the 1006 singleton fetuses between 19 and 28 weeks' gestation, 36 had CHD. The ductus venosus length/width ratio (DVR) for the first CHD screening was extremely sensitive at 88.90%, with a specificity of 99.10% for the cardiac abnormalities included in this study. Chromosomal anomalies accompanied CHD in 0.4% (4/1006) of all cases and 11.11% (4/36) of the CHD cases.The DVR differed significantly between fetuses with CHD and normal fetuses during the second trimester. Careful assessment of the ratio should be a part of the sonographic examination of every fetus. In the case of a small DVR, advanced echocardiography and karyotype analysis should be performed. The ratio is a helpful tool for screening CHD abnormalities prenatally in the Chinese population. PMID:27684831

  1. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and it happens slowly over time. It's the ...

  2. Pilot study of nurse-led rheumatic heart disease echocardiography screening in Fiji--a novel approach in a resource-poor setting.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, Samantha M; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Kado, Joseph H; Reeves, Benjamin M; Remenyi, Boglarka; May, William; Wilson, Nigel J; Steer, Andrew C

    2013-08-01

    We designed a pilot study of a training module for nurses to perform rheumatic heart disease echocardiography screening in a resource-poor setting. The aim was to determine whether nurses given brief, focused, basic training in echocardiography could follow an algorithm to potentially identify cases of rheumatic heart disease requiring clinical referral, by undertaking basic two-dimensional and colour Doppler scans. Training consisted of a week-long workshop, followed by 2 weeks of supervised field experience. The nurses' skills were tested on a blinded cohort of 50 children, and the results were compared for sensitivity and specificity against echocardiography undertaken by an expert, using standardised echocardiography definitions for definite and probable rheumatic heart disease. Analysis of the two nurses' results revealed that when a mitral regurgitant jet length of 1.5 cm was used as the trigger for rheumatic heart disease identification, they had a sensitivity of 100% and 83%, respectively, and a specificity of 67.4% and 79%, respectively. This pilot supports the principle that nurses, given brief focused training and supervised field experience, can follow an algorithm to undertake rheumatic heart disease echocardiography in a developing country setting to facilitate clinical referral with reasonable accuracy. These results warrant further research, with a view to developing a module to guide rheumatic heart disease echocardiographic screening by nurses within the existing public health infrastructure in high-prevalence, resource-poor regions.

  3. A comparison of retesting rates using alternative testing algorithms in the pilot implementation of critical congenital heart disease screening in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Kochilas, Lazaros K; Menk, Jeremiah S; Saarinen, Annamarie; Gaviglio, Amy; Lohr, Jamie L

    2015-03-01

    Prior to state-wide implementation of newborn screening for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) in Minnesota, a pilot program was completed using the protocol recommended by the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children (SACHDNC). This report compares the retesting rates for newborn screening for CCHDs using the SACHDNC protocol and four alternative algorithms used in large published CCHD screening studies. Data from the original Minnesota study were reanalyzed using the passing values from these four alternative protocols. The retesting rate for the first pulse oximeter measurement ranged from 1.1 % in the SACHDNC protocol to 9.6 % in the Ewer protocol. The SACHDNC protocol generated the lowest rate of retesting among all tested algorithms. Our data suggest that even minor modifications of CCHD screening protocol would significantly impact screening retesting rate. In addition, we provide support for including lower extremity oxygen saturations in the screening algorithm.

  4. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease » Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Explore Diabetic Heart Disease What Is... Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Cardiomyopathy Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Failure Send ...

  5. Interethnic differences in the accuracy of anthropometric indicators of obesity in screening for high risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, VM; Casas, JP; Miranda, JJ; Perel, P; Pichardo, R; González, A; Sanchez, JR; Ferreccio, C; Aguilera, X; Silva, E; Oróstegui, M; Gómez, LF; Chirinos, JA; Medina-Lezama, J; Pérez, CM; Suárez, E; Ortiz, AP; Rosero, L; Schapochnik, N; Ortiz, Z; Ferrante, D; Diaz, M; Bautista, LE

    2009-01-01

    Background Cut points for defining obesity have been derived from mortality data among Whites from Europe and the United States and their accuracy to screen for high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in other ethnic groups has been questioned. Objective To compare the accuracy and to define ethnic and gender-specific optimal cut points for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) when they are used in screening for high risk of CHD in the Latin-American and the US populations. Methods We estimated the accuracy and optimal cut points for BMI, WC and WHR to screen for CHD risk in Latin Americans (n=18 976), non-Hispanic Whites (Whites; n=8956), non-Hispanic Blacks (Blacks; n=5205) and Hispanics (n=5803). High risk of CHD was defined as a 10-year risk ≥20% (Framingham equation). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) and the misclassification-cost term were used to assess accuracy and to identify optimal cut points. Results WHR had the highest AUC in all ethnic groups (from 0.75 to 0.82) and BMI had the lowest (from 0.50 to 0.59). Optimal cut point for BMI was similar across ethnic/gender groups (27 kg/m2). In women, cut points for WC (94 cm) and WHR (0.91) were consistent by ethnicity. In men, cut points for WC and WHR varied significantly with ethnicity: from 91 cm in Latin Americans to 102 cm in Whites, and from 0.94 in Latin Americans to 0.99 in Hispanics, respectively. Conclusion WHR is the most accurate anthropometric indicator to screen for high risk of CHD, whereas BMI is almost uninformative. The same BMI cut point should be used in all men and women. Unique cut points for WC and WHR should be used in all women, but ethnic-specific cut points seem warranted among men. PMID:19238159

  6. Construction and Use of Resting 12-Lead High Fidelity ECG "SuperScores" in Screening for Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Arenare, B.; Greco, E. C.; DePalma, J. L.; Starc, V.; Nunez, T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Rahman, M.A.; Delgado, R.

    2007-01-01

    high-fidelity ECG employing and combining the results of several advanced ECG software techniques shows great promise as a rapid and inexpensive tool for screening of heart disease.

  7. [Prevalence of congenital heart diseases in Koranic schools (daara) in Dakar: a cross-sectional study based on clinical and echocardiographic screening in 2019 school children].

    PubMed

    Bodian, M; Ngaïdé, A A; Mbaye, A; Sarr, S A; Jobe, M; Ndiaye, M B; Kane, A D; Aw, F; Gaye, N D; Ba, F G; Bah, M B; Tabane, A; Dioum, M; Diagne, D; Diao, M; Diack, B; Sarr, M; Kane, A; Bâ, S A

    2015-02-01

    Congenital heart diseases are one of the major cardiovascular diseases in developing countries. Most prevalence studies were based on clinical examination of children with echocardiographic confirmation of suspected cases and underestimate its prevalence. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of congenital heart disease in "daara" (Koranic schools) in the city of Dakar and its suburbs on the basis of clinical examination and Doppler echocardiography in school children. This cross-sectional survey was carried out from 9(th) August to 24(th) December 2011, and included a population of 2019 school children aged 5 to 18 years in 16 selected "daaras" under the Academic Inspectorate of Dakar and its suburbs. Anamnestic, clinical and echocardiographic data were recorded in a validated questionnaire. A p < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant in bivariate analysis. 2 019 school children were included out of which 60.1% were male (sex-ratio: 0.66). The average age was 9.7 years (± 3.3 years). 18 cases of congenital heart diseases were detected being a prevalence of 8.9 per 1 000 (95 % CI: 1.8 to 7.9). This included 6 cases of inter-atrial septal aneurysm, 5 cases of peri-membranous ventricular septal defects, 4 cases of patent ductusarteriosus and 3 cases of tetralogy of Fallot. Factors correlated with the presence of congenital heart disease were ageless than 8 (p <0.001) and residence in the suburbs of Dakar (p <0.001). We also detected 10 cases of rheumatic valvular disease, a prevalence of 4.9 per 1 000 (95% CI: 2.4 to 9.1). Our study shows a high prevalence of congenital heart diseases, which is almost identical to the WHO estimates and that ultrasound screening is more sensitive than clinical screening. Reducing the prevalence of these diseases requires implementation of appropriate policies, focusing on awareness and early detection.

  8. Use of an evidence-based protocol to screen for sleep-disordered breathing in a heart failure disease management clinic.

    PubMed

    Garner, Shelby L; Traverse, Ramona D

    2014-01-01

    Undiagnosed and untreated sleep-disordered breathing can lead to negative health outcomes and increased utilization of health resources among patients with heart failure. The purpose of this evidence-based practice project was to implement and evaluate a new multifaceted sleep-disordered breathing screening protocol in a heart failure disease management clinic. The combined use of a symptoms questionnaire, the Epworth sleepiness scale, and overnight pulse oximetry was significantly more effective in identifying patients with a positive diagnosis of sleep-disordered breathing than using the Epworth sleepiness scale alone (P < .05).

  9. Health Gain through Screening--Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: Developing Primary Health Care Services for People with Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, M. B.; Turner, S.; Martin, D. M.; Roy, A.

    1997-01-01

    A study of 120 British adults with intellectual disability found they had higher risk factors of developing coronary heart disease and stroke than the general population. There was a greater incidence of obesity and considerably lower physical activity levels than the general population. Several also had abnormal cholesterol readings. (CR)

  10. Construction of a Resting High Fidelity ECG "SuperScore" for Management and Screening of Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Delgado, Reynolds; Poulin, Greg; Starc, Vito; Arenare, Brian; Rahman, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Resting conventional ECG is notoriously insensitive for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) and only nominally useful in screening for cardiomyopathy (CM). Similarly, conventional exercise stress test ECG is both time- and labor-consuming and its accuracy in identifying CAD is suboptimal for use in population screening. We retrospectively investigated the accuracy of several advanced resting electrocardiographic (ECG) parameters, both alone and in combination, for detecting CAD and cardiomyopathy (CM).

  11. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... very fast, but steady, heartbeat. Sick Sinus Syndrome ( SSS ) Sick sinus syndrome is not a disease, but ... the sinus node, is not working properly. In SSS , the heart rate can alternate between slow ( bradycardia ) ...

  12. Prenatal Detection of Congenital Heart Diseases: One-Year Survey Performing a Screening Protocol in a Single Reference Center in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Luciane Alves; Rolo, Liliam Cristine; Barros, Fernanda Silveira Bello; da Silva, Karina Peres; Leslie, Ana Teresa Figueiredo Stochero; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe the experience of a tertiary center in Brazil to which patients are referred whose fetuses are at increased risk for congenital heart diseases (CHDs). Methods. This was a cross-sectional observational study. The data was collected prospectively, during the year 2012, through a screening protocol of the fetal heart adapted from the International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology (ISUOG) guideline. We performed a fetal echocardiogram screening for all pregnant women who were referred to the fetal cardiology outpatient obstetrics clinic of a university hospital. The exams were classified as normal or abnormal. The cases considered abnormal were undergone to a postnatal echocardiogram. We categorized the abnormal fetal heart according to severity in “complex,” “significant,” “minor,” and “others.” Results. We performed 271 fetal heart screening. The incidence of abnormal screenings was 9.96% (27 fetuses). The structural CHD when categorized due to severity showed 48.1% (n = 13) of “complex” cases, 18.5% (n = 5) “significant” cases, and 7.4% (n = 2) “minor” cases. The most common referral reason was by maternal causes (67%) followed by fetal causes (33%). The main referral indication was maternal metabolic disease (30%), but there was just one fetus with CHD in such cases (1.2%). CHDs were found in 19/29 fetuses with suspicion of some cardiac abnormality by obstetrician (65.5%). Conclusion. We observed a high rate of CHD in our population. We also found that there was higher incidence of complex cases. PMID:24523982

  13. Sarcoid heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Dubrey, Simon W; Bell, Alex; Mittal, Tarun K

    2007-01-01

    To this day the aetiology of sarcoidosis continues to elude definition. Partially as a consequence of this, little in the way of new therapies has evolved. The enigma of this condition is that, unusually for a disease with the potential for devastating consequences, many patients show spontaneous resolution and recover. Cardiac involvement can affect individuals of any age, gender or race and has a predilection for the conduction system of the heart. Heart involvement can also cause a dilated cardiomyopathy with consequent progressive heart failure. The most common presentation of this systemic disease is with pulmonary infiltration, but many cases will be asymptomatic and are detected on routine chest radiography revealing lymphadenopathy. Current advances lie in the newer methods of imaging and diagnosing this unusual heart disease. This review describes the pathology and diagnosis of this condition and the newer imaging techniques that have developed for determining cardiac involvement. PMID:17916869

  14. Screening in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Paolo Del; Mazzoleni, Marzio

    2006-01-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines, although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors, such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction, is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation. PMID:16981254

  15. Screening in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Del Poggio, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Marzio

    2006-09-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines, although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors, such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction, is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation. PMID:16981254

  16. [Ischaemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Brotons, Carlos; Cuende, José I; Fernández Pardo, Jacinto; Plana, Nuria; Moral, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In the year 2011, cardiovascular diseases were responsible of 31.2% of total deaths in Spain. The absolute number of cases of acute coronary syndrome in this year will be approximately 115,752 cases (95%CI: 114,822-116,687). The prevalence of stable angina in the population aged 25-74 years is 2.6% in men and 3.5% in women. Cardiovascular diseases were in the year 2011 the first cause of hospitalizations representing 14.1% of the total hospitalizations. Diagnose of ischaemic heart disease and acute myocardial infarction were responsible of 110,950 and 50,064 hospitalizations, respectively. In the year 2003, the hospitalization rate was 314 while in the year 2011 was 237 per 100,000, a reduction of 24.4%. The average cost of hospitalization due to ischaemic heart disease in 1997 was 3,093.7euros while in the year 2011 was 7,028.71euros. Cardiovascular mortality rates have decreased from 2007 to 2011, showing a relative reduction of 7% in women and 8% in men. With regard to myocardial infarction, it was observed a relative reduction of 17% in men and 20% in women. According to EUROASPIREIII survey done in 8,966 patients with ischaemic heart disease in Europe, 17% of patients were still smokers, 35% were obese, 56% has uncontrolled blood pressure, 51% has raised blood cholesterol and 25% were diabetics. With regard to drugs utilisation, 91% were treated with antiplatelets agents, 80% with beta blockers, 71% with ACE inhibitors/ARBs.

  17. Amyloid Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Walid; Al-Sergani, Hani; Mourad, Walid; Tabbaa, Rashed

    2005-01-01

    Amyloidosis comprises a unique group of diseases that share in common the extracellular deposition of insoluble fibrillar proteins in organs and tissues. Cardiovascular amyloidosis can be primary, a part of systemic amyloidosis, or a result of chronic systemic diseases elsewhere in the body. The most common presentations are congestive heart failure—mainly a restrictive infiltrative pattern—and conduction system disturbances. Recent developments in imaging techniques and extracardiac tissue sampling have minimized the need for invasive endomyocardial biopsy for amyloidosis. Despite advances in treatment, the prognosis for patients with amyloidosis is still poor and depends on the underlying disease type. Herein, we present new insights and recent advances in cardiovascular amyloidosis. PMID:16107109

  18. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nutrition (PDF) Obesity (PDF) Peripheral Artery Disease (PDF) ... statistics, please contact the American Heart Association National Center, Office of Science & Medicine at statistics@heart.org . Please direct all ...

  19. Cyanotic heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart) may be absent or unable to open wide enough. Pulmonary valve (the valve between the heart ... lungs) may be absent or unable to open wide enough . Aortic valve (the valve between the heart ...

  20. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes or prediabetes ... can help prevent future health problems. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disorder of metabolismthe way our ...

  1. [Diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Clodi, Martin; Säly, Christoph; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Resl, Michael; Steinwender, Clemens; Eber, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and heart failure are interacting dynamically. Patients being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease should be screened for diabetes mellitus. Enhanced cardiovascular risk stratification based on biomarkers, symptoms and classical risk factors should be performed in patients with pre-existing diabetes mellitus. PMID:27052249

  2. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  3. The virtual heart as a platform for screening drug cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongfeng; Bai, Xiangyun; Luo, Cunjin; Wang, Kuanquan; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-12-01

    To predict the safety of a drug at an early stage in its development is a major challenge as there is a lack of in vitro heart models that correlate data from preclinical toxicity screening assays with clinical results. A biophysically detailed computer model of the heart, the virtual heart, provides a powerful tool for simulating drug-ion channel interactions and cardiac functions during normal and disease conditions and, therefore, provides a powerful platform for drug cardiotoxicity screening. In this article, we first review recent progress in the development of theory on drug-ion channel interactions and mathematical modelling. Then we propose a family of biomarkers that can quantitatively characterize the actions of a drug on the electrical activity of the heart at multi-physical scales including cellular and tissue levels. We also conducted some simulations to demonstrate the application of the virtual heart to assess the pro-arrhythmic effects of cisapride and amiodarone. Using the model we investigated the mechanisms responsible for the differences between the two drugs on pro-arrhythmogenesis, even though both prolong the QT interval of ECGs. Several challenges for further development of a virtual heart as a platform for screening drug cardiotoxicity are discussed.

  4. Heart Valve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  5. Epidemiological aspects of heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Tao, Ziqi; Wei, Peng; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the main cause of mortality in heart patients following stroke, rheumatic heart disease and myocardial infarctions. Approximately 80% of individuals succumb to CVDs, due to poor living conditions in low and middle income families and malnutrition. Infectious diseases, human immunodeficiency, tuberculosis, malaria, high blood pressure or hypertension, obesity and overweight, and nutritional disorders including smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, high salt and sugar intake, as well as other factors are responsible for CVDs and CHDs in young as well as elderly individuals. The focus of the present review are recent epidemiological aspects of CVD and CHD as well as the usefulness of a Mediterranean diet for heart patients and the prevention of heart diseases. PMID:27602082

  6. Epidemiological aspects of heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Tao, Ziqi; Wei, Peng; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the main cause of mortality in heart patients following stroke, rheumatic heart disease and myocardial infarctions. Approximately 80% of individuals succumb to CVDs, due to poor living conditions in low and middle income families and malnutrition. Infectious diseases, human immunodeficiency, tuberculosis, malaria, high blood pressure or hypertension, obesity and overweight, and nutritional disorders including smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, high salt and sugar intake, as well as other factors are responsible for CVDs and CHDs in young as well as elderly individuals. The focus of the present review are recent epidemiological aspects of CVD and CHD as well as the usefulness of a Mediterranean diet for heart patients and the prevention of heart diseases.

  7. Traumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, S R; Bhagwat, R A; Shahane, A G; Cheema, B S

    1990-09-01

    Five cases of traumatic heart disease (THD) who sustained blunt chest injury in road accidents are reported. In addition to fracture of the ribs (observed in all the cases), there was fracture of the sternum and rupture of the liver and spleen in one case each. Two patients had flail chest. One presented with recurrent ventricular tachycardia lasting for 72 hours followed by changes suggestive of subendocardial infarction. The second case also had changes like subendocardial infarction and it was preceded by junctional tachycardia with aberrant conduction during the first 48 hours. Ventricular premature beats (VPB) were the only abnormality noted in one case and the remaining two had ST-T wave changes suggestive of inferolateral ischaemia without any arrhythmias. The patient with VPB developed pericardial rub without effusion. There was one death and postmortem revealed ruptured liver and spleen in addition to laceration of the right ventricle and haemopericardium. The electrocardiographic changes persisted for two to eight weeks. All four cases were symptom-free at 12 weeks and treadmill exercise test done after 12 to 18 weeks was normal. PMID:2266073

  8. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health • Watch, Learn & Live Animations Library Answers by Heart Fact Sheets Learn and live with our downloadable patient information sheets . Dozens of topics in a question-and-answer format that's brief, easy to follow and easy to read. ... Sodium and Salt 3 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 4 What are the Symptoms of ...

  9. Screening and Characterization of Spontaneous Porcine Congenital Heart Defects for Gene Identification and Models of Human Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Rodent models of human congenital birth defects have been instrumental for gene discovery and investigation of mechanisms of disease. However, these models are limited by their small size making practiced intervention or detailed anatomic evaluation difficult. Swine have similar anato...

  10. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  11. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jamal A, Homa DH, O’Connor E, Babb SD, Caraballo RS, Singh T, et al. Current cigarette ... Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your Risk Factors [Congenital heart diseases in women].

    PubMed

    Putotto, Carolina; Unolt, Marta; Caiaro, Angela; Marino, Dario; Massaccesi, Valerio; Marino, Bruno; Digilio, Maria Cristina

    2013-02-01

    Are there gender differences in prevalence, surgical results and long-term survival of patients with congenital heart disease? Available literature data allow us to state what follows. At birth there is a mild but significant prevalence of congenital heart disease in females. The most severe congenital heart diseases are less frequent in girls, but when they are present in females, they are linked to a higher surgical mortality rate, due perhaps to lower weight at birth and to the prevalence of extracardiac malformations and/or of associated genetic syndromes. On the other hand, in adults, surgery for congenital heart disease is at higher risk in males, and so the long-term survival rate is higher in females. Particular psychological attitudes, a higher incidence of pulmonary hypertension, as well as specific problems linked to the reproductive function characterize congenital heart disease in adult women. The knowledge and analysis of these data are essential for a correct management of congenital heart disease in neonates, children and adults.

  12. Being active when you have heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - activity ... Getting regular exercise when you have heart disease is important. Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may also help you be more active without chest pain or ...

  13. Prospective Coronary Heart Disease Screening in Asymptomatic Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Using Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: Results and Risk Factor Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Girinsky, Theodore; M’Kacher, Radhia; Koscielny, Serge; Elfassy, Eric; Raoux, François; Carde, Patrice; Santos, Marcos Dos; Margainaud, Jean-Pierre; Sabatier, Laure; Paul, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the coronary artery status using coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma treated with combined modalities and mediastinal irradiation. Methods and Materials: All consecutive asymptomatic patients with Hodgkin lymphoma entered the study during follow-up, from August 2007 to May 2012. Coronary CT angiography was performed, and risk factors were recorded along with leukocyte telomere length (LTL) measurements. Results: One hundred seventy-nine patients entered the 5-year study. The median follow-up was 11.6 years (range, 2.1-40.2 years), and the median interval between treatment and the CCTA was 9.5 years (range, 0.5-40 years). Coronary artery abnormalities were demonstrated in 46 patients (26%). Coronary CT angiography abnormalities were detected in nearly 15% of the patients within the first 5 years after treatment. A significant increase (34%) occurred 10 years after treatment (P=.05). Stenoses were mostly nonostial. Severe stenoses were observed in 12 (6.7%) of the patients, entailing surgery with either angioplasty with stent placement or bypass grafting in 10 of them (5.5%). A multivariate analysis demonstrated that age at treatment, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia, as well as radiation dose to the coronary artery origins, were prognostic factors. In the group of patients with LTL measurements, hypertension and LTL were the only independent risk factors. Conclusions: The findings suggest that CCTA can identify asymptomatic individuals at risk of acute coronary artery disease who might require either preventive or curative measures. Conventional risk factors and the radiation dose to coronary artery origins were independent prognostic factors. The prognostic value of LTL needs further investigation.

  14. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... obesity and metabolic syndrome —interact to cause harmful physical changes to the heart. Third, diabetes raises the risk ... outlook. The good news is that many lifestyle changes help control multiple risk factors. For example, physical activity can lower your blood pressure, help control ...

  15. Rheumatic heart disease and its control in the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, Samantha M; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Kado, Joseph H; Steer, Andrew C

    2009-12-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease continue to be a huge public-health burden on many Pacific Island countries. Prevalence reported in some nations are some of the highest seen globally, yet many countries in the region do not have national disease registers. Despite the will of many Pacific Island countries, there are a number of barriers to the implementation and sustainability of effective coordinated prevention programs, including limited funding and competing health priorities. In promising recent developments, a number of countries in the region have been able to develop or strengthen national rheumatic heart disease registers. These registers allow for more effective delivery of secondary prophylaxis, the mainstay of disease control in the Pacific. Primary prevention of rheumatic fever and screening for rheumatic heart disease are important adjunctive strategies. Recent advances in screening methods, focusing on portable echocardiography, may allow for the early detection of rheumatic heart disease in the community.

  16. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... or stomach. Diagnosis Key heart tests include: Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) —This records the electrical activity of the heart as it contracts and relaxes. The ECG can detect abnormal heartbeats, some areas of damage, ...

  17. Heart Disease and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and Asians and Pacific Islanders Overall, Asian American adults are less likely ... Disease Death Rates per 100,000 (2013) Asians/Pacific Islanders Non-Hispanic White Asians/Pacific Islanders /Non- ...

  18. Heart in pituitary diseases.

    PubMed

    Hradec, J; Marek, J; Král, J; Simper, D; Spácil, J

    1992-01-01

    Of hormones secreted by the pituitary, a direct effect on cardiac metabolism and function is exerted only by growth hormone (GH). Its chronic overproduction in adulthood leads to acromegaly. The main cardiovascular manifestations of acromegaly are hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. The paper summarizes the results of clinical research into the "acromegalic heart" in an internationally unique group of 78 patients with acromegaly on long-term follow-up. Both clinical findings and experimental data available in the literature indicate that cardiac hypertrophy is due to a direct effect of GH on the myocardium. Hypertension occurs in 50% of patients, has the nature of volume hypertension and exerts only an additive effect on the development of left ventricular hypertrophy. Once GH overproduction has been eliminated, cardiac hypertrophy and hypertension can be reversed to a certain stage, a finding highlighting the necessity of instituting treatment of acromegaly as early and as vigorous as possible. PMID:1304450

  19. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lifestyle changes also help. These include a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active, and quitting smoking. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  1. Congenital heart disease and rheumatic heart disease in Africa: recent advances and current priorities

    PubMed Central

    Zühlke, Liesl; Mirabel, Mariana; Marijon, Eloi

    2013-01-01

    Africa has one of the highest prevalence of heart diseases in children and young adults, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We present here an extensive review of recent data from the African continent highlighting key studies and information regarding progress in CHD and RHD since 2005. Main findings include evidence that the CHD burden is underestimated mainly due to the poor outcome of African children with CHD. The interest in primary prevention for RHD has been recently re-emphasised, and new data are available regarding echocardiographic screening for subclinical RHD and initiation of secondary prevention. There is an urgent need for comprehensive service frameworks to improve access and level of care and services for patients, educational programmes to reinforce the importance of prevention and early diagnosis and a relevant research agenda focusing on the African context. PMID:23680886

  2. Menopause and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease. It’s a natural phase of a woman’s life cycle,” Dr. Goldberg said. “It’s important for women, as ... emphasizes: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish and nuts, while limiting red meat ...

  3. Stable Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Kones, Richard; Rumana, Umme

    2016-01-01

    Classical angina refers to typical substernal discomfort triggered by effort or emotions, relieved with rest or nitroglycerin. The well-accepted pathogenesis is an imbalance between oxygen supply and demand. Goals in therapy are improvement in quality of life by limiting the number and severity of attacks, protection against future lethal events, and measures to lower the burden of risk factors to slow disease progression. New pathophysiological data, drugs, as well as conceptual and technological advances have improved patient care over the past decade. Behavioral changes to improve diets, increase physical activity, and encourage adherence to cardiac rehabilitation programs, are difficult to achieve but are effective. PMID:26567972

  4. [Valvular heart disease in women].

    PubMed

    Tornos, Pilar

    2006-08-01

    Very few studies of valvular heart disease have been specifically carried out in women. It is well known that the prevalence of some types of valve disease is influenced by sex: rheumatic mitral stenosis is very common in women but degenerative valve disease affects both sexes similarly. A number of sex differences in the physiopathology of degenerative aortic stenosis have been reported: the degree of calcification is less in women than men and women's ventricles respond to equivalent reductions in valve area with a greater increase in gradient and greater contractility. With regard to prognosis, it is generally accepted that mortality associated with heart surgery is higher in women than men, for both coronary artery and valve surgery. The underlying reasons for the increase in mortality are not clear. Pregnancy presents particular difficulties for women with valvular heart disease. In those with significant valve lesions, it is advisable to correct the valve disease before pregnancy is considered. Anticoagulant treatment involves serious problems for pregnant women with a mechanical prosthesis. They suffer increased risks of prosthetic valve thrombosis and of fetal embryopathy if they take oral anticoagulants during the first trimester.

  5. Exercise echocardiography for structural heart disease.

    PubMed

    Izumo, Masaki; Akashi, Yoshihiro J

    2016-03-01

    Since the introduction of transcatheter structural heart intervention, the term "structural heart disease" has been widely used in the field of cardiology. Structural heart disease refers to congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, and cardiomyopathy. In structural heart disease, valvular heart disease is frequently identified in the elderly. Of note, the number of patients who suffer from aortic stenosis (AS) and mitral regurgitation (MR) is increasing in developed countries because of the aging of the populations. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement and percutaneous mitral valve repair has been widely used for AS and MR, individually. Echocardiography is the gold standard modality for initial diagnosis and subsequent evaluation of AS and MR, although the difficulties in assessing patients with these diseases still remain. Here, we review the clinical usefulness and prognostic impact of exercise echocardiography on structural heart disease, particularly on AS and MR.

  6. Data and Statistics: Women and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  7. Prevalence and correlates of heart disease among adults in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Picco, Louisa; Subramaniam, Mythily; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and it has been well established that it is associated with both mental and physical conditions. This paper describes the prevalence of heart disease with mental disorders and other chronic physical conditions among the Singapore resident population. Data were from the Singapore Mental Health Study which was a representative, cross-sectional epidemiological survey undertaken with 6616 Singapore residents, between December 2009 and December 2010. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 was used to establish the diagnosis of mental disorders, while a chronic medical conditions checklist was used to gather information on 15 physical conditions, including various forms of heart disease. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Euro-Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). The lifetime prevalence of heart disease was 2.8%. Socio-demographic correlates of heart disease included older age, Indian ethnicity, secondary education (vs. tertiary) and being economically inactive. After adjusting for socio-demographic variables and other comorbid physical and mental disorders, the prevalence of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder were significantly higher among those with heart disease, as were diabetes, arthritis, kidney failure and lung disease. These findings highlight important associations between heart disease and various socio-demographic correlates, mental disorders and physical conditions. Given the high prevalence of mood disorders among heart disease patients, timely and appropriate screening and treatment of mental disorders among this group is essential.

  8. [Congenital heart diseases and sports].

    PubMed

    Martínez Quintana, E; Agredo Muñoz, J; Rodríguez González, F; Nieto Lago, V

    2008-04-01

    Congenital heart diseases are a frequent cause of cardiology consultation. New diagnostic and therapeutic techniques have allowed greater survival and quality of life of patients who wish to participate in sports. What they can do is not always easy to determine. Guidelines are helpful at the time of deciding, although finally is the doctor the one that must determine in each case the situation of the patient and the type of exercise they can do depending on the severity and type of cardiopathy.

  9. Pathophysiology of valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, YI; SUN, RONGRONG; LI, XIANCHI; LIU, MIN; CHEN, SHUANG; ZHANG, PEIYING

    2016-01-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is caused by either damage or defect in one of the four heart valves, aortic, mitral, tricuspid or pulmonary. Defects in these valves can be congenital or acquired. Age, gender, tobacco use, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and type II diabetes contribute to the risk of disease. VHD is an escalating health issue with a prevalence of 2.5% in the United States alone. Considering the likely increase of the aging population worldwide, the incidence of acquired VHD is expected to increase. Technological advances are instrumental in identifying congenital heart defects in infants, thereby adding to the growing VHD population. Almost one-third of elderly individuals have echocardiographic or radiological evidence of calcific aortic valve (CAV) sclerosis, an early and subclinical form of CAV disease (CAVD). Of individuals ages >60, ~2% suffer from disease progression to its most severe form, calcific aortic stenosis. Surgical intervention is therefore required in these patients as no effective pharmacotherapies exist. Valvular calcium load and valve biomineralization are orchestrated by the concerted action of diverse cell-dependent mechanisms. Signaling pathways important in skeletal morphogenesis are also involved in the regulation of cardiac valve morphogenesis, CAVD and the pathobiology of cardiovascular calcification. CAVD usually occurs without any obvious symptoms in early stages over a long period of time and symptoms are identified at advanced stages of the disease, leading to a high rate of mortality. Aortic valve replacement is the only primary treatment of choice. Biomarkers such as asymmetric dimethylarginine, fetuin-A, calcium phosphate product, natriuretic peptides and osteopontin have been useful in improving outcomes among various disease states. This review, highlights the current understanding of the biology of VHD, with particular reference to molecular and cellular aspects of its regulation. Current clinical questions

  10. Thyroid Disease and the Heart.

    PubMed

    Klein, Irwin; Danzi, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid hormones have an intimate relationship with cardiac function. Some of the most significant clinical signs and symptoms of thyroid disease are the cardiac manifestations. In both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, the characteristic physiological effects of thyroid hormone can be understood from the actions at the molecular and cellular level. Here we explore topics from the metabolism and cellular effects of thyroid hormone to special considerations related to statin and amiodarone therapy for the alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism that accompany heart disease. PMID:26792255

  11. A neonate with critical congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Linder, Jarrett; Dawson, Emily; Williams, Paula

    2014-05-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is defined as a ductal-dependent congenital heart defect requiring surgical or percutaneous intervention via cardiac catheterization before 1 year of age. Most cases of CCHD can be diagnosed with prenatal ultrasound or fetal echocardiogram. If not prenatally diagnosed, CCHD can be stable in the newborn nursery due to persistent ductal patency, and the patient may only be diagnosed after ductal closure and development of cardiac symptoms at home. In this case, a 6-day-old female presented to the emergency department (ED) floppy with agonal respirations, poor capillary refill, and absent femoral pulses. On the day of presentation, the patient became increasingly fussy, refused feeding, and began to gasp. The patient was transported to the ED for evaluation, where a bedside echocardiogram revealed interrupted aortic arch (IAA), ventricular septal defect, minimal flow through a thread-like ductus arteriosus, and severely depressed cardiac function. IAA is very rare, with an incidence of three cases per 1 million live births. Patients require neonatal supportive care, continuous prostaglandin E1 infusion, and urgent referral for neonatal surgical repair in the first days to weeks of life. To reduce the volume of undiagnosed CCHD in the immediate newborn period, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Diseases in Newborns and Children (SACHDNC) recommended that CCHD screening via pulse oximetry be added to the recommended uniform screening panel. A positive screen results in an immediate referral for an echocardiogram. Fetal diagnosis, newborn screening, and/or careful clinical examination may have resulted in detection of IAA in our patient prior to ductal closure. PMID:24877491

  12. Optimal screening for genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Nævdal, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Screening for genetic diseases is performed in many regions and/or ethnic groups where there is a high prevalence of possibly malign genes. The propagation of such genes can be considered a dynamic externality. Given that many of these diseases are untreatable and give rise to truly tragic outcomes, they are a source of societal concern, and the screening process should perhaps be regulated. This paper incorporates a standard model of genetic propagation into an economic model of dynamic management to derive cost benefit rules for optimal screening. The highly non-linear nature of genetic dynamics gives rise to perhaps surprising results that include discontinuous controls and threshold effects. One insight is that any screening program that is in place for any amount of time should screen all individuals in a target population. The incorporation of genetic models may prove to be useful to several emerging fields in economics such as genoeconomics, neuroeconomics and paleoeconomics.

  13. Optimal screening for genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Nævdal, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Screening for genetic diseases is performed in many regions and/or ethnic groups where there is a high prevalence of possibly malign genes. The propagation of such genes can be considered a dynamic externality. Given that many of these diseases are untreatable and give rise to truly tragic outcomes, they are a source of societal concern, and the screening process should perhaps be regulated. This paper incorporates a standard model of genetic propagation into an economic model of dynamic management to derive cost benefit rules for optimal screening. The highly non-linear nature of genetic dynamics gives rise to perhaps surprising results that include discontinuous controls and threshold effects. One insight is that any screening program that is in place for any amount of time should screen all individuals in a target population. The incorporation of genetic models may prove to be useful to several emerging fields in economics such as genoeconomics, neuroeconomics and paleoeconomics. PMID:25203815

  14. [The lung in heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Sill, V

    1990-02-01

    The effects of "hypocirculation" and "hypercirculation" of the lungs are small. Hypocirculation has an influence of the ventilation/perfusion ratio, and can thus contribute to hypocapnia. In the early stages, hypercirculation--in particular via a left-to-right shung, leads to an increase in diffusion capacity; after a course of many years, a "counter-situation" occurs. Progressive pulmonary hypertension, as is exemplified for mitral stenosis, leads to measurable restrictive and obstructive impairment of function, and possible to unspecific hyper-reaction, as also, over the long-term, to a diminishement in membrane diffusion capacity. Chronic left heart failure is characterised by interstitial oedema at the level of the alveolar and bronchial capillary beds. The results are measurable restrictions in the static volumes, and in particular of the obstruction parameters and the closing volume that involve the small airways. In the individual case, no statement as to the extent of left heart failure is possible. In the passive pulmonary hypertension phase, diffusion capacity increases; in the further course of the disease, with development of interstitial and alveolar oedema, it decreases again. In acute left heart failure, the persistance and/or extent of pulmonary oedema is not determined solely by the magnitude of the pulmonary venous pressure. Permeability oedema--brought about by mediators--would appear to be significant on the basis of animal experiments. Not infrequently, left cardiac failure leads to small pleural effusions which occur in combination with substantial atelectasia, the aetiology of which is unclear. Interpretation difficulties are caused by the clinical findings and function-analytical data obtained in patients with a combination of chronic lung disease and reducted volume storage capacity of the pulmonary circulation and of the left heart failure, a common situation in the elderly patient. Diminished pulmonary function parameters that fail to

  15. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease.

  16. African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... more about African-Americans and stroke at our Power To End Stroke website This content was last reviewed July 2015. ... Attack • Heart Failure (HF) • Heart Valve Problems and Disease • High Blood ...

  17. Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000775.htm Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease To use the ... often develops over time. You may have early signs or symptoms long before you have serious heart ...

  18. Histone methylations in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Heart development comprises myocyte specification, differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. These processes are regulated by a group of core cardiac transcription factors in a coordinated temporal and spatial manner. Histone methylation is an emerging epigenetic mechanism for regulating gene transcription. Interplay among cardiac transcription factors and histone lysine modifiers plays important role in heart development. Aberrant expression and mutation of the histone lysine modifiers during development and in adult life can cause either embryonic lethality or congenital heart diseases, and influences the response of adult hearts to pathological stresses. In this review, we describe current body of literature on the role of several common histone methylations and their modifying enzymes in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases.

  19. Histone methylations in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Heart development comprises myocyte specification, differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. These processes are regulated by a group of core cardiac transcription factors in a coordinated temporal and spatial manner. Histone methylation is an emerging epigenetic mechanism for regulating gene transcription. Interplay among cardiac transcription factors and histone lysine modifiers plays important role in heart development. Aberrant expression and mutation of the histone lysine modifiers during development and in adult life can cause either embryonic lethality or congenital heart diseases, and influences the response of adult hearts to pathological stresses. In this review, we describe current body of literature on the role of several common histone methylations and their modifying enzymes in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases. PMID:25942538

  20. Assessing Potential Predisposition of Elementary School Children to Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Thomas A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A health assessment battery was developed to screen elementary school children in Clovis (California) for factors that might lead to heart disease. Students' height, blood pressure, flexibility, weight, and body fatness (by skin-fold tests) were measured. Plans call for future development of longitudinal student profiles. (Authors/PP)

  1. Cardiovascular disease screening.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Jennifer Y; Hameed, Afshan B

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death amongst women worldwide. Cardiovascular risk assessment and primary prevention are important strategies to improve morbidity and mortality. In additional to the traditional risk factors, pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes increment future risk of developing cardiovascular complications. Additionally, several serum biomarkers are valuable measures for both risk assessment and predictors of clinical outcomes in women. The purpose of this review is to describe current risk stratification schemes as well as outline the role of obstetric history and serum biomarkers in adjusting risk stratification in women. PMID:26143091

  2. Newborn screening for Krabbe's disease.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Joseph J; Saavedra-Matiz, Carlos A; Gelb, Michael H; Caggana, Michele

    2016-11-01

    Live newborn screening for Krabbe's disease (KD) was initiated in New York on August 7, 2006, and started in Missouri in August, 2012. As of August 7, 2015, nearly 2.5 million infants had been screened, and 443 (0.018%) infants had been referred for followup clinical evaluation; only five infants had been determined to have KD. As of August, 2015, the combined incidence of infantile KD in New York and Missouri is ∼1 per 500,000; however, patients who develop later-onset forms of KD may still emerge. This Review provides an overview of the processes used to develop the screening and followup algorithms. It also includes updated results from screening and discussion of observations, lessons learned, and suggested areas for improvement that will reduce referral rates and the number of infants defined as at risk for later-onset forms of KD. Although current treatment options for infants with early-infantile Krabbe's disease are not curative, over time treatment options should improve; in the meantime, it is essential to evaluate the lessons learned and to ensure that screening is completed in the best possible manner until these improvements can be realized. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638592

  3. Smoking, Stress, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Leonard H.; Perkins, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on the interrelation between stressors and smoking, and on its potential impact on coronary heart disease risk beyond that due to stressors or to smoking alone. Reviews evidence supporting the stress-smoking interrelationship, its relevance to the risk of heart disease, and mechanisms explaining why smokers smoke more during stress and why…

  4. Psychosocial factors in coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, J. R. P., Jr.; Chaplan, R. D.

    1969-01-01

    The relationship between job satisfaction and coronary heart disease is explored for blue and white collar groups, different personalities and physiological risk factors. Differences found among administrators, engineers and scientists with regard to variables associated with heart disease are in terms of physiology, personality, reported job stress, and smoking.

  5. The high incidence of anti-Ro/SSA and anti-p200 antibodies in female patients with connective tissue diseases confirms the importance of screening for congenital heart block-associated autoantibodies during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, E; Agnoletti, Arianna Fay; Pappalardo, F; Schiavetti, I; Torino, A; Parodi, A

    2016-03-01

    It is known that anti-Ro/SSA positivity leads to higher risk of miscarriage and fetal cardiac malformations. Particularly, anti-p200 antibodies against a finer specificity of the Ro/SSA antigen, have been associated with congenital heart block. The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of anti-p200 among female patients with different connective tissue diseases and, among these, the relevance of anti-p200 values in patients with cutaneous diseases compared to systemic diseases. Anti-p200 were investigated in 110 anti-Ro/SSA positive female sera, sent to our laboratory between 2008 and 2014 with suspect of connective disease, by using ELISA testing. Positivity was found in 40.9 % samples, 34 of them showed a strong positivity (values ≥ 1.0, cut off = 0.7). Patients with systemic diseases were anti-p200 positive in the 45.9 % of cases while patients with cutaneous diseases were positive in the 24.0 % of cases. Positivity for anti-p200 antibodies was revealed in 24.0 % of patients with discoid lupus erythematosus; 100 % of patients with dermatomyositis; 40.0 % of patients with mixed connective tissue disease; 25.0 % of patients with rheumatoid arthritis; 100 % of patients with Sjögren's syndrome; 33.3 % of patients with subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus; 42.9 % of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus; 80.0 % of patients with systemic sclerosis. No significant difference in anti-p200 prevalence was found between systemic and cutaneous involvement, nevertheless, considering only positive sera, the antibody titer was higher in systemic diseases rather than in cutaneous diseases (2.6 ± 1.7 and 1.7 ± 1.9; p = 0.041). The authors think screenings for anti-Ro/SSA and anti-p200 antibodies should be included in the laboratory checklist for pregnancy.

  6. Indications for heart transplantation in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Siân Pincott, E; Burch, M

    2011-05-01

    In this review we have looked at indications for cardiac transplantation in congenital heart disease. An outline of the general principles of the use of transplant as a management strategy both as a first line treatment and following other surgical interventions is discussed. We explore the importance of the timing of patient referral and the evaluations undertaken, and how the results of these may vary between patients with congenital heart disease and patients with other causes of end-stage heart failure. The potential complications associated with patients with congenital heart disease need to be both anticipated and managed appropriately by an experienced team. Timing of transplantation in congenital heart disease is difficult to standardize as the group of patients is heterogeneous. We discuss the role and limitations of investigations such as BNP, 6 minute walk, metabolic exercise testing and self estimated physical functioning. We also discuss the suitability for listing. It is clear that congenital heart patients should not be considered to be at uniform high risk of death at transplant. Morbidity varies greatly in the congenital patient population with the failing Fontan circulation having a far higher risk than a failing Mustard circulation. However the underlying issue of imbalance between donor organ supply and demand needs to be addressed as transplant teams are finding themselves in the increasingly difficult situation of supporting growing numbers of patients with a diverse range of pathologies with declining numbers of donor organs.

  7. Population screening for Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Si Houn

    2014-05-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper transport caused by mutations in the gene encoding an ATPase, ATP7B. Early detection of Wilson's disease is critical because effective medical treatments such as chelating agents and zinc salts are available, which can prevent lifelong neurological disabilities and/or cirrhosis. It is unfortunate that most patients are brought to our attention after they have developed serious complications such as brain damage or cirrhosis, despite the availability of effective treatments. The diagnosis is usually made through copper measurement in the liver tissue, followed by confirmation with genetic testing of the ATP7B gene. Currently, there are no effective biomarkers or methods suitable for newborn screening for Wilson's disease. Ceruloplasmin has been tested for pediatric and newborn screening with limited outcome. Recently, liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (LC-MRM-MS) has emerged as a robust technology that may enable multiplex quantification of signature proteotypic peptides with low abundance. The application of this technology may help facilitate the research on Wilson's disease for protein expression, biomarker study, diagnosis, and, hopefully, screening.

  8. Marital stability and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Silbert, A R; Newburger, J W; Fyler, D C

    1982-06-01

    The incidence of divorce or legal separation was studied in 438 families of children born with heart disease who entered the New England Regional Infant Cardiac Program between 1968 and 1973. The parents were interviewed when the children were 5 1/2 years old. The rate of divorce in 438 families of children with critical congenital heart disease was not significantly different from the rate in two comparison groups: (1) 25 families of children whose cardiac defect was spontaneously cured, and (2) 26 families of children catheterized in infancy for suspected cardiac defect but who were found to be free of heart disease. Rates of divorce or legal separation for the three groups were: critical congenital heart disease, 12.1%, spontaneously cured, 4.2% free of heart disease, 11.5% these rates were not significantly different. The average national divorce rate was 20.3% for the same period.

  9. Defective sumoylation pathway directs congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Chen, Li; Wen, Shu; Zhu, Huiping; Yu, Wei; Moskowitz, Ivan P.; Shaw, Gary M.; Finnell, Richard H.; Schwartz, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common of all birth defects, yet molecular mechanism(s) underlying highly prevalent atrial septal defects (ASDs) and ventricular septal defects (VSDs) have remained elusive. We demonstrate the indispensability of “balanced” post-translational SUMO conjugation-deconjugation pathway for normal cardiac development. Both hetero- and homo-zygous SUMO-1 knockout mice exhibited ASDs and VSDs with high mortality rates, which were rescued by cardiac re-expression of the SUMO-1 transgene. Since SUMO-1 was also involved in cleft lip/palate in human patients, the above findings provided a powerful rationale to question whether SUMO-1 was mutated in babies born with cleft palates and ASDs. Sequence analysis of DNA from newborn screening blood spots revealed a single 16 bp substitution in the SUMO-1 regulatory promoter of a patient displaying both oral-facial clefts and ASDs. Diminished sumoylation activity whether by genetics, environmental toxins and/or pharmaceuticals may significantly contribute to susceptibility to the induction of congenital heart disease worldwide. PMID:21563299

  10. [Acquired and congenital heart diseases during pregancy].

    PubMed

    De Feo, Stefania; Iacovoni, Attilio; Faggiano, Pompilio

    2012-05-01

    Heart diseases are the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. The number of patients with congenital heart diseases reaching childbearing age, as well as the proportion of women with acquired conditions, such as ischemic heart disease, becoming pregnant is constantly increasing. All women with known heart disease should have pre-pregnancy counseling, to assess maternal and fetal risk. Women at moderate or high risk should be under the care of a specialist prenatal team with experience in managing women with heart disease during pregnancy. Conditions that are considered at particularly high risk (mortality >10%) include Marfan syndrome with dilated aortic root, severe left ventricular dysfunction, severe left heart obstructive lesions, and pulmonary hypertension. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare and potentially fatal disease related to pregnancy and the postnatal period that presents with symptoms of congestion and/or hypoperfusion and may rapidly progress to acute and life-threatening heart failure. However, the majority of women with heart disease can tolerate pregnancy; therefore an adequate multidisciplinary approach with the gynecologist, anesthesiologist and cardiologist should be advocated in order to reduce maternal and fetal risks associated with pregnancy.

  11. Season of birth in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bosshardt, Daniela; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Lang, Phung; Bosshardt, Mathias; Bopp, Matthias; Addor, Marie-Claude; Gutzwiller, Felix

    2005-05-01

    This study demonstrates seasonal variations of birth dates in children with congenital valvular heart disease and in adults dying from valvular heart disease. The findings are based on the 1989-98 Swiss EUROCAT data, and on 1969-94 Swiss mortality records. Seasonality was tested with aggregated monthly data using Edwards' procedure. Both data sets showed excesses between December and March, consistent in different forms of valvular disease and in both sexes. Despite the decline of rheumatic heart disease, risk factors causing season of birth effects remain relevant for congenital anomalies.

  12. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  13. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty. PMID:27188830

  14. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-14

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty.

  15. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  16. Antidepressants and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan; Liu, Yen-Bin; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Wang, Chi-Chuan; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Empirical evidence regarding the association between antidepressants and valvular heart disease (VHD) is scarce. Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research database, this nested case-control study assessed the association between antidepressants and VHD in a Chinese population. Among a cohort of patients who used at least 3 prescription antidepressants, 874 cases with VHD and 3496 matched controls (1:4 ratio) were identified. Conditional logistic regression models were used to examine the timing, duration, dose and type of antidepressants use, and the risk of VHD. Current use of antidepressants was associated with a 1.4-fold increase in the risk of VHD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17–1.77). Among current users, a dose–response association was observed in terms of the cumulative duration and the cumulative antidepressant dose. Significantly higher risks of VHD were observed among the current users of tricyclic antidepressants (aOR 1.40 [1.05–1.87]). We found that the use of antidepressants was associated with a greater risk of VHD and that the risks varied according to different antidepressants. PMID:27057841

  17. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease? Some people ... have diabetic heart disease (DHD) may have no signs or symptoms of heart disease. This is called “ ...

  18. Behavior patterns and coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between two behavioral patterns, cardiac risk factors, and coronary heart disease are investigated. Risk factors used in the analysis were family history of coronary disease, smoking, cholesterol, obesity, systotic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood sugar, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood unit. It was found that conventional, non-behavioral pattern risk factors alone were not significantly related to coronary heart disease.

  19. Cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Choo, W S; Steeds, R P

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a perspective on the relative importance and contribution of different imaging modalities in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is increasing in prevalence across Europe, at a time when the clinical ability of physicians to diagnose and assess severity is declining. Increasing reliance is placed on echocardiography, which is the mainstay of cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease. This article outlines the techniques used in this context and their limitations, identifying areas in which dynamic imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and multislice CT are expanding. PMID:22723532

  20. Dietary sugar and ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Howell, R W; Wilson, D G

    1969-07-19

    Comparison of the sugar intake of 1,158 men believed to be free of ischaemic heart disease failed to establish any real difference in intake when compared with 170 men with confirmed or possible ischaemic heart disease. In neither group was mere any significant correlation between sugar intake and serum cholesterol, white blood cell count, haemoglobin, E.S.R., beta-lipoprotein, or uric add; nor was there any correlation between total sugar intake and weight gain after the age of 25 years.These results suggest that considerably more confirmation is required before acceptance of Yudkm's hypothesis that high sugar intake is the chief dietary factor causing ischaemic heart disease.

  1. Pregnancy and adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Karamermer, Yusuf; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2007-09-01

    Increasing numbers of women with complex congenital heart disease are reaching childbearing age. Pregnancy is a major issue in the management of adult congenital heart disease. Cardiac disease is one of the most common causes of maternal morbidity and mortality. Complications, such as growth retardation, preterm and premature birth and even fetal and neonatal mortality, are more frequent among children of women with congenital heart disease. The risk of complications is determined by the severity of the cardiac lesion, the presence of cyanosis, the maternal functional class and the use of anticoagulation. However, the pathophysiology of these complications is not completely understood and may be related to a diminished increase in cardiac output and/or endothelial dysfunction. The management of pregnant cardiac patients is based on limited clinical information. This article reviews pre-pregnancy counseling and management during pregnancy in patients with congenital heart disease.

  2. Interventional treatment of congenital heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Marini, D; Agnoletti, G

    2010-02-01

    During the last 10 years the interventional treatment of congenital and structural heart diseases has known enormous changes in techniques, methods and patients management. Lesions previously treated surgically are now approached in the catheterization laboratory. The advent of multidisciplinary approach of congenital heart disease has made possible the development of hybrid techniques, of fetal medicine and of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- guided cardiac catheterization. Technological innovation has introduced new concepts in treatment of congenital heart disease patients and has allowed to adapt different techniques to single patients. The knowledge of the evolution of structural heart disease has allowed to chose the best percutaneous and/ or surgical technique and the best materials to optimize long term results. Improvement in non invasive imaging modality has allowed to diminish the radiation exposure and to provide useful information to interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. Absorbable, drug eluting tools will change the treatment and probably the natural history of congenital and structural cardiac and vascular diseases.

  3. Novel therapeutic strategies for ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Adam J; Vander Heide, Richard S

    2014-11-01

    Despite significant advances in the physician's ability to initiate myocardial reperfusion and salvage heart tissue, ischemic heart disease remains one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Consequently, alternative therapeutic strategies have been intensively investigated, especially methods of enhancing the heart's resistance to ischemic cell death - so called "cardioprotective" interventions. However, although a great deal has been learned regarding the methods and mechanisms of cardioprotective interventions, an efficacious therapy has yet to be successfully implemented in the clinical arena. This review discusses the current understanding of cardioprotection in the context of ischemic heart disease pathophysiology, highlighting those elements of ischemic heart disease pathophysiology that have received less attention as potential targets of cardioprotective intervention.

  4. [Congenital heart diseases in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Ratti, Carlo; Veronesi, Benedetta; Grassi, Laura; Bompani, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Congenital heart diseases are abnormalities in the heart's structure that are present at birth. Some are known to be associated with genetic disorders. They affect 8 out of every 1,000 newborns. They range from simple defects with no symptoms to complex defects. They are divided in two types: cyanotic and not cyanotic.

  5. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure , and/or diabetic cardiomyopathy . Initially, your doctor may recommend one or more of the following tests. Blood Pressure Measurement To measure your blood pressure, your doctor or nurse will use some type of a gauge, a stethoscope (or electronic sensor), ...

  6. Congenital Heart Disease and Impacts on Child Development

    PubMed Central

    Mari, Mariana Alievi; Cascudo, Marcelo Matos; Alchieri, João Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the child development and evaluate a possible association with the commitment by biopsychosocial factors of children with and without congenital heart disease. Methods: Observational study of case-control with three groups: Group 1 - children with congenital heart disease without surgical correction; Group 2 - children with congenital heart disease who underwent surgery; and Group 3 - healthy children. Children were assessed by socio-demographic and clinical questionnaire and the Denver II Screening Test. Results: One hundred and twenty eight children were evaluated, 29 in Group 1, 43 in Group 2 and 56 in Group 3. Of the total, 51.56% are girls and ages ranged from two months to six years (median 24.5 months). Regarding the Denver II, the children with heart disease had more "suspicious" and "suspect/abnormal" ratings and in the group of healthy children 53.6% were considered with "normal" development (P≤0.0001). The biopsychosocial variables that were related to a possible developmental delay were gender (P=0.042), child's age (P=0.001) and income per capita (P=0.019). Conclusion: The results suggest that children with congenital heart disease are likely to have a developmental delay with significant difference between children who have undergone surgery and those awaiting surgery under clinical follow-up. PMID:27074272

  7. Heart Disease Risk Factors for Children and Teenagers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women and Heart Disease Heart-smart curriculum & health games for grades K-6 at Project Heart . Heart ... sedentary activities like watching TV or playing video games? These are called sedentary activities, because there is ...

  8. FastStats: Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Pacific Islander Population Health of Black or African American non-Hispanic Population Health of Hispanic or Latino ... diagnostic categories [PDF - 58 KB] Hospitalization for Congestive Heart Failure: United States, ... Association Get Email Updates To receive email ...

  9. Air Pollution and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Air Pollution and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 30,2016 ... or Longer-Term Acute short-term effects of air pollution tend to strike people who are elderly or ...

  10. Cardiac Arrhythmias In Congenital Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, Paul; Balaji, Seshadri

    2009-01-01

    Arrhythmias figure prominently among the complications encountered in the varied and diverse population of patients with congenital heart disease, and are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence generally increases as the patient ages, with multifactorial predisposing features that may include congenitally malformed or displaced conduction systems, altered hemodynamics, mechanical or hypoxic stress, and residual or postoperative sequelae. The safe and effective management of arrhythmias in congenital heart disease requires a thorough appreciation for conduction system variants, arrhythmia mechanisms, underlying anatomy, and associated physiology. We, therefore, begin this review by presenting the scope of the problem, outlining therapeutic options, and summarizing congenital heart disease-related conduction system anomalies associated with disorders of the sinus node and AV conduction system. Arrhythmias encountered in common forms of congenital heart disease are subsequently discussed. In so doing, we touch upon issues related to risk stratification for sudden death, implantable cardiac devices, catheter ablation, and adjuvant surgical therapy. PMID:19898654

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity.

  12. Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors is likely why the rates of heart disease are coming down. These factors include high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, overweight and obesity. The rates of high blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol haven' ...

  13. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  14. Radiation-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Dorothy M; Lloyd, Guy; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev

    2016-02-15

    Radiation to the mediastinum is a key component of treatment with curative intent for a range of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer. Exposure to radiation is associated with a risk of radiation-induced heart valve damage characterised by valve fibrosis and calcification. There is a latent interval of 10-20 years between radiation exposure and development of clinically significant heart valve disease. Risk is related to radiation dose received, interval from exposure and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Long-term outlook and the risk of valve surgery are related to the effects of radiation on mediastinal structures including pulmonary fibrosis and pericardial constriction. Dose prediction models to predict the risk of heart valve disease in the future and newer radiation techniques to reduce the radiation dose to the heart are being developed. Surveillance strategies for this cohort of cancer survivors at risk of developing significant heart valve complications are required.

  15. Chagas Heart Disease: Report on Recent Developments

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Shirani, Jamshid; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Mukherjee, Shankar; Nelson, Randin; Coyle, Christina M.; Spray, David C.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Guan, Fangxia; Prado, Cibele M.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiac disease in endemic areas of Latin America. It is now being diagnosed in non-endemic areas due to immigration. Typical cardiac manifestations of Chagas disease include dilated cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, cardioembolism and stroke. Clinical and laboratory-based research to define the pathology resulting from T. cruzi infection has shed light on many of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these manifestations. Antiparasitic treatment may not be appropriate for patients with advanced cardiac disease. Clinical management of Chagas heart disease is similar to that used for cardiomyopathies due to other processes. Cardiac transplantation has been successfully performed in a small number of patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:22293860

  16. CNS-disease affecting the heart: brain-heart disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Wahbi, Karim

    2014-10-15

    There are a number of hereditary and non-hereditary central nervous system (CNS) disorders, which directly or indirectly affect the heart (brain-heart disorders). The most well-known of these CNS-disorders are epilepsy, stroke, subarachanoid bleeding, bacterial meningitis, and head injury. In addition, a number of hereditary and non-hereditary neurodegenerative disorders may impair cardiac functions. Affection of the heart may manifest as arrhythmias, cardiomyopathy, or autonomic dysfunction. Rarer cardiac complications of CNS disorders include heart failure, systolic or diastolic dysfunction, myocardial infarction, arterial hypertension, or pulmonary hypertension. Cardiomyopathy induced by hereditary CNS disease mainly include stress-induced myocardial dysfunction, known as Takotsubo syndrome (TTS). CNS disease triggering TTS includes epilepsy, ischemic stroke, subarachnoid bleeding, or PRES syndrome. Arrhythmias induced by hereditary CNS disease include supraventricular or ventricular arrhythmias leading to palpitations, dizziness, vertigo, fainting, syncope, (near) sudden cardiac death, or sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Appropriate management of cardiac involvement in CNS-disorders is essential to improve outcome of affected patients. PMID:25034054

  17. [Congenital heart disease, heterotaxia and laterality].

    PubMed

    Icardo, José Manuel; García Rincón, Juan Manuel; Ros, María Angeles

    2002-09-01

    Congenital heart disease occurs in about 0,8% of all newborns. Many cardiac malformations occur among relatives and have a polymorphic presentation. The origin of most congenital heart disease is thought to be multifactorial, implying both anomalous expression of genes and the influence of epigenetic factors. However, in a small number of cases, the origin of congenital heart disease has been directly related to chromosomal anomalies or to defects in a single gene. Curiously, defects in a single gene can explain a polymorphic presentation if the anomalous gene controls a basic embryonic process that affects different organs in time and space. Some of these genes appear to control the establishment of laterality. The establishment of the left-right asymmetry starts at the Hensen node. Here, the initial embryonic symmetry is broken by cascades of gene activation that confer specific properties on the left and right sides of the embryo. Although there are variations between species, some basic patterns of gene expression (Nodal, Pitx2) appear to be maintained along the phylogenetic scale. Anomalous expression of these genes induces the heterotaxia syndrome, which usually courses with congenital heart disease. The development of heart malformations is illustrated with the mouse mutant iv/iv, which is a model for the heterotaxia syndrome and the associated congenital heart disease.

  18. Heart Disease: Know Your Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... active, and choosing good nutrition. Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart - You know you should be more physically active. But are you confused, concerned, or just can't get started? This guide uses science-based information to help adults develop a safe ...

  19. Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... active, and choosing good nutrition. Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart - You know you should be more physically active. But are you confused, concerned, or just can't get started? This guide uses science-based information to help adults develop a safe ...

  20. Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... of transportation and lack of health insurance. Those factors can make early diagnoses and management of risks difficult, said Martha L. Daviglus, M.D., Ph.D., a cardiovascular epidemiologist at Northwestern University and University of Illinois and an American Heart ...

  1. Heart failure disease management: implementation and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Whellan, David J

    2005-01-01

    Millions of dollars are being spent to identify new therapies to improve mortality and morbidity for the growing epidemic of patients sustaining heart failure. However, in clinical practice, these therapies are currently underused. To bridge the gap between proven therapies and clinical practice, the medical community has turned to disease management. Heart failure disease management interventions vary from vital-sign monitoring to multidisciplinary approaches involving a pharmacist, nutritionist, nurse practitioner, and physician. This review attempts to categorize these inventions based on location. We compared the published results from randomized, controlled trials of the following types of heart failure disease management interventions: inpatient, clinic visits, home visits, and telephone follow up. Although research shows an improvement in the quality of care and a decrease in hospitalizations for patients sustaining heart failure, the economic impact of disease management is still unclear. The current reimbursement structure is a disincentive to providers wanting to offer disease management services to patients sustaining heart failure. Additionally, the cost of providing disease management services such as additional clinical visits, patient education materials, or additional personnel time has not been well documented. Most heart failure disease management studies do confirm the concept that providing increased access to healthcare providers for an at-risk group of patients sustaining heart failure does improve outcomes. However, a large-scale randomized, controlled clinical trial based in the United States is needed to prove that this concept can be implemented beyond a single center and to determine how much it will cost patients, providers, healthcare systems, and payers.

  2. Carcinoid heart disease: Diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Luis, Sushil A; Pellikka, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Hedinger syndrome refers to carcinoid valvular heart disease. The disease is believed to be triggered by vasoactive substances that result in valvular fibrosis. It classically occurs in patients with metastatic carcinoid and preferentially involves the right sided cardiac valves. Affected valves become thickened and retracted, exhibiting regurgitation and sometimes, stenosis. Echocardiography is recommended in patients with carcinoid syndrome and a follow up study is advisable in those who develop a murmur or other symptoms or signs of valvular heart disease. For appropriately selected patients, valve replacement surgery appears to improve outcomes.

  3. Design for Heart Disease Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

    In this teaching and curriculum guide for community health education, a design is suggested for a course that could help prevent premature deaths due to heart disease. The course communicates facts regarding the causes of cardiovascular diseases, and outlines opportunities for attaining the degree of physical conditioning essential to prevention.…

  4. Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Sep 16,2015 Plain old snoring ... evidence is very strong for the relationship between sleep apnea and hypertension and cardiovascular disease generally, so people really need to know that,” ...

  5. Pregnancy and Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Ami B; DeFaria Yeh, Doreen

    2015-11-01

    Most women with known congenital heart disease can have successful pregnancy, labor, and delivery. Preconception assessment is essential in understanding anatomy, repairs, and current physiology, all of which can influence risk in pregnancy. With that foundation, a multidisciplinary cardio-obstetric team can predict and prepare for complications that may occur with superimposed hemodynamic changes of pregnancy. Individuals with Eisenmenger syndrome, pulmonary hypertension, cyanosis, significant left heart obstruction, ventricular dysfunction, or prior major cardiac event are among the highest risk for complications.

  6. [Evaluation of congenital heart disease in adults].

    PubMed

    Oliver Ruiz, José María; Mateos García, Marta; Bret Zurita, Montserrat

    2003-06-01

    Improvements in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of congenital heart disease during infancy and childhood have resulted in an outstanding increase in the prevalence of these entities during adulthood. Congenital heart disease in the adult represents a new diagnostic challenge to the consultant cardiologist, unfamiliar with the anatomical and functional complexities of cardiac malformations. Assessment of adult congenital heart disease with imaging techniques can be as accurate as in children. However, these techniques cannot substitute for a detailed clinical assessment. Physical examination, electrocardiography and chest x-rays remain the three main pillars of bedside diagnosis. Transthoracic echocardiography is undoubtedly the imaging technique which provides most information, and in many situations no additional studies are needed. Nevertheless, ultrasound imaging properties in adults are not as favorable as in children, and prior surgical procedures further impair image quality. Despite recent advances in ultrasound technologies such as harmonic or contrast imaging, other diagnostic procedures are sometimes required. Fortunately, transesophageal echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging are easily performed in the adult, and do not require anaesthetic support, in contrast to pediatric patients. These techniques, together with nuclear cardiology and cardiac catheterization, complete the second tier of diagnostic techniques for congenital heart disease. To avoid unnecessary repetition of diagnostic procedures, the attending cardiologist should choose the sequence of diagnostic techniques carefully; although the information this yields is often redundant, it is also frequently complementary. This article aims to compare the diagnostic utility of different imaging techniques in adult patients with congenital heart disease, both with and without prior surgical repair.

  7. Genetic Syndromes associated with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that genetic alterations or variations contribute considerably to the development of congenital heart disease. Many kinds of genetic tests are commercially available, and more are currently under development. Congenital heart disease is frequently accompanied by genetic syndromes showing both cardiac and extra-cardiac anomalies. Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of birth defects, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality during infancy and childhood. This review introduces common genetic syndromes showing various types of congenital heart disease, including Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, 22q11 deletion syndrome, Williams syndrome, and Noonan syndrome. Although surgical techniques and perioperative care have improved substantially, patients with genetic syndromes may be at an increased risk of death or major complications associated with surgery. Therefore, risk management based on an accurate genetic diagnosis is necessary in order to effectively plan the surgical and medical management and follow-up for these patients. In addition, multidisciplinary approaches and care for the combined extra-cardiac anomalies may help to reduce mortality and morbidity accompanied with congenital heart disease. PMID:26413101

  8. Project SuperHeart: An Evaluation of a Heart Disease Intervention Program For Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Way, Joyce W.

    1981-01-01

    An effective way to prevent coronary heart disease in later life is to concentrate on preventive measures in the early years before coronary heart disease becomes established. Project SuperHeart, a heart disease intervention program for young children, includes physical fitness and classroom activities emphasizing basic nutritional habits. (JN)

  9. [Vascular brain lesions and ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Levin, G Z

    1979-01-01

    The role of essential hypertension in the pathogenesis of cerebral vessel disorders (not only hemorrhagic, but also ischemic) is greater than in the pathogenesis of the heart ischemic disease. An analysis of the evidences left by ancient doctors, when compared with statistical data of our time, gives one grounds to believe that cerebral hemorrhages have been a rather common disease, at least, since the time of the antique civilization of Greece and Rome, whereas ischemic heart disease has become a widespread disease among the population of the developed countries only in our time. This makes it possible to assume that the role of essential hypertension and that of atherosclerosis are not equal in the "diseases of civilization", if the diseases of today's developed society are meant.

  10. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices.

  11. Heart failure and Alzheimer′s disease

    PubMed Central

    Cermakova, P; Eriksdotter, M; Lund, L H; Winblad, B; Religa, P; Religa, D

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that heart failure is a risk factor for Alzheimer′s disease. Decreased cerebral blood flow and neurohormonal activation due to heart failure may contribute to the dysfunction of the neurovascular unit and cause an energy crisis in neurons. This leads to the impaired clearance of amyloid beta and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein, resulting in the formation of amyloid beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In this article, we will summarize the current understanding of the relationship between heart failure and Alzheimer′s disease based on epidemiological studies, brain imaging research, pathological findings and the use of animal models. The importance of atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, blood pressure and valve disease as well as the effect of relevant medications will be discussed. PMID:25041352

  12. Chagas Heart Disease: An Update.

    PubMed

    Malik, Lindsey H; Singh, Gagan D; Amsterdam, Ezra A

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, results from infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and is a major cause of cardiac disease worldwide. Until recently, Chagas disease was confined to those areas of South and Central America where Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic. With the migration of infected individuals, however, the disease has spread, and it is estimated that 6-7 million people worldwide are infected. In the US alone, more than 7 million people from Trypanosoma cruzi-endemic countries became legal US residents by the turn of the century, resulting in a surge of Chagas disease in this country. According to preliminary estimates, the US now ranks seventh in the Western Hemisphere in number of individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, and the disease has become a major public health concern due to limited awareness in the medical community.

  13. Functional Assessment for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Significant improvement in survival of children with congenital cardiac malformations has resulted in an increasing population of adolescent and adult patients with congenital heart disease. Of the long-term cardiac problems, ventricular dysfunction remains an important issue of concern. Despite corrective or palliative repair of congenital heart lesions, the right ventricle, which may be the subpulmonary or systemic ventricular chamber, and the functional single ventricle are particularly vulnerable to functional impairment. Regular assessment of cardiac function constitutes an important aspect in the long-term follow up of patients with congenital heart disease. Echocardiography remains the most useful imaging modality for longitudinal monitoring of cardiac function. Conventional echocardiographic assessment has focused primarily on quantification of changes in ventricular size and blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycles. Advances in echocardiographic technologies including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking echocardiography have enabled direct interrogation of myocardial deformation. In this review, the issues of ventricular dysfunction in congenital heart disease, conventional echocardiographic and novel myocardial deformation imaging techniques, and clinical applications of these techniques in the functional assessment of congenital heart disease are discussed. PMID:24653734

  14. Epidemiology of congenital heart disease in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinto Júnior, Valdester Cavalcante; Branco, Klébia Magalhães P. Castello; Cavalcante, Rodrigo Cardoso; Carvalho Junior, Waldemiro; Lima, José Rubens Costa; de Freitas, Sílvia Maria; Fraga, Maria Nazaré de Oliveira; de Souza, Nayana Maria Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Congenital heart disease is an abnormality in the structure or cardiocirculatory function, occurring from birth, even if diagnosed later. It can result in intrauterine death in childhood or in adulthood. Accounted for 6% of infant deaths in Brazil in 2007. Objective To estimate underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease in Brazil and its subtypes. Methods The calculations of prevalence were performed by applying coefficients, giving them function rates for calculations of health problems. The study makes an approach between the literature and the governmental registries. It was adopted an estimate of 9: 1000 births and prevalence rates for subtypes applied to births of 2010. Estimates of births with congenital heart disease were compared with the reports to the Ministry of Health and were studied by descriptive methods with the use of rates and coefficients represented in tables. Results The incidence in Brazil is 25,757 new cases/year, distributed in: North 2,758; Northeast 7,570; Southeast 10,112; South 3,329; and Midwest 1,987. In 2010, were reported to System of Live Birth Information of Ministry of Health 1,377 cases of babies with congenital heart disease, representing 5.3% of the estimated for Brazil. In the same period, the most common subtypes were: ventricular septal defect (7,498); atrial septal defect (4,693); persistent ductus arteriosus (2,490); pulmonary stenosis (1,431); tetralogy of Fallot (973); coarctation of the aorta (973); transposition of the great arteries (887); and aortic stenosis 630. The prevalence of congenital heart disease, for the year of 2009, was 675,495 children and adolescents and 552,092 adults. Conclusion In Brazil, there is underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease, signaling the need for adjustments in the methodology of registration. PMID:26107454

  15. Genetic research in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, A G

    1984-01-01

    Coronary heart disease research along genetic lines is difficult. Studies in molecular genetics of apolipoprotein and receptor variability appear most promising in the near future. However, unexpected discoveries and methodology may turn up that may completely change the field. Exclusive concentration on lipid research therefore should be avoided. It is likely that most advances will come from carefully designed studies that ask specific questions. Such research design is appropriate not only for laboratory studies but also for clinical and epidemiological investigations. The collaboration of clinicians, biochemists, geneticists, epidemiologists, and statisticians is likely to lead to better understanding of coronary heart disease.

  16. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2011 Update

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Véronique L.; Go, Alan S.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Adams, Robert J.; Berry, Jarett D.; Brown, Todd M.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Dai, Shifan; de Simone, Giovanni; Ford, Earl S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Fullerton, Heather J.; Gillespie, Cathleen; Greenlund, Kurt J.; Hailpern, Susan M.; Heit, John A.; Ho, P. Michael; Howard, Virginia J.; Kissela, Brett M.; Kittner, Steven J.; Lackland, Daniel T.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Makuc, Diane M.; Marcus, Gregory M.; Marelli, Ariane; Matchar, David B.; McDermott, Mary M.; Meigs, James B.; Moy, Claudia S.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Mussolino, Michael E.; Nichol, Graham; Paynter, Nina P.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Sorlie, Paul D.; Stafford, Randall S.; Turan, Tanya N.; Turner, Melanie B.; Wong, Nathan D.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Chart 19-1). The increases in calories consumed during this time period are attributable primarily to greater average carbohydrate intake, in particular, of starches, refined grains, and sugars. Other specific changes related to increased caloric intake in the United States include larger portion sizes, greater food quantity and calories per meal, and increased consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, snacks, commercially prepared (especially fast food) meals, and higher energy-density foods. The 2011 Update Provides Critical Data Regarding Cardiovascular Quality of Care, Procedure Utilization, and Costs In light of the current national focus on healthcare utilization, costs, and quality, it is critical to monitor and understand the magnitude of healthcare delivery and costs, as well as the quality of healthcare delivery, related to CVDs. The Update provides these critical data in several sections. Quality-of-Care Metrics for CVDs Chapter 20 reviews many metrics related to the quality of care delivered to patients with CVDs, as well as healthcare disparities. In particular, quality data are available from the AHA’s “Get With The Guidelines” programs for coronary artery disease and heart failure and the American Stroke Association/ AHA’s “Get With the Guidelines” program for acute stroke. Similar data from the Veterans Healthcare Administration, national Medicare and Medicaid data and National Cardiovascular Data Registry Acute Coronary Treatment and Intervention Outcomes Network - “Get With The Guidelines” Registry data are also reviewed. These data show impressive adherence with guideline recommendations for many, but not all, metrics of quality of care for these hospitalized patients. Data are also reviewed on screening for cardiovascular risk factor levels and control. Cardiovascular Procedure Utilization and Costs Chapter 21 provides data on trends and current usage of cardiovascular surgical and invasive procedures. For example, the total number of

  17. Generation of Antigen Microarrays to Screen for Autoantibodies in Heart Failure and Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chruscinski, Andrzej; Huang, Flora Y. Y.; Nguyen, Albert; Lioe, Jocelyn; Tumiati, Laura C.; Kozuszko, Stella; Tinckam, Kathryn J.; Rao, Vivek; Dunn, Shannon E.; Persinger, Michael A.; Levy, Gary A.; Ross, Heather J.

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies directed against endogenous proteins including contractile proteins and endothelial antigens are frequently detected in patients with heart failure and after heart transplantation. There is evidence that these autoantibodies contribute to cardiac dysfunction and correlate with clinical outcomes. Currently, autoantibodies are detected in patient sera using individual ELISA assays (one for each antigen). Thus, screening for many individual autoantibodies is laborious and consumes a large amount of patient sample. To better capture the broad-scale antibody reactivities that occur in heart failure and post-transplant, we developed a custom antigen microarray technique that can simultaneously measure IgM and IgG reactivities against 64 unique antigens using just five microliters of patient serum. We first demonstrated that our antigen microarray technique displayed enhanced sensitivity to detect autoantibodies compared to the traditional ELISA method. We then piloted this technique using two sets of samples that were obtained at our institution. In the first retrospective study, we profiled pre-transplant sera from 24 heart failure patients who subsequently received heart transplants. We identified 8 antibody reactivities that were higher in patients who developed cellular rejection (2 or more episodes of grade 2R rejection in first year after transplant as defined by revised criteria from the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation) compared with those who did have not have rejection episodes. In a second retrospective study with 31 patients, we identified 7 IgM reactivities that were higher in heart transplant recipients who developed antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) compared with control recipients, and in time course studies, these reactivities appeared prior to overt graft dysfunction. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the autoantibody microarray technique outperforms traditional ELISAs as it uses less patient sample, has

  18. Autoimmune Pathogenesis of Chagas Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Kevin M.; Engman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas heart disease is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in approximately one-third of individuals infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the discovery of T. cruzi by Carlos Chagas >100 years ago, much has been learned about Chagas disease pathogenesis; however, the outcome of T. cruzi infection is highly variable and difficult to predict. Many mechanisms have been proposed to promote tissue inflammation, but the determinants and the relative importance of each have yet to be fully elucidated. The notion that some factor other than the parasite significantly contributes to the development of myocarditis was hypothesized by the first physician-scientists who noted the conspicuous absence of parasites in the hearts of those who succumbed to Chagas disease. One of these factors—autoimmunity—has been extensively studied for more than half a century. Although questions regarding the functional role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease remain unanswered, the development of autoimmune responses during infection clearly occurs in some individuals, and the implications that this autoimmunity may be pathogenic are significant. In this review, we summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease and conclude with a view of the future of Chagas disease diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention, emphasizing recent advances in these areas that aid in the management of Chagas disease. PMID:25857229

  19. Economic cycles and heart disease in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Quast, Troy; Gonzalez, Fidel

    2014-05-01

    While a considerable literature has emerged regarding the relationship between the business cycles and mortality rates, relatively little is known regarding how economic fluctuations are related to morbidity. We investigate the relationship between business cycles and heart disease in Mexico using a unique state-level dataset of 512 observations consisting of real GDP and heart disease incidence rates (overall and by age group) from 1995 to 2010. Our study is one of the first to use a state-level panel approach to analyze the relationship between the business cycle and morbidity. Further, the state and year fixed effects employed in our econometric specification reduce possible omitted variable bias. We find a general procyclical, although largely statistically insignificant, contemporaneous relationship. However, an increase in GDP per capita sustained over five years is associated with considerable increases in the incidence rates of ischemic heart disease and hypertension. This procyclical relationship appears strongest in the states with the lowest levels of development and for the oldest age groups. Our results suggest that economic fluctuations may have important lagged effects on heart disease in developing countries.

  20. Gene Therapy For Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Madhav; Gundewar, Susheel; Lefer, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Current pharmacologic therapy for ischemic heart disease suffers multiple limitations such as compliance issues and side effects of medications. Revascularization procedures often end with need for repeat procedures. Patients remain symptomatic despite maximal medical therapy. Gene therapy offers an attractive alternative to current pharmacologic therapies and may be beneficial in refractory disease. Gene therapy with isoforms of growth factors such as VEGF, FGF and HGF induces angiogenesis, decreases apoptosis and leads to protection in the ischemic heart. Stem cell therapy augmented with gene therapy used for myogenesis has proven to be beneficial in numerous animal models of myocardial ischemia. Gene therapy coding for antioxidants, eNOS, HSP, mitogen-activated protein kinase and numerous other anti apoptotic proteins have demonstrated significant cardioprotection in animal models. Clinical trials have demonstrated safety in humans apart from symptomatic and objective improvements in cardiac function. Current research efforts are aimed at refining various gene transfection techniques and regulation of gene expression in vivo in the heart and circulation to improve clinical outcomes in patients that suffer from ischemic heart disease. In this review article we will attempt to summarize the current state of both preclinical and clinical studies of gene therapy to combat myocardial ischemic disease. PMID:20600100

  1. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of people who have diabetes die of some type of cardiovascular disease. Diabetic women are at especially high risk for dying ... aware of my risk factors, such as being diabetic and having a family history of heart ... levels—you are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. But you can take steps to ...

  2. The Counselor and Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottens, Allen J.

    1977-01-01

    It is clear that steps can be taken for heart disease prevention and that counselors must give thought to adapting existing ideas and techniques and to developing and experimenting with new and innovative preventive tactics. Of utmost importance is the belief that behavioral intervention is both warranted and worthwhile. (Author)

  3. Update on heart failure, heart transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Almenar, Luis; Zunzunegui, José Luis; Barón, Gonzalo; Carrasco, José Ignacio; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Comín, Josep; Barrios, Vivencio; Subirana, M Teresa; Díaz-Molina, Beatriz

    2013-04-01

    In the year 2012, 3 scientific sections-heart failure and transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology-are presented together in the same article. The most relevant development in the area of heart failure and transplantation is the 2012 publication of the European guidelines for heart failure. These describe new possibilities for some drugs (eplerenone and ivabradine); expand the criteria for resynchronization, ventricular assist, and peritoneal dialysis; and cover possibilities of percutaneous repair of the mitral valve (MitraClip(®)). The survival of children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome in congenital heart diseases has improved significantly. Instructions for percutaneous techniques and devices have been revised and modified for the treatment of atrial septal defects, ostium secundum, and ventricular septal defects. Hybrid procedures for addressing structural congenital heart defects have become more widespread. In the area of clinical cardiology studies have demonstrated that percutaneous prosthesis implantation has lower mortality than surgical implantation. Use of the CHA2DS2-VASc criteria and of new anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) is also recommended. In addition, the development of new sequencing techniques has enabled the analysis of multiple genes.

  4. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  5. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described

  6. Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuenmayor, Gabriela; Redondo, Ana Carolina Costa; Shiraishi, Karen Saori; Souza, Rogerio; Elias, Patrícia Figueiredo; Jatene, Ieda Biscegli

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is one of the main risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. Few data on the impacts of congenital heart diseases are available with regard to the prevalence of dyslipidemia in children. Our study evaluated the lipid profile in children with congenital heart disease at a referral center. From January 2011 to July 2012, 52 pediatric patients had their lipid, metabolic and clinical profiles traced. The mean age was 10.4 ± 2.8 years and male/female rate of 1.38:1. Our population had 53.8% patients with high levels of total cholesterol and 13.4% (CI 95 %, from 6.6 to 25.2%) of them also presenting LDL levels ≥ 130 mg/dL, which characterizes dyslipidemia. The group of dyslipidemic patients presented only two obese individuals. Our data show that the presence of congenital heart disease does not lead to higher risk associated with the prevalence of dyslipidemia. Therefore, the screening of this specific population should follow the regular pediatric guidelines, which are also independent of the nutritional status of the children tested. PMID:24061754

  7. Pharmacogenomics of Hypertension and Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arwood, Meghan J.; Cavallari, Larisa H.; Duarte, Julio D.

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death in the United States, and hypertension is a predominant risk factor. Thus, effective blood pressure control is important to prevent adverse sequelae of hypertension, including heart failure, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, and ischemic stroke. Over half of Americans have uncontrolled blood pressure, which may in part be explained by interpatient variability in drug response secondary to genetic polymorphism. As such, pharmacogenetic testing may be a supplementary tool to guide treatment. This review highlights the pharmacogenetics of antihypertensive response and response to drugs that treat adverse hypertension-related sequelae, particularly coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. While pharmacogenetic evidence may be more robust for the latter with respect to clinical implementation, there is increasing evidence of genetic variants that may help predict antihypertensive response. However, additional research and validation are needed before clinical implementation guidelines for antihypertensive therapy can become a reality. PMID:26272307

  8. Pharmacogenomics of hypertension and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Arwood, Meghan J; Cavallari, Larisa H; Duarte, Julio D

    2015-09-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death in the United States, and hypertension is a predominant risk factor. Thus, effective blood pressure control is important to prevent adverse sequelae of hypertension, including heart failure, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, and ischemic stroke. Over half of Americans have uncontrolled blood pressure, which may in part be explained by interpatient variability in drug response secondary to genetic polymorphism. As such, pharmacogenetic testing may be a supplementary tool to guide treatment. This review highlights the pharmacogenetics of antihypertensive response and response to drugs that treat adverse hypertension-related sequelae, particularly coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. While pharmacogenetic evidence may be more robust for the latter with respect to clinical implementation, there is increasing evidence of genetic variants that may help predict antihypertensive response. However, additional research and validation are needed before clinical implementation guidelines for antihypertensive therapy can become a reality.

  9. Establishment of an Australian National Genetic Heart Disease Registry.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; McGaughran, Julie; Vohra, Jitendra; Weintraub, Robert G; Davis, Andrew; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2008-12-01

    A National Genetic Heart Disease Registry has recently been established, with the aim to enroll every family in Australia with a genetically determined cardiomyopathy or primary arrhythmic disorder. The Registry seeks to further our understanding of the impact and burden of disease in this population; increase awareness and provide education to health professionals and families; and establish a large cardiac genetic cohort as a resource for approved research studies. The Registry is currently recruiting families with inherited cardiomyopathies (e.g. hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) and primary arrhythmogenic disorders (e.g. long QT syndrome), with scope to expand this in the future. Affected individuals, as well as their first-degree (at-risk) family members are eligible to enroll. Participants are currently being recruited from cardiac genetics clinics in approved recruitment sites and hope to expand to other Australian centres including general cardiology practice in the future. A significant focus of the Registry is to improve understanding and create awareness of inherited heart diseases, which includes ensuring families are aware of genetic testing options and current clinical screening recommendations for at-risk family members. A Registry Advisory Committee has been established under the NHMRC Guidelines, and includes a representative from each major recruitment centre. This committee approves all decisions relating to the Registry including approval of research studies. A National Genetic Heart Disease Registry will provide a valuable resource to further our knowledge of the clinical and genetic aspects of these diseases. Since most of the current data about the prevalence, natural history and outcomes of genetic heart diseases has emanated from the United States and Europe, characterising these Australian populations will be of significant benefit, allowing for more informed and specific health care planning and resource provision.

  10. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough evidence to determine the potential benefits and harms of screening all adults for CKD. This fact ... waste out of the blood. Potential Benefits and Harms The Task Force examined the evidence to see ...

  11. Heart Rate and Initial Presentation of Cardiovascular Diseases (Caliber)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-17

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease NOS; Unheralded Coronary Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest, Sudden Cardiac Death

  12. Valvular heart disease and the military patient.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, D A; Mulae, J; Williams, A; Jackson, S; Chambers, J

    2015-09-01

    Valvular heart disease refers to all inherited and acquired abnormalities impairing the function of one or more of the four cardiac valves. Pathology may be of the valve leaflets themselves, of the subvalvular apparatus or of the annulus or other surrounding structures that influences valve function. This paper examines the most common valve lesions, with specific reference to a military population; it focuses on detection and initial management of valve disease in a young adult population and specifically describes how the diagnosis and treatment of valve disease impacts military medical grading.

  13. Ischemic heart disease and the Mediterranean diet.

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2014-01-01

    Lifestyle modification is primary in cardiovascular (CV) disease prevention. A major contribution is the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet), defined by two of seven components. Italian investigators determined a significant decrease in peripheral arterial disease of 56 % for a high score. Multiple specific CV risk factors are also favorably modified by the MedDiet. This includes beneficial effect on inflammation, vascular endothelium, and insulin resistance. There is also evidence that coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome are decreased. Benefit appears to extend to new migrants in France. The economics of dietary adherence are favorable with decreased total lifetime health costs. Although mixed nuts appear to be a major factor in the MedDiet, special emphasis goes to extra virgin olive oil. Benefit also extends to other noncommunicable diseases with a decrease in cancer, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Further quantitation of benefit and understanding of mechanisms involved in dietary benefit is essential. PMID:24743900

  14. Screening and Management of Depression for Adults With Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is the leading cause of disability and the fourth leading contributor to the global burden of disease. In Canada, the 1-year prevalence of major depressive disorder was approximately 6% in Canadians 18 and older. A large prospective Canadian study reported an increased risk of developing depression in people with chronic diseases compared with those without such diseases. Objectives To systematically review the literature regarding the effectiveness of screening for depression and/or anxiety in adults with chronic diseases in the community setting. To conduct a non-systematic, post-hoc analysis to evaluate whether a screen-and-treat strategy for depression is associated with an improvement in chronic disease outcomes. Data Sources A literature search was performed on January 29, 2012, using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, OVID PsycINFO, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published from January 1, 2002 until January 29, 2012. Review Methods No citations were identified for the first objective. For the second, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials that compared depression management for adults with chronic disease with usual care/placebo were included. Where possible, the results of randomized controlled trials were pooled using a random-effects model. Results Eight primary randomized controlled trials and 1 systematic review were included in the post-hoc analysis (objective 2)—1 in people with diabetes, 2 in people with heart failure, and 5 in people with coronary artery disease. Across all studies, there was no evidence that managing depression improved chronic disease outcomes. The quality of evidence (GRADE) ranged from low to moderate. Some of the study results (specifically in coronary artery disease populations) were suggestive of benefit, but

  15. Modern risk stratification in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ginghina, C; Bejan, I; Ceck, C D

    2011-11-14

    The prevalence and impact of cardiovascular diseases in the world are growing. There are 2 million deaths due to cardiovascular disease each year in the European Union; the main cause of death being the coronary heart disease responsible for 16% of deaths in men and 15% in women. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease in Romania is estimated at 7 million people, of which 2.8 million have ischemic heart disease. In this epidemiological context, risk stratification is required for individualization of therapeutic strategies for each patient. The continuing evolution of the diagnosis and treatment techniques combines personalized medicine with the trend of therapeutic management leveling, based on guidelines and consensus, which are in constant update. The guidelines used in clinical practice have involved risk stratification and identification of patient groups in whom the risk-benefit ratio of using new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques has a positive value. Presence of several risk factors may indicate a more important total risk than the presence / significant increase from normal values of a single risk factor. Modern trends in risk stratification of patients with coronary heart disease are polarized between the use of simple data versus complex scores, traditional data versus new risk factors, generally valid scores versus personalized scores, depending on patient characteristics, type of coronary artery disease, with impact on the suggested therapy. All known information and techniques can be integrated in a complex system of risk assessment. The current trend in risk assessment is to identify coronary artery disease in early forms, before clinical manifestation, and to guide therapy, particularly in patients with intermediate risk, which can be classified in another class of risk based on new obtained information.

  16. Contemporary treatment of amyloid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Palecek, Tomas; Fikrle, Michal; Nemecek, Eduard; Bauerova, Lenka; Kuchynka, Petr; Louch, William E; Spicka, Ivan; Rysava, Romana

    2015-01-01

    The amyloidoses represent a group of diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein, amyloid, which is formed by insoluble extracellular fibrils in β-pleated sheets. Although cardiac involvement may occur in all types of amyloidoses, clinically relevant amyloid cardiomyopathy is a typical feature of AL amyloidosis and transthyretin-related amyloidoses. Congestive heart failure represents the commonest manifestation of amyloid heart disease. Noninvasive imaging techniques, especially echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance, play a major role in the diagnosis of amyloid cardiomyopathy; however, histological confirmation and exact typing of amyloid deposits is necessary whether in extracardiac location or directly in the myocardium. Early diagnosis of amyloid heart disease is of utmost importance as the presence and especially the severity of cardiac involvement generally drives the prognosis of affected subjects and plays a major role in determining the intensity of specific treatment, namely in AL amyloidosis. The management of patients with amyloid heart disease is complex. Loop diuretics together with aldosterone antagonists represent the basis for influencing signs of congestion. In AL amyloidosis, high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation is generally considered to be a front-line treatment option, if the disease is diagnosed at its early stage. The combination of mephalan with dexamethasone has been the standard therapy for severely affected individuals; however, the combinations with several novel agents including immunomodulatory drugs and bortezomibe have been tested in clinical trials with promising results. New therapeutic substances with the potential to slow or even stop the progression of transthyretin-related amyloidosis are also extensively studied. PMID:25483951

  17. Development of a Comprehensive Heart Disease Knowledge Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Hannah E.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Moser, Richard P.; Scholl, Sarah; Klein, William M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the United States, yet a comprehensive and evidence-based heart disease knowledge assessment is currently not available. Purpose: This paper describes the two-phase development of a novel heart disease knowledge questionnaire. Methods: After review and critique of the…

  18. Psychological Perspectives on the Development of Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Karen A.

    2005-01-01

    Psychological science has new opportunities to have major input into the understanding of the development of coronary heart disease. This article provides an overview of advances in understanding the etiology of heart disease, recently applied technologies for measuring early stages of heart disease, and an accumulating base of evidence on the…

  19. Irradiation-related ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Corn, B.W.; Trock, B.J.; Goodman, R.L. )

    1990-04-01

    An expectation for long-term survival has emerged among several groups of cancer patients treated with therapeutic irradiation (eg, Hodgkin's disease, early stage breast cancer). Therefore, the cardiovascular sequelae of thoracic irradiation have recently come under scrutiny. Animal models have demonstrated that cardiac irradiation can directly damage the myocardial microvasculature and can indirectly damage the coronary macrovasculature when coupled with cholesterol feeding. A clear association between thoracic radiotherapy and ischemic heart disease was observed among older clinical studies using radiotherapeutic techniques that are no longer optimal by today's standards. Such a relationship could not be confirmed in modern studies in which treatment factors (such as dose and volume of heart irradiated) were more carefully controlled. 56 references.

  20. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-04-15

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging. PMID:26965220

  1. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging. PMID:27102136

  2. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy P.; Maridaki-Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. Aims: The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. Methods: A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. Findings: The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. Conclusions: The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD. PMID:24171883

  3. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-04-15

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging.

  4. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging.

  5. Nephrotic Syndrome with Heart Disease: A Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, P. J.; Jones, N. F.; Tighe, J. R.

    1968-01-01

    The evidence that heart failure alone may cause a nephrotic syndrome is inconclusive. Mercurial diuretics, which have also been implicated as a cause of the nephrotic syndrome, had been given in 23 of the 24 well-documented cases. Two cases of heart disease and nephrotic syndrome are described. Glomerular lesions were minimal on light microscopy, but thickening of the glomerular tuft basement membrane and partial fusion of the epithelial cell foot processes were apparent on elecronmicroscopy. The response to prednisone was such as to justify a trial of corticosteroid therapy in such cases despite the presence of cardiac disease. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:5667991

  6. Epigenetic mechanisms in heart development and disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Shannalee R; Gay, Maresha S; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-07-01

    Suboptimal intrauterine development has been linked to predisposition to cardiovascular disease in adulthood, a concept termed 'developmental origins of health and disease'. Although the exact mechanisms underlying this developmental programming are unknown, a growing body of evidence supports the involvement of epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA confer added levels of gene regulation without altering DNA sequences. These modifications are relatively stable signals, offering possible insight into the mechanisms underlying developmental origins of health and disease. This review will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms in heart development as well as aberrant epigenetic regulation contributing to cardiovascular disease. Additionally, we will address recent advances targeting epigenetic mechanisms as potential therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease.

  7. Multimodality imaging in heart valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, John B; Myerson, Saul G; Rajani, Ronak; Morgan-Hughes, Gareth J; Dweck, Marc R

    2016-01-01

    In patients with heart valve disease, echocardiography is the mainstay for diagnosis, assessment and serial surveillance. However, other modalities, notably cardiac MRI and CT, are used if echocardiographic imaging is suboptimal but can also give complementary information to improve assessment of the valve lesion and cardiac compensation to aid the timing of surgery and determine risk. This statement discusses the way these imaging techniques are currently integrated to improve care beyond what is possible with echocardiography alone. PMID:26977308

  8. Modern risk stratification in coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Ginghina, C.; Bejan, I.; Ceck, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of cardiovascular diseases in the world are growing. There are 2 million deaths due to cardiovascular disease each year in the European Union; the main cause of death being the coronary heart disease responsible for 16% of deaths in men and 15% in women. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease in Romania is estimated at 7 million people, of which 2.8 million have ischemic heart disease. In this epidemiological context, risk stratification is required for individualization of therapeutic strategies for each patient. The continuing evolution of the diagnosis and treatment techniques combines personalized medicine with the trend of therapeutic management leveling, based on guidelines and consensus, which are in constant update. The guidelines used in clinical practice have involved risk stratification and identification of patient groups in whom the risk-benefit ratio of using new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques has a positive value. Presence of several risk factors may indicate a more important total risk than the presence / significant increase from normal values of a single risk factor. Modern trends in risk stratification of patients with coronary heart disease are polarized between the use of simple data versus complex scores, traditional data versus new risk factors, generally valid scores versus personalized scores, depending on patient characteristics, type of coronary artery disease, with impact on the suggested therapy. All known information and techniques can be integrated in a complex system of risk assessment. The current trend in risk assessment is to identify coronary artery disease in early forms, before clinical manifestation, and to guide therapy, particularly in patients with intermediate risk, which can be classified in another class of risk based on new obtained information. Abbreviations: ACS = acute coronary syndrome; AMI = acute myocardial infarction; BNP = brain natriuretic peptide; BP = blood pressure; BPs

  9. Heart disease in workers exposed to dinitrotoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, R.J.; Andjelkovich, D.A.; Kersteter, S.L.; Arp, E.W. Jr.; Balogh, S.A.; Blunden, P.B.; Stanley, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    To determine whether the carcinogenicity of dinitrotoluene (DNT) in rodent bioassays was predictive for humans, we examined the mortality experience of exposed workers at two ammunition plants. Cohorts of 156 and 301 men who had worked a month or more during the 1940s and 1950s at jobs with opportunity for substantial DNT exposure were followed through the end of 1980. Numbers of expected deaths and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed, using mortality rates of US white males as the standard. No evidence of a carcinogenic effect was found, but unsuspected excesses of mortality from ischemic heart disease were noted at both plants (SMRs) 131 and 143; 95% confidence limits 65 to 234 and 107 to 187, respectively). Deaths from ischemic heart disease remained high even when compared with expected numbers derived using mortality rates of the counties in which the plants were located. Additional analyses revealed evidence of a 15-year latent period and suggested a relationship with duration and intensity of exposure. Epidemiologic investigations of other heavily exposed populations are needed to confirm the etiologic significance of the association between DNT and heart disease described here.

  10. Pregnancy in women with heart disease: risk assessment and management of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Jasmine; Silversides, Candice K; Colman, Jack M

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease, present in 0.5% to 3% of pregnant women, is an important cause of morbidity and the leading cause of death among pregnant women in the developed world. Certain heart conditions are associated with an increased risk of heart failure during pregnancy or the postpartum period; for these conditions, management during pregnancy benefits from multidisciplinary care at a center with expertise in pregnancy and heart disease. This article focuses on cardiac risks and management strategies for women with acquired and congenital heart disease who are at increased risk of heart failure during pregnancy.

  11. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  12. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  13. Methylphenidate: pulmonary hypertension and heart valve disease.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    Several amphetamine-like appetite suppressants are known to have cardiovascular adverse effects, in particular pulmonary arterial hypertension and cardiac valve disease. Is this also the case with methylphenidate, an amphetamine-like psychostimulant used in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (especially in children) and also in narcolepsy? Cases of pulmonary hypertension and heart valve disease have been reported with methylphenidate, including in children. The risk appears to be low, but epidemiological studies are needed to estimate the incidence. This risk should be minimised by only using methylphenidate to treat serious disorders, at the lowest effective dose. Attention should be paid to warning signs such as dyspnoea. PMID:26436168

  14. Targeting the unfolded protein response in heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Man; Dudley, Samuel C

    2014-07-01

    In neurological disease and diabetes, the unfolded protein response (UPR) has been investigated for years, while its function in heart disease is less well understood. All three branches of the UPR are involved in ischaemia/reperfusion and can either protect or impair heart function. Recently, UPR has been found to play a role in arrhythmogenesis during human heart failure, and blocking UPR has an antiarrhythmic effect. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to targeting UPR in heart disease.

  15. Epigenetic mechanisms in heart development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Shannalee R.; Gay, Maresha S.; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-01-01

    Suboptimal intrauterine development has been linked to predisposition to cardiovascular disease in adulthood, a concept termed ‘developmental origins of health and disease’. Although the exact mechanisms underlying this developmental programming are unknown, a growing body of evidence supports the involvement of epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA confer added levels of gene regulation without altering DNA sequences. These modifications are relatively stable signals, offering possible insight into the mechanisms underlying developmental origins of health and disease. This review will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms in heart development as well as aberrant epigenetic regulation contributing to cardiovascular disease. Additionally, we will address recent advances targeting epigenetic mechanisms as potential therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease. PMID:25572405

  16. Coeliac disease and autoimmune disease-genetic overlap and screening.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Knut E A; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2015-09-01

    Coeliac disease is a treatable, gluten-induced disease that often occurs concurrently with other autoimmune diseases. In genetic studies since 2007, a partial genetic overlap between these diseases has been revealed and further insights into the pathophysiology of coeliac disease and autoimmunity have been gained. However, genetic screening is not sensitive and specific enough to accurately predict disease development. The current method to diagnose individuals with coeliac disease is serological testing for the presence of autoantibodies whilst the patient is on a regular, gluten-containing diet, followed by gastroduodenoscopy with duodenal biopsy. Serological test results can also predict the probability of coeliac disease development, even if asymptomatic. In patients with autoimmune diseases known to occur alongside coeliac disease (particularly type 1 diabetes mellitus or thyroid disorders), disease screening-and subsequent treatment if coeliac disease is detected-could have beneficial effects on progression or potential complications of both diseases, owing to the effectiveness of gluten-free dietary interventions in coeliac disease. However, whether diagnosis of coeliac disease and subsequent dietary treatment can prevent autoimmune diseases is debated. In this Review, the genetic and immunological features of coeliac disease, overlap with other autoimmune diseases and implications for current screening strategies will be discussed.

  17. Acquired heart conditions in adults with congenital heart disease: a growing problem.

    PubMed

    Tutarel, Oktay

    2014-09-01

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing due to the great achievements in the field of paediatric cardiology, congenital heart surgery and intensive care medicine over the last decades. Mortality has shifted away from the infant and childhood period towards adulthood. As congenital heart disease patients get older, a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is encountered similar to the general population. Consequently, the contribution of acquired morbidities, especially acquired heart conditions to patient outcome, is becoming increasingly important. Therefore, to continue the success story of the last decades in the treatment of congenital heart disease and to further improve the outcome of these patients, more attention has to be given to the prevention, detection and adequate therapy of acquired heart conditions. The aim of this review is to give an overview about acquired heart conditions that may be encountered in adults with congenital heart disease.

  18. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Valve Disease? Major Signs and Symptoms The main sign of heart valve ... legs, abdomen, and veins in the neck Other Signs and Symptoms Heart valve disease can cause chest ...

  19. The Inflammatory Heart Diseases: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The inflammation of the heart muscles, such as myocarditis, the membrane sac which surrounds the heart called as pericarditis, and the inner lining of the heart or the myocardium, heart muscle as endocarditis are known as the inflammatory heart diseases. Inflammation of heart is caused by known infectious agents, viruses, bacteria, fungi or parasites, and by toxic materials from the environment, water, food, air, toxic gases, smoke, and pollution, or by an unknown origin. Myocarditis is induced by infection of heart muscle by virus like sarcoidosis and immune diseases. The symptoms include chest pain, angina, pain in heart muscle, and shortness of breath, edema, swelling of feet or ankles, and fatigue. The ECG, X-ray, and MRI can diagnose the disease; blood test and rise in enzymes levels provide abnormality in heart function. The treatment includes use of antibiotics for inflammation of heart muscle and medications. The ultrasound imaging indicates further damage to the heart muscle. In severe cases of infection heart failure can occur so long-term medications are necessary to control inflammation. The various biomarkers are reported for the inflammatory heart diseases. The causes, symptoms and treatments of inflammatory heart diseases are described.

  20. Current applications of lasers in heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Garrett; Chan, Ming C.; Mason, Dean T.

    1993-03-01

    Although the laser has been in existence for abut 30 years, its application in heart disease has only been examined in the past decade. Much attention has been given its exciting potential in treating coronary artery disease. Transmitted through a catheter comprised of one or more thin optical fibers which can be threaded nonsurgically into the coronary artery, the laser can ablate atherosclerotic plaque that obstructs the artery and diminishes blood flow to the myocardium. In clinical studies, the laser can treat some obstructive lesions that are not suitable for balloon angioplasty (i.e., long and diffuse lesions, very tight stenoses, ostial lesions, calcified lesions). In patients who failed balloon angioplasty due to severe dissection or abrupt closure, the laser may seal up the dissections and restore antegrade blood flow. In addition, the laser may have other applications and treatment modalities that are still under investigation. It may ablate ectopic ventricular foci, or terminate supraventricular tachyrhythmia by destroying the heart's abnormal conduction pathways. It can cut the hypertrophied septum that is associated with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, or create a channel in the atrial septum as a palliative procedure in newborns with transposition of the great vessels. It may provide a wider orifice for blood flow within the heart in infants with pulmonary outflow obstruction and in adults with aortic valvular stenosis. It is also capable of fusing small thin-walled blood vessels together. Further, a more intriguing possibility is its use to bore several tiny channels in the myocardium to allow oxygenated blood from within the ventricular chamber to perfuse the ischemic heart tissue.

  1. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: A clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Chaix, Marie A; Andelfinger, Gregor; Khairy, Paul

    2016-02-26

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient follow-up. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel. PMID:26981213

  2. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: A clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Marie A; Andelfinger, Gregor; Khairy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient follow-up. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel. PMID:26981213

  3. Women and Ischemic Heart Disease: Evolving Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Leslee J.; Bugiardini, Raffaelle; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2009-01-01

    Evolving knowledge regarding sex differences in coronary heart disease (CHD) is emerging. Given the lower burden of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) and preserved systolic function in women contrasted by higher rates of myocardial ischemia and near-term mortality compared to men, we propose the term ischemic heart disease (IHD) as appropriate for this discussion specific to women, rather than CAD or CHD. This paradoxical difference where women have lower rates of anatomical CAD but more symptoms, ischemia, and outcomes appear linked to coronary reactivity which includes microvascular dysfunction. Novel risk factors can improve the Framingham risk score, including inflammatory markers and reproductive hormones, as well as noninvasive imaging and functional capacity measurements. Risk for women with obstructive CAD is elevated compared to men, yet women are less likely to receive guideline-indicated therapies. In the setting of non-ST elevation acute myocardial infarction, interventional strategies are equally effective in biomarker positive women and men, while conservative management is indicated for biomarker negative women. For women with evidence of ischemia but no obstructive CAD, anti-anginal and anti-ischemic therapies can improve symptoms, endothelial function, and quality of life; however trials evaluating adverse outcomes are needed. We hypothesize that women experience more adverse outcomes compared to men because obstructive CAD remains the current focus of therapeutic strategies. Continued research is indicated to devise therapeutic regimens to improve symptom burden and reduce risk in women with IHD. PMID:19833255

  4. Fruits, vegetables and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Dauchet, Luc; Amouyel, Philippe; Dallongeville, Jean

    2009-09-01

    Diet plays an important part in the maintenance of optimal cardiovascular health. This Review summarizes the evidence for a relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and the occurrence of coronary heart disease. This evidence is based on observational cohort studies, nutrition prevention trials with fruit and vegetables, and investigations of the effects of fruit and vegetables on cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the evidence supporting a cardioprotective effect comes from observational epidemiological studies; these studies have reported either weak or nonsignificant associations. Controlled nutritional prevention trials are scarce and the existing data do not show any clear protective effects of fruit and vegetables on coronary heart disease. Under rigorously controlled experimental conditions, fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with a decrease in blood pressure, which is an important cardiovascular risk factor. However, the effects of fruit and vegetable consumption on plasma lipid levels, diabetes, and body weight have not yet been thoroughly explored. Finally, the hypothesis that nutrients in fruit and vegetables have a protective role in reducing the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and preventing complications of atherosclerosis has not been tested in prevention trials. Evidence that fruit and vegetable consumption reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease remains scarce thus far.

  5. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    PubMed

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  6. Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages

    MedlinePlus

    ... 64 have a heart attack. About half of women who have a heart attack before age 65 die within 8 years. Heart ... have another within 6 years. About half of women who have a heart attack will be disabled with heart failure within 6 ...

  7. Chorea, polycythaemis, and cyanotic heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, P D; Prosser, R; Wells, C E

    1975-01-01

    Two cases of polycythaemic chorea are described, both of which were complicated by severe heart disease. The first was a child with patent ductus arteriosus and coarctation of the aorta causing severe cyanosis and secondary polycythaemia. Chorea began intermittently at an early age, becoming continuous by his fifth birthday. The second was a middle-aged male with tight mitral stenosis and a story of paralytic chorea in his teens. Polycythaemia rubra vera was eventually diagnosed two years after mitral valvotomy, some seven years after the onset of chorea. Images PMID:1185193

  8. Perinatal Management of Major Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Eiméar; Sands, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common form of congenital anomaly. Prenatal diagnosis of CHD has been associated with decreased morbidity and mortality for some forms of major CHD. As most cases of major CHD are not identified prenatally, clinical examination of the newborn and pulse oximetry are also important means of identifying more cases. Clinicians must suspect CHD as a diagnosis in a cyanosed or shocked neonate and be familiar with appropriate management, namely the commencement of prostaglandin if a duct dependent cardiac lesion is suspected. Telemedicine can aid prompt diagnosis of CHD and therefore direct appropriate management. PMID:25484461

  9. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Sermer, Mathew; Silversides, Candice K

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in paediatric congenital heart surgery, there are a growing number of women with congenital heart disease (CHD) reaching childbearing age. Pregnancy, however, is associated with haemodynamic stresses which can result in cardiac decompensation in women with CHD. Many women with CHD are aware of their cardiac condition prior to pregnancy, and preconception counselling is an important aspect of their care. Preconception counselling allows women to make informed pregnancy decisions, provides an opportunity for modifications of teratogenic medications and, when necessary, repair of cardiac lesions prior to pregnancy. Less commonly, the haemodynamic changes of pregnancy unmask a previously unrecognised heart lesion. In general, pregnancy outcomes are favourable for women with CHD, but there are some cardiac lesions that carry high risk for both the mother and the baby, and this group of women require care by an experienced multidisciplinary team. This review discusses preconception counselling including contraception, an approach to risk stratification and management recommendations in women with some common CHDs. PMID:27512454

  10. How Is Heart Valve Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have any other heart problems. Echocardiography Echo uses sound waves to create a moving picture of your heart ... the surface of your chest. The transducer sends sound waves through your chest wall to your heart. Echoes ...

  11. Mindfulness meditation, anxiety reduction, and heart disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tacón, Anna M; McComb, Jacalyn; Caldera, Yvonne; Randolph, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death among Americans each year, yet the misperception still exists that cardiovascular disease is not a serious health problem for women. Evidence indicates that anxiety contributes to the development of heart disease. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of Kabat-Zinn's mindfulness-based stress reduction program to reduce anxiety in women with heart disease. Anxiety, emotional control, coping styles, and health locus of control were compared in a treatment and control group of women with heart disease. Post-intervention analyses provide initial support for beneficial effects of this program.

  12. [Association between function of selenium and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    An excessive oxidative stress is considered to be responsible for the development and progression of heart disease. Deficiency of trace elements with antioxidative activities is present in patients with heart disease. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase(GPx), one of the central players of the heart's antioxidant system, and it's deficiency is implicated in certain types of heart disease. Our study suggests that myocardial oxidative stress in chronic heart failure may be augmented at least in part by concomitant GPx deficiency, and that the administration of Se could rescue the exhaustion of this selenoprotein, resulting in improved left ventricular function. PMID:27455811

  13. Fetal heart screening in low-risk pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Rustico, M A; Benettoni, A; D'Ottavio, G; Maieron, A; Fischer-Tamaro, I; Conoscenti, G; Meir, Y; Montesano, M; Cattaneo, A; Mandruzzato, G

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether a screening program for fetal cardiac malformations is justified in a low-risk population, and which factors influence its accuracy. The fetal heart was evaluated in 7024 pregnant women at 20-22 weeks, and evaluation was repeated at a more advanced gestational age in 9% of cases. Cardiological follow-up was continued postnatally until 2 years of age. The overall prevalence of cardiac anomaly was 0.93%. The incidences of major and minor defects were 0.44% and 0.48%, respectively. There were 23 true positives (0.33%): in 20 cases, the diagnosis was made in the second trimester, and 13 women (65%) chose termination of pregnancy. Seventeen of the 20 cases identified in the second trimester were serious malformations. There were 42 false negatives (0.60%). Of these, 12 had signs of cardiac dysfunction at birth or within the 1st month of life, and three of them died as a result of their cardiac anomaly. There were eight false positives (0.11%), all of a minor type. Six abnormal karyotypes, out of a total of 21 performed in the true-positive group (28.5%), were found. In addition, five of the 42 newborns in the false-negative group had trisomy 21. The overall sensitivity was 35.4%, and 61.3% for major defects. The accuracy in two distinct periods was estimated because the level of experience of the operators was different: sensitivity was 45.2% in period 1 (1986-88) (77.8% for major defects) and 26.5% in period 2 (1989-92) (52.9% for major defects). We conclude that a fetal heart screening program in the obstetric population is justified. It defines a high-risk group for karyotyping, allows planning of delivery in a tertiary center or the choice of terminating the pregnancy for the parents and appears to have a positive cost-benefit ratio. A crucial factor is the level of training and experience of the operators, who need specific teaching support. PMID:8590200

  14. [Approach to congenital heart disease in adults].

    PubMed

    Alva Espinosa, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    After a few decades treating patients with congenital heart disease during childhood, we now face the problem of dealing with many of them as adults and few cases with disorders detected in adult life. The number of patients, with and without surgery is growing up rapidly. Conservatively speaking, there are in Mexico approximately 300 thousands patients with this condition, increasing by 15 thousands patients per year. In addition to the complexity of the congenital pathology, the knowledge of acquired diseases should be incorporated as well as the genetic advise, pregnancy care and specialized psychological support. The approach to these patients begins with stratification; diagnosis and treatment requiring a multidisciplinary, well informed and an capable to perform together medical team.

  15. Drug Therapy for Heart Valve Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Borer, Jeffrey S.; Sharma, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    Valvular heart diseases (VHDs) are progressive. When not caused by acute comorbidities they are generally characterized by long asymptomatic phases during which hemodynamic severity may progress leading to morbidity and mortality. Treatment depends on VHD type and severity but when severe and symptomatic, usually involves mechanical intervention. Asymptomatic patients, and those who lack objective descriptors associated with high risk, are closely observed clinically with optimization of associated cardiovascular risk factors until surgical indications develop. Though often prescribed based on theory, no rigorous evidence supports pharmacological therapy in most chronic situations though drugs may be appropriate in acute valvular diseases, or as a bridge to surgery in severely decompensated patients. Herein, we examine evidence supporting drug use for chronic VHDs. PMID:26371236

  16. Dietary fats and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Willett, W C

    2012-07-01

    The relation of dietary fat to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) has been studied extensively using many approaches, including controlled feeding studies with surrogate end-points such as plasma lipids, limited randomized trials and large cohort studies. All lines of evidence indicate that specific dietary fatty acids play important roles in the cause and the prevention of CHD, but total fat as a percent of energy is unimportant. Trans fatty acids from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils have clear adverse effects and should be eliminated. Modest reductions in CHD rates by further decreases in saturated fat are possible if saturated fat is replaced by a combination of poly- and mono-unsaturated fat, and the benefits of polyunsaturated fat appear strongest. However, little or no benefit is likely if saturated fat is replaced by carbohydrate, but this will in part depend on the form of carbohydrate. Because both N-6 and N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential and reduce risk of heart disease, the ratio of N-6 to N-3 is not useful and can be misleading. In practice, reducing red meat and dairy products in a food supply and increasing intakes of nuts, fish, soy products and nonhydrogenated vegetable oils will improve the mix of fatty acids and have a markedly beneficial effect on rates of CHD.

  17. Arrhythmias in patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Edward P

    2002-12-01

    Improved surgical outcome for patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) has created a rapidly expanding population of adolescents and young adult survivors. Cardiac arrhythmias are a common late sequelae of this form of heart disease. Effective treatment requires clear understanding of the underlying anatomic defect as well as the specific surgical interventions. Intraatrial reentrant tachycardia (IART) is the most common and difficult arrhythmia encountered in these patients. Traditional IART treatment with medication has been largely unsuccessful, but radiofrequency ablation has emerged in recent years as a promising option for many patients. The availability of three-dimensional mapping systems and irrigated-tip ablation catheters has improved acute success rates for IART to better than 90%. Postablation recurrence of IART still remains problematic for patients who have undergone the Fontan operation, in which case atrial maze surgery may be considered. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) is seen in a smaller number of CHD patients, most notably those with tetralogy of Fallot or aortic stenosis. The adoption of implantable defibrillator (ICD) therapy for these patients has improved outcome. Owing to their complex anatomy, the CHD population presents unique challenges during both catheterization and device implant. Multicenter study of this unique patient group is needed in order to develop more objective treatment guidelines.

  18. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2011 Update

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Véronique L.; Go, Alan S.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Adams, Robert J.; Berry, Jarett D.; Brown, Todd M.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Dai, Shifan; de Simone, Giovanni; Ford, Earl S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Fullerton, Heather J.; Gillespie, Cathleen; Greenlund, Kurt J.; Hailpern, Susan M.; Heit, John A.; Ho, P. Michael; Howard, Virginia J.; Kissela, Brett M.; Kittner, Steven J.; Lackland, Daniel T.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Makuc, Diane M.; Marcus, Gregory M.; Marelli, Ariane; Matchar, David B.; McDermott, Mary M.; Meigs, James B.; Moy, Claudia S.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Mussolino, Michael E.; Nichol, Graham; Paynter, Nina P.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Sorlie, Paul D.; Stafford, Randall S.; Turan, Tanya N.; Turner, Melanie B.; Wong, Nathan D.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Summary Each year, the American Heart Association (AHA), in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and other government agencies, brings together the most up-to-date statistics on heart disease, stroke, other vascular diseases, and their risk factors and presents them in its Heart Disease and Stroke Statistical Update. The Statistical Update is a valuable resource for researchers, clinicians, healthcare policy makers, media professionals, the lay public, and many others who seek the best national data available on disease morbidity and mortality and the risks, quality of care, medical procedures and operations, and costs associated with the management of these diseases in a single document. Indeed, since 1999, the Statistical Update has been cited more than 8700 times in the literature (including citations of all annual versions). In 2009 alone, the various Statistical Updates were cited ≈1600 times (data from ISI Web of Science). In recent years, the Statistical Update has undergone some major changes with the addition of new chapters and major updates across multiple areas. For this year’s edition, the Statistics Committee, which produces the document for the AHA, updated all of the current chapters with the most recent nationally representative data and inclusion of relevant articles from the literature over the past year and added a new chapter detailing how family history and genetics play a role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Also, the 2011 Statistical Update is a major source for monitoring both cardiovascular health and disease in the population, with a focus on progress toward achievement of the AHA’s 2020 Impact Goals. Below are a few highlights from this year’s Update. Death Rates From CVD Have Declined, Yet the Burden of Disease Remains High The 2007 overall death rate from CVD (International Classification of Diseases 10, I00–I99) was 251.2 per 100 000. The rates were 294

  19. Rheumatic Heart Disease in the Twenty-First Century.

    PubMed

    Woldu, Bethel; Bloomfield, Gerald S

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a chronic valvular disease resulting after severe or repetitive episodes of acute rheumatic fever (ARF), an autoimmune response to group A Streptococcus infection. RHD has been almost eliminated with improved social and health infrastructure in affluent countries while it remains a neglected disease with major cause of morbidity and mortality in many low- and middle-income countries, and resource-limited regions of high-income countries. Despite our evolving understanding of the pathogenesis of RHD, there have not been any significant advances to prevent or halt progression of disease in recent history. Long-term penicillin-based treatment and surgery remain the backbone of a RHD control program in the absence of an effective vaccine. The advent of echocardiographic screening algorithms has improved the accuracy of diagnosing RHD and has shed light on the enormous burden of disease. Encouragingly, this has led to a rekindled commitment from researchers in the most affected countries to advocate and take bold actions to end this disease of social inequality. PMID:27566329

  20. Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease Among Inpatients Who Have Mild Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, S.; Haw, C.; Kirk, J.; Stubbs, J.

    2005-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. The aim of this study was to screen inpatients with mild or borderline intellectual disability, many of whom also have mental illness, for risk factors for CHD. Participants were interviewed, measured and had blood samples taken. Of the 53 participants, 20 (37.7%)…

  1. Life style modification for patients with ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, V

    2013-01-01

    With a view to assess the effectiveness of lifestyle modification in patients with ischemic heart disease, a quasi-experimental study with quantitative approach was undertaken on 60 patients of ischemic heart disease. Purposive sampling technique was used in selecting the patients. The results showed that educating the patients about cessation of smoking, taking proper diet, anxiety reduction and counselling helped in preventing the progression of ischaemic heart disease.

  2. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  3. Health Screenings and Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... your primary doctor. Blood Tests – A Common Screening Method (Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Click ... tests, see What Are Blood Tests? Other Screening Methods Doctors can't screen for all diseases and ...

  4. A vital role for complement in heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena; Espevik, Terje; Aukrust, Pål; Yndestad, Arne; Mollnes, Tom E; Hovland, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Heart diseases are common and significant contributors to worldwide mortality and morbidity. During recent years complement mediated inflammation has been shown to be an important player in a variety of heart diseases. Despite some negative results from clinical trials using complement inhibitors, emerging evidence points to an association between the complement system and heart diseases. Thus, complement seems to be important in coronary heart disease as well as in heart failure, where several studies underscore the prognostic importance of complement activation. Furthermore, patients with atrial fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement system is crucial for the protozoa-host interaction. Thus, complement activation appears to be involved in the pathophysiology of a diverse range of cardiac conditions. Determination of the exact role of complement in the various heart diseases will hopefully help to identify patients that might benefit from therapeutic complement intervention.

  5. Detection of critical congenital heart defects: Review of contributions from prenatal and newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Olney, Richard S; Ailes, Elizabeth C; Sontag, Marci K

    2015-04-01

    In 2011, statewide newborn screening programs for critical congenital heart defects began in the United States, and subsequently screening has been implemented widely. In this review, we focus on data reports and collection efforts related to both prenatal diagnosis and newborn screening. Defect-specific, maternal, and geographic factors are associated with variations in prenatal detection, so newborn screening provides a population-wide safety net for early diagnosis. A new web-based repository is collecting information on newborn screening program policies, quality indicators related to screening programs, and specific case-level data on infants with these defects. Birth defects surveillance programs also collect data about critical congenital heart defects, particularly related to diagnostic timing, mortality, and services. Individuals from state programs, federal agencies, and national organizations will be interested in these data to further refine algorithms for screening in normal newborn nurseries, neonatal intensive care settings, and other special populations; and ultimately to evaluate the impact of screening on outcomes.

  6. The heart-liver metabolic axis: defective communication exacerbates disease.

    PubMed

    Baskin, Kedryn K; Bookout, Angie L; Olson, Eric N

    2014-04-01

    The heart has been recognized as an endocrine organ for over 30 years (de Bold, 2011); however, little is known about how the heart communicates with other organs in the body, and even less is known about this process in the diseased heart. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Magida and Leinwand (2014) introduce the concept that a primary genetic defect in the heart results in aberrant hepatic lipid metabolism, which consequently exacerbates hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This study provides evidence in support of the hypothesis that crosstalk occurs between the heart and liver, and that this becomes disrupted in the diseased state.

  7. Gallstone Disease and the Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jun; Qi, Lu; Yu, Canqing; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Chen, Yiping; Yang, Ling; Shen, Jie; Wang, Shanqing; Li, Mingqiang; Liu, Yongmei; Zhang, Libo; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming; Li, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Objective Gallstone disease (GSD) is related to multiple cardiovascular risk factors; the present study was to prospectively examine the association between GSD and ischemic heart disease (IHD). Approach and Results We examined the association of GSD with IHD among 199,292 men and 288,081 women aged 30–79 years in the China Kadoorie Biobank study. Participants with cancer, heart disease, and stroke at baseline were excluded. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the association of GSD with IHD. The prevalence of self-reported GSD was 3.7% in men and 7.3% in women at baseline. During 3,431,124 person-years of follow-up between 2004 and 2013 (median, 7.2 years), we documented 10,245 incident IHD cases in men and 14,714 in women. As compared with men without GSD at baseline, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio for IHD was 1.11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–1.22) for men with GSD; the respective hazard ratio was 1.27 (95% CI, 1.20–1.34) in women and 1.23 (95% CI, 1.17–1.28) in the whole cohort. The sex difference in IHD risk associated with GSD was statistically significant (P=0.009 for interaction with sex). In addition, we found the association between GSD and IHD was stronger in non-hypertensive than hypertensive women (P<0.001 for interaction). Conclusions In this large prospective study, the presence of GSD was associated with an increased risk of incident IHD, independent of other risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Our findings suggest novel prevention strategy to mitigate heart disease through improvement of gastrointestinal health. PMID:26272939

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of rheumatic heart disease prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Manji, Rizwan A; Witt, Julia; Tappia, Paramjit S; Jung, Young; Menkis, Alan H; Ramjiawan, Bram

    2013-12-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD), secondary to group A streptococcal infection is endemic in the developing as well as parts of the developed world with significant costs to the patient, and to the healthcare system. We briefly review the prevalence and cost of RHD in developed and developing nations. We subsequently develop a Markov model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of three strategies (vs standard no prevention) for preventing RHD in a developing world country: primary prophylaxis (throat swab to detect and subsequently treat group A streptococci as needed); primary prophylaxis (antibiotic prophylaxis for all) with benzathine penicillin G once monthly to all patients (ages 5-21 years) regardless of evidence of infection; and secondary prophylaxis with monthly only to those with echocardiographic evidence of early RHD. Our model suggests that echocardiographic screening and secondary prophylaxis is the best strategy although the strategies change depending on parameters used.

  9. Late Detection of Critical Congenital Heart Disease Among US Infants

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Cora; Ailes, Elizabeth; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Oster, Matthew E.; Olney, Richard S.; Cassell, Cynthia H.; Fixler, David E.; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Shaw, Gary M.; Gilboa, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) was added to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel for Newborns in the United States in 2011. Many states have recently adopted or are considering requirements for universal CCHD screening through pulse oximetry in birth hospitals. Limited previous research is directly applicable to the question of how many US infants with CCHD might be identified through screening. OBJECTIVES To estimate the proportion of US infants with late detection of CCHD (>3 days after birth) based on existing clinical practice and to investigate factors associated with late detection. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Descriptive and multivariable analysis. Data were obtained from a multisite population-based study of birth defects in the United States, the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS). We included all live-born infants with estimated dates of delivery from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2007, and nonsyndromic, clinically verified CCHD conditions potentially detectable through screening via pulse oximetry. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The main outcome measure was the proportion of infants with late detection of CCHD through echocardiography or at autopsy under the assumption that universal screening at birth hospitals might reduce the number of such late diagnoses. Secondary outcome measures included prevalence ratios for associations between selected demographic and clinical factors and late detection of CCHD. RESULTS Of 3746 live-born infants with nonsyndromic CCHD, late detection occurred in 1106 (29.5% [95%CI, 28.1%–31.0%]), including 6 (0.2%) (0.1% –0.4%) first receiving a diagnosis at autopsy more than 3 days after birth. Late detection varied by CCHD type from 9 of 120 infants (7.5%[95%CI, 3.5%–13.8%]) with pulmonary atresia to 497 of 801 (62.0% [58.7%–65.4%]) with coarctation of the aorta. In multivariable analysis, late detection varied significantly by CCHD type and study site, and infants with

  10. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    SciTech Connect

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks in the highest fish-consuming group ({approx}3 times

  11. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:26974003

  12. Diet and cancer and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Michael A

    2014-03-11

    The modern Western diet bears little resemblance to the diet which forged the human genome over many million years. The change in basic food structure is operating to distort biology even before conception and into late years, with the epidemic of obesity and diabetes likely to lead to stroke, heart disease, and now dementia, being flagged as a consequence. In addition, mental ill health is overtaking all other burdens of ill health, and almost certainly has its roots in early disturbance of brain development. Whilst lifestyle will be playing its part, there can be little doubt that the common denominator is the aberrations in food development, predominantly in the last century. It seems it is time to reassess food policy. The principle of food production should be nutrition and human health. The globalisation of a food structure linked to such disorders and their appearance globally in response asks that steps be taken to protect other countries from making the same mistakes. PMID:24620001

  13. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity.

  14. Diet and cancer and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Michael A

    2014-03-11

    The modern Western diet bears little resemblance to the diet which forged the human genome over many million years. The change in basic food structure is operating to distort biology even before conception and into late years, with the epidemic of obesity and diabetes likely to lead to stroke, heart disease, and now dementia, being flagged as a consequence. In addition, mental ill health is overtaking all other burdens of ill health, and almost certainly has its roots in early disturbance of brain development. Whilst lifestyle will be playing its part, there can be little doubt that the common denominator is the aberrations in food development, predominantly in the last century. It seems it is time to reassess food policy. The principle of food production should be nutrition and human health. The globalisation of a food structure linked to such disorders and their appearance globally in response asks that steps be taken to protect other countries from making the same mistakes.

  15. Use of nitrates in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Giuseppe, Cocco; Paul, Jerie; Hans-Ulrich, Iselin

    2015-01-01

    Short-acting nitrates are beneficial in acute myocardial ischemia. However, many unresolved questions remain about the use of long-acting nitrates in stable ischemic heart disease. The use of long-acting nitrates is weakened by the development of endothelial dysfunction and tolerance. Also, we currently ignore whether lower doses of transdermal nitroglycerin would be better than those presently used. Multivariate analysis data from large nonrandomized studies suggested that long-acting nitrates increase the incidence of acute coronary syndromes, while data from another multivariate study indicate that they have positive effects. Because of methodological differences and open questions, the two studies cannot be compared. A study in Japanese patients with vasospastic angina has shown that, when compared with calcium antagonists, long-acting nitrates do not improve long-term prognosis and that the risk for cardiac adverse events increases with the combined therapy. We have many unanswered questions.

  16. MicroRNAs in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tanya; Rajakaruna, Cha; Caputo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a broad term which encompasses a spectrum of pathology, the most common phenotypes include atrial septal defects (ASDs), ventricular septal defects (VSDs), patent ductus arteriosus (PAD) and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). The impact of CHD is profound and it is estimated to be responsible for over 40% of prenatal deaths. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small, highly conserved, non-coding RNAs which have complex roles in a variety of pathophysiological states. miRs are post-transcriptional negative regulators of gene expression. Individual miRs are known to exert effects in multiple target genes, therefore the altered expression of a single miR could influence an entire gene network resulting in complex pathological states. Recent evidences suggest a role in the dysregulation of miRs in CHD. Mouse knock out models have contributed to our knowledge base revealing specific patterns of miR expression in cardiovascular physiology and pathological states. Specific miRs necessary for embryonic cardiac development have been revealed. Dysregulation of these miRs has been shown to cause structural abnormalities in the heart and vasculature, thus furthering our understanding of the processes which result in CHD. These advances have provided new insight into the signalling pathways responsible for CHD. Furthermore, this new appreciation for miRs in the development of CHD has uncovered their potential for new therapeutic targets where modulated miR activity may reduce the burden of disease. Here, we summarize current knowledge of the cause-effect relationships of miRs in CHD and consider their potential as a therapeutic targets and biomarkers in this clinical setting. PMID:26734643

  17. Huntington's disease: prenatal screening for late onset disease.

    PubMed

    Post, S G

    1992-06-01

    This article presents a set of moral arguments regarding the selective abortion of fetuses on the basis of prenatal screening for late onset genetic diseases only, and for Huntington's Disease* in particular. After discussion of human suffering, human perfection and the distinctive features of the lives of people confronting late onset genetic disease, the author concludes that selective abortion is difficult to justify ethically, although it must remain a matter of personal choice.

  18. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Heart." Managing Stress Research shows that strong emotions, such as anger, can trigger a heart attack. Learning how to manage stress , relax, and cope with problems can improve your emotional and physical health. Medicines Medicines are ...

  19. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies.

  20. An Update on Gender Disparities in Coronary Heart Disease Care.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tina; Palaskas, Nicolas; Ahmed, Ameera

    2016-05-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), traditionally considered a male disease, causes far more deaths in women than cancer. The prevalence of CHD is lower in women at any age, but with advancing age, this differential decreases. The clinical outcomes including myocardial infarction mortality, all-cause mortality, and reinfarction rates are also worse in women with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) than in men. Yet, women appear to be underdiagnosed and undertreated for coronary heart disease. There is still a gap in the knowledge, understanding, and general awareness of CHD in women. This review provides updates in gender disparities in the management of risk factors, treatments, and outcomes of coronary heart disease.

  1. What Are Heart Disease and Stroke?

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... may help me? ©2015, American Heart Association Multi-language Fact Sheet Topics Heart-related Conditions What is ...

  2. Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gelb, Michael H.; Scott, C. Ronald; Turecek, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is worldwide interest in newborn screening for lysosomal storage diseases because of the development of treatment options that give better results when carried out early in life. Screens with high differentiation between affected and nonaffected individuals are critical because of the large number of potential false positives. CONTENT This review summarizes 3 screening methods: (a) direct assay of enzymatic activities using tandem mass spectrometry or fluorometry, (b) immunocapture-based measurement of lysosomal enzyme abundance, and (c) measurement of biomarkers. Assay performance is compared on the basis of small-scale studies as well as on large-scale pilot studies of mass spectrometric and fluorometric screens. SUMMARY Tandem mass spectrometry and fluorometry techniques for direct assay of lysosomal enzymatic activity in dried blood spots have emerged as the most studied approaches. Comparative mass spectrometry vs fluorometry studies show that the former better differentiates between nonaffected vs affected individuals. This in turn leads to a manageable number of screen positives that can be further evaluated with second-tier methods. PMID:25477536

  3. Recent advances in echocardiography for valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of patients with valvular heart disease. Echocardiographic advancements may have particular impact on the assessment and management of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will summarize the current literature on advancements, such as three-dimensional echocardiography, strain imaging, intracardiac echocardiography, and fusion imaging, in this patient population. PMID:26594349

  4. Heart Disease Risk Perception in College Men and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, John S.; Grant, Melinda; Hill, Kathy L.; Brizzolara, Jeff; Belmont, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    The authors sought to assess the perception of risks for coronary heart disease (CHD) in college men and women. They surveyed 470 undergraduates from 2 major 4-year institutions who completed a questionnaire that measured perceived risks for heart disease. Sixty-eight percent of the respondents rated their risks as lower or much lower than those…

  5. Clues in diagnosing congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    A number of practical office and bedside clues to cardiac disease in infants and children have been passed on through the years. They relate to the history, to the inspection and palpation components of the physical examination, and to knowledge of the specific cardiac defects that are likely to be associated with certain clinical syndromes. With the possible exception of coarctation of the aorta, the clues are not diagnostically specific. In many instances, however, they serve to narrow a broad array of diagnostic possibilities to 2 or 3 and, with the aid of other clues and auscultation, they can often be distinguished from one another. When a primary care physician is confronted with a child who has an incidental murmur that is "probably" innocent but could be organic, useful clues favoring an organic murmur are a history of congenital heart disease in a first-degree relative; a history of maternal rubella syndrome, alcohol use, or teratogenic drug use during pregnancy; a history of inappropriate sweating; a history of syncope, chest pain, or squatting; maternal diabetes mellitus; premature birth; birth at a high altitude; cyanosis; abnormal pulsations; recurrent bronchiolitis or pneumonia; chronic unexplained hoarseness; asymmetric facies with crying; and a physical appearance suggestive of a clinical syndrome. PMID:1574882

  6. Factors predictive of stress, organizational effectiveness, and coronary heart disease potential.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, W H

    1985-07-01

    Research to predict stress, organizational effectiveness, and potential for developing coronary heart disease (CHD) is presented based on two samples (n = 357 and n = 225). Results indicate that perceived stress is predicted by a combination of individual and job related characteristics. The data suggest that stress, in turn, affects individual and organizational health and effectiveness, by causing increases in cold/flu episodes, somatic symptoms, while decreasing job satisfaction. In addition, stress has an indirect effect on job performance and absenteeism. Models for predicting the ratio of total serum cholesterol divided by HDL cholesterol as an indicator of coronary heart disease potential are provided and a CHD screening model is proposed.

  7. Newborn screening for congenital infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Neto, Eurico Camargo; Rubin, Rosélia; Schulte, Jacqueline; Giugliani, Roberto

    2004-06-01

    To estimate the prevalence of congenital toxoplasmosis, Chagas disease, cytomegalovirus, and rubella, blood samples on dried blood spot (DBS) from neonates (day 3-20 of life) were screened for immunoglobulin (Ig) M against Toxoplasma gondii, cytomegalovirus, rubella virus, and IgG against Trypanosoma cruzi by methods used for serum and adapted for use with DBS. Positive samples were further analyzed for IgM and IgG in serum from neonates and mothers. DBS samples from 364,130 neonates were tested for Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgM, and 15,873 neonates were also tested for IgM against cytomegalovirus and rubella virus and for Trypanosoma cruzi-specific IgG. A total of 195 were diagnosed with congenital toxoplasmosis, 16 with cytomegalovirus, and 11 with congenital rubella. One newborn had a confirmed result for Chagas disease, and 21 mothers had positive serum antibodies. These results suggest that infectious diseases should be considered for future inclusion in programs for newborn screening of metabolic diseases in disease-endemic areas. PMID:15207059

  8. Problems in veterinary ultrasonographic analysis of acquired heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bond, B R

    1991-12-01

    Echocardiography in veterinary medicine has both enhanced our ability to diagnose and treat cardiac diseases in small animals and added confusion to what we already know. Because we can actually see the heart beating and visualize blood flows within the cardiac chambers as well as measure velocities of blood flows, we have a tool that increases our non-invasive diagnostic abilities. On the other hand, the lines between different heart diseases are not always clear-cut, and the more we learn about heart disease the more we see the shades of distinction between different diseases become blurred. This chapter will look at the main abnormalities we see in veterinary medicine (mitral regurgitation, pericardial disease, and the different feline and canine cardiomyopathies) and will attempt to help the veterinary echocardiographer avoid common problems encountered in acquired heart disease as well as use echocardiographic information to gain a better understanding of the disease process occurring in animals. PMID:1839366

  9. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib; de Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes; Klein, Carlos Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Background Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. Objective To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Methods Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Results Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Conclusions Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes. PMID:25004417

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease Is Often Unrecognized among Patients with Coronary Heart Disease: The REGARDS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, William M.; Newsome, Britt B.; McClure, Leslie A.; Cushman, Mary; Howard, George; Audhya, Paul; Abramson, Jerome L.; Warnock, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with kidney disease are at increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and CHD is associated with an increased prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Awareness of CKD may potentially influence diagnostic decisions, life-style changes and pharmacologic interventions targeted at modifiable CHD risk factors. We describe here the degree to which persons with CHD are aware of their CKD. Methods The Reasons for Geographical and Racial Difference in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study, a population-based sample of US residents aged 45 and older. We included in our analyses 28,112 REGARDS participants recruited as of June 2007. We estimated GFR (eGFR) using the MDRD equation, defined CKD as a GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2, and ascertained awareness of chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease through self-report. We used the odds ratio to compare the association between awareness of kidney disease, as measured by GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2, among individuals with and without self-reported CHD by both the presence of CKD and the severity of impaired kidney function. Results Coronary heart disease was reported by 3,803 (14.1%) of subjects, and 11.3% of subjects had CKD by eGFR. Among all individuals with a GFR <60 ml/min/ 1.73 m2, 9.6% reported having been told by a physician that they had kidney disease. Among those with CHD and CKD, 5.0% were aware of their CKD compared to 2.0% in those without CHD [OR (95% CI) = 2.57 (2.08, 3.28)]. This difference persisted after controlling for the level of kidney function [aOR (95% CI) = 1.87 (1.43, 2.41)]. Conclusion There was a high prevalence of CKD and a low prevalence of awareness of kidney disease among older adults in the US population with or without coronary heart disease. These findings support recent recommendations that patients with cardiovascular disease be systematically screened for and educated about CKD. PMID:18663284

  11. 42 CFR 410.17 - Cardiovascular disease screening tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cardiovascular disease screening tests. 410.17... § 410.17 Cardiovascular disease screening tests. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart, the... Part B covers cardiovascular disease screening tests when ordered by the physician who is treating...

  12. 42 CFR 410.17 - Cardiovascular disease screening tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cardiovascular disease screening tests. 410.17... § 410.17 Cardiovascular disease screening tests. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart, the... Part B covers cardiovascular disease screening tests when ordered by the physician who is treating...

  13. 42 CFR 410.17 - Cardiovascular disease screening tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cardiovascular disease screening tests. 410.17... § 410.17 Cardiovascular disease screening tests. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart, the... Part B covers cardiovascular disease screening tests when ordered by the physician who is treating...

  14. 42 CFR 410.17 - Cardiovascular disease screening tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cardiovascular disease screening tests. 410.17... § 410.17 Cardiovascular disease screening tests. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart, the... Part B covers cardiovascular disease screening tests when ordered by the physician who is treating...

  15. 42 CFR 410.17 - Cardiovascular disease screening tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cardiovascular disease screening tests. 410.17... § 410.17 Cardiovascular disease screening tests. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart, the... Part B covers cardiovascular disease screening tests when ordered by the physician who is treating...

  16. The first SHAPE (Screening for Heart Attack Prevention and Education) guideline.

    PubMed

    Naghavi, Morteza; Falk, Erling; Hecht, Harvey S; Shah, Prediman K

    2006-12-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (A-CVD) is preventable. Major causal risk factors are known, and effective and safe treatments exist. However, A-CVD remains the leading cause of death and severe disability not only in affluent countries, but also globally. The burden of A-CVD is growing faster in poor and developing countries threatening their future economic development. Traditional methods for prevention of A-CVD have proven largely insufficient. Although many societal factors contribute to the epidemic of A-CVD (eg, smoking, obesity, diabetes, insufficient physical activity, and so on) and deserve renewed attention, early detection of the asymptomatic vulnerable patient who has significant subclinical atherosclerosis presents as a low hanging fruit in primary prevention of A-CVD. The Screening for Heart Attack Prevention and Education (SHAPE) Task Force, comprised of an international group of experts, has proposed the First SHAPE Guideline to address a major shortcoming in the existing guidelines in primary prevention of A-CVD. It is based on the observation that most heart attacks and strokes occur in people who are not classified as high risk by the traditional risk factor-based approach recommended in the United States (Framingham Risk Score) and Europe (SCORE). Unfortunately, these guidelines provide inadequate warning to asymptomatic individuals with subclinical atherosclerosis who are unaware of their high-risk status and are not aggressively treated by their physicians who follow the existing recommendations. Consequently, most of these asymptomatic individuals, who are vulnerable to a near-future heart attack, are not offered the benefit of existing prophylactic therapies. Unlike decades ago when screening for risk factors of A-CVD was the only available risk stratification method in primary prevention, today, noninvasive detection of atherosclerosis is feasible and widely available. It provides a direct and individualized method for risk

  17. Radiation induced heart disease in hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lauk, S.; Trott, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive Wistar rats were given single doses of X rays to their heart. Irradiation decreased the blood pressure before any myocardial radiation damage was apparent. Male rats, which were more hypertensive than female rats, had a shorter survival time after local heart irradiation than female rats. Antihypertensive treatment with hydralazine did not increase the survival time. It is considered that myocardial hypertrophy is the cause of the increased susceptibility of spontaneously hypertensive rats to local heart irradiation.

  18. [Prevention of coronary heart disease: smoking].

    PubMed

    Heitzer, T; Meinertz, T

    2005-01-01

    Smoking is the leading preventable cause of illness and premature death in Germany, claiming over 110,000 lives a year because it directly increases the risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, emphysema and a variety of cancers. The overwhelming majority of smokers begin tobacco use before they reach adulthood. Among those young people who smoke, the average age is now 13-14. In Germany, about 39% of male and 31% of female adults (age 18-60 years) continue to smoke, despite information about the unequivocally negative health consequences of smoking. The exact mechanisms of smoking-related vascular disease are not yet known. Smoking causes acute hemodynamic alterations such as increase in heart rate, systematic and coronary vascular resistance, myocardial contractility, and myocardial oxygen demand. These short-term effects could lower the ischemic threshold in smokers with coronary artery disease and contribute to the increased risk for acute cardiovascular events. Endothelial damage is thought to be an initiating event in atherosclerosis and early studies have demonstrated that long-term smoking has direct toxic effects with structural changes of human endothelial cells. Recent research has shown the importance of the functional role of the endothelium in regulating vascular tone, platelet-endothelial interactions, leukocyte adhesion and smooth muscle cell proliferation via synthesis and release of a variety of substances such as nitric oxide. There is strong evidence that smoking leads to endothelial dysfunction mainly by increased inactivation of nitric oxide by oxygen-derived free radicals. Smoking also increases oxidative modification of LDL and is associated with lower HDL plasma levels. Smoking induces a systemic inflammatory response with increased leukocyte count and elevation of the C-reactive protein level. Importantly, the prothrombotic effects of smoking have been repeatedly demonstrated to cause alterations in platelet function, imbalance of

  19. Coronary Heart Disease Attributable to Passive Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Lightwood, James M.; Coxson, Pamela G.; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Williams, Lawrence W.; Goldman, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background Passive smoking is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), and existing estimates are out of date due to recent and substantial changes in the level of exposure. Objective To estimate the annual clinical burden and cost of CHD treatment attributable to passive smoking. Outcome measures Annual attributable CHD deaths, myocardial infarctions (MI), total CHD events, and the direct cost of CHD treatment. Methods A Monte Carlo simulation estimated the CHD events and costs as a function of the prevalence of CHD risk factors, including passive-smoking prevalence and a low (1.26) and high (1.65) relative risk of CHD due to passive smoking. Estimates were calculated using the CHD Policy Model, calibrated to reproduce key CHD outcomes in the baseline Year 2000 in the U.S. Results At 1999–2004 levels, passive smoking caused 21,800 (SE=2400) to 75,100 (SE=8000) CHD deaths and 38,100 (SE=4300) to 128,900 (SE=14,000) MIs annually, with a yearly CHD treatment cost of $1.8 (SE=$0.2) to $6.0 (SE=$0.7) billion. If recent trends in the reduction in the prevalence of passive smoking continue from 2000 to 2008, the burden would be reduced by approximately 25%–30%. Conclusions Passive smoking remains a substantial clinical and economic burden in the U.S. PMID:19095162

  20. Control of hypertension in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Banegas, J R; de la Sierra, A; Segura, J; Gorostidi, M; de la Cruz, J; Rodríguez-Artalejo, F; Ruilope, L M

    2009-05-15

    This observational study investigates, for the first time, the actual or out-of-office control of hypertension among coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, by using 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). We used the Spanish Society of Hypertension ABPM Registry, based on a large-scale network of primary-care physicians consecutively recruiting hypertensive patients with conventional clinical indications for ABPM. The average of two office BP measurements was used for analyses. Thereafter, 24-h ABPM was performed, using a SpaceLabs 90207 device. Out-of-office control of hypertension among 2434 treated essential hypertensive patients with clinically documented CHD was much higher (46.4%) than in-office BP control (28.7%). This considerable difference was partly due to the presence of 25.2% of patients with "office resistance", i.e., normal ambulatory BP but with high office BP despite treatment. Although further efforts in controlling BP are needed in CHD patients, physicians should be also comforted by BP results better than previously believed based on office data. PMID:18353471

  1. Relationship between TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Zhang, Y F; Zhao, C F; Liu, M M; Si, J P; Fang, Y F; Xing, W W; Wang, F L

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease in children is a type of birth defect. Previous studies have suggested that the transcription factor, TBX20, is involved in the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease in children; however, the specific regulatory mechanisms are yet to be evaluated. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the TBX20 polymorphism and the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease. The TBX20 gene sequence was obtained from the NCBI database and the polymorphic locus candidate was predicted. Thereafter, the specific gene primers were designed for the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) of DNA extracted from the blood of 80 patients with congenital heart disease and 80 controls. The results of the PCR were subjected to correlation analysis to identify the differences between the amplicons and to determine the relationship between the TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease. One of the single nucleotide polymorphic locus was found to be rs3999950: c.774T>C (Ala265Ala). The TC genotype frequency in the patients was higher than that in the controls, similar to that for the C locus. The odds ratio of the TC genotypes was above 1, indicating that the presence of the TC genotype increases the incidence of congenital heart diseases. Thus, rs3999950 may be associated with congenital heart disease, and TBX20 may predispose children to the defect. PMID:27323105

  2. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  3. The Role of the Proteasome in Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Fan; Wang, Xuejun

    2010-01-01

    Intensive investigations into the pathophysiological significance of the proteasome in the heart did not start until the beginning of the past decade but exciting progresses have been made and are summarized here as two fronts. First, strong evidence continues to emerge to support a novel hypothesis that proteasome functional insufficiency represents a common pathological phenomenon in a large subset of heart disease, compromises protein quality control in heart muscle cells, and thereby acts as a major pathogenic factor promoting the progression of the subset of heart disease to congestive heart failure. This front is represented by the studies on the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in cardiac proteinopathy, which have taken advantage of a transgenic mouse model expressing a fluorescence reporter for UPS proteolytic function. Second, pharmacological inhibition of the proteasome has been explored experimentally as a potential therapeutic strategy to intervene some forms of heart disease, such as pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy, viral myocarditis, and myocardial ischemic injury. Not only between the two fronts but also within each one, a multitude of inconsistency and controversy remain to be explained and clarified. At present, the controversy perhaps reflects the sophistication of cardiac proteasomes in terms of the composition, assembly, and regulation, as well as the intricacy and diversity of heart disease in terms of its etiology and pathogenesis. A definitive role of altered proteasome function in the development of various forms of heart disease remains to be established. PMID:20840877

  4. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation alterations in heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fillmore, N; Mori, J; Lopaschuk, G D

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. In many forms of heart disease, including heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathies, changes in cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolism contribute to contractile dysfunction and to a decrease in cardiac efficiency. Specific metabolic changes include a relative increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates and an uncoupling of glycolysis from glucose oxidation. In heart failure, overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism can be impaired while, in ischaemic heart disease, energy production is impaired due to a limitation of oxygen supply. In both of these conditions, residual mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation dominates over mitochondrial glucose oxidation. In diabetes, the ratio of cardiac fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation also increases, although primarily due to an increase in fatty acid oxidation and an inhibition of glucose oxidation. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutically regulating cardiac energy metabolism by reducing fatty acid oxidation and/or increasing glucose oxidation can improve cardiac function of the ischaemic heart, the failing heart and in diabetic cardiomyopathies. In this article, we review the cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolic changes that occur in these forms of heart disease, what role alterations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation have in contributing to cardiac dysfunction and the potential for targeting fatty acid oxidation to treat these forms of heart disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24147975

  5. The Heart Saver Handbook. A Manual for Those Working for Heart Disease Prevention through Dietary Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago Heart Association, IL.

    This handbook for nutritionists and dietitians as well as other health professionals (physicians, nurses, and health educators) is a guide to the content and conduct of the Heart Saver Program, a health education program designed to help prevent heart disease by bringing about significant changes in the food habits of the public. The content…

  6. The Healthy Heart Program Lowers Heart Disease Risk in a Rural County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jennifer; Nixon, Jan; Woodard, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    Follow-up of 55 adults who completed the Healthy Heart Program, which focused on heart disease risks, cholesterol, and diet, found that attitudes and knowledge were significantly higher after the program; fat intake, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were significantly lower. Locus of control did not change. (SK)

  7. The epidemic of the 20(th) century: coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Dalen, James E; Alpert, Joseph S; Goldberg, Robert J; Weinstein, Ronald S

    2014-09-01

    Heart disease was an uncommon cause of death in the US at the beginning of the 20th century. By mid-century it had become the commonest cause. After peaking in the mid-1960s, the number of heart disease deaths began a marked decline that has persisted to the present. The increase in heart disease deaths from the early 20th century until the 1960s was due to an increase in the prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis with resultant coronary heart disease, as documented by autopsy studies. This increase was associated with an increase in smoking and dietary changes leading to an increase in serum cholesterol levels. In addition, the ability to diagnose acute myocardial infarction with the aid of the electrocardiogram increased the recognition of coronary heart disease before death. The substantial decrease in coronary heart disease deaths after the mid-1960s is best explained by the decreased incidence, and case fatality rate, of acute myocardial infarction and a decrease in out-of-hospital sudden coronary heart disease deaths. These decreases are very likely explained by a decrease in coronary atherosclerosis due to primary prevention, and a decrease in the progression of nonobstructive coronary atherosclerosis to obstructive coronary heart disease due to efforts of primary and secondary prevention. In addition, more effective treatment of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction has led to a substantial decrease in deaths due to acute myocardial infarction. It is very likely that the 20th century was the only century in which heart disease was the most common cause of death in America.

  8. Congenital heart disease in Mexico: advances of the regionalization project.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Cervantes-Salazar, Jorge; Curi-Curi, Pedro; Ramírez-Marroquín, Samuel

    2013-04-01

    Consistent with the mission of the World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery to promote health care for children with congenital heart disease all around the world, a Mexican Association of Specialists in Congenital Heart Disease (abbreviated in Spanish as AMECC) was created in Mexico in 2008. Our efforts were coordinated with those of the National Health Secretary with the objective being implementation of a national plan for regionalization of care for patients with congenital heart disease. To improve our knowledge related to technologic and human resources for management of congenital heart disease, we developed a national survey. Finally, a national database was created for collecting all Mexican centers' information related to congenital heart disease care in order to quantify the advances related to the proposed plans. The database utilized international consensus nomenclature. The aim of this article is to show the sequence of our actions in relation to direct accomplishments and the current status of congenital heart disease care in Mexico. This article emphasizes the main aspects of these actions: regionalization project implementation, national survey results, and cardiovascular pediatric surgical database creation. Knowledge of outcomes related to successful actions would be useful for those countries that face similar challenges and may lead them to consider adoption of similar measures with the respective adjustments to their own reality.

  9. Fetal growth and coronary heart disease in south India.

    PubMed

    Stein, C E; Fall, C H; Kumaran, K; Osmond, C; Cox, V; Barker, D J

    1996-11-01

    People from India living overseas have high rates of coronary heart disease which are not explained by known coronary risk factors. In India, coronary heart disease is predicted to become the most common cause of death within 15 years. Small size at birth is a newly described risk factor for coronary heart disease. The authors studied 517 men and women born between 1934 and 1954 in a mission hospital in Mysore, South India, and who still lived near the hospital. Researchers related the prevalence of coronary heart disease, defined by standard criteria, to individual birth size. 25 men and 27 women had coronary heart disease. Low birth weight, short birth length, and small head circumference were associated with a raised prevalence of the disease. The associations were stronger and statistically significant among people aged 45 years and over. High rates of disease were also found in those whose mothers had a low body weight during pregnancy. The highest prevalence of coronary heart disease was in people who weighed 2.5 kg or less at birth and whose mothers weighed less than 45 kg during pregnancy. These associations were largely independent of known coronary risk factors.

  10. Roles of FGF Signals in Heart Development, Health, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Nobuyuki; Ohta, Hiroya; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika

    2016-01-01

    The heart provides the body with oxygen and nutrients and assists in the removal of metabolic waste through the blood vessels of the circulatory system. It is the first organ to form during embryonic morphogenesis. FGFs with diverse functions in development, health, and disease are signaling proteins, mostly as paracrine growth factors or endocrine hormones. The human/mouse FGF family comprises 22 members. Findings obtained from mouse models and human diseases with FGF signaling disorders have indicated that several FGFs are involved in heart development, health, and disease. Paracrine FGFs including FGF8, FGF9, FGF10, and FGF16 act as paracrine signals in embryonic heart development. In addition, paracrine FGFs including FGF2, FGF9, FGF10, and FGF16 play roles as paracrine signals in postnatal heart pathophysiology. Although FGF15/19, FGF21, and FGF23 are typical endocrine FGFs, they mainly function as paracrine signals in heart development or pathophysiology. In heart diseases, serum FGF15/19 levels or FGF21 and FGF23 levels decrease or increase, respectively, indicating their possible roles in heart pathophysiology. FGF2 and FGF10 also stimulate the cardiac differentiation of cultured stem cells and cardiac reprogramming of cultured fibroblasts. These findings provide new insights into the roles of FGF signaling in the heart and potential therapeutic strategies for cardiac disorders. PMID:27803896

  11. Running, Heart Disease, and the Ironic Death of Jim Fixx.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plymire, Darcy C.

    2002-01-01

    Runner Jim Fixx wrote a book about running and died young of a heart attack while running. Fixx and other authors believed heart disease resulted from overcivilization and recommended running as a way of life and cure, advising readers to listen to their bodies instead of their doctors. Fixx's adherence to that philosophy explains his behavior…

  12. Conceptual model for heart failure disease management.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; Abbate, Kariann; Whellan, David J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to propose a conceptual model for heart failure (HF) disease management (HFDM) and to define the components of an efficient HFDM plan in reference to this model. Articles that evaluated 1 or more of the following aspects of HFDM were reviewed: (1) outpatient clinic follow-up; (2) self-care interventions to enhance patient skills; and (3) remote evaluation of worsening HF either using structured telephone support (STS) or by monitoring device data (telemonitoring). The success of programs in reducing readmissions and mortality were mixed. Outpatient follow-up programs generally resulted in improved outcomes, including decreased readmissions. Based on 1 meta-analysis, specialty clinics improved outcomes and nonspecialty clinics did not. Results from self-care programs were inconsistent and might have been affected by patient cognitive status and educational level, and intervention intensity. Telemonitoring, despite initially promising meta-analyses demonstrating a decrease in the number and duration of HF-related readmissions and all-cause mortality rates at follow-up, has not been shown in randomized trials to consistently reduce readmissions or mortality. However, evidence from device monitoring trials in particular might have been influenced by technology and design issues that might be rectified in future trials. Results from the literature suggest that the ideal HFDM plan would include outpatient follow-up at an HF specialty clinic and continuous education to improve patient self-care. The end result of this plan would lead to better understanding on the part of the patient and improved patient ability to recognize and respond to signs of decompensation.

  13. Screening for thyroid disease and iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Eastman, Creswell J

    2012-02-01

    it cannot currently be recommended. The publication of recent Clinical Practice Guidelines for management of thyroid disease in pregnancy from the American Endocrine Society and American Thyroid Association provide persuasive arguments for early detection and treatment of overt and subclinical hypothyroidism to prevent obstetric complications and potential neurocognitive disorders in the offspring. Given the indisputable benefits of therapy, the sooner thyroid dysfunction is detected, before or as early as possible in gestation, the more likely there will be a better outcome. Because of the limitations of targeted case detection in women at risk of subclinical hypothyroidism, there has been a gradual shift in opinion to universal TSH screening of all women as soon as practicable in pregnancy. While a positive association exists between the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies and increased pregnancy loss, universal screening of all pregnant women for underlying autoimmune thyroid disease is difficult to justify until there is evidence of beneficial outcomes from randomised controlled trials. Vigorous and liberal targeted case detection remains the recommended strategy to address this problem. PMID:22297907

  14. Living with heart disease and angina

    MedlinePlus

    ... the management of high blood pressure in adults: report from the panel members appointed to the Eighth ... to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart ...

  15. Gallstones Linked to Higher Heart Disease Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... highlights a connection between the gut and the cardiovascular system To use the sharing features on this page, ... it highlights a connection between the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. "To help protect your heart health, you may ...

  16. Relationship Between Ischemic Heart Disease and Sexual Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Afra, Leila Ghanbari; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Gilasi, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ischemic heart disease is a life-threatening condition. Considerable doubts exist over the effects of this disease on patients’ sexual activity and satisfaction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between ischemic heart disease and sexual satisfaction. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, the convenience sample of 150 patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and 150 people without exposure it was drawn from Shahid Beheshti hospital, Kashan, Iran. Sampling was performed from March to September 2014. We employed the Larson’s Sexual Satisfaction Questionnaire for gathering the data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square, t-test and linear regression analysis. Results: The means of sexual satisfaction in patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and among the subjects without exposure it were 101.47±13.42 and 100.91±16.52, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding sexual satisfaction. However, sexual satisfaction was significantly correlated with gender and the use of cardiac medications (P value < 0.05). Conclusion: The level of sexual satisfaction in patients with exposure ischemic heart disease is similar to the people without exposure it. Moreover, the men and the patients who do not receive cardiac medications have higher levels of sexual satisfaction. Nurses who are providing care to patients with ischemic heart disease need to pay closer attention to patient education about sexual issues. PMID:26234982

  17. Congenital heart disease in spondylothoracic dysostosis: two familial cases.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, J M; Cook, A; Fagg, N L; MacLachlan, N A; Sharland, G K

    1995-01-01

    Two familial cases of spondylothoracic dysostosis are reported. Both cases had severe congenital heart disease in addition to the skeletal malformations which are characteristic of the condition. Images PMID:7473656

  18. Regenerative medicine for the treatment of heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hansson, E M; Lendahl, U

    2013-03-01

    Heart failure is a major cause of mortality worldwide with a steady increase in prevalence. There is currently no available cure beyond orthotopic heart transplantation, which for a number of reasons is an option only for a small fraction of all patients. Considerable hope has therefore been placed on the possibility of treating a failing heart by replacing lost cardiomyocytes, either through transplantation of various types of stem cells or by boosting endogenous regenerative mechanisms in the heart. Here, we review the current status of stem and progenitor cell-based therapies for heart disease. We discuss the pros and cons of different stem and progenitor cell types that can be considered for transplantation and describe recent advances in the understanding of how cardiomyocytes normally differentiate and how these cells can be generated from more immature cells ex vivo. Finally, we consider the possibility of activation of endogenous stem and progenitor cells to treat heart failure.

  19. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Blood Screening FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... concerned about getting Chagas disease? Why are blood banks now screening for Chagas disease? The transmission of ... have the disease after all. Will the blood bank let me know if my blood tests positive ...

  20. Aortic dilatation and aortopathy in congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Zanjani, Keyhan Sayadpour; Niwa, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    Longer survival after corrective surgery for congenital heart diseases has rendered late complications more important. One of these complications is aortic dilatation which may occur in patients with repaired or unrepaired disease and can progress to aneurysm, dissection, and rupture. This aortic dilatation in various congenital heart diseases does not simply mean anatomical dilatation of the aortic root, but it closely relates to the aortic pathophysiological abnormality, aortic regurgitation, and aortic and ventricular dysfunction; therefore, we can recognize this complex lesion as a new concept: "aortopathy". The pathophysiology of this disease is complex and only partially understood. In this review, we first discuss history, pathophysiology, and clinical features of aortic dilatation and aortopathy of congenital heart disease. Then we provide a review of the evaluation and management of this disease.

  1. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype. DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on. DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky. CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype. PMID:25119760

  2. Incidence and prevalence of pregnancy-related heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sliwa, Karen; Böhm, Michael

    2014-03-15

    Worldwide, the numbers of women who have a pre-existing cardiovascular disease or develop cardiac problems during pregnancy are increasing and, due to the lack of evidenced-based data, this provides challenges for the treating physician. Cardiovascular disease in pregnancy is a complex topic as women can present either pre- or post-partum, due to a pre-existing heart disease such as operated on or unoperated on congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, chronic hypertension, or familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Women often present with symptoms and signs of acute heart failure. On the other hand, there are diseases which are directly related to pregnancy, such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and peripartum cardiomyopathy, or where pregnancy increases risk of a disease as, for example, the risk of myocardial infarction. These diseases can have long-term implications to the life of the affected women and their families. There is, in particular, a paucity of data from developing countries of this unique disease pattern and its presentations. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the incidence and prevalence of pregnancy-related cardiovascular disease in women presenting pre- or post-partum.

  3. Fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lei, Pu-Ping; Qu, Yong-Qiang; Shuai, Qun; Tao, Si-Ming; Bao, Yu-Xia; Wang, Yu; Wang, Shang-Wen; Wang, Dian-Hua

    2013-01-15

    Fibrocytes contribute significantly to fibrosis in many cardiac diseases. However, it is not clear whether fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis in coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes are involved in cardiac fibrosis in CHD. We identified the presence of fibrocytes in CHD heart by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, examined the collagen volume fraction by Masson's Trichrome staining, and evaluated the correlation between fibrocytes and cardiac fibrosis. In conjunction, we examined the location of CXCL12, a homing factor and specific ligand for CXCR4, by immunohistochemistry. Fibrocytes were identified in 26 out of 27 CHD hearts and in 10 out of 11 normal hearts. Combinations, including CD34/αSMA, CD34/procollagen-I, CD45/αSMA, CXCR4/procollagen-I and CXCR4/αSMA, stained significantly more fibrocytes in CHD hearts as compared with those in normal hearts (p<0.05). There were positive correlations between the collagen volume fraction and the amount of fibrocytes (r=0.558; p=0.003<0.01) and between the number of CXCR4(+) fibrocytes and the CXCL12(+) cells (r=0.741; p=0.000<0.01) in CHD hearts. Based upon these findings, we conclude that fibrocytes, likely recruited through the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, may contribute to the increase in the fibroblast population in CHD heart. PMID:23177618

  4. Ventricular assist device use in congenital heart disease with a comparison to heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jacob R; Eghtesady, Pirooz

    2014-09-01

    Despite advances in medical and surgical therapies, some children with congenital heart disease (CHD) are not able to be adequately treated or palliated, leading them to develop progressive heart failure. As these patients progress to end-stage heart failure they pose a unique set of challenges. Heart transplant remains the standard of care; the donor pool, however, remains limited. Following the experience from the adult realm, the pediatric ventricular assist device (VAD) has emerged as a valid treatment option as a bridge to transplant. Due to the infrequent necessity and the uniqueness of each case, the pediatric VAD in the CHD population remains a topic with limited information. Given the experience in the adult realm, we were tasked with reviewing pediatric VADs and their use in patients with CHD and comparing this therapy to heart transplantation when possible.

  5. Depression risk in patients with coronary heart disease in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, Marcel; Jacob, Louis; Rapp, Michael A; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of depression and its risk factors among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) treated in German primary care practices. METHODS Longitudinal data from nationwide general practices in Germany (n = 1072) were analyzed. Individuals initially diagnosed with CHD (2009-2013) were identified, and 59992 patients were included and matched (1:1) to 59992 controls. The primary outcome measure was an initial diagnosis of depression within five years after the index date among patients with and without CHD. Cox proportional hazards models were used to adjust for confounders. RESULTS Mean age was equal to 68.0 years (SD = 11.3). A total of 55.9% of patients were men. After a five-year follow-up, 21.8% of the CHD group and 14.2% of the control group were diagnosed with depression (P < 0.001). In the multivariate regression model, CHD was a strong risk factor for developing depression (HR = 1.54, 95%CI: 1.49-1.59, P < 0.001). Prior depressive episodes, dementia, and eight other chronic conditions were associated with a higher risk of developing depression. Interestingly, older patients and women were also more likely to be diagnosed with depression compared with younger patients and men, respectively. CONCLUSION The risk of depression is significantly increased among patients with CHD compared with patients without CHD treated in primary care practices in Germany. CHD patients should be routinely screened for depression to ensure improved treatment and management. PMID:27721937

  6. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... to talk to your doctor. Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart - You know you should be more physically active. But are you confused, concerned, or just can't get started? This guide uses science-based information to help adults develop a safe ...

  7. Settling the 'Score' with Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Technology and medicine forged a bond in 1986 when a group of dedicated NASA scientists, University of Southern California (USC) medical professors, and a Dutch cardiologist joined forces to prevent heart attacks, using ultrasound images of astronauts blood-flow patterns and the supercomputer depended upon to orchestrate the "Star Wars" Strategic Defense Initiative.

  8. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R. R.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Meyer-Fernandes, José R.; Paula-Neto, Heitor A.; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol’s actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC. PMID:27788262

  9. Coconut Atrium in Long-Standing Rheumatic Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Takahisa; Idei, Yuka; Otsui, Kazunori; Iwata, Sachiyo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ozawa, Toru; Domoto, Koji; Takei, Asumi; Inamoto, Shinya; Inoue, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 76 Final Diagnosis: Rheumatic valvular heart disease Symptoms: Breathlessness and leg edema Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Medical treatment for heart failure Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Complete calcification of the left atrium (LA) is called “coconut atrium”, which decreases the compliance of LA, leading to the elevation of LA pressure that is transmitted to the right-side of the heart. The pathogenesis of LA calcification in patients with rheumatic heart disease is unknown; however, possible mechanisms include chronic strain force in the atrial wall and inflammation. We report here a patient with long-standing rheumatic valvular heart disease with coconut atrium. Case Report: A 76-year-old man presented with breathlessness and leg edema due to right-sided heart failure. He was diagnosed with rheumatic fever at 8 years of age. Mitral commissurotomy and the mitral and aortic valve replacement were previously performed to treat mitral and aortic valvular stenosis. The profile view of the chest X-ray indicated a diffuse calcified outline of the LA wall. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed pulmonary hyper-tension and dilatation of both atria. Moreover, computed tomography showed nearly circumferential calcification of the LA wall. Despite intense medical treatment, he succumbed to heart failure. An autopsy demonstrated that the LA was markedly dilated, its wall was calcified, and its appearance was similar to the surface of an atherosclerotic aorta. Microscopic examination revealed intensive calcification in the endocardium. Minimal accumulation of inflammatory cells was noted. Although slight fibrosis was observed, the cardiac musculature was preserved. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that identifies the histological changes of LA calcification associated with long-standing rheumatic valvular heart disease. PMID:25819539

  10. Nutritional aspects to prevent heart diseases in traditional Persian medicine.

    PubMed

    Kordafshari, Gholamreza; Kenari, Hoorieh Mohammadi; Esfahani, Mohammad Mehdi; Ardakani, Mohammad Reza Shams; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Nazem, Esmaeil; Moghimi, Maryam; Zargaran, Arman

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major health complications currently in various societies. Management of heart diseases as a prevention step or as treatment with low-cost procedures like lifestyle modifications including nutrition are important current trends. Although the term nutrition dates back to 2 past centuries, Persian physicians contributed to this term at least from 1000 years ago. Rhazes (865-925 AD) was one of the pioneers in this field. He preferred using foods in treating illnesses. "Foods and drinks" were 1 subject from 6 principles (Setteh Zarorieh) that Persian physicians believed can affect human health. In this review, we described some medieval Persian views on the role of nutrition in heart diseases and compare their prescriptions with current findings. Interestingly, current investigations mostly support Persian medicine principles. Historically, this work shows that the concept of nutrition in heart diseases has had a successful background at least from 1000 years ago in Persia.

  11. Reemphasizing the Role of Exercise in Preventing Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Heyward L.

    1989-01-01

    A recent study suggests that high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level may be a better predictor of heart disease than total cholesterol level. Even moderate amounts of aerobic exercise can raise the level of HDL-C and lower the risk of coronary artery disease. (SM)

  12. Prophylactic arrhythmia surgery in association with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Deal, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Certain congenital heart anomalies make patients more susceptible to arrhythmia development throughout their lives. This poses the question whether prophylactic arrhythmia surgery should be incorporated into reparative open heart procedures for congenital heart disease. There is currently no consensus on what constitutes a standard prophylactic procedure, owing to the questions that remain regarding lesions to be performed; energy sources to use; proximity of energy source or incisions to coronary arteries, sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node; circumstances for right atrial, left atrial, or biatrial appendectomy; and whether to perform a right, left, or biatrial maze procedure. These considerations are important because prophylactic arrhythmia procedures are performed without knowing if the patient will actually develop an arrhythmia in his or her lifetime. By reviewing and summarizing the literature, congenital heart disease patients who are at risk for developing atrial arrhythmias can be identified and lesion sets can be suggested in an effort to standardize experimental protocols for prophylactic arrhythmia surgery.

  13. "L.I.F.E.": A School-Based Heart-Health Screening and Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northrup, Karen L.; Cottrell, Lesley A.; Wittberg, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the development and growth of "Lifestyle Improvements in the Family Environment" ("L.I.F.E."), a school-based heart-health screening and intervention program. The primary goals of "L.I.F.E." through three rounds of grant funding remained constant: (a) to identify cardiovascular risk factors in students and their families and…

  14. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease. PMID:27347228

  15. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease. PMID:27347228

  16. [Obesity and coronary heart disease: the mechanism of atherogenic impact].

    PubMed

    Micić, Dragan; Polovina, Snezana

    2009-01-01

    The epidemic of obesity and overweight leads to many diseases including cardiovascular disease. Having an influence on function and heart structure, obesity and overweight are in connection with coronary heart disease, heart failure and sudden heart death. Cardiomyopathy in obesity (adipositas cordis) appears due to accumulation of adipose tissue between the heart muscle fibers and degeneration of myocites. The degeneration of myocardial could be due to lipotoxicity of free fatty acids in adipose tissue. The left ventricle hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, increasing blood volume, ejection fraction lead to heart failure. Obesity is low inflammation state with increased adipocitokine production from truncal adipose tissue which causes endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Adipocitokines include leptin, adiponectin, resistin, visfatin, RBP 4 (retinol binding protein), angiotenzinogen, TNF alpha (tumor necrosis factor), PAI 1 (plazminogen activator inhibitor), fatty acids, sex steroids and different growth factors. Adipocitokines act synergistically or competitively with insulin, that explaining their impact on insulin resistance. Inflammatory citokines from adipose tissue could have influence on blood vessels endothelial function without their increase in plasma concentrations.

  17. Cardiac image modelling: Breadth and depth in heart disease.

    PubMed

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; McCulloch, Andrew D; Nash, Martyn P; Pontre, Beau; Young, Alistair A

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of large-scale imaging studies and big health data, and the corresponding growth in analytics, machine learning and computational image analysis methods, there are now exciting opportunities for deepening our understanding of the mechanisms and characteristics of heart disease. Two emerging fields are computational analysis of cardiac remodelling (shape and motion changes due to disease) and computational analysis of physiology and mechanics to estimate biophysical properties from non-invasive imaging. Many large cohort studies now underway around the world have been specifically designed based on non-invasive imaging technologies in order to gain new information about the development of heart disease from asymptomatic to clinical manifestations. These give an unprecedented breadth to the quantification of population variation and disease development. Also, for the individual patient, it is now possible to determine biophysical properties of myocardial tissue in health and disease by interpreting detailed imaging data using computational modelling. For these population and patient-specific computational modelling methods to develop further, we need open benchmarks for algorithm comparison and validation, open sharing of data and algorithms, and demonstration of clinical efficacy in patient management and care. The combination of population and patient-specific modelling will give new insights into the mechanisms of cardiac disease, in particular the development of heart failure, congenital heart disease, myocardial infarction, contractile dysfunction and diastolic dysfunction.

  18. Angiopoietin-2 in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kümpers, Philipp; Denecke, Agnieszka; Westhoff-Bleck, Mechthild; Schieffer, Bernhard; Bauersachs, Johann; Kielstein, Jan T.; Tutarel, Oktay

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure is an important cause for morbidity and mortality in adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD). While NT-proBNP is an established biomarker for heart failure of non-congenital origin, its application in ACHD has limitations. The angiogenic factors Angiopoietin-1 and -2 (Ang-1, Ang-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and soluble receptor tyrosine kinase of the Tie family (sTie2) correlate with disease severity in heart failure of non-congenital origin. Their role in ACHD has not been studied. Methods In 91 patients Ang-2 and NT-proBNP were measured and related to New York Heart Association class, systemic ventricular function and parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Ang-1, VEGF, and sTie2 were also measured. Results Ang-2 correlates with NYHA class and ventricular dysfunction comparable to NT-proBNP. Further, Ang-2 showed a good correlation with parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Both, Ang-2 and NT-proBNP identified patients with severely limited cardiopulmonary exercise capacity. Additionally, Ang-2 is elevated in patients with a single ventricle physiology in contrast to NT-proBNP. VEGF, Ang-1, and sTie2 were not correlated with any clinical parameter. Conclusion The performance of Ang-2 as a biomarker for heart failure in ACHD is comparable to NT-proBNP. Its significant elevation in patients with single ventricle physiology indicates potential in this patient group and warrants further studies. PMID:23826161

  19. Forkhead box transcription factors in embryonic heart development and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic heart development is a very complicated process regulated precisely by a network composed of many genes and signaling pathways in time and space. Forkhead box (Fox, FOX) proteins are a family of transcription factors characterized by the presence of an evolutionary conserved "forkhead"or "winged-helix" DNA-binding domain and able to organize temporal and spatial gene expression during development. They are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, proliferation, differentiation, migration, metabolism and DNA damage response. An abundance of studies in model organisms and systems has established that Foxa2, Foxc1/c2, Foxh1 and Foxm1, Foxos and Foxps are important components of the signaling pathways that instruct cardiogenesis and embryonic heart development, playing paramount roles in heart development. The previous studies also have demonstrated that mutations in some of the forkhead box genes and the aberrant expression of forkhead box gene are heavily implicated in the congenital heart disease (CHD) of humans. This review primarily focuses on the current understanding of heart development regulated by forkhead box transcription factors and molecular genetic mechanisms by which forkhead box factors modulate heart development during embryogenesis and organogenesis. This review also summarizes human CHD related mutations in forkhead box genes as well as the abnormal expression of forkhead box gene, and discusses additional possible regulatory mechanisms of the forkhead box genes during embryonic heart development that warrant further investigation.

  20. Nomenclature and classification of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tynan, M J; Becker, A E; Macartney, F J; Jiménez, M Q; Shinebourne, E A; Anderson, R H

    1979-01-01

    At present there is no universally accepted nomenclature for congenital cardiac malformations. Much of the controversy results from failure to distinguish the structural connections of the heart from the morphology and spatial relations of its components. The confusion is compounded by an abundance of individual definitions, many of them speculative. The present article proposes a totally descriptive nomenclature. It describes in turn the connections of the cardiac segments, their morphology, their relations, and additional anomalies in any segment. Each step in the segmental approach is discrete. The overall effect is to force a succinct and comprehensive description of any cardiac malformation, no matter how complex. Images PMID:465224

  1. [Congenita heart disease--is the procedure always unequivocal?].

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Excellent results of interventional treatment of congenital cardiac defects in childhood resulted in substantial increment of adult population with these diseases. Usually patients lead normal life, undertake work and start a family. Nonetheless vast majority of them still require regular cardiological check-up due to residual lesions, remote sequelae of the intervention or counselling in case of other health problems. Particular attention should be paid on pregnant women with congenital heart disease. As an invasive treatment does not fully normalize morphology and haemodynamics of the heart one has to assess to what extent physiological changes of the cardiovascular system secondary to the pregnancy, delivery and childbed may impact heart disease. The paper summarizes current recommendations associated with these issues.

  2. [Advances in prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Muner-Hernando, Marta; Gil-Mira, Mar; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2013-06-01

    Congenital heart diseases are the most frequent abnormalities at the time of delivery. Their importance lays in the fact that they represent 46% of neonatal deaths and they are cause of a high morbidity rate. However, an early diagnosis is difficult. The aim of this revision is to give an update on the advances in the prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart diseases and their advantages compared to conventional sonography. The introduction of new technology in the detection of congenital heart diseases has improved the acquisition of better images in terms of resolution and quality. However, there is a lack of large studies to prove its benefits in non-selected population, although preliminary studies seem to give faithful results.

  3. Ischemic Heart Disease in Women: A Focus on Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Puja K.; Wei, Janet; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease remains a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in women in the United States and worldwide. This review highlights known and emerging risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD) in women. Traditional Framingham risk factors such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking, as well as lifestyle habits such as unhealthy diet and sedentary lifestyle are all modifiable. Health care providers should be aware of emerging cardiac risk factors in women such as adverse pregnancy outcomes, systemic autoimmune disorders, obstructive sleep apnea, and radiation-induced heart disease; psychosocial factors such as mental stress, depression, anxiety, low socioeconomic status, and work and marital stress play an important role in IHD in women. Appropriate recognition and management of an array of risk factors is imperative given the growing burden of IHD and need to deliver cost-effective, quality care for women. PMID:25453985

  4. Pregnancy and non-valvular heart disease--anesthetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Gaurab; Sengupta, Saikat; Rudra, Amitava; Debnath, Saurabh

    2010-01-01

    Non-valvular heart disease is an important cause of cardiac disease in pregnancy and presents a unique challenge to the anesthesiologist during labor and delivery. A keen understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, in addition to the altered physiology of pregnancy, is the key to managing such patients. Disease-specific goals of management may help preserve the hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters within an acceptable limit and a successful conduct of labor and postpartum period. PMID:20442539

  5. Social class and heart disease mortality among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Elizabeth; Williams, Carol R; Moore, Latetia; Chen, Fangfei

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine variation in heart disease death rates by the social class of decedents. The term, "social class" refers to a complex set of phenomena such as control over economic resources, social status, and power relative to others in society. The target population for this study was African-American adults aged 35-74 years old who resided in the United States during the years 1996-1997. As a proxy for social class, we examined 5 levels of educational attainment: 0-8 years of school completed (Social Class I), 9-11 years of school completed (Social Class II), high school graduate/12 years of school completed (Social Class III), some college completed (Social Class IV), and college degree completed (Social Class V). Older age, male gender, and lower social class were all independently associated with higher heart disease death rates. For all ages, more disadvantaged social classes had a higher risk of heart disease mortality. The highest relative risks were found for Social Classes I and II among the younger age groups. Many of the "prerequisites" for the "heart healthy lifestyle" are predicated on the benefits of a privileged social class position. For African Americans, there are the additional stressors of segregation, exclusion, and discrimination to overcome, as well as the cumulative physiological toll of lifetime resistance to various forms of racism. For many African Americans in disadvantaged social class positions, the obstacles to reducing the risk for heart disease are very difficult to overcome.

  6. [Pediatric cardiology and congenital heart disease: from fetus to adult].

    PubMed

    Subirana, M Teresa; Oliver, José M; Sáez, José M; Zunzunegui, José L

    2012-01-01

    This article contains a review of some of the most important publications on congenital heart disease and pediatric cardiology that appeared in 2010 and up until September 2011. Of particular interest were studies on demographic changes reported in this patient population and on the need to manage the patients' transition from the pediatric to the adult cardiology department. This transition has given rise to the appearance of new areas of interest: for example, pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease, and the effect of genetic factors on the etiology and transmission of particular anomalies. In addition, this review considers some publications on fetal cardiology from the perspective of early diagnosis and, if possible, treatment. There follows a discussion on new contributions to Eisenmenger's syndrome and arrhythmias, as well as on imaging techniques, interventional catheterization and heart transplantation. Finally, there is an overview of the new version of clinical practice guidelines on the management of adult patients with congenital heart disease and of recently published guidelines on pregnancy in women with heart disease, both produced by the European Society of Cardiology.

  7. Dangerous and Expensive Screening and Treatment for Rare Childhood Diseases: The Case of Krabbe Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantos, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Public policy surrounding newborn screening is in flux. New technology allows more screening for more diseases at lower cost. Traditional criteria for target diseases have been criticized by leading health policymakers. The example of newborn screening for Krabbe disease highlights many of the dilemmas associated with population-based screening…

  8. Personality disorders in heart failure patients requiring psychiatric management: comorbidity detections from a routine depression and anxiety screening protocol.

    PubMed

    Tully, Phillip J; Selkow, Terina

    2014-12-30

    Several international guidelines recommend routine depression screening in cardiac disease populations. No previous study has determined the prevalence and comorbidities of personality disorders in patients presenting for psychiatric treatment after these screening initiatives. In the first stage 404 heart failure (HF) patients were routinely screened and 73 underwent structured interview when either of the following criteria were met: (a) Patient Health Questionnaire ≥10; (b) Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire ≥7); (c) Response to one item panic-screener. Or (d) Suicidality. Patients with personality disorders were compared to the positive-screen patients on psychiatric comorbidities. The most common personality disorders were avoidant (8.2%), borderline (6.8%) and obsessive compulsive (4.1%), other personality disorders were prevalent in less than <3% of patients. Personality disorder patients had significantly greater risk of major depression (risk ratio (RR) 1.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-13.3), generalized anxiety disorder (RR 3.2; 95% CI 1.0-10.0), social phobia (RR 3.8; 95% CI 1.3-11.5) and alcohol abuse/dependence (RR 3.2; 95% 1.0-9.5). The findings that HF patients with personality disorders presented with complex psychiatric comorbidity suggest that pathways facilitating the integration of psychiatric services into cardiology settings are warranted when routine depression screening is in place.

  9. [Pathology of the heart conducting system in the thanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Kul'bitskiĭ, B N; Larev, Z V; Fedulova, M V; Denisova, O P; Bogomolov, D V

    2012-01-01

    The present literature review is focused on the contribution of various pathological changes in the heart conducting system to the tanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease viewed from the perspective of a forensic medical expert. The currently available data on the disorders in the heart conducting system in the subjects with these diseases are presented. Various aspects of pathology of the heart conducting system are considered in the modern and historical contexts. The prospects for the further investigations into the tanatogenic mechanisms of sudden death by reason of alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease are outlined. PMID:22686063

  10. [Pathology of the heart conducting system in the thanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Kul'bitskiĭ, B N; Larev, Z V; Fedulova, M V; Denisova, O P; Bogomolov, D V

    2012-01-01

    The present literature review is focused on the contribution of various pathological changes in the heart conducting system to the tanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease viewed from the perspective of a forensic medical expert. The currently available data on the disorders in the heart conducting system in the subjects with these diseases are presented. Various aspects of pathology of the heart conducting system are considered in the modern and historical contexts. The prospects for the further investigations into the tanatogenic mechanisms of sudden death by reason of alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease are outlined.

  11. The role of coronary artery disease in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lala, Anuradha; Desai, Akshay S

    2014-04-01

    Enhanced survival following acute myocardial infarction and the declining prevalence of hypertension and valvular heart disease as contributors to incident heart failure (HF) have fueled the emergence of coronary artery disease (CAD) as the primary risk factor for HF development. Despite the acknowledged role of CAD in the development of HF, the role of coronary revascularization in reducing HF-associated morbidity and mortality remains controversial. The authors review key features of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CAD in patients with HF as well as the emerging data from recent clinical trials that inform the modern approach to management.

  12. A review of the economics of adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Seckeler, Michael D; Thomas, Ian D; Andrews, Jennifer; Joiner, Keith; Klewer, Scott E

    2016-01-01

    Adults living with congenital heart disease (CHD) now outnumber children with the disease. Thanks to medical advances over the past 75 years, many of these fatal childhood heart problems have changed to chronic medical conditions. As the population of adults with CHD increases, they will require increasingly complex medical, surgical and catheter-based therapies. In addition, social burdens including education, employment and insurability, which increase the societal costs of adult CHD, are now being recognized for adults living with CHD. This review summarizes the available literature on the economics of adult CHD.

  13. Does dental disease hurt your heart?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sara C; Barasch, Andrei; Foong, W Choong; Elgeneidy, Ahmed K; Safford, Monika M

    2005-02-01

    Recent research has yielded conflicting data regarding the relationship between dental disease, particularly periodontitis, and cardiovascular disease. A causative relationship would have major ramifications for health care. There is a plausible theoretical basis for such a link, as increased levels of inflammatory mediators may increase the risk of atherosclerotic plaque formation. Nevertheless, a clinical confirmation of a causative relationship has been difficult, in part because cardiovascular disease and periodontal disease share common risk factors such as increasing age and tobacco use, and because cardiovascular medications may increase the risk of periodontitis. Patients should be encouraged to control documented risk factors for cardiovascular disease and to maintain oral health for its well-known health benefits. PMID:15691426

  14. Electrical heart disease: Genetic and molecular basis of cardiac arrhythmias in normal structural hearts.

    PubMed

    Farwell, David; Gollob, Michael H

    2007-08-01

    Purely electrical heart diseases, defined by the absence of any structural cardiac defects, are responsible for a large number of sudden, unexpected deaths in otherwise healthy, young individuals. These conditions include the long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and the short QT syndrome. Collectively, these conditions have been referred to as channelopathies. Ion channels provide the molecular basis for cardiac electrical activity. These channels have specific ion selectivity and are responsible for the precise and timely regulation of the passage of charged ions across the cell membrane in myocytes, and the summation of their activity in cardiac muscle defines the surface electrocardiogram. Impairment in the flow of these ions in heart cells may mean the difference between a normal, prosperous life and the tragedy of a sudden, unexpected death due to ventricular arrhythmia. The present paper reviews the current clinical and molecular understanding of the electrical diseases of the heart associated with sudden cardiac death.

  15. Tuning flux: autophagy as a target of heart disease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Min; Morales, Cyndi R.; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite maximum medical and mechanical support therapy, heart failure remains a relentlessly progressive disorder with substantial morbidity and mortality. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process of cellular cannibalization, has been implicated in virtually all forms of cardiovascular disease. Indeed, its role is context dependent, antagonizing or promoting disease depending on the circumstance. Here, we review current understanding of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of heart failure and explore this pathway as a target of therapeutic intervention. Recent findings In preclinical models of heart disease, cardiomyocyte autophagic flux is activated; indeed, its role in disease pathogenesis is the subject of intense investigation to define mechanism. Similarly, in failing human heart of a variety of etiologies, cardiomyocyte autophagic activity is upregulated, and therapy, such as with mechanical support systems, elicits declines in autophagy activity. However, when suppression of autophagy is complete, rapid and catastrophic cell death occurs, consistent with a model in which basal autophagic flux is required for proteostasis. Thus, a narrow zone of ‘optimal’ autophagy seems to exist. The challenge moving forward is to tune the stress-triggered autophagic response within that ‘sweet spot’ range for therapeutic benefit. Summary Whereas we have known for some years of the participation of lysosomal mechanisms in heart disease, it is only recently that upstream mechanisms (autophagy) are being explored. The challenge for the future is to dissect the underlying circuitry and titrate the response into an optimal, proteostasis-promoting range in hopes of mitigating the ever-expanding epidemic of heart failure. PMID:21415729

  16. Estimating clinical morbidity due to ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure: the future rise of heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Bonneux, L; Barendregt, J J; Meeter, K; Bonsel, G J; van der Maas, P J

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Many developed countries have seen declining mortality rates for heart disease, together with an alleged decline in incidence and a seemingly paradoxical increase in health care demands. This paper presents a model for forecasting the plausible evolution of heart disease morbidity. METHODS. The simulation model combines data from different sources. It generates acute coronary event and mortality rates from published data on incidences, recurrences, and lethalities of different heart disease conditions and interventions. Forecasts are based on plausible scenarios for declining incidence and increasing survival. RESULTS. Mortality is postponed more than incidence. Prevalence rates of morbidity will decrease among the young and middle-aged but increase among the elderly. As the milder disease states act as risk factors for the more severe states, effects will culminate in the most severe disease states with a disproportionate increase in older people. CONCLUSIONS. Increasing health care needs in the face of declining mortality rates are no contradiction, but reflect a tradeoff of mortality for morbidity. The aging of the population will accentuate this morbidity increase. PMID:8279606

  17. Adaptive genetic variation and heart disease risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose of review: Obesity, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease are complex and determined by both genetic and environmental factors and their interrelationships. Many associations from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene approaches have described a multitude of polymorphis...

  18. How Can Heart Disease be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Treated?" Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video All of Our Stories Are Red: Yaskary's Story 04/ ... part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). All of Our Stories Are Red: Eileen's Story 04/ ...

  19. Advances in the Study of Heart Development and Disease Using Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Daniel R.; Samsa, Leigh Ann; Qian, Li; Liu, Jiandong

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of cardiovascular disease are key players in the translational medicine pipeline used to define the conserved genetic and molecular basis of disease. Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are the most common type of human birth defect and feature structural abnormalities that arise during cardiac development and maturation. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is a valuable vertebrate model organism, offering advantages over traditional mammalian models. These advantages include the rapid, stereotyped and external development of transparent embryos produced in large numbers from inexpensively housed adults, vast capacity for genetic manipulation, and amenability to high-throughput screening. With the help of modern genetics and a sequenced genome, zebrafish have led to insights in cardiovascular diseases ranging from CHDs to arrhythmia and cardiomyopathy. Here, we discuss the utility of zebrafish as a model system and summarize zebrafish cardiac morphogenesis with emphasis on parallels to human heart diseases. Additionally, we discuss the specific tools and experimental platforms utilized in the zebrafish model including forward screens, functional characterization of candidate genes, and high throughput applications. PMID:27335817

  20. Heart transplantation for congenital heart disease in the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Chinnock, Richard E; Bailey, Leonard L

    2011-05-01

    Successful infant heart transplantation has now been performed for over 25 years. Assessment of long term outcomes is now possible. We report clinical outcomes for322 patients who received their heart transplant during infancy. Actuarial graft survival for newborn recipients is 59% at 25 years. Survival has improved in the most recent era. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy is the most important late cause of death with an actuarial incidence at 25 years of 35%. Post-transplant lymphoma is estimated to occur in 20% of infant recipients by25 years. Chronic kidney disease grade 3 or worse is present in 31% of survivors. The epidemiology of infant heart transplantation has changed through the years as the results for staged repair improved and donor resources remained stagnant. Most centers now employ staged repair for hypoplastic left heart syndrome and similar extreme forms of congenital heart disease. Techniques for staged repair, including the hybrid procedure, are described. The lack of donors is described with particular note regarding decreased donors due to newer programs for appropriate infant sleep positioning and infant car seats. ABO incompatible donors are a newer resource for maximizing donor resources, as is donation after circulatory determination of death and techniques to properly utilize more donors by expanding the criteria for what is an acceptable donor. An immunological advantage for the youngest recipients has long been postulated, and evaluation of this phenomenon may provide clues to the development of accommodation and/or tolerance. PMID:22548030

  1. [MRI and CT in the evaluation of congenital heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Secchi, F; Giardino, A; Nardella, V G; Sardanelli, F

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows a static and cinetic study of congenital heart diseases avoiding patient exposure to ionizing radiation. It allows for evaluating cardiac morphology, heart function with accurate ventricular volume estimation, flow quantification with gradient and regurgitant fraction estimation, and vascular anatomy (aortic, pulmonary and proximal coronary vessels). Computed tomography (CT), with greater spatial resolution, allows for evaluating proximal and distal coronary arteries, vascular and pericardial calcifications, metal structures such as stents and prosthetic valves. The use of MRI or CT in young and adult patients with congenital heart diseases should be assessed case by case through a close collaboration between cardiologists and radiologists, aiming at an optimal tradeoff between expected diagnostic gain and biological cost in terms of ionizing radiation exposure and contrast material administration.

  2. Cardiac autoimmunity in HIV related heart muscle disease

    PubMed Central

    Currie, P; Goldman, J; Caforio, A; Jacob, A; Baig, M; Brettle, R; Haven, A; Boon, N; McKenna, W

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess the frequency of circulating cardiac specific autoantibodies in HIV positive patients with and without echocardiographic evidence of left ventricular dysfunction.
Subjects—74 HIV positive patients including 28 with echocardiographic evidence of heart muscle disease, 52 HIV negative people at low risk of HIV infection, and 14 HIV negative drug users who had all undergone non-invasive cardiac assessment were studied along with a group of 200 healthy blood donors.
Results—Cardiac autoantibodies detected by indirect immunofluorescence (serum dilution 1/10) were more common in the HIV positive patients (15%), particularly the HIV heart muscle disease group (21%), than in HIV negative controls (3.5%) (both p < 0.001). By ELISA (dilution 1/320), abnormal anti-α myosin autoantibody concentrations were found more often in HIV patients with heart muscle disease (43%) than in HIV positive patients with normal hearts (19%) or in HIV negative controls (3%) (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). Anti-α myosin autoantibody concentrations were greater in HIV positive patients than in HIV negative controls, regardless of cardiac status ((mean SD) 0.253 (0.155) v 0.170 (0.076); p = 0.003). In particular the mean antibody concentration was higher in the HIV heart muscle disease patients (0.291 (0.160) v 0.170 (0.076); p = 0.001) than in HIV negative controls. On follow up, six subjects with normal echocardiograms but raised autoantibody concentrations had died after a median of 298 days, three with left ventricular abnormalities at necropsy. This compared with a median survival of 536 days for 21 HIV positive patients with normal cardiological and immunological results.
Conclusions—There is an increased frequency of circulating cardiac specific autoantibodies in HIV positive individuals, particularly those with heart muscle disease. The data support a role for cardiac autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of HIV related heart

  3. Autoimmune pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease: looking back, looking ahead.

    PubMed

    Bonney, Kevin M; Engman, David M

    2015-06-01

    Chagas heart disease is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in approximately one-third of individuals infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the discovery of T. cruzi by Carlos Chagas >100 years ago, much has been learned about Chagas disease pathogenesis; however, the outcome of T. cruzi infection is highly variable and difficult to predict. Many mechanisms have been proposed to promote tissue inflammation, but the determinants and the relative importance of each have yet to be fully elucidated. The notion that some factor other than the parasite significantly contributes to the development of myocarditis was hypothesized by the first physician-scientists who noted the conspicuous absence of parasites in the hearts of those who succumbed to Chagas disease. One of these factors-autoimmunity-has been extensively studied for more than half a century. Although questions regarding the functional role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease remain unanswered, the development of autoimmune responses during infection clearly occurs in some individuals, and the implications that this autoimmunity may be pathogenic are significant. In this review, we summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease and conclude with a view of the future of Chagas disease diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention, emphasizing recent advances in these areas that aid in the management of Chagas disease.

  4. Small mammalian animal models of heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Paula; Fan, Huimin; Liu, Zhongmin; He, Jia-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent clinical need to develop new therapeutic approaches for treating cardiovascular disease, but the biology of cardiovascular regeneration is complex. Model systems are required to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis, progression, and mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease as well as to test therapeutic approaches to regenerate tissue and restore cardiac function following injury. An ideal model system should be inexpensive, easily manipulated, reproducible, physiologically representative of human disease, and ethically sound. The choice of animal model needs to be considered carefully since it affects experimental outcomes and whether findings of the study can be reasonably translated to humans. This review presents a guideline for the commonly used small animal models (mice, rats, rabbits, and cats) used in cardiac research as an effort to standardize the most relevant procedures and obtain translatable and reproducible results.

  5. Small mammalian animal models of heart disease.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Paula; Fan, Huimin; Liu, Zhongmin; He, Jia-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent clinical need to develop new therapeutic approaches for treating cardiovascular disease, but the biology of cardiovascular regeneration is complex. Model systems are required to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis, progression, and mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease as well as to test therapeutic approaches to regenerate tissue and restore cardiac function following injury. An ideal model system should be inexpensive, easily manipulated, reproducible, physiologically representative of human disease, and ethically sound. The choice of animal model needs to be considered carefully since it affects experimental outcomes and whether findings of the study can be reasonably translated to humans. This review presents a guideline for the commonly used small animal models (mice, rats, rabbits, and cats) used in cardiac research as an effort to standardize the most relevant procedures and obtain translatable and reproducible results. PMID:27679742

  6. Small mammalian animal models of heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Paula; Fan, Huimin; Liu, Zhongmin; He, Jia-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent clinical need to develop new therapeutic approaches for treating cardiovascular disease, but the biology of cardiovascular regeneration is complex. Model systems are required to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis, progression, and mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease as well as to test therapeutic approaches to regenerate tissue and restore cardiac function following injury. An ideal model system should be inexpensive, easily manipulated, reproducible, physiologically representative of human disease, and ethically sound. The choice of animal model needs to be considered carefully since it affects experimental outcomes and whether findings of the study can be reasonably translated to humans. This review presents a guideline for the commonly used small animal models (mice, rats, rabbits, and cats) used in cardiac research as an effort to standardize the most relevant procedures and obtain translatable and reproducible results. PMID:27679742

  7. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-06-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease.

  8. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease. PMID:27504381

  9. PET/MR Imaging in Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Rischpler, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid PET/MR imaging is a complex imaging modality that has raised high expectations not only for oncological and neurologic imaging applications, but also for cardiac imaging applications. Initially, physicians and physicists had to become accustomed to technical challenges including attenuation correction, gating, and more complex workflow and more elaborate image analysis as compared with PET/CT or standalone MR imaging. PET/MR imaging seems to be particularly valuable to assess inflammatory myocardial diseases (such as sarcoidosis), to cross-validate PET versus MR imaging data (eg, myocardial perfusion imaging), and to help validate novel biomarkers of various disease states (eg, postinfarction inflammation). PMID:27593250

  10. PET/MR Imaging in Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Rischpler, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid PET/MR imaging is a complex imaging modality that has raised high expectations not only for oncological and neurologic imaging applications, but also for cardiac imaging applications. Initially, physicians and physicists had to become accustomed to technical challenges including attenuation correction, gating, and more complex workflow and more elaborate image analysis as compared with PET/CT or standalone MR imaging. PET/MR imaging seems to be particularly valuable to assess inflammatory myocardial diseases (such as sarcoidosis), to cross-validate PET versus MR imaging data (eg, myocardial perfusion imaging), and to help validate novel biomarkers of various disease states (eg, postinfarction inflammation).

  11. Heart Disease Management by Women: Does Intervention Format Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noreen M.; Janz, Nancy K.; Dodge, Julia A.; Lin, Xihong; Trabert, Britton L.; Kaciroti, Niko; Mosca, Lori; Wheeler, John R.; Keteyian, Steven

    2009-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial of two formats of a program (Women Take PRIDE) to enhance management of heart disease by patients was conducted. Older women (N = 575) were randomly assigned to a group or self-directed format or to a control group. Data regarding symptoms, functional health status, and weight were collected at baseline and at 4, 12,…

  12. Aspirin and coronary heart disease: findings of a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, E C; Garfinkel, L

    1975-01-01

    Over 1 000 000 men and women answered a confidential questionnaire and were traced for up to six years afterwards. Among other questions each person was asked how often he or she took aspirin-"never", "seldom," or "often." Coronary heart disease death rates were no lower among people who took aspirin often than among those who did not do so. PMID:1131582

  13. Environmental Stress and Biobehavioral Antecedents of Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantz, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides an overview of research on the biobehavioral antecedents of coronary heart disease, including stressful occupational settings characterized by high demands and little control over the job, and the Type A pattern, particularly hostility and mode of anger expression (anger-in). Discusses research on physiologic responsiveness (reactivity)…

  14. Dyslipidaemia and coronary heart disease: nature vs nurture.

    PubMed

    Hegele, R A

    In order to enhance health care for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic markers of susceptibility could be incorporated into a formula for risk evaluation that includes traditional factors. Preventive measures could then be targeted towards 'high-risk' subjects. But can the genetic component be dissected from the environmental component in an intermediate CHD phenotype, such as plasma lipoproteins.

  15. Heart Disease Management by Women: Does Intervention Format Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noreen M.; Janz, Nancy K.; Dodge, Julia A.; Lin, Xihong; Trabert, Britton L.; Kaciroti, Niko; Mosca, Lori; Wheeler, John R.; Keteyian, Steven

    2014-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial of two formats of a program (Women Take PRIDE) to enhance management of heart disease by patients was conducted. Older women (N = 575) were randomly assigned to a group or self-directed format or to a control group. Data regarding symptoms, functional health status, and weight were collected at baseline and at 4, 12,…

  16. Medications Used in the Treatment of Ischemic Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on medications used in the treatment of ischemic heart disease is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first.…

  17. Dyslipidaemia and coronary heart disease: nature vs nurture.

    PubMed

    Hegele, R A

    In order to enhance health care for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic markers of susceptibility could be incorporated into a formula for risk evaluation that includes traditional factors. Preventive measures could then be targeted towards 'high-risk' subjects. But can the genetic component be dissected from the environmental component in an intermediate CHD phenotype, such as plasma lipoproteins. PMID:7582364

  18. Coping Behaviors of Parents with Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strobino, Jane

    The study addresses parental coping patterns of children with congenital heart disease in the state of Hawaii. Attention was given to geography and ethnicity as well as parental and child characteristics as factors impacting on the coping pattern. Telephone interviews with parents (N=32) obtained data concerning parent characteristics, their…

  19. Toward transcriptional therapies for the failing heart: chemical screens to modulate genes

    PubMed Central

    McKinsey, Timothy A.; Olson, Eric N.

    2005-01-01

    In response to acute and chronic stresses, the heart frequently undergoes a remodeling process that is accompanied by myocyte hypertrophy, impaired contractility, and pump failure, often culminating in sudden death. The existence of redundant signaling pathways that trigger heart failure poses challenges for therapeutic intervention. Cardiac remodeling is associated with the activation of a pathological gene program that weakens cardiac performance. Thus, targeting the disease process at the level of gene expression represents a potentially powerful therapeutic approach. In this review, we describe strategies for normalizing gene expression in the failing heart with small molecules that control signal transduction pathways directed at transcription factors and associated chromatin-modifying enzymes. PMID:15765135

  20. [Nutritional screening in heart failure patients: 5 methods review].

    PubMed

    Guerra-Sánchez, Luis; Martínez-Rincón, Carmen; Fresno-Flores, Mar

    2014-01-01

    Introduccion: La malnutrición aumenta la mortalidad y la estancia hospitalaria. Cada vez más instituciones sanitarias adoptan medidas de cribado nutricional con el fin de detectar precozmente la malnutrición o el riesgo de desarrollarla. No existe un método universalmente aceptado para la valoración nutricional. Objetivo: Determinar un método rápido y fiable, que no precise de entrenamiento previo, para el cribado nutricional de pacientes con insuficiencia cardiaca. Métodos: Estudio observacional, transversal, en el que se evaluaron mediante la valoración subjetiva global (VSG), el Mini nutritional assesment (MNA) tanto en su versión abreviada o de cribado (MNA-SF) como en su versión extendida o de valoración (MNA-LF), el nutritional Risk Screnning (NRS 2002), el Conocimiento nutricional o método Ulibarri (CONUT), el método Cardona y el Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), el estado nutricional de 242 pacientes ingresados en un hospital terciario de alta complejidad con diagnósticos compatibles con descompensación de insuficiencia cardiaca crónica. Se analizaron la sensibilidad, especificidad, los valores predictivos, las razones de verosimilitud, la odds ratio diagnostica y el índice de correlación kappa, de los distintos métodos comparados con la valoración subjetiva global, que fue considerada como prueba cierta. Resultados: La edad media fue de 75±9. El 50,8% (n=123) fueron hombres. El índice de correlación kappa de los distintos métodos de cribado con respecto a la valoración subjetiva global fueron MNA valoración =0,637; MNA cribado =0,556; NRS =0,483; MUST =0,197; Cardona =0,188; CONUT =0,076. Discusión: El Mini Nutritional Assesment fue el método que mejor relación ofreció, tanto en su etapa de cribado como en la de valoración con la Valoración subjetiva global.

  1. Prognostic value of heart valve calcifications for cardiovascular events in a lung cancer screening population.

    PubMed

    Willemink, Martin J; Takx, Richard A P; Išgum, Ivana; de Koning, Harry J; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Mali, Willem P Th M; Budde, Ricardo P J; Leiner, Tim; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; de Jong, Pim A

    2015-08-01

    To assess the prognostic value of aortic valve and mitral valve/annulus calcifications for cardiovascular events in heavily smoking men without a history of cardiovascular disease. Heavily smoking men without a cardiovascular disease history who underwent non-contrast-enhanced low-radiation-dose chest CT for lung cancer screening were included. Non-imaging predictors (age, smoking status and pack-years) were collected and imaging-predictors (calcium volume of the coronary arteries, aorta, aortic valve and mitral valve/annulus) were obtained. The outcome was the occurrence of cardiovascular events. Multivariable Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to calculate hazard-ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Subsequently, concordance-statistics were calculated. In total 3111 individuals were included, of whom 186 (6.0%) developed a cardiovascular event during a follow-up of 2.9 (Q1-Q3, 2.7-3.3) years. If aortic (n = 657) or mitral (n = 85) annulus/valve calcifications were present, cardiovascular event incidence increased to 9.0% (n = 59) or 12.9% (n = 11), respectively. HRs of aortic and mitral valve/annulus calcium volume for cardiovascular events were 1.46 (95% CI, 1.09-1.84) and 2.74 (95% CI, 0.92-4.56) per 500 mm(3). The c-statistic of a basic model including age, pack-years, current smoking status, coronary and aorta calcium volume was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.63-0.72), which did not change after adding heart valve calcium volume. Aortic valve calcifications are predictors of future cardiovascular events. However, there was no added prognostic value beyond age, number of pack-years, current smoking status, coronary and aorta calcium volume for short term cardiovascular events. PMID:25962863

  2. Heart failure in congenital heart disease: a confluence of acquired and congenital.

    PubMed

    Fahed, Akl C; Roberts, Amy E; Mital, Seema; Lakdawala, Neal K

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in congenital heart disease (CHD), with increasing prevalence because of improved treatment options and outcomes. Genetic factors and acquired postnatal factors in CHD might play a major role in the progression to HF. This article proposes 3 routes that lead to HF in CHD: rare monogenic entities that cause both CHD and HF; severe CHD lesions in which acquired hemodynamic effects of CHD or surgery result in HF; and, most commonly, a combined effect of complex genetics in overlapping pathways and acquired stressors caused by the primary lesion.

  3. [Right heart failure in a patient with unexplained tricuspid regurgitation and a rare congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Tufaro, Vincenzo; Slavich, Massimo; Fisicaro, Andrea; Ingallina, Giacomo; Margonato, Alberto; Agricola, Eustachio

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 63-year-old woman admitted to the intensive care unit because of acute decompensated right heart failure. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography revealed severe right ventricular dysfunction with severe tricuspid regurgitation of unknown origin and a large membrane running from the inferior vena cava to the interatrial septum with significant diastolic transmembrane gradient, consistent with the diagnosis of cor triatriatum dexter. The clinical interest of our findings relies on the coexistence of multiple diseases, which actually contributed in a different but synergistic manner to right heart failure.

  4. More Than Just the Heart: Transition and Psychosocial Issues in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Adrienne H; Utens, Elisabeth M

    2015-11-01

    Most infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) are now expected to reach adulthood. However, adults with CHD of moderate or great complexity remain at elevated risk of heart failure, arrhythmias, additional surgeries and interventional procedures, and premature mortality. This creates a need for lifelong specialized cardiac care and leads to 2 sets of potential challenges: (1) the transition from pediatric to adult care and (2) the psychosocial implications of coping with a chronic and often life-shortening medical condition. Many adolescents struggle with the transition to adult care, and mood and anxiety disorders are not uncommon in the adult setting.

  5. [Risk management of coronary heart disease-prevention].

    PubMed

    Dorner, Thomas; Rieder, Anita

    2004-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and is responsible for 45% of deaths in the western world and 24.5% of deaths in the developing countries. In the 21st century these diseases will continue to dominate the disease spectrum and death statistics in both the industrialised and developing worlds. Since 1975 mortality from cardiovascular disease has decreased by about 24 to 28% in most countries. About 45% of this reduction can be attributed to an improvement in treatment of coronary heart disease and around 55% are attributable to a reduction in risk factors, in particular, stopping smoking and control of hypertension. However, especially in the case of ischaemic heart disease, it is not clear whether the reduction in mortality reflects a reduction in incidence of this disease. Due to the aging population and the reduction in age-related mortality, it is expected that the absolute number of people with heart disease will increase. Furthermore, the increase in prevalence of obesity, metabolic syndrome, type II diabetes as well as the higher prevalence of female smokers compared with thirty years ago could result in an increase in mortality over the next years and decades. It has been shown that prevention strategies, such as education campaigns aimed at the general public, can potentially greatly contribute to a reduction in incidence of cardiovascular disease at every stage. In order for such campaigns to be effective, it is necessary to understand and reduce the risk factors for cardiovascular disease. A large proportion of these risk factors are associated with lifestyle and are therefore modifiable. These modifiable risk factors include smoking, hypertension, poor diet, dyslipidemia, lack of exercise, overweight, adiposity and diabetes mellitus and optimisation of these should be a key aim for all adults. Gender differences also play a role in the incidence and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Incidence of myocardial

  6. Inherited Structural Heart Diseases With Potential Atrial Fibrillation Occurrence.

    PubMed

    Manuguerra, Roberta; Callegari, Sergio; Corradi, Domenico

    2016-02-01

    Inherited cardiac diseases inducing structural remodeling of the myocardium sometimes develop arrhythmias of various kinds. Among these rhythm disturbances, atrial fibrillation is well known to frequently worsen the prognosis of the primary disorder by increasing morbidity and mortality, especially because of a higher rate of heart failure. In this manuscript, we have reviewed the literature on the most important inherited structural cardiac diseases in whose clinical history atrial fibrillation may occur fairly often.

  7. [Shift work and risk of cancer and coronary heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Johnni; Lassen, Christina Funch

    2014-01-20

    Shift and night work are among the most frequent occupational exposures. Such work schedules involve exposure to light-at-night, which may reduce normal nocturnal melatonin production, create circadian rhythm disruption, sleep deprivation and unhealthy lifestyle. There is strong experimental evidence that light-at-night and circadian disruption may increase the risk of cancer and coronary heart diseases. There is emerging, but limited epidemiologic evidence that night shift work may increase breast cancer and certain cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24629681

  8. A study of heart diseases without clinical signs of heart failure in 47 cattle.

    PubMed

    Buczinski, Sébastien; Francoz, David; Fecteau, Gilles; Difruscia, Rocky

    2010-11-01

    In this retrospective study, features of 47 cattle suffering from heart disease (HD) without clinical signs of heart failure (HF) were reviewed. The most common reasons for referral were respiratory problems (n =14), anorexia (n = 13), fever (n = 10), and lameness (n = 9). Thirty-nine animals were tachypneic. In 31 cases, cardiac auscultation revealed abnormalities. The final diagnoses were bacterial endocarditis (BE; n = 19), congenital heart disease (CHD; n = 18), pericarditis (n = 8), cardiomyopathy (n = 1), and lymphoma (n = 1). Echocardiography was performed in 39 cases. Gross pathology examination confirmed the echocardiographic diagnosis in 4 of 5 cases of pericarditis, 6 of 6 cases of BE, and 4 of 6 cases of CHD. Short-term prognosis was guarded with 19 cases (40.4%) being discharged. Premature death within 2 mo after discharge (n = 5), early culling because of poor breeding performance (n = 5), and normal productive life in the herd (n = 5) were observed in the cases that were followed. Echocardiography may be the most sensitive tool for the antemortem diagnosis of heart disease in cattle.

  9. A study of heart diseases without clinical signs of heart failure in 47 cattle

    PubMed Central

    Buczinski, Sébastien; Francoz, David; Fecteau, Gilles; DiFruscia, Rocky

    2010-01-01

    In this retrospective study, features of 47 cattle suffering from heart disease (HD) without clinical signs of heart failure (HF) were reviewed. The most common reasons for referral were respiratory problems (n =14), anorexia (n = 13), fever (n = 10), and lameness (n = 9). Thirty-nine animals were tachypneic. In 31 cases, cardiac auscultation revealed abnormalities. The final diagnoses were bacterial endocarditis (BE; n = 19), congenital heart disease (CHD; n = 18), pericarditis (n = 8), cardiomyopathy (n = 1), and lymphoma (n = 1). Echocardiography was performed in 39 cases. Gross pathology examination confirmed the echocardiographic diagnosis in 4 of 5 cases of pericarditis, 6 of 6 cases of BE, and 4 of 6 cases of CHD. Short-term prognosis was guarded with 19 cases (40.4%) being discharged. Premature death within 2 mo after discharge (n = 5), early culling because of poor breeding performance (n = 5), and normal productive life in the herd (n = 5) were observed in the cases that were followed. Echocardiography may be the most sensitive tool for the antemortem diagnosis of heart disease in cattle. PMID:21286323

  10. The Hippo pathway in heart development, regeneration, and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Li, Li; Zhao, Bin; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The heart is the first organ formed during mammalian development. A properly sized and functional heart is vital throughout the entire lifespan. Loss of cardiomyocytes due to injury or diseases leads to heart failure, which is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, regenerative potential of the adult heart is very limited. The Hippo pathway is a recently identified signaling cascade that plays an evolutionarily conserved role in organ size control by inhibiting cell proliferation, promoting apoptosis, regulating fates of stem/ progenitor cells, and in some circumstances, limiting cell size. Interestingly, research indicates a key role of this pathway in regulation of cardiomyocyte proliferation and heart size. Inactivation of the Hippo pathway or activation of its downstream effector, the Yes-associated protein (YAP) transcription co-activator, improves cardiac regeneration. Several known upstream signals of the Hippo pathway such as mechanical stress, G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, and oxidative stress, are known to play critical roles in cardiac physiology. In addition, YAP has been shown to regulate cardiomyocyte fate through multiple transcriptional mechanisms. In this review, we summarize and discuss current findings regarding the roles and mechanisms of the Hippo pathway in heart development, injury, and regeneration. PMID:25858067

  11. Autonomic regulation in fetuses with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Saira; Wilpers, Abigail; Myers, Michael; Nugent, J. David; Fifer, William P.; Williams, Ismée A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to antenatal stressors affects autonomic regulation in fetuses. Whether the presence of congenital heart disease (CHD) alters the developmental trajectory of autonomic regulation is not known. Aims/Study Design This prospective observational cohort study aimed to further characterize autonomic regulation in fetuses with CHD; specifically hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), transposition of the great arteries (TGA), and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Subjects From 11/2010 – 11/2012, 92 fetuses were enrolled: 41 controls and 51 with CHD consisting of 19 with HLHS, 12 with TGA, and 20 with TOF. Maternal abdominal fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were obtained at 3 gestational ages: 19-27 weeks (F1), 28-33 weeks (F2), and 34-38 weeks (F3). Outcome measures Fetal ECG was analyzed for mean heart rate along with 3 measures of autonomic variability of the fetal heart rate: interquartile range, standard deviation, and root mean square of the standard deviation of the heart rate (RMSSD), a measure of parasympathetic activity. Results During F1 and F2 periods, HLHS fetuses demonstrated significantly lower mean HR than controls (p<0.05). Heart rate variability at F3, as measured by standard deviation, interquartile range, and RMSSD was lower in HLHS than controls (p<0.05). Other CHD subgroups showed a similar, though non-significant trend towards lower variability. Conclusions Autonomic regulation in CHD fetuses differs from controls with HLHS fetuses most markedly affected. PMID:25662702

  12. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  13. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  14. Angiotensins as therapeutic targets beyond heart disease.

    PubMed

    Passos-Silva, Danielle Gomes; Brandan, Enrique; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2015-05-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular and hydro-electrolyte homeostasis. Blockade of the RAS as a therapeutic strategy for treating hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases is well established. However, actions of the RAS go far beyond the targets initially described. In this regard, the recent identification of novel components of the RAS, including angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], Ang-(1-9), and alamandine, have opened new possibilities for interfering with the development and manifestations of cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases. In this article, we briefly review novel targets for angiotensins and its therapeutic implications in diverse areas, including cancer, inflammation, and glaucoma. PMID:25847571

  15. Spectral Heart Rate Variability analysis using the heart timing signal for the screening of the Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Estevez, Diego; Moret-Bonillo, Vicente

    2016-04-01

    Some approaches have been published in the past using Heart Rate Variability (HRV) spectral features for the screening of Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (SAHS) patients. However there is a big variability among these methods regarding the selection of the source signal and the specific spectral components relevant to the analysis. In this study we investigate the use of the Heart Timing (HT) as the source signal in comparison to the classical approaches of Heart Rate (HR) and Heart Period (HP). This signal has the theoretical advantage of being optimal under the Integral Pulse Frequency Modulation (IPFM) model assumption. Only spectral bands defined as standard for the study of HRV are considered, and for each method the so-called LF/HF and VLFn features are derived. A comparative statistical analysis between the different resulting methods is performed, and subject classification is investigated by means of ROC analysis and a Naïve-Bayes classifier. The standard Apnea-ECG database is used for validation purposes. Our results show statistical differences between SAHS patients and controls for all the derived features. In the subject classification task the best performance in the testing set was obtained using the LF/HF ratio derived from the HR signal (Area under ROC curve=0.88). Only slight differences are obtained due to the effect of changing the source signal. The impact of using the HT signal in this domain is therefore limited, and has not shown relevant differences with respect to the use of the classical approaches of HR or HP.

  16. [The German National Disease Management Guideline "Chronic Heart Failure"].

    PubMed

    Weinbrenner, S; Langer, T; Scherer, M; Störk, S; Ertl, G; Muth, Ch; Hoppe, U C; Kopp, I; Ollenschläger, G

    2012-02-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is an illness mostly affecting elderly people. In Germany CHF is one of the most common causes of death and at the same time one of the most common diagnosis in inpatient care. Due to the expected increase in life expectancy in the next few years experts predict a further step-up of the incidence. Against this background development of a national guideline on chronic heart failure was prioritised and accordingly the National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure was developed by a multi- and interdisciplinary group. The guideline group comprised experts from all relevant scientific medical societies as well as a patient expert. The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) on Chronic Heart Failure aims at supporting patients and health care providers with respect to decisions on a specific health care problem by giving recommendations for actions. Recommendations are informed by the best available scientific evidence on this topic.Patients with CHF often suffer from multiple conditions. Due to this fact and the old age patients do have very complex and demanding health care needs. Thus accounting for co-morbidities is paramount in planning and providing health care for theses patients and communication between doctor and patient but also between all health care providers is crucial.Basic treatment strategies in chronic heart failure comprise management of risk factors and prognostic factors as well as appropriate consideration of co-morbidities accompanied by measures empowering patients in establishing a healthy life style and a self-dependant management of their illness.Psycho-social aspects have a very strong influence on patients' acceptance of the disease and their self-management. In addition they have a strong influence on therapy management of the treating physician thus they have to be addressed adequately during the consultation.The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure (CHF

  17. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  18. Stem cells: An eventual treatment option for heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Bilgimol, Joseph C; Ragupathi, Subbareddy; Vengadassalapathy, Lakshmanan; Senthil, Nathan S; Selvakumar, Kalimuthu; Ganesan, M; Manjunath, Sadananda Rao

    2015-09-26

    Stem cells are of global excitement for various diseases including heart diseases. It is worth to understand the mechanism or role of stem cells in the treatment of heart failure. Bone marrow derived stem cells are commonly practiced with an aim to improve the function of the heart. The majority of studies have been conducted with acute myocardial infarction and a few has been investigated with the use of stem cells for treating chronic or dilated cardiomyopathy. Heterogeneity in the treated group using stem cells has greatly emerged. Ever increasing demand for any alternative made is of at most priority for cardiomyopathy. Stem cells are of top priority with the current impact that has generated among physicians. However, meticulous selection of proper source is required since redundancy is clearly evident with the present survey. This review focuses on the methods adopted using stem cells for heart diseases and outcomes that are generated so far with an idea to determine the best therapeutic possibility in order to fulfill the present demand.

  19. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients’ prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. Methods: In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Result: Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. Conclusion: The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27741117

  20. Molecular signatures and the study of gene expression profiles in inflammatory heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, V; Maisch, B

    2012-09-01

    Myocarditis, a common heart disease pathologically defined as an inflammatory reaction of the myocardium, is most frequently caused by infectious agents, including viruses and bacteria, and may develop in later stages into dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Several studies have identified inflammatory components engaged in the transition from acute myocarditis to chronic DCM, and there is growing evidence that myocarditis and DCM are closely related. Novel technological advances in genomic screening have gained insight into molecular and cellular mechanisms involved the pathogenesis of inflammatory heart disease and, in particular, in the development of systolic dysfunction resulting from DCM. Detection of differential gene expression profiles have become valid tools in the study of inflammatory heart disease. Molecular signatures are defined as individual sets of genes, mRNA transcripts, proteins, genetic variations or other variables, which can be used as markers for a particular phenotype. These signatures may be useful for clinical diagnosis or risk assessment and, in addition, may help to identify molecules not previously known to be involved in the pathogenesis of these disease conditions. Microarray analyses have dramatically refined our knowledge about tissue-specific gene expression patterns, simply by being able to study thousands of genes simultaneously in a single experiment. In the field of cardiovascular research, microarrays are increasingly used in the study of end-stage cardiomyopathies, such as DCM, that ultimately lead to symptoms of heart failure. By means of microarray analysis, a set of differentially expressed genes can be detected, among them are transcripts coding for sarcomeric and extracellular matrix proteins, stress response and inflammatory proteins as well as transcription factors and translational regulators. Expression profiling may be particularly helpful to improve the differential diagnosis of heart failure and enable novel insight

  1. Women and Ischemic Heart Disease: Recognition, Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Mi; Merz, C Noel Bairey

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent causes of death in both males and females throughout the world. However, women exhibit a greater symptom burden, more functional disability, and a higher prevalence of nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to men when evaluated for signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. This paradoxical sex difference appears to be linked to a sex-specific pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia including coronary microvascular dysfunction, a component of the 'Yentl Syndrome'. Accordingly, the term ischemic heart disease (IHD) is more appropriate for a discussion specific to women rather than CAD or coronary heart disease. Following the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Heart Truth/American Heart Association, Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation and guideline campaigns, the cardiovascular mortality in women has been decreased, although significant gender gaps in clinical outcomes still exist. Women less likely undergo testing, yet guidelines indicate that symptomatic women at intermediate to high IHD risk should have further test (e.g. exercise treadmill test or stress imaging) for myocardial ischemia and prognosis. Further, women have suboptimal use of evidence-based guideline therapies compared with men with and without obstructive CAD. Anti-anginal and anti-atherosclerotic strategies are effective for symptom and ischemia management in women with evidence of ischemia and nonobstructive CAD, although more female-specific study is needed. IHD guidelines are not "cardiac catheterization" based but related to evidence of "myocardial ischemia and angina". A simplified approach to IHD management with ABCs (aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-renin blockers, beta blockers, cholesterol management and statin) should be used and can help to increases adherence to guidelines.

  2. Social class and heart disease mortality among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Elizabeth; Williams, Carol R; Moore, Latetia; Chen, Fangfei

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine variation in heart disease death rates by the social class of decedents. The term, "social class" refers to a complex set of phenomena such as control over economic resources, social status, and power relative to others in society. The target population for this study was African-American adults aged 35-74 years old who resided in the United States during the years 1996-1997. As a proxy for social class, we examined 5 levels of educational attainment: 0-8 years of school completed (Social Class I), 9-11 years of school completed (Social Class II), high school graduate/12 years of school completed (Social Class III), some college completed (Social Class IV), and college degree completed (Social Class V). Older age, male gender, and lower social class were all independently associated with higher heart disease death rates. For all ages, more disadvantaged social classes had a higher risk of heart disease mortality. The highest relative risks were found for Social Classes I and II among the younger age groups. Many of the "prerequisites" for the "heart healthy lifestyle" are predicated on the benefits of a privileged social class position. For African Americans, there are the additional stressors of segregation, exclusion, and discrimination to overcome, as well as the cumulative physiological toll of lifetime resistance to various forms of racism. For many African Americans in disadvantaged social class positions, the obstacles to reducing the risk for heart disease are very difficult to overcome. PMID:12477160

  3. Women and Ischemic Heart Disease: Recognition, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Mi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent causes of death in both males and females throughout the world. However, women exhibit a greater symptom burden, more functional disability, and a higher prevalence of nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to men when evaluated for signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. This paradoxical sex difference appears to be linked to a sex-specific pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia including coronary microvascular dysfunction, a component of the 'Yentl Syndrome'. Accordingly, the term ischemic heart disease (IHD) is more appropriate for a discussion specific to women rather than CAD or coronary heart disease. Following the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Heart Truth/American Heart Association, Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation and guideline campaigns, the cardiovascular mortality in women has been decreased, although significant gender gaps in clinical outcomes still exist. Women less likely undergo testing, yet guidelines indicate that symptomatic women at intermediate to high IHD risk should have further test (e.g. exercise treadmill test or stress imaging) for myocardial ischemia and prognosis. Further, women have suboptimal use of evidence-based guideline therapies compared with men with and without obstructive CAD. Anti-anginal and anti-atherosclerotic strategies are effective for symptom and ischemia management in women with evidence of ischemia and nonobstructive CAD, although more female-specific study is needed. IHD guidelines are not "cardiac catheterization" based but related to evidence of "myocardial ischemia and angina". A simplified approach to IHD management with ABCs (aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-renin blockers, beta blockers, cholesterol management and statin) should be used and can help to increases adherence to guidelines. PMID:27482251

  4. Metabolic Profiling of Children Undergoing Surgery for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Goncalo D. S.; Wooi Ng, Keng; Wijeyesekera, Anisha; Gala-Peralta, Sandra; Williams, Rachel; MacCarthy-Morrogh, S.; Jiménez, Beatriz; Inwald, David; Macrae, Duncan; Frost, Gary; Holmes, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Inflammation and metabolism are closely interlinked. Both undergo significant dysregulation following surgery for congenital heart disease, contributing to organ failure and morbidity. In this study, we combined cytokine and metabolic profiling to examine the effect of postoperative tight glycemic control compared with conventional blood glucose management on metabolic and inflammatory outcomes in children undergoing congenital heart surgery. The aim was to evaluate changes in key metabolites following congenital heart surgery and to examine the potential of metabolic profiling for stratifying patients in terms of expected clinical outcomes. Design: Laboratory and clinical study. Setting: University Hospital and Laboratory. Patients: Of 28 children undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease, 15 underwent tight glycemic control postoperatively and 13 were treated conventionally. Interventions: Metabolic profiling of blood plasma was undertaken using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A panel of metabolites was measured using a curve-fitting algorithm. Inflammatory cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The data were assessed with respect to clinical markers of disease severity (Risk Adjusted Congenital heart surgery score-1, Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction, inotrope score, duration of ventilation and pediatric ICU-free days). Measurements and Main Results: Changes in metabolic and inflammatory profiles were seen over the time course from surgery to recovery, compared with the preoperative state. Tight glycemic control did not significantly alter the response profile. We identified eight metabolites (3-d-hydroxybutyrate, acetone, acetoacetate, citrate, lactate, creatine, creatinine, and alanine) associated with surgical and disease severity. The strength of proinflammatory response, particularly interleukin-8 and interleukin-6 concentrations, inversely correlated with PICU-free days at 28 days. The interleukin

  5. Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions

    SciTech Connect

    Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J.

    2009-11-15

    This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

  6. Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group: An Integrated Network for Congenital Heart Disease Research.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Sara K; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Farber, Gregory K; Bertoch, David; Blume, Elizabeth D; Burns, Kristin M; Campbell, Robert; Chang, Anthony C; Chung, Wendy K; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Curtis, Lesley H; Forrest, Christopher B; Gaynor, William J; Gaies, Michael G; Go, Alan S; Henchey, Paul; Martin, Gerard R; Pearson, Gail; Pemberton, Victoria L; Schwartz, Steven M; Vincent, Robert; Kaltman, Jonathan R

    2016-04-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a working group in January 2015 to explore issues related to an integrated data network for congenital heart disease research. The overall goal was to develop a common vision for how the rapidly increasing volumes of data captured across numerous sources can be managed, integrated, and analyzed to improve care and outcomes. This report summarizes the current landscape of congenital heart disease data, data integration methodologies used across other fields, key considerations for data integration models in congenital heart disease, and the short- and long-term vision and recommendations made by the working group.

  7. Egg consumption and coronary heart disease: an epidemiologic overview.

    PubMed

    Kritchevsky, S B; Kritchevsky, D

    2000-10-01

    Serum cholesterol has been established as a modifiable risk factor for coronary heart disease. Experimental feeding studies show that saturated fat and cholesterol increase serum cholesterol levels; thus, dietary recommendations for lowering the risk of heart disease proscribe the intake of both substances. Recommendations have also included limits on the intake of eggs because of their high cholesterol content. In free-living populations, diet reflects a pattern of associated choices. Increases in one food may lead to changes in the consumption of other foods that may modulate disease risk. Epidemiologic data are helpful in assessing the importance of foods and nutrients in the context in which they are actually consumed. We review epidemiologic data relating dietary cholesterol and eggs to coronary disease risk. Cholesterol intake was associated with a modest increase in the risk of coronary events. The true magnitude of the association is difficult to estimate because most studies fail to account for potential confounding by other features of the diet. When a full-range of confounding factors was considered, the association between cholesterol intake and heart disease risk was small (6% increase in risk for 200mg/1,000kcal/day difference in cholesterol intake). Several studies have examined egg intake and its relationship with coronary outcomes. All but one failed to consider the role of other potentially confounding dietary factors. When dietary confounders were considered, no association was seen between egg consumption at levels up to 1 + egg per day and the risk of coronary heart disease in non-diabetic men and women.

  8. Provocative issues in heart disease prevention.

    PubMed

    Juneau, Martin; Hayami, Douglas; Gayda, Mathieu; Lacroix, Sébastien; Nigam, Anil

    2014-12-01

    In this article, new areas of cardiovascular (CV) prevention and rehabilitation research are discussed: high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and new concepts in nutrition. HIIT consists of brief periods of high-intensity exercise interspersed by periods of low-intensity exercise or rest. The optimal mode according our work (15-second exercise intervals at peak power with passive recovery intervals of the same duration) is associated with longer total exercise time, similar time spent near peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) VO2 peak, and lesser perceived exertion relative to other protocols that use longer intervals and active recovery periods. Evidence also suggests that compared with moderate-intensity continuous exercise training, HIIT has superior effects on cardiorespiratory function and on the attenuation of multiple cardiac and peripheral abnormalities. With respect to nutrition, a growing body of evidence suggests that the gut microbiota is influenced by lifestyle choices and might play a pivotal role in modulating CV disease development. For example, recent evidence linking processed (but not unprocessed) meats to increased CV risk pointed to the gut microbial metabolite trimethylamine N-oxide as a potential culprit. In addition, altered gut microbiota could also mediate the proinflammatory and cardiometabolic abnormalities associated with excess added free sugar consumption, and in particular high-fructose corn syrup. Substantially more research is required, however, to fully understand how and which alterations in gut flora can prevent or lead to CV disease and other chronic illnesses. We conclude with thoughts about the appropriate role for HIIT in CV training and future research in the role of gut flora-directed interventions in CV prevention. PMID:25444498

  9. Women and heart disease, the underrecognized burden: sex differences, biases, and unmet clinical and research challenges.

    PubMed

    Westerman, Stacy; Wenger, Nanette K

    2016-04-01

    For many years the significance of heart disease in women was vastly underappreciated, and women were significantly underrepresented in cardiovascular clinical research. We now know that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for women. Women and men share many similarities in the pathophysiology and manifestations of heart disease. However, as research advances with the continued inclusion of more women, knowledge about gender differences between the female and male heart, both on a physiological and pathophysiological basis, grows. These differences can be found in all domains of cardiovascular health and disease, including heart rhythm, heart failure, coronary disease and valvular disease. Further understanding of gender differences in the heart is crucial for advancing our ability to maintain a healthy population and identify and treat heart disease in both women and men. Specific examples within the spectrum of heart disease will be discussed in this review paper, and areas for further research will be proposed.

  10. Public Service Announcement: Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You Wear

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Public Service Announcement Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You Wear Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... page please turn Javascript on. Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You Wear IT'S THE #1 KI ...

  11. Treatment of Anemia in Patients with Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ... Physicians The full report is titled “Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ...

  12. Economic evaluation of Chagas disease screening in Spain.

    PubMed

    Imaz-Iglesia, Iñaki; Miguel, Lucía García-San; Ayala-Morillas, L Eduardo; García-Pérez, Lidia; González-Enríquez, Jesús; Blasco-Hernández, Teresa; Martín-Águeda, María Belén; Sarría-Santamera, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Although Spain is the European country with the highest Chagas disease burden, the country does not have a national control program of the disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of several strategies for Chagas disease screening among Latin American residents living in Spain. The following screening strategies were evaluated: (1) non-screening; (2) screening of the Latin American pregnant women and their newborns; (3) screening also the relatives of the positive pregnant women; (4) screening also the relatives of the negative pregnant women. A cost-utility analysis was carried out to compare the four strategies from two perspectives, the societal and the Spanish National Health System (SNHS). A decision tree representing the clinical evolution of Chagas disease throughout patient's life was built. The strategies were compared through the incremental cost-utility ratio, using euros as cost measurement and quality-adjusted life years as utility measurement. A sensitivity analysis was performed to test the model parameters and their influence on the results. We found the "Non-screening" as the most expensive and less effective of the evaluated strategies, from both the societal and the SNHS perspectives. Among the screening evaluated strategies the most efficient was, from both perspectives, to extent the antenatal screening of the Latin American pregnant women and their newborns up to the relatives of the positive women. Several parameters influenced significantly on the sensitivity analyses, particularly the chronic treatment efficacy or the prevalence of Chagas disease. In conclusion, for the general Latin American immigrants living in Spain the most efficient would be to screen the Latin American mothers, their newborns and the close relatives of the mothers with a positive serology. However for higher prevalence immigrant population the most efficient intervention would be to extend the program to the close relatives of the negative

  13. Ischemic heart disease in systemic inflammatory diseases. An appraisal.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Paola; Marsico, Fabio; Parente, Antonio; Paolillo, Stefania; Cecere, Milena; Casaretti, Laura; Pellegrino, Angela Maria; Formisano, Tiziana; Fabiani, Irma; Soricelli, Andrea; Trimarco, Bruno; Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory diseases are inflammatory syndromes that are associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The link between inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases can be attributed to coexistence of classical risk factors and of inflammatory mechanisms activated in systemic inflammatory diseases and involving the immune system. Yet, clinical implications of these findings are not entirely clear and deeper knowledge and awareness of cardiac involvement in inflammatory diseases are necessary. The aims of this review are to summarize cardiac involvement in systemic inflammatory diseases and to identify areas where evidence is currently lacking that deserve further investigation in the future.

  14. Epidemiology of Pulmonary Hypertension in Left Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Guha, Ashrith; Amione-Guerra, Javier; Park, Myung H

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the setting of left side heart disease is associated with adverse outcomes. The exact prevalence of PH in the different pathologies that affect the left ventricle, however, is difficult to access with the current literature. The lack of a standard definition of PH in older studies, the different modalities to assess pulmonary artery pressures and the varying disease severity, all account for the great variability in the reported prevalence of PH. PH can accompany heart failure (HF) with reduced (HFrEF) or preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) as well as mitral and aortic valve disease; in any of these instances it is important to recognize whether the elevation of pulmonary pressures is driven by elevated left ventricular pressures only (isolated post-capillary PH) or if there is an accompanying remodeling component in the pulmonary arterioles (combined post-capillary and pre-capillary PH). The objective of this review is to describe the definitions, prevalence and the risk factors associated with the development of PH in the setting of HFrEF, HFpEF and valvular heart disease. PMID:27402130

  15. Gene and cell therapy for chronic ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Poh, Kian-Keong

    2007-01-01

    Viable treatment options are becoming available for the 'no-option' patient with chronic ischaemic heart disease. Instead of revascularising the highly diseased epicardial coronary arteries, scientists and clinicians have been looking at augmenting mother nature's way of providing biological bypass in an attempt to provide symptomatic relief in these patients. The novel use of gene and cell therapies for myocardial neovascularisation has exploded into a flurry of early clinical trials. This translational research has been motivated by an improved understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in tissue repair after ischaemic injury. While safety concerns will be top in priority in these trials, different types or combination of therapies, dose and route of delivery are being tested before further optimisation and establishment. With cautious optimism, a new era in the treatment of ischaemic heart disease is being entered. This article reviews the present state in gene and cell therapies for ischaemic heart disease, the modalities of their delivery, novel imaging techniques and future perspectives.

  16. Histamine Blood Concentration in Ischemic Heart Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zdravkovic, Vladimir; Pantovic, Suzana; Rosic, Gvozden; Tomic-Lucic, Aleksandra; Zdravkovic, Nemanja; Colic, Maja; Obradovic, Zdravko; Rosic, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histamine blood concentration in subjects suffering from different types of ischemic heart diseases during the period of eight days. Our results showed that the histamine blood level was associated with different types of ischemic heart diseases. The blood histamine level in all investigated patients was significantly higher when compared to control subjects (44.87 ± 1.09 ng mL−1), indicating the increase of histamine release in patients suffering from coronary diseases. In patients suffering from ACS-UA and ACS-STEMI, the second day peak of histamine level occurs (90.85 ± 6.34 ng mL−1 and 121.7 ± 6.34 ng mL−1, resp.) probably as the reperfusion event. Furthermore, our data suggest that histamine can be additional parameter of myocardial ischemia along with cardiac specific enzymes and may prove to be an excellent single prognostic marker for multitude of ischemic heart diseases. PMID:21687546

  17. Particulate matter and heart disease: Evidence from epidemiological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Annette . E-mail: peters@gsf.de

    2005-09-01

    The association between particulate matter and heart disease was noted in the mid-nineties of last century when the epidemiological evidence for an association between air pollution and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular disease accumulated and first hypotheses regarding the pathomechanism were formulated. Nowadays, epidemiological studies have demonstrated coherent associations between daily changes in concentrations of ambient particles and cardiovascular disease mortality, hospital admission, disease exacerbation in patients with cardiovascular disease and early physiological responses in healthy individuals consistent with a risk factor profile deterioration. In addition, evidence was found that annual average PM{sub 2.5} exposures are associated with increased risks for mortality caused by ischemic heart disease and dysrhythmia. Thereby, evidence is suggesting not only a short-term exacerbation of cardiovascular disease by ambient particle concentrations but also a potential role of particles in defining patients' vulnerability to acute coronary events. While this concept is consistent with the current understanding of the factors defining patients' vulnerability, the mechanisms and the time-scales on which the particle-induced vulnerability might operate are unknown.

  18. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-07-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation.

  19. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation. PMID:27630924

  20. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-07-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation. PMID:27630924

  1. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation.

  2. [Management of heart diseases in pregnancy: rheumatic and congenital heart disease, myocardial infarction and post partum cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Westhoff-Bleck, M; Hilfiker-Kleiner, D; Günter, H H; Schieffer, E; Drexler, H

    2008-07-01

    Heart disease is present in 0.5-1% of all pregnancies. It is the leading non-obstetric cause of maternal mortality accounting for about 10-15% of all maternal death. Over the last decades the underlying cardiac disease has changed. Also new therapeutic options have been developed. In western industrial countries the incidence of acquired rheumatic heart disease has declined. In contrast, as a result of neonatal corrective or palliative surgery, congenital heart disease has become an increasing and challenging problem. Maternal older age and the increase in women's smoking habits amplify the likelihood of coronary artery disease. Multiple therapeutic options including percutaneous interventions are available and novel therapeutic concepts are emerging i.e. for peripartum cardiomyopathy. Management of pregnancy, labor and delivery requires accurate diagnosis of the underlying cardiac disorder. Hemodynamic changes physiologically occurring during pregnancy have a different impact depending on the type and severity of cardiac anomalies. Management of these patients requires teamwork of obstetricians, neonatologists, cardiologists, anesthetists and sometimes cardiac surgeons.

  3. Acromegalic heart disease: influence of treatment of the acromegaly on the heart.

    PubMed

    Hayward, R P; Emanuel, R W; Nabarro, J D

    1987-01-01

    In a series of 256 patients with acromegaly, 10 had evidence of heart disease for which no explanation apart from the acromegaly could be found. Heart disease presented with effort dyspnoea, cardiac failure, palpitation, ECG changes or cardiomegaly. Initial chest radiographs showed cardiac enlargement in seven patients. Electrocardiograms were abnormal in nine patients with repolarisation disorders or intraventricular conduction defects. Rhythm disturbances were found in six. Echocardiograms were performed on six patients; all were abnormal showing left ventricular hypertrophy or impaired function. In five patients radionuclide ventriculography was also performed. Cardiac catheterisation was undertaken on seven patients; all showed either hypertrophy or dilatation of the left ventricle. Coronary arteries were widely dilated in two patients and in another there was dilation of the proximal segment only. In six of the 10 patients, acromegaly was cured by transsphenoidal surgery. This resulted in limited improvement of cardiac function in two patients only. Of the four patients who were not cured, three died and one was lost to the study. Four patients in total died and autopsies were obtained in two: one showed changes suggesting myocarditis and the other diffuse fibrosis. It is concluded that acromegaly may infrequently lead to heart disease, and that if recognised at an early stage progression may, in a proportion of patients, be arrested by successful treatment.

  4. [Anesthesia for non-cardiac surgery in children with congenital and acquired heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Le Bel, S

    2013-01-01

    The goals of this review are to recall some pathophysiological principles at work in most of congenital heart diseases; to specify factors to be considered when defining perioperative risk for a child with an acquired or congenital heart disease; to describe an anaesthetic management strategy in the context of some specific heart diseases.

  5. Life with and without heart disease among women and men over 50.

    PubMed

    Crimmins, Eileen M; Hayward, Mark D; Ueda, Hiroshi; Saito, Yasuhiko; Kim, Jung Ki

    2008-01-01

    This article uses a demographic approach and data from the Health and Retirement Survey, a nationally representative sample of the U.S. population, to investigate sex differences in the length of life lived with heart disease and after a heart attack for persons in the United States age 50 and older. On average, women live longer than men with heart disease. At age 50 women can expect to live 7.9 years and men 6.7 years with heart disease. The average woman experiences heart disease onset three years older and heart attacks 4.4 years older than men.

  6. Mass screening for infectious disease containment and pandemic outbreaks: misconceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leando, Peter

    2015-05-01

    IR imaging in mass screening for the containment of pandemic disease is based on detecting a febril (fever) state in individuals. The ability to use IR affectively for this is dependent on a good understanding of the physiology and physics related to the pathology that we are trying to screen for and is not restricted to temperature measurements alone. The radiometric thermal data processed during real-time imaging must include calibrated reference sources, thermal pattern recognition and comparative analysis between individual people being screened. A screening test should have high `sensitivity' rather than `specificity' and to be effective the false negative rate must be very low. To achieve this the false positive rate will be higher by necessity and so a `secondary' level of screening can be implemented to bring the false positive rate to within a manageable level by the higher `specificity' secondary level of screening.

  7. Measuring the costs and benefits of heart disease monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Perry, A; Capewell, S; Walker, A; Chalmers, J; Redpath, A; Major, K; Morrison, C; Craig, N; Cobbe, S; Smith, W

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the costs and benefits of alternative systems of coronary heart disease monitoring in Scotland.
DESIGN—An option appraisal was conducted to evaluate the costs and benefits of implementing a coronary heart disease monitoring system. This involved a review of existing Scottish datasets and relevant reports, specification of options, definition and weighting of benefit criteria by key stakeholders, assessment of options by experts, and costing of options. The options were assessed by 33 stakeholders (grouped as cardiologists, patient representatives, general practitioners, public health physicians, and policy makers), plus 13 topic experts.
SETTING—Scotland (population 5.1 million).
RESULTS—Between group mean benefit weights were: mortality rates and case fatality (10.6), quality of life (9.8), patient function (8.8), hospital activity (7.8), primary care activity (9.25), prescribing (5.72), socioeconomic impact (4.0), risk factors (7.4), prevalence (5.0), incidence (6.0), case registration (6.82), international comparability (4.2), breadth of coverage (8.8), and frequency (5.8). Differences between group weights were significant for prevalence (p = 0.048) and international comparability (p = 0.032). Four monitoring options were identified: a community epidemiology model, based on MONICA (monitoring trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease) study methodology applied to a series of eight representative communities, had the highest benefits, at an average annual discounted cost of approximately £360 000; models based on the Australian cardiovascular disease monitoring scheme and on enhanced routine data offered fewer benefits at discounted average annual costs ranging from £165 000 to £195 000; finally, a coronary heart disease registry modelled on the Scottish Cancer Registry scheme would have had fewer benefits and substantially higher costs than the other options.
CONCLUSIONS—The most beneficial coronary

  8. Evaluation of ischemic heart disease and viability by cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Mona

    2014-01-01

    In ischemic heart disease, cardiac MRI, besides being the gold standard for evaluation of quantitative ventricular function, enables evaluation of myocardial wall thickness, T2-weighted imaging for myocardial edema and infarct quantification and transmurality. Delayed hyperenhancement sequences are highly predictive of scar formation, being associated with myocyte necrosis. The extent and transmurality of delayed hyperenhancement has prognostic implications and is inversely proportional to the degree of functional recovery after acute myocardial infarction. A greater transmural extent of infarction (eg, hyperenhancement involving >50% of the wall thickness) can predict regions that are less likely to improve in function after therapy. The ultimate focus of MRI in ischemic heart disease is in diagnosis, quantification of myocardium at risk, salvageable myocardium, perfusion defects and differentiation of viable myocardium from non viable myocardium to enable prognostication.

  9. Vasopressin receptor antagonists, heart failure, and polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente E

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of nonpeptide orally bioavailable vasopressin antagonists devoid of agonistic activity (vaptans) has made possible the selective blockade of vasopressin receptor subtypes for therapeutic purposes. Vaptans acting on the vasopressin V2 receptors (aquaretics) have attracted attention as a possible therapy for heart failure and polycystic kidney disease. Despite a solid rationale and encouraging preclinical testing, aquaretics have not improved clinical outcomes in randomized clinical trials for heart failure. Additional clinical trials with select population targets, more flexible dosing schedules, and possibly a different drug type or combination (balanced V1a/V2 receptor antagonism) may be warranted. Aquaretics are promising for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and have been approved in Japan for this indication. More studies are needed to better define their long-term safety and efficacy and optimize their utilization.

  10. The relationship of spirituality to coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Morris, E L

    2001-01-01

    Several studies suggest that religious involvement or spiritual well-being may affect health outcomes. This study was designed to investigate whether the scores from a questionnaire measuring spiritual well-being correlated with progression or regression of coronary heart disease as measured with computerized cardiac catheterization data. Participants in Dr Dean Ornish's Lifestyle Heart Trial were given the "Spiritual Orientation Inventory." A significant difference was found in the spirituality scores between a control group and a research group that practiced daily meditation. The spirituality scores were significantly correlated with the degree of progression or regression of coronary artery obstruction over a 4-year time period. The lowest scores of spiritual well-being had the most progression of coronary obstruction and the highest scores had the most regression. This study suggests that the degree of spiritual well-being may be an important factor in the development of coronary artery disease.

  11. Software innovations in computed tomography for structural heart disease interventions.

    PubMed

    Hell, Michaela; Marwan, Mohamed; Gaede, Luise; Achenbach, Stephan

    2016-05-17

    Computed tomography (CT) provides high, isotropic spatial resolution and has become firmly established in pre-procedural imaging for structural heart disease interventions. It allows determination of the exact dimensions of the target structure, provides information regarding the access route and permits identification of fluoroscopic projection angles to provide optimal visualisation for device placement. Several software solutions are available and have been systematically evaluated in the context of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The use of software products to perform automated measurements can be useful, especially when the experience and expertise regarding evaluation of CT in the context of structural heart disease are limited. In scientific studies, software has been demonstrated to provide accurate support for annulus sizing and prosthesis selection, to aid in reliably identifying patients in whom a transfemoral access may be problematic, and to suggest suitable angulations for fluoroscopic imaging to achieve an orthogonal view onto the aortic valve during implantation. PMID:27174116

  12. Oral health of patients with severe rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Breminand; Vayej, Ahmed C

    2012-07-01

    In order to determine whether adequate attention is paid to the maintenance of good oral health in patients at risk of developing infective endocarditis, we studied 44 black patients with severe rheumatic heart disease before they had cardiac surgery. Plaque and gingival index scores were calculated and panoramic radiographs were done in all patients. There were 17 males and 27 females (mean age: 30.6 years). The plaque and gingival index scores were classified as poor in 31.8 and 54.6% of patients, respectively. Panoramic radiographic findings included caries in 56.8% of patients, peri-apical pathology in 18.1% and retained roots in 22.7% of patients. This study demonstrates that inadequate attention is paid to the maintenance of good oral health in patients with severe rheumatic heart disease. The oral and dental care of patients at risk of developing infective endocarditis needs to be improved. PMID:22836156

  13. [Echocardiography as primary diagnostic tool for valvular heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Nabauer, M

    2013-10-01

    Echocardiography is the method of choice for diagnostics and decision making in valvular heart diseases. It is a universally available diagnostic tool not limited by radiation exposure or toxicity of contrast agents. It is capable of displaying cardiac anatomy, function and blood flow allowing an integrative approach to diagnosing valvular heart diseases. Quantification of stenotic valve lesions by calculating the valve opening area is well established. On the other hand, quantification of valve regurgitation is more difficult as it relies on simplifications and assumptions on geometry of the regurgitation orifice and its boundaries. Three dimensional assessments of the regurgitation orifice and flow may improve the accuracy of grading of cardiac valve regurgitation. PMID:24129985

  14. Biology of the cardiac myocyte in heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Angela K.; Bjerke, Maureen A.; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a major risk factor for heart failure, and it has been shown that this increase in size occurs at the level of the cardiac myocyte. Cardiac myocyte model systems have been developed to study this process. Here we focus on cell culture tools, including primary cells, immortalized cell lines, human stem cells, and their morphological and molecular responses to pathological stimuli. For each cell type, we discuss commonly used methods for inducing hypertrophy, markers of pathological hypertrophy, advantages for each model, and disadvantages to using a particular cell type over other in vitro model systems. Where applicable, we discuss how each system is used to model human disease and how these models may be applicable to current drug therapeutic strategies. Finally, we discuss the increasing use of biomaterials to mimic healthy and diseased hearts and how these matrices can contribute to in vitro model systems of cardiac cell biology. PMID:27418636

  15. Software innovations in computed tomography for structural heart disease interventions.

    PubMed

    Hell, Michaela; Marwan, Mohamed; Gaede, Luise; Achenbach, Stephan

    2016-05-17

    Computed tomography (CT) provides high, isotropic spatial resolution and has become firmly established in pre-procedural imaging for structural heart disease interventions. It allows determination of the exact dimensions of the target structure, provides information regarding the access route and permits identification of fluoroscopic projection angles to provide optimal visualisation for device placement. Several software solutions are available and have been systematically evaluated in the context of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The use of software products to perform automated measurements can be useful, especially when the experience and expertise regarding evaluation of CT in the context of structural heart disease are limited. In scientific studies, software has been demonstrated to provide accurate support for annulus sizing and prosthesis selection, to aid in reliably identifying patients in whom a transfemoral access may be problematic, and to suggest suitable angulations for fluoroscopic imaging to achieve an orthogonal view onto the aortic valve during implantation.

  16. Lipids, lipoproteins, and coronary heart disease: implications for antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Feher, M D; Betteridge, D J

    1989-06-01

    There is now considerable evidence that treatment of abnormalities of lipids and lipoproteins reduces the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD). Treatment of hypertension, another major cardiovascular risk factor, has not been shown to have the same impact on CHD. Possible explanations for this are that cardiovascular risk factors may occur in combination in an individual or that therapy for hypertension has adversely affected one or several of the other risk factors for CHD, thereby offsetting the benefit gained by lowering blood pressure. This article reviews the relationship between lipids, lipoproteins, and coronary heart disease, and the impact of cholesterol lowering on CHD. The evidence that antihypertensive drugs are associated with lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities is introduced by a critical appraisal of the several studies for such evidence. Implications for the treatment of the hypertensive patient are discussed. PMID:2487804

  17. Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Defects with Pulse Oximetry: Medical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Ewer, Andrew K

    2016-09-01

    The detection of newborn babies with potentially life-threatening, critical congenital heart defects (CCHDs) before they collapse or expire remains an important clinical challenge. The absence of physical signs and the difficulty assessing mild cyanosis means that the newborn baby check misses up to a third of babies. Fetal anomaly ultrasound scanning identifies an increasing proportion, but this screen is operator-dependent and therefore highly variable; although some units report very high detection rates, overall most babies with CCHD are still missed. Pulse oximetry screening (POS) is an additional test that meets the criteria for universal screening. POS increases overall detection of CCHD to over 90% and also identifies babies with noncardiac, hypoxemic conditions (such as congenital pneumonia, early-onset sepsis, and pulmonary hypertension), which are usually included in the false positives. There is a wealth of published data on the POS, both in a research setting and more recently in routine clinical practice, and consideration of POS is becoming increasingly widespread particularly among high-income countries. But a degree of controversy still remains, and debate continues regarding the most appropriate time to screen, the most effective screening pathway, and screening outside the well-baby nursery. So, should all newborn babies be screened with POS, if so, when and where should screening take place, what saturations are acceptable, and which conditions are we trying to identify? This review will look at the available evidence and try to suggest the way forward for those considering its introduction into their clinical practice. PMID:27603536

  18. Acute Kidney Disease After Liver and Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ana P; Vella, John P

    2016-03-01

    After transplantation of nonrenal solid organs, an acute decline in kidney function develops in the majority of patients. In addition, a significant number of nonrenal solid organ transplant recipients develop chronic kidney disease, and some develop end-stage renal disease, requiring renal replacement therapy. The incidence varies depending on the transplanted organ. Acute kidney injury after nonrenal solid organ transplantation is associated with prolonged length of stay, cost, increased risk of death, de novo chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease. This overview focuses on the risk factors for posttransplant acute kidney injury after liver and heart transplantation, integrating discussion of proteinuria and chronic kidney disease with emphasis on pathogenesis, histopathology, and management including the use of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibition and costimulatory blockade.

  19. Chemical quality of maternal drinking water and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zierler, S; Theodore, M; Cohen, A; Rothman, K J

    1988-09-01

    We undertook a case-control study to investigate the association between chemicals in maternal drinking water consumed during pregnancy and congenital heart disease in the offspring. Two hundred and seventy affected children and 665 healthy children were enrolled in the study. Information on contaminant levels in maternal drinking water was available from records of routine water analysis of samples taken from public taps in the communities where the mothers resided during pregnancy. Mothers provided information during a telephone interview on their health, pregnancy management, and demographic characteristics. Nine inorganic metals were analysed for detection of an association with congenital heart disease. The chemical exposures of particular interest were arsenic, lead, mercury and selenium. None of the chemicals was associated materially with an increase in the frequency of congenital heart disease overall. Arsenic exposure at any detectable level was associated with a threefold increase in occurrence of coarctation of the aorta (prevalence odds ratio = 3.4, 95% confidence interval = 1.3-8.9). Detectable traces of selenium in drinking water were associated with a lower frequency of any congenital heart disease than was observed among children exposed to drinking water not containing detectable levels of selenium (prevalence odds ratio = 0.62, 95% confidence limits = 0.40-0.97). A dose-response effect was observed over four levels of selenium exposure. Non-differential errors in the measurement and classification of exposure to contaminants routinely monitored in drinking water could account for lack of positive findings. In addition, most of the contaminant levels were below the maximum levels set by the Environmental Protection Agency, so that lack of evidence of effect may have been due to the low exposure levels in this population.

  20. Linoleic acid content in adipose tissue and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Riemersma, R A; Wood, D A; Butler, S; Elton, R A; Oliver, M; Salo, M; Nikkari, T; Vartiainen, E; Puska, P; Gey, F

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of an inverse relation between essential fatty acids in adipose tissue, in particular linoleic acid, and mortality from coronary heart disease was studied by a cross sectional survey of random population samples of apparently healthy men aged 40-49 from four European regions with differing mortality from coronary heart disease. The proportion of linoleic acid in adipose tissue was lowest in men from north Karelia, Finland, where mortality from coronary heart disease is highest, and highest in men from Italy, where mortality is lowest, with intermediate proportions in men from Scotland and south west Finland. Similar gradients were observed for the desaturation and elongation products dihomo-gamma-linolenic and arachidonic acid. The proportion of saturated fatty acids in adipose tissue was highest in Finland, intermediate in Scotland, and lowest in Italy. Italian men also had the highest proportion of oleate in their adipose tissue and the lowest proportion of myristoleate and palmitoleate. Finnish men were more obese and had a higher blood pressure. Serum cholesterol concentration was higher in north Karelia and south west Finland than in Scotland or Italy. High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations reflected the regional differences in serum cholesterol, being higher in Finland and lower in Italy. The ratios of HDL cholesterol to total cholesterol, however, did not differ. The regional differences in linoleic acid in adipose tissue remained highly significant when the observed differences in other known risk factors for coronary heart disease among the four areas were taken into account by multivariate analysis. The gradients in proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids probably reflect differences in dietary intake of linoleic acid. PMID:3087455

  1. Tachyarrhythmia in patients with congenital heart disease: inevitable destiny?

    PubMed

    Teuwen, C P; Taverne, Y J H J; Houck, C; Götte, M; Brundel, B J J M; Evertz, R; Witsenburg, M; Roos-Hesselink, J W; Bogers, A J J C; de Groot, N M S

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased over the last century. As a result, the number of CHD patients presenting with late, postoperative tachyarrhythmias has increased as well. The aim of this review is to discuss the present knowledge on the mechanisms underlying both atrial and ventricular tachyarrhythmia in patients with CHD and the advantages and disadvantages of the currently available invasive treatment modalities.

  2. Echocardiographic evaluation of coronary arteries in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Freire, Grace; Miller, Michelle S

    2015-12-01

    Among populations of patients with the congenital heart disease, there is considerable diversity in the anatomy of the coronary arteries. Understanding these anatomical differences is vitally important in directing interventions and surgical repair. In this report, the authors describe the echocardiographic evaluation of the variants of coronary artery anatomy in the following lesions: transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, double-inlet left ventricle, common arterial trunk, tetralogy of Fallot, and double-outlet right ventricle.

  3. Ischemic heart disease, serum cholesterol, and apolipoproteins in CAPD.

    PubMed

    Gault, M H; Longerich, L; Prabhakaran, V; Purchase, L

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-one patients, mean age 54 years, had been on chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) for an average of 38 months. Mean values (mg/dl) for triglycerides (567), total-C (267), LDL-C (133), and Apo-B (154) were elevated, and HDL-C (30) were low. The low values for total-C/Apo-B and LDL-C/Apo-B suggest an increase in the number of low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, rather than in the amount of cholesterol per LDL particle. Without knowledge of lipids, ischemic heart disease for the 31 patients was categorized into five grades in the following manner. All patients were graded based on history (angina, myocardial infarction, and bypass surgery), electrocardiogram (EKG), and echocardiography. In addition, five patients underwent coronary angiography, the results of which were considered in their grading. The five grades were assigned as follows: Grade I, no evidence (n = 15); Grade II, angina with EKG ischemia (n = 4); Grade III, myocardial infarction (MI) (n = 1); Grade IV, MI with dyskinesia-akinesia on echo (n = 4); Grade V, severe three vessel disease on angiography, or multiple infarcts, or Grade IV with heart failure (n = 7). Only Apo-B (r = 0.56) and total-C/HDL-C (r = 0.57) correlated with severity of grade, with p less than 0.001. When patients with and without detectable ischemic heart disease were compared by stepwise logistic regression, Apo-B was the only variable that independently predicted heart disease (p = 0.001). However, contribution of the lipid changes induced by CAPD has not been established.

  4. Dietary cholesterol, heart disease risk and cognitive dissonance.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Donald J

    2014-05-01

    In the 1960s, the thesis that dietary cholesterol contributes to blood cholesterol and heart disease risk was a rational conclusion based on the available science at that time. Fifty years later the research evidence no longer supports this hypothesis yet changing the dietary recommendation to limit dietary cholesterol has been a slow and at times contentious process. The preponderance of the clinical and epidemiological data accumulated since the original dietary cholesterol restrictions were formulated indicate that: (1) dietary cholesterol has a small effect on the plasma cholesterol levels with an increase in the cholesterol content of the LDL particle and an increase in HDL cholesterol, with little effect on the LDL:HDL ratio, a significant indicator of heart disease risk, and (2) the lack of a significant relationship between cholesterol intake and heart disease incidence reported from numerous epidemiological surveys. Over the last decade, many countries and health promotion groups have modified their dietary recommendations to reflect the current evidence and to address a now recognised negative consequence of ineffective dietary cholesterol restrictions (such as inadequate choline intake). In contrast, health promotion groups in some countries appear to suffer from cognitive dissonance and continue to promote an outdated and potentially hazardous dietary recommendation based on an invalidated hypothesis. This review evaluates the evidence for and against dietary cholesterol restrictions and the potential consequences of such restrictions.

  5. Postoperative nosocomial infections among children with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Yuan, Yan; Li, Peiling; Wang, Tuanjie; Gao, Jun; Yao, Jinhua; Li, Shujun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathogen distribution, antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors of postoperative nosocomial infections among children with congenital heart disease. Methods: Three hundreds children with congenital heart disease admitted to our hospital to receive surgeries from February 2010 to February 2013 were selected. Results: A total of 120 children were tested as positive by sputum culture, with the infection rate of 40.0%. The top five most common pathogenic microorganisms included Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. S. epidermidis, S. aureus and Enterococcus were highly resistant to penicillin, azithromycin and erythromycin, moderately susceptible to levofloxacin and cefazolin, and completely susceptible to vancomycin. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that hospitalization stay length, combined use of antibiotics, systemic use of hormones, mechanical ventilation and catheter indwelling were the independent risk factors of postoperative nosocomial infections (P<0.05). Conclusion: Nosocomial infection, which was the most frequent postoperative complication of pediatric congenital heart disease, was predominantly induced by Gram-positive bacteria that were highly susceptible to cephalosporins and vancomycin. Particular attention should be paid to decrease relevant risk factors to improve the prognosis. PMID:24948978

  6. Quality Indicator Development for Positive Screen Follow-up for Sickle Cell Disease and Trait.

    PubMed

    Faro, Elissa Z; Wang, C Jason; Oyeku, Suzette O

    2016-07-01

    Extensive variation exists in the follow-up of positive screens for sickle cell disease. Limited quality indicators exist to measure if the public health goals of screening-early initiation of treatment and enrollment to care-are being achieved. This manuscript focuses on the development of quality indicators related to the follow-up care for individuals identified with sickle cell disease and trait through screening processes. The authors used a modified Delphi method to develop the indicators. The process included a comprehensive literature review with rating of the evidence followed by ratings of draft indicators by an expert panel held in September 2012. The expert panel was nominated by leaders of various professional societies, the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and met face to face to discuss and rate each indicator. The panel recommended nine quality indicators focused on key aspects of follow-up care for individuals with positive screens for sickle cell disease and trait. Public health programs and healthcare institutions can use these indicators to assess the quality of follow-up care and provide a basis for improvement efforts to ensure appropriate family education, early initiation of treatment, and appropriate referral to care for individuals identified with sickle cell disease and trait. PMID:27320465

  7. Deciphering the genetic and modular connections between coronary heart disease, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Xiaoxu; Yu, Yanan; Li, Bing; Wang, Pengqian; Li, Haixia; Zhao, Yijun; Shen, Chunti; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and pulmonary heart disease (PHD) are circulatory system diseases that may simultaneously emerge in a patient and they are often treated together in clinical practice. However, the molecular mechanisms connecting these three diseases remain unclear. In order to determine the multidimensional characteristic correlations between these three diseases based on genomic networks to aid in medical decision-making, genes from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database were obtained, and applied network construction and modularized analysis were conducted. Functional enrichment analysis was conducted to explore the associations between overlapping genes, modules and pathways. A total of 29 overlapping genes and 3 common modules were identifed for the 3 diseases. Glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and the arachidonic acid metabolism are common pathways, and the biosynthetic process is suggested to be the major function involved in the three diseases. The current study reported, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the role of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis in IPAH and PHD. The present study provided an improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying CHD, IPAH and PHD. The overlapping genes, modules and pathways suggest novel areas for further research, and drug targets. The observations of the current study additionally suggest that drug indications can be broadened because of the presence of common targets. PMID:27221156

  8. Deciphering the genetic and modular connections between coronary heart disease, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, YE; ZHANG, YINGYING; ZHANG, XIAOXU; YU, YANAN; LI, BING; WANG, PENGQIAN; LI, HAIXIA; ZHAO, YIJUN; SHEN, CHUNTI; WANG, ZHONG

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and pulmonary heart disease (PHD) are circulatory system diseases that may simultaneously emerge in a patient and they are often treated together in clinical practice. However, the molecular mechanisms connecting these three diseases remain unclear. In order to determine the multidimensional characteristic correlations between these three diseases based on genomic networks to aid in medical decision-making, genes from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database were obtained, and applied network construction and modularized analysis were conducted. Functional enrichment analysis was conducted to explore the associations between overlapping genes, modules and pathways. A total of 29 overlapping genes and 3 common modules were identifed for the 3 diseases. Glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and the arachidonic acid metabolism are common pathways, and the biosynthetic process is suggested to be the major function involved in the three diseases. The current study reported, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the role of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis in IPAH and PHD. The present study provided an improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying CHD, IPAH and PHD. The overlapping genes, modules and pathways suggest novel areas for further research, and drug targets. The observations of the current study additionally suggest that drug indications can be broadened because of the presence of common targets. PMID:27221156

  9. Diagnosis and screening of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Anthony, David

    2005-12-01

    Diagnostic testing for CAD is aided by the calculation of the pretest probability using either the Diamond-Forrester score or the Morise score. Patients who have a low risk of CAD should not undergo testing. Exercise ECG testing should be reserved for patients who have pretest probabilities lower than 20%, because a negative test does not adequately reduce the posttest probability of significant CAD. For patients who are at intermediate risk, either nuclear perfusion imaging or stress echocardiography is an acceptable choice depending on local availability and practice. Due to its low specificity, CAC scoring is currently limited in its usefulness for the diagnosis of CAD in symptomatic patients. Currently, screening for CAD among patients at low risk should not extend beyond screening for traditional risk factors. Physicians should use the Framingham Risk Score to stratify patients into levels of 10-year risk for cardiac events. Due to its high rate of false positive tests and low sensitivity, exercise ECG is of limited value in screening. Among patients with higher levels of risk, in whom further risk stratification would be of use in making decisions about risk factor management, measurement of CAC either with EBCT or multidetector row CT scanning is a promising option, but more research is required before its use should become widespread. Measures of endothelial function are in development but lack data to support their widespread use currently. PMID:16326220

  10. Assessing the relationship between dental disease and coronary heart disease in elderly U.S. veterans.

    PubMed

    Loesche, W J; Schork, A; Terpenning, M S; Chen, Y M; Dominguez, B L; Grossman, N

    1998-03-01

    Several recent studies have shown a link between dental disease and coronary heart disease. The authors studied 320 U.S. veterans in a convenience sample to assess the relationship between oral health and systemic diseases among older people. They present cross-sectional data confirming that a statistically significant association exists between a diagnosis of coronary heart disease and certain oral health parameters, such as the number of missing teeth, plaque benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamide test scores, salivary levels of Streptococcus sanguis and complaints of xerostomia. The oral parameters in these subjects were independent of and more strongly associated with coronary heart disease than were recognized risk factors, such as serum cholesterol levels, body mass index, diabetes and smoking status. However, because of the convenience sample studied, these findings cannot be generalized to other populations. PMID:9529805

  11. A systematic variant screening in familial cases of congenital heart defects demonstrates the usefulness of molecular genetics in this field.

    PubMed

    El Malti, Rajae; Liu, Hui; Doray, Bérénice; Thauvin, Christel; Maltret, Alice; Dauphin, Claire; Gonçalves-Rocha, Miguel; Teboul, Michel; Blanchet, Patricia; Roume, Joëlle; Gronier, Céline; Ducreux, Corinne; Veyrier, Magali; Marçon, François; Acar, Philippe; Lusson, Jean-René; Levy, Marilyne; Beyler, Constance; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Cordier-Alex, Marie-Pierre; Heitz, François; Sanlaville, Damien; Bonnet, Damien; Bouvagnet, Patrice

    2016-02-01

    The etiology of congenital heart defect (CHD) combines environmental and genetic factors. So far, there were studies reporting on the screening of a single gene on unselected CHD or on familial cases selected for specific CHD types. Our goal was to systematically screen a proband of familial cases of CHD on a set of genetic tests to evaluate the prevalence of disease-causing variant identification. A systematic screening of GATA4, NKX2-5, ZIC3 and Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) P311 Kit was setup on the proband of 154 families with at least two cases of non-syndromic CHD. Additionally, ELN screening was performed on families with supravalvular arterial stenosis. Twenty-two variants were found, but segregation analysis confirmed unambiguously the causality of 16 variants: GATA4 (1 ×), NKX2-5 (6 ×), ZIC3 (3 ×), MLPA (2 ×) and ELN (4 ×). Therefore, this approach was able to identify the causal variant in 10.4% of familial CHD cases. This study demonstrated the existence of a de novo variant even in familial CHD cases and the impact of CHD variants on adult cardiac condition even in the absence of CHD. This study showed that the systematic screening of genetic factors is useful in familial CHD cases with up to 10.4% elucidated cases. When successful, it drastically improved genetic counseling by discovering unaffected variant carriers who are at risk of transmitting their variant and are also exposed to develop cardiac complications during adulthood thus prompting long-term cardiac follow-up. This study provides an important baseline at dawning of the next-generation sequencing era.

  12. [Why screen for lung cancer in patients with arterial disease?].

    PubMed

    Lederlin, M; Trédaniel, J; Priollet, P

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in France. Such a prognosis is explained by late diagnosis at a metastatic stage for half of the patients. Tobacco is the main risk factor for lung cancer, as it is for peripheral arterial disease. A review of literature shows that between 2.3% and 19% of patients with arterial disease also have lung cancer. When lung cancer is detected after treatment of arterial disease, it is at an advanced stage. But it can be diagnosed at an early stage when it is searched simultaneously with arterial disease treatment. There is no recommendation for lung cancer screening specifically for patients with arterial disease. However individual screening based on an annual low-dose chest scan is proposed for smokers meeting the criteria defined by the study of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). Such screening has two disadvantages : the high number of false positives and the irradiation induced by the accumulation of examinations. The ISET method would alternatively help to identify circulating tumor cells on a simple blood test for subjects not yet at solid tumor stage, provided this method be subject to multicentric validation. Thus one could consider that the management of a patient with arterial disease meeting NLST criteria should be accompanied with screening for lung cancer by searching for tumor cells associated with low-dose scanner.

  13. [Ischemic heart disease (myocardial perfusion and viability): techniques and results].

    PubMed

    Croisille, P

    2004-10-01

    Over the last two decades, the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease have made tremendous progress, in particular with the help of the development of non-invasive methodologies for assessing myocardial perfusion and viability. Clinically, nuclear medicine techniques (particularly SPECT imaging) have predominated. With the recent technical developments allowing for a combined assessment of perfusion and irreversible damage with late enhancement imaging, MRI will now play a major role in the assessment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:15507837

  14. Heart transplant coronary artery disease: Multimodality approach in percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Leite, Luís; Matos, Vítor; Gonçalves, Lino; Silva Marques, João; Jorge, Elisabete; Calisto, João; Antunes, Manuel; Pego, Mariano

    2016-06-01

    Coronary artery disease is the most important cause of late morbidity and mortality after heart transplantation. It is usually an immunologic phenomenon termed cardiac allograft vasculopathy, but can also be the result of donor-transmitted atherosclerosis. Routine surveillance by coronary angiography should be complemented by intracoronary imaging, in order to determine the nature of the coronary lesions, and also by assessment of their functional significance to guide the decision whether to perform percutaneous coronary intervention. We report a case of coronary angiography at five-year follow-up after transplantation, using optical coherence tomography and fractional flow reserve to assess and optimize treatment of coronary disease in this challenging population.

  15. An Android-Based Heart Monitoring System for the Elderly and for Patients with Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The current trend in health monitoring systems is to move from the hospital to portable personal devices. This work shows how consumer devices like heart rate monitors can be used not only for applications in sports, but also for medical research and diagnostic purposes. The goal pursued by our group was to develop a simple, accurate, and inexpensive system that would use a few pieces of data acquired by the heart rate monitor and process them on a smartphone to (i) provide detailed test reports about the user's health state; (ii) store report records; (iii) generate emergency calls or SMSs; and (iv) connect to a remote telemedicine portal to relay the data to an online database. The system developed by our team uses sophisticated algorithms to detect stress states, detect and classify arrhythmia events, and calculate energy consumption. It is suitable for use by elderly subjects and by patients with heart disease (e.g., those recovering from myocardial infarction) or neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease. Easy, immediate, and economical remote health control can therefore be achieved without the need for expensive hospital equipment, using only portable consumer devices. PMID:25210513

  16. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart ...

  17. Screening system for drug-induced arrhythmogenic risk combining a patch clamp and heart simulator

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Jun-ichi; Yoshinaga, Takashi; Kurokawa, Junko; Washio, Takumi; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Sawada, Kohei; Sugiura, Seiryo; Hisada, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    To save time and cost for drug discovery, a paradigm shift in cardiotoxicity testing is required. We introduce a novel screening system for drug-induced arrhythmogenic risk that combines in vitro pharmacological assays and a multiscale heart simulator. For 12 drugs reported to have varying cardiotoxicity risks, dose-inhibition curves were determined for six ion channels using automated patch clamp systems. By manipulating the channel models implemented in a heart simulator consisting of more than 20 million myocyte models, we simulated a standard electrocardiogram (ECG) under various doses of drugs. When the drug concentrations were increased from therapeutic levels, each drug induced a concentration-dependent characteristic type of ventricular arrhythmia, whereas no arrhythmias were observed at any dose with drugs known to be safe. We have shown that our system combining in vitro and in silico technologies can predict drug-induced arrhythmogenic risk reliably and efficiently. PMID:26601174

  18. Preventing cardiovascular disease through community-based risk reduction: the Bootheel Heart Health Project.

    PubMed Central

    Brownson, R C; Smith, C A; Pratt, M; Mack, N E; Jackson-Thompson, J; Dean, C G; Dabney, S; Wilkerson, J C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a community-based risk reduction project affected behavioral risk factors for cardiovascular disease. METHODS. Community-based activities (e.g., exercise groups, healthy cooking demonstrations, blood pressure and cholesterol screenings, and cardiovascular disease education) were conducted in six southeastern Missouri counties. Evaluation involved population-based, cross-sectional samples of adult residents of the state and the intervention region. Weighted prevalence estimates were calculated for self-reported physical inactivity, cigarette smoking, consumption of fruits and vegetables, overweight, and cholesterol screening. RESULTS. Physical inactivity decreased within the intervention region, that is, in communities where heart health coalitions were developed and among respondents who were aware of these coalitions. In addition, the prevalence rates for reports of cholesterol screening within the past 2 years were higher for respondents in areas with coalitions and among persons who were aware of the coalitions. CONCLUSIONS. Even with modest resources, community-based interventions show promise in reducing self-reported risk for cardiovascular disease within a relatively brief period. PMID:8633737

  19. Fontan-associated liver disease: Implications for heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Greenway, Steven C; Crossland, David S; Hudson, Mark; Martin, Steven R; Myers, Robert P; Prieur, Tim; Hasan, Asif; Kirk, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are associated with multiple complications, including cirrhosis, portal hypertension, ascites, synthetic dysfunction and hepatocellular carcinoma, and these processes are increasingly recognized in post-Fontan patients. Fontan-associated liver disease (FALD) can be defined as abnormalities in liver structure and function that result from the Fontan circulation and are not related to another disease process. FALD arises due to chronic congestion of the liver created by the elevated venous pressure and low cardiac output of the Fontan circulation, which may be superimposed on previous liver injury. Pathology studies have generally shown that FALD worsens as time post-Fontan increases, but the prevalence of FALD is not well defined because the majority of Fontan patients, even those with significant hepatic fibrosis, appear to be asymptomatic and biochemical or functional hepatic abnormalities are usually subtle or absent. Alternate non-invasive investigations, derived from the study of other chronic liver diseases, have been tested in small series of pediatric and adult Fontan patients, but they have been confounded by congestion and do not correlate well with liver biopsy findings. Liver disease can complicate Fontan circulatory failure and may even be significant enough to be considered a contraindication to heart transplantation or require combined heart-liver transplantation. The search for the optimal management strategy continues in the setting of increasing numbers of Fontan patients surviving to adulthood and being referred for heart transplantation. Thus, in this review we attempt to define the scope and significance of FALD and address transplant-related assessment and management of this challenging disorder. PMID:26586487

  20. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Bangladesh: A review.

    PubMed

    Islam, A K M Monwarul; Majumder, A A S

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are the most-common cardiovascular disease in young people aged <25 years, globally. They are important contributors to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh. Classical risk factors, i.e. poverty, overcrowding, ignorance, and insufficient health care services were responsible for the high incidence and prevalence of these diseases over the last century. In concert with the progresses in socioeconomic indicators, advances in health sectors, improved public awareness, and antibiotic prophylaxis, acute RF came into control. However, chronic RHD continues to be prevalent, and the actual disease burden may be much higher. RHD predominantly affects the young adults, seriously incapacitates them, follows a protracted course, gets complicated because of delayed diagnosis and is sometimes maltreated. The treatment is often palliative and expensive. Large-scale epidemiological and clinical researches are needed to formulate evidence-based national policy to tackle this important public health issue in future. PMID:26896274

  1. Advances in the Care of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Viviane G; Kussman, Barry D

    2015-09-01

    The significant decline in mortality among children and adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with an increasing prevalence of CHD in adults, particularly those with moderate to severe defects. As a significant percentage of adolescents and young adults are lost to follow-up in the transition from pediatric to adult care, they may present for elective procedures with substantial CHD-associated morbidity. In addition to the specific cardiac defect, the procedures performed, and the current pathophysiological status, several factors should be considered when managing the adult with CHD. These include the type of setting (adult vs pediatric institution); surgeon (pediatric vs adult cardiac surgeon); coexisting diseases associated with CHD, such as coronary artery disease, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, cerebrovascular accidents, myopathy, and coagulation disorders; acquired diseases of aging; pregnancy; and psychosocial functioning. The current status of the management of common and important congenital cardiac defects is also described. PMID:25542866

  2. "The Heart Truth:" Using the Power of Branding and Social Marketing to Increase Awareness of Heart Disease in Women.

    PubMed

    Long, Terry; Taubenheim, Ann; Wayman, Jennifer; Temple, Sarah; Ruoff, Beth

    2008-03-01

    In September 2002, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute launched The Heart Truth, the first federally-sponsored national campaign aimed at increasing awareness among women about their risk of heart disease. A traditional social marketing approach, including an extensive formative research phase, was used to plan, implement, and evaluate the campaign. With the creation of the Red Dress as the national symbol for women and heart disease awareness, the campaign integrated a branding strategy into its social marketing framework. The aim was to develop and promote a women's heart disease brand that would create a strong emotional connection with women. The Red Dress brand has had a powerful appeal to a wide diversity of women and has given momentum to the campaign's three-part implementation strategy of partnership development, media relations, and community action. In addition to generating its own substantial programming, The Heart Truth became a catalyst for a host of other national and local educational initiatives, both large and small. By the campaign's fifth anniversary, surveys showed that women were increasingly aware of heart disease as their leading cause of death and that the rise in awareness was associated with increased action to reduce heart disease risk.

  3. "The Heart Truth:" Using the Power of Branding and Social Marketing to Increase Awareness of Heart Disease in Women.

    PubMed

    Long, Terry; Taubenheim, Ann; Wayman, Jennifer; Temple, Sarah; Ruoff, Beth

    2008-03-01

    In September 2002, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute launched The Heart Truth, the first federally-sponsored national campaign aimed at increasing awareness among women about their risk of heart disease. A traditional social marketing approach, including an extensive formative research phase, was used to plan, implement, and evaluate the campaign. With the creation of the Red Dress as the national symbol for women and heart disease awareness, the campaign integrated a branding strategy into its social marketing framework. The aim was to develop and promote a women's heart disease brand that would create a strong emotional connection with women. The Red Dress brand has had a powerful appeal to a wide diversity of women and has given momentum to the campaign's three-part implementation strategy of partnership development, media relations, and community action. In addition to generating its own substantial programming, The Heart Truth became a catalyst for a host of other national and local educational initiatives, both large and small. By the campaign's fifth anniversary, surveys showed that women were increasingly aware of heart disease as their leading cause of death and that the rise in awareness was associated with increased action to reduce heart disease risk. PMID:19122892

  4. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  5. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  6. Incidence of coronary artery disease in patients with valvular heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, G W; Thomas, R D; Grimmer, S F; Silverton, P N; Smith, D R

    1980-01-01

    The case notes, cardiac catheterisation data, and coronary arteriograms of 239 patients investigated for valvular heart disease during a five year period were reviewed. Angina present in 13 of 95 patients with isolated mitral valve disease, 43 of 90 patients with isolated aortic valve disease, and 18 of 54 patients with combined mitral and aortic valve disease. Significant coronary artery disease was present in 85 per cent of patients with mitral valve disease and angina, but in only 33 per cent of patients with aortic valve disease and angina. Patients with no chest pain still had a high incidence of coronary artery disease, significant coronary obstruction being present in 22 per cent with mitral valve disease, 22 per cent with aortic valve disease, and 11 per cent with combine mitral and aortic valve disease. Several possible clinical markers of coronary artery disease were examined but none was found to be of practical help. There was, however, a significant inverse relation between severity of coronary artery disease and severity of valve disease in patients with aortic valve disease. Asymptomatic coronary artery disease is not uncommon in patients with valvular heart disease and if it is policy to perform coronary artery bypass grafting in such patients, routine coronary arteriography must be part of the preoperative investigation. PMID:7459146

  7. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia. PMID:24908957

  8. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia.

  9. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Breitling, Siegfried; Ravindran, Krishnan; Goldenberg, Neil M; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure leading to right-sided heart failure and can arise from a wide range of etiologies. The most common cause of PH, termed Group 2 PH, is left-sided heart failure and is commonly known as pulmonary hypertension with left heart disease (PH-LHD). Importantly, while sharing many clinical features with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), PH-LHD differs significantly at the cellular and physiological levels. These fundamental pathophysiological differences largely account for the poor response to PAH therapies experienced by PH-LHD patients. The relatively high prevalence of this disease, coupled with its unique features compared with PAH, signal the importance of an in-depth understanding of the mechanistic details of PH-LHD. The present review will focus on the current state of knowledge regarding the pathomechanisms of PH-LHD, highlighting work carried out both in human trials and in preclinical animal models. Adaptive processes at the alveolocapillary barrier and in the pulmonary circulation, including alterations in alveolar fluid transport, endothelial junctional integrity, and vasoactive mediator secretion will be discussed in detail, highlighting the aspects that impact the response to, and development of, novel therapeutics.

  10. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy.

  11. Should All Congestive Heart Failure Patients Have a Routine Sleep Apnea Screening? Con

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanru; Daniels, Lori B.; Strollo, Patrick J.; Malhotra, Atul

    2015-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is one of the most common comorbidities in people with congestive heart failure (CHF). Although SDB has major cardiometabolic consequences, the attributable risk of SDB in asymptomatic CHF patients remains unclear. Whether early intervention using positive airway pressure would improve the prognosis in CHF patients is uncertain. As yet, there is insufficient evidence that routine polysomnography screening is cost-effective for asymptomatic CHF patients. Careful clinical risk evaluation and thoughtful use of limited-channel home sleep testing should be considered before the application of routine polysomnography in all CHF patients. PMID:26112304

  12. The Heart of New Ulm Project: using community-based cardiometabolic risk factor screenings in a rural population health improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Johnson, Pamela Jo; Pereira, Raquel F; Boucher, Jackie L; Britt, Heather R; Stephens, Charles W; Thygeson, N Marcus; Graham, Kevin J

    2012-06-01

    Awareness of cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk factors can improve the health of individuals and populations. Community-based risk factor screening programs may be particularly useful for quantifying the burden of cardiometabolic risk in a given population, particularly in underserved areas. This study provided a description of a screening platform and how it has been used to monitor the cardiometabolic risk profile within the broader Heart of New Ulm Project, which is based in a rural Minnesota community. A cross-sectional, descriptive examination of baseline screening data indicated that 45% of the target population participated in the program over 8 months. Overall, 13% of the sample reported a personal history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Among the subset without active cardiometabolic disease, 35% were found to be at high risk for developing cardiovascular disease or type 2 diabetes over the next 8-10 years. A high prevalence of metabolic syndrome, high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, obesity, and low fruit/vegetable consumption were of particular concern in this community. This article describes the use of screening results to inform the design of intervention programs that target these risk factors at both the community and individual levels. In addition, design considerations for future community-based cardiometabolic risk factor screening programs are discussed, with a focus on balancing program objectives related to health surveillance, research, and the delivery of preventive health care services.

  13. Burn-induced subepicardial injury in frog heart: a simple model mimicking ST segment changes in ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    KAZAMA, Itsuro

    2015-01-01

    To mimic ischemic heart disease in humans, several animal models have been created, mainly in rodents by surgically ligating their coronary arteries. In the present study, by simply inducing burn injuries on the bullfrog heart, we reproduced abnormal ST segment changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG), mimicking those observed in ischemic heart disease, such as acute myocardial infarction and angina pectoris. The “currents of injury” created by a voltage gradient between the intact and damaged areas of the myocardium, negatively deflected the ECG vector during the diastolic phase, making the ST segment appear elevated during the systolic phase. This frog model of heart injury would be suitable to explain the mechanisms of ST segment changes observed in ischemic heart disease. PMID:26346747

  14. Preconception Counseling for Women with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Wang, Jou-Kou; Lin, Min-Tai; Chen, Chun-An; Chiu, Shenn-Nan; Chiu, Hsin-Hui

    2015-01-01

    With advances that have been made over the recent decades in transcatheter and surgical interventions, most patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) can survive into adulthood. Overall, probably half of these surviving patients are female. When these female CHD patients reach childbearing age, however, pregnancy management will be a major issue. In order to meet the demands of fetal growth, the maternal cardiovascular system starts a series of adaptations beginning in early pregnancy. These adaptations include: decreased systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances, decreased blood pressure, expansion of the blood volume, increased heart rate and increased cardiac output. For women with CHD, this hemodynamic alteration may increase the risks of adverse cardiovascular events as well as the fetal and neonatal complications. Therefore, proper risk stratification and effective counseling for women with CHD who are planning their pregnancies is an important undertaking. PMID:27122914

  15. Pathways in heart failure disease management across socioeconomic spectra.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Kathy; Gogichaishvili, Ilia; Gopie, Stephanie; Arcement, Lee

    2011-12-01

    Caring for heart failure patients with a low socioeconomic status presents a unique set of challenges for health care providers. Heart failure disease management programs can integrate the use of teaching DVDs to overcome deficiencies in health literacy and take advantage of the Wal-Mart/Target $4 dollar medication program to provide life-saving medical therapy. In addition, open discussions with the patient and family regarding the costs of medications and the reality of what they can afford to pay monthly on a long term basis can guide the physician to prescribing medications by prioritizing use with a focus on evidence-based data for the medications with the highest mortality reduction. Finally, connecting inpatient visits to outpatient visits through the use of electronic medical records systems can facilitate avoidance of unnecessary repeat lab and diagnostic testing.

  16. Management of Hypertension among Patients with Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Zizi, Ferdinand; Brimah, Perry; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Makaryus, Amgad N; McFarlane, Samy; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common outcome of hypertension. Hypertension accelerates the development of atherosclerosis, and sustained elevation of blood pressure (BP) can destabilize vascular lesions and precipitate acute coronary events. Hypertension can cause myocardial ischemia in the absence of CHD. These cardiovascular risks attributed to hypertension can be reduced by optimal BP control. Although several antihypertensive agents exist, the choice of agent and the appropriate target BP for patients with CHD remain controversial. In this succinct paper, we examine the evidence and the mechanisms for the linkage between hypertension and CHD and we discuss the treatment options and the goals of therapy that are consistent with the report of the seventh Joint National Committee on the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) and American Heart Association scientific statement. We anticipate changes in the recommendations of the forthcoming JNC 8. PMID:21785704

  17. Pathways in heart failure disease management across socioeconomic spectra.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Kathy; Gogichaishvili, Ilia; Gopie, Stephanie; Arcement, Lee

    2011-12-01

    Caring for heart failure patients with a low socioeconomic status presents a unique set of challenges for health care providers. Heart failure disease management programs can integrate the use of teaching DVDs to overcome deficiencies in health literacy and take advantage of the Wal-Mart/Target $4 dollar medication program to provide life-saving medical therapy. In addition, open discussions with the patient and family regarding the costs of medications and the reality of what they can afford to pay monthly on a long term basis can guide the physician to prescribing medications by prioritizing use with a focus on evidence-based data for the medications with the highest mortality reduction. Finally, connecting inpatient visits to outpatient visits through the use of electronic medical records systems can facilitate avoidance of unnecessary repeat lab and diagnostic testing. PMID:22089272

  18. Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening: a 21-year experience.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, G; McCann, C L; Hedrick, J; Fairley, C; Nagel, H L; Kushner, J D; Kessel, R

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a community-based carrier screening program for Tay-Sachs disease, initiated on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus in 1978. The Madison Community Tay-Sachs Screening Program (MCTSSP) is a collaborative, interdisciplinary program that organizes and conducts periodic screening for Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) for the purpose of identifying Tay-Sachs carriers. We present and analyze data on carrier detection with regard to various demographics, including family history of TSD, ancestry, gender, medication exposure, and illness. Individuals participating in the MCTSSP between 1978 and 1999 were primarily of the target population, and the carrier rate was within the expected range (1/25). Despite aggressive publicity efforts and a well-established program, attendance at the screens has declined. A recent survey of Jewish undergraduate students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison showed poor recall of family screen history and carrier status and reinforced the perception that utilization of the Madison screening program has been low. Ways to increase awareness of and interest in carrier screening for TSD are explored.

  19. Prognosis of patients with carcinoid heart disease after valvular surgery.

    PubMed

    Manoly, Imthiaz; McAnelly, Sarah-Louise; Sriskandarajah, Sanjeevan; McLaughlin, Kenneth Edward

    2014-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. We addressed the following question: in patients who are diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease (CHD), do valvular surgeries improve their prognosis? Fifty percent of the patients with clinically diagnosed carcinoid syndrome had cardiac involvement which was present either as valvular dysfunction or as cardiac metastases. These patients often require surgery due to their heightened risk of cardiac disease. Altogether 217 relevant papers were identified as a result of the below-mentioned search, of which 10 papers represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Of the patients who were identified to have carcinoid heart disease in different studies, 193 patients had valve procedure, mainly replacements at tricuspid, mitral and aortic valve positions and either valvuloplasty or replacement at pulmonary valve. Tricuspid and pulmonary valves represented the majority of the excised valves among patients undergoing valvular surgery for CHD. The pathology of carcinoid valve was attributed to the presence of plaque, causing thickening and retraction. Pure regurgitation was the most common finding in all the valves except pulmonary valve which had both stenosis and insufficiency. Thirty-day mortality was 17% (range 1-63%) and long-term survivors were reported to be alive at an average of 58 months (28-80 months) after the valve surgery. The evidence demonstrates that surgical intervention can lead to improved prognosis and reduce the symptoms of heart failure. Postoperative mortality was mainly due to the carcinoid disease itself and not as a complication of the surgery. Therefore, surgery could be considered for symptomatic palliation in carefully selected individuals.

  20. Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease in Newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pediatrics . 2009 ; 124 : 823 – 836 . OpenUrl Abstract / FREE Full Text 2. ↵ Thangaratinam S , Brown K , Zamora J , Khan KS , ... Pediatrics . 2011 ; 128 : e1259 – e1267 . OpenUrl Abstract / FREE Full Text 6. ↵ http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/pediatricgenetics/cchdscreening. ...

  1. Pulmonary heart disease: The heart-lung interaction and its impact on patient phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Forfia, Paul R.; Vaidya, Anjali; Wiegers, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary heart disease (PHD) refers to altered structure or function of the right ventricle occurring in association with abnormal respiratory function. Although nearly always associated with some degree of PH, the degree, nature, severity, and causality of PH in relation to the PHD is not necessarily linear and direct. Abnormal gas exchange is a fundamental underpinning of PHD, affecting pulmonary vascular, cardiac, renal, and neurohormonal systems. Direct and indirect effects of chronic respiratory disease can disrupt the right ventricular-pulmonary arterial (RV-PA) interaction and, likewise, factors such as sympathetic nervous system activation, altered blood viscosity, and salt and water retention can function in a feedback loop to further influence RV-PA function. Left heart function may also be affected, especially in those with pre-existing left heart disease. Thus, the physiologic interactions between abnormal respiratory and cardiovascular function are complex, with PHD representing a heterogeneous end organ effect of an integrated multisystem process. In this review, we propose to separate PHD into two distinct entities, “Type I” and “Type II” PHD. Type I PHD is most common, and refers to subjects with chronic respiratory disease (CRD) where the perturbations in respiratory function dominate over more mild cardiac and circulatory disruptions. In contrast, Type II PHD refers to the smaller subset of patients with more severe pulmonary vascular and right heart dysfunction, whom often present in a fashion similar to patients with PAH. Phenotypic differences are not made by PA pressure alone, but instead by differences in the overall physiology and clinical syndrome. Thus, key differences can be seen in symptomatology, physical signs, cardiac imaging, hemodynamics, and the cardiovascular and gas exchange responses to exercise. Such key baseline differences in the overall physiologic phenotype are likely critical to predicting response to PH specific

  2. Sickle cell disease: time for a targeted neonatal screening programme.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C; Geoghegan, R; Conroy, H; Lippacott, S; O'Brien, D; Lynam, P; Langabeer, L; Cotter, M; Smith, O; McMahon, C

    2015-02-01

    Ireland has seen a steady increase in paediatric sickle cell disease (SCD). In 2005, only 25% of children with SCD were referred to the haemoglobinopathy service in their first year. A non-funded screening programme was implemented. This review aimed to assess the impact screening has had. All children referred to the haemoglobinopathy service born in Ireland after 2005 were identified. Data was collected from the medical chart and laboratory system. Information was analysed using Microsoft Excel. 77 children with SCD were identified. The median age at antibiotic commencement in the screened group was 56 days compared with 447 days in the unscreened group, p = < 0.0003. 22 (28%) of infants were born in centre's that do not screen and 17 (81%) were over 6 months old at referral, compared with 14 (21%) in the screened group. 6 (27%) of those in the unscreened group presented in acute crisis compared with 2 (3%) in the screened population. The point prevalence of SCD in Ireland is 0.2% in children under 15 yr of African and Asian descent. We identified delays in referral and treatment, which reflect the lack of government funded support and policy. We suggest all maternity units commence screening for newborns at risk of SCD. It is a cost effective intervention with a number needed to screen of just 4 to prevent a potentially fatal crisis. PMID:25803954

  3. Proteomics in human disease: cancer, heart and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, P R; Zimny-Arndt, U; Zeindl-Eberhart, E; Stulik, J; Koupilova, K; Pleissner, K P; Otto, A; Müller, E C; Sokolowska-Köhler, W; Grabher, G; Stöffler, G

    1999-07-01

    In recent years, genomics has increased the understanding of many diseases. Proteomics is a rapidly growing research area that encompasses both genetic and environmental factors. The protein composition represents the functional status of a biological compartment. The five approaches presented here resulted in the detection of disease-associated proteins. Calgranulin B was upregulated in colorectal cancer, and hepatoma-derived aldose reductase-like protein was reexpressed in a rat model during hepatocarcinogenesis. In these two investigations, attention was focused on one protein, obviously differing in amount, directly after two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Additional methods, such as enzyme activity measurements and immunohistochemistry, confirmed the disease association of the two candidates resulting from 2-DE subtractive analysis. The following three investigations take advantage of the holistic potential of the 2-DE approach. The comparison of 2-DE patterns from dilated cardiomyopathy patients with those of controls revealed 25 statistically significant intensity differences, from which 12 were identified by amino acid analysis, Edman degradation or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). A human myocardial 2-DE database was constructed, containing 3300 protein spots and 150 identified protein species. The number of identified proteins was limited by the capacity of our group, rather than by the principle of feasibility. Another field where proteomics proves to be a valuable tool in identifying proteins of importance for diagnosis is proteome analysis of pathogenic microorganisms such as Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease) and Toxoplasma gondii (toxoplasmosis). Sera from patients with early or late symptoms of Lyme borreliosis contained antibodies of various classes against about 80 antigens each, containing the already described antigens OspA, B and C, flagellin, p83/100, and p39. Similarly, antibody reactivity to

  4. Screening for infectious diseases at international airports: the Frankfurt model.

    PubMed

    Gaber, Walter; Goetsch, Udo; Diel, Roland; Doerr, Hans W; Gottschalk, René

    2009-07-01

    Historically, ships brought infectious diseases to the continents of the world, but in this modern era, infectious diseases and pandemics are primarily spread through aviation as a mode of travel. This is a significant issue in the realm of infection control because of the increased potential for the rapid worldwide transmission and spread of disease. Although the transmission of infectious diseases to airline passengers inside an aircraft is a rare occurrence, it is essential to implement entry and exit screening procedures at airports within the context of the International Health Regulations (IHR) in order to slow down the spread of infection, especially during the early phases of a pandemic event. Currently, there are no standardized procedures for health screening at airports, thus allowing individual regional authorities to determine what they deem to be appropriate screening measures for implementation. In this paper, we will discuss a new pragmatic approach for entry and exit screening procedures at international airports, propose a new classification system for contacts within the aircraft, and discuss changing the fixed enforcement of standardized community mitigation measures to the implementation of measures that correspond to specific characteristics of individual pathogenic agents. The proposed catalog of screening measures is aimed at attaining the goals of the IHR, which states that the measures should be reasonable while avoiding inconvenience or harm to passengers and should not be any more disruptive to the smooth handling of passenger traffic than is necessary.

  5. Bioengineering and Stem Cell Technology in the Treatment of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, Alexis; Edel, Michael J.; Blue, Gillian; Dilley, Rodney J.; Harvey, Richard P.; Winlaw, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease places a significant burden on the individual, family and community despite significant advances in our understanding of aetiology and treatment. Early research in ischaemic heart disease has paved the way for stem cell technology and bioengineering, which promises to improve both structural and functional aspects of disease. Stem cell therapy has demonstrated significant improvements in cardiac function in adults with ischaemic heart disease. This finding, together with promising case studies in the paediatric setting, demonstrates the potential for this treatment in congenital heart disease. Furthermore, induced pluripotent stems cell technology, provides a unique opportunity to address aetiological, as well as therapeutic, aspects of disease. PMID:26239354

  6. Stem cells as a novel tool for drug screening and treatment of degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Zuba-Surma, Ewa K; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Madeja, Zbigniew; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2012-01-01

    Degenerative diseases similarly as acute tissue injuries lead to massive cell loss and may cause organ failure of vital organs (e.g., heart, central nervous system). Therefore, they belong to a group of disorders that may significantly benefit from stem cells (SCs)-based therapies. Several stem and progenitor cell populations have already been described as valuable tools for developing therapeutic strategies in regenerative medicine. In particular, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), including adult-tissue-derived PSCs, neonatal-tissue-derived SCs, embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and recently described induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), are the focus of particular attention because of their capacity to differentiate into all the cell lineages. Although PSCs are predominantly envisioned to be applied for organ regeneration, they may be also successfully employed in drug screening and disease modeling. In particular, adult PSCs and iPSCs derived from patient tissues may not only be a source of cells for autologous therapies but also for individual customized in vitro drug testing and studies on the molecular mechanisms of disease. In this review, we will focus on the potential applications of SCs, especially PSCs i) in regenerative medicine therapies, ii) in studying mechanisms of disease, as well as iii) in drug screening and toxicology tests that are crucial in new drug development. In particular, we will discuss the application of SCs in developing new therapeutic approaches to treat degenerative diseases of the neural system and heart. The advantage of adult PSCs in all the above-mentioned settings is that they can be directly harvested from patient tissues and used not only as a safe non-immunogenic source of cells for therapy but also as tools for personalized drug screening and pharmacological therapies.

  7. Framingham Heart Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Hypertension; Heart Failure, Congestive; Peripheral Vascular Diseases; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Atherosclerosis; Heart Failure

  8. The Epidemiology, Clinical Manifestations, and Management of Chagas Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Malik, Lindsey H; Singh, Gagan D; Amsterdam, Ezra A

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease results from infection by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and is endemic in Latin America. T cruzi is most commonly transmitted through the feces of an infected triatomine, but can also be congenital, via contaminated blood transfusion or through direct oral contact. In the acute phase, the disease can cause cardiac derangements such as myocarditis, conduction system abnormalities, and/or pericarditis. If left untreated, the disease advances to the chronic phase. Up to one-half of these patients will develop a cardiomyopathy, which can lead to cardiac failure and/or ventricular arrhythmias, both of which are major causes of mortality. Diagnosis is confirmed by serologic testing for specific immunoglobulin G antibodies. Initial treatment consists of the antiparasitic agents benznidazole and nifurtimox. The treatment of Chagas cardiac disease comprises standard medical therapy for heart failure and amiodarone for ventricular arrhythmias, with consideration for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Chagas disease causes the highest infectious burden of any parasitic disease in the Western Hemisphere, and increased awareness of this disease is essential to improve diagnosis, enhance management, and reduce spread.

  9. Women and Heart Disease | Healthy Blood Pressure | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Special Section: Healthy Blood Pressure Women and Heart Disease Past Issues / Winter 2010 ... Truth Campaign" Urges Women To Take Good Blood Pressure Seriously February is American Heart Month, and the ...

  10. [Features of dietary treatment in patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    RUS

    2015-01-01

    The present review summarizes the current data of dietary treatment in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Numerous studies have shown that the diet can affect the modifiable risk factors for CHD that is the basis of primary and secondary prevention of this disease. The main areas of personalization of nutrition is the selection of an adequate energy value, a certain quota of protein,fats and carbohydrates in the diet, as well as other micronutrients that may influence the development of coronary artery disease. Caloric restriction of the diet in overweight patients is the most important factor of weight loss, independent of macronutrient composition of the diet. Diets with higher dietary protein content increase the rate of weight loss and improve blood lipid profile, but have a short-term effect. Excessive consumption of saturated fatty acids is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. As a result, numerous studies have shown that replacing saturated fats with mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids have a beneficial effect on blood lipid profile in patients with coronary artery disease. Several studies have shown that increasing the glycemic load is accompanied by an elevated risk of CHD, especially in women. Personalized dietary treatment on the basis of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of CHD and with the individual characteristics of a particular patient (sex, age, heredity, nutritional status, physical activity) is becoming increasingly important. Personalization of the diet provides a positive effect on risk factors for coronary heart disease, on the quality of life and increases the effectiveness of diet-therapy.

  11. [Features of dietary treatment in patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    RUS

    2015-01-01

    The present review summarizes the current data of dietary treatment in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Numerous studies have shown that the diet can affect the modifiable risk factors for CHD that is the basis of primary and secondary prevention of this disease. The main areas of personalization of nutrition is the selection of an adequate energy value, a certain quota of protein,fats and carbohydrates in the diet, as well as other micronutrients that may influence the development of coronary artery disease. Caloric restriction of the diet in overweight patients is the most important factor of weight loss, independent of macronutrient composition of the diet. Diets with higher dietary protein content increase the rate of weight loss and improve blood lipid profile, but have a short-term effect. Excessive consumption of saturated fatty acids is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. As a result, numerous studies have shown that replacing saturated fats with mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids have a beneficial effect on blood lipid profile in patients with coronary artery disease. Several studies have shown that increasing the glycemic load is accompanied by an elevated risk of CHD, especially in women. Personalized dietary treatment on the basis of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of CHD and with the individual characteristics of a particular patient (sex, age, heredity, nutritional status, physical activity) is becoming increasingly important. Personalization of the diet provides a positive effect on risk factors for coronary heart disease, on the quality of life and increases the effectiveness of diet-therapy. PMID:26852529

  12. Vascular Disease in Young Indians (20-40 years): Role of Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Murugesh Shantaveeraya; Das, Mrinal Kanti; Desai, Devangkumar M; Chopra, Vijay Kumar; Biswas, Arup Das

    2016-01-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) occurs at a younger age in Indians with over 50% of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) mortality occurring in individuals aged less than 50 years. Although several risk factors have been suggested; smoking, dyslipidemia and hypertension are major risk factors in the young. In this review, we have pooled the current evidence on Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) in young (20-40 years) and provided an opinion for the effective management of IHD in young Indians. PMID:27790504

  13. Adolescents and Adults with Congenital Heart Diseases in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Balushi, Asim; Al-Kindi, Hamood; Al-Shuaili, Hamood; Kumar, Suresh; Al-Maskari, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of our study was to examine the spectrum, demographics, and mortality rate among adolescents and adults with congenital heart diseases (CHD) in Oman. Methods Data was collected retrospectively from the Royal Hospital, Muscat, electronic health records for all patients with a diagnosis of CHD aged 13 years and above. Data was analyzed according to the type of CHD and in-hospital mortality was assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results A total of 600 patients with CHD were identified, among them 145 (24%) were aged 18 years or below. The median age was 24 years. The majority of patients had a simple form of CHD. Atrial and ventricular septal defects together constituted 62.8% of congenital heart diseases. Most patients were clustered in Muscat (32%) and the Batinah regions (31.1%) of Oman. Patients with tetralogy of Fallot and Fontan had shorter survival time than recorded in the published literature. Conclusion Mostly simple forms of CHD in younger patients was observed. The survival rate was significantly shortened in more complex lesions compared to simple lesions. A national data registry for CHD is needed to address the morbidities and mortality associated with the disease. PMID:25829997

  14. Computational modeling and engineering in pediatric and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Alison L.; Feinstein, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent methodological advances in computational simulations are enabling increasingly realistic simulations of hemodynamics and physiology, driving increased clinical utility. We review recent developments in the use of computational simulations in pediatric and congenital heart disease, describe the clinical impact in modeling in single ventricle patients, and provide an overview of emerging areas. Recent Findings Multiscale modeling combining patient specific hemodynamics with reduced order (i.e. mathematically and computationally simplified) circulatory models has become the defacto standard for modeling local hemodynamics and “global” circulatory physiology. We review recent advances that have enabled faster solutions, discuss new methods, (e.g. fluid structure interaction and uncertainty quantification), which lend realism both computationally and clinically to results, highlight novel computationally-derived surgical methods for single ventricle patients, and discuss areas in which modeling has begun to exert its influence including Kawasaki disease, fetal circulation, tetralogy of Fallot, (and pulmonary tree), and circulatory support. Summary Computational modeling is emerging as a crucial tool for clinical decision-making and evaluation of novel surgical methods and interventions in pediatric cardiology and beyond. Continued development of modeling methods, with an eye towards clinical needs, will enable clinical adoption in a wide range of pediatric and congenital heart diseases. PMID:26262579

  15. Potential benefits of cell therapy in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Casamassimi, Amelia; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Zullo, Alberto; Infante, Teresa; Napoli, Claudio

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest both in basic and clinical research regarding the field of cell therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD). Several preclinical models of CHD have suggested that regenerative properties of stem and progenitor cells might help restoring myocardial functions in the event of cardiac diseases. Here, we summarize different types of stem/progenitor cells that have been tested in experimental and clinical settings of cardiac regeneration, from embryonic stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. Then, we provide a comprehensive description of the most common cell delivery strategies with their major pros and cons and underline the potential of tissue engineering and injectable matrices to address the crucial issue of restoring the three-dimensional structure of the injured myocardial region. Due to the encouraging results from preclinical models, the number of clinical trials with cell therapy is continuously increasing and includes patients with CHD and congestive heart failure. Most of the already published trials have demonstrated safety and feasibility of cell therapies in these clinical conditions. Several studies have also suggested that cell therapy results in improved clinical outcomes. Numerous ongoing clinical trials utilizing this therapy for CHD will address fundamental issues concerning cell source and population utilized, as well as the use of imaging techniques to assess cell homing and survival, all factors that affect the efficacy of different cell therapy strategies.

  16. Preoperative prediction of significant coronary artery disease in patients with valvular heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdale, D R; Faragher, E B; Bennett, D H; Bray, C L; Ward, C; Beton, D C

    1982-01-01

    A prognostic index for predicting significant coronary artery disease was established using multiple logistic regression analysis of clinical data from 643 patients with valvular heart disease who had undergone routine coronary arteriography before valve replacement. The index or equation obtained incorporated the presence of angina, a family history of ischaemic heart disease, age, cigarette smoking habits, mitral valve disease, sex, and electrocardiographic evidence of myocardial infarction. The equation was validated using prospective data from 387 patients with valvular disease and shown to enable almost a third of routine coronary arteriograms to be omitted while maintaining 95% sensitivity for patients with coronary artery disease. Similar analysis of the more detailed prospective data produced a second discriminant function incorporating diastolic blood pressure, total cigarettes smoked in life, the severity of angina, family history of ischaemic heart disease, age, current cigarette smoking habits, and the ratio of total to high density lipoprotein cholesterol. This method improved the discrimination between patients with and without coronary artery disease, allowing omission of 30% of routine coronary arteriograms with 100% sensitivity for patients with coronary disease and omission of 41% with a 96% sensitivity level. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 PMID:6799111

  17. Pathobiology of Ischemic Heart Disease: Past, Present and Future.

    PubMed

    Buja, L Maximilian; Vander Heide, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    This review provides a perspective on knowledge of ischemic heart disease (IHD) obtained from the contemporary era of research which began in the 1960s and has continued to the present day. Important discoveries have been made by basic and translational scientists and clinicians. Pathologists have contributed significantly to insights obtained from experimental studies and clinicopathological studies in humans. The review also provides a perspective for future directions in research in IHD aimed at increasing basic knowledge and developing additional therapeutic options for patients with IHD. PMID:26897485

  18. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  19. Echocardiography in congenital heart disease. An aid to surgical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R A

    1977-05-01

    Echocardiography is an important noninvasive method for accurately diagnosing many congenital cardiac defects. This method provides significant information so that cardiac surgery, when necessary, can be planned with greater facility. The value of the sonar method rests not only on its ability to diagnose specific cardiac defects but also to exclude heart disease, especially in infants with shock or cyanosis from noncardiac causes. Development of two-dimensional real-time scanning systems should provide greater understanding of anatomic spatial relationships and ease of diagnosis.

  20. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  1. Use of diuretics in cardiovascular diseases: (1) heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S; Anjum, S; Littler, W

    2004-01-01

    Diuretics are used extensively in hospitals and in community medical practice for the management of cardiovascular diseases. They are used frequently as the first line treatment for mild to moderate hypertension and are an integral part of the management of symptomatic heart failure. Although diuretics have been used for several decades, there is still some ambiguity and confusion regarding the optimal way of using these common drugs. In this paper, the classes and action of diuretics are reviewed, and the various indications, optimal doses, and recommendations on the effective use of these agents are discussed. PMID:15082840

  2. Controversies in pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Cheli, Martino

    2015-01-01

    Left heart failure is currently the most prevalent cause of pulmonary hypertension (PH) worldwide and this is due mainly to the increased left ventricular and pulmonary venous pressures seen in this condition. Still, a quota of patients with left heart failure will have a pulmonary arterial disease “disproportionate” to the initial increase of left-sided pressures. Whatever the mechanism involved, the appearance of PH is a powerful marker, as it determines decreased exercise tolerance and survival. To date, all trials using therapies approved for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) failed to demonstrate a benefit in the context of heart failure (HF) without or with PH. In addition, the comparison among studies is limited by relevant differences in definitions, methodology, and timing of assessment. A novel rigorous hemodynamic classification based on the diastolic pulmonary gradient has been recently proposed to better characterize this form of PH. This will promote uniformity in patient populations and end-points for future clinical trials. PMID:25705390

  3. Commonly Asked Questions about Children and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... only the heart. It has specialized probes and hardware that allow clear images of the fetal heart. ... Defects • Understand Your Risk • Symptoms & Diagnosis • Care & Treatment • Tools & Resources Congenital Heart Defects and Other Educational Brochures ...

  4. Lung cancer screening in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jessica; Marín, Marta; Sánchez-Salcedo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two intimately related diseases, with great impact on public health. Annual screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) of the chest significantly reduces mortality due to lung cancer, and several scientific societies now recommend this technique. COPD, defined by the presence of airflow obstruction [forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio less than 0.70], and their clinical phenotypes, namely emphysema and chronic bronchitis, have been associated with increased lung cancer risk. Several epidemiological studies, including lung cancer screening trials, have found a 2- to 4-fold increase in lung cancer risk in patients with COPD when compared to individuals without airflow obstruction. Part of the risk attributed to airflow obstruction appears to be derived from the presence of radiographic emphysema. The latter has proven to be an important lung cancer risk factor in smokers without airflow obstruction and even in never smokers. This evidence supports the idea of including patients with COPD and/or emphysema in lung cancer screening programs. There is evidence that lung cancer screening in this population is effective and can potentially reduce mortality. Specific lung cancer risk scores have been developed for patients with COPD [COPD lung cancer screening score (LUCSS) and COPD-LUCSS-diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO)] to identify those at high risk. A multidisciplinary approach for an adequate patient selection, especially of patients with severe disease, is key to maximize benefits and reduce harms from lung cancer screening in this population. Patients with COPD included in lung cancer screening programs could also benefit from other interventions, such as smoking cessation and adequate treatment. PMID:27195278

  5. Prevalence of heart disease demonstrated in 60 years of the Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia.

    PubMed

    Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa; Nather, Julio Cesar; Rodrigues, Alfredo José

    2014-01-01

    Considering the historical and academic relevance of the Brazilian Archives of Cardiology (ABC), as its MEDLINE indexing began in 1950, it was assumed as a hypothesis that the analysis of the publications over the last 60 years could reflect the changing trends of heart disease in Brazil. The study data were collected using a program developed for this purpose, allowing the automatic extraction of information from the MEDLINE database. The study information were collected by searching "Brazilian Archives of Cardiology AND selected parameter in English". Four observational groups were determined: (1) major groups of heart diseases (coronary artery disease, valvular heart disease, congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies); (2) relevant diseases in clinical practice (cardiac arrhythmias, cor pulmonale, myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure); (3) cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis); and (4) group determined due to the growing trend of publications on congestive heart failure seen in previous groups (congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, rheumatic heart disease and Chagasic heart disease) All publications within the established groups were described, highlighting the increasing importance of heart failure and diabetes as risk factors. A relatively easy search was carried out, using the computer program developed for literature search covering six decades. Emphasizing the limitations of the study, we suggest the existence of an epidemiological link between cardiac diseases that are prevalent in Brazil and the publications of the Brazilian Archives of Cardiology.

  6. Rheumatic fever & rheumatic heart disease: The last 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R. Krishna; Tandon, R.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) continue to be a major health hazard in most developing countries as well as sporadically in developed economies. Despite reservations about the utility, echocardiographic and Doppler (E&D) studies have identified a massive burden of RHD suggesting the inadequacy of the Jones’ criteria updated by the American Heart Association in 1992. Subclinical carditis has been recognized by E&D in patients with acute RF without clinical carditis as well as by follow up of RHD patients presenting as isolated chorea or those without clinical evidence of carditis. Over the years, the medical management of RF has not changed. Paediatric and juvenile mitral stenosis (MS), upto the age of 12 and 20 yr respectively, severe enough to require operative treatement was documented. These negate the belief that patients of RHD become symptomatic ≥20 years after RF as well as the fact that congestive cardiac failure in childhood indicates active carditis and RF. Non-surgical balloon mitral valvotomy for MS has been initiated. Mitral and/or aortic valve replacement during active RF in patients not responding to medical treatment has been found to be life saving as well as confirming that congestive heart failure in acute RF is due to an acute haemodynamic overload. Pathogenesis as well as susceptibility to RF continue to be elusive. Prevention of RF morbidity depends on secondary prophylaxis which cannot reduce the burden of diseases. Primary prophylaxis is not feasible in the absence of a suitable vaccine. Attempts to design an antistreptococcal vaccine utilizing the M-protein has not succeeded in the last 40 years. Besides pathogenesis many other questions remain unanswered. PMID:23703332

  7. From vulnerable plaque to vulnerable patient--Part III: Executive summary of the Screening for Heart Attack Prevention and Education (SHAPE) Task Force report.

    PubMed

    Naghavi, Morteza; Falk, Erling; Hecht, Harvey S; Jamieson, Michael J; Kaul, Sanjay; Berman, Daniel; Fayad, Zahi; Budoff, Matthew J; Rumberger, John; Naqvi, Tasneem Z; Shaw, Leslee J; Faergeman, Ole; Cohn, Jay; Bahr, Raymond; Koenig, Wolfgang; Demirovic, Jasenka; Arking, Dan; Herrera, Victoria L M; Badimon, Juan; Goldstein, James A; Rudy, Yoram; Airaksinen, Juhani; Schwartz, Robert S; Riley, Ward A; Mendes, Robert A; Douglas, Pamela; Shah, Prediman K

    2006-07-17

    Screening for early-stage asymptomatic cancers (eg, cancers of breast and colon) to prevent late-stage malignancies has been widely accepted. However, although atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (eg, heart attack and stroke) accounts for more death and disability than all cancers combined, there are no national screening guidelines for asymptomatic (subclinical) atherosclerosis, and there is no government- or healthcare-sponsored reimbursement for atherosclerosis screening. Part I and Part II of this consensus statement elaborated on new discoveries in the field of atherosclerosis that led to the concept of the "vulnerable patient." These landmark discoveries, along with new diagnostic and therapeutic options, have set the stage for the next step: translation of this knowledge into a new practice of preventive cardiology. The identification and treatment of the vulnerable patient are the focuses of this consensus statement. In this report, the Screening for Heart Attack Prevention and Education (SHAPE) Task Force presents a new practice guideline for cardiovascular screening in the asymptomatic at-risk population. In summary, the SHAPE Guideline calls for noninvasive screening of all asymptomatic men 45-75 years of age and asymptomatic women 55-75 years of age (except those defined as very low risk) to detect and treat those with subclinical atherosclerosis. A variety of screening tests are available, and the cost-effectiveness of their use in a comprehensive strategy must be validated. Some of these screening tests, such as measurement of coronary artery calcification by computed tomography scanning and carotid artery intima-media thickness and plaque by ultrasonography, have been available longer than others and are capable of providing direct evidence for the presence and extent of atherosclerosis. Both of these imaging methods provide prognostic information of proven value regarding the future risk of heart attack and stroke. Careful and responsible

  8. Heart disease risk factors and hormone use in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Barrett-Connor, E; Brown, W V; Turner, J; Austin, M; Criqui, M H

    1979-05-18

    A population of 1,496 women aged 55 to 74 years was studied for the distribution of heart disease risk factors in the presence or absence of postmenopausal estrogens. Current hormone use was reported by 39%. Hormone users were significantly slimmer than nonusers at all ages. After adjustment for the effect of obesity, hormone users had significantly lower mean levels of plasma cholesterol and higher mean levels of plasma triglycerides than nonusers. Blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose concentration tended to be lower among hormone users, although the differences were not statistically significant in all age groups. This article discusses the theoretical implications of these observations for cardiovascular disease mortality and contrasts them with the cancer risk of postmenopausal estrogen use. PMID:430817

  9. Heart disease risk factors and hormone use in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Barrett-Connor, E; Brown, W V; Turner, J; Austin, M; Criqui, M H

    1979-05-18

    A population of 1,496 women aged 55 to 74 years was studied for the distribution of heart disease risk factors in the presence or absence of postmenopausal estrogens. Current hormone use was reported by 39%. Hormone users were significantly slimmer than nonusers at all ages. After adjustment for the effect of obesity, hormone users had significantly lower mean levels of plasma cholesterol and higher mean levels of plasma triglycerides than nonusers. Blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose concentration tended to be lower among hormone users, although the differences were not statistically significant in all age groups. This article discusses the theoretical implications of these observations for cardiovascular disease mortality and contrasts them with the cancer risk of postmenopausal estrogen use.

  10. [Various lipoprotein fractions and their relation to ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, V; Mondillo, S; Kristodhullu, A; De Stefano, R; Amatucci, G

    1983-01-01

    In a study carried out on over 700 patients with three different manifestations of aterosclerosis (cerebrovascular, coronary and peripheral), we could not find any statistically significant difference between the total cholesterol and triglyceride concentration in these three groups. Also, there was o difference in cholesterol and triglyceride levels between these three groups and 200 normal subjects. The same held true when we compared a selected group of 76 patients with ischaemic heart disease who had no other risk factor, with a group of 80 control subjects. On the contrary, when we compared several fractions of serum lipoproteins and the ratios of apolipoprotein A to Apolipoprotein B, LDL Cholesterol to HDL Cholesterol, and total Cholesterol to HDL Cholesterol of the two groups, the differences were statistically significant. We conclude that when other risk factors are excluded, the protein component, rather than the lipid component of the plasma lipoproteins correlates the presence of coronary artery disease.

  11. Potential effects of environmental chemical contamination in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gorini, Francesca; Chiappa, Enrico; Gargani, Luna; Picano, Eugenio

    2014-04-01

    There is compelling evidence that prenatal exposures to environmental xenobiotics adversely affect human development and childhood. Among all birth defects, congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent of all congenital malformations and remains the leading cause of death. It has been estimated that in most cases the causes of heart defects remain unknown, while a growing number of studies have indicated the potential role of environmental agents as risk factors in CHD occurrence. In particular, maternal exposure to chemicals during the first trimester of pregnancy represents the most critical window of exposure for CHD. Specific classes of xenobiotics (e.g. organochlorine pesticides, organic solvents, air pollutants) have been identified as potential risk factors for CHD. Nonetheless, the knowledge gained is currently still incomplete as a consequence of the frequent heterogeneity of the methods applied and the difficulty in estimating the net effect of environmental pollution on the pregnant mother. The presence of multiple sources of pollution, both indoor and outdoor, together with individual lifestyle factors, may represent a further confounding element for association with the disease. A future new approach for research should probably focus on individual measurements of professional, domestic, and urban exposure to physical and chemical pollutants in order to accurately retrace the environmental exposure of parents of affected offspring during the pre-conceptional and pregnancy periods.

  12. Milk and other dietary influences on coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    While dietary links to ischemic heart disease (IHD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality have been studied for many years, the correlation has not clearly been resolved, especially for older populations. In this paper, a multi-country statistical approach involving 32 countries is used to find dietary links to IHD and CHD for various age groups aged 35+. For IHD, milk carbohydrates were found to have the highest statistical association for males aged 35+ and females aged 65+, while for females aged 35-64, sugar was found to have the highest association. In the case of CHD, non-fat milk was found to have the highest association for males aged 45+ and females aged 75+, while for females 65-74, milk carbohydrates and sugar had the highest associations, and for females aged 45-64, sugar had the highest association. A number of mechanisms have been proposed in the literature that might explain the milk carbohydrate or non-fat milk association. One of the most prominent theories is that animal proteins contribute to homocysteine (Hcy) production; however, milk more than meat lacks adequate B vitamins to convert Hcy to useful products. Lactose and calcium in conjunction with Hcy from consumption of non-fat milk may also contribute to calcification of the arteries.

  13. [Assessment of exercise capacity in congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Bouzo-López, Raquel; González-Represas, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    For many years, the treatment of congenital heart diseases has been a field in which, based on the seriousness of these conditions, treatment options were viewed with the greatest deference. This has conditioned, in many cases, the interventions to be undertaken in each. In this sense, exercise was thought to have a negative impact and thus the practise of almost any physical activity was limited. Although there has recently been a change in the paradigm with respect to exercise, this idea continues to hold sway. For many cardiopathies, the information obtained through a stress test is essential in order to implement and supervise an exercise program. The aim of this study is to analyze the parameters within the stress test which allow for an adequate stratification of the risk to subjects with congenital heart diseases who undertake exercise, as well as their values in accordance with the type of pathology, the gravity of such, and the age of the patients. Furthermore, these parameters will be analyzed for both their survival markers and the protocols that can best be adjusted for patients with these characteristic.

  14. 3D Printing to Guide Ventricular Assist Device Placement in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Kanwal M; Saeed, Omar; Zaidi, Ali; Sanz, Javier; Nielsen, James C; Hsu, Daphne T; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2016-04-01

    As the population of adults with congenital heart disease continues to grow, so does the number of these patients with heart failure. Ventricular assist devices are underutilized in adults with congenital heart disease due to their complex anatomic arrangements and physiology. Advanced imaging techniques that may increase the utilization of mechanical circulatory support in this population must be explored. Three-dimensional printing offers individualized structural models that would enable pre-surgical planning of cannula and device placement in adults with congenital cardiac disease and heart failure who are candidates for such therapies. We present a review of relevant cardiac anomalies, cases in which such models could be utilized, and some background on the cost and procedure associated with this process. PMID:27033018

  15. Increased prevalence of regurgitant valvular heart disease in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Alberto M; van Thiel, Sjoerd W; Lindner, Jonathan R; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; van der Wall, Ernst E; Morreau, Hans; Smit, Jan W A; Romijn, Johannes A; Bax, Jeroen J

    2004-01-01

    Cardiac involvement is common in acromegaly, but the prevalence of valvular abnormalities in patients with acromegaly has not been documented and is the topic of this study. In a prospective study design, 40 consecutive patients with acromegaly and 120 control subjects (matched for age, sex, hypertension, and left ventricular systolic function) were studied. All patients and controls were evaluated using conventional two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography. Significant valve disease was more prevalent in acromegalics compared with controls (22% vs. 6.7%, respectively; P = 0.005). Aortic valve regurgitation (>/=>trace severity) was present in 30% of patients vs. 7% of controls (P < 0.001), and mitral regurgitation (>/=moderate severity) was absent in controls but present in 5% of acromegalics (P = 0.014 vs. controls). Binary logistic regression analysis showed a significant impact only for disease duration on valvular disease, with an odds ratio of 1.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.028-1.376; P = 0.019). Acromegaly is associated with an increased prevalence of regurgitant valvular heart disease. This is dependent on the duration of exposure to increased GH concentrations, with a 19% increase in odds per year. This increased prevalence of occult valvular disease indicates that these patients require appropriate follow-up care and monitoring, especially patients with inadequate control of GH overproduction.

  16. Prototype early warning system for heart disease detection using Android Application.

    PubMed

    Zennifa, Fadilla; Fitrilina; Kamil, Husnil; Iramina, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    Heart Disease affects approximately 70 million people worldwide where most people do not even know the symptoms. This research examines the prototype of early warning system for heart disease by android application. It aims to facilitate users to early detect heart disease which can be used independently. To build the application in android phone, variable centered intelligence rule system (VCIRS) as decision makers and pulse sensor - Arduino as heart rate detector were applied in this study. Moreover, in Arduino, the heart rate will become an input for symptoms in Android Application. The output of this system is the conclusion statement of users diagnosed with either coronary heart disease, hypertension heart disease, rheumatic heart disease or do not get any kind of heart disease. The result of diagnosis followed by analysis of the value of usage variable rate (VUR) rule usage rate (RUR) and node usage rate (NUR) that shows the value of the rule that will increase when the symptoms frequently appear. This application was compared with the medical analysis from 35 cases of heart disease and it showed concordance between diagnosis from android application and expert diagnosis of the doctors.

  17. Periodontal disease as a risk marker in coronary heart disease and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.; Borgnakke, Wenche S.; Taylor, George W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Over half a million Americans die each year from coronary heart disease (CHD), 26 million suffer from chronic kidney disease (CKD), and a large proportion have periodontal disease (PD), a chronic infection of the tissues surrounding teeth. Chronic inflammation contributes to CHD and CKD occurrence and progression, and PD contributes to the cumulated chronic systemic inflammatory burden. This review examines recent evidence regarding the role of PD in CHD and CKD. Recent findings Periodontal pathogens cause both local infection and bacteremia, eliciting local and systemic inflammatory responses. PD is associated with the systemic inflammatory reactant CRP, a major risk factor for both CHD and CKD. Non-surgical PD treatment is shown to improve periodontal health, endothelial function and levels of CRP and other inflammatory markers. Evidence for the association of PD with CKD consists of a small body of literature represented mainly by cross-sectional studies. No definitive randomized-controlled trials exist with either CHD or CKD as primary endpoints. Summary Recent evidence links PD with CHD and CKD. Adding oral health self-care and referral for professional periodontal assessment and therapy to the repertoire of medical care recommendations is prudent to improve patients’ oral health and possibly reduce CHD and CKD risk. PMID:20948377

  18. Urine β 2-Microglobolin in the Patients with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noori, Noor Mohammad; Sadeghi, Simin; Shahramian, Iraj; Keshavarz, Kambiz

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the renal tubular function in the patients with congenital heart disease using β2-microglobulin. Methods In this case-control study, based on oxymetry, the patients with congenital heart disease were divided into two groups of cyanotic (n=20) and acyanotic (n=20). Congenital heart disease was diagnosed by echocardiography. Healthy individuals within the same age and sex groups were used as controls. Na+, β2-micro globulin, creatinine (Cr), and β2-microglobulin/Cr ratio were measured in random urine samples and the results were compared to the same parameters in the control group using Tukey, One-Way ANOVA, and X2 tests. Results Based on the study results, urine sodium in the patients with cyanotic heart disease was significantly different from that of the controls (P=0.023). The results also revealed a significant difference between the two groups with congenital heart disease regarding urine β2-microglobulin (P=0.045). In addition, the patients with cyanotic heart disease were significantly different from those with acyanotic heart disease and the controls regarding urine β2-micro globulin/Cr ratio (P=0.012 and P=0.026, respectively). Conclusions The results of this study demonstrated that renal tubular dysfunction began in the patients with congenital heart disease, especially in those with cyanotic congenital heart disease. Besides, early diagnosis before cardiac surgery leads to better control of renal tubular disease. PMID:24757623

  19. Cadmium in the blood and heart tissue of patients (smokers/non-smokers) with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Spieker, C.; Bertram, H.P.; Stratmann, T.; Achatzy, R.; Kisters, K.; Zumkley, H.

    1986-01-01

    Cadmium has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human hypertension and arteriosclerotic heart disease. Various experiments showed that cadmium could influence the vasopressor-induced reactivity and the stress-strain characteristics of the blood vessel wall. Smoking is considered to be one of the risk factors in accumulating high amounts of cadmium in human organic tissue. Therefore, in the present study the cadmium content of the blood and the heart tissue was evaluated in smoking and non-smoking patients who suffered from coronary heart diseases and various vascular defects. Blood and heart tissue samples of 49 patients undergoing a heart operation were examined. The measurements were carried out with atomic absorption spectometry. Cadmium concentration in the blood was elevated significantly in smoking patients versus non-smokers. In the heart tissue samples of smoking patients cadmium was increased as well towards non-smoking patients. These data show that smoking influences the cadmium intake and it may support the opinion of different research groups that cadmium might have a toxic effect on the myocardium and that cadmium accumulation is another risk factor in the development of coronary heart disease. 10 references, 1 figure.

  20. Nutrition in the prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and the management of lipoprotein disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is comprised of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). CVD is caused by progressive narrowing and blockage of arteries supplying the heart, brain, and other tissues and organs. CVD is the leading cause of death and disability in our ...

  1. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... heart disease is 25 grams (g) or more per day of soy protein. (ii) Nature of the substance. (A) Soy... and treatment; (6) The claim may include information on the number of people in the United States who... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is......

  2. Hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease in the survivors of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Roche, S Lucy; Silversides, Candice K

    2013-07-01

    Obesity, hypertension, and coronary artery disease are prevalent in the general population and well recognized as contributors to cardiac morbidity and mortality. With surgical and medical advances, there is a growing and aging population with congenital heart disease who are also at risk of developing these comorbidities. In addition, some congenital cardiac lesions predispose patients to conditions such as hypertension or coronary artery disease. The effect of these comorbidities on the structurally abnormal heart is not well understood, but might be very important, especially in those with residual abnormalities. Thus, in addition to surveillance for and treatment of late complications it is important for the congenital cardiologist to consider and aggressively manage acquired comorbidities. In this review we explore the prevalence of hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease, discuss congenital lesions that predispose to these conditions and review management strategies for this unique population.

  3. Transcatheter interventions for multiple lesions in adults with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Tahir; Clarke, Bernard; Mahadevan, Vaikom

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnosis, surgery and interventional management have significantly changed the quality of life of patients with congenital heart disease. Historically, congenital heart disease patients with multiple cardiac lesions have been referred for surgery; however, with the advent of newer technologies and expertise, transcatheter treatment has evolved as an alternative option. A series of patients who underwent interventional procedures for multiple congenital heart disease lesions with excellent procedural and medium-term outcomes is reported. PMID:22826648

  4. Risks for heart disease and lung cancer from passive smoking by workers in the catering industry.

    PubMed

    Hedley, Anthony J; McGhee, Sarah M; Repace, James L; Wong, Lai-Chin; Yu, Marcus Y S; Wong, Tze-Wai; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2006-04-01

    Workers in the catering industry are at greater risk of exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) when smoke-free workplace policies are not in force. We determined the exposure of catering workers to SHS in Hong Kong and their risk of death from heart disease and lung cancer. Nonsmoking catering workers were provided with screening at their workplaces and at a central clinic. Participants reported workplace, home, and leisure time exposure to SHS. Urinary cotinine was estimated by enzyme immunoassay. Catering facilities were classified into three types: nonsmoking, partially restricted smoking (with nonsmoking areas), and unrestricted smoking. Mean urinary cotinine levels ranged from 3.3 ng/ml in a control group of 16 university staff through 6.4 ng/ml (nonsmoking), 6.1 ng/ml (partially restricted), and 15.9 ng/ml (unrestricted smoking) in 104 workers who had no exposures outside of work. Workers in nonsmoking facilities had exposures to other smoking staff. We modeled workers' mortality risks using average cotinine levels, estimates of workplace respirable particulates, risk data for cancer and heart disease from cohort studies, and national (US) and regional (Hong Kong) mortality for heart disease and lung cancer. We estimated that deaths in the Hong Kong catering workforce of 200,000 occur at the rate of 150 per year for a 40-year working-lifetime exposure to SHS. When compared with the current outdoor air quality standards for particulates in Hong Kong, 30% of workers exceeded the 24-h and 98% exceeded the annual air quality objectives due to workplace SHS exposures. PMID:16428261

  5. Association of ischemic heart disease to global and regional longitudinal strain in asymptomatic aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang; Jensen, Jan Skov; Mogelvang, Rasmus

    2015-03-01

    Longitudinal deformation has been shown to deteriorate with progressive aortic stenosis as well as ischemic heart disease. Despite that both conditions share risk factors and are often coexisting, studies have not assessed the influence on longitudinal deformation for both conditions simultaneously. Thus the purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between subclinical ischemic heart disease and global and regional longitudinal strain in asymptomatic patients with significant aortic stenosis. Prevalent patients with a diagnosis of aortic stenosis at six hospitals in the Greater Copenhagen area were screened for inclusion. A total of 104 asymptomatic patients with moderate-severe aortic stenosis (aortic valve area ≤1.5 cm(2)) fulfilled study criteria and underwent advanced echocardiographic analysis and coronary angiography by multi-detector computed tomography. Angiography revealed coronary stenosis >50% in 31% (n = 32). All regional longitudinal strain measures (apical, mid and basal longitudinal strain) were significant predictors of significant coronary stenosis (>70% stenosis), but only apical and mid longitudinal strain were significant predictors in multivariable analyses independent of aortic valve area, stroke volume index, pro-BNP, valvulo-arterial impedance, body mass index and heart rate. In linear regression models with both aortic valve area and significant coronary stenosis, apical (p < 0.001) and mid (p < 0.01) longitudinal strain were associated to significant coronary stenosis but not aortic valve area. Conversely, basal longitudinal strain was significantly associated to aortic valve area (p = 0.001), but not to significant coronary stenosis. Subclinical coronary artery disease is frequent in moderate and severe aortic stenosis, and should be suspected when regional longitudinal dysfunction is predominant in the apical and mid ventricular segments.

  6. Community Screening for Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy in Asymptomatic Subjects ≥65 Years With Stage B Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Nolan, Mark; Negishi, Kazuaki; Okin, Peter M; Marwick, Thomas H

    2016-06-15

    A process to identify and target a selected population at risk of heart failure (HF) could facilitate screening and prevention. We sought to develop an effective screening process from clinical characteristics, functional capacity, and electrocardiogram (ECG). Asymptomatic subjects ≥65 years, with ≥1 HF risks were recruited from the community. Subjects with valvular disease, ejection fraction <40%, and atrial fibrillation were excluded. All underwent clinical evaluation including assessment of HF risk using Framingham HF score and Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) score, ECG, echocardiography, and 6-minute walk (6 MW) test. After 14 ± 4 months, new HF was assessed using Framingham criteria. A randomly selected derivation cohort was used to integrate ARIC score and 6 MW in a classification and regression tree (CART) analysis, with the remaining population used for validation. Of the 419 subjects (age 70 ± 5; 48% men), 52 developed HF. ARIC was more effective than the Framingham HF score (area under the curve 0.65 vs 0.53, p = 0.01). CART selected ARIC (>9.5%) and 6 MW (<501 m) as cutoffs to define low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups. Abnormal ECG further divided the intermediate group into high and low risks. The 134 subjects identified as high risk by a combined clinical and electrocardiographic strategy showed more echocardiographic features of cardiac dysfunction including LV mass, mitral e', mitral E/e', and longitudinal strain (p <0.01). New HF was significantly more frequent than in the remaining patients (20% vs 10%, p = 0.003; hazard ratio 2.08, 95% confidence interval 1.21 to 3.57, p = 0.008). Thus, initial clinical risk and electrocardiographic assessment facilitate effective HF screening by identifying a high-risk group. PMID:27138184

  7. Screening for late-onset Pompe disease in Finland.

    PubMed

    Palmio, Johanna; Auranen, Mari; Kiuru-Enari, Sari; Löfberg, Mervi; Bodamer, Olaf; Udd, Bjarne

    2014-11-01

    Pompe disease (glycogen storage disease type II) is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in GAA gene. The estimated frequency of late-onset Pompe disease is around 1:60,000. However, only two infantile and one late-onset Pompe patients have been reported in Finland with a population of 5 million. We screened for late-onset Pompe disease in a cohort of undetermined myopathy patients with proximal muscle weakness and/or elevated serum creatine kinase values. Acid α-glucosidase (GAA) activity in dried blood spots was measured and clinical data collected in 108 patients. Four patients had low normal GAA activity; all the others had activities well within the normal range. Re-analyses of these patients did not reveal new Pompe patients. Our findings suggest that Pompe disease is extremely rare in Finland. Finland is an example of an isolated population with enrichment of certain mutations for genetic disorders and low occurrence of some autosomal recessive diseases.

  8. Pregnancy and contraception in young women with congenital heart disease: General considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Rachel M; Sermer, Mathew; Colman, Jack M

    2011-01-01

    Young women with heart disease are increasingly being seen in obstetrical referral centres owing, in large part, to the dramatic improvements in survival of young adults with congenital heart disease in recent years. Although pregnancies in most women with heart disease result in favourable outcomes, there are important exceptions that must be recognized. These exceptions pose significant mortality risk to the mother and/or the fetus. The present article outlines cardiovascular adaptations to pregnancy, general outcomes and management considerations for practitioners caring for pregnant young women with congenital heart disease. A lesion-specific review is published in a complementary article. PMID:22468131

  9. ESC Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease Position Paper: assessing the risk of interventions in patients with valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenhek, Raphael; Iung, Bernard; Tornos, Pilar; Antunes, Manuel J.; Prendergast, Bernard D.; Otto, Catherine M.; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Stepinska, Janina; Kaden, Jens J.; Naber, Christoph K.; Acartürk, Esmeray; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa

    2012-01-01

    Aims Risk scores provide an important contribution to clinical decision-making, but their validity has been questioned in patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), since current scores have been mainly derived and validated in adults undergoing coronary bypass surgery. The Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease of the European Society of Cardiology reviewed the performance of currently available scores when applied to VHD, in order to guide clinical practice and future development of new scores. Methods and results The most widely used risk scores (EuroSCORE, STS, and Ambler score) were reviewed, analysing variables included and their predictive ability when applied to patients with VHD. These scores provide relatively good discrimination, i.e. a gross estimation of risk category, but cannot be used to estimate the exact operative mortality in an individual patient because of unsatisfactory calibration. Conclusion Current risk scores do not provide a reliable estimate of exact operative mortality in an individual patient with VHD. They should therefore be interpreted with caution and only used as part of an integrated approach, which incorporates other patient characteristics, the clinical context, and local outcome data. Future risk scores should include additional variables, such as cognitive and functional capacity and be prospectively validated in high-risk patients. Specific risk models should also be developed for newer interventions, such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation. PMID:21406443

  10. Identifying Early Changes in Myocardial Microstructure in Hypertensive Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Pranoti; Bauer, Michael; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Cheng, Hui-Wen; Unno, Kazumasa; Patel, Ravi B.; Harvey, Bethany W.; Chang, Wei-Ting; Groarke, John D.; Liao, Ronglih; Cheng, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The transition from healthy myocardium to hypertensive heart disease is characterized by a series of poorly understood changes in myocardial tissue microstructure. Incremental alterations in the orientation and integrity of myocardial fibers can be assessed using advanced ultrasonic image analysis. We used a modified algorithm to investigate left ventricular myocardial microstructure based on analysis of the reflection intensity at the myocardial-pericardial interface on B-mode echocardiographic images. We evaluated the extent to which the novel algorithm can differentiate between normal myocardium and hypertensive heart disease in humans as well as in a mouse model of afterload resistance. The algorithm significantly differentiated between individuals with uncomplicated essential hypertension (N = 30) and healthy controls (N = 28), even after adjusting for age and sex (P = 0.025). There was a trend in higher relative wall thickness in hypertensive individuals compared to controls (P = 0.08), but no difference between groups in left ventricular mass (P = 0.98) or total wall thickness (P = 0.37). In mice, algorithm measurements (P = 0.026) compared with left ventricular mass (P = 0.053) more clearly differentiated between animal groups that underwent fixed aortic banding, temporary aortic banding, or sham procedure, on echocardiography at 7 weeks after surgery. Based on sonographic signal intensity analysis, a novel imaging algorithm provides an accessible, non-invasive measure that appears to differentiate normal left ventricular microstructure from myocardium exposed to chronic afterload stress. The algorithm may represent a particularly sensitive measure of the myocardial changes that occur early in the course of disease progression. PMID:24831515

  11. Global research priorities in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Zühlke, Liesl J

    2011-01-01

    We now stand at a critical juncture for rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) control. In recent years, we have seen a surge of interest in these diseases in regions of the world where RF/RHD mostly occur. This brings real opportunities to make dramatic progress in the next few years, but also real risks if we miss these opportunities. Most public health and clinical approaches in RF/RHD arose directly from programmes of research. Many unanswered questions remain, including those around how to implement what we know will work, so research will continue to be essential in our efforts to bring a global solution to this disease. Here we outline our proposed research priorities in RF/RHD for the coming decade, grouped under the following four challenges: Translating what we know already into practical RHD control; How to identify people with RHD earlier, so that preventive measures have a higher chance of success; Better understanding of disease pathogenesis, with a view to improved diagnosis and treatment of ARF and RHD; and Finding an effective approach to primary prevention. We propose a mixture of basic, applied, and implementation science. With concerted efforts, strong links to clinical and public health infrastructure, and advocacy and funding support from the international community, there are good prospects for controlling these RF and RHD over the next decade.

  12. Lessons for Health Promotion from Selected Community-Based Heart Disease Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Manoj; Galletly, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Discusses four key community-based coronary heart disease prevention interventions, elaborating on some of the challenges they encountered. The four interventions are the Stanford Three Community Study, Stanford Five-City Project, Minnesota Heart Health Program, and Pawtucket (Rhode Island) Heart Health Program. (SM)

  13. Obesity and hypertension, heart failure, and coronary heart disease-risk factor, paradox, and recommendations for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Artham, Surya M; Lavie, Carl J; Milani, Richard V; Ventura, Hector O

    2009-01-01

    Obesity prevalence has reached epidemic proportions and is independently associated with numerous cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cancers, sleep apnea, and other major CVDs. Obesity has significant negative impact on CVD, including hypertension, coronary heart disease, heart failure, and arrhythmias via its maladaptive effects on individual CVD risk factors and cardiac structure and function. Despite this negative association between obesity and the incidence and prevalence of CVD, many studies have demonstrated that obese patients with established CVD might have better short- and long-term prognosis, suggesting an "obesity paradox." This intriguing phenomenon has been well documented in populations with heart failure, coronary heart disease, and hypertension. This review summarizes the adverse effects of obesity on individual CVD risk factors; its role in the genesis of CVDs, including heart failure, coronary heart disease, and hypertension; and the obesity paradox observed in these populations and the potential underlying mechanisms behind this puzzling phenomenon and concludes with a discussion on the potential benefits of weight reduction.

  14. [High altitude stay and air travel in coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Allemann, Y; Saner, H; Meier, B

    1998-04-25

    Acute exposure to high altitude produces hypoxia-associated stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. This response is further enhanced by physical activity and induces an increase in heart rate and blood pressure. Consequently, cardiac work, myocardial oxygen consumption, and coronary blood flow are also increased. During the first 4 days of acute exposure to moderate or high altitude, coronary patients are at greatest risk of untoward events. Gradual ascent, early limitation of activity to a lower level than tolerated at low altitude, pre-ascent physical conditioning and rigorous blood pressure control should all help to minimise the cardiac risk. At altitudes of 2500 to 3000 m or lower, an asymptomatic coronary patient with good exercise tolerance, without exercise induced signs or symptoms of ischemia, and with an ejection fraction of the left ventricle > 50%, is at very low risk. However, several days' acclimatization before high-level activity at moderate or high altitude is recommended. High risk coronary patients should be investigated more carefully and precautionary measures should be more stringent. Left and right cardiac function and pulmonary artery pressure are the most helpful parameters for evaluation and counselling of patients with non-ischemic heart disease who plan to ascend to moderate or high altitudes. When advising patients who intend to fly as passengers in commercial aircraft, it is important to know that in-flight atmospheric pressure conditions in commercial jet aircraft approach altitude equivalents of 1500 to 2400 m. Propeller-driven planes are rarely pressurized but usually fly at altitudes below 3300 m. Relatively strict contraindications for air travel by coronary patients are uncomplicated myocardial infarction within the last 2 weeks, complicated myocardial infarction within the last 6 weeks, unstable angina, thoracic surgery within the last 3 weeks, and poorly controlled congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, or hypertension.

  15. Mutations of TFAP2B in congenital heart disease patients in Mysore, South India

    PubMed Central

    Lingaiah, Kusuma; Sosalagere, Dinesh M.; Mysore, Savitha R.; Krishnamurthy, B.; Narayanappa, Doddaiah; Nallur, Ramachandra B.

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Cardiac malformations in the young constitute a major portion of clinically significant birth defects. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a common congenital cardiac birth defect, affecting nearly 1 per cent of all live births. Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is clinically significant foetal circulation anomaly, second most common form of CHD which constitutes approximately 10 per cent of total CHDs. The study aimed to screen for TFAP2B mutations in CHD patients of Mysore. Methods: With informed consent, 100 clinically diagnosed CHD patients and 50 healthy controls in Mysore, south India, were recruited for the analysis of screening of mutations. MassARRAY analysis of 5 prominent mutations of TFAP2B was performed. Results: The analysis did not show any of the five mutations of TFAP2B screened by massARRAY in patients and controls, indicating that these mutations were not involved in the manifestation of CHD in the patients at Mysore, south India. Interpretation & Conclusions: The findings suggest the lack of involvement of known mutations of TFAP2B with syndromic or nonsyndromic CHDs in Mysore patients. PMID:22199100

  16. Coronary heart disease and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in the elderly diabetic.

    PubMed

    Chanudet, X; Bonnevie, L; Bauduceau, B

    2007-04-01

    Diabetes and old age come together to increase the frequency and severity of coronary heart disease. Often clinically nearly silent, symptoms frequently manifest dramatically, to such an extent that the question of screening should be raised, as in younger subjects. Preventing these manifestations relies on better management of the cardiovascular risk factors and obtaining good blood glucose control, but here progress remains necessary, which also requires adapting to the older patient's clinical and psychological condition. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is a frequent degenerative complication in diabetics, particularly in the oldest subjects. The most severe types have serious clinical consequences, thus a higher mortality factor, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. As for coronary heart disease, the therapeutic tools have expanded these last few years and should be thought out in relation to the geriatric evaluation, with the objective of improving these patients' quality of life. Therefore, a necessary distinction should be made between subjects who have aged successfully, whose management, ultimately, differs little from younger subjects, and frail elderly individuals for whom exploratory techniques and treatment should be adapted. PMID:17702096

  17. Management of Hypertension in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Agbor-Etang, Brian B; Setaro, John F

    2015-12-01

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) affects about 16 million adults in the USA. Many more individuals likely harbor subclinical coronary disease. Hypertension (HTN) continues to be a potent and widespread risk factor for IHD. Among other Framingham risk factors of tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and left ventricular hypertrophy, HTN plays an independent role in augmenting IHD risk, as well as a multiplicative role with respect to adverse outcomes when HTN is present concurrently with the other major IHD risk factors listed above. Over the past two decades, numerous studies and guideline reports have been presented with the aims of (a) elucidating the pathophysiology of IHD, (b) delineating an ideal blood pressure (BP) threshold at which to institute pharmacotherapy, and (c) defining the optimal pharmacologic elements of a therapeutic regimen. While there are active debates surrounding the existence and relevance of the J curve in IHD patients who have HTN, as well as the numerical level of the BP cutoff justifying drug therapy in the general population, there is a general consensus that the BP target in IHD patients should be lower than 140/90 mmHg. The most appropriate class (or classes) of medication recommended will depend on the comorbid conditions associated with each individual patient. Overall, however, there is no major evidence underscoring a significant difference between drug classes, provided the target BP is achieved, although it should be pointed out that the most recent (2015) American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Society of Hypertension (ASH) guideline statement now elevates beta-blockers (BB) to the same level of recommendation as other classes of hypertension drugs in the treatment of patients who have hypertension and ischemic heart disease. Although most agents that reduce blood pressure will correspondingly lower myocardial workload, BB may exhibit a special advantage in IHD patients because BB

  18. [Real time 3D echocardiography in congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Acar, P; Dulac, Y; Taktak, A; Villacèque, M

    2004-05-01

    The introduction of the 3D mode in echocardiography has led to its use in everyday clinical practice. One hundred and fifty real time 3D echocardiographic examinations were performed in 20 foetus, 110 children and 20 adults with various congenital heart lesions (shunts, valvular lesions, aortic diseases). The 4x matricial probe enables the instantaneous acquisition of transthoracic volumes. Four modes of 3D imaging were used: real time, total volume, colour Doppler and biplane. Quantitative measurements were performed at an outlying station. The feasibility of the method in the foetus, the child and the adult was respectively 90%, 99% and 85%. Real time 3D echocardiography did not affect the diagnoses made by standard echocardiography. The 3D imaging gave a more accurate description of atrial septal defects and congenital valvular lesions. Biplane imaging was decisive in the quantitative approach to aortic dilatation of Marfan's syndrome and in segmental analysis of the foetal heart. 3D colour Doppler imaging has been disappointing but the possibilities of volumic quantification of blood flow are very promising. The present limitations of the method are the inadequate resolution in the small child and the absence of quantitative measurement on the echograph. The facility of utilisation of the matricial probe should lead to routine usage of 3D echocardiography as with 2D and the Doppler modes. Its value should be decisive in many congenital cardiac lesions requiring surgery or interventional catheterisation. PMID:15214550

  19. Assessing potential divers with a history of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Turner, Mark S

    2015-06-01

    This article describes a structured approach to assessing the medical fitness of potential divers who have a history of congenital heart disease. The importance of a complete and accurate cardiac history, including details of surgery and other interventions is emphasized. Specific assessment of intracardiac shunts, exercise capacity and ability to deal with the physical challenge of diving, risk of diving-included pulmonary oedema, of arrhythmia and of incapacity in case of arrhythmia and the consequences of surgical and catheter treatment are discussed, including the risks associated with lung injury and the pressure limitations of implanted devices like pacemakers. Clinical assessment will usually include echocardiography and exercise testing with additional investigations such as MRI scanning, CT of heart or lungs, cardiopulmonary exercise testing and ECG monitoring, as required. Examples of different congenital lesions are given applying this approach (atrial septal defect, tetralogy of Fallot, bicuspid aortic valve and the Fontan circulation). The approach is based on an individual cardiologist's opinion and is not specifically evidence-based, but seeks to apply what is known in other areas of diving medicine to this potentially complex group of patients. PMID:26271135

  20. Abnormal Cerebral Microstructure in Premature Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Lisa B.; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Ceschin, Rafael; Pruetz, Jay D.; Detterich, Jon A.; Del Castillo, Sylvia; Nagasunder, Arabhi C.; Kim, Richard; Painter, Michael J.; Gilles, Floyd H.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Williams, Roberta G.; Blüml, Stefan; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Abnormal cerebral microstructure has been documented in term neonates with congenital heart disease (CHD) portending risk for injury and poor neurodevelopmental outcome. Our hypothesis was that preterm neonates with CHD would demonstrate diffuse cerebral microstructural abnormalities when compared to critically ill neonates without CHD. A secondary aim was to identify any association between microstructural abnormalities, white matter injury (e.g., punctate white matter lesions, pWMLs) and other clinical variables, including heart lesion. Material and Methods Using Tract-Based-Spatial-Statistics (TBSS), an unbiased, voxel-wise method for analyzing diffusion tensor imaging data, we compared 21 preterm neonates with CHD to two cohorts of neonates without CHD: 28 term and 27 preterm neonates, identified from the same neonatal intensive care unit. Results Compared to term neonates without CHD, preterm neonates with CHD had microstructural abnormalities in widespread regions of the central white matter. However, 42% of the preterm CHD neonates had pWMLs. When neonates with pWMLs were excluded, microstructural abnormalities remained only in the splenium. Preterms with CHD had similar microstructure to preterms without CHD. Conclusion Diffuse microstructural abnormalities were observed in preterm neonates with CHD, strongly associated with pWMLs. Independently, regional vulnerability of the splenium, a structure associated with visual spatial function, was observed in all preterm CHD neonates. PMID:23703146