Science.gov

Sample records for heart failure exacerbations

  1. Drugs That May Cause or Exacerbate Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Page, Robert L; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Cheng, Davy; Dow, Tristan J; Ky, Bonnie; Stein, C Michael; Spencer, Anne P; Trupp, Robin J; Lindenfeld, JoAnn

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is a common, costly, and debilitating syndrome that is associated with a highly complex drug regimen, a large number of comorbidities, and a large and often disparate number of healthcare providers. All of these factors conspire to increase the risk of heart failure exacerbation by direct myocardial toxicity, drug-drug interactions, or both. This scientific statement is designed to serve as a comprehensive and accessible source of drugs that may cause or exacerbate heart failure to assist healthcare providers in improving the quality of care for these patients.

  2. Thyroid Echography-induced Thyroid Storm and Exacerbation of Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Naomi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Asano, Ryotaro; Saito, Hideki; Nomura, Hidekimi; Isomura, Daichi; Okada, Hisayuki; Sugiura, Ryo; Oka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism and thyroid storm affect cardiac circulation in some conditions. Several factors including trauma can induce thyroid storms. We herein describe the case of a 57-year-old woman who experienced a thyroid storm and exacerbation of acute heart failure on thyroid echography. She initially demonstrated a good clinical course after medical rate control for atrial fibrillation; however, thyroid echography for evaluating hyperthyroidism led to a thyroid storm and she collapsed. A multidisciplinary approach stabilized her thyroid hormone levels and hemodynamics. Thus, the medical staff should be prepared for a deterioration in the patient's condition during thyroid echography in heart failure patients with hyperthyroidism.

  3. Thyroid Echography-induced Thyroid Storm and Exacerbation of Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Naomi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Asano, Ryotaro; Saito, Hideki; Nomura, Hidekimi; Isomura, Daichi; Okada, Hisayuki; Sugiura, Ryo; Oka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism and thyroid storm affect cardiac circulation in some conditions. Several factors including trauma can induce thyroid storms. We herein describe the case of a 57-year-old woman who experienced a thyroid storm and exacerbation of acute heart failure on thyroid echography. She initially demonstrated a good clinical course after medical rate control for atrial fibrillation; however, thyroid echography for evaluating hyperthyroidism led to a thyroid storm and she collapsed. A multidisciplinary approach stabilized her thyroid hormone levels and hemodynamics. Thus, the medical staff should be prepared for a deterioration in the patient's condition during thyroid echography in heart failure patients with hyperthyroidism. PMID:27522996

  4. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  5. High fat feeding in mice is insufficient to induce cardiac dysfunction and does not exacerbate heart failure.

    PubMed

    Brainard, Robert E; Watson, Lewis J; Demartino, Angelica M; Brittian, Kenneth R; Readnower, Ryan D; Boakye, Adjoa Agyemang; Zhang, Deqing; Hoetker, Joseph David; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Baba, Shahid Pervez; Jones, Steven P

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical studies of animals with risk factors, and how those risk factors contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease and cardiac dysfunction, are clearly needed. One such approach is to feed mice a diet rich in fat (i.e. 60%). Here, we determined whether a high fat diet was sufficient to induce cardiac dysfunction in mice. We subjected mice to two different high fat diets (lard or milk as fat source) and followed them for over six months and found no significant decrement in cardiac function (via echocardiography), despite robust adiposity and impaired glucose disposal. We next determined whether antecedent and concomitant exposure to high fat diet (lard) altered the murine heart's response to infarct-induced heart failure; high fat feeding during, or before and during, heart failure did not significantly exacerbate cardiac dysfunction. Given the lack of a robust effect on cardiac dysfunction with high fat feeding, we then examined a commonly used mouse model of overt diabetes, hyperglycemia, and obesity (db/db mice). db/db mice (or STZ treated wild-type mice) subjected to pressure overload exhibited no significant exacerbation of cardiac dysfunction; however, ischemia-reperfusion injury significantly depressed cardiac function in db/db mice compared to their non-diabetic littermates. Thus, we were able to document a negative influence of a risk factor in a relevant cardiovascular disease model; however, this did not involve exposure to a high fat diet. High fat diet, obesity, or hyperglycemia does not necessarily induce cardiac dysfunction in mice. Although many investigators use such diabetes/obesity models to understand cardiac defects related to risk factors, this study, along with those from several other groups, serves as a cautionary note regarding the use of murine models of diabetes and obesity in the context of heart failure.

  6. Heart failure.

    PubMed

    2014-12-15

    Essential facts Heart failure affects about 900,000 people in the UK. The condition can affect people of all ages, but it is more common in older people, with more than half of all patients over the age of 75. It is caused by the heart failing to pump enough blood around the body at the right pressure, usually because the heart muscle has become too weak or stiff to work properly. Acute heart failure, which occurs when symptoms develop quickly, is the leading cause of hospital admission in people over 65. PMID:25492766

  7. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It is more common in people who are 65 years old or older, African Americans, people who are ... treatments fail. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  8. What Is Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  9. Cyp2c44 gene disruption exacerbated pulmonary hypertension and heart failure in female but not male mice.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sachindra Raj; Lakhkar, Anand; Dhagia, Vidhi; Zias, Ariadne L; Soldatos, Vasiliki; Oshima, Kaori; Jiang, Houli; Gotlinger, Katherine; Capdevila, Jorge H; Schwartzman, Michal L; McMurtry, Ivan F; Gupte, Sachin A

    2016-09-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoicacids (EETs), synthesized from arachidonic acid by epoxygenases of the CYP2C and CYP2J gene subfamilies, contribute to hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) in mice. Despite their roles in HPV, it is controversial whether EETs mediate or ameliorate pulmonary hypertension (PH). A recent study showed that deficiency of Cyp2j did not protect male and female mice from hypoxia-induced PH. Since CYP2C44 is a functionally important epoxygenase, we hypothesized that knockout of the Cyp2c44 gene would protect both sexes of mice from hypoxia-induced PH. We tested this hypothesis in wild-type (WT) and Cyp2c44 knockout (Cyp2c44 (-/-)) mice exposed to normoxia (room air) and hypoxia (10% O2) for 5 weeks. Exposure of WT and Cyp2c44 (-/-) mice to hypoxia resulted in pulmonary vascular remodeling, increased pulmonary artery resistance, and decreased cardiac function in both sexes. However, in female Cyp2c44 (-/-) mice, compared with WT mice, (1) pulmonary artery resistance and right ventricular hypertrophy were greater, (2) cardiac index was lower, (3) left ventricular and arterial stiffness were higher, and (4) plasma aldosterone levels were higher, but (5) there was no difference in levels of EET in lungs and heart. Paradoxically and unexpectedly, we found that Cyp2c44 disruption exacerbated hypoxia-induced PH in female but not male mice. We attribute exacerbated PH in female Cyp2c44 (-/-) mice to elevated aldosterone and as-yet-unknown systemic factors. Therefore, we suggest a role for the human CYP2C genes in protecting women from severe PH and that this could be one of the underlying causes for a better 5-year survival rate in women than in men. PMID:27683613

  10. Cyp2c44 gene disruption exacerbated pulmonary hypertension and heart failure in female but not male mice

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sachindra Raj; Lakhkar, Anand; Dhagia, Vidhi; Zias, Ariadne L.; Soldatos, Vasiliki; Oshima, Kaori; Jiang, Houli; Gotlinger, Katherine; Capdevila, Jorge H.; Schwartzman, Michal L.; McMurtry, Ivan F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epoxyeicosatrienoicacids (EETs), synthesized from arachidonic acid by epoxygenases of the CYP2C and CYP2J gene subfamilies, contribute to hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) in mice. Despite their roles in HPV, it is controversial whether EETs mediate or ameliorate pulmonary hypertension (PH). A recent study showed that deficiency of Cyp2j did not protect male and female mice from hypoxia-induced PH. Since CYP2C44 is a functionally important epoxygenase, we hypothesized that knockout of the Cyp2c44 gene would protect both sexes of mice from hypoxia-induced PH. We tested this hypothesis in wild-type (WT) and Cyp2c44 knockout (Cyp2c44−/−) mice exposed to normoxia (room air) and hypoxia (10% O2) for 5 weeks. Exposure of WT and Cyp2c44−/− mice to hypoxia resulted in pulmonary vascular remodeling, increased pulmonary artery resistance, and decreased cardiac function in both sexes. However, in female Cyp2c44−/− mice, compared with WT mice, (1) pulmonary artery resistance and right ventricular hypertrophy were greater, (2) cardiac index was lower, (3) left ventricular and arterial stiffness were higher, and (4) plasma aldosterone levels were higher, but (5) there was no difference in levels of EET in lungs and heart. Paradoxically and unexpectedly, we found that Cyp2c44 disruption exacerbated hypoxia-induced PH in female but not male mice. We attribute exacerbated PH in female Cyp2c44−/− mice to elevated aldosterone and as-yet-unknown systemic factors. Therefore, we suggest a role for the human CYP2C genes in protecting women from severe PH and that this could be one of the underlying causes for a better 5-year survival rate in women than in men. PMID:27683613

  11. Cyp2c44 gene disruption exacerbated pulmonary hypertension and heart failure in female but not male mice

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sachindra Raj; Lakhkar, Anand; Dhagia, Vidhi; Zias, Ariadne L.; Soldatos, Vasiliki; Oshima, Kaori; Jiang, Houli; Gotlinger, Katherine; Capdevila, Jorge H.; Schwartzman, Michal L.; McMurtry, Ivan F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epoxyeicosatrienoicacids (EETs), synthesized from arachidonic acid by epoxygenases of the CYP2C and CYP2J gene subfamilies, contribute to hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) in mice. Despite their roles in HPV, it is controversial whether EETs mediate or ameliorate pulmonary hypertension (PH). A recent study showed that deficiency of Cyp2j did not protect male and female mice from hypoxia-induced PH. Since CYP2C44 is a functionally important epoxygenase, we hypothesized that knockout of the Cyp2c44 gene would protect both sexes of mice from hypoxia-induced PH. We tested this hypothesis in wild-type (WT) and Cyp2c44 knockout (Cyp2c44−/−) mice exposed to normoxia (room air) and hypoxia (10% O2) for 5 weeks. Exposure of WT and Cyp2c44−/− mice to hypoxia resulted in pulmonary vascular remodeling, increased pulmonary artery resistance, and decreased cardiac function in both sexes. However, in female Cyp2c44−/− mice, compared with WT mice, (1) pulmonary artery resistance and right ventricular hypertrophy were greater, (2) cardiac index was lower, (3) left ventricular and arterial stiffness were higher, and (4) plasma aldosterone levels were higher, but (5) there was no difference in levels of EET in lungs and heart. Paradoxically and unexpectedly, we found that Cyp2c44 disruption exacerbated hypoxia-induced PH in female but not male mice. We attribute exacerbated PH in female Cyp2c44−/− mice to elevated aldosterone and as-yet-unknown systemic factors. Therefore, we suggest a role for the human CYP2C genes in protecting women from severe PH and that this could be one of the underlying causes for a better 5-year survival rate in women than in men.

  12. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  13. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Oct 8,2015 When heart failure (HF) ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  14. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart, leading to heart failure. High Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the ... weaken your heart and lead to plaque buildup. Blood pressure is considered high if it stays at or ...

  15. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... An echocardiogram (Echo) is a test that uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. The picture is much more detailed than a plain ...

  16. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Susan M.; Cedars, Ari M.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Geltman, Edward M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    Hospitalizations for acute decompensated heart failure are increasing in the United States. Moreover, the prevalence of heart failure is increasing consequent to an increased number of older individuals, as well as to improvement in therapies for coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death that have enabled patients to live longer with cardiovascular disease. The main treatment goals in the hospitalized patient with heart failure are to restore euvolemia and to minimize adverse events. Common in-hospital treatments include intravenous diuretics, vasodilators, and inotropic agents. Novel pharmaceutical agents have shown promise in the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure and may simplify the treatment and reduce the morbidity associated with the disease. This review summarizes the contemporary management of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:20069075

  17. Hyperkalemia in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Chaudhry M S; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Pitt, Bertram; Piña, Ileana; Zannad, Faiez; Anker, Stefan D; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-10-01

    Disorders of potassium homeostasis can potentiate the already elevated risk of arrhythmia in heart failure. Heart failure patients have a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, which further heightens the risk of hyperkalemia, especially when renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors are used. Acute treatment for hyperkalemia may not be tolerated in the long term. Recent data for patiromer and sodium zirconium cyclosilicate, used to treat and prevent high serum potassium levels on a more chronic basis, have sparked interest in the treatment of hyperkalemia, as well as the potential use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors in patients who were previously unable to take these drugs or tolerated only low doses. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and outcomes of hyperkalemia in heart failure; provides an overview of traditional and novel ways to approach management of hyperkalemia; and discusses the need for further research to optimally treat heart failure.

  18. Hyperkalemia in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Chaudhry M S; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Pitt, Bertram; Piña, Ileana; Zannad, Faiez; Anker, Stefan D; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-10-01

    Disorders of potassium homeostasis can potentiate the already elevated risk of arrhythmia in heart failure. Heart failure patients have a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, which further heightens the risk of hyperkalemia, especially when renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors are used. Acute treatment for hyperkalemia may not be tolerated in the long term. Recent data for patiromer and sodium zirconium cyclosilicate, used to treat and prevent high serum potassium levels on a more chronic basis, have sparked interest in the treatment of hyperkalemia, as well as the potential use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors in patients who were previously unable to take these drugs or tolerated only low doses. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and outcomes of hyperkalemia in heart failure; provides an overview of traditional and novel ways to approach management of hyperkalemia; and discusses the need for further research to optimally treat heart failure. PMID:27687200

  19. Types of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. This content was last ... heart failure. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  20. Classes of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. HF Resources For Life ... heart failure. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  1. Decompensated heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Mangini, Sandrigo; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Braga, Fabiana Goulart Marcondes; Bacal, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heart failure is a disease with high incidence and prevalence in the population. The costs with hospitalization for decompensated heart failure reach approximately 60% of the total cost with heart failure treatment, and mortality during hospitalization varies according to the studied population, and could achieve values of 10%. In patients with decompensated heart failure, history and physical examination are of great value for the diagnosis of the syndrome, and also can help the physician to identify the beginning of symptoms, and give information about etiology, causes and prognosis of the disease. The initial objective of decompensated heart failure treatment is the hemodynamic and symptomatic improvement preservation and/or improvement of renal function, prevention of myocardial damage, modulation of the neurohormonal and/or inflammatory activation and control of comorbidities that can cause or contribute to progression of the syndrome. According to the clinical-hemodynamic profile, it is possible to establish a rational for the treatment of decompensated heart failure, individualizing the proceedings to be held, leading to reduction in the period of hospitalization and consequently reducing overall mortality. PMID:24136770

  2. Troponins in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Omland, T; Røsjø, H; Giannitsis, E; Agewall, S

    2015-03-30

    The signs and symptoms of heart failure are frequently unspecific and correlate poorly with objective indices of cardiac function. Objective assessment of cardiac function by echocardiography or other imaging modalities also correlate poorly with symptomatic status and functional capacity. Accordingly, there is a need for circulating biomarkers that can provide incremental diagnostic and prognostic information to the existing armamentarium of tests. The introduction of more sensitive assays that allow determination of very low circulating concentrations of the myofibrillar proteins cardiac troponin I and T has not only resulted in improved diagnostic accuracy in the setting of acute coronary syndromes. The high sensitivity assays have also shown that cardiac troponins are frequently found chronically circulating in a variety of acute and chronic, cardiac and non-cardiac disease conditions, including acute heart failure and chronic symptomatic and asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction. Cardiac troponin I and T provide may provide clinically useful prognostic information both concerning the future risk of developing heart failure in asymptomatic subjects and the risk of fatal events and hospital admissions in those with already established heart failure This review summarizes current literature on the clinical performance and utility of cardiac troponin measurements as diagnostic and prognostic tools in patients with symptomatic heart failure, as well as in those with asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction, and clinical phenotypes at high risk for developing heart failure, including stable coronary artery disease, left ventricular hypertrophy, and aortic stenosis.

  3. Pathophysiology of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Tanai, Edit; Frantz, Stefan

    2015-12-15

    Heart failure is considered an epidemic disease in the modern world affecting approximately 1% to 2% of adult population. It presents a multifactorial, systemic disease, in which--after cardiac injury--structural, neurohumoral, cellular, and molecular mechanisms are activated and act as a network to maintain physiological functioning. These coordinated, complex processes lead to excessive volume overload, increased sympathetic activity, circulation redistribution, and result in different, parallel developing clinical signs and symptoms. These signs and symptoms sum up to an unspecific clinical picture; thus invasive and noninvasive diagnostic tools are used to get an accurate diagnosis and to specify the underlying cause. The most important, outcome determining factor in heart failure is its constant progression. Constant optimizing of pharmatherapeutical regimes, novel targets, and fine regulation of these processes try to keep these compensatory mechanisms in a physiological range. Beside pharmacological therapy, interventional and surgical therapy options give new chances in the management of heart failure. For the optimization and establishment of these and novel therapeutical approaches, complete and comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms is essentially needed. Besides diagnosis and treatment, efforts should be made for better prevention in heart failure by treatment of risk factors, or identifying and following risk groups. This summary of the pathophysiology of heart failure tries to give a compact overview of basic mechanisms and of the novel unfolding, progressive theory of heart failure to contribute to a more comprehensive knowledge of the disease.

  4. Pathophysiology of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Tanai, Edit; Frantz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is considered an epidemic disease in the modern world affecting approximately 1% to 2% of adult population. It presents a multifactorial, systemic disease, in which--after cardiac injury--structural, neurohumoral, cellular, and molecular mechanisms are activated and act as a network to maintain physiological functioning. These coordinated, complex processes lead to excessive volume overload, increased sympathetic activity, circulation redistribution, and result in different, parallel developing clinical signs and symptoms. These signs and symptoms sum up to an unspecific clinical picture; thus invasive and noninvasive diagnostic tools are used to get an accurate diagnosis and to specify the underlying cause. The most important, outcome determining factor in heart failure is its constant progression. Constant optimizing of pharmatherapeutical regimes, novel targets, and fine regulation of these processes try to keep these compensatory mechanisms in a physiological range. Beside pharmacological therapy, interventional and surgical therapy options give new chances in the management of heart failure. For the optimization and establishment of these and novel therapeutical approaches, complete and comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms is essentially needed. Besides diagnosis and treatment, efforts should be made for better prevention in heart failure by treatment of risk factors, or identifying and following risk groups. This summary of the pathophysiology of heart failure tries to give a compact overview of basic mechanisms and of the novel unfolding, progressive theory of heart failure to contribute to a more comprehensive knowledge of the disease. PMID:26756631

  5. Heart Failure Society of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Review Course in Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiology is now available OnDemand! Monday, August 29, 2016! ... than expected, and the FDA... European Society of Cardiology – Heart Failure 2017 October 11, 2016 ESC: Heart ...

  6. Combination of angiotensin II and l-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester exacerbates mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress to cause heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Dale J; Zhang, Aijun; Li, Shumin; Cao, Tram N; Smith, Jessie A; Vedula, Indira; Cordero-Reyes, Andrea M; Youker, Keith A; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; Gupte, Anisha A

    2016-03-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated as a cause of energy deprivation in heart failure (HF). Herein, we tested individual and combined effects of two pathogenic factors of nonischemic HF, inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis [with l-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME)] and hypertension [with angiotensin II (AngII)], on myocardial mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, and metabolic gene expression. l-NAME and AngII were administered individually and in combination to mice for 5 wk. Although all treatments increased blood pressure and reduced cardiac contractile function, the l-NAME + AngII group was associated with the most severe HF, as characterized by edema, hypertrophy, oxidative stress, increased expression of Nppa and Nppb, and decreased expression of Atp2a2 and Camk2b. l-NAME + AngII-treated mice exhibited robust deterioration of cardiac mitochondrial function, as observed by reduced respiratory control ratios in subsarcolemmal mitochondria and reduced state 3 levels in interfibrillar mitochondria for complex I but not for complex II substrates. Cardiac myofibrils showed reduced ADP-supported and oligomycin-inhibited oxygen consumption. Mitochondrial functional impairment was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial DNA content and activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase and complex I but increased H2O2 production and tissue protein carbonyls in hearts from AngII and l-NAME + AngII groups. Microarray analyses revealed the majority of the gene changes attributed to the l-NAME + AngII group. Pathway analyses indicated significant changes in metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial function, cardiac hypertrophy, and fatty acid metabolism in l-NAME + AngII hearts. We conclude that l-NAME + AngII is associated with impaired mitochondrial respiratory function and increased oxidative stress compared with either l-NAME or AngII alone, resulting in nonischemic HF.

  7. Non-invasive ventilation: comparison of effectiveness, safety, and management in acute heart failure syndromes and acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pladeck, T; Hader, C; Von Orde, A; Rasche, K; Wiechmann, H W

    2007-11-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure ventilation (CPAP) and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) are accepted treatments in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE) and acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). The aim of the study was a comparison of effectiveness, safety, and management of NPPV in ACPE and AECOPD trying to find an approach for standard management in intensive care. Thirty patients with acute respiratory failure (14 due to ACPE, 16 due to AECOPD) were prospectively included into the study. If clinical stability could not be achieved by standard therapy (pharmacological therapy and oxygen) patients were treated by non-invasive ventilation (NPPV) using a BiPAP-Vision device in S/T-mode. During the first 90 min after the onset of NPPV respiratory and vital parameters were documented every 30 min. Additional relevant outcome parameters (need for intubation, duration of ICU stay, complications and mortality) were monitored. We found that 85.7% of the ACPE patients and 50.0% of the AECOPD patients were treated successfully with NPPV. Intubation rate was 31.2% in the AECOPD group and 14.3% in the ACPE group. 78.6% of the ACPE patients and 43.8% of the AECOPD patients were regularly discharged from hospital in a good condition. In the first 90 min of NIV, there was a significant amelioration of respiratory and other vital parameters. In ACPE patients there was a significant increase in PaO2 from 58.9 mmHg to 80.6 mmHg and of oxygen saturation (SaO2) from 85.1% to 93.1% without changing the inspiratory O2 concentration. This effect was comparable in the AECOPD group, but only could be achieved by increasing the inspiratory ventilation pressure. In the ACPE group inspiratory ventilation pressure could be reduced. In conclusion, in acute respiratory failure, ACPE patients comparably profit from NPPV as do patients with AECOPD, but the algorithm of titration for non-invasive ventilation pressure is different.

  8. Living with Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... should be. This includes advice on daily activities, work, leisure time, sex, and exercise. Your level of activity will depend on the stage of your heart failure (how severe it is). Keep all of your ... to get tests and lab work. Your doctor needs the results of these tests ...

  9. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Cardiology; American Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism; American Heart Association Interdisciplinary Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research. State of the science: promoting self-care in persons with heart failure: ...

  10. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Heart Failure For ...

  11. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Aug 24,2016 An important part of ... content was last reviewed on 04/16/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  12. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Mar 25,2016 Patients with ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  13. Diastolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gary, Rebecca; Davis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Diastolic heart failure (DHF) is estimated to occur in 40% to 50% of patients with heart failure. Evidence suggests that DHF is primarily a cardiogeriatric syndrome that increases from approximately 1% at age 50 years to 10% or more at 80 years. DHF is also more likely to occur in older women who are hypertensive or diabetic. Although survival is better in patients with DHF compared with systolic heart failure, mortality rates for patients with DHF are four times higher than those for healthy, community-dwelling older adults. The increase in DHF is anticipated to continue during the next several decades largely because of the aging of the population; increase in risk factors associated with hypertension, diabetes, and obesity; and ongoing technologic advances in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Few clinical trials have evaluated therapy in this population, so evidence about the effectiveness of treatment strategies for DHF is limited. Future research should target novel interventions that specifically target patients with DHF who are typically older and female, and experience exertional intolerance and have a considerably reduced quality of life.

  14. Heart failure prognostic model.

    PubMed

    Axente, L; Sinescu, C; Bazacliu, G

    2011-05-15

    Heart failure (HF) is a common, costly, disabling and deadly syndrome. Heart failure is a progressive disease characterized by high prevalence in society, significantly reducing physical and mental health, frequent hospitalization and high mortality (50% of the patients survive up to 4 years after the diagnosis, the annual mortality varying from 5% to 75%). The purpose of this study is to develop a prognostic model with easily obtainable variables for patients with heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS. Our lot included 101 non-consecutive hospitalized patients with heart failure diagnosis. It included 49.5% women having the average age of 71.23 years (starting from 40 up to 91 years old) and the roughly estimated period for monitoring was 35.1 months (5-65 months). Survival data were available for all patients and the median survival duration was of 44.0 months. A large number of variables (demographic, etiologic, co morbidity, clinical, echocardiograph, ECG, laboratory and medication) were evaluated. We performed a complex statistical analysis, studying: survival curve, cumulative hazard, hazard function, lifetime distribution and density function, meaning residual life time, Ln S (t) vs. t and Ln(H) t vs. Ln (t). The Cox multiple regression model was used in order to determine the major factors that allow the forecasting survival and their regression coefficients: age (0.0369), systolic blood pressure (-0.0219), potassium (0.0570), sex (-0.3124) and the acute myocardial infarction (0.2662). DISCUSSION. Our model easily incorporates obtainable variables that may be available in any hospital, accurately predicting survival of the heart failure patients and enables risk stratification in a few hours after the patients' presentation. Our model is derived from a sample of patients hospitalized in an emergency department of cardiology, some with major life-altering co morbidities. The benefit of being aware of the prognosis of these patients with high risk is extremely

  15. Electrophysiological Remodeling in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanggan; Hill, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure affects nearly 6 million Americans, with a half-million new cases emerging each year. Whereas up to 50% of heart failure patients die of arrhythmia, the diverse mechanisms underlying heart failure-associated arrhythmia are poorly understood. As a consequence, effectiveness of antiarrhythmic pharmacotherapy remains elusive. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of heart failure-associated molecular events impacting the electrical function of the myocardium. We approach this from an anatomical standpoint, summarizing recent insights gleaned from pre-clinical models and discussing their relevance to human heart failure. PMID:20096285

  16. Obesity and heart failure.

    PubMed

    De Pergola, Giovanni; Nardecchia, Adele; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Triggiani, Vincenzo; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Minischetti, Manuela Castiglione; Silvestris, Franco

    2013-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have recently shown that obesity, and abdominal obesity in particular, is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure (HF). Higher cardiac oxidative stress is the early stage of heart dysfunction due to obesity, and it is the result of insulin resistance, altered fatty acid and glucose metabolism, and impaired mitochondrial biogenesis. Extense myocyte hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis are early microscopic changes in patients with HF, whereas circumferential strain during the left ventricular (LV) systole, LV increase in both chamber size and wall thickness (LV hypertrophy), and LV dilatation are the early macroscopic and functional alterations in obese developing heart failure. LV hypertrophy leads to diastolic dysfunction and subendocardial ischemia in obesity, and pericardial fat has been shown to be significantly associated with LV diastolic dysfunction. Evolving abnormalities of diastolic dysfunction may include progressive hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction, and various degrees of eccentric and/or concentric LV hypertrophy may be present with time. Once HF is established, overweight and obese have a better prognosis than do their lean counterparts with the same level of cardiovascular disease, and this phenomenon is called "obesity paradox". It is mainly due to lower muscle protein degradation, brain natriuretic peptide circulating levels and cardio-respiratory fitness than normal weight patients with HF.

  17. Heart failure in South America.

    PubMed

    Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-05-01

    Continued assessment of temporal trends in mortality and epidemiology of specific heart failure in South America is needed to provide a scientific basis for rational allocation of the limited health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk and predict the future burden of heart failure. The epidemiology of heart failure in South America was reviewed. Heart failure is the main cause of hospitalization based on available data from approximately 50% of the South American population. The main etiologies of heart failure are ischemic, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, valvular, hypertensive and chagasic etiologies. In endemic areas, Chagas heart disease may be responsible by 41% of the HF cases. Also, heart failure presents high mortality especially in patients with Chagas etiology. Heart failure and etiologies associated with heart failure may be responsible for 6.3% of causes of deaths. Rheumatic fever is the leading cause of valvular heart disease. However, a tendency to reduction of HF mortality due to Chagas heart disease from 1985 to 2006, and reduction in mortality due to HF from 1999 to 2005 were observed in selected states in Brazil. The findings have important public health implications because the allocation of health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk of heart failure should also consider the control of neglected Chagas disease and rheumatic fever in South American countries.

  18. Heart Failure in South America

    PubMed Central

    Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Continued assessment of temporal trends in mortality and epidemiology of specific heart failure in South America is needed to provide a scientific basis for rational allocation of the limited health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk and predict the future burden of heart failure. The epidemiology of heart failure in South America was reviewed. Heart failure is the main cause of hospitalization based on available data from approximately 50% of the South American population. The main etiologies of heart failure are ischemic, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, valvular, hypertensive and chagasic etiologies. In endemic areas, Chagas heart disease may be responsible by 41% of the HF cases. Also, heart failure presents high mortality especially in patients with Chagas etiology. Heart failure and etiologies associated with heart failure may be responsible for 6.3% of causes of deaths. Rheumatic fever is the leading cause of valvular heart disease. However, a tendency to reduction of HF mortality due to Chagas heart disease from 1985 to 2006, and reduction in mortality due to HF from 1999 to 2005 were observed in selected states in Brazil. The findings have important public health implications because the allocation of health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk of heart failure should also consider the control of neglected Chagas disease and rheumatic fever in South American countries. PMID:23597301

  19. Sleep and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kimberly A; Trupp, Robin J

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation occurs for many reasons but, when chronic in nature, has many consequences for optimal health and performance. Despite its high prevalence, sleep-disordered breathing is underrecognized and undertreated. This is especially true in the setting of heart failure, where sleep-disordered breathing affects more than 50% of patients. Although the optimal strategy to best identify patients is currently unknown, concerted and consistent efforts to support early recognition, diagnosis, and subsequent treatment should be encouraged. Optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy and concurrent treatment of sleep-disordered breathing are necessary to improve outcomes in this complex high-risk population. PMID:26567495

  20. Home Medical Care for Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Yumino, Dai

    2016-01-01

    As heart failure progresses to the end stage, it becomes more difficult to maintain the same level of quality of life using the established therapy for the heart failure patients. We believe that an innovative home medical care for heart failure therapy that focuses on the individual's quality of daily living and early intervention is necessary. The roles of home medical care include: early discharge to home as opposed to long hospitalization; the prevention of re-hospitalization; the provision of good care; treatment of any exacerbations; and options available at the end of the patient's life at home. Being able to provide all of the above will allow heart failure patients to live at their home. Home medical care for heart failure requires collaborative teamwork among multiple institutions and medical professionals. Among this collaborative group, the role of pharmacists is critical. Since many of the elderly with heart failure are taking multiple medications, it is important to evaluate the compliance and to intervene for improvement. Pharmacists visiting the patient's home will be able to check the patient's living environment, to evaluate medication compliance, to reconsider the necessary medications for the specific patient, and to consult physicians. Pharmacists can also explain clearly to patients and their family members any changes in medical therapy, as the conditions for an end-stage heart failure patient may change drastically in a short time. By achieving all of the above, it may be possible to prevent re-hospitalization and to help maintain the quality of life for heart failure patients. PMID:27477731

  1. Renal neurohormonal regulation in heart failure decompensation.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Sofia; Agic, Mediha Becirovic; Narfström, Fredrik; Melville, Jacqueline M; Hultström, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Decompensation in heart failure occurs when the heart fails to balance venous return with cardiac output, leading to fluid congestion and contributing to mortality. Decompensated heart failure can cause acute kidney injury (AKI), which further increases mortality. Heart failure activates signaling systems that are deleterious to kidneys such as renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and vasopressin secretion. All three reduce renal blood flow (RBF) and increase tubular sodium reabsorption, which may increase renal oxygen consumption causing AKI through renal tissue hypoxia. Vasopressin contributes to venous congestion through aquaporin-mediated water retention. Additional water retention may be mediated through vasopressin-induced medullary urea transport and hyaluronan but needs further study. In addition, there are several systems that could protect the kidneys and reduce fluid retention such as natriuretic peptides, prostaglandins, and nitric oxide. However, the effect of natriuretic peptides and nitric oxide are blunted in decompensation, partly due to oxidative stress. This review considers how neurohormonal signaling in heart failure drives fluid retention by the kidneys and thus exacerbates decompensation. It further identifies areas where there is limited data, such as signaling systems 20-HETE, purines, endothelin, the role of renal water retention mechanisms for congestion, and renal hypoxia in AKI during heart failure.

  2. The heart-liver metabolic axis: defective communication exacerbates disease.

    PubMed

    Baskin, Kedryn K; Bookout, Angie L; Olson, Eric N

    2014-04-01

    The heart has been recognized as an endocrine organ for over 30 years (de Bold, 2011); however, little is known about how the heart communicates with other organs in the body, and even less is known about this process in the diseased heart. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Magida and Leinwand (2014) introduce the concept that a primary genetic defect in the heart results in aberrant hepatic lipid metabolism, which consequently exacerbates hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This study provides evidence in support of the hypothesis that crosstalk occurs between the heart and liver, and that this becomes disrupted in the diseased state.

  3. Insomnia Self-Management in Heart Failure

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-11

    Cardiac Failure; Heart Failure; Congestive Heart Failure; Heart Failure, Congestive; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Chronic Insomnia; Disorders of Initiating and Maintaining Sleep; Fatigue; Pain; Depressive Symptoms; Sleep Disorders; Anxiety

  4. Copeptin in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Balling, Louise; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and mortality in the modern Western world and an increasing proportion of the population will be affected by HF in the future. Although HF management has improved quality of life and prognosis, mortality remains very high despite therapeutic options. Medical management consists of a neurohormonal blockade of an overly activated neurohormonal axis. No single marker has been able to predict or monitor HF with respect to disease progression, hospitalization, or mortality. New methods for diagnosis, monitoring therapy, and prognosis are warranted. Copeptin, a precursor of pre-provasopressin, is a new biomarker in HF with promising potential. Copeptin has been found to be elevated in both acute and chronic HF and is associated with prognosis. Copeptin, in combination with other biomarkers, could be a useful marker in the monitoring of disease severity and as a predictor of prognosis and survival in HF. PMID:26975969

  5. New medications for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gordin, Jonathan S; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is common and results in substantial morbidity and mortality. Current guideline-based therapies for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, including beta blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and aldosterone antagonists aim to interrupt deleterious neurohormonal pathways and have shown significant success in reducing morbidity and mortality associated with heart failure. Continued efforts to further improve outcomes in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction have led to the first new-in-class medications approved for heart failure since 2005, ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Ivabradine targets the If channels in the sinoatrial node of the heart, decreasing heart rate. Sacubitril/valsartan combines a neprilysin inhibitor that increases levels of beneficial vasodilatory peptides with an angiotensin receptor antagonist. On a background of previously approved, guideline-directed medical therapies for heart failure, these medications have shown improved clinical outcomes ranging from decreased hospitalizations in a select group of patients to a reduction in all-cause mortality across all pre-specified subgroups. In this review, we will discuss the previously established guideline-directed medical therapies for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, the translational research that led to the development of these new therapies, and the results from the major clinical trials of ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. PMID:27038558

  6. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure.

  7. Heart failure in North America.

    PubMed

    Blair, John E A; Huffman, Mark; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2013-05-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem that affects patients and healthcare systems worldwide. Within the continent of North America, differences in economic development, genetic susceptibility, cultural practices, and trends in risk factors and treatment all contribute to both inter-continental and within-continent differences in heart failure. The United States and Canada represent industrialized countries with similar culture, geography, and advanced economies and infrastructure. During the epidemiologic transition from rural to industrial in countries such as the United States and Canada, nutritional deficiencies and infectious diseases made way for degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, overweight/obesity, and diabetes. This in turn has resulted in an increase in heart failure incidence in these countries, especially as overall life expectancy increases. Mexico, on the other hand, has a less developed economy and infrastructure, and has a wide distribution in the level of urbanization as it becomes more industrialized. Mexico is under a period of epidemiologic transition and the etiology and incidence of heart failure is rapidly changing. Ethnic differences within the populations of the United States and Canada highlight the changing demographics of each country as well as potential disparities in heart failure care. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction makes up approximately half of all hospital admissions throughout North America; however, important differences in demographics and etiology exist between countries. Similarly, acute heart failure etiology, severity, and management differ between countries in North America. The overall economic burden of heart failure continues to be large and growing worldwide, with each country managing this burden differently. Understanding the inter-and within-continental differences may help improve understanding of the heart failure epidemic, and may aid healthcare systems in delivering

  8. The Influence of a High Salt Diet on a Rat Model of Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4 weeks) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion exacerbated cardiomyopathy in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats. Others have shown...

  9. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  10. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  11. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A.; Zugck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  12. Heart failure - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... NOT smoke . Stay active. Walk or ride a stationary bicycle. Your provider can provide a safe and ... with or without stenting may help improve blood flow to the damaged or weakened heart muscle. Heart ...

  13. [Metabolic therapy for heart failure].

    PubMed

    Loiacono, Ferdinando; Alberti, Luca; Lauretta, Ludovica; Puccetti, Patrizia; Silipigni, Carmen; Margonato, Alberto; Fragasso, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure may promote metabolic changes such as insulin resistance, in part through neurohumoral activation, and determining an increased utilization of non-carbohydrate substrates for energy production. In fact, fasting blood ketone bodies as well as fat oxidation have been shown to be increased in patients with heart failure. The result is depletion of myocardial ATP, phosphocreatine and creatine kinase with decreased efficiency of mechanical work. A direct approach to manipulate cardiac energy metabolism consists in modifying substrate utilization by the failing heart. To date, the most effective metabolic treatments include several pharmacological agents that directly inhibit fatty acid oxidation. The results of current research are supporting the concept that shifting the energy substrate preference away from fatty acid metabolism and toward glucose metabolism could be an effective adjunctive treatment in patients with heart failure. Trimetazidine is the most studied drug in this context. Several small studies have evidenced the usefulness of such additional therapeutic tools for heart failure. More specifically, recent meta-analyses and a multicenter retrospective study have shown that additional use of trimetazidine in patients with heart failure, along with symptoms and cardiac function improvement, also provides a significant protective effect on all-cause mortality, cardiovascular events and hospitalization due to cardiac causes. Nevertheless, the exact role of metabolic therapy in heart failure is yet to be established, and a large multicenter randomized trial is necessary. PMID:25072544

  14. [Competence Network Heart Failure (CNHF). Together against heart failure].

    PubMed

    Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Börste, Rita

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is one of the most urgent medical and socio-economic challenges of the 21(st) century. Up to three million people are affected in Germany; this means one in ten people over the age of 65  live with heart failure. The current demographic changes will accentuate the importance of this grave health problem. The care of patients with heart failure, as well as the associated research mandates a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach. The Competence Network Heart Failure (CNHF) pursues this objective. CNHF is a research alliance with 11 sites in Germany and was funded by the Federal Ministry of Research (BMBF) from 2003 through 2014. Since January 2015, the network has been an associate cooperating partner of the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK). During the 12-year funding period by the BMBF, scientists in the field of heart failure from 30 university hospitals, 5 research institutes, 7 heart centers, 17 cardiovascular clinics, over 200 general practitioners, 4 rehabilitation clinics, as well as numerous organizations and associations were involved in cooperative CNHF research. In the context of 22 projects, the CNHF covered basic, clinical, and health care research, and generated numerous groundbreaking insights into disease mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment of heart failure, which are documented in more than 350 publications. With its central study database and bank of biomaterials, the network has set up a Europe-wide unique research resource, which can be used in the future for national and international cooperations with the DZHK and other partners. Furthermore, the CNHF strongly promotes nation- and Europe-wide public relations and heart failure awareness activities. PMID:26979718

  15. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... 70. You can have a normal ejection fraction reading and still have heart failure (called HFpEF or ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. HF Resources For Life ...

  16. Severe Obesity and Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161011.html Severe Obesity and Heart Failure Study sees link even without ... 2016 FRIDAY, Sept. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Severe obesity appears to be an independent risk factor for ...

  17. Epigenetic regulation and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dian J

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure has become a huge public health problem. The treatment options for heart failure, however, are considerably limited. The significant disparity between the scope of a prominent health problem and the restricted means of therapy propagates heart failure epidemics. Delineating novel mechanisms of heart failure is imperative. Emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic regulation may take part in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Epigenetic regulation involves DNA and histone modifications that lead to changes in DNA-based transcriptional programs without altering the DNA sequence. Although more and more mechanisms are being discovered, the best understood epigenetic modifications are achieved through covalent biochemical reactions including histone acetylation, histone methylation and DNA methylation. Connecting environmental stimuli with genomic programs, epigenetic regulation remains important in maintaining homeostases and the pathogeneses of diseases. This review summarizes the most recent developments regarding individual epigenetic modifications and their implications in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Understanding this strategically important mechanism is potentially the key for developing powerful interventions in the future.

  18. Heart failure in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Yancy, Clyde W

    2005-10-10

    The demographics of the United States are changing, and in the next few decades there will no longer be a racial/ethnic majority population. Increased awareness of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in special populations is warranted as these populations increase. Heart failure carries a substantial burden on those affected, particularly African Americans, who have a disproportionate burden of heart disease. Current treatments for heart failure include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, angiotensin II-receptor antagonists, and vasodilating agents. This review discusses the unique characteristics of CVD in African Americans and addresses the need for targeted treatments to reduce the excess burden found in this population.

  19. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. Circulation . 2013 Oct 15;128(16):e240-327. Epub 2013 Jun 5. PMID: 23741058 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ ...

  20. Heart failure - home monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. Circulation . 2013 Oct 15;128(16):e240-327. Epub 2013 Jun 5. PMID: 23741058 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ ...

  1. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Update

    PubMed Central

    Teerlink, John R; Alburikan, Khalid; Metra, Marco; Rodgers, Jo E

    2015-01-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) continues to increase in prevalence and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity including frequent hospitalizations. The American Heart Association is predicting that more than eight million Americans will have heart failure by 2030 and that the total direct costs associated with the disease will rise from $21 billion in 2012 to $70 billion in 2030. The increase in the prevalence and cost of HF is primarily the result of shifting demographics and a growing population. Although many large, randomized, controlled clinical trials have been conducted in patients with chronic heart failure, it was not until recently that a growing number of studies began to address the management of ADHF. It is the intent of this review to update the clinician regarding the evaluation and optimal management of ADHF. PMID:24251454

  2. Understand Your Risk for Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Causes and Risks for Heart Failure Updated:Jul 29,2016 Who Develops Heart Failure ( ... HF. This content was last reviewed April 2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  3. Diastolic Function in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Sándor J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure has reached epidemic proportions, and diastolic heart failure or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes about 50% of all heart failure admissions. Long-term prognosis of both reduced ejection fraction heart failure and HFpEF are similarly dismal. No pharmacologic agent has been developed that actually treats or repairs the physiologic deficit(s) responsible for HFpEF. Because the physiology of diastole is both subtle and counterintuitive, its role in heart failure has received insufficient attention. In this review, the focus is on the physiology of diastole in heart failure, the dominant physiologic laws that govern the process in all hearts, how all hearts work as a suction pump, and, therefore, the elucidation and characterization of what actually is meant by “diastolic function”. The intent is for the reader to understand what diastolic function actually is, what it is not, and how to measure it. Proper measurement of diastolic function requires one to go beyond the usual E/A, E/E′, etc. phenomenological metrics and employ more rigorous causality (mathematical modeling) based parameters of diastolic function. The method simultaneously provides new physiologic insight into the meaning of in vivo “equilibrium volume” of the left ventricle (LV), longitudinal versus transverse volume accommodation of the chamber, diastatic “ringing” of the mitral annulus, and the mechanism of L-wave generation, as well as availability of a load-independent index of diastolic function (LIIDF). One important consequence of understanding what diastolic function is, is the recognition that all that current therapies can do is basically alter the load, rather than actually “repair” the functional components (chamber stiffness, chamber relaxation). If beneficial (biological/structural/metabolic) remodeling due to therapy does manifest ultimately as improved diastolic function, it is due to resumption of normal physiology (as in

  4. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E Dale

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu, leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead box O transcriptional signaling or glucose transport, which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure, and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed. PMID:27034277

  5. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E Dale

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu, leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead box O transcriptional signaling or glucose transport, which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure, and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed.

  6. Mechanisms of heart failure in obesity.

    PubMed

    Ebong, Imo A; Goff, David C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Chen, Haiying; Bertoni, Alain G

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and its prevalence continues to rise. Because obesity has been linked with heart failure, the increasing prevalence of obesity may presage further rise in heart failure in the future. Obesity-related factors are estimated to cause 11% of heart failure cases in men and 14% in women. Obesity may result in heart failure by inducing haemodynamic and myocardial changes that lead to cardiac dysfunction, or due to an increased predisposition to other heart failure risk factors. Direct cardiac lipotoxicity has been described where lipid accumulation in the heart results in cardiac dysfunction inexplicable of other heart failure risk factors. In this overview, we discussed various pathophysiological mechanisms that could lead to heart failure in obesity, including the molecular mechanisms underlying cardiac lipotoxicity. We defined the obesity paradox and enumerated various premises for the paradoxical associations observed in the relationship between obesity and heart failure.

  7. Heart failure: SGLT2 inhibitors and heart failure -- clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Raz, Itamar; Cahn, Avivit

    2016-04-01

    The latest findings from the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial show a 34% reduction in hospitalization for heart failure or cardiovascular death in patients receiving empagliflozin, a sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, compared with placebo. These outstanding results call for discussion of the clinical implications, and in-depth studies of the mechanisms of action of SGLT2 inhibitors.

  8. Model for heart failure education.

    PubMed

    Baldonado, Analiza; Dutra, Danette; Abriam-Yago, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the heart's inability to meet the body's need for blood and oxygen. According to the American Heart Association 2013 update, approximately 5.1 million people are diagnosed with HF in the United States in 2006. Heart failure is the most common diagnosis for hospitalization. In the United States, the HF direct and indirect costs are estimated to be US $39.2 billion in 2010. To address this issue, nursing educators designed innovative teaching frameworks on HF management both in academia and in clinical settings. The model was based on 2 resources: the American Association of Heart Failure Nurses (2012) national nursing certification and the award-winning Pierce County Responsive Care Coordination Program. The HF educational program is divided into 4 modules. The initial modules offer foundational levels of Bloom's Taxonomy then progress to incorporate higher-levels of learning when modules 3 and 4 are reached. The applicability of the key components within each module allows formatting to enhance learning in all areas of nursing, from the emergency department to intensive care units to the medical-surgical step-down units. Also applicable would be to provide specific aspects of the modules to nurses who care for HF patients in skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation centers, and in the home-health care setting. PMID:25140745

  9. Management of Patients Admitted with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Krim, Selim R.; Campbell, Patrick T.; Desai, Sapna; Mandras, Stacy; Patel, Hamang; Eiswirth, Clement; Ventura, Hector O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital admission for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure is an unfortunate certainty in the vast majority of patients with heart failure. Regardless of the etiology, inpatient treatment for acute decompensated heart failure portends a worsening prognosis. Methods This review identifies patients with heart failure who need inpatient therapy and provides an overview of recommended therapies and management of these patients in the hospital setting. Results Inpatient therapy for patients with acute decompensated heart failure should be directed at decongestion and symptom improvement. Clinicians should also treat possible precipitating events, identify comorbid conditions that may exacerbate heart failure, evaluate and update current guideline-directed medical therapy, and perform risk stratification for all patients. Finally, efforts should be made to educate patients about the importance of restricting salt and fluid, monitoring daily weights, and adhering to a graded exercise program. Conclusion Early discharge follow-up and continued optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy are key to preventing future heart failure readmissions. PMID:26413005

  10. Heart failure - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000224.htm Heart failure - what to ask your doctor To use the ... a pump that moves blood through your body. Heart failure occurs when blood does not move well and ...

  11. Smoking Thickens Heart Wall, Leading to Heart Failure: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160932.html Smoking Thickens Heart Wall, Leading to Heart Failure: Study The more you smoke and the ... Sept. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking leads to heart failure by causing thickened heart walls and reducing ...

  12. Gene therapy for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Barry

    2015-09-01

    Heart failure is a major public health problem throughout the world and it is likely that its prevalence will continue to grow over the next several decades. Despite advances in the treatment of heart failure, morbidity and mortality remain unacceptably high. Gene transfer therapy provides a novel strategy for targeting abnormalities in cardiac cells that adversely affect cardiac function. New vectors for gene delivery, mainly adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) that are preferentially taken up by cardiomyocytes, can result in sustained transgene expression. The cardiac isoform of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)ATPase (SERCA2a) plays a major role in regulating calcium levels in cardiomyocytes. Abnormal calcium handling by the failing heart caused by a reduction in SERCA2a activity adversely affects both systolic and diastolic function. The Calcium Upregulation by Percutaneous Administration of Gene Therapy in Cardiac Disease (CUPID) study was a Phase 2a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-finding study that was performed in patients with advanced heart failure due to systolic dysfunction. Eligible patients received AAV/SERCA2a or placebo by direct antegrade infusion into the coronary circulation. At the end of 12 months, patients receiving high-dose therapy (i.e. 1×10(13) DNase Resistant Particles) had evidence of favorable changes in several clinically relevant domains compared to patients treated with placebo. There were no safety concerns at any dose of AAV/SERCA2a. Patients treated with AAV/SERCA2a exhibited a striking reduction in cardiovascular events that persisted through 36 months of follow-up compared to patients who received placebo. Transgene expression was detected in the myocardium of patients receiving AAV/SERCA2a gene therapy as long as 31 months after delivery. A second Phase 2b study, CUPID 2, designed to confirm this favorable effect on heart failure events, is currently underway with the results expected to be presented later in

  13. Outpatient treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    McConaghy, John R; Smith, Steven R

    2002-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) affects more than 2 million adults in the United States. This common, costly, and disabling disorder mainly affects the elderly, with prevalence rates up to 10% in patients older than 65 years. The management of HF is responsible for millions of outpatient visits per year, is the most common discharge diagnosis for Medicare beneficiaries, and accounts for more than 5% of total health care dollars spent.

  14. Increased Heme Levels in the Heart Lead to Exacerbated Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sawicki, Konrad Teodor; Shang, Meng; Wu, Rongxue; Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Khechaduri, Arineh; Sato, Tatsuya; Kamide, Christine; Liu, Ting; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Ardehali, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background Heme is an essential iron-containing molecule for cardiovascular physiology, but in excess it may increase oxidative stress. Failing human hearts have increased heme levels, with upregulation of the rate-limiting enzyme in heme synthesis, δ-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2), which is normally not expressed in cardiomyocytes. We hypothesized that increased heme accumulation (through cardiac overexpression of ALAS2) leads to increased oxidative stress and cell death in the heart. Methods and Results We first showed that ALAS2 and heme levels are increased in the hearts of mice subjected to coronary ligation. To determine the causative role of increased heme in the development of heart failure, we generated transgenic mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of ALAS2. While ALAS2 transgenic mice have normal cardiac function at baseline, their hearts display increased heme content, higher oxidative stress, exacerbated cell death, and worsened cardiac function after coronary ligation compared to nontransgenic littermates. We confirmed in cultured cardiomyoblasts that the increased oxidative stress and cell death observed with ALAS2 overexpression is mediated by increased heme accumulation. Furthermore, knockdown of ALAS2 in cultured cardiomyoblasts exposed to hypoxia reversed the increases in heme content and cell death. Administration of the mitochondrial antioxidant MitoTempo to ALAS2-overexpressing cardiomyoblasts normalized the elevated oxidative stress and cell death levels to baseline, indicating that the effects of increased ALAS2 and heme are through elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress. The clinical relevance of these findings was supported by the finding of increased ALAS2 induction and heme accumulation in failing human hearts from patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy compared to nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Conclusions Heme accumulation is detrimental to cardiac function under ischemic conditions, and reducing heme in the heart may be a

  15. Pediatric Heart Failure in the Developing World.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    The exact prevalence of heart failure among children of developing countries is not known, as the data is limited. The relative frequency of different causes of pediatric heart failure varies widely across different countries and even among different parts of large countries like India. Children of developing countries face a double burden of etiologies. Conditions such us congenital heart disease, myocarditis and cardiomyopathies are common causes of pediatric of heart failure. In addition, diseases like rheumatic heart disease, nutritional deficiencies, and other tropical diseases also result in heart failure among children of the developing countries. However, most of the developing countries have low resources and hence management of pediatric heart failure becomes challenging. Advanced therapies for heart failure are rarely used in children of developing countries and cardiac transplant remains a distant dream.

  16. Rationale and benefits of trimetazidine by acting on cardiac metabolism in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lopatin, Yuri M; Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Fragasso, Gabriele; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Seferovic, Petar M; Gowdak, Luis Henrique W; Vinereanu, Dragos; Hamid, Magdy Abdel; Jourdain, Patrick; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2016-01-15

    Heart failure is a systemic and multiorgan syndrome with metabolic failure as a fundamental mechanism. As a consequence of its impaired metabolism, other processes are activated in the failing heart, further exacerbating the progression of heart failure. Recent evidence suggests that modulating cardiac energy metabolism by reducing fatty acid oxidation and/or increasing glucose oxidation represents a promising approach to the treatment of patients with heart failure. Clinical trials have demonstrated that the adjunct of trimetazidine to the conventional medical therapy improves symptoms, cardiac function and prognosis in patients with heart failure without exerting negative hemodynamic effects. This review focuses on the rationale and clinical benefits of trimetazidine by acting on cardiac metabolism in heart failure, and aims to draw attention to the readiness of this agent to be included in all the major guidelines dealing with heart failure.

  17. Rationale and benefits of trimetazidine by acting on cardiac metabolism in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lopatin, Yuri M; Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Fragasso, Gabriele; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Seferovic, Petar M; Gowdak, Luis Henrique W; Vinereanu, Dragos; Hamid, Magdy Abdel; Jourdain, Patrick; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2016-01-15

    Heart failure is a systemic and multiorgan syndrome with metabolic failure as a fundamental mechanism. As a consequence of its impaired metabolism, other processes are activated in the failing heart, further exacerbating the progression of heart failure. Recent evidence suggests that modulating cardiac energy metabolism by reducing fatty acid oxidation and/or increasing glucose oxidation represents a promising approach to the treatment of patients with heart failure. Clinical trials have demonstrated that the adjunct of trimetazidine to the conventional medical therapy improves symptoms, cardiac function and prognosis in patients with heart failure without exerting negative hemodynamic effects. This review focuses on the rationale and clinical benefits of trimetazidine by acting on cardiac metabolism in heart failure, and aims to draw attention to the readiness of this agent to be included in all the major guidelines dealing with heart failure. PMID:26618252

  18. Heart Failure Update: Outpatient Management.

    PubMed

    Wojnowich, Katherine; Korabathina, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Outpatient management of heart failure (HF) is aimed at treating symptoms and preventing hospitalizations and readmissions. Management is initiated in a stepwise approach. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system is a cornerstone of therapy and should be started, along with beta blockers, as soon as the diagnosis of HF is made. Other drugs, including diuretics, aldosterone antagonists, hydralazine, and nitrates, may be added based on symptoms and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association stage. Despite a great interest in and theoretical benefit of naturoceutical products in the mitigation of oxidative stress and HF progression, none has been proven to be beneficial, and concerns exist regarding their interactions with standard HF drugs. Other nonpharmacologic interventions, including sodium restriction, regular exercise, and/or cardiac rehabilitation, should be initiated at diagnosis. HF often is progressive, and clinicians should be aware of late stage management options, including implantable devices, cardiac transplantation, and hospice care. PMID:26974001

  19. Heart Failure in Rural Communities.

    PubMed

    Verdejo, Hugo E; Ferreccio, Catterina; Castro, Pablo F

    2015-10-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) living in rural areas face an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Even in countries with universal access to health care, rural areas are characteristically underserved, with reduced health care providers supply, greater distance to health care centers, decreased physician density with higher reliance on generalists, and high health care staff turnover. On the other hand, patient-related characteristics vary widely among published data. This review describes the epidemiology of CHF in rural or remote settings, organizational and patient-related factors involved in cardiovascular outcomes, and the role of interventions to improve rural health care.

  20. [Diuretic therapy in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luís; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-02-20

    Many of the primary clinical manifestations of heart failure (HF) are due to fluid retention, and treatments targeting congestion play a central role in HF management. Diuretic therapy remains the cornerstone of congestion treatment, and diuretics are prescribed to the majority of HF patients. Despite this ubiquitous use, there is limited evidence from prospective randomized studies to guide the use of diuretics. With the chronic use of diuretic and usually in advanced stages of HF, diuretics may fail to control salt and water retention. This review describes the mechanism of action of available diuretic classes, reviews their clinical use based on scientific evidence and discusses strategies to overcome diuretic resistance.

  1. Common Variants for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shutong; Tao, Lichan; Wang, Xiuzhi; Kong, Xiangqing; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common disease with high morbidity and mortality; however, none of the drugs available are now entirely optimal for the treatment of HF. In addition to various clinical diseases and environment influences, genetic factors also contribute to the development and progression of HF. Identifying the common variants for HF by genome-wide association studies will facilitate the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying HF. This review summarizes the recently identified common variants for HF risk and outcome and discusses their implications for the clinic therapy. PMID:26085806

  2. Mineralcorticoid antagonists in heart failure.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, Emilia; Krum, Henry

    2014-10-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) have become mandated therapy in patients with reduced ejection fraction (systolic) heart failure (HF) across all symptom classes. These agents should also be prescribed in the early post-myocardial infarction setting in those with reduced ejection fraction and either HF symptoms or diabetes. This article explores the pathophysiological role of aldosterone, an endogenous ligand for the mineralcorticoid receptor (MR), and summarizes the clinical data supporting guideline recommendations for these agents in systolic HF. The use of MRAs in novel areas beyond systolic HF ejection is also explored. Finally, the current status of newer agents will be examined. PMID:25217431

  3. Socioeconomic Inequalities in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Toro, Felipe; Verdejo, Hugo E; Castro, Pablo F

    2015-10-01

    Prevalence and incidence of chronic heart failure (CHF) has increased during the past decades. Beyond its impact on mortality rates, CHF severely impairs quality of life, particularly with the elderly and vulnerable population. Several studies have shown that CHF takes its toll mostly on the uneducated, low-income population, who exhibit impaired access to health care systems, less knowledge regarding its pathology and poorer self-care behaviors. This review summarizes the available evidence linking socioeconomic inequalities and CHF, focusing on the modifiable factors that may explain the impaired health outcomes in socioeconomically deprived populations. PMID:26462090

  4. Right heart failure: toward a common language.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Park, Myung H; Landzberg, Michael J; Lala, Anuradha; Waxman, Aaron B

    2014-02-01

    In this perspective, the International Right Heart Foundation Working Group moves a step forward to develop a common language to describe the development and defects that exemplify the common syndrome of right heart failure. We first propose fundamental definitions of the distinctive components of the right heart circulation and provide consensus on a universal definition of right heart failure. These definitions will form the foundation for describing a uniform nomenclature for right heart circulatory failure with a view to foster collaborative research initiatives and conjoint education in an effort to provide insight into echanisms of disease unique to the right heart.

  5. Right heart failure: toward a common language

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this guideline, the International Right Heart Foundation Working Group moves a step forward to develop a common language to describe the development and defects that exemplify the common syndrome of right heart failure. We first propose fundamental definitions of the distinctive components of the right heart circulation and provide consensus on a universal definition of right heart failure. These definitions will form the foundation for describing a uniform nomenclature for right heart circulatory failure with a view to foster collaborative research initiatives and conjoint education in an effort to provide insight into mechanisms of disease unique to the right heart. PMID:25006413

  6. Right heart failure: toward a common language.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Park, Myung H; Landzberg, Michael J; Lala, Anuradha; Waxman, Aaron B

    2013-12-01

    In this guideline, the International Right Heart Foundation Working Group moves a step forward to develop a common language to describe the development and defects that exemplify the common syndrome of right heart failure. We first propose fundamental definitions of the distinctive components of the right heart circulation and provide consensus on a universal definition of right heart failure. These definitions will form the foundation for describing a uniform nomenclature for right heart circulatory failure with a view to foster collaborative research initiatives and conjoint education in an effort to provide insight into mechanisms of disease unique to the right heart. PMID:25006413

  7. Right heart failure: toward a common language.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Park, Myung H; Landzberg, Michael J; Lala, Anuradha; Waxman, Aaron B

    2014-02-01

    In this perspective, the International Right Heart Foundation Working Group moves a step forward to develop a common language to describe the development and defects that exemplify the common syndrome of right heart failure. We first propose fundamental definitions of the distinctive components of the right heart circulation and provide consensus on a universal definition of right heart failure. These definitions will form the foundation for describing a uniform nomenclature for right heart circulatory failure with a view to foster collaborative research initiatives and conjoint education in an effort to provide insight into echanisms of disease unique to the right heart. PMID:24268184

  8. Heart failure and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Lombardi, Carolina; Castagna, Francesco; Mattaliano, Paola; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Awareness of the importance of sleep-related disorders in patients with cardiovascular diseases is growing. In particular, sleep-disordered breathing, short sleep time, and low sleep quality are frequently reported by patients with heart failure (HF). Sleep-disordered breathing, which includes obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and central sleep apnoea (CSA), is common in patients with HF and has been suggested to increase the morbidity and mortality in these patients. Both OSA and CSA are associated with increased sympathetic activation, vagal withdrawal, altered haemodynamic loading conditions, and hypoxaemia. Moreover, OSA is strongly associated with arterial hypertension, the most common risk factor for cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Intrathoracic pressure changes are also associated with OSA, contributing to haemodynamic alterations and potentially affecting overexpression of genes involved in ventricular remodelling. HF treatment can decrease the severity of both OSA and CSA. Indeed, furosemide and spironolactone administration, exercise training, cardiac resynchronization therapy, and eventually heart transplantation have shown a positive effect on OSA and CSA in patients with HF. At present, whether CSA should be treated and, if so, which is the optimal therapy is still debated. By contrast, more evidence is available on the beneficial effects of OSA treatment in patients with HF.

  9. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... signal to your heart. The signal makes your heart beat at the correct pace. Pacemakers may be used: To correct abnormal heart rhythms. The heart may beat too slowly, too fast, or in an irregular ...

  10. How Is Heart Failure Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a pocket, or hung around your neck. Nuclear Heart Scan A nuclear heart scan shows how well blood is flowing ... blood is reaching your heart muscle. During a nuclear heart scan, a safe, radioactive substance called a ...

  11. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  12. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rosca, Mariana G; Hoppel, Charles L

    2013-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF, several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cyclic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus, and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cylic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22948484

  15. Heart Failure Update: Inpatient Management.

    PubMed

    Korabathina, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (HF) is one of most common reasons for hospitalization among individuals older than 65 years. A thorough evaluation, including history, physical examination, and laboratory assessment, is required to optimize care of these patients. In uncertain cases, serum brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal proBNP level, stress testing, and/or invasive coronary angiography may be helpful in establishing the diagnosis. The hospital setting provides an opportunity to identify etiologies and stabilize the patient. The primary goal of inpatient HF therapy is systemic and pulmonary decongestion, achieved most effectively using intravenous diuretic therapy. Rate and rhythm control may be needed for patients with concurrent atrial fibrillation and, in American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association stage D HF, intravenous inotropes may become necessary. New pharmacologic or device therapies also are considered as a means of transitioning patients, especially those with severe disease, to the outpatient setting. Patients hospitalized for acute decompensated HF have high postdischarge mortality and rehospitalization rates and, thus, should be monitored carefully. PMID:26974002

  16. Lifestyle Changes for Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... about Alcohol and Heart Disease . Avoiding or limiting caffeine Consume only a moderate amount of caffeine per day, no more than a cup or two of coffee. Learn more about Caffeine and Heart Disease . Eating a heart-healthy diet ...

  17. Diuretics as pathogenetic treatment for heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Guglin, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Increased intracardiac filling pressure or congestion causes symptoms and leads to hospital admissions in patients with heart failure, regardless of their systolic function. A history of hospital admission, in turn, predicts further hospitalizations and morbidity, and a higher number of hospitalizations determine higher mortality. Congestion is therefore the driving force of the natural history of heart failure. Congestion is the syndrome shared by heart failure with preserved and reduced systolic function. These two conditions have almost identical morbidity, mortality, and survival because the outcomes are driven by congestion. A small difference in favor of heart failure with preserved systolic function comes from decreased ejection fraction and left ventricular remodeling which is only present in heart failure with decreased systolic function. The magnitude of this difference reflects the contribution of decreased systolic function and ventricular remodeling to the progression of heart failure. The only treatment available for congestion is fluid removal via diuretics, ultrafiltration, or dialysis. It is the only treatment that works equally well for heart failure with reduced and preserved systolic function because it affects congestion, the main pathogenetic feature of the disease. Diuretics are pathogenetic therapy for heart failure. PMID:21403798

  18. Heart Failure - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arabic) هبوط القلب - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Heart Failure Zatajenje srca - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Heart Failure 心力衰竭 - 简体中文 (Chinese - ...

  19. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance...

  20. Increased heteroscedasticity of heart rate in fatal heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzik, Z. R.; Kiyono, K.; Hayano, J.; Watanabe, E.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2008-04-01

    Healthy human heart rate is known to fluctuate in a highly complex manner, displaying complexity characteristics such as those shared by physical systems at a critical state. It is, however, widely believed that chronic heart failure reduces this complexity and that heart rate data from chronic-heart-failure patients can be used for the validation of complexity measures and paradigms applicable both to heart rate and more generally to assess any system's complexity. Here, we counter the above belief, showing an increase in fluctuations and in complexity of heart rate in chronic-heart-failure patients, in particular those at risk of death. This is supported by evidence of increased non-Gaussianity and heteroscedasticity resulting from the emergence of a characteristic correlation scale in the magnitude correlation landscape.

  1. Explanatory Models of Heart Failure Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Angela P.; McDougall, Graham J.; Joiner-Rogers, Glenda; Innerarity, Sheri; Delville, Carol; Meraviglia, Marty; Davila, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Chronic health failure is a leading cause of hospital readmissions and is reaching epidemic proportions in the United States. Explanatory models of illness can provide insight about how people with heart failure perceive their etiology of heart failure. Six themes were found in this descriptive, qualitative study to explore the perceived origin of heart failure in 50 participants. Forty percent of the people were unaware of why they had the diagnosis. Misconceptions and misinformation were common, including confusion about whether the symptoms themselves caused the disease. PMID:22156813

  2. The systemic inflammatory response in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Anderson

    2000-09-01

    The physiologic diagnosis of heart failure has changed very little over the past several decades: heart failure is the inability of the cardiac output to meet the metabolic demands of the organism. The clinical definition of heart failure (also relatively unchanged) describes it as ventricular dysfunction that is accompanied by reduced exercise tolerance. Our understanding of the true pathophysiologic processes involved in heart failure have, however, changed. We have moved from thinking of heart failure as primarily a circulatory phenomenon to seeing it as a pathophysiologic state under the control of multiple complex systems. Over the past several years the dramatic explosion of research in the fields of immunology and immunopathology have added an additional piece to the puzzle that defines heart failure and have lead to an understanding of heart failure, at least in some part, as an 'inflammatory disease'. In this review we will examine several of the key inflammatory mediators as they relate to heart failure while at the same time attempting to define the source(s) of these mediators. We will examine key elements of the inflammatory cascade as they relate to heart failure such as: cytokines, 'proximal mediators' (e.g. NF-kappaB), and distal mediators (e.g. nitric oxide). We will end with a discussion of the potential therapeutic role of anti-inflammatory strategies in the future treatment of heart failure. Also, throughout the review we will examine the potential pitfalls encountered in applying bench discoveries to the bedside as have been learned in the field of septic shock research. PMID:10978715

  3. [Rehabilitation in chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Maroto Montero, J M

    1995-01-01

    The functional capacity of patients with chronic heart failure usually undergoes significant deterioration. Its decrease can be influenced by a low cardiac output, but is directly related to alterations at the level of the skeletal muscle. Cardiac rehabilitation programmes, which are therapeutic systems of multifactorial action (physical and psychological training, and guidelines for control of risk factors), have shown great benefits in this type of patients. There is an increase in the aerobic capacity, anaerobic threshold, O2 peak, cardiac out put and in the maximum O2 arteriovenous difference. This entails an improvement in functional capacity, which has a very positive influence on the psychological sphere. In view of the small number of cases included in the studies published, it is impossible to get to know the results at a prognosis level. The performance of physical training, which has to be carefully programmed, does not occasion more complications than when performed by low risk groups. There is no evidence proving that physical training deteriorates the ventricular function. The decrease in the ejection fraction found in some patients with very low values at the beginning of the programme could be secondary to other usual factors responsible for the negative evolution of this type of pathology.

  4. Health Literacy and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Cajita, Maan Isabella; Cajita, Tara Rafaela; Han, Hae-Ra

    2015-01-01

    Background Low health literacy affects millions of Americans, putting those who are affected at a disadvantage and at risk for poorer health outcomes. Low health literacy can act as a barrier to effective disease self-management; this is especially true for chronic diseases such as heart failure (HF) that require complicated self-care regimens. Purpose This systematic review examined quantitative research literature published between 1999 and 2014 to explore the role of health literacy among HF patients. The specific aims of the systematic review are to (1) describe the prevalence of low health literacy among HF patients, (2) explore the predictors of low health literacy among HF patients, and (3) discuss the relationship between health literacy and HF self-care and common HF outcomes. Methods A systematic search of the following databases was conducted, PubMed, CINAHL Plus, Embase, PsycINFO, and Scopus, using relevant keywords and clear inclusion and exclusion criteria. Conclusions An average of 39% of HF patients have low health literacy. Age, race/ethnicity, years of education, and cognitive function are predictors of health literacy. In addition, adequate health literacy is consistently correlated with higher HF knowledge and higher salt knowledge. Clinical Implications Considering the prevalence of low health literacy among in the HF population, nurses and healthcare professionals need to recognize the consequences of low health literacy and adopt strategies that could minimize its detrimental effect on the patient's health outcomes. PMID:25569150

  5. Mortality in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Bytyçi, Ibadete; Bajraktari, Gani

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a clinical syndrome, which is becoming a major public health problem in recent decades, due to its increasing prevalence, especially in the developed countries, mostly due to prolonged lifespan of the general population as well as the increased of HF patients. The HF treatment, particularly, new pharmacological and non-pharmacological agents, has markedly improved clinical outcomes of patients with HF including increased life expectancy and improved quality of life. However, despite the facts that mortality in HF patients has decreased, it still remains unacceptably high. This review of summarizes the evidence to date about the mortality of HF patients. Despite the impressive achievements in the pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of HF patients which has undeniably improved the survival of these patients, the mortality still remains high particularly among elderly, male and African-American patients. Patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction have higher mortality rates, most commonly due to cardiovascular causes, compared with patients HF and preserved ejection fraction. PMID:25550250

  6. Cellular Therapy for Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Psaltis, Peter J; Schwarz, Nisha; Toledo-Flores, Deborah; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF) is underpinned by complex changes at subcellular, cellular and extracellular levels in the ventricular myocardium. For all of the gains that conventional treatments for HF have brought to mortality and morbidity, they do not adequately address the loss of cardiomyocyte numbers in the remodeling ventricle. Originally conceived to address this problem, cellular transplantation for HF has already gone through several stages of evolution over the past two decades. Various cell types and delivery routes have been implemented to positive effect in preclinical models of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy, with pleiotropic benefits observed in terms of myocardial remodeling, systolic and diastolic performance, perfusion, fibrosis, inflammation, metabolism and electrophysiology. To a large extent, these salubrious effects are now attributed to the indirect, paracrine capacity of transplanted stem cells to facilitate endogenous cardiac repair processes. Promising results have also followed in early phase human studies, although these have been relatively modest and somewhat inconsistent. This review details the preclinical and clinical evidence currently available regarding the use of pluripotent stem cells and adult-derived progenitor cells for cardiomyopathy and HF. It outlines the important lessons that have been learned to this point in time, and balances the promise of this exciting field against the key challenges and questions that still need to be addressed at all levels of research, to ensure that cell therapy realizes its full potential by adding to the armamentarium of HF management. PMID:27280304

  7. Pioglitazone-induced congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema in a patient with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Jearath, Vaneet; Vashisht, Rajan; Rustagi, Vipul; Raina, Sujeet; Sharma, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Pioglitazone-induced heart failure is known in patients with underlying heart disease, but is not well documented in patients with normal left ventricular function. Pioglitazone has been very popular as it is an insulin sensitizer and insulin resistance is prevalent among Indians. Fluid retention exacerbates pre-existing heart failure or precipitates heart failure in a patient with underlying left ventricular dysfunction. However, pathogenesis of heart failure in a patient with normal left ventricular function is not known. Probably it is due to dose-related effect on pulmonary endothelial permeability, rather than alterations in left ventricular mass or ejection fraction. We report a patient who developed congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema with normal left ventricular function within 1 year of starting pioglitazone therapy. We have to be careful in monitoring all possible side effects during followup when patients are on pioglitazone therapy.

  8. Pioglitazone-induced congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema in a patient with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Jearath, Vaneet; Vashisht, Rajan; Rustagi, Vipul; Raina, Sujeet; Sharma, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Pioglitazone-induced heart failure is known in patients with underlying heart disease, but is not well documented in patients with normal left ventricular function. Pioglitazone has been very popular as it is an insulin sensitizer and insulin resistance is prevalent among Indians. Fluid retention exacerbates pre-existing heart failure or precipitates heart failure in a patient with underlying left ventricular dysfunction. However, pathogenesis of heart failure in a patient with normal left ventricular function is not known. Probably it is due to dose-related effect on pulmonary endothelial permeability, rather than alterations in left ventricular mass or ejection fraction. We report a patient who developed congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema with normal left ventricular function within 1 year of starting pioglitazone therapy. We have to be careful in monitoring all possible side effects during followup when patients are on pioglitazone therapy. PMID:27127397

  9. Emerging Novel Therapies for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Szema, Anthony M; Dang, Sophia; Li, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Heart function fails when the organ is unable to pump blood at a rate proportional to the body’s need for oxygen or when this function leads to elevated cardiac chamber filling pressures (cardiogenic pulmonary edema). Despite our sophisticated knowledge of heart failure, even so-called ejection fraction-preserved heart failure has high rates of mortality and morbidity. So, novel therapies are sorely needed. This review discusses current standard therapies for heart failure and launches an exploration into emerging novel treatments on the heels of recently-approved sacubitril and ivbradine. For example, Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) is protective of the heart, so in the absence of VIP, VIP knockout mice have dysregulation in key heart failure genes: 1) Force Generation and Propagation; 2) Energy Production and Regulation; 3) Ca+2 Cycling; 4) Transcriptional Regulators. VIP administration leads to coronary dilation in human subjects. In heart failure patients, VIP levels are elevated as a plausible endogenous protective effect. With the development of elastin polymers to stabilize VIP and prevent its degradation, VIP may therefore have a chance to satisfy the unmet need as a potential treatment for acute heart failure. PMID:26512208

  10. Hyponatremia in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2013-01-01

    The present review analyses the mechanisms relating heart failure and hyponatremia, describes the association of hyponatremia with the progress of disease and morbidity/mortality in heart failure patients and presents treatment options focusing on the role of arginine vasopressin (AVP)-receptor antagonists. Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder in the clinical setting and in hospitalized patients. Patients with hyponatremia may have neurologic symptoms since low sodium concentration produces brain edema, but the rapid correction of hyponatremia is also associated with major neurologic complications. Patients with heart failure often develop hyponatremia owing to the activation of many neurohormonal systems leading to decrease of sodium levels. A large number of clinical studies have associated hyponatremia with increased morbidity and mortality in patients hospitalized for heart failure or outpatients with chronic heart failure. Treatment options for hyponatremia in heart failure, such as water restriction or the use of hypertonic saline with loop diuretics, have limited efficacy. AVP-receptor antagonists increase sodium levels effectively and their use seems promising in patients with hyponatremia. However, the effects of AVP-receptor antagonists on hard outcomes in patients with heart failure and hyponatremia have not been thoroughly examined. PMID:24109495

  11. Tolvaptan: A Novel Diuretic in Heart Failure Management.

    PubMed

    Zulkifli Amin, Hilman; Suridanda Danny, Siska

    2016-01-13

    Heart failure (HF) is still a major problem worldwide with high morbidity and mortality rates. The recently developed medication for HF is still incapable of reducing its morbidity and mortality, and clinical data supporting the efficacy and safety of its mainstay therapy remain insufficient. Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) plays important roles in circulatory and water homeostasis, one of which is water retention through the V2 receptor. In patients with HF, there is an increased level of AVP, contributing to such symptoms as edema, dyspnea, and congestion. Tolvaptan as a selective V2 receptor antagonist, in addition to the conventional therapy, has been shown to cause an increase in net fluid loss, a decrease in body weight, and a reduction in the rate of HF exacerbation. Such evidence has been provided by the Acute and Chronic Therapeutic Impact of a Vasopressin Antagonist (ACTIV) in Congestive Heart Failure (CHF), Efficacy of Vasopressin Antagonism in Heart Failure Outcome Study With Tolvaptan (EVEREST), Acute Heart Failure Volume Control Multicenter Randomized (AVCMA), and Study of Ascending Levels of Tolvaptan in hyponatremia 1and 2 (SALT-1 and SALT-2) trials. Tolvaptan can be an alternative diuretic in conjunction with other standard therapies for HF and has already been proved to be able to decrease morbidity and mortality, especially in HF patients with hyponatremia. PMID:27403182

  12. Ca2+ Cycling in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Anderson, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+ plays a crucial role in connecting membrane excitability with contraction in myocardium. The hallmark features of heart failure are mechanical dysfunction and arrhythmias; defective intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is a central cause of contractile dysfunction and arrhythmias in failing myocardium. Defective Ca2+ homeostasis in heart failure can result from pathological alteration in the expression and activity of an increasingly understood collection of Ca2+ homeostatic binding proteins, ion channels and enzymes. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms of defective Ca2+ cycling in heart failure and consider how fundamental understanding of these pathways may translate into novel and innovative therapies. PMID:23989713

  13. Misconceptions and facts about 'diastolic' heart failure.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Messerli, Franz H

    2014-12-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction has become a fashionable diagnosis. An increasing number of elderly patients with dyspnea carry this diagnosis. Evaluation and management of these patients typically labeled as having "diastolic" heart failure are challenging, and misconceptions are common. No drug class has been shown to consistently provide outcome benefit. Therapeutic strategies based on the predominant pathophysiologic mechanism and stage of the disease currently remain the best option in tackling the perplexing syndrome of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. PMID:24937156

  14. Are statins beneficial for chronic heart failure?

    PubMed

    Rain, Carmen; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-05-27

    There is controversy about the role of statins in chronic heart failure. Even though it is clear they decrease inflammatory markers and probably improve some echocardiographic parameters, it is not clear if they impact clinically important outcomes. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 21 randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded statins in chronic heart failure do not decrease mortality, and might lead to little or no decrease in hospitalizations for heart failure or other clinical outcomes.

  15. Adrenal adrenoceptors in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    de Lucia, Claudio; Femminella, Grazia D.; Gambino, Giuseppina; Pagano, Gennaro; Allocca, Elena; Rengo, Carlo; Silvestri, Candida; Leosco, Dario; Ferrara, Nicola; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a chronic clinical syndrome characterized by the reduction in left ventricular (LV) function and it represents one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite considerable advances in pharmacological treatment, HF represents a severe clinical and social burden. Sympathetic outflow, characterized by increased circulating catecholamines (CA) biosynthesis and secretion, is peculiar in HF and sympatholytic treatments (as β-blockers) are presently being used for the treatment of this disease. Adrenal gland secretes Epinephrine (80%) and Norepinephrine (20%) in response to acetylcholine stimulation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors on the chromaffin cell membranes. This process is regulated by adrenergic receptors (ARs): α2ARs inhibit CA release through coupling to inhibitory Gi-proteins, and β ARs (mainly β2ARs) stimulate CA release through coupling to stimulatory Gs-proteins. All ARs are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and GPCR kinases (GRKs) regulate their signaling and function. Adrenal GRK2-mediated α2AR desensitization and downregulation are increased in HF and seem to be a fundamental regulator of CA secretion from the adrenal gland. Consequently, restoration of adrenal α2AR signaling through the inhibition of GRK2 is a fascinating sympatholytic therapeutic strategy for chronic HF. This strategy could have several significant advantages over existing HF pharmacotherapies minimizing side-effects on extra-cardiac tissues and reducing the chronic activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone and endothelin systems. The role of adrenal ARs in regulation of sympathetic hyperactivity opens interesting perspectives in understanding HF pathophysiology and in the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:25071591

  16. Mechanical circulatory support in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Szyguła-Jurkiewicz, Bożena; Szczurek, Wioletta; Suliga, Kamil; Rempega, Grzegorz; Rajwa, Paweł

    2016-06-01

    The increasing number of end-stage heart failure patients eligible for heart transplant and the disproportionately low number of donor hearts have led to increased interest in ventricular assist devices (VAD). These devices can be used as a bridge to decision, bridge to recovery, or bridge to candidacy. The main advantage of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is the improvement of organ perfusion and function, which leads to better quality of life and survival. The MCS can also be used as a destination therapy in end-stage heart failure patients who are not eligible for heart transplant. It should be remembered that, despite the tangible benefits, VAD implantation may also be associated with the risk of serious complications, such as bleeding, infection, arrhythmias, blood clots, right ventricular failure, and cardiovascular events. This study presents an up-to-date overview of the current knowledge on the role of MCS in modern medicine. PMID:27516785

  17. Mechanical circulatory support in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Szczurek, Wioletta; Suliga, Kamil; Rempega, Grzegorz; Rajwa, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of end-stage heart failure patients eligible for heart transplant and the disproportionately low number of donor hearts have led to increased interest in ventricular assist devices (VAD). These devices can be used as a bridge to decision, bridge to recovery, or bridge to candidacy. The main advantage of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is the improvement of organ perfusion and function, which leads to better quality of life and survival. The MCS can also be used as a destination therapy in end-stage heart failure patients who are not eligible for heart transplant. It should be remembered that, despite the tangible benefits, VAD implantation may also be associated with the risk of serious complications, such as bleeding, infection, arrhythmias, blood clots, right ventricular failure, and cardiovascular events. This study presents an up-to-date overview of the current knowledge on the role of MCS in modern medicine. PMID:27516785

  18. Telerehabilitation for patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tousignant, Michel; Mampuya, Warner Mbuila

    2015-02-01

    Heart failure is a chronic and progressive condition that is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Even though cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has been shown to be beneficial to heart failure patients, only a very small proportion of them will actually be referred and eventually participate. The low participation rate is due in part to accessibility and travel difficulties. Telerehabilitation is a new approach in the rehabilitation field that allows patients to receive a complete rehabilitation program at home in a safe manner and under adequate supervision. We believe that by increasing accessibility to CR, telerehabilitation programs will significantly improve heart failure patients' functional capacity and quality of life. However, it is crucial to provide policy makers with evidence-based data on cardiac telerehabilitation if we want to see its successful implementation in heart failure patients.

  19. Recent advances in treatment of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Kitai, Takeshi; Tang, WH Wilson

    2015-01-01

    With the total cases and economic burden of heart failure continuing to rise, there is an overwhelming need for novel therapies. Several drugs for heart failure have succeeded in preclinical and early-phase clinical trials, but most of them failed to show the real benefit in pivotal clinical trials. Meanwhile, the US Food and Drug Administration recently approved two promising new drugs to treat heart failure: ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Furthermore, some of the newer agents in testing offer the potential for significant progress in addition to these drugs. Patiromer and zirconium cyclosilicate are attractive agents that are expected to prevent hyperkalemia during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition, and serelaxin and urodilatin are promising drugs in the treatment of acute heart failure. Future clinical trials with more appropriate study designs, optimal clinical endpoints, and proper patient selection are mandatory to assess the true efficacy of these attractive compounds in clinical practice. PMID:26918130

  20. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Gladden, James D.; Linke, Wolfgang A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of this series devoted to heart failure (HF), we review the epidemiology, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Gaps in knowledge and needed future research are discussed. PMID:24663384

  1. Heart Failure in Children and Adolescents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools and Resources • Personal Stories HF Resources For Life What is Heart Failure? | Spanish How Can I ... How Can Physical Activity Become a Way of Life? | Spanish How Can I Make My Lifestyle Healthier? ...

  2. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center for Professionals • Personal Stories HF Resources For Life What is Heart Failure? | Spanish How Can I ... How Can Physical Activity Become a Way of Life? | Spanish How Can I Make My Lifestyle Healthier? ...

  3. Drug Therapy for Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Magrini, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is globally one of most frequent reasons for hospitalization and still represents a challenge for the choice of the best treatment to improve patient outcome. According to current international guidelines, as soon as patients with acute heart failure arrive at the emergency department, the common therapeutic approach aims to improve their signs and symptoms, correct volume overload, and ameliorate cardiac hemodynamics by increasing vital organ perfusion. Recommended treatment for the early management of acute heart failure is characterized by the use of intravenous diuretics, oxygen, and vasodilators. Although these measures ameliorate the patient's symptoms, they do not favorably impact on short- and long-term mortality. Consequently, there is a pressing need for novel agents in acute heart failure treatment with the result that research in this field is increasing worldwide.

  4. Imaging Techniques in Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Pérez del Villar, Candelas; Yotti, Raquel; Bermejo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnosis of heart failure. In patients with a clinical picture of acute decompensation, prognosis is largely determined by early implementation of general measures and treatment of the underlying cause. Given its diagnostic yield and portability, ultrasound has become an essential tool in the setting of acute heart failure, and is currently found in all medical departments involved in the care of the critically ill patient. Cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography allow detailed characterization of multiple aspects of cardiac structure and function that were previously unavailable. This helps guide and monitor many of the treatment decisions in the acute heart failure population in an entirely noninvasive way. This article aims to review the usefulness of the imaging techniques that are clinically relevant in the context of an episode of acute heart failure. We discuss the indications and limitations of these techniques in detail and describe the general principles for the appropriate interpretation of results.

  5. Outpatient treatment of systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    McConaghy, John R; Smith, Steven R

    2004-12-01

    Optimal outpatient treatment of systolic heart failure has three goals that should be pursued simultaneously: (1) control of risk factors for the development and progression of heart failure, (2) treatment of heart failure, and (3) education of patients. Control of risk factors includes treating hypertension, diabetes, and coronary artery disease, and eliminating the use of alcohol and tobacco. All patients with heart failure should be taking an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin-receptor blocker. In the absence of contraindications, an ACE inhibitor is preferred. In most patients, physicians should consider adding a beta blocker to ACE-inhibitor therapy. In patients with severe heart failure, spironolactone is a useful addition to baseline drug therapy, as is carvedilol (substitute carvedilol if patient is already taking a beta blocker). Patients with stable heart failure should be encouraged to begin and maintain a regular aerobic exercise program. Digoxin therapy may reduce the likelihood of hospitalization but does not reduce mortality. It must be monitored closely, with a target dosage level of 0.5 to 1.1 ng per mL. Symptoms may be controlled with the use of diuretics and restricted dietary sodium. Finally, patient education, with the patient's active participation in the care, is a key strategy in the management of heart failure. Periodic follow-up between scheduled office visits, which is essential in the long-term management of heart failure, may include telephone calls from the office nurse, maintenance of a daily symptom and weight diary, and participation in a disease-management program.

  6. Implantable Hemodynamic Monitoring in Ambulatory Heart Failure: Who, When, Why, How?

    PubMed

    Desai, Akshay S

    2015-12-01

    Despite considerable advances in therapeutics, the risk of hospitalization for patients with heart failure remains high. Since many hospitalizations in heart failure patients are driven by congestive exacerbations, optimal management of congestion is a key goal of longitudinal heart failure disease management. Existing strategies for hemodynamic optimization in heart failure patients rely heavily on remote monitoring of weights and symptoms, augmented in selected cases by data from implanted cardiac devices. When they have been systematically studied, however, none of these approaches has been demonstrated to consistently improve clinical outcomes. Recent data suggests that implantable hemodynamic monitors may facilitate early detection and treatment of worsening congestion, thereby reducing the need for hospital admission. In this review, we explore the rationale and evidence supporting the use of these novel devices as an adjunct to routine heart failure management and the strategies for appropriate patient selection.

  7. Update: Acute Heart Failure (VII): Nonpharmacological Management of Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Plácido, Rui; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2015-09-01

    Acute heart failure is a major and growing public health problem worldwide with high morbidity, mortality, and cost. Despite recent advances in pharmacological management, the prognosis of patients with acute decompensated heart failure remains poor. Consequently, nonpharmacological approaches are being developed and increasingly used. Such techniques may include several modalities of ventilation, ultrafiltration, mechanical circulatory support, myocardial revascularization, and surgical treatment, among others. This document reviews the nonpharmacological approach in acute heart failure, indications, and prognostic implications.

  8. In-hospital worsening heart failure.

    PubMed

    Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Kelkar, Anita; Fonarow, Gregg C; Anker, Stefan; Greene, Stephen J; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Collins, Sean; Ruschitzka, Frank; Yancy, Clyde W; Teerlink, John R; Adams, Kirkwood; Cotter, Gadi; Ponikowski, Piotr; Felker, G Michael; Metra, Marco; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-11-01

    Acute worsening heart failure (WHF) is seen in a sizable portion of patients hospitalized for heart failure, and is increasingly being recognized as an entity that is associated with an adverse in-hospital course. WHF is generally defined as worsening heart failure symptoms and signs requiring an intensification of therapy, and is reported to be seen in anywhere from 5% to 42% of heart failure admissions. It is difficult to ascertain the exact epidemiology of WHF due to varying definitions used in the literature. Studies indicate that WHF cannot be precisely predicted on the basis of baseline variables assessed at the time of admission. Recent data suggest that some experimental therapies may reduce the risk of development of WHF among hospitalized heart failure patients, and this is associated with a reduction in risk of subsequent post-discharge cardiovascular mortality. In this respect, WHF holds promise as a endpoint for acute heart failure clinical trials to better elucidate the benefit of targeted novel therapies. Better understanding of the pathophysiology and a consensus on the definition of WHF will further improve our epidemiological and clinical understanding of this entity.

  9. [Pathophysiologic and diagnostic aspects of heart failure].

    PubMed

    Rudolph, W

    1990-06-01

    Ventricular dysfunction due to an abnormality of the heart which is associated with typical hemodynamic, renal and hormonal reactions, characterizes the clinical syndrome heart failure. The traditional definition of heart failure as the inability to pump an amount of blood sufficient to cover the metabolic needs of the body in the presence of adequate venous return, emphasizes mainly the reduction in cardiac output but not the increase in intracardiac pressures. Pressure or volume overload, decreased contractility, loss of muscle mass or restricted filling represent the most important pathological processes leading to heart failure. The disturbance of systolic ventricular function due to pressure or volume overload or diminished contractility is characterized by a decrease in the ejection fraction, the disturbance in diastolic ventricular function associated with restricted filling is characterized by elevated chamber stiffness. Decreased contractility is most commonly responsible for the development of heart failure. Impairment of diastolic ventricular function can only be regarded as the dominant mechanism leading to heart failure in the presence of a small noncompliant ventricle. Impairment of diastolic ventricular function in an enlarged heart is always associated with an impairment of systolic ventricular function and is, then, relegated to a subordinate role. Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, hypertension, cardiomyopathies, valvular heart diseases and congenital heart diseases, for the incidence of which coronary artery disease is most frequently responsible. Most of these diseases lead to heart failure not via a single, but rather several of the specified pathophysiological processes. Possible mechanisms for loss of contractility include structural changes as well as alterations in excitation-contraction coupling. Possible mechanisms responsible for impaired diastolic ventricular function encompass, in addition to altered calcium

  10. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge for Heart Failure and Cardiogenic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhao-peng; Wang, Hong; Hou, Xiao-tong

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) can be defined as cardiac structural or functional abnormality leading to a series of symptoms due to deficiency of oxygen delivery. In the clinical practice, acute heart failure (AHF) is usually performed as cardiogenic shock (CS), pulmonary edema, and single or double ventricle congestive heart failure. CS refers to depressed or insufficient cardiac output (CO) attributable to myocardial infarction, fulminant myocarditis, acute circulatory failure attributable to intractable arrhythmias or the exacerbation of chronic heart failure, postcardiotomy low CO syndrome, and so forth. Epidemiological studies have shown that CS has higher in-hospital mortality in patients with AHF. Besides, we call the induced, sustained circulatory failure even after administration of high doses of inotropes and vasopressors refractory cardiogenic shock. In handling these cases, mechanical circulatory support devices are usually needed. In this review, we discuss the current application status and clinical points in utilizing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). PMID:27294130

  11. Optimization of cardiac metabolism in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Yoshimura, Michihiro; Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Mochizuki, Seibu

    2011-12-01

    The derangement of the cardiac energy substrate metabolism plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. The utilization of non-carbohydrate substrates, such as fatty acids, is the predominant metabolic pathway in the normal heart, because this provides the highest energy yield per molecule of substrate metabolized. In contrast, glucose becomes an important preferential substrate for metabolism and ATP generation under specific pathological conditions, because it can provide greater efficiency in producing high energy products per oxygen consumed compared to fatty acids. Manipulations that shift energy substrate utilization away from fatty acids toward glucose can improve the cardiac function and slow the progression of heart failure. However, insulin resistance, which is highly prevalent in the heart failure population, impedes this adaptive metabolic shift. Therefore, the acceleration of the glucose metabolism, along with the restoration of insulin sensitivity, would be the ideal metabolic therapy for heart failure. This review discusses the therapeutic potential of modifying substrate utilization to optimize cardiac metabolism in heart failure. PMID:21933140

  12. Extracorporeal Life Support for Pediatric Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Christopher R.; McMullan, D. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) represents an essential component in the treatment of the pediatric patient with refractory heart failure. Defined as the use of an extracorporeal system to provide cardiopulmonary support, ECLS provides hemodynamic support to facilitate end-organ recovery and can be used as a salvage therapy during acute cardiorespiratory failure. Support strategies employed in pediatric cardiac patients include bridge to recovery, bridge to therapy, and bridge to transplant. Advances in extracorporeal technology and refinements in patient selection have allowed wider application of this therapy in pediatric heart failure patients. PMID:27812522

  13. Update on ivabradine for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Borer, Jeffrey S; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    Despite dramatic advances in therapy for heart failure (HF) during the past 3 decades, hospitalization and mortality rates remain relatively high. In recent decades, it has become apparent that HF is divisible into two equally lethal but pathophysiologically different sub-classes, the first comprising patients with LV systolic dysfunction [heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF)] and the other, approximately equal in size, involving patients with "preserved" systolic function [heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF)]. Evidence-based event reducing therapy currently is available only for HFrEF. With the completion of seminal trials of beta blockers, now part of standard therapy for HFrEF, it was apparent that heart rate slowing is an underlying basis of clinical effectiveness of HFrEF therapy. With the discovery of the "f current" that modulates the slope of spontaneous diastolic depolarization of the sino-atrial node, a non-beta blockade approach to heart rate slowing became available. Ivabradine, the first FDA-approved f-current blocker for HFrEF, markedly reduces hospitalizations for worsening heart failure, while also progressively reducing mortality as pre-therapy heart rate increases, and also promotes beneficial left ventricular remodeling, improves health-related quality of life and is effective despite a wide range of comorbidities. The drug is well tolerated and adverse effects are relatively few. Ivabradine represents an important addition to the armamentarium for mitigation of HFrEF. PMID:26934996

  14. Initial Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treatment Failure is Associated with Exacerbations in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Kronmal, Richard A.; Gibson, Ronald L.; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Retsch-Bogart, George; Treggiari, Miriam M.; Burns, Jane L.; Khan, Umer; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2011-01-01

    Rationale The risk of pulmonary exacerbation following Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) acquisition in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) is unknown. Objectives To determine if failure of antibiotic therapy to eradicate Pa and frequency of Pa recurrence are associated with increased exacerbation risk. Methods The cohort included 282 children with CF who participated in the EPIC trial ages 1–12 with newly acquired Pa, defined as either a first lifetime Pa positive respiratory culture or positive after two years of negative cultures (past isolation of Pa but >2 years prior to the trial). All received antibiotics to promote initial eradication followed by 15 months of intermittent maintenance antibiotics. Quarterly cultures were used to define initial eradication success and subsequent number of Pa recurrences. A standardized symptom-based definition of exacerbation was utilized. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate exacerbation risk. Results Failure to initially eradicate Pa was associated with exacerbation risk (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.26,4.93). In 245/282 with successful initial eradication during the trial, past isolation of Pa >2 years before the trial was the most significant predictor of exacerbation (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.12,2.35). In 37/282 who failed initial eradication, persistent Pa during the maintenance phase (1 or more Pa recurrences after failure to initially eradicate) added even greater exacerbation risk (HR 4.13, 95% CI 1.28, 13.32). Conclusions Children with CF who fail to eradicate after initial antibiotic treatment are at higher risk of subsequent exacerbation, suggesting clinical benefit to successful early eradication of Pa infection. PMID:21830317

  15. Heart Failure After Heart Attack Tied to Cancer Risk in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159804.html Heart Failure After Heart Attack Tied to Cancer Risk in Study Preliminary finding ... News) -- People who develop heart failure after a heart attack may also face a higher risk of cancer, ...

  16. Heart failure disease management: implementation and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Whellan, David J

    2005-01-01

    Millions of dollars are being spent to identify new therapies to improve mortality and morbidity for the growing epidemic of patients sustaining heart failure. However, in clinical practice, these therapies are currently underused. To bridge the gap between proven therapies and clinical practice, the medical community has turned to disease management. Heart failure disease management interventions vary from vital-sign monitoring to multidisciplinary approaches involving a pharmacist, nutritionist, nurse practitioner, and physician. This review attempts to categorize these inventions based on location. We compared the published results from randomized, controlled trials of the following types of heart failure disease management interventions: inpatient, clinic visits, home visits, and telephone follow up. Although research shows an improvement in the quality of care and a decrease in hospitalizations for patients sustaining heart failure, the economic impact of disease management is still unclear. The current reimbursement structure is a disincentive to providers wanting to offer disease management services to patients sustaining heart failure. Additionally, the cost of providing disease management services such as additional clinical visits, patient education materials, or additional personnel time has not been well documented. Most heart failure disease management studies do confirm the concept that providing increased access to healthcare providers for an at-risk group of patients sustaining heart failure does improve outcomes. However, a large-scale randomized, controlled clinical trial based in the United States is needed to prove that this concept can be implemented beyond a single center and to determine how much it will cost patients, providers, healthcare systems, and payers.

  17. The Impact of Worsening Heart Failure in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Lauren B; DeVore, Adam D; Michael Felker, G

    2015-10-01

    In-hospital worsening heart failure represents a clinical scenario wherein a patient hospitalized for acute heart failure experiences a worsening of their condition, requiring escalation of therapy. Worsening heart failure is associated with worse in-hospital and postdischarge outcomes. Worsening heart failure is increasingly being used as an endpoint or combined endpoint in clinical trials, as it is unique to episodes of acute heart failure and captures an important event during the inpatient course. While prediction models have been developed to identify worsening heart failure, there are no known FDA-approved medications associated with decreased worsening heart failure. Continued study is warranted.

  18. Diabetes Drug Victoza Might Not Help Advanced Heart Failure Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Diabetes Drug Victoza Might Not Help Advanced Heart Failure Patients Study participants may have been too sick ... to improve heart function in patients with advanced heart failure, a new study finds. The theory for this ...

  19. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease.

  20. Rehospitalization for heart failure in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ogbemudia, Ehimwenma J.; Asekhame, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the burden of preventable rehospitalization for decompensated heart failure in the elderly. Methods: This was a retrospective study performed in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital,. Demographic variables, etiology, and participants of heart failure were retrieved from data of elderly patients with heart failure admitted between January 2014 and December 2015. The participants were classified and described as either preventable, or unpreventable to determine whether the hospitalizations were preventable or not. The frequency of the groups with preventable participants (hospitalization) was derived. Results: Five groups of participants were preventable (55.5%), while 4 groups (44.5%) were unpreventable. The preventable participants were poor drug compliance (24 [23.4%]), uncontrolled hypertension (7 [6.9%]), infectious (34 [33.3%]), pulmonary thromboembolism (1 [1%]), and anemia (1 [1%]). The unpreventable participants include arrhythmias (19 [18.6%]), acute kidney injury (2 [2%]), acute coronary syndrome (1 [1%]), and progressive ventricular dysfunction (13 [12.7%]). Conclusion: Multiple rehospitalization for heart failure is a challenge for the elderly, but 55.5% of these readmissions are preventable. Poor drug compliance and pulmonary infections were the most common preventable participants. Multidisciplinary measures involving patient education, home based care, and physician training will reduce the number of hospitalizations for heart failure in the elderly. PMID:27652368

  1. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    ElGuindy, Ahmed; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) has recently emerged as a major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Contrary to initial beliefs, HFpEF is now known to be as common as heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and carries an unacceptably high mortality rate. With a prevalence that has been steadily rising over the past two decades, it is very likely that HFpEF will represent the dominant heart failure phenotype over the coming few years. The scarcity of trials in this semi-discrete form of heart failure and lack of unified enrolment criteria in the studies conducted to date might have contributed to the current absence of specific therapies. Understanding the epidemiological, pathophysiological and molecular differences (and similarities) between these two forms of heart failure is cornerstone to the development of targeted therapies. Carefully designed studies that adhere to unified diagnostic criteria with the recruitment of appropriate controls and adoption of practical end-points are urgently needed to help identify effective treatment strategies. PMID:25610841

  2. Can complexity decrease in congestive heart failure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sayan; Palit, Sanjay Kumar; Banerjee, Santo; Ariffin, M. R. K.; Rondoni, Lamberto; Bhattacharya, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    The complexity of a signal can be measured by the Recurrence period density entropy (RPDE) from the reconstructed phase space. We have chosen a window based RPDE method for the classification of signals, as RPDE is an average entropic measure of the whole phase space. We have observed the changes in the complexity in cardiac signals of normal healthy person (NHP) and congestive heart failure patients (CHFP). The results show that the cardiac dynamics of a healthy subject is more complex and random compare to the same for a heart failure patient, whose dynamics is more deterministic. We have constructed a general threshold to distinguish the border line between a healthy and a congestive heart failure dynamics. The results may be useful for wide range for physiological and biomedical analysis.

  3. Skeletal Muscle Abnormalities in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kinugawa, Shintaro; Takada, Shingo; Matsushima, Shouji; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Exercise capacity is lowered in patients with heart failure, which limits their daily activities and also reduces their quality of life. Furthermore, lowered exercise capacity has been well demonstrated to be closely related to the severity and prognosis of heart failure. Skeletal muscle abnormalities including abnormal energy metabolism, transition of myofibers from type I to type II, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduction in muscular strength, and muscle atrophy have been shown to play a central role in lowered exercise capacity. The skeletal muscle abnormalities can be classified into the following main types: 1) low endurance due to mitochondrial dysfunction; and 2) low muscle mass and muscle strength due to imbalance of protein synthesis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms of these skeletal muscle abnormalities have been studied mainly using animal models. The current review including our recent study will focus upon the skeletal muscle abnormalities in heart failure. PMID:26346520

  4. Heart failure and Alzheimer′s disease

    PubMed Central

    Cermakova, P; Eriksdotter, M; Lund, L H; Winblad, B; Religa, P; Religa, D

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that heart failure is a risk factor for Alzheimer′s disease. Decreased cerebral blood flow and neurohormonal activation due to heart failure may contribute to the dysfunction of the neurovascular unit and cause an energy crisis in neurons. This leads to the impaired clearance of amyloid beta and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein, resulting in the formation of amyloid beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In this article, we will summarize the current understanding of the relationship between heart failure and Alzheimer′s disease based on epidemiological studies, brain imaging research, pathological findings and the use of animal models. The importance of atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, blood pressure and valve disease as well as the effect of relevant medications will be discussed. PMID:25041352

  5. [Holistic therapy of chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Feldmann, C; Ertl, G; Angermann, C E

    2014-06-01

    The rising prevalence and increasing disease-related costs render chronic heart failure a rapidly growing socioeconomic challenge. The concerted action of guideline-adjusted therapy and holistic patient care is essential to achieve improvements in mortality, morbidity, functional status and quality of life of patients with symptomatic heart failure. Holistic care strategies comprise consideration of comorbidities and individual needs, lifestyle recommendations and multidisciplinary management programs for high-risk symptomatic patients in addition to basic medication and surgical therapies. For optimal patient care and coaching, seamless interaction is required between in-hospital treatment and outpatient facilities. Moreover, the palliative needs of heart failure patients need to be considered, a topic that is currently not receiving enough attention.

  6. Management of acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Varughese, Sheeba

    2007-01-01

    Heart failure, a debilitating complex clinical syndrome, affects nearly 5 million people in the United States and presents a heavy socioeconomic burden. Neurohormonal abnormalities contribute to the pathophysiology of heart failure. Acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) has emerged as a major health problem associated with poor prognosis, increased costs related to care, reduced quality of life, and frequent readmissions. Symptoms of ADHF are primarily related to congestion and/or low perfusion states. The use of biomakers such as B-natriuretic peptides is useful in distinguishing between cardiac and noncardiac causes of symptoms. Treatment for ADHF begins with identification and treatment of precipitating factors for acute decompensation. Initial goal of therapy is focused on symptom management followed by interventions that delay disease progression, reduce readmission, and prolong survival. PMID:17356351

  7. [Heart failure and arterial hypertension disclosing amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Habbal, R; Noureddine, M; Hachim, K; Zahraoui, M; Azzouzi, L; Fadouach, S; Zaid, D; Chraibi, N

    1997-01-01

    Amyloidosis results from protein infiltration of the extracellular space of organs and tissues. Several amyloidosis proteins have been identified. Protein AL, (deriving from immunoglobulin light chain), protein AA and prealbumin are the most involved in this disease. When AL amyloidosis involves the heart, the illness is often terminal. Most clinical symptoms are heart failure and arrhythmia or block conduction. This case was characterised by the unusual combination of hypertension and amyloidosis. The diagnosis suggested by the echocardiographic but was confirmed by the damaged organ's biopsy. The present case concerns a young woman, who has hypertension and a pulmonary oedema. The echocardiographic scan showed a septal hypertrophy with a shining and granite-like aspect which is compatible with heart amyloidosis. Systolic and diastolic disorder with mitral and aortic regurgitation were also revealed. The kidney and rectum biopsies confirmed amyloidosis AL of the Kappa dysglobulinemia type, without extraosseous plasmocytoma. The heart and kidney failure symptoms disappeared after treatment with diuretics and ACE inhibitors.

  8. Acute cardio-renal syndrome: progression from congestive heart failure to congestive kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Wencker, Detlef

    2007-09-01

    Over the past few years, acute worsening of renal function has emerged as a powerful and independent predictor of adverse cardiac outcomes among patients hospitalized with acute heart failure exacerbation. This phenomenon has been recently termed acute cardio-renal syndrome. Acute cardio-renal syndrome is not uncommon, affecting roughly one third of acute decompensated heart failure patients. The mechanism of acute cardio-renal syndrome is poorly understood and difficult to elucidate in light of the complex and multifactorial comorbidities associated with acute heart failure syndrome. Acute cardio-renal syndrome is commonly explained by hypoperfusion of the kidney with intravascular volume depletion, hypotension and low flow state ("pre-renal syndrome"). This perception, however, is challenged by the actual hemodynamics present during acute cardio-renal syndrome characterized by hypervolemia, normal cardiac output, and elevated filling pressures of the systemic and venous circulation. This review discusses the long-standing and unnoticed evidence in support of the notion that right-sided failure with raised filling pressure of the renal vein by itself can indeed lead to acute worsening renal function with oliguria, azotemia, and reduced glomerular filtration rate.

  9. GENE THERAPIES FOR ARRHYTHMIAS IN HEART FAILURE

    PubMed Central

    Akar, Fadi G.; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we review recent advances in our understanding of arrhythmia mechanisms in the failing heart. We focus on changes in repolarization, conduction, and intracellular calcium cycling because of their importance to the vast majority of clinical arrhythmias in heart failure. We highlight recent efforts to combat arrhythmias using gene-based approaches that target ion channel, gap junction, and calcium cycling proteins. We further discuss the advantages and limitations associated with individual approaches. PMID:24566976

  10. [Nesiritide, a novel treatment for heart failure].

    PubMed

    Francisco-Méndez, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    Nesiritide, is a recombinant form of human-B-type natriuretic peptide (hBNP) used for the therapy of acute decompensated heart failure. hBNP produces natriuresis, diuresis, hypotension, and smooth muscle relaxation preventing myocardial fibrosis and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Nesiritide treatment of patients with heart failure causes balanced arterial and venous dilatation with reduction in the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) and increases the cardiac index. It is administered intravenously with a recommended dosage as intravenous bolus of 2 microg/kg/min followed by a continuous infusion of 0.01 microg/kg/min for less than 48 hours. Clinical experience has shown that in patients with heart failure, this drug reduces PCWP, increases cardiac index without changes in heart rate, with the subsequent improvement in clinical symptoms of dyspnea after 3 hours of treatment. Also, there is evidence of less ventricular tachyarrhytmia when compared with dobutamine and better tolerance with less secondary effects when compared with nitroglycerin. It has been suggested that there is an increase in the mortality hazard ratio at 30 days with this treatment, however clinical trials using Nesiritide did not analyze mortality at short or long term as primary end-point. Recently published meta-analysis reported that there is no-increase in mortality at 30 days or 6 months with this treatment. Nesiritide is a novel and effective option for the medical treatment of acute decompensated heart failure.

  11. Tissue microarray profiling in human heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lal, Sean; Nguyen, Lisa; Tezone, Rhenan; Ponten, Fredrik; Odeberg, Jacob; Li, Amy; Dos Remedios, Cristobal

    2016-09-01

    Tissue MicroArrays (TMAs) are a versatile tool for high-throughput protein screening, allowing qualitative analysis of a large number of samples on a single slide. We have developed a customizable TMA system that uniquely utilizes cryopreserved human cardiac samples from both heart failure and donor patients to produce formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Confirmatory upstream or downstream molecular studies can then be performed on the same (biobanked) cryopreserved tissue. In a pilot study, we applied our TMAs to screen for the expression of four-and-a-half LIM-domain 2 (FHL2), a member of the four-and-a-half LIM family. This protein has been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure in a variety of animal models. While FHL2 is abundant in the heart, not much is known about its expression in human heart failure. For this purpose, we generated an affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal anti-human FHL2 antibody. Our TMAs allowed high-throughput profiling of FHL2 protein using qualitative and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry that proved complementary to Western blot analysis. We demonstrated a significant relative reduction in FHL2 protein expression across different forms of human heart failure.

  12. Autonomic Regulation Therapy in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Una; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Ardell, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic Regulation Therapy (ART) is a rapidly emerging therapy in the management of congestive heart failure secondary to systolic dysfunction. Modulation of the cardiac neuronal hierarchy can be achieved with bioelectronics modulation of the spinal cord, cervical vagus, baroreceptor, or renal nerve ablation. This review will discuss relevant preclinical and clinical research in ART for systolic heart failure. Understanding mechanistically what is being stimulated within the autonomic nervous system by such device-based therapy and how the system reacts to such stimuli is essential for optimizing stimulation parameters and for the future development of effective ART. PMID:26054327

  13. Congestive Heart Failure and Central Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Sands, Scott A; Owens, Robert L

    2016-03-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is among the most common causes of admission to hospitals in the United States, especially in those over age 65. Few data exist regarding the prevalence CHF of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) owing to congestive heart failure in the intensive care unit (ICU). Nevertheless, CSR is expected to be highly prevalent among those with CHF. Treatment should focus on the underlying mechanisms by which CHF increases loop gain and promotes unstable breathing. Few data are available to determine prevalence of CSR in the ICU, or how CSR might affect clinical management and weaning from mechanical ventilation.

  14. Congestive heart failure and central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Sands, Scott A; Owens, Robert L

    2015-07-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is among the most common causes of admission to hospitals in the United States, especially in those over age 65. Few data exist regarding the prevalence CHF of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) owing to congestive heart failure in the intensive care unit (ICU). Nevertheless, CSR is expected to be highly prevalent among those with CHF. Treatment should focus on the underlying mechanisms by which CHF increases loop gain and promotes unstable breathing. Few data are available to determine prevalence of CSR in the ICU, or how CSR might affect clinical management and weaning from mechanical ventilation.

  15. Occurrence of lymphopenia in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hurdle, A D; Gyde, O H; Willoughby, J M

    1966-01-01

    The incidence of lymphopenia and eosinopenia in 10 patients admitted to hospital in heart failure was compared with that in 11 ;cold' admissions and 10 with acute diseases admitted via the Casualty Department. Plasma cortisol determinations were made simultaneously. A significant difference was found between the heart failure group and the ;cold' controls in respect of lymphopenia, eosinopenia, and cortisol levels. The ;acute' control patients showed an overlap with both groups. It is concluded that this lymphopenia is part of a response to stress.Seventy-two hours after admission there was no significant change in these values although the figures suggest the beginning of a return to normal.

  16. Occurrence of lymphopenia in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Hurdle, A. D. F.; Gyde, O. H. B.; Willoughby, J. M. T.

    1966-01-01

    The incidence of lymphopenia and eosinopenia in 10 patients admitted to hospital in heart failure was compared with that in 11 `cold' admissions and 10 with acute diseases admitted via the Casualty Department. Plasma cortisol determinations were made simultaneously. A significant difference was found between the heart failure group and the `cold' controls in respect of lymphopenia, eosinopenia, and cortisol levels. The `acute' control patients showed an overlap with both groups. It is concluded that this lymphopenia is part of a response to stress. Seventy-two hours after admission there was no significant change in these values although the figures suggest the beginning of a return to normal. Images PMID:5904984

  17. Intercellular communication lessons in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bang, Claudia; Antoniades, Charalambos; Antonopoulos, Alexios S; Eriksson, Ulf; Franssen, Constantijn; Hamdani, Nazha; Lehmann, Lorenz; Moessinger, Christine; Mongillo, Marco; Muhl, Lars; Speer, Thimoteus; Thum, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Cell-cell or inter-organ communication allows the exchange of information and messages, which is essential for the coordination of cell/organ functions and the maintenance of homeostasis. It has become evident that dynamic interactions of different cell types play a major role in the heart, in particular during the progression of heart failure, a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Heart failure is associated with compensatory structural and functional changes mostly in cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts, which finally lead to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis. Intercellular communication within the heart is mediated mostly via direct cell-cell interaction or the release of paracrine signalling mediators such as cytokines and chemokines. However, recent studies have focused on the exchange of genetic information via the packaging into vesicles as well as the crosstalk of lipids and other paracrine molecules within the heart and distant organs, such as kidney and adipose tissue, which might all contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure. In this review, we discuss emerging communication networks and respective underlying mechanisms which could be involved in cardiovascular disease conditions and further emphasize promising therapeutic targets for drug development.

  18. Heart failure with a normal left ventricular ejection fraction: diastolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Little, William C

    2008-01-01

    A reduced left ventricular ejection fraction measured by echocardiography in a patient with clinical features of heart failure demonstrates that the patient has a cardiac abnormality and that the clinical picture is, in fact, due to heart failure. As such, a reduced ejection fraction (< 0.30 or 0.35) has been used as entry criteria for almost all the large clinical trials that guide our therapy of patients with heart failure. However, it has been recently recognized that a substantial and increasing proportion of patients with heart failure have a normal ejection fraction (> 0.50). Such patients are typically elderly women with systolic hypertension. These patients are subject to the sudden development of pulmonary congestion (flash pulmonary edema). The finding of heart failure in patients with a normal ejection fraction has focused attention on the role of diastolic dysfunction in producing symptomatic heart failure. The optimal treatment of patients with heart failure and normal ejection fraction has not yet been defined, but the control of systolic hypertension and the avoidance of fluid overload are important.

  19. The role of invasive ventilation in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease causing respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Kosky, Christopher; Turton, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can usually be managed initially with medical treatment and non- invasive ventilation. In circumstances where non- invasive ventilation cannot be used or has failed, intubation and invasive ventilation may be lifesaving. The outcome of patients with an exacerbation of COPD requiring invasive ventilation is better than often thought, with a hospital survival of 70-89%. Decisions regarding invasive ventilation made by physicians and patients with COPD are unpredictable and vary with the individual. This article reviews the role of invasive ventilation in exacerbations of COPD to assist decision making.

  20. The Readmitted Patient with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Centrella-Nigro, Andrea; Bognar, Lora; Burke, Kathleen; Faber, Kathy; Flynn, Virginia; LaForgia, Mabel; Wiklinski, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A multi-site descriptive retrospective study of physiologic, demographic, and psychosocial factors associated with 30-day readmissions for heart failure was conducted in six Magnet-designated hospitals. Results can be used to plan effective nursing interventions to target readmitted patients. PMID:27522843

  1. New Management Strategies in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Owens, Anjali Tiku; Brozena, Susan C; Jessup, Mariell

    2016-02-01

    Despite >100 clinical trials, only 2 new drugs had been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of chronic heart failure in more than a decade: the aldosterone antagonist eplerenone in 2003 and a fixed dose combination of hydralazine-isosorbide dinitrate in 2005. In contrast, 2015 has witnessed the Food and Drug Administration approval of 2 new drugs, both for the treatment of chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: ivabradine and another combination drug, sacubitril/valsartan or LCZ696. Seemingly overnight, a range of therapeutic possibilities, evoking new physiological mechanisms, promise great hope for a disease that often carries a prognosis worse than many forms of cancer. Importantly, the newly available therapies represent a culmination of basic and translational research that actually spans many decades. This review will summarize newer drugs currently being used in the treatment of heart failure, as well as newer strategies increasingly explored for their utility during the stages of the heart failure syndrome.

  2. Geographic differences in heart failure trials.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João Pedro; Girerd, Nicolas; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez

    2015-09-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are essential to develop advances in heart failure (HF). The need for increasing numbers of patients (without substantial cost increase) and generalization of results led to the disappearance of international boundaries in large RCTs. The significant geographic differences in patients' characteristics, outcomes, and, most importantly, treatment effect observed in HF trials have recently been highlighted. Whether the observed regional discrepancies in HF trials are due to trial-specific issues, patient heterogeneity, structural differences in countries, or a complex interaction between factors are the questions we propose to debate in this review. To do so, we will analyse and review data from HF trials conducted in different world regions, from heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF), heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF), and acute heart failure (AHF). Finally, we will suggest objective and actionable measures in order to mitigate regional discrepancies in future trials, particularly in HF-PEF where prognostic modifying treatments are urgently needed and in which trials are more prone to selection bias, due to a larger patient heterogeneity.

  3. New Management Strategies in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Owens, Anjali Tiku; Brozena, Susan C; Jessup, Mariell

    2016-02-01

    Despite >100 clinical trials, only 2 new drugs had been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of chronic heart failure in more than a decade: the aldosterone antagonist eplerenone in 2003 and a fixed dose combination of hydralazine-isosorbide dinitrate in 2005. In contrast, 2015 has witnessed the Food and Drug Administration approval of 2 new drugs, both for the treatment of chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: ivabradine and another combination drug, sacubitril/valsartan or LCZ696. Seemingly overnight, a range of therapeutic possibilities, evoking new physiological mechanisms, promise great hope for a disease that often carries a prognosis worse than many forms of cancer. Importantly, the newly available therapies represent a culmination of basic and translational research that actually spans many decades. This review will summarize newer drugs currently being used in the treatment of heart failure, as well as newer strategies increasingly explored for their utility during the stages of the heart failure syndrome. PMID:26846642

  4. Geographic differences in heart failure trials.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João Pedro; Girerd, Nicolas; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez

    2015-09-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are essential to develop advances in heart failure (HF). The need for increasing numbers of patients (without substantial cost increase) and generalization of results led to the disappearance of international boundaries in large RCTs. The significant geographic differences in patients' characteristics, outcomes, and, most importantly, treatment effect observed in HF trials have recently been highlighted. Whether the observed regional discrepancies in HF trials are due to trial-specific issues, patient heterogeneity, structural differences in countries, or a complex interaction between factors are the questions we propose to debate in this review. To do so, we will analyse and review data from HF trials conducted in different world regions, from heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF), heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF), and acute heart failure (AHF). Finally, we will suggest objective and actionable measures in order to mitigate regional discrepancies in future trials, particularly in HF-PEF where prognostic modifying treatments are urgently needed and in which trials are more prone to selection bias, due to a larger patient heterogeneity. PMID:26198782

  5. Air Travel Considerations for the Patients With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Izadi, Morteza; Alemzadeh-Ansari, Mohammad Javad; Kazemisaleh, Davood; Moshkani-Farahani, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Context: Prevalence of patients with heart failure (HF) is increasing in worldwide, and also the number of people with HF traveling long distances is increasing. These patients are more prone to experience problems contributed air travel and needs more attention during flight. However, observational studies about problems of HF patients during flight and appropriated considerations for them are limited. Evidence Acquisition: We evaluated the conditions that may be encountered in a HF patient and provide the recommendations to prevent the exacerbation of cardiac failure during air travel. For this review article, a comprehensive search was undertaken for the studies that evaluated the complications and considerations of HF patients during flight. Data bases searched were: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Direct, and Google Scholar. Results: HF patients are more prone to experience respiratory distress, anxiety, stress, cardiac decompensation, and venous thromboembolism (VTE) during air travel. Although stable HF patients can tolerate air travel, but those with acute heart failure syndrome should not fly until complete improvement is achieved. Conclusions: Thus, identifying the HF patients before the flight and providing them proper education about the events that may occur during flight is necessary. PMID:25068047

  6. Cell therapy in congestive heart failure*

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ze-wei; Li, Long-gui

    2007-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) has emerged as a major worldwide epidemic and its main causes seem to be the aging of the population and the survival of patients with post-myocardial infarction. Cardiomyocyte dropout (necrosis and apoptosis) plays a critical role in the progress of CHF; thus treatment of CHF by exogenous cell implantation will be a promising medical approach. In the acute phase of cardiac damage cardiac stem cells (CSCs) within the heart divide symmetrically and/or asymmetrically in response to the change of heart homeostasis, and at the same time homing of bone marrow stem cells (BMCs) to injured area is thought to occur, which not only reconstitutes CSC population to normal levels but also repairs the heart by differentiation into cardiac tissue. So far, basic studies by using potential sources such as BMCs and CSCs to treat animal CHF have shown improved ventricular remodelling and heart function. Recently, however, a few of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials demonstrated mixed results in heart failure with BMC therapy during acute myocardial infarction. PMID:17726746

  7. Exercise and heart failure in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kappagoda, Tissa; Amsterdam, Ezra A

    2012-09-01

    In this review, we will examine the physiological responses to exercise in elderly populations (age > 65 years) with and without evidence of heart failure. Aging per se in both men and women is associated with a ~40% lower maximum oxygen consumption in sedentary subjects. In trained individuals, this value is 25-32% lower. A smaller SV accounts for nearly 50% of these age-related differences, and the remainder is explained by a lower maximal HR and reduced oxygen extraction. Exercise training is also associated with an increase in the arteriovenous O(2) difference in previously sedentary elderly men and women, which probably contributes to the overall beneficial effect of training in the elderly. However, during vigorous exercise (125 W), the cardiac output in the elderly is dependent upon an age-related increase in end-diastolic volume and stroke volume, which "compensates" partially for the age-related decrease in heart rate. Hence, in elderly individuals, the stroke volume during exercise depends upon diastolic filling. The changes that occur in the heart are also associated with an overall reduction in efferent sympathetic nerve activity. Despite this decline, the metaboreflex initiated by receptors in exercising muscles remains the main determinant of sympathetic activation (to maintain blood pressure) during exercise in the elderly. It is recognized that aging is associated with the development of heart failure, particularly in women in whom its prevalence increases >twofold from age 65-69 (6.6%) to age 85 years (14%). Almost half the people presenting with heart failure appear to have normal left ventricular systolic function, a phenomenon that is more common in women. Exercise training in elderly people with and without heart failure appears to have a beneficial effect in terms of enhancing the quality of life and functional capacity. Mortality benefit in the latter has not been established with certainty.

  8. Remote Monitoring of Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bhimaraj, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    “The Teledactyl (Tele, far; Dactyl, finger — from the Greek) is a future instrument by which it will be possible for us to ‘feel at a distance.’ This idea is not at all impossible, for the instrument can be built today with means available right now. It is simply the well known telautograph, translated into radio terms, with additional refinements. The doctor of the future, by means of this instrument, will be able to feel his patient, as it were, at a distance…The doctor manipulates his controls, which are then manipulated at the patient’s room in exactly the same manner. The doctor sees what is going on in the patient’s room by means of a television screen.” —Hugo Gernsback, Science and Invention Magazine, February 1925 Heart failure continues to be a major burden on our health care system. As the number of patients with heart failure increases, the cost of hospitalization alone is contributing significantly to the overall cost of this disease. Readmission rate and hospital length of stay are emerging as quality markers of heart failure care along with reimbursement policies that force hospitals to optimize these outcomes. Apart from maintaining quality assurance, the disease process of heart failure per-se requires demanding and close attention to vitals, diet, and medication compliance to prevent acute decompensation episodes. Remote patient monitoring is morphing into a key disease management strategy to optimize care for heart failure. Innovative implantable technologies to monitor intracardiac hemodynamics also are evolving, which potentially could offer better and substantial parameters to monitor. PMID:23519115

  9. Remote monitoring of heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Bhimaraj, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    "The Teledactyl (Tele, far; Dactyl, finger--from the Greek) is a future instrument by which it will be possible for us to 'feel at a distance.' This idea is not at all impossible, for the instrument can be built today with means available right now. It is simply the well known telautograph, translated into radio terms, with additional refinements. The doctor of the future, by means of this instrument, will be able to feel his patient, as it were, at a distance...The doctor manipulates his controls, which are then manipulated at the patient's room in exactly the same manner. The doctor sees what is going on in the patient's room by means of a television screen." -Hugo Gernsback, Science and Invention Magazine, February 1925 Heart failure continues to be a major burden on our health care system. As the number of patients with heart failure increases, the cost of hospitalization alone is contributing significantly to the overall cost of this disease. Readmission rate and hospital length of stay are emerging as quality markers of heart failure care along with reimbursement policies that force hospitals to optimize these outcomes. Apart from maintaining quality assurance, the disease process of heart failure per-se requires demanding and close attention to vitals, diet, and medication compliance to prevent acute decompensation episodes. Remote patient monitoring is morphing into a key disease management strategy to optimize care for heart failure. Innovative implantable technologies to monitor intracardiac hemodynamics also are evolving, which potentially could offer better and substantial parameters to monitor.

  10. A patient with heart failure and worsening kidney function.

    PubMed

    Sarnak, Mark J

    2014-10-01

    There is high prevalence of CKD, defined by reduced GFR, in patients with heart failure. Reduced kidney function is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in this patient population. The cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) involves a bidirectional relationship between the heart and kidneys whereby dysfunction in either may exacerbate the function of the other, but this syndrome has been difficult to precisely define because it has many complex physiologic, biochemical, and hormonal abnormalities. The pathophysiology of CRS is not completely understood, but potential mechanisms include reduced kidney perfusion due to decreased forward flow, increased right ventricular and venous pressure, and neurohormonal adaptations. Treatment options include inotropic medications; diuretics; ultrafiltration; and medications, such as β-blockers, inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and more novel treatments that focus on unique aspects of the pathophysiology. Recent observational studies suggest that treatments that result in a decrease in venous pressure and lead to hemoconcentration may be associated with improved outcomes. Patients with CRS that is not responsive to medical interventions should be considered for ventricular assist devices, heart transplantation, or combined heart and kidney transplantation.

  11. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure? The most common ... lungs. The condition requires emergency treatment. Heart Failure Signs and Symptoms The image shows the major signs ...

  12. Interventions for heart failure readmissions: successes and failures.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Lisa M; Kociol, Robb D

    2014-06-01

    Heart failure readmissions result in significant costs to the health care system and to patients' quality of life, but programs to reduce readmissions have met with mixed success. Successful strategies have included multidisciplinary hospital-based quality initiatives, disease management programs, and care transition interventions. Devices like telemonitors and indwelling catheters, however, have met with mixed success. Research is still needed to elucidate the most effective interventions for readmission reduction in the HF population.

  13. The sympathetic nervous system and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, David Y; Anderson, Allen S

    2014-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a syndrome characterized by upregulation of the sympathetic nervous system and abnormal responsiveness of the parasympathetic nervous system. Studies in the 1980s and 1990s demonstrated that inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors improved symptoms and mortality in HF resulting from systolic dysfunction, thus providing a framework to consider the use of β-blockers for HF therapy, contrary to the prevailing wisdom of the time. Against this backdrop, this article reviews the contemporary understanding of the sympathetic nervous system and the failing heart.

  14. Intersections Between Microbiome and Heart Failure: Revisiting the Gut Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Yuji; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-12-01

    Microbes play an important role in human health and disease. In the setting of heart failure (HF), substantial hemodynamic changes, such as hypoperfusion and congestion in the intestines, can alter gut morphology, permeability, function, and possibly the growth and composition of gut microbiota. These changes can disrupt the barrier function of the intestines and exacerbate systemic inflammation via microbial or endotoxin translocation into systemic circulation. Furthermore, cardiorenal alterations via metabolites derived from gut microbiota can potentially mediate or modulate HF pathophysiology. Recently, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) has emerged as a key mediator that provides a mechanistic link between gut microbiota and multiple cardiovascular diseases, including HF. Potential intervention strategies which may target this microbiota-driven pathology include dietary modification, prebiotics/probiotics, and selective binders of microbial enzymes or molecules, but further investigations into their safety and efficacy are warranted.

  15. Heart failure association of the European society of cardiology specialist heart failure curriculum.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Gardner, Roy S; Lainscak, Mitja; Nielsen, Olav W; Parissis, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anker, Stefan D

    2014-02-01

    It is well established that organized care of heart failure patients, including specialist management by cardiologists, improves patient outcomes. In response to this, other national training bodies (the UK and the USA) have developed heart failure subspecialty curricula within their Cardiology Training Curricula. In addition, European Society of Cardiology (ESC) subspecialty curricula exist for Interventional Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Management. The purpose of this heart failure curriculum is to provide a framework which can be used as a blueprint for training across Europe. This blueprint mirrors other ESC curricula. Each section has three components: the knowledge required, the skills which are necessary, and the professionalism (attitudes and behaviours) which should be attained. The programme is designed to last 2 years. The first year is devoted to the specialist heart failure module. The second year allows completion of the optional modules of advanced imaging, device therapy for implanters, cardiac transplantation, and mechanical circulatory support. The second year can also be devoted to continuation of specialist heart failure training and/or research for those not wishing to continue with the advanced modules.

  16. Advanced (stage D) heart failure: a statement from the Heart Failure Society of America Guidelines Committee.

    PubMed

    Fang, James C; Ewald, Gregory A; Allen, Larry A; Butler, Javed; Westlake Canary, Cheryl A; Colvin-Adams, Monica; Dickinson, Michael G; Levy, Phillip; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Sweitzer, Nancy K; Teerlink, John R; Whellan, David J; Albert, Nancy M; Krishnamani, Rajan; Rich, Michael W; Walsh, Mary N; Bonnell, Mark R; Carson, Peter E; Chan, Michael C; Dries, Daniel L; Hernandez, Adrian F; Hershberger, Ray E; Katz, Stuart D; Moore, Stephanie; Rodgers, Jo E; Rogers, Joseph G; Vest, Amanda R; Givertz, Michael M

    2015-06-01

    We propose that stage D advanced heart failure be defined as the presence of progressive and/or persistent severe signs and symptoms of heart failure despite optimized medical, surgical, and device therapy. Importantly, the progressive decline should be primarily driven by the heart failure syndrome. Formally defining advanced heart failure and specifying when medical and device therapies have failed is challenging, but signs and symptoms, hemodynamics, exercise testing, biomarkers, and risk prediction models are useful in this process. Identification of patients in stage D is a clinically important task because treatments are inherently limited, morbidity is typically progressive, and survival is often short. Age, frailty, and psychosocial issues affect both outcomes and selection of therapy for stage D patients. Heart transplant and mechanical circulatory support devices are potential treatment options in select patients. In addition to considering indications, contraindications, clinical status, and comorbidities, treatment selection for stage D patients involves incorporating the patient's wishes for survival versus quality of life, and palliative and hospice care should be integrated into care plans. More research is needed to determine optimal strategies for patient selection and medical decision making, with the ultimate goal of improving clinical and patient centered outcomes in patients with stage D heart failure.

  17. Sexual dysfunction in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Fridlund, Bengt; Mårtensson, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure has a severe impact on different aspects of a patient's life, including sexual function. Sexual problems are common in heart failure (HF) patients, both in men and women, and are not always adequately addressed and treated in the current health care system. Several factors have been described to be related to sexual problems, such as activity intolerance, psychological factors, physiological factors, cardiac medications, recreational habits and co-morbidity. The current review summarizes knowledge that can help clinicians treat sexual dysfunction in HF patients. After a good assessment, several steps are advised, including improving HF and co-morbid conditions, discussing psychosocial problems, worries and misunderstandings, managing risk factors and considering PDE-5 inhibitors or other libido enhancing agents. PMID:24800993

  18. Chronic heart failure: contemporary diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Gautam V; Uber, Patricia A; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2010-02-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) remains the only cardiovascular disease with an increasing hospitalization burden and an ongoing drain on health care expenditures. The prevalence of CHF increases with advancing life span, with diastolic heart failure predominating in the elderly population. Primary prevention of coronary artery disease and risk factor management via aggressive blood pressure control are central in preventing new occurrences of left ventricular dysfunction. Optimal therapy for CHF involves identification and correction of potentially reversible precipitants, target-dose titration of medical therapy, and management of hospitalizations for decompensation. The etiological phenotype, absolute decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction and a widening of QRS duration on electrocardiography, is commonly used to identify patients at increased risk of progression of heart failure and sudden death who may benefit from prophylactic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement with or without cardiac resynchronization therapy. Patients who transition to advanced stages of disease despite optimal traditional medical and device therapy may be candidates for hemodynamically directed approaches such as a left ventricular assist device; in selected cases, listing for cardiac transplant may be warranted.

  19. Gene and cell therapy for heart failure.

    PubMed

    de Muinck, Ebo D

    2009-08-01

    Cardiac gene and cell therapy have both entered clinical trials aimed at ameliorating ventricular dysfunction in patients with chronic congestive heart failure. The transduction of myocardial cells with viral constructs encoding a specific cardiomyocyte Ca(2+) pump in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), SRCa(2+)-ATPase has been shown to correct deficient Ca(2+) handling in cardiomyocytes and improvements in contractility in preclinical studies, thus leading to the first clinical trial of gene therapy for heart failure. In cell therapy, it is not clear whether beneficial effects are cell-type specific and how improvements in contractility are brought about. Despite these uncertainties, a number of clinical trials are under way, supported by safety and efficacy data from trials of cell therapy in the setting of myocardial infarction. Safety concerns for gene therapy center on inflammatory and immune responses triggered by viral constructs, and for cell therapy with myoblast cells, the major concern is increased incidence of ventricular arrhythmia after cell transplantation. Principles and mechanisms of action of gene and cell therapy for heart failure are discussed, together with the potential influence of reactive oxygen species on the efficacy of these treatments and the status of myocardial-delivery techniques for viral constructs and cells.

  20. Chronic Heart Failure: Contemporary Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Gautam V.; Uber, Patricia A.; Mehra, Mandeep R.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) remains the only cardiovascular disease with an increasing hospitalization burden and an ongoing drain on health care expenditures. The prevalence of CHF increases with advancing life span, with diastolic heart failure predominating in the elderly population. Primary prevention of coronary artery disease and risk factor management via aggressive blood pressure control are central in preventing new occurrences of left ventricular dysfunction. Optimal therapy for CHF involves identification and correction of potentially reversible precipitants, target-dose titration of medical therapy, and management of hospitalizations for decompensation. The etiological phenotype, absolute decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction and a widening of QRS duration on electrocardiography, is commonly used to identify patients at increased risk of progression of heart failure and sudden death who may benefit from prophylactic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement with or without cardiac resynchronization therapy. Patients who transition to advanced stages of disease despite optimal traditional medical and device therapy may be candidates for hemodynamically directed approaches such as a left ventricular assist device; in selected cases, listing for cardiac transplant may be warranted. PMID:20118395

  1. The Prevalence and Prognosis of Resistant Hypertension in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chun-Na; Liu, Ming; Sun, Jing-Ping; Fang, Fang; Wen, Yong-Na; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Lee, Alex Pui-Wai

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistant hypertension is associated with adverse clinical outcome in hypertensive patients. However, the prognostic significance of resistant hypertension in patients with heart failure remains uncertain. Methods and Results The 1 year survival and heart failure re-hospitalization rate of 1288 consecutive patients admitted to a university hospital for either newly diagnosed heart failure or an exacerbation of prior chronic heart failure was analyzed. Resistant hypertension was defined as uncontrolled blood pressure (>140/90 mmHg) despite being compliant with an antihypertensive regimen that includes 3 or more drugs (including a diuretic). A total of 176 (13.7%) heart failure patients had resistant hypertension. There was no difference in all cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and heart failure related re-hospitalization between patients with versus without resistant hypertension. Diabetes [hazard ratio = 1.62, 95% confidence interval = 1.13–2.34; P = 0.010] and serum sodium >139 mmol/L (hazard ratio = 1.54, 95% confidence interval = 1.06–2.23; P = 0.024) were independently associated with resistant hypertension. Patients with resistant hypertension had a relatively higher survival rate (86.9% vs. 83.8%), although the difference was not significant (log-rank x2 = 1.00, P = 0.317). In patients with reduced ejection fraction, heart failure related re-hospitalization was significantly lower in patients with resistant hypertension (45.8% vs. 59.1%, P = 0.050). Conclusions Resistant hypertension appears to be not associated with adverse clinical outcome in patients with heart failure, in fact may be a protective factor for reduced heart failure related re-hospitalization in patients with reduced ejection fraction. PMID:25490405

  2. Parathyroid hormone and risk of heart failure in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanbo; Wang, Wei; Ma, Jianghong; Lin, Baisong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Inconsistent findings have been reported on the association between the parathyroid hormone (PTH) level and risk of heart failure. We aimed to systematically evaluate the association between circulating level of PTH and risk of heart failure in the general population by conducting a meta-analysis. We made a comprehensive literature search in PubMed, Embase, VIP, CNKI, and Wanfang databases published until January 2016. Only prospective observational studies reporting the association between circulating level of PTH and risk of heart failure in the general population were selected. Pooled adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for the highest versus lowest PTH category. Six studies with 25,207 participants identified. Higher circulating level of PTH was associated with an increased risk of heart failure (HR: 1.38; 95% CI 1.09–1.74) in a random effect model. Subgroup analyses revealed that the risk of heart failure was more pronounced among men (HR: 1.75; 95% CI 1.38–2.22) than in both genders. However, the risk increment was not statistically significant (HR: 1.12; 95% CI 0.76–1.66) in the middle-aged population. Higher PTH level is independently associated with an exacerbated risk of heart failure in the general population. PMID:27749533

  3. Autonomic Predictors of Hospitalization Due to Heart Failure Decompensation in Patients with Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Suchecka, Justyna; Niemirycz-Makurat, Agnieszka; Rozwadowska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Autonomic nervous system balance can be significantly deteriorated during heart failure exacerbation. However, it is still unknown whether these changes are only the consequence of heart failure decompensation or can also predict development thereof. Objectives were to verify if simple, non-invasive autonomic parameters, such as baroreflex sensitivity and short-term heart rate variability can provide independent of other well-known clinical parameters information on the risk of heart failure decompensation in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Methods In 142 stable patients with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 40%, baroreflex sensitivity and short-term heart rate variability, as well as other well-known clinical parameters, were analyzed. During 23 ± 9 months of follow-up 19 patients were hospitalized due to the heart failure decompensation (EVENT). Results Pre-specified cut-off values of baroreflex sensitivity (≤2.4 ms/mmHg) and low frequency power index of heart rate variability (≤19 ms2) were significantly associated with the EVENTs (hazard ratio 4.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35–14.54 and 5.41, 95% CI 1.87–15.65 respectively). EVENTs were also associated with other parameters, such as left ventricular ejection fraction, NYHA class, diuretic use, renal function, brain natriuretic peptide and hemoglobin level, left atrial size, left and right ventricular heart failure signs. After adjusting baroreflex sensitivity and low frequency power index for each of the abovementioned parameters, autonomic parameters were still significant predictors of hospitalization due to the heart failure decompensation. Conclusion Simple, noninvasive autonomic indices can be helpful in identifying individuals with increased risk of hospitalization due to the heart failure decompensation among clinically stable patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, even when adjusted for other well-known clinical parameters. PMID

  4. Telemonitoring in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Sarwat I.; Mattera, Jennifer A.; Curtis, Jeptha P.; Spertus, John A.; Herrin, Jeph; Lin, Zhenqiu; Phillips, Christopher O.; Hodshon, Beth V.; Cooper, Lawton S.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Small studies suggest that telemonitoring may improve heart-failure outcomes, but its effect in a large trial has not been established. METHODS We randomly assigned 1653 patients who had recently been hospitalized for heart failure to undergo either telemonitoring (826 patients) or usual care (827 patients). Telemonitoring was accomplished by means of a telephone-based interactive voice-response system that collected daily information about symptoms and weight that was reviewed by the patients’ clinicians. The primary end point was readmission for any reason or death from any cause within 180 days after enrollment. Secondary end points included hospitalization for heart failure, number of days in the hospital, and number of hospitalizations. RESULTS The median age of the patients was 61 years; 42.0% were female, and 39.0% were black. The telemonitoring group and the usual-care group did not differ significantly with respect to the primary end point, which occurred in 52.3% and 51.5% of patients, respectively (difference, 0.8 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], −4.0 to 5.6; P = 0.75 by the chi-square test). Readmission for any reason occurred in 49.3% of patients in the telemonitoring group and 47.4% of patients in the usual-care group (difference, 1.9 percentage points; 95% CI, −3.0 to 6.7; P = 0.45 by the chi-square test). Death occurred in 11.1% of the telemonitoring group and 11.4% of the usual care group (difference, −0.2 percentage points; 95% CI, −3.3 to 2.8; P = 0.88 by the chi-square test). There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the secondary end points or the time to the primary end point or its components. No adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS Among patients recently hospitalized for heart failure, telemonitoring did not improve outcomes. The results indicate the importance of a thorough, independent evaluation of disease-management strategies before their adoption. (Funded by

  5. Mechano-signaling in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Buyandelger, Byambajav; Mansfield, Catherine; Knöll, Ralph

    2014-06-01

    Mechanosensation and mechanotransduction are fundamental aspects of biology, but the link between physical stimuli and biological responses remains not well understood. The perception of mechanical stimuli, their conversion into biochemical signals, and the transmission of these signals are particularly important for dynamic organs such as the heart. Various concepts have been introduced to explain mechanosensation at the molecular level, including effects on signalosomes, tensegrity, or direct activation (or inactivation) of enzymes. Striated muscles, including cardiac myocytes, differ from other cells in that they contain sarcomeres which are essential for the generation of forces and which play additional roles in mechanosensation. The majority of cardiomyopathy causing candidate genes encode structural proteins among which titin probably is the most important one. Due to its elastic elements, titin is a length sensor and also plays a role as a tension sensor (i.e., stress sensation). The recent discovery of titin mutations being a major cause of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) also underpins the importance of mechanosensation and mechanotransduction in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Here, we focus on sarcomere-related mechanisms, discuss recent findings, and provide a link to cardiomyopathy and associated heart failure. PMID:24531746

  6. Modeling Pathologies of Diastolic and Systolic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Genet, M; Lee, L C; Baillargeon, B; Guccione, J M; Kuhl, E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic heart failure is a medical condition that involves structural and functional changes of the heart and a progressive reduction in cardiac output. Heart failure is classified into two categories: diastolic heart failure, a thickening of the ventricular wall associated with impaired filling; and systolic heart failure, a dilation of the ventricles associated with reduced pump function. In theory, the pathophysiology of heart failure is well understood. In practice, however, heart failure is highly sensitive to cardiac microstructure, geometry, and loading. This makes it virtually impossible to predict the time line of heart failure for a diseased individual. Here we show that computational modeling allows us to integrate knowledge from different scales to create an individualized model for cardiac growth and remodeling during chronic heart failure. Our model naturally connects molecular events of parallel and serial sarcomere deposition with cellular phenomena of myofibrillogenesis and sarcomerogenesis to whole organ function. Our simulations predict chronic alterations in wall thickness, chamber size, and cardiac geometry, which agree favorably with the clinical observations in patients with diastolic and systolic heart failure. In contrast to existing single- or bi-ventricular models, our new four-chamber model can also predict characteristic secondary effects including papillary muscle dislocation, annular dilation, regurgitant flow, and outflow obstruction. Our prototype study suggests that computational modeling provides a patient-specific window into the progression of heart failure with a view towards personalized treatment planning. PMID:26043672

  7. What is the optimal medical management of ischaemic heart failure?

    PubMed

    Cleland, J G; John, J; Dhawan, J; Clark, A

    2001-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is probably the most important cause of heart failure. All patients with heart failure may benefit from treatment designed to retard progressive ventricular dysfunction and arrhythmias. Patients with heart failure due to ischaemic heart disease may also, theoretically, benefit from treatments designed to relieve ischaemia and prevent coronary occlusion and from revascularisation. However, there is little evidence to show that effective treatments, such as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta-blockers, exert different effects in patients with heart failure with or without coronary disease. Moreover, there is no evidence that treatment directed specifically at myocardial ischaemia, whether or not symptomatic, or coronary disease alters outcome in patients with heart failure. Some agents, such as aspirin, designed to reduce the risk of coronary occlusion appear ineffective or harmful in patients with heart failure. There is no evidence, yet, that revascularisation improves prognosis in patients with heart failure, even in patients who are demonstrated to have extensive myocardial hibernation. On current evidence, revascularisation should be reserved for the relief of angina. Large-scale, randomised controlled trials are currently underway investigating the role of specific treatments targeted at coronary syndromes in patients who have heart failure. The CHRISTMAS study is investigating the effects of carvedilol in a large cohort of patients with and without hibernating myocardium. The WATCH study is comparing the efficacy of aspirin, clopidogrel and warfarin. The HEART-UK study is assessing the effect of revascularisation on mortality in patients with heart failure and myocardial hibernation. Smaller scale studies are currently assessing the safety and efficacy of statin therapy in patients with heart failure. Only when the results of these and other studies are known will it be possible to come to firm conclusions about

  8. Acute Kidney Injury in Pediatric Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Riley, Alyssa; Gebhard, Daniel J; Akcan-Arikan, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is very common in pediatric medical and surgical cardiac patients. Not only is it an independent risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in the short run, but repeated episodes of AKI lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD) especially in the most vulnerable hosts with multiple risk factors, such as heart transplant recipients. The cardiorenal syndrome, a term coined to emphasize the bidirectional nature of simultaneous or sequential cardiac-renal dysfunction both in acute and chronic settings, has been recently described in adults but scarcely reported in children. Despite the common occurrence and clinical and financial impact, AKI in pediatric heart failure outside of cardiac surgery populations remains poorly studied and there are no large-scale pediatric specific preventive or therapeutic studies to date. This article will review pediatric aspects of the cardiorenal syndrome in terms of pathophysiology, clinical impact and treatment options.

  9. Multidisciplinary Approach for Patients Hospitalized With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Frankenstein, Lutz; Fröhlich, Hanna; Cleland, John G F

    2015-10-01

    Acute heart failure describes the rapid deterioration, over minutes, days or hours, of symptoms and signs of heart failure. Its management is an interdisciplinary challenge that requires the cooperation of various specialists. While emergency providers, (interventional) cardiologists, heart surgeons, and intensive care specialists collaborate in the initial stabilization of acute heart failure patients, the involvement of nurses, discharge managers, and general practitioners in the heart failure team may facilitate the transition from inpatient care to the outpatient setting and improve acute heart failure readmission rates. This review highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to acute heart failure with particular focus on the chain-of-care delivered by the various services within the healthcare system. PMID:26409892

  10. Multidisciplinary Approach for Patients Hospitalized With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Frankenstein, Lutz; Fröhlich, Hanna; Cleland, John G F

    2015-10-01

    Acute heart failure describes the rapid deterioration, over minutes, days or hours, of symptoms and signs of heart failure. Its management is an interdisciplinary challenge that requires the cooperation of various specialists. While emergency providers, (interventional) cardiologists, heart surgeons, and intensive care specialists collaborate in the initial stabilization of acute heart failure patients, the involvement of nurses, discharge managers, and general practitioners in the heart failure team may facilitate the transition from inpatient care to the outpatient setting and improve acute heart failure readmission rates. This review highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to acute heart failure with particular focus on the chain-of-care delivered by the various services within the healthcare system.

  11. Chronic heart failure: a review for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Escudero, José A; Zayas-Torres, Carlos; Banchs-Pieretti, Hector

    2003-01-01

    Heart failure is a complex clinical syndrome. The pharmacological therapy for chronic heart failure has been changing in the past decade with acquired knowledge of the pathophysiology of this medical condition. Primary care physicians currently treat a significant number of patients. This article summarizes core topics of heart failure including epidemiological information, etiology, pathophysiology, clinical features and diagnostic tools. Also, we review some of the most relevant research studies that have led to the current recommendations for the pharmacological therapeutic strategies in the management of chronic heart failure. We make reference to the latest guidelines in the management of chronic heart failure submitted by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association (ACC/AHA). New technological advances, such as the biventricular-pacing devices, are an important adjuvant to the established pharmacological therapies for chronic heart failure.

  12. The Path From Heart Failure to Cardiac Transplant.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Regi; Koerner, Erika; Clark, Courtney; Halabicky, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a progressive and fatal disease impacting millions of American each year. Divided into stages, heart failure presents with progressive symptoms requiring a wide range of medical treatments. Treatments include diet and lifestyle changes, medications, electrical therapies (defibrillator and/or cardiac resynchronization therapy), as well as mechanical circulatory support. Cardiac transplant is the gold standard treatment of heart failure, although the availability of donors limits the utility of a cardiac transplant. This article outlines heart failure treatments and the indications, contraindications, and pretransplant evaluation for a cardiac transplant. Information on the allocation of donor hearts and donor characteristics is also included for the reader. PMID:27254637

  13. Rescue of Heart Failure by Mitochondrial Recovery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a multifactorial disease brought about by numerous, and oftentimes complex, etiological mechanisms. Although well studied, HF continues to affect millions of people worldwide and current treatments can only prevent further progression of HF. Mitochondria undoubtedly play an important role in the progression of HF, and numerous studies have highlighted mitochondrial components that contribute to HF. This review presents an overview of the role of mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore in HF, discusses ongoing studies that attempt to address the disease through mitochondrial targeting, and provides an insight on how these studies can affect future research on HF treatment. PMID:27032551

  14. Obesity paradox, cachexia, frailty, and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Carl J; De Schutter, Alban; Alpert, Martin A; Mehra, Mandeep R; Milani, Richard V; Ventura, Hector O

    2014-04-01

    Overweight and obesity adversely affect cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and CV structure and function, and lead to a marked increase in the risk of developing heart failure (HF). Despite this, an obesity paradox exists, wherein those who are overweight and obese with HF have a better prognosis than their leaner counterparts, and the underweight, frail, and cachectic have a particularly poor prognosis. In light of this, the potential benefits of exercise training and efforts to improve cardiorespiratory fitness, as well as the potential for weight reduction, especially in severely obese patients with HF, are discussed.

  15. Positive airway pressure therapy for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takao; Suda, Shoko; Kasai, Takatoshi

    2014-11-26

    Heart failure (HF) is a life-threatening disease and is a growing public health concern. Despite recent advances in pharmacological management for HF, the morbidity and mortality from HF remain high. Therefore, non-pharmacological approaches for HF are being developed. However, most non-pharmacological approaches are invasive, have limited indication and are considered only for advanced HF. Accordingly, the development of less invasive, non-pharmacological approaches that improve outcomes for patients with HF is important. One such approach may include positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy. In this review, the role of PAP therapy applied through mask interfaces in the wide spectrum of HF care is discussed. PMID:25429330

  16. [Chronic heart failure in the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Chivite, David; Franco, Jhonatan; Formiga, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence and incidence of heart failure (HF) is increasing, especially in the elderly population, and is becoming a major geriatric problem. Elderly patients with HF usually show etiopathogenic, epidemiological, and even clinical characteristics significantly different from those present in younger patients. Their treatment, however, derives from clinical trials performed with only a few elderly subjects. Moreover, beyond the cardiovascular disease itself, it is essential to evaluate the patient as a whole, given the interrelationship between HF and the characteristic geriatric syndromes of the elderly patient. This review examines the peculiarities in the most prevalent "real world" HF patient.

  17. Gastrointestinal and Liver Issues in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Varun; Fang, James C

    2016-04-26

    Heart failure affects ≈23 million people worldwide and continues to have a high mortality despite advancements in modern pharmacotherapy and device therapy. HF is a complex clinical syndrome that can result in the impairment of endocrine, hematologic, musculoskeletal, renal, respiratory, peripheral vascular, hepatic, and gastrointestinal systems. Although gastrointestinal involvement and hepatic involvement are common in HF and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, their bidirectional association with HF progression remains poorly fathomed. The current understanding of multiple mechanisms, including proinflammatory cytokine milieu, hormonal imbalance, and anabolic/catabolic imbalance, has been used to explain the relationship between the gut and HF and has been the basis for many novel therapeutic strategies. However, the failure of these novel therapies such as anti-tumor necrosis factor-α has resulted in further complexity. In this review, we describe the involvement of the gastrointestinal and liver systems within the HF syndrome, their pathophysiological mechanisms, and their clinical consequences.

  18. Mechanisms of Cardiotoxicity and the Development of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S

    2015-12-01

    Cardiotoxicity is a broad term that refers to the negative effects of toxic substances on the heart. Cancer drugs can cause cardiotoxicity by effects on heart cells, thromboembolic events, and/or hypertension that can lead to heart failure. Rheumatoid arthritis biologics may interfere with ischemic preconditioning and cause/worsen heart failure. Long-term and heavy alcohol use can result in oxidative stress, apoptosis, and decreased contractile protein function. Cocaine use results in sympathetic nervous system stimulation of heart and smooth muscle cells and leads to cardiotoxicity and evolution of heart failure. The definition of cardiotoxicity is likely to evolve along with knowledge about detecting subclinical myocardial injury. PMID:26567492

  19. The Pathophysiology of Heart Failure in Children: The Basics.

    PubMed

    Knudson, Jarrod D; Cabrera, Antonio G

    2016-01-01

    Few data exist on the pathophysiologic changes in pediatric heart failure. Most of the knowledge has evolved from animal models of ischemic or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. This review addresses the pathophysiologic changes that occur in the failing heart from animal models and the adult experience to unique aspects of heart failure in children.

  20. Monocyte and macrophage subsets along the continuum to heart failure: Misguided heroes or targetable villains?

    PubMed

    Glezeva, Nadezhda; Horgan, Stephen; Baugh, John A

    2015-12-01

    The important contribution of monocytes and macrophages to cardiovascular disease and heart failure pathophysiology has attracted significant attention in the past several years. Moreover, subsets of these cells have been shown to partake in the initiation and exacerbation of several cardiovascular pathologies including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, pressure overload, cardiac ischemia and fibrosis. This review focuses on the role of monocytes and macrophages along the continuum to heart failure and the contribution of different cell subsets in promoting or inhibiting cardiac injury or repair. It outlines a primary role for the monocyte/macrophage system as an important regulator of cardiac inflammation and extracellular matrix remodelling in early and late stage heart disease with particular focus on phenotypic plasticity and the inflammatory and fibrotic functions of these cells. It also summarizes evidence from pre-clinical and clinical studies evaluating monocyte type regulation and its functional significance for development of cardiovascular disease and heart failure. Finally, current and prospective therapeutic approaches based on monocyte and macrophage manipulation for the treatment of cardiovascular disease and heart failure are discussed. Based on these data, future work in this fertile research area may aid in identifying potential diagnostic biomarkers and novel therapies for chronic heart failure.

  1. Hormonal alterations in heart failure: anabolic impairment in chronic heart failure - diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic issues.

    PubMed

    Arcopinto, Michele; Cittadini, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Chronic heart failure represents a leading cause of mortality and health care expenditure in developed countries. In the last 20 years, medical therapy of heart failure has dramatically changed thanks to the introduction of agents able to significantly reduce the neurohormonal hyperactivation that underpins the syndrome, and to the growing opportunities of electrical therapies. Although major advances in terms of improved survival and quality of life have been achieved, the reduction in the burden of heart failure is still the primary goal of cardiovascular societies. In the last decades, other research lines have also grown to complement the neurohormonal paradigm. It is increasingly evident that several hormonal systems are down-regulated or impaired in patients with heart failure, including growth and thyroid hormones, androgens and insulin. These abnormalities could be considered interrelated and linked, in turn, to the neurohormonal and cytokine hyperactivation. Since most of these alterations provide prognostic information, these new lines of evidence support the extension of the classical neurohormonal scheme to a more comprehensive pathophysiological model that includes multiple hormonal and metabolic deficiencies. This chapter examines the evidence in support of this concept. Preliminary experience concerning targeted hormonal supplementation or metabolic modulation is also briefly reviewed in this article.

  2. Crosstalk between the heart and peripheral organs in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jahng, James Won Suk; Song, Erfei; Sweeney, Gary

    2016-03-11

    Mediators from peripheral tissues can influence the development and progression of heart failure (HF). For example, in obesity, an altered profile of adipokines secreted from adipose tissue increases the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI). Less appreciated is that heart remodeling releases cardiokines, which can strongly impact various peripheral tissues. Inflammation, and, in particular, activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors with pyrin domain (NLRP3) inflammasome are likely to have a central role in cardiac remodeling and mediating crosstalk with other organs. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to cardiac injury induces the production and secretion of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. In addition to having local effects in the myocardium, these pro-inflammatory cytokines are released into circulation and cause remodeling in the spleen, kidney, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The collective effects of various cardiokines on peripheral organs depend on the degree and duration of myocardial injury, with systematic inflammation and peripheral tissue damage observed as HF progresses. In this article, we review mechanisms regulating myocardial inflammation in HF and the role of factors secreted by the heart in communication with peripheral tissues.

  3. Crosstalk between the heart and peripheral organs in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Jahng, James Won Suk; Song, Erfei; Sweeney, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Mediators from peripheral tissues can influence the development and progression of heart failure (HF). For example, in obesity, an altered profile of adipokines secreted from adipose tissue increases the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI). Less appreciated is that heart remodeling releases cardiokines, which can strongly impact various peripheral tissues. Inflammation, and, in particular, activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors with pyrin domain (NLRP3) inflammasome are likely to have a central role in cardiac remodeling and mediating crosstalk with other organs. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to cardiac injury induces the production and secretion of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. In addition to having local effects in the myocardium, these pro-inflammatory cytokines are released into circulation and cause remodeling in the spleen, kidney, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The collective effects of various cardiokines on peripheral organs depend on the degree and duration of myocardial injury, with systematic inflammation and peripheral tissue damage observed as HF progresses. In this article, we review mechanisms regulating myocardial inflammation in HF and the role of factors secreted by the heart in communication with peripheral tissues. PMID:26964833

  4. Heart Failure: Diagnosis, Management and Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Inamdar, Arati A.; Inamdar, Ajinkya C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advancement in medicine, management of heart failure (HF), which usually presents as a disease syndrome, has been a challenge to healthcare providers. This is reflected by the relatively higher rate of readmissions along with increased mortality and morbidity associated with HF. In this review article, we first provide a general overview of types of HF pathogenesis and diagnostic features of HF including the crucial role of exercise in determining the severity of heart failure, the efficacy of therapeutic strategies and the morbidity/mortality of HF. We then discuss the quality control measures to prevent the growing readmission rates for HF. We also attempt to elucidate published and ongoing clinical trials for HF in an effort to evaluate the standard and novel therapeutic approaches, including stem cell and gene therapies, to reduce the morbidity and mortality. Finally, we discuss the appropriate utilization/documentation and medical coding based on the severity of the HF alone and with minor and major co-morbidities. We consider that this review provides an extensive overview of the HF in terms of disease pathophysiology, management and documentation for the general readers, as well as for the clinicians/physicians/hospitalists. PMID:27367736

  5. Interventional heart failure: a new field.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sanjiv J

    2016-05-17

    With the rapid expansion of interventional therapies for structural heart disease, it is no surprise that the field of interventional heart failure (HF) is now an established reality. Why is there a need for interventional treatment of HF? Despite critical advances in the treatment of some forms of HF, there are still major unmet needs in the HF field (e.g., HF with preserved ejection fraction and right ventricular failure), and HF-related morbidity and mortality remain high. Furthermore, there are several advantages to device-based therapies for HF: they may help reduce polypharmacy and the need for patient compliance with pharmacotherapies, both of which continue to plague the treatment of HF. For these reasons and others, there has been a plethora of development within the interventional HF field, with therapies ranging from interatrial shunt devices to left ventricular partition devices. Here we discuss the current unmet need for interventional HF therapies, lessons learned from prior successes and challenges in the development of device-based HF therapeutics, novel interventional therapies on the horizon for HF patients, and future challenges that will be critical for all those in the field to consider when developing interventional therapies for HF. PMID:27174120

  6. [Diuretic therapy in acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luis; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-03-01

    Diuretics are widely recommended in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Unfortunately, despite their widespread use, limited data are available from randomized clinical trials to guide clinicians on the appropriate management of diuretic therapy. Loop diuretics are considered the first-line diuretic therapy, especially intravenous furosemide, but the best mode of administration (high-dose versus low-dose and continuous infusion versus bolus) is unclear. When diuretic resistance develops, different therapeutic strategies can be adopted, including combined diuretic therapy with thiazide diuretics and/or aldosterone antagonists. Low or "non-diuretic" doses (25-50mg QD) of aldosterone antagonists have been demonstrated to confer a survival benefit in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction and consequently should be prescribed in all such patients, unless contraindicated by potassium and/or renal function values. There is less evidence on the use of aldosterone antagonists at higher or "diuretic" doses (≥ 100mg QD) but these drugs could be useful in relieving congestive symptoms in combination with furosemide. Thiazide diuretics can also be helpful as they have synergic effects with loop diuretics by inhibiting sodium reabsorption in distal parts of the nephron. The effect of diuretic therapy in AHF should be monitored with careful observation of clinical signs and symptoms of congestion. Serum electrolytes and kidney function should also be monitored during the use of intravenous diuretics.

  7. Rehospitalization for heart failure: problems and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Fonarow, Gregg C; Bonow, Robert O

    2013-01-29

    With a prevalence of 5.8 million in the United States alone, heart failure (HF) is associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditures. Close to 1 million hospitalizations for heart failure (HHF) occur annually, accounting for over 6.5 million hospital days and a substantial portion of the estimated $37.2 billion that is spent each year on HF in the United States. Although some progress has been made in reducing mortality in patients hospitalized with HF, rates of rehospitalization continue to rise, and approach 30% within 60 to 90 days of discharge. Approximately half of HHF patients have preserved or relatively preserved ejection fraction (EF). Their post-discharge event rate is similar to those with reduced EF. HF readmission is increasingly being used as a quality metric, a basis for hospital reimbursement, and an outcome measure in HF clinical trials. In order to effectively prevent HF readmissions and improve overall outcomes, it is important to have a complete and longitudinal characterization of HHF patients. This paper highlights management strategies that when properly implemented may help reduce HF rehospitalizations and include adopting a mechanistic approach to cardiac abnormalities, treating noncardiac comorbidities, increasing utilization of evidence-based therapies, and improving care transitions, monitoring, and disease management.

  8. Heart Failure: Diagnosis, Management and Utilization.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Arati A; Inamdar, Ajinkya C

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advancement in medicine, management of heart failure (HF), which usually presents as a disease syndrome, has been a challenge to healthcare providers. This is reflected by the relatively higher rate of readmissions along with increased mortality and morbidity associated with HF. In this review article, we first provide a general overview of types of HF pathogenesis and diagnostic features of HF including the crucial role of exercise in determining the severity of heart failure, the efficacy of therapeutic strategies and the morbidity/mortality of HF. We then discuss the quality control measures to prevent the growing readmission rates for HF. We also attempt to elucidate published and ongoing clinical trials for HF in an effort to evaluate the standard and novel therapeutic approaches, including stem cell and gene therapies, to reduce the morbidity and mortality. Finally, we discuss the appropriate utilization/documentation and medical coding based on the severity of the HF alone and with minor and major co-morbidities. We consider that this review provides an extensive overview of the HF in terms of disease pathophysiology, management and documentation for the general readers, as well as for the clinicians/physicians/hospitalists. PMID:27367736

  9. [Alternatives to conventional diuretic therapy in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Morales-Rull, José Luis; Trullàs, Joan Carles; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-03-01

    Although treatment of acute heart failure is based primarily on the administration of intravenous loop diuretics, evidence supporting this practice is still scarce and there is uncertainty about the optimal dose. The existence of a considerable percentage of patients refractory to diuretic therapy and worsening of renal failure associated with the use of these drugs, with possible implications for medium-term mortality, have prompted the search for more effective and safer alternatives. Extracorporeal purification techniques, such as ultrafiltration, have demonstrated efficacy, although their superiority is unclear, due to the possible adverse effects associated with the procedure. The use of low-dose dopamine is not superior to conventional diuretic therapy after the first few hours of treatment. Moreover, combination with furosemide and hypertonic saline could be a valid alternative for patients with refractory congestion and depressed ejection fraction and serum creatinine ≤ 2.5mg/dL, but further studies are needed before its widespread use. The use of tolvaptan may be an effective alternative in the short-term but its use may be limited by its price. There is still controversy about whether treatment with loop diuretics is associated with higher mortality in all groups of patients with HF exacerbations. These controversies should be clarified by future clinical trials.

  10. [Alternatives to conventional diuretic therapy in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Morales-Rull, José Luis; Trullàs, Joan Carles; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-03-01

    Although treatment of acute heart failure is based primarily on the administration of intravenous loop diuretics, evidence supporting this practice is still scarce and there is uncertainty about the optimal dose. The existence of a considerable percentage of patients refractory to diuretic therapy and worsening of renal failure associated with the use of these drugs, with possible implications for medium-term mortality, have prompted the search for more effective and safer alternatives. Extracorporeal purification techniques, such as ultrafiltration, have demonstrated efficacy, although their superiority is unclear, due to the possible adverse effects associated with the procedure. The use of low-dose dopamine is not superior to conventional diuretic therapy after the first few hours of treatment. Moreover, combination with furosemide and hypertonic saline could be a valid alternative for patients with refractory congestion and depressed ejection fraction and serum creatinine ≤ 2.5mg/dL, but further studies are needed before its widespread use. The use of tolvaptan may be an effective alternative in the short-term but its use may be limited by its price. There is still controversy about whether treatment with loop diuretics is associated with higher mortality in all groups of patients with HF exacerbations. These controversies should be clarified by future clinical trials. PMID:24930083

  11. The association between COPD and heart failure risk: a review

    PubMed Central

    de Miguel Díez, Javier; Morgan, Jorge Chancafe; García, Rodrigo Jiménez

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is commonly associated with heart failure (HF) in clinical practice since they share the same pathogenic mechanism. Both conditions incur significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the prognosis of COPD and HF combined is poorer than for either disease alone. Nevertheless, usually only one of them is diagnosed. An active search for each condition using clinical examination and additional tests including plasma natriuretic peptides, lung function testing, and echocardiography should be obtained. The combination of COPD and HF presents many therapeutic challenges. The beneficial effects of selective β1-blockers should not be denied in stable patients who have HF and coexisting COPD. Additionally, statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin-receptor blockers may reduce the morbidity and mortality of COPD patients. Moreover, caution is advised with use of inhaled β2-agonists for the treatment of COPD in patients with HF. Finally, noninvasive ventilation, added to conventional therapy, improves the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure due to hypercapnic exacerbation of COPD or HF in situations of acute pulmonary edema. The establishment of a combined and integrated approach to managing these comorbidities would seem an appropriate strategy. Additional studies providing new data on the pathogenesis and management of patients with COPD and HF are needed, with the purpose of trying to improve quality of life as well as survival of these patients. PMID:23847414

  12. Electrocardiographic, hemodynamic, and biochemical responses to acute particulate matter (PM) exposure in aged heart failure-prone rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to ambient PM from fossil-fuel emissions is linked to cardiovascular disease and death. This association strengthens in people with preexisting cardiac disease-especially heart failure (HF). The mechanisms explaining PM-induced exacerbation ofHF are unclear. Some o...

  13. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices.

  14. [Function of cannabinoids in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Rudź, Radosław; Baranowska, Urszula; Malinowska, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids, substances derived from Cannabis sativa, have been used by humans as therapeutic agents for thousands of years. They act through the cannabinoid CB(1), CB(2), vanilloid TRPV1, and the as yet undefined putative endothelial cannabinoid receptors. Intensive research on the influence of cannabinoids on the cardiovascular system has been conducted since the 1990s after the discovery that cannabinoids are involved in hypotension connected with septic, cardiogenic, and hemorrhagic shock. One cannot exclude the future possibility of using cannabinoids as new therapeutic agents in diseases of the cardiovascular system. In the present paper the mechanisms of cannabinoids on heart failure are described. In the acute phase of myocardial infarction, cannabinoids protect the endothelium of coronary vessels and decrease the heart's necrotic area and the risk of arrhythmia. Cannabinoids also act in the chronic phase of myocardial infarction in the process of the heart remodeling. However, the present knowledge of the effects of cannabinoids on the acute and chronic phases of myocardial infarction and the possibility of using these agents in cardiovascular disease therapy is still insufficient. PMID:18464680

  15. Khat Use: History and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Mekkodathil, Ahammed; Al-Thani, Hassan; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that 20 million people worldwide are regularly using khat as a stimulant, even though the habit of chewing khat is known to cause serious health issues. Historical evidence suggests khat use has existed since the 13th century in Ethiopia and the southwestern Arabian regions even before the cultivation and use of coffee. In the past three decades, its availability and use spread all over the world including the United States and Europe. Most of the consumers in the Western world are immigrant groups from Eastern Africa or the Middle East. The global transport and availability of khat has been enhanced by the development of synthetic forms of its active component. The World Health Organization considers khat a drug of abuse since it causes a range of health problems. However, it remains lawful in some countries. Khat use has long been a part of Yemeni culture and is used in virtually every social occasion. The main component of khat is cathinone, which is structurally and functionally similar to amphetamine and cocaine. Several studies have demonstrated that khat chewing has unfavorable cardiovascular effects. The effect on the myocardium could be explained by its effect on the heart rate, blood pressure, its vasomotor effect on the coronary vessels, and its amphetamine–like effects. However, its direct effect on the myocardium needs further elaboration. To date, there are few articles that contribute death among khat chewers to khat-induced heart failure. Further studies are needed to address the risk factors in khat chewers that may explain khat-induced cardiotoxicity, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. PMID:25960830

  16. Advanced Congestive Heart Failure Associated With Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Sarcon, Annahita; Liu, Xiaoli; Ton, David; Haywood, James; Hitchcock, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) is a complication of an underlying disease and not a primary illness. It is most commonly associated with sepsis, trauma, obstetrical complications, and malignancies. There are very few cases in the literature illustrating the association between DIC and congestive heart failure. Findings. In this report, we present a case of severe congestive heart failure, leading to biventricular thrombi and subsequently DIC. Conclusion. We suggest that the association between congestive heart failure and DIC is an underrecognized one. Congestive heart failure continues to remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality despite advances in medical therapies. Thus far, the precise role of coagulation factors in congestive heart failure is unknown. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure and coagulation factors.

  17. Developing New Treatments for Heart Failure: Focus on the Heart.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Larson, Christopher J; Shah, Sanjiv J; Greene, Stephen J; Cleland, John G F; Colucci, Wilson S; Dunnmon, Preston; Epstein, Stephen E; Kim, Raymond J; Parsey, Ramin V; Stockbridge, Norman; Carr, James; Dinh, Wilfried; Krahn, Thomas; Kramer, Frank; Wahlander, Karin; Deckelbaum, Lawrence I; Crandall, David; Okada, Shunichiro; Senni, Michele; Sikora, Sergey; Sabbah, Hani N; Butler, Javed

    2016-05-01

    Compared with heart failure (HF) care 20 to 30 years ago, there has been tremendous advancement in therapy for ambulatory HF with reduced ejection fraction with the use of agents that block maladaptive neurohormonal pathways. However, during the past decade, with few notable exceptions, the frequency of successful drug development programs has fallen as most novel therapies have failed to offer incremental benefit or raised safety concerns (ie, hypotension). Moreover, no therapy has been approved specifically for HF with preserved ejection fraction or for worsening chronic HF (including acutely decompensated HF). Across the spectrum of HF, preliminary results from many phase II trials have been promising but are frequently followed by unsuccessful phase III studies, highlighting a disconnect in the translational process between basic science discovery, early drug development, and definitive clinical testing in pivotal trials. A major unmet need in HF drug development is the ability to identify homogeneous subsets of patients whose underlying disease is driven by a specific mechanism that can be targeted using a new therapeutic agent. Drug development strategies should increasingly consider therapies that facilitate reverse remodeling by directly targeting the heart itself rather than strictly focusing on agents that unload the heart or target systemic neurohormones. Advancements in cardiac imaging may allow for more focused and direct assessment of drug effects on the heart early in the drug development process. To better understand and address the array of challenges facing current HF drug development, so that future efforts may have a better chance for success, the Food and Drug Administration facilitated a meeting on February 17, 2015, which was attended by clinicians, researchers, regulators, and industry representatives. The following discussion summarizes the key takeaway dialogue from this meeting.

  18. Heart failure in African Americans: disparities can be overcome.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok; Colvin-Adams, Monica; Yancy, Clyde W

    2014-05-01

    African Americans are disproportionately affected by heart failure, with a high prevalence at an early age. Hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and chronic kidney disease are all common in African Americans and all predispose to heart failure. Neurohormonal imbalances, endothelial dysfunction, genetic polymorphisms, and socioeconomic factors also contribute. In general, the same evidence-based treatment guidelines that apply to white patients with heart failure also apply to African Americans. However, the combination of hydralazine and isosorbide dinitrate is advised specifically for African Americans.

  19. Diagnosing and managing acute heart failure in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Dick C.; Peacock, W. Frank

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that results from the impairment of ventricular filling or ejection of blood and affects millions of people worldwide. Diagnosis may not be straightforward and at times may be difficult in an undifferentiated patient. However, rapid evaluation and diagnosis is important for the optimal management of acute heart failure. We review the many aspects of diagnosing and treating acute heart failure in the emergency department. PMID:27752588

  20. [Novelties in the pharmacological treatment of chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Nyolczas, Noémi

    2016-09-01

    Recently, results of several novel clinical trials on the pharmacological treatment of chronic heart failure have been published. In addition, the new European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure and a focused update by the ACC/AHA/HFSA on new pharmacological therapy for heart failure has been reported in 2016. This paper intends to provide an overview of the current state of the pharmacological treatment of chronic heart failure in the light of the new guidelines which incorporate the results of the new clinical trials. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(38), 1517-1521. PMID:27640618

  1. Quality of congestive heart failure care

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Heather; Marshall, J. Neil; Stewart, Moira; Terry, Amanda L.; Cejic, Sonny; Hammond, Jo-Anne; Jordan, John; Chevendra, Vijaya; Denomme, Louisa Bestard; Thind, Amardeep

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To study the feasibility of using electronic medical record (EMR) data from the Deliver Primary Healthcare Information (DELPHI) database to measure quality of care for patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) in primary care and to determine the percentage of patients with CHF receiving the recommended care. DESIGN Items listed on the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care Heart Failure Patient Care Flow Sheet (CHF flow sheet) were assessed and measured using EMRs of patients diagnosed with CHF between October 1, 2005, and September 30, 2008. SETTING Ten primary health care practices in southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS Four hundred eighty-eight patients who were considered to have CHF because at least 1 of the following was indicated in their EMRs: an International Classification of Diseases billing code for CHF (category 428), an International Classification of Primary Care diagnosis code for heart failure (ie, K77), or “CHF” reported on the problem list. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Number of CHF flow sheet items that were measurable using EMR data from the DELPHI database. Percentage of patients with CHF receiving required quality-of-care items since the date of diagnosis. RESULTS The DELPHI database contained information on 60 (65.9%) of the 91 items identified using the CHF flow sheet. The recommended tests and procedures were recorded infrequently: 55.5% of patients with CHF had chest radiographs; 32.6% had electrocardiograms; 32.2% had echocardiograms; 30.5% were prescribed angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; 20.9% were prescribed β-blockers; and 15.8% were prescribed angiotensin II receptor blockers. CONCLUSION Low frequencies of recommended care items for patients with CHF were recorded in the EMR. Physicians explained that CHF care was documented in areas of the EMR that contained patient identifiers, such as the encounter notes, and was therefore not part of the DELPHI database. Extractable information from the EMR

  2. Clinical service organisation for heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Stephanie JC; Bestall, Janine C; Cotter, Sarah; Falshaw, Margaret; Hood, Sonja G; Parsons, Suzanne; Wood, Lesley; Underwood, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a serious, common condition associated with frequent hospitalisation. Several different disease management interventions (clinical service organisation interventions) for patients with CHF have been proposed. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of disease management interventions for patients with CHF. Search methods We searched: Cochrane CENTRAL Register of Controlled Trials (to June 2003); MEDLINE (January 1966 to July 2003); EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2003); CINAHL (January 1982 to July 2003); AMED (January 1985 to July 2003); Science Citation Index Expanded (searched January 1981 to March 2001); SIGLE (January 1980 to July 2003); DARE (July 2003); National Research Register (July 2003); NHS Economic Evaluations Database (March 2001); reference lists of articles and asked experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing disease management interventions specifically directed at patients with CHF to usual care. Data collection and analysis At least two reviewers independently extracted data information and assessed study quality. Study authors were contacted for further information where necessary. Main results Sixteen trials involving 1,627 people were included. We classified the interventions into three models: multidisciplinary interventions (a holistic approach bridging the gap between hospital admission and discharge home delivered by a team); case management interventions (intense monitoring of patients following discharge often involving telephone follow up and home visits); and clinic interventions (follow up in a CHF clinic). There was considerable overlap within these categories, however the components, intensity and duration of the interventions varied. Case management interventions tended to be associated with reduced all cause mortality but these findings were not statistically significant (odds ratio 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.67 to 1.10, P = 0.23), although the

  3. Update on heart failure, heart transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Almenar, Luis; Zunzunegui, José Luis; Barón, Gonzalo; Carrasco, José Ignacio; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Comín, Josep; Barrios, Vivencio; Subirana, M Teresa; Díaz-Molina, Beatriz

    2013-04-01

    In the year 2012, 3 scientific sections-heart failure and transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology-are presented together in the same article. The most relevant development in the area of heart failure and transplantation is the 2012 publication of the European guidelines for heart failure. These describe new possibilities for some drugs (eplerenone and ivabradine); expand the criteria for resynchronization, ventricular assist, and peritoneal dialysis; and cover possibilities of percutaneous repair of the mitral valve (MitraClip(®)). The survival of children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome in congenital heart diseases has improved significantly. Instructions for percutaneous techniques and devices have been revised and modified for the treatment of atrial septal defects, ostium secundum, and ventricular septal defects. Hybrid procedures for addressing structural congenital heart defects have become more widespread. In the area of clinical cardiology studies have demonstrated that percutaneous prosthesis implantation has lower mortality than surgical implantation. Use of the CHA2DS2-VASc criteria and of new anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) is also recommended. In addition, the development of new sequencing techniques has enabled the analysis of multiple genes.

  4. Potential Autonomic Nervous System Effects of Statins in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Horwich, Tamara; Middlekauff, Holly

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Sympathetic nervous system activation in heart failure, as indexed by elevated norepinephrine levels, higher muscle sympathetic nerve activity and reduced heart rate variability, is associated with pathologic ventricular remodeling, increased arrhythmias, sudden death, and increased mortality. Recent evidence suggests that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (statin) therapy may provide survival benefit in heart failure of both ischemic and non-ischemic etiology, and one potential mechanism of benefit of statins in heart failure is modulation of the autonomic nervous system. Animal models of heart failure demonstrate reduced sympathetic activation and improved sympathovagal balance with statin therapy. Initial human studies have reported mixed results. Ongoing translational studies and outcomes trials will help delineate the potentially beneficial effects of statins on the autonomic nervous system in heart failure. PMID:18433696

  5. [The heart failure patient: a case report].

    PubMed

    Alconero-Camarero, Ana Rosa; Arozamena-Pérez, Jorge; García-Garrido, Lluïsa

    2014-01-01

    Given its prevalence, high mortality rate, morbidity, chronicity and use of resources, heart failure (HF) is a priority issue from a social and health standpoint, due to the ageing population and to lack of adherence to and the complexity of treatment. For these reasons, an individualized care plan needs to be established to meet the real and potential needs of the patient diagnosed with HF. A clinical case is presented of a patient admitted to the Cardiology Critical Care (CCC) unit of a tertiary hospital. A patient care plan was prepared following the steps of the scientific method and relying on the NANDA taxonomy, and the NOC and NIC to design goals and nursing interventions, respectively.

  6. The pathophysiology of hypertensive acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Viau, David M; Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Spranger, Marty D; O'Leary, Donal S; Levy, Phillip D

    2015-12-01

    While acute heart failure (AHF) is often regarded as a single disorder, an evolving understanding recognises the existence of multiple phenotypes with varied pathophysiological alterations. Herein we discuss hypertensive AHF and provide insight into a mechanism where acute fluid redistribution is caused by a disturbance in the ventricular-vascular coupling relationship. In this relationship, acute alterations in vascular elasticity, vasoconstriction and reflected pulse waves lead to increases in cardiac work and contribute to decompensated LV function with associated subendocardial ischaemia and end-organ damage. Chronic predisposing factors (neurohormonal activity, nitric oxide insensitivity, arterial stiffening) and physiological stressors (sympathetic surge, volume overload, physical exertion) that are causally linked to acute symptom onset are discussed. Lastly, we review treatment options including both nitrovasodilators and promising novel therapeutics, and discuss future directions in the management of this phenotypic variant.

  7. Cognitive impairment in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Leto, Laura; Feola, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive damage in heart failure (HF) involves different domains thus interfering with the ability for single patient to self-care and to cope with treatment regimens, modifying symptoms and health behaviours. Many cerebral and functional changes were detected in brain imaging, involving areas of both grey and white matter deputed to cognition. Although various instruments are available to explore cognition, no consensus was obtained on better tools to be used in HF population. Reduction in cerebral blood flow, decreased cardiac output, alterations of cerebrovascular reactivity and modification of blood pressure levels are the main features involved in the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of cognitive deficit. Several cardiac variables, laboratory parameters, demographic and clinical elements were studied for their possible relation with cognition and should be properly evaluated to define patients at increased risk of impairment. The present review gathers available data pointing out assured information and discussing possible areas of research development. PMID:25593581

  8. Nutritional Deficiency in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sciatti, Edoardo; Lombardi, Carlo; Ravera, Alice; Vizzardi, Enrico; Bonadei, Ivano; Carubelli, Valentina; Gorga, Elio; Metra, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in Western countries. Although evidence-based treatments have substantially improved outcomes, prognosis remains poor with high costs for health care systems. In patients with HF, poor dietary behaviors are associated with unsatisfactory quality of life and adverse outcome. The HF guidelines have not recommended a specific nutritional strategy. Despite the role of micronutrient deficiency it has been extensively studied, and data about the efficacy of supplementation therapy in HF are not supported by large randomized trials and there is limited evidence regarding the outcomes. The aim of the present review is to analyze the state-of-the-art of nutritional deficiencies in HF, focusing on the physiological role and the prognostic impact of micronutrient supplementation. PMID:27455314

  9. Metabolic remodeling in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Guo, Tao

    2013-08-01

    Although the management of chronic heart failure (CHF) has made enormous progress over the past decades, CHF is still a tremendous medical and societal burden. Metabolic remodeling might play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of CHF. The characteristics and mechanisms of metabolic remodeling remained unclear, and the main hypothesis might include the changes in the availability of metabolic substrate and the decline of metabolic capability. In the early phases of the disease, metabolism shifts toward carbohydrate utilization from fatty acids (FAs) oxidation. Along with the progress of the disease, the increasing level of the hyperadrenergic state and insulin resistance cause the changes that shift back to a greater FA uptake and oxidation. In addition, a growing body of experimental and clinical evidence suggests that the improvement in the metabolic capability is likely to be more significant than the selection of the substrate.

  10. Cognitive impairment in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Leto, Laura; Feola, Mauro

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive damage in heart failure (HF) involves different domains thus interfering with the ability for single patient to self-care and to cope with treatment regimens, modifying symptoms and health behaviours. Many cerebral and functional changes were detected in brain imaging, involving areas of both grey and white matter deputed to cognition. Although various instruments are available to explore cognition, no consensus was obtained on better tools to be used in HF population. Reduction in cerebral blood flow, decreased cardiac output, alterations of cerebrovascular reactivity and modification of blood pressure levels are the main features involved in the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of cognitive deficit. Several cardiac variables, laboratory parameters, demographic and clinical elements were studied for their possible relation with cognition and should be properly evaluated to define patients at increased risk of impairment. The present review gathers available data pointing out assured information and discussing possible areas of research development. PMID:25593581

  11. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:26974003

  12. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity.

  13. Organ protection possibilities in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M; Morales-Rull, J L

    2016-04-01

    Unlike chronic heart failure (HF), the treatment for acute HF has not changed over the last decade. The drugs employed have shown their ability to control symptoms but have not achieved organ protection or managed to reduce medium to long-term morbidity and mortality. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute HF suggest that treatment should be directed not only towards correcting the haemodynamic disorders and achieving symptomatic relief but also towards preventing organ damage, thereby counteracting myocardial remodelling and cardiac and extracardiac disorders. Compounds that exert vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory action in the acute phase of HF and can stop cell death, thereby boosting repair mechanisms, could have an essential role in organ protection.

  14. [EFFICIENCY OF COMBINATION OF ROFLUMILAST AND QUERCETIN FOR CORRECTION OXYGEN- INDEPENDENT MECHANISMS AND PHAGOCYTIC ACTIVITY OF MACROPHAGE CELLS OF PATIENTS WITH ACUTE EXACERBATION OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE WHEN COMBINED WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Gerych, P; Yatsyshyn, R

    2015-01-01

    Studied oxygen independent reaction and phagocytic activity of macrophage cells of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) II-III stage when combined with coronary heart disease (CHD). The increasing oxygen independent reactions monocytes and neutrophils and a decrease of the parameters that characterize the functional state of phagocytic cells, indicating a decrease in the functional capacity of macrophage phagocytic system (MPS) in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD, which runs as its own or in combination with stable coronary heart disease angina I-II. FC. Severity immunodeficiency state in terms of cellular component of nonspecific immunity in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD II-III stage in conjunction with the accompanying CHD increases with the progression of heart failure. Inclusion of basic therapy of COPD exacerbation and standard treatment of coronary artery disease and drug combinations Roflumilastand quercetin causes normalization of phagocytic indices MFS, indicating improved immune status and improves myocardial perfusion in terms of daily ECG monitoring.

  15. Epidemiology and risk profile of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Anh L.; Horwich, Tamara B.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a major public health issue, with a prevalence of over 5.8 million in the USA, and over 23 million worldwide, and rising. The lifetime risk of developing HF is one in five. Although promising evidence shows that the age-adjusted incidence of HF may have plateaued, HF still carries substantial morbidity and mortality, with 5-year mortality that rival those of many cancers. HF represents a considerable burden to the health-care system, responsible for costs of more than $39 billion annually in the USA alone, and high rates of hospitalizations, readmissions, and outpatient visits. HF is not a single entity, but a clinical syndrome that may have different characteristics depending on age, sex, race or ethnicity, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) status, and HF etiology. Furthermore, pathophysiological differences are observed among patients diagnosed with HF and reduced LVEF compared with HF and preserved LVEF, which are beginning to be better appreciated in epidemiological studies. A number of risk factors, such as ischemic heart disease, hypertension, smoking, obesity, and diabetes, among others, have been identified that both predict the incidence of HF as well as its severity. In this Review, we discuss key features of the epidemiology and risk profile of HF. PMID:21060326

  16. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    PubMed

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  17. Women, men and heart failure: a review.

    PubMed

    Rosengren, Annika; Hauptman, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and is the reason for more than one in five of all hospital admissions in patients aged >65 years. Major advances in the diagnosis and treatment of HF over the last two decades have proven effective in reducing morbidity and mortality among both men and women, but with less improvement for women and elderly patients. Women and men with HF differ in several respects. Women tend to be older and more often hypertensive, but are less likely to demonstrate any clinical evidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and more often have preserved ventricular function. Conversely, hypertension plays a greater role in the development of HF in women than in men. Sex differences in systolic and diastolic function in patients with hypertension have been demonstrated. Although men have higher incidence of HF at all ages, lifetime risk is similar in men and women because women live longer. Intervention studies have included far more men than women but in patients with reduced ventricular function there is no evidence to suggest that women benefit less than men from evidence-based treatments, and current guidelines do not differentiate between men and women. There is no consistent recent evidence that women receive poorer quality of care than men. Women with HF have better survival rates than men, which may be due to better systolic function or less CHD among women; however, mortality rates for HF are still very high regardless of sex. As most trials have been targeted towards patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, which is less typical for women than for men with HF, more research is needed to help define treatment aimed at improving prognosis for patients with HF and preserved systolic function. In light of these differences and ongoing uncertainties, future European guidelines should incorporate gender issues. Heart Fail Monit 2008;6(1):34-40. PMID:18607520

  18. Low-intensity noninvasive ventilation: Lower pressure, more exacerbations of chronic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Toru; Wakabayashi, Kiryo; Kimura, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kanako; Ikeda, Toshikazu; Yano, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic respiratory failure (CRF) who are treated with noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV), a little is known regarding the effects of low-intensity NPPV (LI-NPPV) on the clinical course of CRF and the frequency of adjustments in these patients. OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the effects of LI-NPPV on the clinical course of patients with CRF as compared with patients who were treated with conventional NPPV (C-NPPV) and determined how frequently NPPV was adjusted during therapy. METHODS: Clinical data from 21 patients who received long-term NPPV were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were categorized into two groups based on the level of initial pressure support (PS): C-NPPV group (PS ≥ 10 cm H2O) and LI-NPPV group (PS < 10 cm H2O). RESULTS: Patients in the LI-NPPV group had significantly more exacerbations of CRF (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the number of patients who required adjustments of NPPV settings between the two groups. There was no significant difference in PaCO2 levels 1 month after the start of NPPV between the two groups; however, PaCO2 levels were significantly lower after 1 year in the C-group (P < 0.001). Seventy-one percent of LI-NPPV patients and 43% of C-NPPV patients needed NPPV adjustments. CONCLUSIONS: Attention should be paid to CRF patients who are initially administered LI-NPPV; they should be carefully observed because they can develop more exacerbations of CRF than patients undergoing C-NPPV. If possible, higher initial PS should be administered to prevent CRF exacerbations. PMID:27168863

  19. Nutrient dyshomeostasis in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kamalov, German; Holewinski, Joshua P; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Ahokas, Robert A; Sun, Yao; Gerling, Ivan C; Weber, Karl T

    2009-07-01

    The clinical syndrome congestive heart failure (CHF) has its origins rooted in a salt-avid state mediated largely by effector hormones of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. In recent years, this cardiorenal perspective of CHF has taken on a broader perspective. One which focuses on a progressive systemic illness, whose major features include the presence of oxidative stress in diverse tissues and elevated circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines coupled with a wasting of soft tissues and bone. Experimental studies, which simulate chronic renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation, and translational studies in patients with salt avidity having decompensated biventricular failure with hepatic and splanchnic congestion have forged a broader understanding of this illness and the important contribution of a dyshomeostasis of Ca2+, Mg2+, Zn2+, Se2+, and vitamins D, B12, and B1. Herein, we review biomarkers indicative of the nutrient imbalance found in CHF and raise the question of a need for a polynutrient supplement in the overall management of CHF. PMID:19593100

  20. Paediatric heart failure research: role of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kristin M

    2015-08-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, of the National Institutes of Health, is committed to supporting research in paediatric heart failure. The Institute's support of paediatric heart failure research includes both investigator-initiated grants and Institute initiatives. There were 107 funded grants in paediatric heart failure over the past 20 years in basic, translational and clinical research, technology development, and support of registries. Such research includes a broad diversity of scientific topics and approaches. The Institute also supports several initiatives for paediatric heart failure, including the Pediatric Circulatory Support Program, the Pumps for Kids, Infants, and Neonates (PumpKIN) Program, PediMACS, and the Pediatric Heart Network. This review article describes the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's past, present, and future efforts to promote a better understanding of paediatric heart failure, with the ultimate goal of improving outcomes. PMID:26377724

  1. Paediatric heart failure research: role of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kristin M

    2015-08-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, of the National Institutes of Health, is committed to supporting research in paediatric heart failure. The Institute's support of paediatric heart failure research includes both investigator-initiated grants and Institute initiatives. There were 107 funded grants in paediatric heart failure over the past 20 years in basic, translational and clinical research, technology development, and support of registries. Such research includes a broad diversity of scientific topics and approaches. The Institute also supports several initiatives for paediatric heart failure, including the Pediatric Circulatory Support Program, the Pumps for Kids, Infants, and Neonates (PumpKIN) Program, PediMACS, and the Pediatric Heart Network. This review article describes the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's past, present, and future efforts to promote a better understanding of paediatric heart failure, with the ultimate goal of improving outcomes.

  2. Practical guide on home health in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Larsen, Torben; Strömberg, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Chronic heart failure is a common condition affecting up to 15 million people in the extended Europe. Heart failure is burdensome and costly for patients in terms of decreased quality of life and poor prognosis, and it is also costly for society. Better integrated care is warranted in this population and specialised heart failure care can save costs and improve the quality of care. However, only a few European countries have implemented specialised home care and offered this to a larger number of patients with heart failure. Method We developed a guide on Home Health in Heart Failure patients from a literature review, a survey of heart failure management programs, the opinion of researchers and practitioners, data from clinical trials and a reflection of an international expert meeting. Results In integrated home care for heart failure patients, it is advised to consider the following components: integrated multidisciplinary care, patient and partner participation, care plans with clear goals of care, patient education, self-care management, appropriate access to care and optimised treatment. Discussion We summarised the state of the art of home-based care for heart failure patients in Europe, described the typical content of such care to provide a guide for health care providers. PMID:24250283

  3. Current concepts and pharmacologic treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri

    2002-04-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common diagnoses and reason for hospitalization in the United States. Ace inhibitors, diuretics, beta-blockers and digitalis are the leading agents in pharmacologic management of heart failure. In order to improve patient outcomes, adult-health nurses need to understand the diagnosis, pathophysiology, nursing interventions, and pharmacologic treatment of this common disorder.

  4. Heart and brain interconnection - clinical implications of changes in brain function during heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Seok; Kim, Jae-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a highly prevalent disorder worldwide and, consequently, a burden on the healthcare systems of many nations. Although the effects of HF are systemic, many therapeutic targets are focused on cardiac dysfunction. The brain is closely related to the heart, but there are few reports on the relationship between these organs. We describe the effects of the brain on HF progression. Specific brain regions control sympathetic drive and neurohumoral factors, which play an important role in disease exacerbation. In addition, we review some of our previous studies on deranged cerebral metabolism and reduced cerebral blood flow during HF. Although the reasons underlying these effects during HF remain uncertain, we propose plausible mechanisms for these phenomena. In addition, the clinical implications of such conditions in terms of predicting prognosis are discussed. Finally, we investigate cognitive impairment in patients with HF. Cognitive impairment through cerebral infarction or hypoperfusion is associated with adverse outcomes, including death. This brief review of brain function during the development of HF should assist with future strategies to better manage patients with this condition.

  5. Diagnosis and management of heart failure in the fetus

    PubMed Central

    DAVEY, B.; SZWAST, A.; RYCHIK, J.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure can be defined as the inability of the heart to sufficiently support the circulation. In the fetus, heart failure can be caused by a myriad of factors that include fetal shunting abnormalities, genetic cardiomyopathies, extracardiac malformations, arrhythmias and structural congenital heart disease. With advances in ultrasound has come the ability to characterize many complex conditions, previously poorly understood. Fetal echocardiography provides the tools necessary to evaluate and understand the various physiologies that contribute to heart failure in the fetus. In this review, we will explore the different mechanisms of heart failure in this unique patient population and highlight the role of fetal echocardiography in the current management of these conditions PMID:22992530

  6. The Current and Potential Clinical Relevance of Heart Failure Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Parul U; Testani, Jeffrey M; Ahmad, Tariq

    2015-10-01

    Heart failure is a growing epidemic, and our understanding of the intricacies of its pathophysiology continues to evolve. Over the last decade, biomarkers of heart failure have been extensively investigated, particularly for diagnosis and risk stratification. While the natriuretic peptides remain the gold standard heart failure biomarker, they are plagued by their non-specific nature; furthermore, the strategy of natriuretic peptide-guided care remains elusive. Multiple candidate markers indicative of other physiologic aspects of heart failure have been identified and studied, including soluble ST2, galectin-3, and high-sensitivity cardiac troponins. Each of these biomarkers has the potential to provide unique therapeutically relevant information. Ultimately, a multi-marker approach may be applied to improve care of patients with heart failure. Definitive clinical trials and the use of advanced statistical analytic techniques are needed to truly determine the optimal strategy of biomarker-assisted diagnosis, prognostication, and management of patients who suffer from this devastating condition.

  7. Management of Noncardiac Comorbidities in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Chong, Vun Heng; Singh, Jagdeep; Parry, Helen; Saunders, Jocelyn; Chowdhury, Farhad; Mancini, Donna M; Lang, Chim C

    2015-10-01

    Prevalence of heart failure is increasing, especially in the elderly population. Noncardiac comorbidities complicate heart failure care and are increasingly common in elderly patients with reduced or preserved ejection fraction heart failure, owing to prolongation of patient's lives by advances in chronic heart failure (CHF) management. Common comorbidities include respiratory disease, renal dysfunction, anemia, arthritis, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cognitive dysfunction, and depression. These conditions contribute to the progression of the disease and may alter the response to treatment, partly as polypharmacy is inevitable in these patients. Cardiologists and other physicians caring for patients with CHF need to be vigilant to comorbid conditions that complicate the care of these patients. There is now more guidance on management of noncardiac comorbidities in heart failure, and this article contains a comprehensive review of the most recent updates on management of noncardiac comorbidities in CHF.

  8. Respiratory sleep disorders in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Matthew T

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory sleep disorders (RSD) occur in about 40-50% of patients with symptomatic congestive heart failure (CHF). Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered a cause of CHF, whereas central sleep apnea (CSA) is considered a response to heart failure, perhaps even compensatory. In the setting of heart failure, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has a definite role in treating OSA with improvements in cardiac parameters expected. However in CSA, CPAP is an adjunctive therapy to other standard therapies directed towards the heart failure (pharmacological, device and surgical options). Whether adaptive servo controlled ventilatory support, a variant of CPAP, is beneficial is yet to be proven. Supplemental oxygen therapy should be used with caution in heart failure, in particular, by avoiding hyperoxia as indicated by SpO2 values >95%.

  9. Respiratory sleep disorders in patients with congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory sleep disorders (RSD) occur in about 40-50% of patients with symptomatic congestive heart failure (CHF). Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered a cause of CHF, whereas central sleep apnea (CSA) is considered a response to heart failure, perhaps even compensatory. In the setting of heart failure, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has a definite role in treating OSA with improvements in cardiac parameters expected. However in CSA, CPAP is an adjunctive therapy to other standard therapies directed towards the heart failure (pharmacological, device and surgical options). Whether adaptive servo controlled ventilatory support, a variant of CPAP, is beneficial is yet to be proven. Supplemental oxygen therapy should be used with caution in heart failure, in particular, by avoiding hyperoxia as indicated by SpO2 values >95%. PMID:26380758

  10. Targeting success in heart failure: evidence-based management.

    PubMed

    Gruszczynski, Adam B; Schuster, Brenda; Regier, Loren; Jensen, Brent

    2010-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common condition in primary care with 1% of the population self-reporting this condition. Mortality is substantial, approaching 40% to 50% over 5 years. Heart failure is a complex syndrome in which abnormal heart function results in, or increases the subsequent risk of, clinical symptoms and signs of low cardiac output or pulmonary or systemic congestion.¹ This article will present some practical tips for managing HF.²

  11. Left ventricular heart failure and pulmonary hypertension†

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, Stephan; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Wachter, Rolf; De Marco, Teresa; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    In patients with left ventricular heart failure (HF), the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and right ventricular (RV) dysfunction are frequent and have important impact on disease progression, morbidity, and mortality, and therefore warrant clinical attention. Pulmonary hypertension related to left heart disease (LHD) by far represents the most common form of PH, accounting for 65–80% of cases. The proper distinction between pulmonary arterial hypertension and PH-LHD may be challenging, yet it has direct therapeutic consequences. Despite recent advances in the pathophysiological understanding and clinical assessment, and adjustments in the haemodynamic definitions and classification of PH-LHD, the haemodynamic interrelations in combined post- and pre-capillary PH are complex, definitions and prognostic significance of haemodynamic variables characterizing the degree of pre-capillary PH in LHD remain suboptimal, and there are currently no evidence-based recommendations for the management of PH-LHD. Here, we highlight the prevalence and significance of PH and RV dysfunction in patients with both HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), and provide insights into the complex pathophysiology of cardiopulmonary interaction in LHD, which may lead to the evolution from a ‘left ventricular phenotype’ to a ‘right ventricular phenotype’ across the natural history of HF. Furthermore, we propose to better define the individual phenotype of PH by integrating the clinical context, non-invasive assessment, and invasive haemodynamic variables in a structured diagnostic work-up. Finally, we challenge current definitions and diagnostic short falls, and discuss gaps in evidence, therapeutic options and the necessity for future developments in this context. PMID:26508169

  12. Nutrient Intake in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, Daurice A.; O’Brien, Marian C.; Clark, Patricia C.; Dunbar, Sandra B.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Research Objective Approximately 50% of heart failure (HF) patients are thought to be malnourished, and macronutrient and micronutrient deficiencies may potentially aggravate HF symptoms. Thus, concerns have been raised about the overall nutrient composition of diets in HF populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the macronutrient and micronutrient intake by caloric adequacy among community-dwelling adults with HF. Participants and Methods A secondary analysis of baseline data of participants in an HF lifestyle intervention study was conducted. Participants (n = 45) were predominantly male (55.6%), white, and non-Hispanic (64.4%); had a mean age of 61 years (SD, 11 years) and mean body mass index of 31.2 kg/m2 (SD, 7.3 kg/m2); were of New York Heart Association functional classes II and III (77.8%); and had a mean ejection fraction of 31.9% (SD,13.2%); and 69% had a college or higher level of education. The Block Food Habits Questionnaire was used to assess the intake of macronutrients and micronutrients. Analysis included descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results and Conclusions Individuals reporting inadequate daily caloric intake reported a lower intake of macronutrients and micronutrients as well as other differences in dietary patterns compared with individuals reporting adequate daily caloric intake. More than half of the individuals reporting adequate caloric intake did not meet the recommended dietary allowance for magnesium and vitamin E. Interventions aimed at increasing overall intake and nutrient density are suggested. Further research is needed to better understand the relationship between dietary factors and outcomes in HF. PMID:18596500

  13. Abdominal contributions to cardiorenal dysfunction in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, Frederik H; Dupont, Matthias; Steels, Paul; Grieten, Lars; Malbrain, Manu; Tang, W H Wilson; Mullens, Wilfried

    2013-08-01

    Current pathophysiological models of congestive heart failure unsatisfactorily explain the detrimental link between congestion and cardiorenal function. Abdominal congestion (i.e., splanchnic venous and interstitial congestion) manifests in a substantial number of patients with advanced congestive heart failure, yet is poorly defined. Compromised capacitance function of the splanchnic vasculature and deficient abdominal lymph flow resulting in interstitial edema might both be implied in the occurrence of increased cardiac filling pressures and renal dysfunction. Indeed, increased intra-abdominal pressure, as an extreme marker of abdominal congestion, is correlated with renal dysfunction in advanced congestive heart failure. Intriguing findings provide preliminary evidence that alterations in the liver and spleen contribute to systemic congestion in heart failure. Finally, gut-derived hormones might influence sodium homeostasis, whereas entrance of bowel toxins into the circulatory system, as a result of impaired intestinal barrier function secondary to congestion, might further depress cardiac as well as renal function. Those toxins are mainly produced by micro-organisms in the gut lumen, with presumably important alterations in advanced heart failure, especially when renal function is depressed. Therefore, in this state-of-the-art review, we explore the crosstalk between the abdomen, heart, and kidneys in congestive heart failure. This might offer new diagnostic opportunities as well as treatment strategies to achieve decongestion in heart failure, especially when abdominal congestion is present. Among those currently under investigation are paracentesis, ultrafiltration, peritoneal dialysis, oral sodium binders, vasodilator therapy, renal sympathetic denervation and agents targeting the gut microbiota. PMID:23747781

  14. Heart failure care for patients who do not speak English.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Emma Jane

    Heart failure affects 1-2% of the UK population with prevalence rates predicted to rise over the next decade. Ineffective education for patients with heart failure can lead to a failure to adhere to guidance, reduced self-care and increased hospital readmissions. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have issued clear guidelines on patient-centred care in heart failure, particularly in relation to patients' cultural and linguistic needs. Patients with heart failure should have access to an interpreter or advocate if needed. Furthermore, heart failure educational materials should be tailored to suit the individual and be accessible to people who do not speak or read English. This article explores the practice recommendations for these patients with heart failure and provides an overview of current guidelines associated with optimal patient outcomes. It also includes practical advice on translation services, and information and educational materials available for patients with heart failure who do not speak English.

  15. The war against heart failure: the Lancet lecture.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2015-02-28

    Heart failure is a global problem with an estimated prevalence of 38 million patients worldwide, a number that is increasing with the ageing of the population. It is the most common diagnosis in patients aged 65 years or older admitted to hospital and in high-income nations. Despite some progress, the prognosis of heart failure is worse than that of most cancers. Because of the seriousness of the condition, a declaration of war on five fronts has been proposed for heart failure. Efforts are underway to treat heart failure by enhancing myofilament sensitivity to Ca(2+); transfer of the gene for SERCA2a, the protein that pumps calcium into the sarcoplasmic reticulum of the cardiomyocyte, seems promising in a phase 2 trial. Several other abnormal calcium-handling proteins in the failing heart are candidates for gene therapy; many short, non-coding RNAs--ie, microRNAs (miRNAs)--block gene expression and protein translation. These molecules are crucial to calcium cycling and ventricular hypertrophy. The actions of miRNAs can be blocked by a new class of drugs, antagomirs, some of which have been shown to improve cardiac function in animal models of heart failure; cell therapy, with autologous bone marrow derived mononuclear cells, or autogenous mesenchymal cells, which can be administered as cryopreserved off the shelf products, seem to be promising in both preclinical and early clinical heart failure trials; and long-term ventricular assistance devices are now used increasingly as a destination therapy in patients with advanced heart failure. In selected patients, left ventricular assistance can lead to myocardial recovery and explantation of the device. The approaches to the treatment of heart failure described, when used alone or in combination, could become important weapons in the war against heart failure.

  16. Heart failure patients utilizing an electric home monitor: What effects does heart failure have on their quality of life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simuel, Gloria J.

    Heart Failure continues to be a major public health problem associated with high mortality and morbidity. Heart Failure is the leading cause of hospitalization for persons older than 65 years, has a poor prognosis and is associated with poor quality of life. More than 5.3 million American adults are living with heart failure. Despite maximum medical therapy and frequent hospitalizations to stabilize their condition, one in five heart failure patients die within the first year of diagnosis. Several disease-management programs have been proposed and tested to improve the quality of heart failure care. Studies have shown that hospital admissions and emergency room visits decrease with increased nursing interventions in the home and community setting. An alternative strategy for promoting self-management of heart failure is the use of electronic home monitoring. The purpose of this study was to examine what effects heart failure has on patient's quality of life that had been monitoring on an electronic home monitor longer than 2 months. Twenty-one questionnaires were given to patients utilizing an electronic home monitor by their home health agency nurse. Eleven patients completed the questionnaire. The findings showed that there is some deterioration in quality of life with more association with the physical aspects of life than with the emotional aspects of life, which probably was due to the small sample size. There was no significant difference in readmission rates in patients utilizing an electronic home monitor. Further research is needed with a larger population of patients with chronic heart failure and other chronic diseases which may provide more data, and address issues such as patient compliance with self-care, impact of heart failure on patient's quality of life, functional capacity, and heart failure patient's utilization of the emergency rooms and hospital. Telemonitoring holds promise for improving the self-care abilities of persons with HF.

  17. Exercise training in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Paul; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Conraads, Viviane M.

    2013-01-01

    The syndrome of heart failure (HF) is a growing epidemic that causes a significant socio-economic burden. Despite considerable progress in the management of patients with HF, mortality and morbidity remain a major healthcare concern and frequent hospital admissions jeopardize daily life and social activities. Exercise training is an important adjunct nonpharmacological treatment modality for patients with HF that has proven positive effects on mortality, morbidity, exercise capacity and quality of life. Different training modalities are available to target the problems with which HF patients are faced. It is essential to tailor the prescribed exercise regimen, so that both efficiency and safety are guaranteed. Electrical implanted devices and mechanical support should not exclude patients from exercise training; however, particular precautions and a specialized approach are advised. At least 50% of patients with HF, older than 65 years of age, present with HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). Although the study populations included in studies evaluating the effect of exercise training in this population are small, the results are promising and seem to support the idea that exercise training is beneficial for HFPEF patients. Both the short- and especially long-term adherence to exercise training remain a major challenge that can only be tackled by a multidisciplinary approach. Efforts should be directed towards closing the gap between recommendations and the actual implementation of training programmes. PMID:23634278

  18. Regional Hippocampal Damage in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Mary A.; Ogren, Jennifer A.; Abouzeid, Christiane M.; Macey, Paul M.; Sairafian, Kevin G.; Saharan, Priya S.; Thompson, Paul M.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Hamilton, Michele A.; Harper, Ronald M.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Aims Heart failure (HF) patients show cognitive and mood impairments, including short-term memory loss and depression, adversely impacting quality of life and self-care management. Brain regions, including the hippocampus, a structure significantly involved in memory and mood, show injury in HF, but the integrity of specific hippocampal subregions is unclear. Methods and results To assess regional hippocampal volume loss, we evaluated 17 HF patients (mean age ± SD, 54.4 ± 2.0 years; 12 male, LVEF 28.3 ± 6.8%; NYHA Class II/III 94%/6%) and 34 healthy control subjects (52.3 ± 1.3 years; 24 male) using high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and evaluated localized surface changes with morphometric procedures. Hippocampi were manually outlined, and volumes calculated from normalized tracings. Volume differences between groups were assessed by two-sample t-tests, and regional differences were assessed by surface morphometry. HF patients exhibited smaller hippocampal volumes than controls (Right: 3060±146 vs. 3478±94 mm3; p = 0.02, Left: 3021±145 vs. 3352±98 mm3; p = 0.06). Volume reductions were detected principally in CA1, an area integral to an array of learning and memory functions, as well as in mid- to posterior CA3 and subiculum. Conclusion The hippocampus shows regional volume reduction in HF, which may contribute to short-term memory loss and depression associated with the condition. PMID:25704495

  19. MicroRNA and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lee Lee; Wang, Juan; Liew, Oi Wah; Richards, Arthur Mark; Chen, Yei-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) imposes significant economic and public health burdens upon modern society. It is known that disturbances in neurohormonal status play an important role in the pathogenesis of HF. Therapeutics that antagonize selected neurohormonal pathways, specifically the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, have significantly improved patient outcomes in HF. Nevertheless, mortality remains high with about 50% of HF patients dying within five years of diagnosis thus mandating ongoing efforts to improve HF management. The discovery of short noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) and our increasing understanding of their functions, has presented potential therapeutic applications in complex diseases, including HF. Results from several genome-wide miRNA studies have identified miRNAs differentially expressed in HF cohorts suggesting their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of HF and their potential as both biomarkers and as therapeutic targets. Unravelling the functional relevance of miRNAs within pathogenic pathways is a major challenge in cardiovascular research. In this article, we provide an overview of the role of miRNAs in the cardiovascular system. We highlight several HF-related miRNAs reported from selected cohorts and review their putative roles in neurohormonal signaling. PMID:27058529

  20. Blood flow dynamics in heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Naylor, H. L.; Hogeman, C. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise intolerance in heart failure (HF) may be due to inadequate vasodilation, augmented vasoconstriction, and/or altered muscle metabolic responses that lead to fatigue. METHODS AND RESULTS: Vascular and metabolic responses to rhythmic forearm exercise were tested in 9 HF patients and 9 control subjects (CTL) during 2 protocols designed to examine the effect of HF on the time course of oxygen delivery versus uptake (protocol 1) and on vasoconstriction during exercise with 50 mm Hg pressure about the forearm to evoke a metaboreflex (protocol 2). In protocol 1, venous lactate and H+ were greater at 4 minutes of exercise in HF versus CTL (P<0.05) despite similar blood flow and oxygen uptake responses. In protocol 2, mean arterial pressure increased similarly in each group during ischemic exercise. In CTL, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were similar at the end of ischemic and ambient exercise. In HF, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were reduced during ischemic exercise compared with the ambient trial. CONCLUSIONS: Intrinsic differences in skeletal muscle metabolism, not vasodilatory dynamics, must account for the augmented glycolytic metabolic responses to moderate-intensity exercise in class II and III HF. The inability to increase forearm vascular conductance during ischemic handgrip exercise, despite a normal pressor response, suggests that enhanced vasoconstriction of strenuously exercising skeletal muscle contributes to exertional fatigue in HF.

  1. MODELS OF INSULIN RESISTANCE AND HEART FAILURE

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Mauricio; Kohli, Smita; Sabbah, Hani N.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus is rapidly increasing and is associated with poor prognosis. In spite of the advances in therapy, HF remains a major health problem with high morbidity and mortality. When HF and diabetes coexist, clinical outcomes are significantly worse. The relationship between these two conditions has been studied in various experimental models. However, the mechanisms for this interrelationship are complex, incompletely understood, and have become a matter of considerable clinical and research interest. There are only few animal models that manifest both HF and diabetes. However, the translation of results from these models to human disease is limited and new models are needed to expand our current understanding of this clinical interaction. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of insulin signaling and insulin resistance, the clinical association between insulin resistance and HF and its proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms. Finally, we discuss available animal models of insulin resistance and HF and propose requirements for future new models. PMID:23456447

  2. Biased β2-adrenoceptor signalling in heart failure: pathophysiology and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Anthony Yiu-Ho; Song, Ying; Xiao, Rui-Ping; Zhu, Weizhong

    2015-12-01

    The body is constantly faced with a dynamic requirement for blood flow. The heart is able to respond to these changing needs by adjusting cardiac output based on cues emitted by circulating catecholamine levels. Cardiac β-adrenoceptors transduce the signal produced by catecholamine stimulation via Gs proteins to their downstream effectors to increase heart contractility. During heart failure, cardiac output is insufficient to meet the needs of the body; catecholamine levels are high and β-adrenoceptors become hyperstimulated. The hyperstimulated β1-adrenoceptors induce a cardiotoxic effect, which could be counteracted by the cardioprotective effect of β2-adrenoceptor-mediated Gi signalling. However, β2-adrenoceptor-Gi signalling negates the stimulatory effect of the Gs signalling on cardiomyocyte contraction and further exacerbates cardiodepression. Here, further to the localization of β1- and β2-adrenoceptors and β2-adrenoceptor-mediated β-arrestin signalling in cardiomyocytes, we discuss features of the dysregulation of β-adrenoceptor subtype signalling in the failing heart, and conclude that Gi-biased β2-adrenoceptor signalling is a pathogenic pathway in heart failure that plays a crucial role in cardiac remodelling. In contrast, β2-adrenoceptor-Gs signalling increases cardiomyocyte contractility without causing cardiotoxicity. Finally, we discuss a novel therapeutic approach for heart failure using a Gs-biased β2-adrenoceptor agonist and a β1-adrenoceptor antagonist in combination. This combination treatment normalizes the β-adrenoceptor subtype signalling in the failing heart and produces therapeutic effects that outperform traditional heart failure therapies in animal models. The present review illustrates how the concept of biased signalling can be applied to increase our understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases and in the development of novel therapies.

  3. Atrial natriuretic factor binding sites in experimental congestive heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, C.; Thibault, G.; Wrobel-Konrad, E.; De Lean, A.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M. )

    1989-10-01

    A quantitative in vitro autoradiographic study was performed on the aorta, renal glomeruli, and adrenal cortex of cardiomyopathic hamsters in various stages of heart failure and correlated, in some instances, with in vivo autoradiography. The results indicate virtually no correlation between the degree of congestive heart failure and the density of 125I-labeled atrial natriuretic factor ((Ser99, Tyr126)ANF) binding sites (Bmax) in the tissues examined. Whereas the Bmax was increased in the thoracic aorta in moderate and severe heart failure, there were no significant changes in the zona glomerulosa. The renal glomeruli Bmax was lower in mild and moderate heart failure compared with control and severe heart failure. The proportion of ANF B- and C-receptors was also evaluated in sections of the aorta, adrenal, and kidney of control and cardiomyopathic hamsters with severe heart failure. (Arg102, Cys121)ANF (des-(Gln113, Ser114, Gly115, Leu116, Gly117) NH2) (C-ANF) at 10(-6) M displaced approximately 505 of (Ser99, Tyr126)125I-ANF bound in the aorta and renal glomeruli and approximately 20% in the adrenal zona glomerulosa in both series of animals. These results suggest that ANF may exert a buffering effect on the vasoconstriction of heart failure and to a certain extent may inhibit aldosterone secretion. The impairment of renal sodium excretion does not appear to be related to glomerular ANF binding sites at any stage of the disease.

  4. Pregnancy in women with heart disease: risk assessment and management of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Jasmine; Silversides, Candice K; Colman, Jack M

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease, present in 0.5% to 3% of pregnant women, is an important cause of morbidity and the leading cause of death among pregnant women in the developed world. Certain heart conditions are associated with an increased risk of heart failure during pregnancy or the postpartum period; for these conditions, management during pregnancy benefits from multidisciplinary care at a center with expertise in pregnancy and heart disease. This article focuses on cardiac risks and management strategies for women with acquired and congenital heart disease who are at increased risk of heart failure during pregnancy.

  5. Frequency of low-risk hospital admissions for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Butler, J; Hanumanthu, S; Chomsky, D; Wilson, J R

    1998-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common reasons for admission to acute care hospitals. A proportion of these admissions are probably low risk and could be managed in subacute care facilities, resulting in substantial cost savings. To investigate the proportion of low-risk hospital admissions for heart failure, all admissions for heart failure to Vanderbilt University Medical Center between July 1993 and June 1995 were identified (n = 743). One hundred twenty of these admissions were randomly selected, reviewed, and classified into a high-risk versus low-risk group on admission based on the severity of heart failure and the presence of life-threatening complications. Of the 120 admissions, 57 (48%) were classified as high risk based on the presence of moderate to severe heart failure for the first time or recurrent heart failure with a major complicating factor. Sixteen admissions (28%) were associated with adverse outcomes, including myocardial infarction in 5 (9%), intubation in 6 (11%), and death in 4 (7%). Sixty-three admissions (52%) were classified as low risk based on the presence of new-onset mild heart failure or mild to moderate recurrent heart failure with no complicating factors. Most of these admissions were for dyspnea without any life-threatening complication; 57 (91%) had no evidence of interstitial or alveolar pulmonary edema, and arterial oxygen saturation averaged 95 +/- 3%. Only 3 of these low risk admissions (5%) were associated with an adverse cardiovascular event. None of the patients died. These data suggest that over half of the patients admitted for heart failure to an acute care facility are low risk and probably could be managed in a subacute care setting, resulting in large cost savings. PMID:9462604

  6. Heart failure among Indigenous Australians: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases contribute substantially to the poor health and reduced life expectancy of Indigenous Australians. Heart failure is a common, disabling, progressive and costly complication of these disorders. The epidemiology of heart failure and the adequacy of relevant health service provision in Indigenous Australians are not well delineated. Methods A systematic search of the electronic databases PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cinahl Plus, Informit and Google Scholar was undertaken in April 2012 for peer-reviewed journal articles relevant to the topic of heart failure in Indigenous Australians. Additionally, a website search was done to identify other pertinent publications, particularly government reports. Results There was a paucity of relevant peer-reviewed research, and government reports dominated the results. Ten journal articles, 1 published conference abstract and 10 reports were eligible for inclusion. Indigenous Australians reportedly have higher morbidity and mortality from heart failure than their non-Indigenous counterparts (age-standardised prevalence ratio 1.7; age-standardised hospital separation ratio ≥3; crude per capita hospital expenditure ratio 1.58; age-adjusted mortality ratio >2). Despite the evident disproportionate burden of heart failure in Indigenous Australians, the accuracy of estimation from administrative data is limited by poor indigenous identification, inadequate case ascertainment and exclusion of younger subjects from mortality statistics. A recent journal article specifically documented a high prevalence of heart failure in Central Australian Aboriginal adults (5.3%), noting frequent undiagnosed disease. One study examined barriers to health service provision for Indigenous Australians in the context of heart failure. Conclusions Despite the shortcomings of available published data, it is clear that Indigenous Australians have an excess burden of heart failure. Emerging data suggest that undiagnosed

  7. Summary of the 2015 International Paediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Quintessenza, James A; Karl, Tom R; Asante-Korang, Alfred; Everett, Allen D; Collins, Susan B; Ramirez-Correa, Genaro A; Burns, Kristin M; Cohen, Mitchell; Colan, Steven D; Costello, John M; Daly, Kevin P; Franklin, Rodney C G; Fraser, Charles D; Hill, Kevin D; Huhta, James C; Kaushal, Sunjay; Law, Yuk M; Lipshultz, Steven E; Murphy, Anne M; Pasquali, Sara K; Payne, Mark R; Rossano, Joseph; Shirali, Girish; Ware, Stephanie M; Xu, Mingguo; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2015-08-01

    In the United States alone, ∼14,000 children are hospitalised annually with acute heart failure. The science and art of caring for these patients continues to evolve. The International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute was held on February 4 and 5, 2015. The 2015 International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute was funded through the Andrews/Daicoff Cardiovascular Program Endowment, a philanthropic collaboration between All Children's Hospital and the Morsani College of Medicine at the University of South Florida (USF). Sponsored by All Children's Hospital Andrews/Daicoff Cardiovascular Program, the International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit assembled leaders in clinical and scientific disciplines related to paediatric heart failure and created a multi-disciplinary "think-tank". The purpose of this manuscript is to summarise the lessons from the 2015 International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute, to describe the "state of the art" of the treatment of paediatric cardiac failure, and to discuss future directions for research in the domain of paediatric cardiac failure.

  8. How Can I Live with Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... me? Should I stay in bed? ©2015, American Heart Association Multi-language Fact Sheet Topics Heart-related Conditions What is Angina? What is an ... a Coronary Angiogram? How Can I Recover From Heart Surgery? What is Carotid ... Do I Understand "Nutrition Facts" Labels? How Can I Quit Smoking? How Can ...

  9. Heart failure in 3 patients with acromegaly: echocardiographic assessment.

    PubMed

    Aono, J; Nobuoka, S; Nagashima, J; Hatano, S; Yoshida, A; Ando, H; Miyake, F; Murayama, M

    1998-07-01

    We evaluated 3 patients with acromegaly who developed heart failure. Heart failure appeared to be due to acromegalic cardiomyopathy in 2 patients who did not have hypertension or evidence of coronary artery disease, and it was possibly due to acromegalic cardiomyopathy combined with familiar hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 1 patient. The common echocardiographic findings in the present three cases were: 1) enlargement of the left atrium, 2) markedly dilated left ventricular cavity with diffuse hypokinesis, 3) decrease of indices of the left ventricular systolic function, and 4) no evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy. Echocardiographic findings in acromegaly with congestive heart failure resemble those of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

  10. Skeletal myopathy in heart failure: effects of aerobic exercise training.

    PubMed

    Brum, P C; Bacurau, A V; Cunha, T F; Bechara, L R G; Moreira, J B N

    2014-04-01

    Reduced aerobic capacity, as measured by maximal oxygen uptake, is a hallmark in cardiovascular diseases and strongly predicts poor prognosis and higher mortality rates in heart failure patients. While exercise capacity is poorly correlated with cardiac function in this population, skeletal muscle abnormalities present a striking association with maximal oxygen uptake. This fact draws substantial attention to the clinical relevance of targeting skeletal myopathy in heart failure. Considering that skeletal muscle is highly responsive to aerobic exercise training, we addressed the benefits of aerobic exercise training to combat skeletal myopathy in heart failure, focusing on the mechanisms by which aerobic exercise training counteracts skeletal muscle atrophy.

  11. When should we use nitrates in congestive heart failure?

    PubMed

    Vizzardi, Enrico; Bonadei, Ivano; Rovetta, Riccardo; D'Aloia, Antonio; Quinzani, Filippo; Curnis, Antonio; Dei Cas, Livio

    2013-02-01

    Organic nitrates remain among the oldest and most commonly employed drugs in cardiology. Although, in most cases, their use in acute and chronic heart failure is based on clinical practice, only a few clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate their use in acute and chronic heart failure, most of which compare them with other drugs to evaluate differing endpoints. The purpose of this review is to examine the various trials that have evaluated the use of nitrates in acute and chronic heart failure.

  12. Induction of autophagy markers is associated with attenuation of miR-133a in diabetic heart failure patients undergoing mechanical unloading

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Shyam Sundar; Duryee, Michael J; Shahshahan, Hamid R; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Anderson, Daniel R; Mishra, Paras K

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is ubiquitous in all forms of heart failure and cardioprotective miR-133a is attenuated in human heart failure. Previous reports from heart failure patients undergoing left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation demonstrated that autophagy is upregulated in the LV of the failing human heart. Studies in the murine model show that diabetes downregulates miR-133a. However, the role of miR-133a in the regulation of autophagy in diabetic hearts is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that diabetes exacerbates cardiac autophagy by inhibiting miR-133a in heart failure patients undergoing LVAD implantation. The miRNA assay was performed on the LV of 15 diabetic (D) and 6 non-diabetic (ND) heart failure patients undergoing LVAD implantation. Four ND with highly upregulated and 5 D with highly downregulated miR-133a were analyzed for autophagy markers (Beclin1, LC3B, ATG3) and their upstream regulators (mTOR and AMPK), and hypertrophy marker (beta-myosin heavy chain) by RT-qPCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Our results demonstrate that attenuation of miR-133a in diabetic hearts is associated with the induction of autophagy and hypertrophy, and suppression of mTOR without appreciable difference in AMPK activity. In conclusion, attenuation of miR-133a contributes to the exacerbation of diabetes mediated cardiac autophagy and hypertrophy in heart failure patients undergoing LVAD implantation. PMID:26064437

  13. ZINC AND THE PROOXIDANT HEART FAILURE PHENOTYPE

    PubMed Central

    Efeovbokhan, Nephertiti; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Ahokas, Robert A.; Sun, Yao; Guntaka, Ramareddy V.; Gerling, Ivan C.; Weber, Karl T.

    2014-01-01

    Neurohormonal activation with attendant aldosteronism contributes to the clinical appearance of congestive heart failure (CHF). Aldosteronism is intrinsically coupled to Zn2+ and Ca2+ dyshomeostasis, in which consequent hypozincemia compromises Zn2+ homeostasis and Zn2+-based antioxidant defenses that contribute to the CHF prooxidant phenotype. Ionized hypocalcemia leads to secondary hyperparathyroidism with parathyroid hormone-mediated Ca2+ overloading of diverse cells, including cardiomyocytes. When mitochondrial Ca2+ overload exceeds a threshold, myocyte necrosis follows. The reciprocal regulation involving cytosolic free [Zn2+]i as antioxidant and [Ca2+]i as prooxidant that can be uncoupled in favor of Zn2+-based antioxidant defenses. Increased [Zn2+]i acts as a multifaceted antioxidant by: i) inhibiting Ca2+ entry via L-type channels and hence cardioprotectant from the Ca2+-driven mitochondriocentric signal-transducer-effector pathway to nonischemic necrosis; ii) serving as catalytic regulator of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase; and iii) activating its cytosolic sensor, metal-responsive transcription factor that regulates the expression of relevant antioxidant defense genes. Albeit present in subnanomolar range, increased cytosolic free [Zn2+]i enhances antioxidant capacity that confers cardioprotection. It can be achieved exogenously by ZnSO4 supplementation or endogenously, using a β3 receptor agonist, (e.g., nebivolol) that enhances NO generation to release inactive cytosolic Zn2+ bound to metallothionein. By recognizing the pathophysiologic relevance of Zn2+ dyshomeostasis in the prooxidant CHF phenotype and by exploiting the pharmacophysiologic potential of [Zn2+]i as antioxidant, vulnerable cardiomyocytes under assault from neurohormonal activation can be protected and the myocardium spared from adverse structural remodeling. PMID:25291496

  14. Heart Failure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Ois, Angel; Roquer, Jaume

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the ventricle to fill with or eject blood. Due to the aging of the population it has become a growing public health problem in recent decades. Diagnosis of HF is clinical and there is no diagnostic test, although some basic complementary testing should be performed in all patients. Depending on the ejection fraction (EF), the syndrome is classified as HF with low EF or HF with normal EF (HFNEF). Although prognosis in HF is poor, HFNEF seems to be more benign. HF and ischemic stroke (IS) share vascular risk factors such as age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. Persons with HF have higher incidence of IS, varying from 1.7% to 10.4% per year across various cohort studies. The stroke rate increases with length of follow-up. Reduced EF, independent of severity, is associated with higher risk of stroke. Left ventricular mass and geometry are also related with stroke incidence, with concentric hypertrophy carrying the greatest risk. In HF with low EF, the stroke mechanism may be embolism, cerebral hypoperfusion or both, whereas in HFNEF the mechanism is more typically associated with chronic endothelial damage of the small vessels. Stroke in patients with HF is more severe and is associated with a higher rate of recurrence, dependency, and short term and long term mortality. Cardiac morbidity and mortality is also high in these patients. Acute stroke treatment in HF includes all the current therapeutic options to more carefully control blood pressure. For secondary prevention, optimal control of all vascular risk factors is essential. Antithrombotic therapy is mandatory, although the choice of a platelet inhibitor or anticoagulant drug depends on the cardiac disease. Trials are ongoing to evaluate anticoagulant therapy for prevention of embolism in patients with low EF who are at

  15. CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: WHERE HOMEOSTASIS BEGETS DYSHOMEOSTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Kamalov, German; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2010-01-01

    Despite today’s standard of care, aimed at containing homeostatic neurohormonal activation, 1 in every 5 patients recently hospitalized with congestive heart failure (CHF) will be readmitted within 30 days of discharge because of a recurrence of their symptoms and signs. In light of recent pathophysiologic insights, it is now propitious to revisit CHF with a view toward complementary and evolving management strategies. CHF is a progressive systemic illness. Its features include: oxidative stress in diverse tissues; an immunostimulatory state with circulating proinflammatory cytokines; a wasting of soft tissues; and a resorption of bone. Its origins are rooted in homeostatic mechanisms gone awry to beget dyshomeostasis. For example, marked excretory losses of Ca2+ and Mg2+ accompany renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) activation, causing ionized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia that lead to secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) with consequent bone resorption and a propensity to atraumatic fractures. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) accounts for paradoxical intracellular Ca2+ overloading in diverse tissues and consequent systemic induction of oxidative stress. In cardiac myocytes and mitochondria these events orchestrate opening of the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (mPTP) with an ensuing osmotic-based destruction of these organelles and resultant cardiomyocyte necrosis with myocardial scarring. Contemporaneous with Ca2+ and Mg2+ dyshomeostasis is hypozincemia and hyposelenemia, which compromise metalloenzyme-based antioxidant defenses while hypovitaminosis D threatens Ca2+ stores needed to prevent SHPT. An intrinsically coupled dyshomeostasis of intracellular Ca2+ and Zn2+, representing prooxidant and antioxidant, respectively, is integral to regulating mitochondrial redox state; it can be uncoupled by a Zn2+ supplement in favor of antioxidant defenses. Hence, the complementary use of nutriceuticals to nullify dyshomeostatic responses

  16. Conceptual model for heart failure disease management.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; Abbate, Kariann; Whellan, David J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to propose a conceptual model for heart failure (HF) disease management (HFDM) and to define the components of an efficient HFDM plan in reference to this model. Articles that evaluated 1 or more of the following aspects of HFDM were reviewed: (1) outpatient clinic follow-up; (2) self-care interventions to enhance patient skills; and (3) remote evaluation of worsening HF either using structured telephone support (STS) or by monitoring device data (telemonitoring). The success of programs in reducing readmissions and mortality were mixed. Outpatient follow-up programs generally resulted in improved outcomes, including decreased readmissions. Based on 1 meta-analysis, specialty clinics improved outcomes and nonspecialty clinics did not. Results from self-care programs were inconsistent and might have been affected by patient cognitive status and educational level, and intervention intensity. Telemonitoring, despite initially promising meta-analyses demonstrating a decrease in the number and duration of HF-related readmissions and all-cause mortality rates at follow-up, has not been shown in randomized trials to consistently reduce readmissions or mortality. However, evidence from device monitoring trials in particular might have been influenced by technology and design issues that might be rectified in future trials. Results from the literature suggest that the ideal HFDM plan would include outpatient follow-up at an HF specialty clinic and continuous education to improve patient self-care. The end result of this plan would lead to better understanding on the part of the patient and improved patient ability to recognize and respond to signs of decompensation.

  17. Cardiac Metabolism in Heart Failure - Implications beyond ATP production

    PubMed Central

    Doenst, Torsten; Nguyen, T. Dung; Abel, E. Dale

    2013-01-01

    The heart has a high rate of ATP production and turnover which is required to maintain its continuous mechanical work. Perturbations in ATP generating processes may therefore affect contractile function directly. Characterizing cardiac metabolism in heart failure revealed several metabolic alterations termed metabolic remodeling, ranging from changes in substrate utilization to mitochondrial dysfunction, ultimately resulting in ATP deficiency and impaired contractility. However, ATP depletion is not the only relevant consequence of metabolic remodeling during heart failure. By providing cellular building blocks and signaling molecules, metabolic pathways control essential processes such as cell growth and regeneration. Thus, alterations in cardiac metabolism may also affect the progression to heart failure by mechanisms beyond ATP supply. Our aim is therefore to highlight that metabolic remodeling in heart failure not only results in impaired cardiac energetics, but also induces other processes implicated in the development of heart failure such as structural remodeling and oxidative stress. Accordingly, modulating cardiac metabolism in heart failure may have significant therapeutic relevance that goes beyond the energetic aspect. PMID:23989714

  18. Adrenal GRK2 upregulation mediates sympathetic overdrive in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Rengo, Giuseppe; Funakoshi, Hajime; Eckhart, Andrea D; Koch, Walter J

    2007-03-01

    Cardiac overstimulation by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is a salient characteristic of heart failure, reflected by elevated circulating levels of catecholamines. The success of beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) antagonists in heart failure argues for SNS hyperactivity being pathogenic; however, sympatholytic agents targeting alpha2AR-mediated catecholamine inhibition have been unsuccessful. By investigating adrenal adrenergic receptor signaling in heart failure models, we found molecular mechanisms to explain the failure of sympatholytic agents and discovered a new strategy to lower SNS activity. During heart failure, there is substantial alpha2AR dysregulation in the adrenal gland, triggered by increased expression and activity of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). Adrenal gland-specific GRK2 inhibition reversed alpha2AR dysregulation in heart failure, resulting in lowered plasma catecholamine levels, improved cardiac betaAR signaling and function, and increased sympatholytic efficacy of a alpha2AR agonist. This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of a molecular mechanism for SNS hyperactivity in heart failure, and our study identifies adrenal GRK2 activity as a new sympatholytic target.

  19. Achieving medical stability: Wives' experiences with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hupcey, Judith E; Fenstermacher, Kimberly; Kitko, Lisa; Penrod, Janice

    2010-08-01

    The incidence of heart failure continues to rise as innovative treatments are developed. Despite life-prolonging interventions, morbidity and mortality in patients younger than 65 remain high. Few studies have focused on this younger cohort and/or their family caregivers as they navigate the complex illness trajectories manifested in heart failure. Instrumental case studies were employed to present exemplars for each of the five identified heart failure trajectories. Culling data from a longitudinal study of female spousal caregivers, each case study represents a wife's discussion of caring for a husband (<65 years) in response to the husband's changing heart failure trajectory. The goal of medical stability and the notion of uncertainty permeate throughout the case studies. Suggestions for supporting these wives are presented.

  20. Genomic variation and neurohormonal intervention in heart failure.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Dennis M

    2010-01-01

    Neurohormonal activation is an important driver of heart-failure progression, and all pharmacologic interventions that improve heart-failure survival inhibit this systemic response to myocardial injury. Adrenergic stimulation of beta(1) receptors in the kidney results in the release of plasma renin, the conversion of peptide precursors to angiotensin II (a2), and ultimately the production of aldosterone. beta(1)-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and aldosterone receptor antagonists all act by inhibiting the activity of critical protein of this core pathway: the beta(1) receptor, ACE, the a2 receptor, and aldosterone synthase. Investigation of the pharmacogenetic interactions of the ACE D/I polymorphism and heart-failure therapy demonstrates the power of genomics to target therapeutics. This review explores how genetic variation in genes involved in neurohormonal activation influences heart-failure outcomes and the impact of pharmacotherapy.

  1. Risk stratification in heart failure using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed Central

    Atienza, F.; Martinez-Alzamora, N.; De Velasco, J. A.; Dreiseitl, S.; Ohno-Machado, L.

    2000-01-01

    Accurate risk stratification of heart failure patients is critical to improve management and outcomes. Heart failure is a complex multisystem disease in which several predictors are categorical. Neural network models have successfully been applied to several medical classification problems. Using a simple neural network, we assessed one-year prognosis in 132 patients, consecutively admitted with heart failure, by classifying them in 3 groups: death, readmission and one-year event-free survival. Given the small number of cases, the neural network model was trained using a resampling method. We identified relevant predictors using the Automatic Relevance Determination (ARD) method, and estimated their mean effect on the 3 different outcomes. Only 9 individuals were misclassified. Neural networks have the potential to be a useful tool for making prognosis in the domain of heart failure. PMID:11079839

  2. D-ribose, a metabolic substrate for congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Susan; Herrick, James; Shecterle, Linda M; St Cyr, John A

    2009-06-01

    The incidence of congestive heart failure continues to escalate worldwide, taxing health care systems. Current therapies focus on clinical management. Current accepted regimens have provided some success; however, most patients show progression of their disease. Because of this failure, research continues to explore therapies directed at stabilization of their disease and hopefully to improve the downward spiral. Publications have asserted that the failing heart is energy starved. D-ribose, a naturally occurring pentose carbohydrate and a key component in the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecule, has demonstrated an ability to replenish ATP levels and improve diastolic dysfunction following myocardial ischemia, which has been shown to improve the clinical state of patients afflicted with congestive heart failure. D-ribose may provide the necessary metabolic substrate to benefit this energy-deficient state found in heart failure. PMID:19523159

  3. Pharmacologic Approaches to Electrolyte Abnormalities in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Grodin, Justin L

    2016-08-01

    Electrolyte abnormalities are common in heart failure and can arise from a variety of etiologies. Neurohormonal activation from ventricular dysfunction, renal dysfunction, and heart failure medications can perturb electrolyte homeostasis which impact both heart failure-related morbidity and mortality. These include disturbances in serum sodium, chloride, acid-base, and potassium homeostasis. Pharmacological treatments differ for each electrolyte abnormality and vary from older, established treatments like the vaptans or acetazolamide, to experimental or theoretical treatments like hypertonic saline or urea, or to newer, novel agents like the potassium binders: patiromer and zirconium cyclosilicate. Pharmacologic approaches range from limiting electrolyte intake or directly repleting the electrolyte, to blocking or promoting their resorption, and to neurohormonal antagonism. Because of the prevalence and clinical impact of electrolyte abnormalities, understanding both the older and newer therapeutic options is and will continue to be necessity for the management of heart failure. PMID:27278221

  4. Postinfarct Left Ventricular Remodelling: A Prevailing Cause of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Alessio; Lombardi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic disease with high morbidity and mortality, which represents a growing challenge in medicine. A major risk factor for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is a history of myocardial infarction. The expansion of a large infarct scar and subsequent regional ventricular dilatation can cause postinfarct remodelling, leading to significant enlargement of the left ventricular chamber. It has a negative prognostic value, because it precedes the clinical manifestations of heart failure. The characteristics of the infarcted myocardium predicting postinfarct remodelling can be studied with cardiac magnetic resonance and experimental imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging can identify the changes in the architecture of myocardial fibers. This review discusses all the aspects related to postinfarct left ventricular remodelling: definition, pathogenesis, diagnosis, consequences, and available therapies, together with experimental interventions that show promising results against postinfarct remodelling and heart failure. PMID:26989555

  5. The Genetic Challenges and Opportunities in Advanced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Hannah-Shmouni, Fady; Seidelmann, Sara B; Sirrs, Sandra; Mani, Arya; Jacoby, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The causes of heart failure are diverse. Inherited causes represent an important clinical entity and can be divided into 2 major categories: familial and metabolic cardiomyopathies. The distinct features that might be present in early disease states can become broadly overlapping with other diseases, such as in the case of inherited cardiomyopathies (ie, familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or mitochondrial diseases). In this review article, we focus on genetic issues related to advanced heart failure. Because of the emerging importance of this topic and its breadth, we sought to focus our discussion on the known genetic forms of heart failure syndromes, genetic testing, and newer data on pharmacogenetics and therapeutics in the treatment of heart failure, to primarily encourage clinicians to place a priority on the diagnosis and treatment of these potentially treatable conditions.

  6. End of life care services for patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Charnock, Louise A

    2014-08-26

    Heart failure has high incidence and prevalence in the UK. However, access to palliative care services for patients with heart failure is inequitable. Patients with heart failure often do not receive specialist palliative care at the end of life, or referral is made only in the last days of life. This results in lost opportunities for advance care planning, psychological support for patients and families and symptom management. Prognostic tools are useful in ensuring appropriate referral. However, the controversy regarding the Liverpool Care Pathway has created uncertainty for healthcare professionals, patients and families. This article examines palliative care and end of life care services for patients with heart failure. It presents the case for service development and examines the benefits for patients who traditionally may not have had access to this care. PMID:25138875

  7. Antidepressant No Help to Heart Failure Patients: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Antidepressant No Help to Heart Failure Patients: Study Depression in these cases may be caused by ... therapy and physical exercise," she said. For the study, Angermann and her colleagues randomly assigned 372 patients ...

  8. ESRD and death after heart failure in CKD.

    PubMed

    Sud, Maneesh; Tangri, Navdeep; Pintilie, Melania; Levey, Andrew S; Naimark, David M J

    2015-03-01

    CKD is a risk factor for heart failure, but there is no data on the risk of ESRD and death after recurrent hospitalizations for heart failure. We sought to determine how interim heart failure hospitalizations modify the subsequent risk of ESRD or death before ESRD in patients with CKD. We retrospectively identified 2887 patients with a GFR between 15 and 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 referred between January of 2001 and December of 2008 to a nephrology clinic in Toronto, Canada. We ascertained interim first, second, and third heart failure hospitalizations as well as ESRD and death before ESRD outcomes from administrative data. Over a median follow-up time of 3.01 (interquartile range=1.56-4.99) years, interim heart failure hospitalizations occurred in 359 (12%) patients, whereas 234 (8%) patients developed ESRD, and 499 (17%) patients died before ESRD. Compared with no heart failure hospitalizations, one, two, or three or more heart failure hospitalizations increased the adjusted hazard ratio of ESRD from 4.89 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.21 to 7.44) to 10.27 (95% CI, 5.54 to 19.04) to 14.16 (95% CI, 8.07 to 24.83), respectively, and the adjusted hazard ratio death before ESRD from 3.30 (95% CI, 2.55 to 4.27) to 4.20 (95% CI, 2.82 to 6.25) to 6.87 (95% CI, 4.96 to 9.51), respectively. We conclude that recurrent interim heart failure is associated with a stepwise increase in the risk of ESRD and death before ESRD in patients with CKD.

  9. Pharmacology of heart failure: From basic science to novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Lother, Achim; Hein, Lutz

    2016-10-01

    Chronic heart failure is one of the leading causes for hospitalization in the United States and Europe, and is accompanied by high mortality. Current pharmacological therapy of chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is largely based on compounds that inhibit the detrimental action of the adrenergic and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems on the heart. More than one decade after spironolactone, two novel therapeutic principles have been added to the very recently released guidelines on heart failure therapy: the HCN-channel inhibitor ivabradine and the combined angiotensin and neprilysin inhibitor valsartan/sacubitril. New compounds that are in phase II or III clinical evaluation include novel non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, guanylate cyclase activators or myosine activators. A variety of novel candidate targets have been identified and the availability of gene transfer has just begun to accelerate translation from basic science to clinical application. This review provides an overview of current pharmacology and pharmacotherapy in chronic heart failure at three stages: the updated clinical guidelines of the American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology, new drugs which are in clinical development, and finally innovative drug targets and their mechanisms in heart failure which are emerging from preclinical studies will be discussed.

  10. Self-care behaviour of patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, T; Abu-Saad, H H; Dracup, K; Halfens, R

    2000-01-01

    Heart failure-related self-care behaviour is important to optimize outcomes for patients with heart failure. Such behaviours include adherence to medication, diet and exercise, but self-care also refers to such things as seeking assistance when symptoms occur, and daily weighing. The study aim was to describe heart failure-related self-care behaviour, to test the effect of education and support on self-care behaviour and to discuss limitations. Data were collected from 128 heart failure patients during their hospital stay and at 1-, 3-, and 9-month follow-ups. Concepts from Orem's general theory of nursing were used to describe heart failure-related self-care behaviour and its limitations. The effects of intensive systematized and planned education from a nurse in hospital and at home were evaluated in an experimental design. Results showed that education enhanced self-care behaviour significantly at 1 and 3 months after discharge. Despite intensive education and support, patients did not manifest all self-care behaviours that might be expected. Patients in both the intervention and control groups described limitations in knowledge, judgement/decision-making and skills. It can be concluded that supportive-educative intervention is effective in enhancing heart failure-related self-care behaviour early after discharge. To optimize such intervention, more emphasis must be placed on behavioural strategies (e.g. self-medication), social support (e.g. from family members) and reinforcement (e.g. home visits).

  11. Self-care behaviour of patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, T; Abu-Saad, H H; Dracup, K; Halfens, R

    2000-01-01

    Heart failure-related self-care behaviour is important to optimize outcomes for patients with heart failure. Such behaviours include adherence to medication, diet and exercise, but self-care also refers to such things as seeking assistance when symptoms occur, and daily weighing. The study aim was to describe heart failure-related self-care behaviour, to test the effect of education and support on self-care behaviour and to discuss limitations. Data were collected from 128 heart failure patients during their hospital stay and at 1-, 3-, and 9-month follow-ups. Concepts from Orem's general theory of nursing were used to describe heart failure-related self-care behaviour and its limitations. The effects of intensive systematized and planned education from a nurse in hospital and at home were evaluated in an experimental design. Results showed that education enhanced self-care behaviour significantly at 1 and 3 months after discharge. Despite intensive education and support, patients did not manifest all self-care behaviours that might be expected. Patients in both the intervention and control groups described limitations in knowledge, judgement/decision-making and skills. It can be concluded that supportive-educative intervention is effective in enhancing heart failure-related self-care behaviour early after discharge. To optimize such intervention, more emphasis must be placed on behavioural strategies (e.g. self-medication), social support (e.g. from family members) and reinforcement (e.g. home visits). PMID:12035274

  12. [Isolated left ventricular noncompaction causing refractory heart failure].

    PubMed

    Meneguz-Moreno, Rafael Alexandre; Rodrigues da Costa Teixeira, Felipe; Rossi Neto, João Manoel; Finger, Marco Aurélio; Casadei, Carolina; Castillo, Maria Teresa; Sanchez de Almeida, Antonio Flávio

    2016-03-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by excessive left ventricular trabeculation, deep intertrabecular recesses and a thin compacted layer due to the arrest of compaction of myocardial fibers during embryonic development. We report the case of a young patient with isolated left ventricular noncompaction, leading to refractory heart failure that required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation followed by emergency heart transplantation. PMID:26928017

  13. Pediatric heart failure: current state and future possibilities.

    PubMed

    Rossano, Joseph W; Jang, Gi Young

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a complex pathophysiological syndrome that can occur in children from a variety of diseases, including cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, and congenital heart disease. The condition is associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality and places a significant burden on families of affected children and to society as a whole. Current medical therapy is taken largely from the management of heart failure in adults, though clear survival benefit of these medications are lacking. Ventricular assist devices (VADs) have taken an increasingly important role in the management of advanced heart failure in children. The predominant role of these devices has been as a bridge to heart transplantation, and excellent results are currently achieved for most children with cardiomyopathies. There is an ongoing investigation to improve outcomes in high-risk populations, such as small infants and those with complex congenital heart disease, including patients with functionally univentricular hearts. Additionally, there is an active investigation and interest in expansion of VADs beyond the predominant utilization as a bridge to a heart transplant into ventricular recovery, device explant without a heart transplantation (bridge to recovery), and placement of devices without the expectation of recovery or transplantation (destination therapy).

  14. Gene transfer for congestive heart failure: update 2013.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tong; Hammond, H Kirk

    2013-04-01

    Congestive heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality with increasing social and economic costs. There have been no new high impact therapeutic agents for this devastating disease for more than a decade. However, many pivotal regulators of cardiac function have been identified using cardiac-directed transgene expression and gene deletion in preclinical studies. Some of these increase function of the failing heart. Altering the expression of these pivotal regulators using gene transfer is now either being tested in clinical gene transfer trials, or soon will be. In this review, we summarize recent progress in cardiac gene transfer for clinical congestive heart failure.

  15. A reappraisal of loop diuretic choice in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Buggey, Jonathan; Mentz, Robert J.; Pitt, Bertram; Eisenstein, Eric L.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Velazquez, Eric J.; O’Connor, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The health and economic burden of heart failure is significant, and continues to grow each year. Loop diuretics are an integral part of symptom management in heart failure. Furosemide is used disproportionately compared to other loop diuretics and there is currently no guidance for physicians regarding which agent to choose. However, there exist pharmacologic differences as well as other mechanistic differences that appear to favor torsemide use over furosemide. Compared to furosemide, torsemide improves surrogate markers of heart failure severity such as left ventricular function, plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels, and New York Heart Association functional class and may also reduce hospitalizations, readmissions, and mortality. Data suggest these benefits could be mediated through torsemide’s ability to positively affect the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Specifically, torsemide has been shown to inhibit aldosterone secretion, synthesis, and receptor binding in vitro, as well as decrease transcardiac extraction of aldosterone, myocardial collagen production and cardiac fibrosis in patients with heart failure. We identified pertinent literature using keyword MEDLINE searches and cross-referencing prior bibliographies. We summarize the available data suggesting potential benefits with torsemide over furosemide, and call attention to the need for a reappraisal of diuretic use in heart failure patients and also for a well powered, randomized control trial assessing torsemide versus furosemide use. PMID:25728721

  16. Mitochondria as a Therapeutic Target in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bayeva, Marina; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is a pressing public health problem with no curative treatment currently available. The existing therapies provide symptomatic relief, but are unable to reverse molecular changes that occur in cardiomyocytes. The mechanisms of heart failure are complex and multiple, but mitochondrial dysfunction appears to be a critical factor in the development of this disease. Thus, it is important to focus research efforts on targeting mitochondrial dysfunction in the failing heart in order to revive the myocardium and its contractile function. This review highlights the three promising areas for the development of heart failure therapies, including mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial oxidative stress and mitochondrial iron handling. Moreover, the translational potential of compounds targeting these pathways is discussed. PMID:23219298

  17. Ventricular assist devices for treatment of acute heart failure and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, James N; Wieselthaler, Georg; Strueber, Martin; St John Sutton, Martin G; Rame, J Eduardo

    2015-07-01

    Despite therapeutic advances that improve longevity and quality of life, heart failure (HF) remains a relentless disease. At the end stage of HF, patients may become eligible for mechanical circulatory support (MCS) for the indications of stabilising acute cardiogenic shock or for chronic HF management. MCS use is growing rapidly in the USA and some countries of the European Union, especially in transplant-ineligible patients. In others, it remains largely a tool to stabilise patients until heart transplant. MCS comprises a heterogeneous group of temporary and durable devices which augment or replace the pumping function of one or both ventricles, with postimplant 2 year survival rivalling that of transplant in selected, lower-risk patients. In transplant-eligible and non-transplant-eligible patients, improvement in end-organ perfusion, functional capacity and quality of life have been noted. Even for optimal candidates, however, there are a host of potential complications that require constant vigilance of a coordinated care team. Recently, there has been official recognition of the importance of palliative care expertise in advance care planning preimplant and management of patients with ventricular assist devices at the end of their lives. PMID:25948420

  18. Targeting BNIP3 in inflammation-mediated heart failure: a novel concept in heart failure therapy.

    PubMed

    Fordjour, Patrick Asare; Wang, Lingyang; Gao, Hui; Li, Lan; Wang, Yadong; Nyagblordzro, Makafui; Agyemang, Kojo; Fan, Guanwei

    2016-09-01

    Myocardial injury activates inflammatory mediators and provokes the integration of BCL-2/adenovirus E1B 19KD interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) into mitochondrial membranes. Translocation of BNIP3 to mitochondria inexorably causes mitochondrial fragmentation. Heart failure (HF) epitomizes the life-threatening phase of BNIP3-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiomyocyte death. Available data suggest that inflammatory mediators play a key role in cardiac cell demise and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of HF syndrome. In the present study, we reviewed the changes in BNIP3 protein expression levels during inflammatory response and postulated its role in inflammation-mediated HF. We also identified inflammatory mediators' response such as stimulation of TNF-α and NO as potent inducer of BNIP3. Previous studies suggest that the pro-apoptotic protein has a common regulator with IL-1β and induces IL-6-stimulated cardiac hypertrophy. These findings corroborate our contention that interventions designed to functionally modulate BNIP3 activity during inflammatory-mediated HF may prove beneficial in preventing HF. Such a revelation will open new avenue for further research to unravel a novel therapeutic strategy in HF diseases. Moreover, understanding of the relationship between BNIP3 and inflammatory mediators in HF pathologies will not only contribute to the discovery of drugs that can inhibit inflammation-mediated heart diseases, but also enhance the current knowledge on the key role BNIP3 plays during inflammation. PMID:27112557

  19. [Obesity and cardiac cachexia in chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Clauser, M; Altenberger, J

    2013-09-01

    Obesity as well as cardiac cachexia in heart failure patients are not fully understood and therefore of high scientific interest. Obesity as a common risk factor for cardiovascular disease is associated with a high mortality. In contrast obesity in patients suffering from chronic heart failure seems to be accompanied with a favorable outcome in contrast to people with normal weight, known as the obesity paradox. In the last decade there has been growing interest in cachexia, which is common in advanced stages of chronic diseases, such as heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cancer and renal failure and is associated with a poor prognosis. Until now cachexia has been underdiagnosed and undertreated. This review discusses the complex underlying pathomechanisms as well as potential therapeutic approaches.

  20. New Insights in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Agnetti, Giulio; Piepoli, Massimo F.; Siniscalchi, Giuseppe; Nicolini, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the US and in westernized countries with ischemic heart disease accounting for the majority of these deaths. Paradoxically, the improvements in the medical and surgical treatments of acute coronary syndrome are leading to an increasing number of “survivors” who are then developing heart failure. Despite considerable advances in its management, the gold standard for the treatment of end-stage heart failure patients remains heart transplantation. Nevertheless, this procedure can be offered only to a small percentage of patients who could benefit from a new heart due to the limited availability of donor organs. The aim of this review is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of innovative approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of patients refractory to standard medical therapy and excluded from cardiac transplantation lists. PMID:26634204

  1. Pathophysiology of cardiorenal syndrome in decompensated heart failure: role of lung-right heart-kidney interaction.

    PubMed

    Guazzi, M; Gatto, P; Giusti, G; Pizzamiglio, F; Previtali, I; Vignati, C; Arena, R

    2013-11-30

    Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is defined as an interaction of cardiac disease with renal dysfunction that leads to diuretic resistance and renal function worsening, mainly with heart failure (HF) exacerbation. Hemodynamic variables linking heart and kidney are renal blood flow (cardiac output) and perfusion pressure, i.e., the aortic - renal venous pressure gradient. CRS has traditionally been interpreted as related to defective renal perfusion and arterial underfilling and, more recently, to elevation in central venous pressure transmitted back to renal veins. Our suggestion is that in a setting where aortic pressure is generally low, due to heart dysfunction and to vasodrepressive therapy, the elevated central venous pressure (CVP) contributes to lower the renal perfusion pressure below the threshold of kidney autoregulation (≤80mm Hg) and causes renal perfusion to become directly pressure dependent. This condition is associated with high neurohumoral activation and preglomerular vasoconstriction that may preserve pressure, but may decrease filtration fraction and glomerular filtration rate and enhance proximal tubular sodium absorption. Thus, congestion worsens and drives the vicious cycle of further sodium retention and HF exacerbation. Lowering CVP by targeting the lung-right heart interaction that sustains elevated CVP seems to be a more rational approach rather than reducing intravascular volume. This interaction is crucial and consists of a cascade with stepwise development of pulmonary post-capillary hypertension, precapillary arteriolar hypertone, right ventricular overload and enlargement with tricuspid incompetence and interference with left ventricular filling (interdependence). The resultant CVP rise is transmitted to the renal veins, eventually drives CRS and leads to a positive feedback loop evolving towards HF refractoriness.

  2. [Physical training in chronic heart failure: pathophysiology and clinical evolution].

    PubMed

    Rivas Estany, Eduardo; Hernández García, Susana

    2016-09-05

    Chronic heart failure has become one of the main global health problems; 23 million people suffer from this disease worldwide and age of onset has varied considerably over the past five decades, coinciding with other co-morbidities as longevity in the population increases. Treatment of heart failure has also shown striking variations in recent years. Such is the case of the substitution of sympathomimetic drugs by beta-blocking agents, which primarily means a conceptual change in the pathophysiological interpretation of this syndrome. Incorporating to the treatment of heart failure drugs such as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers has meant a great step forward in the treatment of patients with this condition that significantly has decreased mortality and morbidity. The latest introduction of the drug identified as angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor (LCZ696), launched in August 2014 with an even greater reduction in mortality and morbidity of heart failure and fewer side effects, offers a valid hope in the treatment of this pathology. Training and physical activity is another area of treatment being completely reassessed. Pathophysiological aspects that link the practice of systematic physical exercise with heart failure and how they both relate to clinical outcomes, morbidity and mortality in the trained patient are reviewed in this paper.

  3. Living with heart failure; patient and carer perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pattenden, J F; Roberts, H; Lewin, R J P

    2007-12-01

    Patients with heart failure have multiple readmissions to hospital, a poor prognosis and varying quality of life. This paper explores how patients with heart failure and their family carers cope with daily life. 36 patients and 20 family caregivers were interviewed in five centres in the UK. Analysis showed that living with heart failure can be frightening, restrictive and distressing for both patients and their family carers. Patients found most difficulty coping with functional limitation and adapting to living with heart failure, but also reported particular problems due to side effects of medications, co-morbidities and a lack of psychosocial support and rehabilitation services. Those with less socio-economic resources found it harder to cope. Patients from minority ethnic groups held different beliefs about the illness and its treatment, and some had profound problems communicating with health and social care professionals that made managing the disease even more difficult. Caring for a person with heart failure often has a considerable impact on the psychological and physical health of family caregivers. Psychosocial support and rehabilitation services provided at diagnosis and after an acute episode would enable families to better manage living with this syndrome. PMID:17383236

  4. Needs of caregivers in heart failure management: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Julia; Britten, Nicky; Jolly, Kate; Greaves, Colin; Abraham, Charles; Dalal, Hayes

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the needs of caregivers supporting a person with heart failure and to inform the development of a caregiver resource to be used as part of a home-based self-management programme. Methods A qualitative study informed by thematic analysis involving 26 caregivers in individual interviews or a focus group. Results Three distinct aspects of caregiver support in heart failure management were identified. Firstly, caregivers identified needs about supporting management of heart failure including: coping with the variability of heart failure symptoms, what to do in an emergency, understanding and managing medicines, providing emotional support, promoting exercise and physical activity, providing personal care, living with a cardiac device and supporting depression management. Secondly, as they make the transition to becoming a caregiver, they need to develop skills to undertake difficult discussions about the role; communicate with health professionals; manage their own mental health, well-being and sleep; and manage home and work. Thirdly, caregivers require skills to engage social support, and voluntary and formal services while recognising that the long-term future is uncertain. Discussion The identification of the needs of caregiver has been used to inform the development of a home-based heart failure intervention facilitated by a trained health care practitioner. PMID:25795144

  5. Telehealth on heart failure: results of the Recap project.

    PubMed

    Varon, Carolina; Alao, Morenikeji; Minter, Jan; Stapleton, Michelle; Thomson, Stuart; Jaecques, Siegfried; Rocca, Hans-Peter Bl; Huffel, Sabine V

    2015-09-01

    Telehealth has become a very important tool that allows the monitoring of heart failure patients in a home environment. However, little is known about the effect that such monitoring systems have on patients' compliance, evolution and self-care behaviour. In particular, the effect that the selected user interface has on these factors is unknown. This study aims to investigate this, and to determine some practicalities that must be considered when designing and implementing a telehealth programme for heart failure. To achieve this, daily measurements of blood pressure, pulse, SpO2 and weight were collected from 534 patients suffering from heart failure. In addition, they were asked to fill in the European heart failure self-care behaviour scale questionnaire and the EQ-5D quality of life questionnaire, before and after the monitoring period. Two telehealth systems were used, the Motiva platform provided by Philips and the standalone unit provided by Docobo, the Doc@Home system. Significant differences were found between both systems concerning the compliance and adherence of patients. Moreover, a general, positive effect of telehealth was identified due to the fact that patients showed an increased self-awareness when managing their condition. These findings are supported by behavioural changes and a better understanding of heart failure from the patients' perspective.

  6. [Physical training in chronic heart failure: pathophysiology and clinical evolution].

    PubMed

    Rivas Estany, Eduardo; Hernández García, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic heart failure has become one of the main global health problems; 23 million people suffer from this disease worldwide and age of onset has varied considerably over the past five decades, coinciding with other co-morbidities as longevity in the population increases. Treatment of heart failure has also shown striking variations in recent years. Such is the case of the substitution of sympathomimetic drugs by beta-blocking agents, which primarily means a conceptual change in the pathophysiological interpretation of this syndrome. Incorporating to the treatment of heart failure drugs such as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers has meant a great step forward in the treatment of patients with this condition that significantly has decreased mortality and morbidity. The latest introduction of the drug identified as angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor (LCZ696), launched in August 2014 with an even greater reduction in mortality and morbidity of heart failure and fewer side effects, offers a valid hope in the treatment of this pathology. Training and physical activity is another area of treatment being completely reassessed. Pathophysiological aspects that link the practice of systematic physical exercise with heart failure and how they both relate to clinical outcomes, morbidity and mortality in the trained patient are reviewed in this paper. PMID:27636114

  7. Use of Inotropic Agents in Treatment of Systolic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Sohaib; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2015-12-04

    The most common use of inotropes is among hospitalized patients with acute decompensated heart failure, with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and with signs of end-organ dysfunction in the setting of a low cardiac output. Inotropes can be used in patients with severe systolic heart failure awaiting heart transplant to maintain hemodynamic stability or as a bridge to decision. In cases where patients are unable to be weaned off inotropes, these agents can be used until a definite or escalated supportive therapy is planned, which can include coronary revascularization or mechanical circulatory support (intra-aortic balloon pump, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, impella, left ventricular assist device, etc.). Use of inotropic drugs is associated with risks and adverse events. This review will discuss the use of the inotropes digoxin, dopamine, dobutamine, norepinephrine, milrinone, levosimendan, and omecamtiv mecarbil. Long-term inotropic therapy should be offered in selected patients. A detailed conversation with the patient and family shall be held, including a discussion on the risks and benefits of use of inotropes. Chronic heart failure patients awaiting heart transplants are candidates for intravenous inotropic support until the donor heart becomes available. This helps to maintain hemodynamic stability and keep the fluid status and pulmonary pressures optimized prior to the surgery. On the other hand, in patients with severe heart failure who are not candidates for advanced heart failure therapies, such as transplant and mechanical circulatory support, inotropic agents can be used for palliative therapy. Inotropes can help reduce frequency of hospitalizations and improve symptoms in these patients.

  8. Neprilysin and Natriuretic Peptide Regulation in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Morant-Talamante, Nuria; Lupón, Josep

    2016-08-01

    Neprilysin is acknowledged as a key player in neurohormonal regulation, a cornerstone of modern drug therapy in chronic heart failure. In the cardiovascular system, neprilysin cleaves numerous vasoactive peptides, some with mainly vasodilating effects (natriuretic peptides, adrenomedullin, bradykinin) and other with mainly vasoconstrictor effects (angiotensin I and II, endothelin-1). For decades, neprilysin has been an important biotarget. Academia and industry have combined active efforts to search for neprilysin inhibitors (NEPIs) that might be useful in clinical practice. NEPI monotherapy was initially tested with little success due to efficacy issues. Next, combination of NEPI and ACE-inhibiting activity agents were abandoned due to safety concerns. Recently, the combination of NEPI and ARB, also known as ARNI, has shown better than expected results in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, and multitude of ongoing studies are set to prove its value across the heart failure spectrum. PMID:27260315

  9. The puzzle of kidney dysfunction in heart failure: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Metra, Marco; Voors, Adriaan A

    2012-03-01

    Heart failure and kidney disease often coexist, and each of the two conditions may lead to progression of the other. Kidney dysfunction is an independent prognostic factor in patients with either acute or chronic heart failure. Worsening renal function may be related with poorer outcomes as well. Multiple mechanisms are involved in the cardio-renal interaction, including hemodynamic abnormalities, neurohormonal and inflammatory activation, oxidative stress, anemia, and abnormalities in mineral and vitamin D metabolism. Serum creatinine has limitations for the assessment of kidney function in patients with heart failure as its short-term changes are dependent on hemodynamic changes and fluid status. New biomarkers of glomerular and tubular function might allow an earlier and more accurate detection of worsening renal function.

  10. Comprehensive therapeutic approach for patients with heart failure and comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Laiglesia, F J; Garcés-Horna, V; Formiga, F

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of heart failure increases with age and is accompanied by other diseases, which are encompassed within a «cardiometabolic phenotype». Their interrelation changes the evolution and treatment that each disease would have in isolation. Patients with heart failure and comorbidity are frail and complex. They require a comprehensive assessment (not just biomedical), which includes functional, cognitive, affective and psychosocial aspects. The overall treatment, which is not covered in the clinical practice guidelines, should adapt to each and every one of the comorbidities. Polypharmacy should be avoided as much as possible, due to its interactions and reduced adherence. Treatment needs to be optimised and adapted to the evolutionary phase of the disease and the specific needs of each patient. The complexity of the care process for patients with heart failure and comorbidities requires the coordination of healthcare providers and support from family and others involved in the patient's care.

  11. Heart failure and the emergency department: epidemiology, characteristics, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Green, Gary B

    2009-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the impact of heart failure on society is enormous. The research community has responded, resulting in an ongoing period of rapid advancement across a wide range of fields. The pace of progress is perhaps most apparent in the barrage of new and revised terminology appearing in the heart failure literature. Although sometimes confusing, the complexity of nomenclature directly reflects a growing appreciation that the symptom complex previously labeled "heart failure" is actually a spectrum of complex multisystem pathologies. Accordingly, clinicians must adopt a more sophisticated and more effective approach to evaluation and treatment that is increasingly based on objective measurement of outcome-linked physiologic parameters rather than the subjectively described symptom constellations relied on previously.

  12. Telerehabilitation in heart failure patients: The evidence and the pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Piotrowicz, Ewa; Piepoli, Massimo F; Jaarsma, Tiny; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Coats, Andrew J S; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Corrà, Ugo; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Dickstein, Kenneth; Seferović, Petar M; Adamopoulos, Stamatis; Ponikowski, Piotr P

    2016-10-01

    Accessibility to the available traditional forms of cardiac rehabilitation programs in heart failure patients is not adequate and adherence to the programs remains unsatisfactory. The home-based telerehabilitation model has been proposed as a promising new option to improve this situation. This paper's aims are to discuss the tools available for telemonitoring, and describing their characteristics, applicability, and effectiveness in providing optimal long term management for heart failure patients who are unable to attend traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs. The critical issues of psychological support and adherence to the telerehabilitation programs are outlined. The advantages and limitations of this long term management modality are presented and compared with alternatives. Finally, the importance of further research, multicenter studies of telerehabilitation for heart failure patients and the technological development needs are outlined, in particular interactive remotely controlled intelligent telemedicine systems with increased inter-device compatibility.

  13. Nitric Oxide Synthases in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Crabtree, Mark J.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The regulation of myocardial function by constitutive nitric oxide synthases (NOS) is important for the maintenance of myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis, relaxation and distensibility, and protection from arrhythmia and abnormal stress stimuli. However, sustained insults such as diabetes, hypertension, hemodynamic overload, and atrial fibrillation lead to dysfunctional NOS activity with superoxide produced instead of NO and worse pathophysiology. Recent Advances: Major strides in understanding the role of normal and abnormal constitutive NOS in the heart have revealed molecular targets by which NO modulates myocyte function and morphology, the role and nature of post-translational modifications of NOS, and factors controlling nitroso-redox balance. Localized and differential signaling from NOS1 (neuronal) versus NOS3 (endothelial) isoforms are being identified, as are methods to restore NOS function in heart disease. Critical Issues: Abnormal NOS signaling plays a key role in many cardiac disorders, while targeted modulation may potentially reverse this pathogenic source of oxidative stress. Future Directions: Improvements in the clinical translation of potent modulators of NOS function/dysfunction may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many hearts diseases that are fueled by nitroso-redox imbalance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1078–1099. PMID:22871241

  14. Continuous positive airway pressure increases heart rate variability in heart failure patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Matthew P; Floras, John S; Usui, Kengo; Kaneko, Yasuyuki; Leung, Richard S T; Bradley, T Douglas

    2008-02-01

    Patients with heart failure or OSA (obstructive sleep apnoea) have reduced HF-HRV (high-frequency heart rate variability), indicating reduced cardiac vagal modulation, a marker of poor prognosis. CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) abolishes OSA in patients with heart failure, but effects on daytime HF-HRV have not been determined. We hypothesized that, in patients with heart failure, treatment of coexisting OSA by CPAP would increase morning HF-HRV. In 19 patients with heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction <45%) and OSA (>/=20 apnoeas and hypopnoeas/h of sleep), HF-HRV was quantified before and 1 month after randomization to a control or CPAP-treated group. In the control group (n=7), there were no changes in HF-HRV over the 1 month study during wakefulness in the morning. In the CPAP-treated group (n=12) HF-HRV increased significantly during wakefulness in the morning [from 2.43+/-0.55 to 2.82+/-0.50 log(ms(2)/Hz); P=0.002] due to an increase in transfer function between changes in lung volume and changes in HF-HRV (92.37+/-96.03 to 219.07+/-177.14 ms/l; P=0.01). In conclusion, treatment of coexisting OSA by nocturnal CPAP in patients with heart failure increases HF-HRV during morning wakefulness, indicating improved vagal modulation of heart rate. This may contribute to improved prognosis.

  15. The cardiac enigma: current conundrums in heart failure research

    PubMed Central

    Kapiloff, Michael S.; Emter, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of heart failure is expected to increase almost 50% in the next 15 years because of aging of the general population, an increased frequency of comorbidities, and an improved survival following cardiac events. Conventional treatments for heart failure have remained largely static over the past 20 years, illustrating the pressing need for the discovery of novel therapeutic agents for this patient population. Given the heterogeneous nature of heart failure, it is important to specifically define the cellular mechanisms in the heart that drive the patient’s symptoms, particularly when considering new treatment strategies. This report highlights the latest research efforts, as well as the possible pitfalls, in cardiac disease translational research and discusses future questions and considerations needed to advance the development of new heart failure therapies. In particular, we discuss cardiac remodeling and the translation of animal work to humans and how advancements in our understanding of these concepts relative to disease are central to new discoveries that can improve cardiovascular health. PMID:26918161

  16. Ventricular repolarization in a rat model of global heart failure.

    PubMed

    Krandycheva, Valeria; Kharin, Sergey; Strelkova, Marina; Shumikhin, Konstantin; Sobolev, Aleksey; Shmakov, Dmitry

    2013-07-01

    Isoproterenol in high doses induces infarction-like myocardial damage and structural and functional remodelling of the ventricular myocardium. The purpose of the present study was to investigate ventricular repolarization in a rat model of isoproterenol-induced heart failure. Isoproterenol was administered twice to female Wistar rats (170 mg/kg, s.c., 24 h apart). Four weeks after the injections, cardiac output was measured and unipolar epicardial ventricular electrograms were recorded in situ. Activation-recovery intervals were calculated to assess repolarization. Histological examination of the heart ventricles was also performed. Heart failure in rats treated with isoproterenol was indicated by myocardial histopathological damage and reduced cardiac output. In rats with heart failure, the regional differences in activation-recovery interval prolongation over the ventricular epicardium resulted in increasing heterogeneity in the activation-recovery interval distribution and increasing repolarization heterogeneity of the ventricular subepicardium. Myocardial damage and haemodynamic changes in heart failure induced by isoproterenol were accompanied by significant changes in ventricular repolarization, which were not associated with myocardial hypertrophy.

  17. Panax ginseng reduces adriamycin-induced heart failure in rats.

    PubMed

    You, Jyh-Sheng; Huang, Hui-Feng; Chang, Ying-Ling

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of Panax ginseng on adriamycin-induced heart failure. Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control, adriamycin, ginseng and adriamycin with ginseng. Adriamycin (cumulative dose, 15 mg/kg) was administered to rats in six equal intraperitoneal injections over a period of 2 weeks. Ginseng was administered via an oral feeding tube once a day for 30 days (cumulative dose, 150 g/kg). At the end of the 5 week post-treatment period, the hearts of the rats were used to study the synthesis rates of DNA, RNA and protein, myocardial antioxidants and lipid peroxidation. At the end of 3 weeks treatment, heart failure was characterized by ascites, congested liver and depressed cardiac function. Nucleic acid as well as protein synthesis was inhibited, lipid peroxidation was increased and myocardial glutathione peroxidase activity was decreased indicating adriamycin-induced heart failure. In contrast, the administration of ginseng, before and concurrent with adriamycin, significantly attenuated the myocardial effects, lowered the mortality as well as the amount of ascites, increased in myocardial glutathione peroxidase, macromolecular biosynthesis and superoxide dismutase activities, with a concomitant decrease in lipid peroxidation. These findings indicated that ginseng may be partially protective against adriamycin-induced heart failure.

  18. Prognosis of morbid obesity patients with advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Vijaiganesh; Cauthen, Clay A; Starling, Randall C; Tang, Wai Hong Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Obese patients have been noted to have better prognosis in many conditions including heart failure. We hypothesize that this favorable prognosis for obesity may not be seen in patients with morbid obesity and advanced heart failure. A total of 501 consecutive patients with advanced heart failure referred for heart transplant evaluation to the Cleveland Clinic were studied. Patients were categorized into 3 groups based on their body mass index score as nonobese (≤30 kg/m(2) ), obese (30.1-40 kg/m(2) ), and morbidly obese (≥40 kg/m(2) ). There were fewer cardiovascular risk factors in the morbidly obese group. Unadjusted event-free survival rates were 48.4%, 57.4%, and 28.6% in the nonobese, obese, and morbidly obese groups, respectively (P=.02). In univariate analysis, both the nonobese group (hazard ratio [HR], 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.91; P=.01) and the morbidly obese group (HR, 2.46; 95% CI, 1.40-4.30; P=.002) had significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality/transplantation compared with the obese group. This difference persisted in multivariate analysis after adjustment for confounding factors. Our study re-emphasizes the presence of an obesity paradox even in patients with very advanced heart failure. This favorable prognosis, however, may not be relevant in patients with morbidly obesity. Cardiovascular risk factors may not contribute to this phenomenon.

  19. Exercise Intolerance In Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anisha A.; Hamilton, Dale J.

    2016-01-01

    More than 50% of Americans with heart failure have preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Exercise intolerance is a hallmark of HFpEF, but the pathophysiology is not well understood. Diverse etiologies and incomplete mechanistic understanding have resulted in ineffective management strategies to improve the outcomes of HFpEF. Traditional therapies that have been beneficial in the treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), neurohormonal blockade in particular, have not been effective in treating HFpEF. In this review, we address underlying mechanisms of HFpEF and present the rationale supporting exercise as a component of comprehensive management. PMID:27486493

  20. [Echocardiography for the evaluation of patients with heart failure].

    PubMed

    Mele, Donato

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography is the most widely used technique for evaluating patients with heart failure owing to its widespread use, non-invasiveness and ability to provide diagnostic, functional, hemodynamic and prognostic information. However, echocardiography is not always used appropriately as regards both clinical indications to the examination and the information gathered in the course of the examination itself. This can lead to repeated, unnecessary or unhelpful echocardiographic evaluations, that is, non-optimal consumption of available resources. The purpose of this article is to describe how to use echocardiography appropriately for assessing patients with heart failure, and to highlight the advantages and limitations of this technique. PMID:26901256

  1. [Mechanoelectric feedback and sudden death in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Guadalajara Boo, J F

    2001-01-01

    Better knowledge of mechanisms which perpetuate heart failure and promote progression and death in patients with these sicknesses, has led to find a better medical treatment to improve the functional status, decrease mortality and improve life span, avoiding the progression of ventricular dysfunction. Mortality reduction due to the disease progression has led to evident arrhythmic mortality show by sudden death. Aspects involved in the genesis and pathophysiology of sudden death in patients with chronic-heart failure; are reviewed in this paper. Special reference to mechano-electrical feedback is considered. PMID:11565349

  2. Semantic web ontology utilization for heart failure expert system design.

    PubMed

    Prcela, Marin; Gamberger, Dragan; Jovic, Alan

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present the usage of semantic web knowledge representation formalism in combination with general purpose reasoning for building a medical expert system. The properties of the approach have been studied on the example of the knowledge base construction for decision support tasks in the heart failure domain. The work consisted of descriptive knowledge presentation in the ontological form and its integration with the heart failure procedural knowledge. In this setting instance checking in description logic represents the main process of the expert system reasoning.

  3. Congestive Heart Failure and Diabetes: Balancing Glycemic Control with Heart Failure Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Saifullah; Aguilar, David

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes and congestive heart failure (HF) commonly coexist in the same patient, and the presence of diabetes in HF patients is associated with increased adverse events compared to patients without diabetes. Recent guidelines regarding glycemic control stress individualization of glycemic therapy based on patient comorbid conditions and potential adverse effects of medical therapy. This balance in glycemic control may be particularly relevant in patients with diabetes and HF. In this review, we address data regarding the influence that certain HF medications may have on glycemic control. Despite potential modest changes in glycemic control, clinical benefits of proven pharmacologic HF therapies extend to patients with diabetes and HF. In addition, we review potential benefits and challenges associated with commonly used glycemic medications in HF patients. Finally, recent data and controversies on optimal glycemic targets in HF patients are discussed. Given the large number of patients with diabetes and HF and the health burden of these conditions, much needed future work is necessary to define the optimal glycemic treatment in HF patients with diabetes. PMID:23062568

  4. A novel distributed model of the heart under normal and congestive heart failure conditions.

    PubMed

    Ravanshadi, Samin; Jahed, Mehran

    2013-04-01

    Conventional models of cardiovascular system frequently lack required detail and focus primarily on the overall relationship between pressure, flow and volume. This study proposes a localized and regional model of the cardiovascular system. It utilizes noninvasive blood flow and pressure seed data and temporal cardiac muscle regional activity to predict the operation of the heart under normal and congestive heart failure conditions. The analysis considers specific regions of the heart, namely, base, mid and apex of left ventricle. The proposed method of parameter estimation for hydraulic electric analogy model is recursive least squares algorithm. Based on simulation results and comparison to clinical data, effect of congestive heart failure in the heart is quantified. Accumulated results for simulated ejection fraction percentage of the apex, mid and base regions of the left ventricle in congestive heart failure condition were 39 ± 6, 36 ± 9 and 38 ± 8, respectively. These results are shown to satisfactorily match those found through clinical measurements. The proposed analytical method can in effect be utilized as a preclinical and predictive tool for high-risk heart patients and candidates for heart transplant, assistive device and total artificial heart.

  5. Predictive Factors for the Effect of Treatment by Noninvasive Ventilation in Patients with Respiratory Failure as a Result of Acute Exacerbation of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pejkovska, Sava; Kaeva, Biserka Jovkovska; Goseva, Zlatica; Arsovski, Zoran; Janeva, Jelena Jovanovska; Zeynel, Sead

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) applies ventilator support through the patient’s upper airway using a mask. AIM: The aim of the study is to define factors that will point out an increased risk of NIV failure in patients with exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients over the age of 40, treated with NIV, were prospectively recruited. After data processing, the patients were divided into two groups: 1) successful NIV treatment group; 2) failed NIV treatment group. RESULTS: On admission arterial pH and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) levels were lower (pH: p < 0.05, GCS: p < 0.05), and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE) score and PaCO2 were higher (p < 0.05) in the NIV failure group. Arterial pH was lower (p < 0.05) and PaCO2 and respiratory rate were higher (p < 0.05) after 1h, and arterial pH was lower (p < 0.05) and PaCO2 (p < 0.05), respiratory and heart rate were higher (p < 0.05) after 4h in the NIV failure group. CONCLUSION: Measurement and monitoring of certain parameters may be of value in terms of predicting the effectiveness of NIV treatment. PMID:27275303

  6. The usefulness of chronic heart failure treatments in chronic cardiac graft failure.

    PubMed

    Najam, Osman; Yonan, Nizar; Williams, Simon G; Shaw, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    Following cardiac transplantation, registry data has demonstrated a gradual improvement in survival over the last several decades, which is testament to continual improvement in aftercare strategy. However, a significant number of patients will eventually develop a new syndrome of chronic heart failure, owing to the multitude of physiological processes that occur after transplantation. This condition, referred to as chronic graft failure (CGF) should be regarded as a unique illness rather than one that is simply analogous with chronic heart failure. In particular, the unique pathophysiological (and pharmacological) environment in the setting of CGF presents a challenging situation to the transplant physician. There is uncertainty over which treatments to offer given a paucity of clinical trial data to support the use of standard heart failure treatments in CGF. In this review, we discuss which chronic heart failure treatments could be considered in the setting of CGF based on their mechanisms of action, benefits within the native heart failure setting, and the relevant issues within the posttransplant environment.

  7. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib; de Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes; Klein, Carlos Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Background Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. Objective To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Methods Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Results Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Conclusions Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes. PMID:25004417

  8. Increased walking variability in elderly persons with congestive heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Forman, D. E.; Ladin, Z.; Goldberger, A. L.; Rigney, D. R.; Wei, J. Y.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of congestive heart failure on a person's ability to walk at a steady pace while ambulating at a self-determined rate. SETTING: Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, a primary and tertiary teaching hospital, and a social activity center for elderly adults living in the community. PARTICIPANTS: Eleven elderly subjects (aged 70-93 years) with well compensated congestive heart failure (NY Heart Association class I or II), seven elderly subjects (aged 70-79 years) without congestive heart failure, and 10 healthy young adult subjects (aged 20-30 years). MEASUREMENTS: Subjects walked for 8 minutes on level ground at their own selected walking rate. Footswitches were used to measure the time between steps. Step rate (steps/minute) and step rate variability were calculated for the entire walking period, for 30 seconds during the first minute of the walk, for 30 seconds during the last minute of the walk, and for the 30-second period when each subject's step rate variability was minimal. Group means and 5% and 95% confidence intervals were computed. MAIN RESULTS: All measures of walking variability were significantly increased in the elderly subjects with congestive heart failure, intermediate in the elderly controls, and lowest in the young subjects. There was no overlap between the three groups using the minimal 30-second variability (elderly CHF vs elderly controls: P < 0.001, elderly controls vs young: P < 0.001), and no overlap between elderly subjects with and without congestive heart failure when using the overall variability. For all four measures, there was no overlap in any of the confidence intervals, and all group means were significantly different (P < 0.05).

  9. Embryonic stem cell therapy of heart failure in genetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Liu, Xiao-Ke; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Behfar, Atta; Terzic, Andre

    2008-10-01

    Pathogenic causes underlying nonischemic cardiomyopathies are increasingly being resolved, yet repair therapies for these commonly heritable forms of heart failure are lacking. A case in point is human dilated cardiomyopathy 10 (CMD10; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man #608569), a progressive organ dysfunction syndrome refractory to conventional therapies and linked to mutations in cardiac ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel subunits. Embryonic stem cell therapy demonstrates benefit in ischemic heart disease, but the reparative capacity of this allogeneic regenerative cell source has not been tested in inherited cardiomyopathy. Here, in a Kir6.2-knockout model lacking functional K(ATP) channels, we recapitulated under the imposed stress of pressure overload the gene-environment substrate of CMD10. Salient features of the human malignant heart failure phenotype were reproduced, including compromised contractility, ventricular dilatation, and poor survival. Embryonic stem cells were delivered through the epicardial route into the left ventricular wall of cardiomyopathic stressed Kir6.2-null mutants. At 1 month of therapy, transplantation of 200,000 cells per heart achieved teratoma-free reversal of systolic dysfunction and electrical synchronization and halted maladaptive remodeling, thereby preventing end-stage organ failure. Tracked using the lacZ reporter transgene, stem cells engrafted into host heart. Beyond formation of cardiac tissue positive for Kir6.2, transplantation induced cell cycle activation and halved fibrotic zones, normalizing sarcomeric and gap junction organization within remuscularized hearts. Improved systemic function induced by stem cell therapy translated into increased stamina, absence of anasarca, and benefit to overall survivorship. Embryonic stem cells thus achieve functional repair in nonischemic genetic cardiomyopathy, expanding indications to the therapy of heritable heart failure. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is

  10. NADPH Oxidases in Heart Failure: Poachers or Gamekeepers?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Perino, Alessia; Ghigo, Alessandra; Hirsch, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of heart failure but clinical antioxidant trials have been unsuccessful. This may be because effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) depend upon their source, location, and concentration. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) proteins generate ROS in a highly regulated fashion and modulate several components of the heart failure phenotype. Recent Advances: Two Nox isoforms, Nox2 and Nox4, are expressed in the heart. Studies using gene-modified mice deficient in Nox2 activity indicate that Nox2 activation contributes to angiotensin II–induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, atrial fibrillation, and the development of interstitial fibrosis but may also positively modulate physiological excitation-contraction coupling. Nox2 contributes to myocyte death under stress situations and plays important roles in postmyocardial infarction remodeling, in part by modulating matrix metalloprotease activity. In contrast to Nox2, Nox4 is constitutively active at a low level and induces protective effects in the heart under chronic stress, for example, by maintaining myocardial capillary density. However, high levels of Nox4 could have detrimental effects. Critical Issues: The effects of Nox proteins during the development of heart failure likely depend upon the isoform, activation level, and cellular distribution, and may include beneficial as well as detrimental effects. More needs to be learnt about the precise regulation of abundance and biochemical activity of these proteins in the heart as well as the downstream signaling pathways that they regulate. Future Directions: The development of specific approaches to target individual Nox isoforms and/or specific cell types may be important for the achievement of therapeutic efficacy in heart failure. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1024–1041. PMID:22747566

  11. Peritoneal ultrafiltration in patients with advanced decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Iadarola, Gian Maria; Lusardi, Paola; La Milia, Vincenzo; Amici, Gianpaolo; Santarelli, Stefano; Virga, Giovambattista; Basile, Carlo; Bertoli, Silvio; Bonofiglio, Renzo; Del Rosso, Goffredo; Feriani, Mariano; Galli, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Sandrini, Massimo; Sisca, Sergio; Cancarini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the Best Practice guidelines on peritoneal ultrafiltration (UF) in patients with treatment-resistant advanced decompensated heart failure (TR-AHDF) is to achieve a common approach to the management of decompensated heart failure in those situations in which all conventional treatment options have been unsuccessful, and to stimulate a closer cooperation between nephrologists and cardiologists. The standardization of the case series of different centers would allow a better definition of the results published in the literature, without which they are nothing more than anecdotes. TR-AHDF is characterized by the persistence of severe symptoms even when all possible pharmacological and surgical options have been exhausted. These patients are often treated with methods that allow extracorporeal UF - slow continuous ultrafiltration (SCUF) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) - which have to be performed in hospital facilities. Peritoneal ultrafiltration (PUF) can be considered a treatment option in patients with TR-AHDF when, despite the fact that all treatment options have been used, patients meet the following criteria: • stage D decompensated heart failure (ACC/AHA classification); • INTERMACS level 4 decompensated heart failure; • INTERMACS frequent flyer profile; • chronic renal failure (estimated glomerular filtration rate <50 ml/min per 1.73 m2: KDOQI classification stage 3 chronic kidney disease); • no obvious contraindications to peritoneal UF. PUF treatment modes are derived from the treatment regimens proposed by various authors to obtain systemic UF in patients with severe decompensated heart failure, using manual and automated incremental peritoneal dialysis involving various glucose concentrations in addition to the single icodextrin exchange. These guidelines also identify a minimum set of tests and procedures for the follow-up phase, to be supplemented, according to the center's resources and policy, with other tests that

  12. Decreased renal clearance of digoxin in chronic congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Naafs, M A; van der Hoek, C; van Duin, S; Koorevaar, G; Schopman, W; Silberbusch, J

    1985-01-01

    Renal digoxin clearance was compared in patients suffering from atrial fibrillation with well preserved cardiac function (n = 9; salt intake +/- 170 mmol daily) and patients with chronic congestive heart failure (n = 10; salt intake 50 mmol daily and maintenance treatment with diuretics). There was no difference between the groups concerning digoxin dosage, creatinine clearance, diuresis or sodium excretion in the urine. Digoxin clearance in chronic heart failure proved to be significantly lower than in atrial fibrillation (48 +/- 21 vs 71 +/- 36 ml X min-1, p less than 0.05), and Cdig/Ccreat was similarly reduced at 0.73 +/- 0.15 compared to 1.09 +/- 0.27 (p less than 0.005). Steady state serum digoxin concentration was significantly higher in patients with congestive heart failure (1.44 +/- 0.47 vs 0.87 +/- 0.33 micrograms X 1(-1), p less than 0.01). Chronic congestive heart failure is a state with reduced digoxin clearance by the kidney, which could lead to digoxin intoxication not explicable by overdose, reduced renal function or the effect of interacting drugs. PMID:4007028

  13. Sleep apnoea, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation—quo vadis?

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, C. Anwar A.; Somers, Virend K.

    2015-01-01

    Strong associations exist between sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and both heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF). Burgeoning epidemics of obesity, SDB, HF, and AF make these conditions priorities for health-care policymakers. Two observational studies now suggest outcome benefits from screening and treating for SDB in AF and HF. PMID:25781416

  14. Teaching Congestive Heart Failure to Doctor of Pharmacy Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes a lecture given to pharmacy students that emphasizes the pathophysiologic mechanisms causing congestive heart failure and the effects of drugs on these mechanisms. The approach shows the importance of drug therapy in this disorder and how this knowledge can improve patient care. An appendix provides a case study. (GLR)

  15. Giant pulmonary hamartoma causing acute right heart failure.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Heman M N; Page, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Giant pulmonary hamartomas are rare. We describe a case of a 59-year-old female patient with a giant chondroid hamartoma in the lower lobe of the right lung presenting with acute right heart failure. To the best of our knowledge such a unique presentation has not been previously described in the literature. PMID:24384217

  16. Statins and oxidative stress in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sónia; Reina-Couto, Marta; Albino-Teixeira, António; Sousa, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Statins are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the treatment of dyslipidemia. They are also recommended in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. In addition to decreasing cholesterol synthesis, statins interfere with the synthesis of isoprenoid intermediates, which may explain many of their pleiotropic properties, including their antioxidant effects. Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between the synthesis of reactive oxygen species and their elimination by antioxidant defense systems, with a prevailing pro-oxidant status that results in macromolecular damage and disruption of cellular redox signaling. Reactive oxygen species interfere with various processes that affect cardiac structure and function, contributing to the contractile dysfunction, myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis observed in the pathophysiology of heart failure. By regulating several molecular pathways that control nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity, statins help restore redox homeostasis. These drugs also contribute to the control of inflammation and appear to have a protective role in various diseases. The results of observational studies and clinical trials with statins in heart failure have not been consensual. This review aims to analyze the role of oxidative stress in heart failure and the molecular mechanisms underlying statins' antioxidant properties. It also examines current scientific evidence on the use of these drugs as a specific treatment for heart failure.

  17. Device therapy in the management of congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Turer, Aslan T; Rao, Sunil V

    2005-01-01

    Despite significant advancements in the treatment of heart failure over the past 2 decades, this patient population is still subject to considerably high morbidity and mortality rates. In recent years, the field of device therapy as adjunctive treatment to the medical management of congestive heart failure has grown in the wake of the large number of randomized trials that have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of these devices. The implantable defibrillator currently represents the standard of care in certain segments of the heart failure population, even in those without a prior arrhythmic event. Biventricular pacing systems appear to have a role in heart failure patients with prolongation of their QRS duration in improving ventricular performance and symptoms, if not mortality. Last, the shortage of organs available for orthotopic transplant has heightened interest in using ventricular-assist devices as destination therapy, and although there is evidence for the feasibility for this approach at the current time, there is a next generation of devices that appear even more promising.

  18. Systemic sclerosis: a rare cause of heart failure?

    PubMed

    González-Cambeiro, María Cristina; Abu-Assi, Emad; Abumuaileq, Rami Riziq-Yousef; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Rigueiro-Veloso, Pedro; Virgós-Lamela, Alejandro; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SS) is a chronic disease in which there may be multisystem involvement. It is rare (estimated prevalence: 0.5-2/10000) with high morbidity and mortality, and there is as yet no curative treatment. We report the case of a young woman newly diagnosed with SS, in whom decompensated heart failure was the main manifestation.

  19. [The German National Disease Management Guideline "Chronic Heart Failure"].

    PubMed

    Weinbrenner, S; Langer, T; Scherer, M; Störk, S; Ertl, G; Muth, Ch; Hoppe, U C; Kopp, I; Ollenschläger, G

    2012-02-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is an illness mostly affecting elderly people. In Germany CHF is one of the most common causes of death and at the same time one of the most common diagnosis in inpatient care. Due to the expected increase in life expectancy in the next few years experts predict a further step-up of the incidence. Against this background development of a national guideline on chronic heart failure was prioritised and accordingly the National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure was developed by a multi- and interdisciplinary group. The guideline group comprised experts from all relevant scientific medical societies as well as a patient expert. The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) on Chronic Heart Failure aims at supporting patients and health care providers with respect to decisions on a specific health care problem by giving recommendations for actions. Recommendations are informed by the best available scientific evidence on this topic.Patients with CHF often suffer from multiple conditions. Due to this fact and the old age patients do have very complex and demanding health care needs. Thus accounting for co-morbidities is paramount in planning and providing health care for theses patients and communication between doctor and patient but also between all health care providers is crucial.Basic treatment strategies in chronic heart failure comprise management of risk factors and prognostic factors as well as appropriate consideration of co-morbidities accompanied by measures empowering patients in establishing a healthy life style and a self-dependant management of their illness.Psycho-social aspects have a very strong influence on patients' acceptance of the disease and their self-management. In addition they have a strong influence on therapy management of the treating physician thus they have to be addressed adequately during the consultation.The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure (CHF

  20. Protective effect of oxymatrine on chronic rat heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shu-Ting; Tang, Ying; Shen, Ya-Feng; Ao, Hai-Hang; Bai, Jie; Wang, Yong-Liang; Yang, Yong-Ji

    2011-09-01

    Oxymatrine is one of the alkaloids extracted from the Chinese herb Sophora japonica (Sophora flavescens Ait.) with anti-inflammatory, immune reaction inhibiting, antiviral, and hepatocyte and antihepatic fibrosis protective activities. However, the effect of oxymatrine on heart failure is not yet known. In this study, the effect of oxymatrine on heart failure was investigated using a Sprague-Dawley rat model of chronic heart failure. Morphological findings showed that in the group treated with 50 and 100 mg/kg of oxymatrine; intermyofibrillar lysis disappeared, myofilaments were orderly, closely and evenly arranged; and mitochondria contained tightly packed cristae compared with the heart failure group. We investigated the cytosolic Ca(2+) transients and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content, and assessed the expression of ryanodine receptor (RyR2), SR-Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA2a), and L-type Ca(2+) channel (dihydropyridine receptor, DHPR). We found that the cytosolic Ca(2+) transients were markedly increased in amplitude in the medium- (ΔF/F (0) = 26.22 ± 2.01) and high-dose groups (ΔF/F (0) = 29.49 ± 1.17) compared to the heart failure group (ΔF/F (0) = 12.12 ± 1.35, P < 0.01), with changes paralleled by a significant increase in the SR Ca(2+) content (medium-dose group: ΔF/F (0) = 32.20 ± 1.67, high-dose group: ΔF/F (0) = 32.57 ± 1.29, HF: ΔF/F (0) = 17.26 ± 1.05, P < 0.01). Moreover, we demonstrated that the expression of SERCA2a and cardiac DHPR was significantly increased in the medium- and high-dose group compared with the heart failure rats. These findings suggest that oxymatrine could improve heart failure by improving the cardiac function and that this amelioration is associated with upregulation of SERCA2a and DHPR. PMID:21691940

  1. The Effects of Heart Failure on Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Udani, Suneel M; Koyner, Jay L

    2010-01-01

    Summary Heart-kidney interactions have been increasingly recognized by clinicians and researchers involved in the study and treatment of heart failure and kidney disease. A classification system has been developed to categorize the different manifestations of cardiac and renal dysfunction. Recent work has highlighted the significant negative prognostic effect of worsening renal function on outcomes for individuals with heart failure. The etiology of the concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunction remains unclear; however, increasing evidence supports alternatives to the established theory of underfilling, including effects of venous congestion and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. Conventional therapy focuses on blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with expanding use of direct renin and aldosterone antagonists. Novel therapeutic interventions using extracorporeal therapy and antagonists of the adenosine pathway show promise and require further investigation. PMID:20621250

  2. [Epidemiology and management of heart failure in a Moroccan center].

    PubMed

    Kheyi, Jamal; Benelmakki, Abdelilah; Bouzelmat, Hicham; Chaib, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This is a prospective observational study of 424 patients hospitalized for heart failure. Data were collected from the intensive care unit and Rhythmology Depatment of the Mohamed V Military Hospital for Instruction in Rabat, between December 2008 and December 2014. The average age was 60.91±12.77. The main cardiovascular risk factors encountered were: hypertension (46%), smoking (45%), and diabetes (43%). Clinically, 63% of patients were admitted for left-sided heart failure. The left ventricle was dilated in 58% of cases, with a mean ejection fraction estimated at 36.33 ± 13.5%. The dominant etiology was ischemic heart disease (254 cases). In addition to optimal medical treatment, 14.4% of our patients underwent cardiac resynchronization with or without defibrillator system. The intra-hospital evolution under medical treatment was marked by 26 deaths. The average length of stay in hospital was 12.1 ± 6.6 days. PMID:27642424

  3. HCN Channel as Therapeutic Targets for Heart Failure and Pain.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ying; Pang, Jianxin; Zhou, Pingzheng

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels play important roles both in the control of heart rate and neuronal excitability. HCN channels open on hyperpolarization voltage, permeate to potassium and sodium, and generate an inward current, which is modulated by intracellular cAMP. HCN channels have been reported to involve in various human diseases, including heart failure, pain and epilepsy with datas from mutagenesis, transgenic mice and pharmacological studies. As a result, HCN channels may offer excellent drug development opportunities for novel analgestic, bradycardic and anticonvulsant drugs. Ivabradine is the first HCN channel inhibitor being clinically approved in 2005 for the treatment of chronic stable angina pectoris and heart failure. This review will summarize the structure and function of HCN channels. Further, we will discuss recent advances concerning the identification and action mechanism of reported HCN channel inhibitors.

  4. [Organ damage and cardiorenal syndrome in acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Casado Cerrada, Jesús; Pérez Calvo, Juan Ignacio

    2014-03-01

    Heart failure is a complex syndrome that affects almost all organs and systems of the body. Signs and symptoms of organ dysfunction, in particular kidney dysfunction, may be accentuated or become evident for the first time during acute decompensation of heart failure. Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney, regardless of which of the two organs may have suffered the initial damage and regardless also of their previous functional status. Research into the mechanisms regulating the complex relationship between the two organs is prompting the search for new biomarkers to help physicians detect renal damage in subclinical stages. Hence, a preventive approach to renal dysfunction may be adopted in the clinical setting in the near future. This article provides a general overview of cardiorenal syndrome and an update of the physiopathological mechanisms involved. Special emphasis is placed on the role of visceral congestion as an emergent mechanism in this syndrome.

  5. Patient Characteristics Predicting Readmission Among Individuals Hospitalized for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Melissa; Murtaugh, Christopher M.; Shah, Shivani; Barrón-Vaya, Yolanda; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Peng, Timothy R.; Zhu, Carolyn W.; Feldman, Penny H.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is difficult to manage and increasingly common with many individuals experiencing frequent hospitalizations. Little is known about patient factors consistently associated with hospital readmission. A literature review was conducted to identify heart failure patient characteristics, measured before discharge, that contribute to variation in hospital readmission rates. Database searches yielded 950 potential articles, of which 34 studies met inclusion criteria. Patient characteristics generally have a very modest effect on all-cause or heart failure–related readmission within 7 to 180 days of index hospital discharge. A range of cardiac diseases and other comorbidities only minimally increase readmission rates. No single patient characteristic stands out as a key contributor across multiple studies underscoring the challenge of developing successful interventions to reduce readmissions. Interventions may need to be general in design with the specific intervention depending on each patient's unique clinical profile. PMID:26180045

  6. CXCR4 gene transfer prevents pressure overload induced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    LaRocca, Thomas J.; Jeong, Dongtak; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Lee, Ahyoung; Chen, JiQiu; Hajjar, Roger J.; Tarzami, Sima T.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell and gene therapies are being pursued as strategies for repairing damaged cardiac tissue following myocardial infarction in an attempt to prevent heart failure. The chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) and its ligand, CXCL12, play a critical role in stem cell recruitment post-acute myocardial infarction. Whereas progenitor cell migration via the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is well characterized, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of CXCR4 mediated modulation of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. We used gene therapy to test the effects of CXCR4 gene delivery on adverse ventricular remodeling due to pressure overload. We assessed the effect of cardiac overexpression of CXCR4 during trans-aortic constriction (TAC) using a cardiotropic adeno-associated viral vector (AAV9) carrying the CXCR4 gene. Cardiac overexpression of CXCR4 in mice with pressure overload prevented ventricular remodeling, preserved capillary density and maintained function as determined by echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamics. In isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes, CXCL12 treatment prevented isoproterenol induced hypertrophy and interrupted the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. Finally, a complex involving the L-type calcium channel, β2-adenoreceptor, and CXCR4 (Cav1.2/β2AR/CXCR4) was identified in healthy cardiac myocytes and was shown to dissociate as a consequence of heart failure. CXCR4 administered to the heart via gene transfer prevents pressure overload induced heart failure. The identification of CXCR4 participation in a Cav1.2-β2AR regulatory complex provides further insight into the mechanism by which CXCR4 modulates calcium homeostasis and chronic pressure overload responses in the cardiac myocyte. Together these results suggest AAV9.CXCR4 gene therapy is a potential therapeutic approach for congestive heart failure. PMID:22668785

  7. Self-care in heart failure patients 1

    PubMed Central

    da Conceição, Ana Paula; dos Santos, Mariana Alvina; dos Santos, Bernardo; da Cruz, Diná de Almeida Lopes Monteiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to describe self-care behavior and its associated factors in a sample of heart failure Brazilian patients. Method: descriptive cross-sectional study with non-probabilistic sample of 116 ambulatory patients undergoing heart failure treatment. Self-care was evaluated using the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index, (scores ≥70 points=appropriate self-care). Association tests were applied, considering a descriptive level of 0.05. Results: the mean age of participants was 57.7 (SD =11.3) years; 54.3% were male; the mean schooling was 5.5 (SD = 4.0) years; and 74.1% had functional class II-III. The mean scores on the subscales of the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index indicated inappropriate self-care (self-care maintenance: 53.2 (SD =14.3), selfcare management: 50.0 (SD = 20.3) and self-care confidence: 52.6 (SD=22.7)) and it was found low frequencies of participants with appropriate self-care (self-care maintenance, 6.9%), self-care management (14.7%) and self-care confidence (19%). Higher scores of the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index were associated with: reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (p=0.001), longer time of experience with the disease (p=0.05) and joint monitoring by physician and nurse (p=0.007). Conclusion: investments are needed to improve the self-care behavior and the nursing can play a relevant role in this improvement. PMID:26444158

  8. [Diastolic heart failure treated by diet].

    PubMed

    Heilmeyer, Peter; von Bibra, Helene

    2016-01-01

    History and admission findings | An obese patient with type 2 diabetes (on 90 IU insulin daily) and exertional dyspnoea (NYHA II-III) for 3 weeks presented in a rehabilitation clinic hoping to reduce his weight. Clinical and laboratory findings excluded any inflammatory or systemic disease apart from diabetes mellitus. Blood pressure and serum lipid levels were normal. Investigations | An unremarkable ECG stress test and echocardiogram excluded ischemic and hypertensive heart disease and primary cardiomyopathy. Pulsed tissue Doppler revealed diastolic cardiac dysfunction. Unremarkable were also chest X-ray, pulmonary function testing and 24-hour ECG. Treatment and Course | The findings supported the diagnosis of HFpEF and diabetic/insulin resistance cardiomyopathy. Insulin resistance was treated for three weeks by low-carbohydrate nutrition and moderate exercise. At discharge, weight was reduced by 2 kg, exercise capacity and diastolic function were normalized, as were insulin resistance and postprandial glucose levels, whilst antidiabetic therapy was reduced to low-carbohydrate nutrition. Conclusion | HFpEF due to insulin resistance cardiomyopathy is often not recognized, especially in obese individuals, and may be further aggravated by the traditional recommendation of low-fat nutrition. Due to the high reversibility of metabolically dysregulated cardiovascular mechanisms, a causal, i.e. metabolic therapeutic strategy that normalizes insulin resistance by low-carbohydrate nutrition is a promising option.

  9. [Diastolic heart failure treated by diet].

    PubMed

    Heilmeyer, Peter; von Bibra, Helene

    2016-01-01

    History and admission findings | An obese patient with type 2 diabetes (on 90 IU insulin daily) and exertional dyspnoea (NYHA II-III) for 3 weeks presented in a rehabilitation clinic hoping to reduce his weight. Clinical and laboratory findings excluded any inflammatory or systemic disease apart from diabetes mellitus. Blood pressure and serum lipid levels were normal. Investigations | An unremarkable ECG stress test and echocardiogram excluded ischemic and hypertensive heart disease and primary cardiomyopathy. Pulsed tissue Doppler revealed diastolic cardiac dysfunction. Unremarkable were also chest X-ray, pulmonary function testing and 24-hour ECG. Treatment and Course | The findings supported the diagnosis of HFpEF and diabetic/insulin resistance cardiomyopathy. Insulin resistance was treated for three weeks by low-carbohydrate nutrition and moderate exercise. At discharge, weight was reduced by 2 kg, exercise capacity and diastolic function were normalized, as were insulin resistance and postprandial glucose levels, whilst antidiabetic therapy was reduced to low-carbohydrate nutrition. Conclusion | HFpEF due to insulin resistance cardiomyopathy is often not recognized, especially in obese individuals, and may be further aggravated by the traditional recommendation of low-fat nutrition. Due to the high reversibility of metabolically dysregulated cardiovascular mechanisms, a causal, i.e. metabolic therapeutic strategy that normalizes insulin resistance by low-carbohydrate nutrition is a promising option. PMID:26800073

  10. Angiopoietin-2 in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kümpers, Philipp; Denecke, Agnieszka; Westhoff-Bleck, Mechthild; Schieffer, Bernhard; Bauersachs, Johann; Kielstein, Jan T.; Tutarel, Oktay

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure is an important cause for morbidity and mortality in adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD). While NT-proBNP is an established biomarker for heart failure of non-congenital origin, its application in ACHD has limitations. The angiogenic factors Angiopoietin-1 and -2 (Ang-1, Ang-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and soluble receptor tyrosine kinase of the Tie family (sTie2) correlate with disease severity in heart failure of non-congenital origin. Their role in ACHD has not been studied. Methods In 91 patients Ang-2 and NT-proBNP were measured and related to New York Heart Association class, systemic ventricular function and parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Ang-1, VEGF, and sTie2 were also measured. Results Ang-2 correlates with NYHA class and ventricular dysfunction comparable to NT-proBNP. Further, Ang-2 showed a good correlation with parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Both, Ang-2 and NT-proBNP identified patients with severely limited cardiopulmonary exercise capacity. Additionally, Ang-2 is elevated in patients with a single ventricle physiology in contrast to NT-proBNP. VEGF, Ang-1, and sTie2 were not correlated with any clinical parameter. Conclusion The performance of Ang-2 as a biomarker for heart failure in ACHD is comparable to NT-proBNP. Its significant elevation in patients with single ventricle physiology indicates potential in this patient group and warrants further studies. PMID:23826161

  11. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure: Revisiting Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Julio; Miñana, Gema; Santas, Enrique; Bertomeu-González, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney. Worsening renal function that occurs in patients with acute heart failure has been classified as cardiorenal syndrome type 1. In this setting, worsening renal function is a common finding and is due to complex, multifactorial, and not fully understood processes involving hemodynamic (renal arterial hypoperfusion and renal venous congestion) and nonhemodynamic factors. Traditionally, worsening renal function has been associated with worse outcomes, but recent findings have revealed mixed and heterogeneous results, perhaps suggesting that the same phenotype represents a diversity of pathophysiological and clinical situations. Interpreting the magnitude and chronology of renal changes together with baseline renal function, fluid overload status, and clinical response to therapy might help clinicians to unravel the clinical meaning of renal function changes that occur during an episode of heart failure decompensation. In this article, we critically review the contemporary evidence on the pathophysiology and clinical aspects of worsening renal function in acute heart failure.

  12. Targeted gene therapy for the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rapti, Kleopatra; Chaanine, Antoine H; Hajjar, Roger J

    2011-01-01

    Chronic heart failure is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Western countries and is a major financial burden to the health care system. Pharmacologic treatment and implanting devices are the predominant therapeutic approaches. They improve survival and have offered significant improvement in patient quality of life, but they fall short of producing an authentic remedy. Cardiac gene therapy, the introduction of genetic material to the heart, offers great promise in filling this void. In-depth knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of heart failure is, obviously, a prerequisite to achieve this aim. Extensive research in the past decades, supported by numerous methodological breakthroughs, such as transgenic animal model development, has led to a better understanding of the cardiovascular diseases and, inadvertently, to the identification of several candidate genes. Of the genes that can be targeted for gene transfer, calcium cycling proteins are prominent, as abnormalities in calcium handling are key determinants of heart failure. A major impediment, however, has been the development of a safe, yet efficient, delivery system. Nonviral vectors have been used extensively in clinical trials, but they fail to produce significant gene expression. Viral vectors, especially adenoviral, on the other hand, can produce high levels of expression, at the expense of safety. Adeno-associated viral vectors have emerged in recent years as promising myocardial gene delivery vehicles. They can sustain gene expression at a therapeutic level and maintain it over extended periods of time, even for years, and, most important, without a safety risk.

  13. [Heart failure. Importance and utility of the echocardiographic evaluation].

    PubMed

    Echeverri-Rico, Jorge Valente; Aceves-Millán, Rocío; Amezcua-Gómez, Lilia; Ixcamparij-Rosales, Carlos Haroldo; Ruiz-Rivero, Antonio; Torres, Armando; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Millions of people die every year due to cardiovascular diseases. The objective against these diseases is primary prevention, but secondary prevention is the major goal in those individuals who already suffered an event. The order of the cardiovascular complication is the next one: arrhythmia, heart failure, myocardial infarction or stroke, and death. Approximately between 1 and 2 % of adults present heart failure, but this percentage rises to more than 10 % in adults over 70 years. Therefore, it is necessary to diagnose and to treat this complication. Left ventricular ejection fraction is the most important prognosis factor in these patients, because it decreases in 50 % of them. Almost 50 % of patients with heart failure have a conserved systolic function, but a decreased diastolic function. Treatment must improve the structural and functional heart abnormalities. Echocardiography is a useful tool in these patients due to its exactitude, accessibility, safety, and low cost. It provides information about the characteristics of the cardiac chambers and its volumes, the diameter in the walls, and about the diastolic, systolic and valvular function. Recently, echocardiography evolved to third dimension techniques, which seem to be more exact. In the next years, we will have more evidence about this diagnostic modality.

  14. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure: Revisiting Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Julio; Miñana, Gema; Santas, Enrique; Bertomeu-González, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney. Worsening renal function that occurs in patients with acute heart failure has been classified as cardiorenal syndrome type 1. In this setting, worsening renal function is a common finding and is due to complex, multifactorial, and not fully understood processes involving hemodynamic (renal arterial hypoperfusion and renal venous congestion) and nonhemodynamic factors. Traditionally, worsening renal function has been associated with worse outcomes, but recent findings have revealed mixed and heterogeneous results, perhaps suggesting that the same phenotype represents a diversity of pathophysiological and clinical situations. Interpreting the magnitude and chronology of renal changes together with baseline renal function, fluid overload status, and clinical response to therapy might help clinicians to unravel the clinical meaning of renal function changes that occur during an episode of heart failure decompensation. In this article, we critically review the contemporary evidence on the pathophysiology and clinical aspects of worsening renal function in acute heart failure. PMID:25758162

  15. Heart failure: an overview of consensus guidelines and nursing implications.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Anna

    2003-01-01

    Heart failure affects more than 350,000 Canadians and costs over $1 billion annually for inpatient care alone. Consensus guidelines have been developed to guide care and improve quality of life based on current evidence or best practice. This article will provide a brief overview of medications and lifestyle modifications described in guidelines developed by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, the Heart Failure Society of America, and the European Society of Cardiology. Medications for treating heart failure can be divided into two groups: those with a mortality benefit (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, beta-blockers, and selective aldosterone receptor antagonists), and those that improve symptoms (diuretics and cardiac glycosides). Nursing implications include careful assessment of volume status, vital signs, monitoring electrolyte and renal function, as well as spacing of medications. Nurses play a key role in assisting patients to identify their lifestyle habits that require modifications, ultimately improving their quality of life and decreasing hospital readmissions. Education focusing on self-care activities, diet, rest, and exercise enables patients to retain a sense of control in their lives.

  16. Management and monitoring of haemodynamic complications in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Aspromonte, Nadia; Cruz, Dinna N; Valle, Roberto; Ronco, Claudio

    2011-11-01

    The pathophysiology of acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS), defined as a change or worsening in heart failure symptoms and signs, is complex. The variety of adverse neurohormonal adaptations includes increased levels of plasma renin, aldosterone and angiotensin II, all responsible for cardio-renal dysfunction. In fact, such alterations result in an array of clinical changes that include abnormal haemodynamics, altered ventricular filling pressures, pathological neurohormonal responses, leading to fluid overload, congestion and ultimately heart failure symptoms. Clinical pictures can be various: in spite of a usual improvement in dyspnoea, little weight change and significant morbidity are generally observed during hospitalization. Short-term outcomes are characterized by a high 60-day re-hospitalization and high mortality rates; apparently, both can be predicted from pre-discharge characteristics. The most frequently used treatments for AHF care include diuretics, inotropic agents, and vasodilator/vasoactive agents; however, the final therapeutic strategy is often individualized. Diuretics are currently the most used agents, but resistance to diuretic therapy is common. In addition, several studies have demonstrated that aggressive diuresis can contribute to reduced renal function, and high doses of diuretics have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Many patients with AHFS also suffer from acute or from chronic renal dysfunction (cardio-renal syndromes type 1 and 2, respectively), which further complicate the outcomes and treatment strategies. A personalized patient evaluation of the combined heart and kidney functions is advised to implement the best possible multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

  17. [Beta-blocking drugs indicated in patients with heart failure].

    PubMed

    Voors, A A; van Gilst, W H; van Veldhuisen, D J

    2003-12-13

    Until recently, beta-blocking drugs were considered to be contraindicated in patients with chronic heart failure. However, several well-conducted randomised clinical trials have now proven otherwise. Yet, it was still not clear whether nonselective alpha-, beta 1- and beta 2-receptor blockade with carvedilol would be superior to selective beta 1-receptor blockade with metoprolol. One of the studies ('Carvedilol or metoprolol European trial' (COMET)) demonstrated a statistically significant 17% reduction of all-cause mortality with carvedilol. Although striking, the results may have been influenced by differences in blood pressure and heart rate, as well as the short-acting formula of metoprolol that was used. Furthermore, the 'Carvedilol hibernation reversible ischaemia trial; marker of success' (CHRISTMAS) study demonstrated myocardial hibernation in the majority of ischaemic heart-failure patients, and showed beneficial effects on left-ventricle function with carvedilol in both hibernated and non-hibernated patients. Despite this and the rest of the overwhelming evidence, at present only a minority of eligible chronic heart-failure patients are treated with beta-blockers.

  18. ST2 and patient prognosis in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Zhang, Yuhui; Ky, Bonnie

    2015-04-01

    Biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases are indispensable tools for diagnosis and prognosis, and the use of several biomarkers is now considered the standard of care. New markers continue to be developed, but few prove to be substantially better than established markers. Suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) is a marker of cardiomyocyte stress and fibrosis that provides incremental value to natriuretic peptides for risk stratification of patients with a wide spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. On the basis of all available data, the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines now recommend measurement of ST2 for additive risk stratification in patients with acute or chronic ambulatory heart failure (HF). This report provides an up-to-date overview of the clinical studies that led to the endorsement of ST2 as a cardiovascular prognostic marker in chronic HF. The presented data suggest that the addition of ST2 to a model that includes established mortality risk factors, including natriuretic peptides, substantially improves the risk stratification for death and HF hospitalization in patients with HF. ST2's prognostic value remains strong even in the subset of patients with renal insufficiency and is superior to other remodeling-fibrosis biomarkers currently being evaluated. In conclusion, these results have been repeatedly validated; thus, ST2 could be rapidly incorporated into clinical practice for risk prediction. Indeed, the body of evidence supporting the use of ST2 in chronic HF stratification continues to grow, with consistent data from cohorts around the world in single-center (Barcelona, Brussels, and San Diego cohorts) and multicenter (Penn Heart Failure Study [PHFS] and Muerte Subita en Insuficiencia Cardiac [MUSIC]) studies and in post hoc studies from clinical trials (Prospective Randomized Amlodipine Survival Evaluation 2 [PRAISE-2], Heart Failure: A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training [HF

  19. ST2 and patient prognosis in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Zhang, Yuhui; Ky, Bonnie

    2015-04-01

    Biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases are indispensable tools for diagnosis and prognosis, and the use of several biomarkers is now considered the standard of care. New markers continue to be developed, but few prove to be substantially better than established markers. Suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) is a marker of cardiomyocyte stress and fibrosis that provides incremental value to natriuretic peptides for risk stratification of patients with a wide spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. On the basis of all available data, the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines now recommend measurement of ST2 for additive risk stratification in patients with acute or chronic ambulatory heart failure (HF). This report provides an up-to-date overview of the clinical studies that led to the endorsement of ST2 as a cardiovascular prognostic marker in chronic HF. The presented data suggest that the addition of ST2 to a model that includes established mortality risk factors, including natriuretic peptides, substantially improves the risk stratification for death and HF hospitalization in patients with HF. ST2's prognostic value remains strong even in the subset of patients with renal insufficiency and is superior to other remodeling-fibrosis biomarkers currently being evaluated. In conclusion, these results have been repeatedly validated; thus, ST2 could be rapidly incorporated into clinical practice for risk prediction. Indeed, the body of evidence supporting the use of ST2 in chronic HF stratification continues to grow, with consistent data from cohorts around the world in single-center (Barcelona, Brussels, and San Diego cohorts) and multicenter (Penn Heart Failure Study [PHFS] and Muerte Subita en Insuficiencia Cardiac [MUSIC]) studies and in post hoc studies from clinical trials (Prospective Randomized Amlodipine Survival Evaluation 2 [PRAISE-2], Heart Failure: A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training [HF

  20. Comparison of partners-heart failure algorithm vs care alert in remote heart failure management

    PubMed Central

    Calo’, Leonardo; Martino, Annamaria; Tota, Claudia; Fagagnini, Alessandro; Iulianella, Renzo; Rebecchi, Marco; Sciarra, Luigi; Giunta, Giuseppe; Romano, Maria Grazia; Colaceci, Roberto; Ciccaglioni, Antonio; Ammirati, Fabrizio; de Ruvo, Ermenegildo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the utility of the partners-heart failure (HF) algorithm with the care alert strategy for remote monitoring, in guiding clinical actions oriented to treat impending HF. METHODS: Consecutive cardiac resynchronization-defibrillator recipients were followed with biweekly automatic transmissions. After every transmission, patients received a phone contact in order to check their health status, eventually followed by clinical actions, classified as “no-action”, “non-active” and “active”. Active clinical actions were oriented to treat impending HF. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and diagnostic accuracy of the partners-HF algorithm vs care alert in determining active clinical actions oriented to treat pre-HF status and to prevent an acute decompensation, were also calculated. RESULTS: The study population included 70 patients with moderate to advanced systolic HF and QRS duration longer than 120 ms. During a mean follow-up of 8 ± 2 mo, 665 transmissions were collected. No deaths or HF hospitalizations occurred. The sensitivity and specificity of the partners-HF algorithm for active clinical actions oriented to treat impending HF were 96.9% (95%CI: 0.96-0.98) and 92.5% (95%CI: 0.90-0.94) respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 84.6% (95%CI: 0.82-0.87) and 98.6% (95%CI: 0.98-0.99) respectively. The partners-HF algorithm had an accuracy of 93.8% (95%CI: 0.92-0.96) in determining active clinical actions. With regard to active clinical actions, care alert had a sensitivity and specificity of 11.05% (95%CI: 0.09-0.13) and 93.6% respectively (95%CI: 0.92-0.95). The positive predictive value was 42.3% (95%CI: 0.38-0.46); the negative predictive value was 71.1% (95%CI: 0.68-0.74). Care alert had an accuracy of 68.9% (95%CI: 0.65-0.72) in determining active clinical actions. CONCLUSION: The partners-HF algorithm proved higher accuracy and sensitivity than care alert in determining active

  1. Quality of Life After Bypass Surgery in Patients with Chest Pain and Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bypass Surgery in Patients With Chest Pain and Heart Failure The full report is titled “Quality-of-Life ... in patients who have coronary artery disease plus heart failure, which can cause additional symptoms, such as shortness ...

  2. Effect of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy on Inflammation in Congestive Heart Failure: A Review.

    PubMed

    Lappegård, K T; Bjørnstad, H; Mollnes, T E; Hovland, A

    2015-09-01

    Congestive heart failure is associated with increased levels of several inflammatory mediators, and animal studies have shown that infusion of a number of cytokines can induce heart failure. However, several drugs with proven efficacy in heart failure have failed to affect inflammatory mediators, and anti-inflammatory therapy in heart failure patients has thus far been disappointing. Hence, to what extent heart failure is caused by or responsible for the increased inflammatory burden in the patient is still unclear. Over the past couple of decades, resynchronization therapy with a biventricular pacemaker has emerged as an effective treatment in a subset of heart failure patients, reducing both morbidity and mortality. Such treatment has also been shown to affect the inflammation associated with heart failure. In this study, we review recent data on the association between heart failure and inflammation, and in particular how resynchronization therapy can affect the inflammatory process.

  3. Precipitating factors leading to decompensation of chronic heart failure in the elderly patient in South-American community hospital

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Alejandro; Ciocchini, Cleto; Esperatti, Mariano; Becerra, Alberto; Mainardi, Sabrina; Farah, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Background Exacerbations of heart failure appear frequently associated with precipitating factors not directly related to the evolution of cardiac disease. There still a paucity of data on the proportional distribution of precipitating factors specifically in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to examine prospectively the precipitating factors leading to hospitalization in elderly patients with heart failure in our community hospital. Methods We evaluate elderly patients who need admissions for decompensate heart failure. All patients were reviewed daily by the study investigators at the first 24 h and closely followed-up. Decompensation was defined as the worsening in clinical NYHA class associated with the need for an increase in medical treatment (at minimum intravenously diuretics). Results We included 102 patients (mean age 79 ± 12 years). Precipitating factors were identified in 88.5%. The decompensation was sudden in 35% of the cases. Noncompliance with diet was identified in 52% of the patients, lack of adherence to the prescribed medications amounted to 30%. Others precipitating factors were infections (29%), arrhythmias (25%), acute coronary ischemia (22%), and uncontrolled hypertension (15%), miscellaneous causes were detected in 18% of the cases (progression of renal disease 60%, anemia 30% and iatrogenic factors 10%). Concomitant cause was not recognizable in 11.5%. Conclusions Large proportion heart failure hospitalizations are associated with preventable precipitating factors. Knowledge of potential precipitating factors may help to optimize treatment and provide guidance for patients with heart failure. The presence of potential precipitating factors should be routinely evaluated in patients presenting chronic heart failure. PMID:22783279

  4. The role of coronary artery disease in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lala, Anuradha; Desai, Akshay S

    2014-04-01

    Enhanced survival following acute myocardial infarction and the declining prevalence of hypertension and valvular heart disease as contributors to incident heart failure (HF) have fueled the emergence of coronary artery disease (CAD) as the primary risk factor for HF development. Despite the acknowledged role of CAD in the development of HF, the role of coronary revascularization in reducing HF-associated morbidity and mortality remains controversial. The authors review key features of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CAD in patients with HF as well as the emerging data from recent clinical trials that inform the modern approach to management.

  5. Heart failure in elderly patients: distinctive features and unresolved issues

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarini, Valentina; Mentz, Robert J.; Fiuzat, Mona; Metra, Marco; O'Connor, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of heart failure (HF) increases with age. While clinical trials suggest that contemporary evidence-based HF therapies have reduced morbidity and mortality, these trials largely excluded the elderly. Questions remain regarding the clinical characteristics of elderly HF patients and the impact of contemporary therapies on their outcomes. This review presents the epidemiology of HF in the elderly and summarizes the data on the pathophysiology of the ageing heart. The clinical characteristics, treatment patterns, and outcomes of elderly HF patients are explored. Finally, the main gaps regarding HF therapies in the elderly and the opportunities for future trials are highlighted. PMID:23429975

  6. Risks and benefits of weight loss in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Carl J; Alpert, Martin A; Ventura, Hector O

    2015-01-01

    Obesity adversely affects many cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and increases the risk of most CVD, including heart failure (HF). HF is markedly increased in the setting of obesity. However, obese patients with HF have a better prognosis than lean patients with HF, which has been termed the obesity paradox. Therefore, the role of weight loss, which generally improves ventricular structure, systolic and diastolic ventricular function, and New York Heart Association functional class in HF, remains controversial. This article discusses the pros and cons of weight loss and differentiates purposeful (healthy) from nonpurposeful (unhealthy) weight loss.

  7. Prulifloxacin vs Levofloxacin for Exacerbation of COPD after Failure of Other Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Massimo; Blasi, Francesco; Iori, Ido; Mazzone, Antonino; Sgambato, Francesco; Politi, Cecilia; Colagrande, Paola; Casali, Annamaria; Valerio, Antonella; Gussoni, Gualberto; Bonizzoni, Erminio; Campanini, Mauro

    2016-10-01

    The chronic course and evolution of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often characterized by periods of exacerbation of symptoms, which have a negative impact on the quality of life of patients, as well as on the evolution of COPD, and represent a significant cause of medical intervention and hospitalization. Very few data are available on the efficacy of rescue antibiotics in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) unresponsive to previous treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of two fluoroquinolones in AECOPD previously treated without success. The FADOI-FLOR study is a randomized, single-blind, non-inferiority comparison between levofloxacin and prulifloxacin. Primary end-point was "therapeutic success" at Day 10 of treatment, defined as disappearance of signs/symptoms or decrease of at least three points of a global score of symptomatology (maximum score = 15). 258 patients were enrolled (128 levofloxacin and 130 prulifloxacin), in 25 centers. A very high proportion of patients in the two groups had therapeutic success at Day-10 (levofloxacin 93.0% vs prulifloxacin 96.7%, population intention-to-treat; 94.6% vs 99.1%, population per-protocol). Earlier therapeutic success (within 7 days) was achieved in 32.0% and 36.2% of patients receiving levofloxacin or prulifloxacin, respectively. At 3-month follow-up, re-exacerbations occurred in 17.8% of patients treated with levofloxacin and 14.2% of those receiving prulifloxacin (p = 0.44). In conclusion, fluoroquinolones are very effective in the treatment of AECOPD resistant to other antibiotics. PMID:27027547

  8. Central nervous system circuits modified in heart failure: pathophysiology and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Pinto, Bernardo; Ferreira-Pinto, Manuel J; Santos, Mário; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F

    2014-11-01

    The pathophysiology of heart failure (HF) is characterized by an abnormal activation of neurohumoral systems, including the sympathetic nervous and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems, which have long-term deleterious effects on the disease progression. Perpetuation of this neurohumoral activation is partially dependent of central nervous system (CNS) pathways, mainly involving the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and some regions of the brainstem. Modifications in these integrative CNS circuits result in the attenuation of sympathoinhibitory and exacerbation of sympathoexcitatory pathways. In addition to the regulation of sympathetic outflow, these central pathways coordinate a complex network of agents with an established pathophysiological relevance in HF such as angiotensin, aldosterone, and proinflammatory cytokines. Central pathways could be potential targets in HF therapy since the current mainstay of HF pharmacotherapy aims primarily at antagonizing the peripheral mechanisms. Thus, in the present review, we describe the role of CNS pathways in HF pathophysiology and as potential novel therapeutic targets.

  9. Drug Treatment of Heart Failure in Children: Focus on Recent Recommendations from the ISHLT Guidelines for the Management of Pediatric Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Alexander D; Weintraub, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    The International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) recently updated consensus pediatric heart failure guidelines from those published in 2004 with an aim to provide a practical evidence-based resource whilst recognizing the influence of adult heart failure practice. The new guidelines were formed from published evidence for heart failure management and used parallels with adult literature where pediatric evidence was lacking. This is a summary of the pharmacological therapies discussed in the new 2014 guidelines, emphasizing changes from the previous recommendations with regards to treatment of chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, chronic heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and acute decompensated heart failure. Each recommendation is classified according to strength and level of evidence. We also discuss future perspectives in the pharmacological treatment of heart failure. The 2014 ISHLT guidelines have evolved considerably from those published in 2004 with extensive information surrounding the underlying pathophysiology, investigations and recommended treatment. The new guidelines contain a modest amount of new pediatric data on pharmacological therapies and extrapolate adult data when appropriate. It is likely that most new recommendations for pediatric heart failure will continue to be based on therapies of proven benefit in adult heart failure studies. PMID:26939781

  10. [Right heart failure in a patient with unexplained tricuspid regurgitation and a rare congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Tufaro, Vincenzo; Slavich, Massimo; Fisicaro, Andrea; Ingallina, Giacomo; Margonato, Alberto; Agricola, Eustachio

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 63-year-old woman admitted to the intensive care unit because of acute decompensated right heart failure. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography revealed severe right ventricular dysfunction with severe tricuspid regurgitation of unknown origin and a large membrane running from the inferior vena cava to the interatrial septum with significant diastolic transmembrane gradient, consistent with the diagnosis of cor triatriatum dexter. The clinical interest of our findings relies on the coexistence of multiple diseases, which actually contributed in a different but synergistic manner to right heart failure.

  11. Generation of Antigen Microarrays to Screen for Autoantibodies in Heart Failure and Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chruscinski, Andrzej; Huang, Flora Y. Y.; Nguyen, Albert; Lioe, Jocelyn; Tumiati, Laura C.; Kozuszko, Stella; Tinckam, Kathryn J.; Rao, Vivek; Dunn, Shannon E.; Persinger, Michael A.; Levy, Gary A.; Ross, Heather J.

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies directed against endogenous proteins including contractile proteins and endothelial antigens are frequently detected in patients with heart failure and after heart transplantation. There is evidence that these autoantibodies contribute to cardiac dysfunction and correlate with clinical outcomes. Currently, autoantibodies are detected in patient sera using individual ELISA assays (one for each antigen). Thus, screening for many individual autoantibodies is laborious and consumes a large amount of patient sample. To better capture the broad-scale antibody reactivities that occur in heart failure and post-transplant, we developed a custom antigen microarray technique that can simultaneously measure IgM and IgG reactivities against 64 unique antigens using just five microliters of patient serum. We first demonstrated that our antigen microarray technique displayed enhanced sensitivity to detect autoantibodies compared to the traditional ELISA method. We then piloted this technique using two sets of samples that were obtained at our institution. In the first retrospective study, we profiled pre-transplant sera from 24 heart failure patients who subsequently received heart transplants. We identified 8 antibody reactivities that were higher in patients who developed cellular rejection (2 or more episodes of grade 2R rejection in first year after transplant as defined by revised criteria from the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation) compared with those who did have not have rejection episodes. In a second retrospective study with 31 patients, we identified 7 IgM reactivities that were higher in heart transplant recipients who developed antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) compared with control recipients, and in time course studies, these reactivities appeared prior to overt graft dysfunction. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the autoantibody microarray technique outperforms traditional ELISAs as it uses less patient sample, has

  12. Lifestyle modification with diet and exercise in obese patients with heart failure - A pilot study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a paucity of data regarding intentional weight loss in obese heart failure patients. This study sought to ascertain the safety and effectiveness of a lifestyle modification program in patients with systolic heart failure and metabolic syndrome. Patients (n=20) with systolic heart failure (e...

  13. Determined to Fail--the Role of Genetic Mechanisms in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kayvanpour, Elham; Katus, Hugo A; Meder, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    Genetic variants contribute to several steps during heart failure pathophysiology. The mechanisms include frequent polymorphisms that increase the susceptibility to heart failure in the general population and rare variants as causes of an underlying cardiomyopathy. In this review, we highlight recent discoveries made by genetic approaches and provide an outlook onto the role of epigenetic modifiers of heart failure.

  14. Arrhythmia triggers in heart failure: the smoking gun of [Ca2+]i dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Aistrup, Gary L; Balke, C William; Wasserstrom, J Andrew

    2011-11-01

    Among the most serious problems associated with heart failure is the increased likelihood of life-threatening arrhythmias. Both triggered and reentrant arrhythmias in heart failure may arise as a result of aberrant intracellular Ca cycling. This article presents some new ideas, based on recent studies, about how altered Ca cycling in heart failure might serve as the cellular basis for arrhythmogenesis. PMID:21699870

  15. Systems biology applied to heart failure with normal ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Jorge, Antonio Jose Lagoeiro; Souza Junior, Celso Vale de; Cassino, João Paulo Pedroza

    2014-05-01

    Heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF) is currently the most prevalent clinical phenotype of heart failure. However, the treatments available have shown no reduction in mortality so far. Advances in the omics sciences and techniques of high data processing used in molecular biology have enabled the development of an integrating approach to HFNEF based on systems biology. This study aimed at presenting a systems-biology-based HFNEF model using the bottom-up and top-down approaches. A literature search was conducted for studies published between 1991 and 2013 regarding HFNEF pathophysiology, its biomarkers and systems biology. A conceptual model was developed using bottom-up and top-down approaches of systems biology. The use of systems-biology approaches for HFNEF, a complex clinical syndrome, can be useful to better understand its pathophysiology and to discover new therapeutic targets.

  16. Pathophysiology and clinical evaluation of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mentz, Robert J; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a complex syndrome characterized by worsening heart failure (HF) symptoms that requires escalation of therapy. Intrinsic cardiac abnormalities and comorbid conditions, including lung and renal disease, and sleep-disordered breathing, can contribute to the development of AHF. In this Review, we summarize and discuss the literature on the clinical evaluation and underlying pathophysiology of AHF. Important features of AHF evaluation include identification of precipitating factors to the disease, and assessment of circulatory-renal limitations associated with use of HF medications, prior HF hospitalizations, congestion and perfusion profiles, and end-organ dysfunction. The pathophysiological contributions of endothelial dysfunction, neurohormonal activation, venous congestion, and myocardial injury to the development of AHF are also discussed. These potential causative mechanisms provide a framework for clinicians to evaluate and manage patients with AHF and highlight possible future targets for therapies designed to improve clinical outcomes.

  17. Vasopressin receptor antagonists, heart failure, and polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente E

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of nonpeptide orally bioavailable vasopressin antagonists devoid of agonistic activity (vaptans) has made possible the selective blockade of vasopressin receptor subtypes for therapeutic purposes. Vaptans acting on the vasopressin V2 receptors (aquaretics) have attracted attention as a possible therapy for heart failure and polycystic kidney disease. Despite a solid rationale and encouraging preclinical testing, aquaretics have not improved clinical outcomes in randomized clinical trials for heart failure. Additional clinical trials with select population targets, more flexible dosing schedules, and possibly a different drug type or combination (balanced V1a/V2 receptor antagonism) may be warranted. Aquaretics are promising for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and have been approved in Japan for this indication. More studies are needed to better define their long-term safety and efficacy and optimize their utilization.

  18. Novelties in the early management of acute heart failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Salem, Reda; Sibellas, Franck; Socrates, Thenral; Arenja, Nisha; Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Mueller, Christian; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2010-07-22

    The recent European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines delineate the diagnosis and management of distinct categories of acute heart failure syndromes. However, physicians dealing with these patients may need guidance in choosing therapeutic alternatives as soon as the dyspneic patient arrives at the emergency department, until distinct categories of the ESC guidelines are identified. Hence, this manuscript summarizes practical recommendations for the very early management of patients with acute heart failure syndromes. The recommendations are based on a clinical classification system considering the initial systolic blood pressure and other symptoms. Early initiation of diagnostic and goal-directed treatment strategies are key factors in improving patient outcomes. Early and frequent reassessment is also imperative so that adjustments to the initial therapeutic approach can be made, as clinically indicated.

  19. Congestive heart failure from suspected ductal closure in utero.

    PubMed

    Arcilla, R A; Thilenius, O G; Ranniger, K

    1969-07-01

    This is the 1st case report of a ductal closure occurring during fetal growth. The case was a spontaneous delivery in cephalic presentation from a 31-year-old gravida 3, para 3 Black woman who had been treated with isoniazid and spreptomycin up to 2 months before her delivery. Gestational age was 37 weeks when the fetus was delivered weighing 3.15 kgm. The cord had been wrapped around the fetus's neck, and breathing was delayed 2 minutes. In the nursery, the baby's general condition was poor, and congestive heart failure was diagnosed. The newborn had trieuspid insufficiency, severe heart failure, and acidosis at birth. These disappeared the next day. Hemodynamic studies when the baby was 4 hours old showed a large cone-shaped ductus arteriousus extending from the pulmonary artery but ending blindly at the aortic end.

  20. Evolution of the chronic congestive heart failure paradigm.

    PubMed

    Savino, John A; Kosmas, Constantine E; Wagman, Gabriel; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Paradigms are a part of our human nature. In the world of medicine and science, they allow investigators to work within a particular, previously accepted framework that provides certain constraints. This is the crux of Newton's quote, "If I've seen so far it's because I stood upon the shoulders of giants." However, in the same way that it allows us to build, it can constrain our thought processes if we fail to accept new data that are ill suited to an accepted paradigm. The physiological mechanisms to explain the phenomenon of chronic congestive heart failure are similar to other paradigms of science, in that they have undergone several shifts throughout their history, and continue to change with new evidence. Here, we seek to explore how our understanding of congestive heart failure has changed.

  1. Pathways in heart failure disease management across socioeconomic spectra.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Kathy; Gogichaishvili, Ilia; Gopie, Stephanie; Arcement, Lee

    2011-12-01

    Caring for heart failure patients with a low socioeconomic status presents a unique set of challenges for health care providers. Heart failure disease management programs can integrate the use of teaching DVDs to overcome deficiencies in health literacy and take advantage of the Wal-Mart/Target $4 dollar medication program to provide life-saving medical therapy. In addition, open discussions with the patient and family regarding the costs of medications and the reality of what they can afford to pay monthly on a long term basis can guide the physician to prescribing medications by prioritizing use with a focus on evidence-based data for the medications with the highest mortality reduction. Finally, connecting inpatient visits to outpatient visits through the use of electronic medical records systems can facilitate avoidance of unnecessary repeat lab and diagnostic testing.

  2. Systems Biology Applied to Heart Failure With Normal Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Jorge, Antonio Jose Lagoeiro; de Souza, Celso Vale; Cassino, João Paulo Pedroza

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF) is currently the most prevalent clinical phenotype of heart failure. However, the treatments available have shown no reduction in mortality so far. Advances in the omics sciences and techniques of high data processing used in molecular biology have enabled the development of an integrating approach to HFNEF based on systems biology. This study aimed at presenting a systems-biology-based HFNEF model using the bottom-up and top-down approaches. A literature search was conducted for studies published between 1991 and 2013 regarding HFNEF pathophysiology, its biomarkers and systems biology. A conceptual model was developed using bottom-up and top-down approaches of systems biology. The use of systems-biology approaches for HFNEF, a complex clinical syndrome, can be useful to better understand its pathophysiology and to discover new therapeutic targets. PMID:24918915

  3. [Mitochondrial dynamics: a potential new therapeutic target for heart failure].

    PubMed

    Kuzmicic, Jovan; Del Campo, Andrea; López-Crisosto, Camila; Morales, Pablo E; Pennanen, Christian; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Hechenleitner, Jonathan; Zepeda, Ramiro; Castro, Pablo F; Verdejo, Hugo E; Parra, Valentina; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles able to vary their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and fragmented disconnected arrays, through events of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. These events allow the transmission of signaling messengers and exchange of metabolites within the cell. They have also been implicated in a variety of biological processes including embryonic development, metabolism, apoptosis, and autophagy. Although the majority of these studies have been confined to noncardiac cells, emerging evidence suggests that changes in mitochondrial morphology could participate in cardiac development, the response to ischemia-reperfusion injury, heart failure, and diabetes mellitus. In this article, we review how the mitochondrial dynamics are altered in different cardiac pathologies, with special emphasis on heart failure, and how this knowledge may provide new therapeutic targets for treating cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21820793

  4. Pathways in heart failure disease management across socioeconomic spectra.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Kathy; Gogichaishvili, Ilia; Gopie, Stephanie; Arcement, Lee

    2011-12-01

    Caring for heart failure patients with a low socioeconomic status presents a unique set of challenges for health care providers. Heart failure disease management programs can integrate the use of teaching DVDs to overcome deficiencies in health literacy and take advantage of the Wal-Mart/Target $4 dollar medication program to provide life-saving medical therapy. In addition, open discussions with the patient and family regarding the costs of medications and the reality of what they can afford to pay monthly on a long term basis can guide the physician to prescribing medications by prioritizing use with a focus on evidence-based data for the medications with the highest mortality reduction. Finally, connecting inpatient visits to outpatient visits through the use of electronic medical records systems can facilitate avoidance of unnecessary repeat lab and diagnostic testing. PMID:22089272

  5. Demographics, Clinical Characteristics, Management, and Outcomes of Acute Heart Failure Patients: Observations from the Oman Acute Heart Failure Registry

    PubMed Central

    Panduranga, Prashanth; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alazzawi, Aouf AbdlRahman; Abraham, Abraham; Singh, Prit Pal; Narayan, Narayan Anantha; Rajarao, Mamatha Punjee; Khdir, Mohammed Ahmed; Abdlraheem, Mohamad; Siddiqui, Aftab Ahmed; Soliman, Hisham; Elkadi, Osama Abdellatif; Bichu, Ruchir Kumar; Al Lawati, Kumayl Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, management and outcomes of patients in Oman with acute heart failure (AHF) as part of the Gulf aCute heArt failuRe rEgistry (CARE) project. Methods Data were analyzed from 988 consecutive patients admitted with AHF to 12 hospitals in Oman between 14 February and 14 November 2012. Results The mean age of our patients was 63±12 years. Over half (57%) were male and 95% were Omani citizens. Fifty-seven percent of patients presented with acute decompensated chronic heart failure (ADCHF) while 43% had new-onset AHF. The primary comorbid conditions were hypertension (72%), coronary artery disease (55%), and diabetes mellitus (53%). Ischemic heart disease (IHD), hypertensive heart disease, and idiopathic cardiomyopathy were the most common etiologies of AHF in Oman. The median left ventricular ejection fraction of the cohort was 36% (27–45%) with 56% of the patients having heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (< 40%). Atrial fibrillation was seen in 15% of patients. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and non-compliance with medications were the most common precipitating factors. At discharge, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers were prescribed adequately, but aldosterone antagonists were under prescribed. Within 12-months follow-up, one in two patients were rehospitalized for AHF. In-hospital mortality was 7.1%, which doubled to 15.7% at three months and reached 26.4% at one-year post discharge. Conclusions Oman CARE was the first prospective multicenter registry of AHF in Oman and showed that heart failure (HF) patients present at a younger age with recurrent ADCHF and HF with reduced ejection fraction. IHD was the most common etiology of HF with a low prevalence of AHF, but a high prevalence of acute coronary syndrome and non-compliance with medications precipitating HF. A quarter of patients died at one-year follow-up even though at discharge medical therapy was

  6. Cellular cardiomyoplasty for a patient with heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Fumin; Chen Yijiang; Yang Zhijian; Gao Xiang; Ma Wenzhu; Li Chuanfu; Kao, Race L

    2003-03-01

    Background: A 73-year-old man with a history of myocardial infarction and hypertension for 5 years suffered heart failure (NYHA III-IV). Methods: 2D echo indicated hypokinesia at septal, left ventricular anterior wall and apical regions. Coronary angiograms demonstrated 60% stenosis in distal left main and 99% stenosis in proximal and distal left anterior descending coronary arteries (LAD). Both proximal artery and middle left circumflex coronary artery (LC) had 90% stenosis, and diffuse stenosis of right coronary artery (RC) was found. Myocardial perfusion imaging using {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI indicated defective perfusion of left ventricular apex, anterior wall and septal region and severe reduced perfusion of posterior inferior wall. Myocardial metabolic activities ({sup 18}F-deoxyglucose) also showed comparable reductions. After exposing the heart, LAD, LC, and RC were all completely occluded and bypass procedure could not be completed. Autologous satellite cells were implanted without any complication and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Results: During the first 2 months, he remained in heart failure, and by the third month, he gradually improved and reached NYHA II. At fifth month after the procedure, significant increased ejection fraction (37.1-48.6%) and wall movement with modest reduction of left ventricular systolic diameter (48-45 mm) were observed. Imaging with {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose showed dramatic improvement in myocardial metabolic activity with similar improvement in myocardial perfusion ({sup 99m}Tc-MIBI). Conclusion: This is the first successful case of cellular cardiomyoplasty without any conjunctional procedure for patient with severe coronary heart disease and heart failure.

  7. Team-Based Care for Outpatients with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Creaser, Julie W; DePasquale, Eugene C; Vandenbogaart, Elizabeth; Rourke, Darlene; Chaker, Tamara; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2015-07-01

    Management of heart failure requires a multidisciplinary team-based approach that includes coordination of numerous team members to ensure guideline-directed optimization of medical therapy, frequent and regular assessment of volume status, frequent education, use of cardiac rehabilitation, continued assessment for the use of advanced therapies, and advance care planning. All of these are important aspects of the management of this complex condition.

  8. Novel device-based interventional strategies for advanced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Vanderheyden, Marc; Bartunek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    While heart failure is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, our tools to provide ultimate treatment solutions are still limited. Recent developments in new devices are designed to fill this therapeutic gap. The scope of this review is to focus on two particular targets, namely (1) left ventricular geometric restoration and (2) atrial depressurization. (1) Reduction of the wall stress by shrinking the ventricular cavity has been traditionally attempted surgically. Recently, the Parachute device (CardioKinetix Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA) has been introduced to restore ventricular geometry and cardiac mechanics. The intervention aims to partition distal dysfunctional segments that are non-contributory to the ventricular mechanics and forward cardiac output. (2) Diastolic heart failure is characterized by abnormal relaxation and chamber stiffness. The main therapeutic goal achieved should be the reduction of afterload and diastolic pressure load. Recently, new catheter-based approaches were proposed to reduce left atrial pressure and ventricular decompression: the InterAtrial Shunt Device (IASD™) (Corvia Medical Inc., Tewksbury, MA, USA) and the V-Wave Shunt (V-Wave Ltd, Or Akiva, Israel). Both are designed to create a controlled atrial septal defect in symptomatic patients with heart failure. While the assist devices are aimed at end-stage heart failure, emerging device-based percutaneous or minimal invasive techniques comprise a wide spectrum of innovative concepts that target ventricular remodeling, cardiac contractility or neuro-humoral modulation. The clinical adoption is in the early stages of the initial feasibility and safety studies, and clinical evidence needs to be gathered in appropriately designed clinical trials. PMID:26966444

  9. Hope in elderly adults with chronic heart failure. Concept analysis

    PubMed Central

    Caboral, Meriam F.; Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Whetsell, Martha V.

    2015-01-01

    This topic review employed Walker and Avant’s method of concept analysis to explore the construct of hope in elderly adults with chronic heart failure. The articles analyzed revealed that hope, as the belief of the occurrence of a positive result without any guarantee that it will be produced, is necessary for the survival and wellbeing of the elderly adults enduring this disease. PMID:26321777

  10. Macro- and micronutrients in African-Americans with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Ahokas, Robert A; Carbone, Laura D; Newman, Kevin P; Gerling, Ivan C; Sun, Yao; Weber, Karl T

    2006-03-01

    An emerging body of evidence suggests secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) may be an important covariant of congestive heart failure (CHF), especially in African-Americans (AA) where hypovitaminosis D is prevalent given that melanin, a natural sunscreen, mandates prolonged exposure of skin to sunlight and where a housebound lifestyle imposed by symptomatic CHF limits outdoor activities and hence sunlight exposure. In addition to the role of hypovitaminosis D in contributing to SHPT is the increased urinary and fecal losses of macronutrients Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) associated with the aldosteronism of CHF and their heightened urinary losses with furosemide treatment of CHF. Thus, a precarious Ca(2+) balance seen with reduced serum 25(OH)D is further compromised when AA develop CHF with circulating RAAS activation and are then treated with a loop diuretic. SHPT accounts for a paradoxical Ca(2+) overloading of diverse tissues and the induction of oxidative stress at these sites which spills over to the systemic circulation. In addition to SHPT, hypozincemia and hyposelenemia have been found in AA with compensated and decompensated heart failure and where an insufficiency of these micronutrients may have its origins in inadequate dietary intake, altered rates of absorption or excretion and/or tissue redistribution, and treatment with an ACE inhibitor or AT(1) receptor antagonist. Zn and Se deficiencies, which compromise the activity of several endogenous antioxidant defenses, could prove contributory to the severity of heart failure and its progressive nature. These findings call into question the need for nutriceutical treatment of heart failure and which is complementary to today's pharmaceuticals, especially in AA. PMID:16819577

  11. Novel device-based interventional strategies for advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Toth, Gabor G; Vanderheyden, Marc; Bartunek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    While heart failure is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, our tools to provide ultimate treatment solutions are still limited. Recent developments in new devices are designed to fill this therapeutic gap. The scope of this review is to focus on two particular targets, namely (1) left ventricular geometric restoration and (2) atrial depressurization. (1) Reduction of the wall stress by shrinking the ventricular cavity has been traditionally attempted surgically. Recently, the Parachute device (CardioKinetix Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA) has been introduced to restore ventricular geometry and cardiac mechanics. The intervention aims to partition distal dysfunctional segments that are non-contributory to the ventricular mechanics and forward cardiac output. (2) Diastolic heart failure is characterized by abnormal relaxation and chamber stiffness. The main therapeutic goal achieved should be the reduction of afterload and diastolic pressure load. Recently, new catheter-based approaches were proposed to reduce left atrial pressure and ventricular decompression: the InterAtrial Shunt Device (IASD™) (Corvia Medical Inc., Tewksbury, MA, USA) and the V-Wave Shunt (V-Wave Ltd, Or Akiva, Israel). Both are designed to create a controlled atrial septal defect in symptomatic patients with heart failure. While the assist devices are aimed at end-stage heart failure, emerging device-based percutaneous or minimal invasive techniques comprise a wide spectrum of innovative concepts that target ventricular remodeling, cardiac contractility or neuro-humoral modulation. The clinical adoption is in the early stages of the initial feasibility and safety studies, and clinical evidence needs to be gathered in appropriately designed clinical trials. PMID:26966444

  12. Predictors of excess heart failure readmissions: implications for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Stamp, Kelly D; Flanagan, Jane; Gregas, Matt; Shindul-Rothschild, Judith

    2014-01-01

    In this study of California, Massachusetts, and New York hospitals, 6 factors predicted 27.6% of readmissions for patients with heart failure (HF). We found that higher admissions per bed, teaching hospitals, and poor nurse-patient communication increased HF readmissions. Conversely, the HF readmissions were lower when nurse staffing was greater, more patients reported receiving discharge information, and among hospitals in California. The implications for nursing practice in the delivery of care to patients with HF are discussed.

  13. Device therapy to modulate the autonomic nervous system to treat heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lopshire, John C; Zipes, Douglas P

    2012-10-01

    Heart failure is the final common pathway in many forms of heart disease, and is associated with excessive morbidity and mortality. Pathophysiologic alterations in the interaction between the heart and the autonomic nervous system in advanced heart failure have been noted for decades. Over the last decade, great advances have been made in the medical and surgical treatment of heart failure - and some of these modalities target the neuro-cardiac axis. Despite these advances, many patients progress to end-stage heart failure and death. Recently, device-based therapy targeting the neuro-cardiac axis with various forms of neuromodulatory stimuli has been shown to improve heart function in experimental heart failure models. These include spinal cord stimulation, vagal nerve stimulation, and baroreflex modulation. Human trials are now underway to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these device-based neuromodulatory modalities in the heart failure population.

  14. Tumor necrosis factor alpha polymorphism in heart failure/cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, Lou; Iyengar, Srinivas

    2004-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-alpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is produced by activated macrophages. It has been shown to stimulate the release of endothelial cytokines and NO, increase vascular permeability, decrease contractility, and induce a prothrombotic state. The most studied TNF-a gene mutation in heart disease is a gamma to alpha substitution, which occurs when 308 nucleotides move upstream from the transcription initiation site in the TNF promoter and has been associated with elevated levels of TNF-alpha. The TNF1 allele (wild type) contains gamma at this site, while the TNF2 allele has an alpha substitution at the site. The TNF2 allele is a more powerful transcriptional activator, therefore leading to higher TNF-alpha levels. Most of the studies to date have failed to conclusively show any link between the polymorphism and heart disease, both coronary artery disease and cardiomyopathy/heart failure. PMID:15591843

  15. Wearable and mobile system to manage remotely heart failure.

    PubMed

    Villalba, E; Salvi, D; Ottaviano, M; Peinado, I; Arredondo, M T; Akay, A

    2009-11-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) account for 45% of all deaths in the western world according to the 2004 World Health Organization statistics report. Heart failure (HF), CVD's primary paradigm, mainly affects people older than 65. The European MyHeart Project's mission is to empower citizens to fight CVD by leading a preventative lifestyle and allowing early diagnosis. This paper presents the iterative design and development of the HF management system, part of MyHeart Project. The system daily measures vital body signals to assess HF. The methodology applied herein has involved stakeholders in an iterative process: concept validation, feasibility, efficiency, patients' experience, and patients' acceptance. The final solution allows patient self-management of their chronic condition. PMID:19643715

  16. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation alterations in heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fillmore, N; Mori, J; Lopaschuk, G D

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. In many forms of heart disease, including heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathies, changes in cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolism contribute to contractile dysfunction and to a decrease in cardiac efficiency. Specific metabolic changes include a relative increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates and an uncoupling of glycolysis from glucose oxidation. In heart failure, overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism can be impaired while, in ischaemic heart disease, energy production is impaired due to a limitation of oxygen supply. In both of these conditions, residual mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation dominates over mitochondrial glucose oxidation. In diabetes, the ratio of cardiac fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation also increases, although primarily due to an increase in fatty acid oxidation and an inhibition of glucose oxidation. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutically regulating cardiac energy metabolism by reducing fatty acid oxidation and/or increasing glucose oxidation can improve cardiac function of the ischaemic heart, the failing heart and in diabetic cardiomyopathies. In this article, we review the cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolic changes that occur in these forms of heart disease, what role alterations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation have in contributing to cardiac dysfunction and the potential for targeting fatty acid oxidation to treat these forms of heart disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24147975

  17. Biomarkers in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Meijers, W C; van der Velde, A R; de Boer, R A

    2016-04-01

    Biomarkers are widely used and studied in heart failure. Most studies have described the utility and performance of biomarkers in sub-studies of randomised clinical trials, where the vast majority of the patients suffered from heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), and not with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). As a result, there is a scarcity of data describing the levels, dynamics, clinical and biochemical correlates, and biology of biomarkers in patients suffering from HFpEF, whereas HFpEF is in fact a very frequent clinical entity. This article discusses the value of different biomarkers in HFpEF. We describe various aspects of natriuretic peptide measurements in HFpEF patients, with a focus on diagnosis, prognosis and the risk prediction of developing heart failure. Further, we will discuss several emerging biomarkers such as galectin-3 and suppression of tumorigenicity 2, and recently discovered ones such as growth differentiation factor-15 and syndecan-1. PMID:26942916

  18. Novel biomarkers in acute heart failure: MR-pro-adrenomedullin.

    PubMed

    Peacock, W Frank

    2014-10-01

    First isolated from human pheochromocytoma cells, adrenomedullin (ADM) is a peptide hormone with natriuretic, vasodilatory, and hypotensive effects mediated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), nitric oxide, and renal prostaglandin systems. ADM expression occurs in many tissues and organ systems, including cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary, cerebrovascular, gastrointestinal, and endocrine tissues where it acts as a circulating hormone and a local autocrine and paracrine hormone. ADM plasma concentrations are increased in hypertension, chronic renal disease, and heart failure. As ADM is unstable in vitro, it is necessary to measure its mid-regional pro-hormone fragment, the levels of which correspond to ADM concentration (MR-proADM). The prognostic potential of MR-proADM was recently demonstrated in the Biomarkers in Acute Heart Failure (BACH) trial. In this trial of 568 acute heart failure patients, MR-proADM was superior to both brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and NT-proBNP in predicting mortality within 14 days. MR-proADM also provided significant additive incremental predictive value for 90-day mortality when added to BNP and NT-proBNP.

  19. Decongestion: Diuretics and other therapies for hospitalized heart failure.

    PubMed

    Vazir, Ali; Cowie, Martin R

    2016-04-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a potentially life-threatening clinical syndrome, usually requiring hospital admission. Often the syndrome is characterized by congestion, and is associated with long hospital admissions and high risk of readmission and further healthcare expenditure. Despite a limited evidence-base, diuretics remain the first-line treatment for congestion. Loop diuretics are typically the first-line diuretic strategy with some evidence that initial treatment with continuous infusion or boluses of high-dose loop diuretic is superior to an initial lower dose strategy. In patients who have impaired responsiveness to diuretics, the addition of an oral thiazide or thiazide-like diuretic to induce sequential nephron blockade can be beneficial. The use of intravenous low-dose dopamine is no longer supported in heart failure patients with preserved systolic blood pressure and its use to assist diuresis in patients with low systolic blood pressures requires further study. Mechanical ultrafiltration has been used to treat patients with heart failure and fluid retention, but the evidence-base is not robust, and its place in clinical practice is yet to be established. Several novel pharmacological agents remain under investigation.

  20. Medical management of congestive heart failure in a horse.

    PubMed

    Brumbaugh, G W; Thomas, W P; Hodge, T G

    1982-04-15

    A 4-year-old Quarter Horse gelding with atrial fibrillation, mitral regurgitation, and signs of bilateral congestive heart failure was initially treated IV with digoxin and furosemide. After parenteral digitalization, a daily maintenance dose of digoxin was administered orally at a rate of 21.7 micrograms/kg of body weight. At this dosage, a steady-state serum digoxin concentration of 2.3 ng/ml was achieved without clinical signs of toxicosis. The furosemide dosage was decreased and eventually discontinued as clinical improvement occurred. Clinical signs of congestive heart failure were controlled and sinus rhythm was intermittently established, but an unfavorable prognosis was given for future athletic work. After 35 days of therapy, cardiac catheterization was performed and the horse was euthanatized. At necropsy there was marked dilatation of all cardiac chambers, mitral valve fibrosis, and left atrial jet lesions. The response of this patient suggested that orally administered digoxin may be useful in the management of congestive heart failure in selected equine patients.

  1. Depressive symptoms and spiritual wellbeing in asymptomatic heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Mills, Paul J; Wilson, Kathleen; Iqbal, Navaid; Iqbal, Fatima; Alvarez, Milagros; Pung, Meredith A; Wachmann, Katherine; Rutledge, Thomas; Maglione, Jeanne; Zisook, Sid; Dimsdale, Joel E; Lunde, Ottar; Greenberg, Barry H; Maisel, Alan; Raisinghani, Ajit; Natarajan, Loki; Jain, Shamini; Hufford, David J; Redwine, Laura

    2015-06-01

    Depression adversely predicts prognosis in individuals with symptomatic heart failure. In some clinical populations, spiritual wellness is considered to be a protective factor against depressive symptoms. This study examined associations among depressive symptoms, spiritual wellbeing, sleep, fatigue, functional capacity, and inflammatory biomarkers in 132 men and women with asymptomatic stage B heart failure (age 66.5 years ± 10.5). Approximately 32 % of the patients scored ≥10 on the Beck Depression Inventory, indicating potentially clinically relevant depressive symptoms. Multiple regression analysis predicting fewer depressive symptoms included the following significant variables: a lower inflammatory score comprised of disease-relevant biomarkers (p < 0.02), less fatigue (p < 0.001), better sleep (p < 0.04), and more spiritual wellbeing (p < 0.01) (overall model F = 26.6, p < 0.001, adjusted R square = 0.629). Further analyses indicated that the meaning (p < 0.01) and peace (p < 0.01) subscales, but not the faith (p = 0.332) subscale, of spiritual wellbeing were independently associated with fewer depressive symptoms. Interventions aimed at increasing spiritual wellbeing in patients lives, and specifically meaning and peace, may be a potential treatment target for depressive symptoms asymptomatic heart failure. PMID:25533643

  2. Predictors of cardiac hepatopathy in patients with right heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Megalla, Sherry; Holtzman, Dvorah; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Nazari, Reza; Korenfeld, Svetlana; Schwarcz, Aron; Goldberg, Ythan; Spevack, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Some patients with right heart failure develop cardiac hepatopathy (CH). The pathophysiology of CH is thought to be secondary to hepatic venous congestion and arterial ischemia. We sought to define the clinical and hemodynamic characteristics associated with CH. Material/Methods A retrospective cross sectional analysis was performed in which subjects were identified from our institutional cardiology database if echocardiography showed either right ventricular (RV) hypokinesis or dilatation, and was performed within 30 days of right heart catheterization. A chart review was then performed to identify patient clinical characteristics and to determine if the patients had underlying liver disease. Subjects with non-cardiac causes for hepatopathy were excluded. Results In 188 included subjects, etiology for right heart dysfunction included left heart failure (LHF), shunt, pulmonary hypertension, mitral- tricuspid- and pulmonic valvular disease. On multivariate analysis, higher RV diastolic pressure and etiology for RV dysfunction other than LHF were both associated with CH. Low cardiac output was associated with CH only amongst those without LHF. Conclusions CH is most often seen in subjects with elevated RV diastolic pressure suggesting a congestive cause in most cases. CH associated with low cardiac output in patients without LHF suggests that low flow may be contributing to the patophysiology in some cases. PMID:21959605

  3. Primary prevention of stroke: blood pressure, lipids, and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Endres, Matthias; Heuschmann, Peter U; Laufs, Ulrich; Hakim, Antoine M

    2011-03-01

    Stroke contributes significantly to morbidity, mortality, and disability worldwide. Despite the successes accomplished in the acute treatment and rehabilitation of stroke, the global burden of this disease can only be tackled with co-ordinated approaches for primary prevention. Stroke is a heterogeneous disease and the contribution of individual risk factors to its occurrence estimated by population attributable risk differs from coronary heart disease. Here, we review evidence to demonstrate the prominent role of elevated blood pressure (BP) and heart disease on risk of stroke, while the influence of lipids on stroke is less clear; we also demonstrate that stroke is an important complication of heart failure. Current approaches to primary preventive action emphasize the need to target the absolute risk of cardiovascular diseases rather than individual risk factors. Lifestyle interventions serve as a basis for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. It is estimated that 70% of strokes are potentially preventable by lifestyle modification but prospective evidence is needed to support these hypotheses derived from epidemiological studies. Different strategies for drug interventions in primary prevention are discussed, including the polypill strategy. Additional measures are needed for the primary prevention of stroke which focus on BP, chronic heart failure, and possibly lipids.

  4. Telomere attrition and Chk2 activation in human heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hidemasa; Wang, Sam C.; Prahash, Arun; Sano, Motoaki; Moravec, Christine S.; Taffet, George E.; Michael, Lloyd H.; Youker, Keith A.; Entman, Mark L.; Schneider, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    The “postmitotic” phenotype in adult cardiac muscle exhibits similarities to replicative senescence more generally and constitutes a barrier to effective restorative growth in heart disease. Telomere dysfunction is implicated in senescence and apoptotic signaling but its potential role in heart disorders is unknown. Here, we report that cardiac apoptosis in human heart failure is associated specifically with defective expression of the telomere repeat- binding factor TRF2, telomere shortening, and activation of the DNA damage checkpoint kinase, Chk2. In cultured cardiomyocytes, interference with either TRF2 function or expression triggered telomere erosion and apoptosis, indicating that cell death can occur via this pathway even in postmitotic, noncycling cells; conversely, exogenous TRF2 conferred protection from oxidative stress. In vivo, mechanical stress was sufficient to down-regulate TRF2, shorten telomeres, and activate Chk2 in mouse myocardium, and transgenic expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase conferred protection from all three responses. Together, these data suggest that apoptosis in chronic heart failure is mediated in part by telomere dysfunction and suggest an essential role for TRF2 even in postmitotic cells. PMID:12702777

  5. Critical care for paediatric patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Costello, John M; Mazwi, Mjaye L; McBride, Mary E; Gambetta, Katherine E; Eltayeb, Osama; Epting, Conrad L

    2015-08-01

    This review offers a critical-care perspective on the pathophysiology, monitoring, and management of acute heart failure syndromes in children. An in-depth understanding of the cardiovascular physiological disturbances in this population of patients is essential to correctly interpret clinical signs, symptoms and monitoring data, and to implement appropriate therapies. In this regard, the myocardial force-velocity relationship, the Frank-Starling mechanism, and pressure-volume loops are discussed. A variety of monitoring modalities are used to provide insight into the haemodynamic state, clinical trajectory, and response to treatment. Critical-care treatment of acute heart failure is based on the fundamental principles of optimising the delivery of oxygen and minimising metabolic demands. The former may be achieved by optimising systemic arterial oxygen content and the variables that determine cardiac output: heart rate and rhythm, preload, afterload, and contractility. Metabolic demands may be decreased by a number of ways including positive pressure ventilation, temperature control, and sedation. Mechanical circulatory support should be considered for refractory cases. In the near future, monitoring modalities may be improved by the capture and analysis of complex clinical data such as pressure waveforms and heart rate variability. Using predictive modelling and streaming analytics, these data may then be used to develop automated, real-time clinical decision support tools. Given the barriers to conducting multi-centre trials in this population of patients, the thoughtful analysis of data from multi-centre clinical registries and administrative databases will also likely have an impact on clinical practice.

  6. Nitrendipine binding in congestive heart failure due to myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, I.M.; Lee, S.L.; Dhalla, N.S. )

    1990-03-01

    Depressed cardiac pump function is the hallmark of congestive heart failure, and it is suspected that decreased influx of Ca2+ into the cardiac cell is responsible for depressed contractile function. Since Ca2+ channels in the sarcolemmal membrane are considered to be an important route for the entry of Ca2+, we examined the status of Ca2+ receptors/channels in failing rat hearts after myocardial infarction of the left ventricular free wall. For this purpose, the left coronary artery was ligated and hearts were examined 4, 8, and 16 weeks later; sham-operated animals served as controls. Hemodynamic assessment revealed decreased total mechanical energy (left ventricular systolic pressure x heart rate), increased left ventricular diastolic pressure, and decreased positive and negative dP/dt in experimental animals at 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Although accumulation of ascites in the abdominal cavity was evident at 4 weeks, other clinical signs of congestive heart failure in experimental rats were evident from the presence of lung congestion and cardiac dilatation at 8 and 16 weeks after induction of myocardial infarction. The density of Ca2+ receptors/channels in crude membranes, as assessed by (3H)nitrendipine binding assay, was found to be decreased in the uninfarcted experimental left ventricle at 8 and 16 weeks; however, no change in the affinity of nitrendipine was evident. A similar depression in the specific binding of another dihydropyridine compound, (3H)PN200-110, was also evident in failing hearts. Brain and skeletal muscle crude membrane preparations, unlike those of the right ventricle and liver, revealed a decrease in Ca2+ receptors/channels density in experimental animals at 16 weeks.

  7. Central role of carotid body chemoreceptors in disordered breathing and cardiorenal dysfunction in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Noah J.; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Schultz, Harold D.

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory breathing (OB) patterns are observed in pre-term infants, patients with cardio-renal impairment, and in otherwise healthy humans exposed to high altitude. Enhanced carotid body (CB) chemoreflex sensitivity is common to all of these populations and is thought to contribute to these abnormal patterns by destabilizing the respiratory control system. OB patterns in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients are associated with greater levels of tonic and chemoreflex-evoked sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), which is associated with greater morbidity and poor prognosis. Enhanced chemoreflex drive may contribute to tonic elevations in SNA by strengthening the relationship between respiratory and sympathetic neural outflow. Elimination of CB afferents in experimental models of CHF has been shown to reduce OB, respiratory-sympathetic coupling, and renal SNA, and to improve autonomic balance in the heart. The CB chemoreceptors may play an important role in progression of CHF by contributing to respiratory instability and OB, which in turn further exacerbates tonic and chemoreflex-evoked increases in SNA to the heart and kidney. PMID:25505417

  8. Open access to an outpatient intravenous diuresis program in a systolic heart failure disease management program.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Kathy; Dias, Andre; Franco, Emiliana; Tamariz, Leonardo; Steen, Dylan; Arcement, Lee M

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide efficient utilization of resources in an outpatient setting for acute exacerbation of heart failure (HF), the authors piloted an open-access outpatient intravenous (IV) diuretic program (IVDP) to evaluate utilization in an HF disease management program (HFDMP), patient characteristics for users of the program, and safety. An outpatient HFDMP at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, Florida, enrolling 577 patients 18 years and older with an ejection fraction ≤40% was implemented. For symptoms or weight gain ≥5 pounds, patients were eligible to use an open-access IVDP during clinic hours. A total of 130 HFDM patients (22.5%) used the IVDP. IVDP users were more likely to be diabetic, with lower body mass indices than non-IVDP users. New York Heart Association class IV patients and previously hospitalized patients were more likely to use the IVDP. There were no documented adverse reactions for patients receiving treatment and no difference in mortality between groups. This open-access outpatient IVDP model for patients with HF was readily utilized by the HFDMP participants and appears safe for use in this population. This unique model may provide alternative access for acute HF treatment. Congest Heart Fail.

  9. Simulation of Dilated Heart Failure with Continuous Flow Circulatory Support

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yajuan; Loghmanpour, Natasha; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Ferreira, Antonio; Keller, Bradley; Gorcsan, John; Antaki, James

    2014-01-01

    Lumped parameter models have been employed for decades to simulate important hemodynamic couplings between a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and the native circulation. However, these studies seldom consider the pathological descending limb of the Frank-Starling response of the overloaded ventricle. This study introduces a dilated heart failure model featuring a unimodal end systolic pressure-volume relationship (ESPVR) to address this critical shortcoming. The resulting hemodynamic response to mechanical circulatory support are illustrated through numerical simulations of a rotodynamic, continuous flow ventricular assist device (cfVAD) coupled to systemic and pulmonary circulations with baroreflex control. The model further incorporated septal interaction to capture the influence of left ventricular (LV) unloading on right ventricular function. Four heart failure conditions were simulated (LV and bi-ventricular failure with/without pulmonary hypertension) in addition to normal baseline. Several metrics of LV function, including cardiac output and stroke work, exhibited a unimodal response whereby initial unloading improved function, and further unloading depleted preload reserve thereby reducing ventricular output. The concept of extremal loading was introduced to reflect the loading condition in which the intrinsic LV stroke work is maximized. Simulation of bi-ventricular failure with pulmonary hypertension revealed inadequacy of LV support alone. These simulations motivate the implementation of an extremum tracking feedback controller to potentially optimize ventricular recovery. PMID:24465511

  10. Evaluation of the efficacy of a nurse practitioner-led home-based congestive heart failure clinical pathway.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jo-Ann Mary

    2016-01-01

    Frequent exacerbations of symptoms and financial penalties for 30-day hospital readmissions of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) have led to new disease management approaches. A nurse practitioner (NP)-led interdisciplinary program for CHF management that included home telemonitoring and early NP assessments and interventions was piloted by a home health agency. A 4-month evaluation of the efficacy of a clinical pathway for CHF patients resulted in the enrollment of 22 CHF patients in the program. Two clients were readmitted within 30 days. The new program was effective in reducing 30-day readmission rates to 9% compared to the national average of 23%.

  11. Decrease of cardiac chaos in congestive heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Chi-Sang; Merrill, Christopher K.

    1997-10-01

    The electrical properties of the mammalian heart undergo many complex transitions in normal and diseased states. It has been proposed that the normal heartbeat may display complex nonlinear dynamics, including deterministic chaos,, and that such cardiac chaos may be a useful physiological marker for the diagnosis and management, of certain heart trouble. However, it is not clear whether the heartbeat series of healthy and diseased hearts are chaotic or stochastic, or whether cardiac chaos represents normal or abnormal behaviour. Here we have used a highly sensitive technique, which is robust to random noise, to detect chaos. We analysed the electrocardiograms from a group of healthy subjects and those with severe congestive heart failure (CHF), a clinical condition associated with a high risk of sudden death. The short-term variations of beat-to-beat interval exhibited strongly and consistently chaotic behaviour in all healthy subjects, but were frequently interrupted by periods of seemingly non-chaotic fluctuations in patients with CHF. Chaotic dynamics in the CHF data, even when discernible, exhibited a high degree of random variability over time, suggesting a weaker form of chaos. These findings suggest that cardiac chaos is prevalent in healthy heart, and a decrease in such chaos may be indicative of CHF.

  12. Right ventricular long noncoding RNA expression in human heart failure.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, Thomas G; Guo, Yan; Su, Yan Ru; Clark, Travis; Brittain, Evan; Absi, Tarek; Maltais, Simon; Hemnes, Anna

    2015-03-01

    The expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human heart failure (HF) has not been widely studied. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we compared lncRNA expression in 22 explanted human HF hearts with lncRNA expression in 5 unused donor human hearts. We used Cufflinks to identify isoforms and DESeq to identify differentially expressed genes. We identified the noncoding RNAs by cross-reference to Ensembl release 73 (Genome Reference Consortium human genome build 37) and explored possible functional roles using a variety of online tools. In HF hearts, RNA-Seq identified 84,793 total messenger RNA coding and noncoding different transcripts, including 13,019 protein-coding genes, 2,085 total lncRNA genes, and 1,064 pseudogenes. By Ensembl noncoding RNA categories, there were 48 lncRNAs, 27 pseudogenes, and 30 antisense RNAs for a total of 105 differentially expressed lncRNAs in HF hearts. Compared with donor hearts, HF hearts exhibited differential expression of 7.7% of protein-coding genes, 3.7% of lncRNAs (including pseudogenes), and 2.5% of pseudogenes. There were not consistent correlations between antisense lncRNAs and parent genes and between pseudogenes and parent genes, implying differential regulation of expression. Exploratory in silico functional analyses using online tools suggested a variety of possible lncRNA regulatory roles. By providing a comprehensive profile of right ventricular polyadenylated messenger RNA transcriptome in HF, RNA-Seq provides an inventory of differentially expressed lncRNAs, including antisense transcripts and pseudogenes, for future mechanistic study.

  13. Hepatic Dysfunction in Ambulatory Patients With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Maryjane; Wu, Christina; Givens, Raymond C.; Collado, Ellias; Mancini, Donna M.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score and its modified versions, which are established measures of liver dysfunction, as a tool to assess heart transplantation (HTx) urgency in ambulatory patients with heart failure. Background Liver abnormalities have a prognostic impact on the outcome of patients with advanced heart failure. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 343 patients undergoing HTx evaluation between 2005 and 2009. The prognostic effectiveness of MELD and 2 modifications (MELDNa [includes serum sodium levels] and MELD-XI [does not include international normalized ratio]) for endpoint events, defined as death/HTx/ventricular assist device requirement, was evaluated in our cohort and in subgroups of patients on and off oral anticoagulation. Results The MELD and MELDNa scores were excellent predictors for 1-year endpoint events (areas under the curve: 0.71 and 0.73, respectively). High scores (>12) were strongly associated with poor survival at 1 year (MELD 69.3% vs. 90.4% [p < 0.0001]; MELDNa 70.4% vs. 96.9% [p < 0.0001]). Increased scores were associated with increased risk for HTx (hazard ratio: 1.10 [95% confidence interval: 1.06 to 1.14]; p < 0.0001 for both scores), which was independent of other known risk factors (MELD p = 0.0055; MELDNa p = 0.0083). Anticoagulant use was associated with poor survival at 1 year (73.7% vs. 86.4%; p = 0.0118), and the statistical significance of MELD/MELDNa was higher in patients not receiving oral anticoagulation therapy. MELD-XI was a fair but limited predictor of the endpoint events in patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy. Conclusions Assessment of liver dysfunction according to the MELD scoring system provides additional risk information in ambulatory patients with heart failure. PMID:23563127

  14. Influence of heart failure on nucleolar organization and protein expression in human hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Rosello-Lleti, Esther; Rivera, Miguel; Cortes, Raquel; Azorin, Inmaculada; Sirera, Rafael; Martinez-Dolz, Luis; Hove, Leif; Cinca, Juan; Lago, Francisca; Gonzalez-Juanatey, Jose R.; Salvador, Antonio; Portoles, Manuel

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heart failure alters nucleolar morphology and organization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleolin expression is significant increased in ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ventricular function of heart failure patients was related with nucleolin levels. -- Abstract: We investigate for the first time the influence of heart failure (HF) on nucleolar organization and proteins in patients with ischemic (ICM) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). A total of 71 human hearts from ICM (n = 38) and DCM (n = 27) patients, undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n = 6), were analysed by western-blotting, RT-PCR and cell biology methods. When we compared protein levels according to HF etiology, nucleolin was increased in both ICM (117%, p < 0.05) and DCM (141%, p < 0.01). Moreover, mRNA expression were also upregulated in ICM (1.46-fold, p < 0.05) and DCM (1.70-fold, p < 0.05. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the highest intensity of nucleolin was into nucleolus (p < 0.0001), and it was increased in pathological hearts (p < 0.0001). Ultrastructure analysis by electron microscopy showed an increase in the nucleus and nucleolus size in ICM (17%, p < 0.05 and 131%, p < 0.001) and DCM (56%, p < 0.01 and 69%, p < 0.01). Nucleolar organization was influenced by HF irrespective of etiology, increasing fibrillar centers (p < 0.001), perinucleolar chromatin (p < 0.01) and dense fibrillar components (p < 0.01). Finally, left ventricular function parameters were related with nucleolin levels in ischemic hearts (p < 0.0001). The present study demonstrates that HF influences on morphology and organization of nucleolar components, revealing changes in the expression and in the levels of nucleolin protein.

  15. Ambulatory heart rate range predicts mode-specific mortality and hospitalisation in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Cubbon, Richard M; Ruff, Naomi; Groves, David; Eleuteri, Antonio; Denby, Christine; Kearney, Lorraine; Ali, Noman; Walker, Andrew M N; Jamil, Haqeel; Gierula, John; Gale, Chris P; Batin, Phillip D; Nolan, James; Shah, Ajay M; Fox, Keith A A; Sapsford, Robert J; Witte, Klaus K; Kearney, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to define the prognostic value of the heart rate range during a 24 h period in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods Prospective observational cohort study of 791 patients with CHF associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Mode-specific mortality and hospitalisation were linked with ambulatory heart rate range (AHRR; calculated as maximum minus minimum heart rate using 24 h Holter monitor data, including paced and non-sinus complexes) in univariate and multivariate analyses. Findings were then corroborated in a validation cohort of 408 patients with CHF with preserved or reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Results After a mean 4.1 years of follow-up, increasing AHRR was associated with reduced risk of all-cause, sudden, non-cardiovascular and progressive heart failure death in univariate analyses. After accounting for characteristics that differed between groups above and below median AHRR using multivariate analysis, AHRR remained strongly associated with all-cause mortality (HR 0.991/bpm increase in AHRR (95% CI 0.999 to 0.982); p=0.046). AHRR was not associated with the risk of any non-elective hospitalisation, but was associated with heart-failure-related hospitalisation. AHRR was modestly associated with the SD of normal-to-normal beats (R2=0.2; p<0.001) and with peak exercise-test heart rate (R2=0.33; p<0.001). Analysis of the validation cohort revealed AHRR to be associated with all-cause and mode-specific death as described in the derivation cohort. Conclusions AHRR is a novel and readily available prognosticator in patients with CHF, which may reflect autonomic tone and exercise capacity. PMID:26674986

  16. HeartDrive: A Broader Concept of Interoperability to Implement Care Processes for Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Lettere, M; Guerri, D; La Manna, S; Groccia, M C; Lofaro, D; Conforti, D

    2016-01-01

    This paper originates from the HeartDrive project, a platform of services for a more effective, efficient and integrated management of heart failure and comorbidities. HeartDrive establishes a cooperative approach based on the concepts of continuity of care and extreme, patient oriented, customization of diagnostic, therapeutic and follow-up procedures. Definition and development of evidence based processes, migration from parceled and episode based healthcare provisioning to a workflow oriented model and increased awareness and responsibility of citizens towards their own health and wellness are key objectives of HeartDrive. In two scenarios for rehabilitation and home monitoring we show how the results are achieved by providing a solution that highlights a broader concept of cooperation that goes beyond technical interoperability towards semantic interoperability explicitly sharing process definitions, decision support strategies and information semantics. PMID:27225572

  17. Activation of endothelial β-catenin signaling induces heart failure.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Akito; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Sumida, Tomokazu; Nomura, Seitaro; Shibamoto, Masato; Higo, Tomoaki; Okada, Katsuki; Sakai, Taku; Hashimoto, Akihito; Kuramoto, Yuki; Oka, Toru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Harada, Mutsuo; Ueda, Kazutaka; Shiojima, Ichiro; Limbourg, Florian P; Adams, Ralf H; Noda, Tetsuo; Sakata, Yasushi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Activation of β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signaling in endothelial cells plays a key role in angiogenesis during development and ischemic diseases, however, other roles of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that sustained activation of β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells causes cardiac dysfunction through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB pathway in the heart. Conditional gain-of-function mutation of β-catenin, which activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in Bmx-positive arterial endothelial cells (Bmx/CA mice) led to progressive cardiac dysfunction and 100% mortality at 40 weeks after tamoxifen treatment. Electron microscopic analysis revealed dilatation of T-tubules and degeneration of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes of Bmx/CA mice, which are similar to the changes observed in mice with decreased neuregulin-ErbB signaling. Endothelial expression of Nrg1 and cardiac ErbB signaling were suppressed in Bmx/CA mice. The cardiac dysfunction of Bmx/CA mice was ameliorated by administration of recombinant neuregulin protein. These results collectively suggest that sustained activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells might be a cause of heart failure through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB signaling, and that the Wnt/β-catenin/NRG axis in cardiac endothelial cells might become a therapeutic target for heart failure. PMID:27146149

  18. Glycoproteins identified from heart failure and treatment models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Chen, Lijun; Sun, Shisheng; Shah, Punit; Yang, Weiming; Zhang, Bai; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W; Kass, David A; van Eyk, Jennifer E; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Conduction abnormalities can lead to dyssynchronous contraction, which significantly worsens morbidity and mortality of heart failure. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can reverse ventricular remodeling and improve cardiac function. Although the underlying molecular changes are unknown, the use of a canine model of dyssynchronous heart failure (DHF) and CRT has shown that there are global changes across the cardiac proteome. This study determines changes in serum glycoprotein concentration from DHF and CRT compared to normal. We hypothesize that CRT invokes protective or advantageous pathways that can be reflected in the circulating proteome. Two prong discovery approaches were carried out on pooled normal, DHF, and CRT samples composed of individual canine serum to determine the overall protein concentration and the N-linked glycosites of circulating glycoproteins. The level of the glycoproteins was altered in DHF and CRT compared to control sera, with 63 glycopeptides substantially increased in DHF and/or CRT. Among the 32 elevated glycosite-containing peptides in DHF, 13 glycopeptides were reverted to normal level after CRT therapy. We further verify the changes of glycopeptides using label-free LC-MS from individual canine serum. Circulating glycoproteins such as alpha-fetoprotein, alpha-2-macroglobulin, galectin-3-binding protein, and collectin-10 show association to failing heart and CRT treatment model.

  19. Thrombospondins in the transition from myocardial infarction to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Jonathan A; Cingolani, Oscar H

    2016-01-01

    The heart's reaction to ischemic injury from a myocardial infarction involves complex cross-talk between the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) and different cell types within the myocardium. The ECM functions not only as a scaffold where myocytes beat synchronously, but an active signaling environment that regulates the important post-MI responses. The thrombospondins are matricellular proteins that modulate cell--ECM interactions, functioning as "sensors" that mediate outside-in and inside-out signaling. Thrombospondins are highly expressed during embryonic stages, and although their levels decrease during adult life, can be re-expressed in high quantities in response to cardiac stress including myocardial infarction and heart failure. Like a Swiss-army knife, the thrombospondins possess many tools: numerous binding domains that allow them to interact with other elements of the ECM, cell surface receptors, and signaling molecules. It is through these that the thrombospondins function. In the present review, we provide basic as well as clinical evidence linking the thrombospondin proteins with the post myocardial infarction response, including inflammation, fibrotic matrix remodeling, angiogenesis, as well as myocyte hypertrophy, apoptosis, and contractile dysfunction in heart failure. We will describe what is known regarding the intracellular signaling pathways that are involved with these responses, paving the road for future studies identifying these proteins as therapeutic targets for cardiac disease.

  20. Activation of endothelial β-catenin signaling induces heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Akito; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Sumida, Tomokazu; Nomura, Seitaro; Shibamoto, Masato; Higo, Tomoaki; Okada, Katsuki; Sakai, Taku; Hashimoto, Akihito; Kuramoto, Yuki; Oka, Toru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Harada, Mutsuo; Ueda, Kazutaka; Shiojima, Ichiro; Limbourg, Florian P.; Adams, Ralf H.; Noda, Tetsuo; Sakata, Yasushi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Activation of β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signaling in endothelial cells plays a key role in angiogenesis during development and ischemic diseases, however, other roles of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that sustained activation of β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells causes cardiac dysfunction through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB pathway in the heart. Conditional gain-of-function mutation of β-catenin, which activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in Bmx-positive arterial endothelial cells (Bmx/CA mice) led to progressive cardiac dysfunction and 100% mortality at 40 weeks after tamoxifen treatment. Electron microscopic analysis revealed dilatation of T-tubules and degeneration of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes of Bmx/CA mice, which are similar to the changes observed in mice with decreased neuregulin-ErbB signaling. Endothelial expression of Nrg1 and cardiac ErbB signaling were suppressed in Bmx/CA mice. The cardiac dysfunction of Bmx/CA mice was ameliorated by administration of recombinant neuregulin protein. These results collectively suggest that sustained activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells might be a cause of heart failure through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB signaling, and that the Wnt/β-catenin/NRG axis in cardiac endothelial cells might become a therapeutic target for heart failure. PMID:27146149

  1. Muscle reflex in heart failure: the role of exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han-Jun; Zucker, Irving H.; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Exercise evokes sympathetic activation and increases blood pressure and heart rate (HR). Two neural mechanisms that cause the exercise-induced increase in sympathetic discharge are central command and the exercise pressor reflex (EPR). The former suggests that a volitional signal emanating from central motor areas leads to increased sympathetic activation during exercise. The latter is a reflex originating in skeletal muscle which contributes significantly to the regulation of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems during exercise. The afferent arm of this reflex is composed of metabolically sensitive (predominantly group IV, C-fibers) and mechanically sensitive (predominately group III, A-delta fibers) afferent fibers. Activation of these receptors and their associated afferent fibers reflexively adjusts sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity during exercise. In heart failure, the sympathetic activation during exercise is exaggerated, which potentially increases cardiovascular risk and contributes to exercise intolerance during physical activity in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients. A therapeutic strategy for preventing or slowing the progression of the exaggerated EPR may be of benefit in CHF patients. Long-term exercise training (ExT), as a non-pharmacological treatment for CHF increases exercise capacity, reduces sympatho-excitation and improves cardiovascular function in CHF animals and patients. In this review, we will discuss the effects of ExT and the mechanisms that contribute to the exaggerated EPR in the CHF state. PMID:23060821

  2. [Obesity and the prognosis of heart failure: the obesity paradox, myth or reality?].

    PubMed

    Bounhoure, Jean-Paul; Galinier, Michel; Roncalli, Jerôme; Massabuau, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has now reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Obesity is associated with numerous comorbidities, including hypertension, lipid disorders and type II diabetes, and is also a major cause of cardiovascular disease, coronary disease, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and sudden death. Obesity is the main cause of heart failure in respectively 11% and 14% of cases in men and women. The Framingham study showed that, after correction for other risk factors, each point increase in the body mass index raises the risk of heart failure by 5% in men and 7% in women. Obesity increases the heart workload, causes left ventricular hypertrophy, and impairs both diastolic and systolic function. The most common form of heart failure is diastolic dysfunction, and heart failure in obese individuals is associated with preserved systolic function. Despite these comorbidities and the severity of heart failure, numerous studies have revealed an "obesity paradox" in which overweight and obese individuals with heart failure appear to have a better prognosis than non overweight subjects. This review summarizes the adverse cardiac effects of this nutritional disease, the results of some studies supporting the obesity paradox, the better survival rate of obese patients with heart failure. Potential explanations for these surprising data include the possibility that a number of obese patients may simply not have heart failure, as well as methodological bias, and protective effects of adipose tissue. Further studies of large populations are needed to determine how obesity may improve the prognosis of heart failure.

  3. Congestive heart failure in acromegaly: A review of 6 cases

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, P.; Das, S.; Bhansali, A.; Bhadada, S. K.; Rajesh, B. V.; Reddy, K. S.; Vaiphei, K.; Mukherjee, K. K.; Pathak, A.; Shah, V. N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Though cardiac involvement is common in acromegaly, overt congestive heart failure is uncommon. Materials and Methods: This is retrospective analysis of hospital record between 1996 and 2007. We analyzed records of 150 consecutive patients with acromegaly. We included the patients with acromegaly those who had overt congestive heart failure either at presentation or during the course of illness for the present analysis. The diagnosis of acromegaly and congestive cardiac failure were based on standard criteria. Results: Out of 150 patients with acromegaly, 6 patients had overt CHF (4.0%), of which 4 presented with the features of CHF and 2 developed during the course of illness. Three patients had hypertension and 1 had diabetes. Baseline echocardiography showed severe biventricular dysfunction and global hypokinesia in all. Angiography showed dilated hypokinetic left ventricle with normal coronaries in 3, it was confirmed at autopsy in 1. Three underwent trans-sphenoidal surgery, 1 received somatostatin analogue as primary treatment modality. Normalization of growth hormone and IGF-1 led to improvement in cardiac function in 1, 1 patient lost to follow up, and 4 died during the course of illness. In 1 patient, autopsy was performed and cardiac specimen revealed normal coronaries, concentric ventricular hypertrophy, and dilatation with myofibrolysis and interfascicular fibrosis. Conclusion: Prevalence of overt CHF is 4% in present series. Overt CHF carries poor prognosis and hence, this complication should be recognized at earliest, and medical management to normalized cardiac function should be given utmost priority. PMID:23226648

  4. Mechanisms of carotid body chemoreflex dysfunction during heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Harold D.; Marcus, Noah J.; Del Rio, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances have drawn interest in the potential for carotid body (CB) ablation or desensitization as an effective strategy for clinical treatment and management of cardio-respiratory diseases including hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and renal failure. These disease states have in common sympathetic overactivity, which plays an important role in the development and progression of the disease and is often associated with breathing dysregulation, which in turn likely mediates or aggravates the autonomic imbalance. Evidence from both chronic heart failure (CHF) patients and animal models indicates that the CB chemoreflex is enhanced in CHF and contributes to the tonic elevation in sympathetic activity and the development of periodic breathing associated with the disease. Although this maladaptive change likely derives from altered function at all levels of the reflex arc, a tonic increase in afferent activity from CB glomus cells is likely to be a main driving force. This report will focus on our understanding of mechanisms that alter CB function in CHF and their potential translational impact on treatment of CHF. PMID:25398713

  5. Dystrophic heart failure blocked by membrane sealant poloxamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Soichiro; Townsend, Dewayne; Michele, Daniel E.; Favre, Elizabeth G.; Day, Sharlene M.; Metzger, Joseph M.

    2005-08-01

    Dystrophin deficiency causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in humans, an inherited and progressive disease of striated muscle deterioration that frequently involves pronounced cardiomyopathy. Heart failure is the second leading cause of fatalities in DMD. Progress towards defining the molecular basis of disease in DMD has mostly come from studies on skeletal muscle, with comparatively little attention directed to cardiac muscle. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in cardiac myocytes may differ significantly from skeletal myofibres; this is underscored by the presence of significant cardiac disease in patients with truncated or reduced levels of dystrophin but without skeletal muscle disease. Here we show that intact, isolated dystrophin-deficient cardiac myocytes have reduced compliance and increased susceptibility to stretch-mediated calcium overload, leading to cell contracture and death, and that application of the membrane sealant poloxamer 188 corrects these defects in vitro. In vivo administration of poloxamer 188 to dystrophic mice instantly improved ventricular geometry and blocked the development of acute cardiac failure during a dobutamine-mediated stress protocol. Once issues relating to optimal dosing and long-term effects of poloxamer 188 in humans have been resolved, chemical-based membrane sealants could represent a new therapeutic approach for preventing or reversing the progression of cardiomyopathy and heart failure in muscular dystrophy.

  6. [The psychological evaluation of patients with severe heart failure awaiting a heart transplant].

    PubMed

    Gentili, P; De Biase, L; Franzese, A; Malgarini, R B; Vaccaro, M; Giorda, G P; Della Monica, P L; Grutter, G; Marino, B; Campa, P P

    1997-02-01

    Because of the limitations resulting from the severity of heart failure, patients in the waiting list for cardiac transplantation often show a worsening in their social life. They usually present with psychological problems caused by symptoms, medical or surgical therapies and consequences on their own work. We have devised and utilized an experimental psychodiagnostic protocol to study the psychological characteristics of a sample of patients with heart failure (NYHA functional class III and IV) candidate to heart transplantation. Our study was particularly aimed at investigating the quality of life and the psychological mechanisms of adaptation. Findings show a strong attempt of denying the discomfort deriving from the disease and the expectation for transplant. Patients seem to have an adequate reaction to the illness and, otherwise, they feel anxiety and trouble that make very fragile their psychological adaptation. This behaviour is probably correlated with symptoms and the clinical history of heart failure, and does not match with a visible state of well-being that can be detected with a superficial analysis. Nevertheless patients have a good availability in receiving a psychological support from the whole medical staff (physicians, nurses): this suggests that the benefits deriving from a contemporary medical and psychological therapy are able to prevent the appearance of clear psychiatric symptoms. Additional studies involving larger samples of selected populations are needed to confirm the results of the present investigation.

  7. SERCA2 Haploinsufficiency in a Mouse Model of Darier Disease Causes a Selective Predisposition to Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N.; Lasko, Valerie M.; Nieman, Michelle L.; Huang, Wei; Wang, Yigang; Wieczorek, David W.; Shull, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    Null mutations in one copy of ATP2A2, the gene encoding sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), cause Darier disease in humans, a skin condition involving keratinocytes. Cardiac function appears to be unimpaired in Darier disease patients, with no evidence that SERCA2 haploinsufficiency itself causes heart disease. However, SERCA2 deficiency is widely considered a contributing factor in heart failure. We therefore analyzed Atp2a2 heterozygous mice to determine whether SERCA2 haploinsufficiency can exacerbate specific heart disease conditions. Despite reduced SERCA2a levels in heart, Atp2a2 heterozygous mice resembled humans in exhibiting normal cardiac physiology. When subjected to hypothyroidism or crossed with a transgenic model of reduced myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity, SERCA2 deficiency caused no enhancement of the disease state. However, when combined with a transgenic model of increased myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity, SERCA2 haploinsufficiency caused rapid onset of hypertrophy, decompensation, and death. These effects were associated with reduced expression of the antiapoptotic Hax1, increased levels of the proapoptotic genes Chop and Casp12, and evidence of perturbations in energy metabolism. These data reveal myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity to be an important determinant of the cardiac effects of SERCA2 haploinsufficiency and raise the possibility that Darier disease patients are more susceptible to heart failure under certain conditions. PMID:26064889

  8. SERCA2 Haploinsufficiency in a Mouse Model of Darier Disease Causes a Selective Predisposition to Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N; Lasko, Valerie M; Nieman, Michelle L; Huang, Wei; Wang, Yigang; Wieczorek, David W; Shull, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    Null mutations in one copy of ATP2A2, the gene encoding sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), cause Darier disease in humans, a skin condition involving keratinocytes. Cardiac function appears to be unimpaired in Darier disease patients, with no evidence that SERCA2 haploinsufficiency itself causes heart disease. However, SERCA2 deficiency is widely considered a contributing factor in heart failure. We therefore analyzed Atp2a2 heterozygous mice to determine whether SERCA2 haploinsufficiency can exacerbate specific heart disease conditions. Despite reduced SERCA2a levels in heart, Atp2a2 heterozygous mice resembled humans in exhibiting normal cardiac physiology. When subjected to hypothyroidism or crossed with a transgenic model of reduced myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity, SERCA2 deficiency caused no enhancement of the disease state. However, when combined with a transgenic model of increased myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity, SERCA2 haploinsufficiency caused rapid onset of hypertrophy, decompensation, and death. These effects were associated with reduced expression of the antiapoptotic Hax1, increased levels of the proapoptotic genes Chop and Casp12, and evidence of perturbations in energy metabolism. These data reveal myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity to be an important determinant of the cardiac effects of SERCA2 haploinsufficiency and raise the possibility that Darier disease patients are more susceptible to heart failure under certain conditions.

  9. Influence of heart failure on nucleocytoplasmic transport in human cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Raquel; Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Rivera, Miguel; Martínez-Dolz, Luis; Salvador, Antonio; Azorín, Inmaculada; Portolés, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Aims The role of the cell nucleus in the development of heart failure (HF) is unknown, so the objectives of this study were to analyse the effect of HF on nucleocytoplasmic transport and density of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Methods and results A total of 51 human heart samples from ischaemic (ICM, n = 30) and dilated (DCM, n = 16) patients undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (CNT, n = 5) were analysed by western blotting. Subcellular distribution of proteins and NPC were analysed by fluorescence and electron microscopy, respectively. When we compared nucleocytoplasmic machinery protein levels according to aetiology of HF, ICM showed higher levels of importins [(IMP-β3) (150%, P < 0.0001), IMP-α2 (69%, P = 0.001)] and exportins [EXP-1 (178%, P < 0.0001), EXP-4 (81%, P = 0.006)] than those of the CNT group. Furthermore, DCM also showed significant differences for IMP-β3 (192%, P < 0.0001), IMP-α2 (52%, P = 0.025), and EXP-1 (228%, P < 0.0001). RanGTPase-activating proteins (RanGAP1 and RaGAP1u) were increased in ICM (76%, P = 0.005; 51%, P = 0.012) and DCM (41%, P = 0.042; 50%, P = 0.029). Furthermore, subcellular distribution of nucleocytoplasmic machinery was not altered in pathological hearts. Finally, nucleoporin (Nup) p62 was increased in ICM (80%) and DCM (109%) (P < 0.001 and P = 0.024). Nuclear pore density was comparable in pathological and CNT hearts, and ICM showed a low diameter (P = 0.005) and different structural configuration of NPC. Conclusion This study shows the effect of HF on nucleocytoplasmic trafficking machinery, evidenced by higher levels of importins, exportins, Ran regulators and Nup p62 in ischaemic and dilated human hearts than those in the controls, with NPCs acquiring a different configuration and morphology in ICM. PMID:19819881

  10. Sleep Apnea in Heart Failure Increases Heart Rate Variability and Sympathetic Dominance

    PubMed Central

    Szollosi, Irene; Krum, Henry; Kaye, David; Naughton, Matthew T.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is common in heart failure and ventilation is known to influence heart rate. Our aims were to assess the influence of SDB on heart rate variability (HRV) and to determine whether central sleep apnea (CSA) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) produced different patterns of HRV. Methods and Results: Overnight polysomnography was performed in 21 patients with heart failure and SDB. Two 10-minute segments each of SDB and stable breathing from each patient were visually identified and ECG signal exported for HRV analysis. SDB increased total power (TP) with very low frequency (VLF) power accounting for the greatest increase (1.89±0.54 vs 2.96±0.46 ms2, P <0.001); LF/HF ratio increased during SDB (1.2±1.0 vs 2.7±2.1, P <0.001). Compared to OSA, CSA was associated with lower absolute LF (2.10±0.47 vs 2.52±0.55 ms2, P = 0.049) and HF power (1.69±0.41 vs 2.34±0.58 ms2, P = 0.004), increased VLF% (78.9%±13.4% vs 60.9%±19.2%, P = 0.008), decreased HF% (6.9%±7.8% vs 16.0%±11.7%, P = 0.046) with a trend to higher LF/HF ratio. Conclusions: SDB increases HRV in the setting of increased sympathetic dominance. HRV in CSA and OSA have unique HRV patterns which are likely to reflect the different pathophysiological mechanisms involved. Citation: Szollosi I; Krum H; Kaye D; Naughton MT. Sleep apnea in heart failure increases heart rate variability and sympathetic dominance. SLEEP 2007;30(11):1509-1514. PMID:18041483

  11. Update on Obesity and Obesity Paradox in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Carl J; Sharma, Abhishek; Alpert, Martin A; De Schutter, Alban; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Milani, Richard V; Ventura, Hector O

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in most of the Westernized world. Overweightness and obesity adversely impact cardiac structure and function, including on both the right and, especially, left sides of the heart, with adverse affects on systolic and, especially, diastolic ventricular function. Therefore, it is not surprising that obesity markedly increases the prevalence of heart failure (HF). Nevertheless, many studies have documented an obesity paradox in large cohorts with HF, where overweight and obese have a better prognosis, at least in the short-term, compared with lean HF patients. Although weight loss clearly improves cardiac structure and function and reduces symptoms in HF, there are no large studies on the impact of weight loss on clinical events in HF, preventing definitive guidelines on optimal body composition in patients with HF.

  12. Pathophysiology of acute heart failure: a world to know.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Marteles, M; Rubio Gracia, J; Giménez López, I

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of heart failure (HF) has changed considerably in recent years, progressing from a merely haemodynamic viewpoint to a concept of systemic and multifactorial involvement in which numerous mechanisms interact and concatenate. The effects of these mechanisms go beyond the heart itself, to other organs of vital importance such as the kidneys, liver and lungs. Despite this, the pathophysiology of acute HF still has aspects that elude our deeper understanding. Haemodynamic overload, venous congestion, neurohormonal systems, natriuretic peptides, inflammation, oxidative stress and its repercussion on cardiac and vascular remodelling are currently considered the main players in acute HF. Starting with the concept of acute HF, this review provides updates on the various mechanisms involved in this disease.

  13. Exercise Intolerance in Heart Failure: Did We Forget the Brain?

    PubMed

    Brassard, Patrice; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-04-01

    Exercise tolerance is affected in patients with heart failure (HF). Although the inability of the heart to pump blood to the working muscle has been the conventional mechanism proposed to explain the lowered capacity of patients with HF to exercise, evidence suggests that the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with their exercise intolerance is more complex. Recent findings indicate that lowered cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygenation likely represent limiting factors for exercise capacity in patients with HF. After an overview of cardiac and peripheral responses during acute and chronic exercise in healthy individuals, we succinctly review cardiac and noncardiac mechanisms by which HF influences exercise tolerance. We then consider how HF, comorbidity, and HF treatment influence CBF and oxygenation at rest and during exercise. Finally, we provide suggestions for further research to improve our understanding of the role of the brain in exercise intolerance in HF.

  14. Heart failure in congenital heart disease: a confluence of acquired and congenital.

    PubMed

    Fahed, Akl C; Roberts, Amy E; Mital, Seema; Lakdawala, Neal K

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in congenital heart disease (CHD), with increasing prevalence because of improved treatment options and outcomes. Genetic factors and acquired postnatal factors in CHD might play a major role in the progression to HF. This article proposes 3 routes that lead to HF in CHD: rare monogenic entities that cause both CHD and HF; severe CHD lesions in which acquired hemodynamic effects of CHD or surgery result in HF; and, most commonly, a combined effect of complex genetics in overlapping pathways and acquired stressors caused by the primary lesion.

  15. Clinical Evaluation of Heart Failure: Agreement among Tests.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Amit K; Penny, William F; Bhargava, Valmik; Lai, N Chin; Xu, Ronghui; Hammond, H Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Methods commonly used clinically to assess cardiac function in patients with heart failure include ejection fraction (EF), exercise treadmill testing (ETT), and symptom evaluation. Although these approaches are useful in evaluating patients with heart failure, there are at times substantial mismatches between individual assessments. For example, ETT results are often discordant with EF, and patients with minimal symptoms sometimes have surprisingly low EFs. To better define the relationship of these methods of assessment, we studied 56 patients with heart failure with reduced EF (HFrEF) who underwent measurement of ETT duration, EF by echocardiography, quantitative symptom evaluation, and LV peak dP/dt (rate of left ventricular pressure development and decline, measured invasively). Correlations were determined among these four tests in order to assess the relationship of EF, ETT, and symptoms against LV peak dP/dt. In addition, we sought to determine whether EF, ETT, and symptoms correlated with each other. Overall, correlations were poor. Only 15 of 63 total correlations (24%) were significant (p < 0.05). EF correlated most closely with LV peak -dP/dt. Linear regression analysis indicated that EF, ETT, and symptoms taken together predicted LV peak dP/dt better than any one measure alone. We conclude that clinical tests used to assess LV function in patients with HFrEF may not be as accurate or correlate as well as expected. All three clinical measures considered together may be the best representation of cardiac function in HFrEF patients currently available. PMID:27537778

  16. Charting a Roadmap for Heart Failure Biomarker Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Tariq; Fiuzat, Mona; Pencina, Michael J.; Geller, Nancy L.; Zannad, Faiez; Cleland, John G. F.; Snider, James V.; Blankenberg, Stephan; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Redberg, Rita F.; Kim, Jae B.; Mascette, Alice; Mentz, Robert J.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Felker, G. Michael; Januzzi, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a syndrome with a pathophysiological basis that can be traced to dysfunction in several interconnected molecular pathways. Identification of biomarkers of heart failure that allow measurement of the disease on a molecular level has resulted in enthusiasm for their use in prognostication and selection of appropriate therapies. However, despite considerable amounts of information available on numerous biomarkers, inconsistent research methodologies and lack of clinical correlations have made bench-to-bedside translations rare and left the literature with countless publications of varied quality. There is a need for a systematic and collaborative approach aimed at definitively studying the clinical benefits of novel biomarkers. In this review, on the basis of input from academia, industry, and governmental agencies, we propose a systematized approach based on adherence to specific quality measures for studies looking to augment current prediction model or use biomarkers to tailor therapeutics. We suggest that study quality, rather than results, should determine publication and propose a system for grading biomarker studies. We outline the need for collaboration between clinical investigators and statisticians to introduce more advanced statistical methodologies into the field of biomarkers that would allow for data from a large number of variables to be distilled into clinically actionable information. Lastly, we propose the creation of a heart failure biomarker consortium that would allow for a comprehensive list of biomarkers to be concomitantly analyzed in a pooled sample of randomized clinical trials and hypotheses to be generated for testing in biomarker-guided trials. Such a consortium could collaborate in sharing samples to identify biomarkers, undertake meta- analyses on completed trials, and spearhead clinical trials to test the clinical utility of new biomarkers. PMID:24929535

  17. Clinical Evaluation of Heart Failure: Agreement among Tests

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Amit K.; Penny, William F.; Bhargava, Valmik; Lai, N. Chin; Xu, Ronghui; Hammond, H. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Methods commonly used clinically to assess cardiac function in patients with heart failure include ejection fraction (EF), exercise treadmill testing (ETT), and symptom evaluation. Although these approaches are useful in evaluating patients with heart failure, there are at times substantial mismatches between individual assessments. For example, ETT results are often discordant with EF, and patients with minimal symptoms sometimes have surprisingly low EFs. To better define the relationship of these methods of assessment, we studied 56 patients with heart failure with reduced EF (HFrEF) who underwent measurement of ETT duration, EF by echocardiography, quantitative symptom evaluation, and LV peak dP/dt (rate of left ventricular pressure development and decline, measured invasively). Correlations were determined among these four tests in order to assess the relationship of EF, ETT, and symptoms against LV peak dP/dt. In addition, we sought to determine whether EF, ETT, and symptoms correlated with each other. Overall, correlations were poor. Only 15 of 63 total correlations (24%) were significant (p < 0.05). EF correlated most closely with LV peak -dP/dt. Linear regression analysis indicated that EF, ETT, and symptoms taken together predicted LV peak dP/dt better than any one measure alone. We conclude that clinical tests used to assess LV function in patients with HFrEF may not be as accurate or correlate as well as expected. All three clinical measures considered together may be the best representation of cardiac function in HFrEF patients currently available. PMID:27537778

  18. Liver Enzymes and Uric acid in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vakilian, Farveh; Rafighdoost, Abbas Ali; Rafighdoost, Amir Hossein; Amin, Ahmad; Salehi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute heart failure (AHF) is defined as the new onset or recurrence of gradual or rapidly worsening signs and symptoms of heart failure, requiring urgent or emergent therapy. Objectives: This study attempts to assess the association of liver function tests (LFT) and uric acid level with in hospital outcome and echocardiography parameters, in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Patients and Methods: A total of 100 patients (aged 16 - 90 years, 60% men) admitted with AHF were enrolled. LFTs and uric acid levels were assessed on first day and before discharge, and patients were followed for 3 months. Results: In-hospital outcomes were considered. Mean Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction (LVEF) was 35% (20 - 45%). Mean Uric acid level was 8.4 mg/dL, significantly higher than chronic HF and normal groups (P < 0.02). Elevated liver enzymes were seen in 52% patients, mostly (87%) in transaminases. Liver enzymes were decreased in 85% patients before discharge. LFT and uric acid levels were inversely and significantly correlated with LVEF on echocardiography (P = 0.02), but not with diastolic parameters. Although there was no significant correlation between uric acid level and in-hospital mortality, risk of intubation and rehospitalization in 3 months, enzyme levels increased in these groups. Increased aspartate transaminase (AST level) was associated with inotrope infusion in AHF patients (42 vs. 82 mg/dL, P = 0.03). Conclusions: Abnormal transaminases and uric acid levels are seen in AHF patients. Increased AST levels may be a predictor of the need for inotrope during hospital course in these patients. PMID:26528447

  19. Cheyne-Stokes respiration in patients with heart failure: prevalence, causes, consequences and treatments.

    PubMed

    Brack, Thomas; Randerath, Winfried; Bloch, Konrad E

    2012-01-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) is characterized by a pattern of cyclic oscillations of tidal volume and respiratory rate with periods of hyperpnea alternating with hypopnea or apnea in patients with heart failure. CSR harms the failing heart through intermittent hypoxia brought about by apnea and hypopnea and recurrent sympathetic surges. CSR impairs the quality of life and increases cardiac mortality in patients with heart failure. Thus, CSR should actively be pursued in patients with severe heart failure. When CSR persists despite optimal therapy of heart failure, noninvasive adaptive servoventilation is currently the most promising treatment.

  20. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists as diuretics: Can congestive heart failure learn from liver failure?

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Amirali; Ortiz, Fernando; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Schrier, Robert W; Colombo, Paolo C

    2015-05-01

    Despite significant improvements in diagnosis, understanding the pathophysiology and management of the patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), diuretic resistance, yet to be clearly defined, is a major hurdle. Secondary hyperaldosteronism is a pivotal factor in pathogenesis of sodium retention, refractory congestion in heart failure (HF) as well as diuretic resistance. In patients with decompensated cirrhosis who suffer from ascites, similar pathophysiological complications have been recognized. Administration of natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) has been well established in management of cirrhotic patients. However, this strategy in patients with ADHF has not been well studied. This article will discuss the potential use of natriuretic doses of MRAs to overcome the secondary hyperaldosteronism as an alternative diuretic regimen in patients with HF.

  1. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists as diuretics: Can congestive heart failure learn from liver failure?

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Fernando; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Schrier, Robert W.; Colombo, Paolo C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in diagnosis, understanding the pathophysiology and management of the patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), diuretic resistance, yet to be clearly defined, is a major hurdle. Secondary hyperaldosteronism is a pivotal factor in pathogenesis of sodium retention, refractory congestion in heart failure (HF) as well as diuretic resistance. In patients with decompensated cirrhosis who suffer from ascites, similar pathophysiological complications have been recognized. Administration of natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) has been well established in management of cirrhotic patients. However, this strategy in patients with ADHF has not been well studied. This article will discuss the potential use of natriuretic doses of MRAs to overcome the secondary hyperaldosteronism as an alternative diuretic regimen in patients with HF. PMID:25447845

  2. Invasive hemodynamic characterization of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mads J; Borlaug, Barry A

    2014-07-01

    Recent hemodynamic studies have advanced our understanding of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Despite improved pathophysiologic insight, clinical trials have failed to identify an effective treatment for HFpEF. Invasive hemodynamic assessment can diagnose or exclude HFpEF, making it invaluable in understanding the basis of the disease. This article reviews the hemodynamic mechanisms underlying HFpEF and how they manifest clinically, discusses invasive hemodynamic assessment as a diagnostic tool, and explores how invasive hemodynamic profiling may allow understanding of pathophysiological differences and inform the design and entry criteria for future trials.

  3. Temporary Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support in Advanced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessica L; Estep, Jerry D

    2016-07-01

    Cardiogenic shock is severe, refractory heart failure caused by significant myocardial dysfunction in the setting of adequate preload that is accompanied by systemic hypoperfusion. Progressive end-organ dysfunction is a hallmark of persistent cardiogenic shock and necessitates intervention to overcome altered hemodynamics and restore end-organ perfusion. Temporary percutaneous mechanical circulatory support is an established modality in the treatment of cardiogenic shock and is increasingly used in patients with cardiogenic shock as a bridge to recovery or further definitive therapy. This article reviews the current devices, their effects on left ventricular hemodynamics, and the evidence supporting their continued use. PMID:27371515

  4. [Outpatient rehabilitation after myocardial infarction or for heart failure].

    PubMed

    Fischer, H M; Charrier, A; Dörr, R; Spitzer, S G

    2012-02-01

    Reducing cardiac mortality and improving quality of life are the main objectives of cardiac rehabilitation. In recent years, outpatient rehabilitation within easy patient reach has achieved the same status as inpatient rehabilitation. Outpatient rehabilitation permits close involvement of the patient's family and social environment, thus easing reintegration into everyday life. However, the health care system is not yet utilizing outpatient rehabilitation to its full potential. This contribution illustrates the principles of rehabilitation following myocardial infarction or for heart failure in an outpatient setting, as well as its potential and future development.

  5. Heart Failure: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Medical Treatment Guidelines, and Nursing Management.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Chad; Bush, Nathania

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a debilitating chronic disease and is expected to increase in upcoming years due to demographic changes. Nurses in all settings have an essential role in supporting patients in managing this disease. This article describes the pathophysiology of HF, diagnosis, medical management, and nursing interventions. It is crucial for nurses to understand the pathophysiology of HF and the importance that nursing actions have on enhancing medical management to alleviate symptoms and to deter the advancement of the pathophysiologic state. Such an understanding can ultimately reduce morbidity and mortality and optimize quality of life in patients with HF.

  6. How to measure dyspnea in acute heart failure?

    PubMed

    Socrates, Thenral; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2009-09-01

    Dyspnea is the most common presenting symptom of patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Although dyspnea is an important target for treatment in clinical practice and clinical trials, there remains a lack of consensus on how to assess it. We describe and recommend to use absolute scales such the Likert 5-point or the Visual Analogue Scale rather than any comparator scale such as the Likert 7-point scale. We further recommend starting dyspnea measurements in sitting position and perform, if possible, similar measurements in lying position. The same set of measurements may be repeated as needed during the time course of disease and the treatment.

  7. Sleep-associated movement disorders and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Schaffernocker, Troy; Ho, Julia; Hayes, Don

    2009-09-01

    Sleep-associated movement disorders are a broad group of sleep disorders characterized by involuntary movements that may disrupt sleep. Relatively little is known about the clinical consequences of sleep-associated movement disorders on cardiovascular health. Because these disorders manifest mostly during sleep, recognizing a movement disorder can be particularly difficult. Nevertheless, patients can have frequent arousals and suffer from similar sleep deprivation, fragmentation, and autonomic disruption as occurs in sleep-disordered breathing. Subsequently, these disorders may have a serious impact on daytime function and perception of health in patients with chronic heart failure.

  8. Technology to promote and increase physical activity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Nina C

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity is firmly recommended as part of a multifaceted approach to heart failure (HF) self-management. Unfortunately, research indicates that most patients are less likely to engage in and adhere to such activities. The widespread use of information and communication technology tools and resources offers an innovative and potentially beneficial avenue for increasing physical activity levels in HF patients. This article presents specific ways in which advances in information and communication technologies, including Internet- and mobile-based communications, social media platforms, and self-monitoring health devices, can serve as a means to broadly promote increasing levels of physical activity to improve health outcomes in the HF population.

  9. Team management of congestive heart failure across the continuum.

    PubMed

    Venner, G H; Seelbinder, J S

    1996-01-01

    Despite an increased incidence of congestive heart failure and frequency of hospital admissions for the Medicare population, there is little information available on improving outcomes for these patients. As changes in health care lead toward capitation, efficient care with limited use of expensive inpatient hospital resources is a necessity. The coordination of three critical components--inpatient, outpatient, and home care--can lead to positive outcomes in terms of functional capacity changes, length of stay, readmission rates, patient self-care knowledge, and patient satisfaction.

  10. Potential applications of pharmacogenomics to heart failure therapies.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Kishan S; Ahmad, Tariq; Fiuzat, Mona

    2014-10-01

    Pharmacogenomics explores one drug's varying effects on different patient genotypes. A better understanding of genomic variation's contribution to drug response can impact 4 arenas in heart failure (HF): (1) identification of patients most likely to receive benefit from therapy, (2) risk stratify patients for risk of adverse events, (3) optimize dosing of drugs, and (4) steer future clinical trial design and drug development. In this review, the authors explore the potential applications of pharmacogenomics in patients with HF in the context of these categories.

  11. PTH: Potential role in management of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gruson, D; Buglioni, A; Burnett, J C

    2014-06-10

    Biomarkers play an important role for the diagnosis and prognosis of heart failure (HF), a disease with high morbidity and mortality as well as a huge impact on healthcare budgets. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a major systemic calcium-regulating hormone and an important regulator of bone and mineral homeostasis. PTH testing is important for differential diagnosis of calcemia related disorders and for the management of patients with chronic kidney disease. As secondary hyperparathyroidism has been evidenced in HF patients, PTH testing might be relevant in HF patients for risk stratification and more personalized selection of treatment. PMID:24704306

  12. Obesity in heart failure: impact on survival and treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Richard K; DePasquale, Eugene C; Deng, Mario C; Nsair, Ali; Horwich, Tamara B

    2013-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) and obesity are commonly seen in the USA. Although obesity is associated with traditional cardiovascular disease, its relationship with HF is complex. Obesity is an accepted risk factor for incident HF. However, in patients with established HF, there exists a paradoxical correlation, with escalating BMI incrementally protective against adverse outcomes. Despite this relationship, patients with HF may desire to lose weight to reduce comorbidities or to improve quality of life. Thus far, studies have shown that intentional weight loss in obese patients with HF does not increase risk, with strategies including dietary modification, physical activity, pharmacotherapy, and/or surgical intervention.

  13. Heart failure and health related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Quality of life is a major goal in the context of preventive and therapeutic cardiology. It is important, both as an outcome measure in clinical trials of congestive heart failure (CHF) and as a consideration in individual physicians' therapeutic decisions. In this article, quality of life concepts are reviewed, methods of measurement are explored and clinically significant changes on prognosis are discussed. There is a need for more research which is based on carefully selected measures of quality of life chosen as being of particular importance to patients and to the hypotheses being tested. PMID:16202163

  14. Use of diuretics in cardiovascular diseases: (1) heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S; Anjum, S; Littler, W

    2004-01-01

    Diuretics are used extensively in hospitals and in community medical practice for the management of cardiovascular diseases. They are used frequently as the first line treatment for mild to moderate hypertension and are an integral part of the management of symptomatic heart failure. Although diuretics have been used for several decades, there is still some ambiguity and confusion regarding the optimal way of using these common drugs. In this paper, the classes and action of diuretics are reviewed, and the various indications, optimal doses, and recommendations on the effective use of these agents are discussed. PMID:15082840

  15. [Chronic heart failure and its consequences on the partner relationship].

    PubMed

    Sztajzel, Juan

    2015-12-01

    There are presently few data on chronic heart failure (CHF) and its consequences on the partner relationship. The aim of our study was to assess how patients with severe CHF and their female partners were affected in their relationship. First, there was a need to address the issue of sexuality with the doctor because of fear of the occurrence of a cardiac event or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock. Second, there was often a significant decrease in libido and erectile dysfunction associated with general depressive symptoms. Finally, the female partners in several couples developed an overprotective behavior leading to resentment and frustration in patients towards them. PMID:26790235

  16. [Diuretics in heart failure and Karl Popper's turkey].

    PubMed

    Cice, Gennaro

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure and renal failure often coexist in the same patient. This condition is commonly referred to as cardiorenal syndrome. When this occurs, patient survival worsens significantly with increasing degree of renal dysfunction. Management of this complex patient poses treatment challenges because of unstable hemodynamics (the problem is to reduce congestion without affecting organ perfusion) and very high mid-term in-hospital mortality. Congestion is a typical feature of this syndrome, and use of diuretics is mandatory. Loop diuretics should be administered first. However, poor attention to pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of loop diuretics may contribute to the development of diuretic resistance leading to iatrogenic hyponatremia. Accordingly, emphasis is given to the importance of sequential nephron blockade to reduce the number of non-responder patients to diuretics and to recognize a possible role for acquaretics.

  17. Implementation of a self-care of heart failure program among home-based clients.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Rebecca; Gaspar, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is the most common admission in hospitals among Medicare recipients aged 65 years or older. Self-care management of heart failure has been reported to decrease heart failure hospital admission rates. The purpose of this evidence-based practice project was to examine how a self-care of heart failure program (Heart Failure Self-care to Success) impacts hospital admissions and patient perceptions of self-care management. Heart Failure Self-care to Success (HF S2S) was successfully implemented with 18 participants by nurse practitioners in a house call practice. Six months following implementation of the self-care of heart failure program no heart failure admissions occurred among participants and a significant increase in their self-care of heart failure behaviors (p < .01) was reported by participants. Nurse practitioners using HF S2S can decrease health care costs and improve self-care behaviors in the older, homebound heart failure patient. Further testing of HF S2S is recommended in different practice settings, sample populations, and geographic locations.

  18. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Phenylbutyrate Exaggerates Heart Failure in Pressure Overloaded Mice independently of HDAC inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Luo, Tao; Zeng, Zhi; Fu, Haiying; Asano, Yoshihiro; Liao, Yulin; Minamino, Tetsuo; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    4-Sodium phenylbutyrate (PBA) has been reported to inhibit endoplasmic reticulum stress and histone deacetylation (HDAC), both of which are novel therapeutic targets for cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, it is unclear whether PBA can improve heart function. Here, we tested the effects of PBA and some other HDAC inhibitors on cardiac dysfunction induced by pressure overload. Transverse aortic constriction (TAC) was performed on male C57BL/6 mice. PBA treatment (100 mg/kg, 6 weeks) unexpectedly led to a higher mortality, exacerbated cardiac remodelling and dysfunction. Similar results were noted in TAC mice treated with butyrate sodium (BS), a PBA analogue. In contrast, other HDAC inhibitors, valproic acid (VAL) and trichostatin A (TSA), improved the survival. All four HDAC inhibitors induced histone H3 acetylation and inhibited HDAC total activity. An individual HDAC activity assay showed that rather than class IIa members (HDAC4 and 7), PBA and BS predominantly inhibited class I members (HDAC2 and 8), whereas VAL and TSA inhibited all of them. These findings indicate that PBA and BS accelerate cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction, whereas VAL and TSA have opposing effects. PMID:27667442

  19. New strategies for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: the importance of targeted therapies for heart failure phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Senni, Michele; Paulus, Walter J; Gavazzi, Antonello; Fraser, Alan G; Díez, Javier; Solomon, Scott D; Smiseth, Otto A; Guazzi, Marco; Lam, Carolyn S P; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tschöpe, Carsten; Metra, Marco; Hummel, Scott L; Edelmann, Frank; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Stewart Coats, Andrew J; Filippatos, Gerasimos S; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Anker, Stefan D; Levy, Daniel; Pfeffer, Marc A; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Pieske, Burkert M

    2014-10-21

    The management of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) has improved significantly over the last two decades. In contrast, little or no progress has been made in identifying evidence-based, effective treatments for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Despite the high prevalence, mortality, and cost of HF-PEF, large phase III international clinical trials investigating interventions to improve outcomes in HF-PEF have yielded disappointing results. Therefore, treatment of HF-PEF remains largely empiric, and almost no acknowledged standards exist. There is no single explanation for the negative results of past HF-PEF trials. Potential contributors include an incomplete understanding of HF-PEF pathophysiology, the heterogeneity of the patient population, inadequate diagnostic criteria, recruitment of patients without true heart failure or at early stages of the syndrome, poor matching of therapeutic mechanisms and primary pathophysiological processes, suboptimal study designs, or inadequate statistical power. Many novel agents are in various stages of research and development for potential use in patients with HF-PEF. To maximize the likelihood of identifying effective therapeutics for HF-PEF, lessons learned from the past decade of research should be applied to the design, conduct, and interpretation of future trials. This paper represents a synthesis of a workshop held in Bergamo, Italy, and it examines new and emerging therapies in the context of specific, targeted HF-PEF phenotypes where positive clinical benefit may be detected in clinical trials. Specific considerations related to patient and endpoint selection for future clinical trials design are also discussed.

  20. New strategies for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: the importance of targeted therapies for heart failure phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Senni, Michele; Paulus, Walter J.; Gavazzi, Antonello; Fraser, Alan G.; Díez, Javier; Solomon, Scott D.; Smiseth, Otto A.; Guazzi, Marco; Lam, Carolyn S. P.; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Tschöpe, Carsten; Metra, Marco; Hummel, Scott L.; Edelmann, Frank; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Stewart Coats, Andrew J.; Filippatos, Gerasimos S.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Anker, Stefan D.; Levy, Daniel; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Pieske, Burkert M.

    2014-01-01

    The management of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) has improved significantly over the last two decades. In contrast, little or no progress has been made in identifying evidence-based, effective treatments for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Despite the high prevalence, mortality, and cost of HF-PEF, large phase III international clinical trials investigating interventions to improve outcomes in HF-PEF have yielded disappointing results. Therefore, treatment of HF-PEF remains largely empiric, and almost no acknowledged standards exist. There is no single explanation for the negative results of past HF-PEF trials. Potential contributors include an incomplete understanding of HF-PEF pathophysiology, the heterogeneity of the patient population, inadequate diagnostic criteria, recruitment of patients without true heart failure or at early stages of the syndrome, poor matching of therapeutic mechanisms and primary pathophysiological processes, suboptimal study designs, or inadequate statistical power. Many novel agents are in various stages of research and development for potential use in patients with HF-PEF. To maximize the likelihood of identifying effective therapeutics for HF-PEF, lessons learned from the past decade of research should be applied to the design, conduct, and interpretation of future trials. This paper represents a synthesis of a workshop held in Bergamo, Italy, and it examines new and emerging therapies in the context of specific, targeted HF-PEF phenotypes where positive clinical benefit may be detected in clinical trials. Specific considerations related to patient and endpoint selection for future clinical trials design are also discussed. PMID:25104786

  1. [Renal dysfunction in heart failure and hypervolumenia : Importance of congestion and backward failure].

    PubMed

    Druml, W

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, renal dysfunction in congestive heart failure (cardiorenal syndrome type 1) has been attributed to reduced cardiac output and low mean arterial perfusion pressure, which elicit a series of neurohumoral activations resulting in increased renal vascular resistance and decreased renal function.During the last decade, several studies have shown that the extent of renal dysfunction is not so closely associated with indices of forward failure-such as the cardiac index or mean arterial pressure-but rather with indicators of congestion, such as left ventricular enddiasystolic pressure or central venous pressure (CVP), which are indicators of backward failure. The impact of backward failure on renal function is not confined to an elevation of CVP, the renal drainage pressure, but includes a broad spectrum of mechanisms. Involved are the organ systems right heart, lung, the liver, the proinflammatory signals originating from the intestines, but also renal interstitial edema (renal compartment syndrome) and the intraabdominal pressure.The therapeutic measures must focus on the modulation of the preload adapted to the specific situation of an individual patient. This includes diuretics aiming at different segments of the tubulus system including antagonists of aldosteron and ADH, extracorporeal fluid elimination by ultrafiltration or peritoneal dialysis.

  2. Norepinephrine-induced nerve growth factor depletion causes cardiac sympathetic denervation in severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kensuke; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Ieda, Masaki; Kawaguchi-Manabe, Haruko; Miyake, Yoshiko; Yagi, Takashi; Arai, Takahide; Sano, Motoaki; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2010-08-25

    In severe congestive heart failure (CHF), sympathetic overactivity correlates with the exacerbation of cardiac performance. To test the hypothesis that the cardiac sympathetic nerve density dramatically changes with the acceleration of circulating norepinephrine (NE) concentration, we investigated the temporal association of nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the heart and cardiac sympathetic nerve density during the development of CHF in the continuous NE-infused rats. The animals were analyzed at 0-, 1-, 3-, 7-, 14-, and 28-day after implantation of osmotic pump at a rate of 0.05 mg/kg/hr. The cardiac performance was temporally facilitated in NE-exposed rats at 3-day in accordance with the sympathetic hyper-innervation induced by the augmentation of NGF mRNA expression in the heart. In NE-treated rats, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was significantly increased after 7-day and marked left ventricular hypertrophy and systemic fluid retention were observed at 28-day. CHF-induced sympathetic overactivity further increased plasma NE concentration in NE-treated rats and finally reached to 16.1+/-5.6 ng/ml at 28-day (control level was 0.39+/-0.1 ng/ml, p<0.01). In the decompensated CHF rats at 28-day, the NGF mRNA expression was conspicuously reduced concomitant with the obvious nerve fiber loss confirmed by the immunostaining of nerve axonal marker, PGP9.5 and sympathetic neuron marker, tyrosine hydroxylase. This resulted in the attenuated tissue NE contents and the exacerbating cardiac performance. The cardiac sympathetic fiber loss was also confirmed in NE-exposed DBH (dopamine beta-hydroxylase)-Cre/Floxed-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) mice with severe CHF, in which sympathetic nerve could be traced by EGFP. Our results suggest that the cardiac sympathetic nerve density is strictly regulated by the NGF expression in the heart and long-exposure of high plasma NE concentration caused myocardial NGF reduction, following sympathetic fiber loss

  3. Frailty in advanced heart failure: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jha, Sunita R; Ha, Hakeem S K; Hickman, Louise D; Hannu, Malin; Davidson, Patricia M; Macdonald, Peter S; Newton, Phillip J

    2015-09-01

    Frailty is a common geriatric syndrome of increased vulnerability to adverse events. The prevalence of frailty among chronic heart failure (CHF) is high and confers a greater risk of adverse events including falls, hospitalisation and mortality. There have been few studies assessing frailty in CHF. A review of the key databases was conducted from 2004 to 2014 including the key search terms 'frail elderly' and 'heart failure'. The following electronic databases were searched: Medline, Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health and Academic Search Complete, with reference lists being manually searched. Articles were included if frailty was assessed using a valid measuring tool in a population with a confirmed diagnosis of CHF. The search yielded a total of 393 articles with 8 articles being selected for review. The prevalence of frailty among those with CHF was high, ranging from 18 to 54 %. The frailty phenotype and geriatric assessments tools were the most common frailty measures utilised; high rates of co-morbidity, hospitalisation and mortality were identified. Frailty is common in CHF and is associated with adverse outcomes. PMID:25982016

  4. Fatigue, Inflammation, and Projected Mortality in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Anne M.; Gonzalez, Rosalia C.; Lisowski, Tadeusz; Pini, Maria; Fantuzzi, Giamila; Levy, Wayne C.; Piano, Mariann R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a prominent and poorly understood symptom of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The purpose of this study was to determine whether fatigue correlated with immune biomarkers and prognosis. Methods/Results In patients with HFrEF (N = 59) and healthy controls (N = 25), we prospectively measured fatigue (Profile of Mood States), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-8), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and immune biomarkers (plasma C-reactive protein [CRP], tumor necrosis factor-α [TNFα], and interleukins [IL-6 and IL-10]). Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) mortality risk scores were determined. Patients with HFrEF had significantly greater fatigue and depressive symptoms and poorer sleep quality compared to control subjects. When controlling for depressive symptoms, however, fatigue did not differ significantly between patients with HFrEF and controls. Patients with HFrEF had significantly lower levels of IL-10 compared to controls. Cytokines did not correlate significantly with fatigue, but fatigue was significantly associated with higher SHFM scores. Conclusions Depressive symptoms were an important covariate of fatigue in patients with HFrEF. Our study findings were the first to show a positive association between fatigue and the SHFM score, indicating that fatigue was associated with poorer prognosis. PMID:22939040

  5. A review of levosimendan in the treatment of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Kasikcioglu, Hulya Akhan; Cam, Nese

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure is a relatively important public health problem due to its increasing incidence, poor prognosis, and frequent need of re-hospitalization. Intravenous positive inotropic agents play an important role in treating acute decompensation of patients with heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Although frequently used, the inotropic agents β-adrenergic agonists and phosphodiesterase inhibitors seem effective for improving symptoms in the short term; it has been shown that they increase morbidity and mortality by elevating intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and calcium levels. Levosimendan is a new positive inotropic agent having ATP-dependent potassium-channel-opening and calcium-sensitizing effects. In studies on its effects without increasing intracellular calcium concentrations and on its effects that depend on available intracellular calcium levels, it has been shown to have favorable characteristics different from those of current inotropic agents, which exert their effects by increasing calcium concentrations. This study aims to review other important studies about levosimendan by revealing the underlying mechanisms of its activity, efficiency, and safety. PMID:17323593

  6. Review: Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sachil

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) affects 5,700 000 people in the United States, with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) being responsible for between 30%-50% of acute admissions. Epidemiological studies and HF registries have found HFPEF patients to be older, hypertensive and to have a history of atrial fibrillation. These findings, however, may not be fully applicable to African Americans, as they have been poorly studied making up only a minority of the test subjects. This review article is intended to discuss the pathophysiology and epidemiology of HFPEF within African Americans, highlight the differences compared to Caucasian populations and review current treatment guidelines. Studies looking at African Americans in particular have shown them to be younger, female and have worse diastolic dysfunction compared to Caucasian populations. African Americans also have been shown to have a worse mortality outcome especially in patients without coronary artery disease. The treatment of HFPEF is primarily symptomatic with no survival benefit seen in randomized controlled trials. Mechanisms postulated for the worse prognosis in African Americans with HFPEF include: greater incidence of hypertension and diastolic dysfunction, undefined race-driven genetic predispositions or relative resistance to medications that treat HF in general. The biological predispositions may also be compounded by inequality of healthcare access; something still felt to exist today. Prospective studies and randomized controlled trials need to be conducted with particular emphasis on African American populations to fully elucidate this disease and to formulate race specific treatment outcomes for the future.

  7. Some current controversies in heart failure (2004-2005).

    PubMed

    Cleland, J G F; Loh, H; Windram, J

    2004-12-01

    The disparity between what doctor's believe and the medical facts can be frightening at times. This reflects centuries of training on how to manage patients in the absence of evidence to guide practice. Increasingly disease is becoming susceptible to treatment, requiring a change in the professional approach from the educated, hopeful guess to the application of objective data. Arrogance and certainty, born of ignorance and clutching in desperation at imaginary straws probably still have a place in medicine when conventional treatment has failed, but should play a diminishing role within the medical profession. Epidemiological association is no longer sufficient evidence to conclude that an intervention is effective; with few exceptions, randomised-controlled trials are required. A more successful and objective era of medical practice has arrived. Consequently, a greater degree of scepticism about claims of benefit is also appropriate, which should apply equally to treatments new and old. Of course, no 2 patients are alike, and the evidence-base remains a guide-map on how patients should be treated, rather than a set of rigid rules. Guidelines are guidelines and not infallible, inviolable decrees. In this article, some of the current controversies in the management of heart failure are discussed, ranging from diagnosis, diastolic heart failure, and the role of natriuretic peptides, to the lack of evidence for a clinically-relevant benefit (and therefore possible harm) from aspirin, statins, implantable defibrillators or revascularisation.

  8. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease.

  9. Management of acute heart failure in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Antonio; Arrigo, Mattia; Tolppanen, Heli; Gayat, Etienne; Laribi, Said; Metra, Marco; Seronde, Marie France; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is the most common cause of unplanned hospital admissions, and is associated with high mortality rates. Over the next few decades, the combination of improved cardiovascular disease survival and progressive ageing of the population will further increase the prevalence of AHF in developed countries. New recommendations on the management of AHF have been published recently, but as elderly patients are under-represented in clinical trials, and scientific evidence is often lacking, the diagnosis and management of AHF in this population is challenging. The clinical presentation of AHF, especially in patients aged>85years, differs substantially from that in younger patients, with unspecific symptoms, such as fatigue and confusion, often overriding dyspnoea. Older patients also have a different risk profile compared with younger patients: often heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and infection as the most frequent precipitating factor of AHF. Moreover, co-morbidities, disability and frailty are common, and increase morbidity, recovery time, readmission rates and mortality; their presence should be detected during a geriatric assessment. Diagnostics and treatment for AHF should be tailored according to cardiopulmonary and geriatric status, giving special attention to the patient's preferences for care. Whereas many elderly AHF patients may be managed similarly to younger patients, different strategies should be applied in the presence of relevant co-morbidities, disability and frailty. The option of palliative care should be considered at an early stage, to avoid unnecessary and harmful diagnostics and treatments. PMID:27185193

  10. Physical training in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Senden, P.J.; Mosterd, A.; Brügemann, J.

    2004-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) can be defined as a complex of symptoms and signs caused by cardiac dysfunction. Dyspnoea on exertion, fatigue, reduced exercise tolerance and fluid retention are hallmarks of the syndrome. Reduced peripheral blood flow, endothelial dysfunction, alterations in skeletal muscle structure and function, an increased activity of the muscle ergoreflex, as well as autonomic and neurohormonal activation reduce exercise performance, ultimately leading to physical deconditioning in CHF patients. The beneficial effects of physical training for CHF patients are increasingly acknowledged. Based on European and American guidelines on physical training in CHF, results from controlled randomised trials (summarised in this paper) and expert opinions, the Dutch Committee on Cardiac Rehabilitation has formulated statements on physical training in CHF. In addition, recommendations implementing physical training programmes in CHF patients are given. The selection criteria, contraindications and methods, and duration of a physical training programme in heart failure are discussed. Concomitant with the training programme, a multidisciplinary intervention programme is needed to stimulate patients to adopt and maintain an active and healthy lifestyle. PMID:25696346

  11. Using EHRs and Machine Learning for Heart Failure Survival Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Panahiazar, Maryam; Taslimitehrani, Vahid; Pereira, Naveen; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a frequent health problem with high morbidity and mortality, increasing prevalence and escalating healthcare costs” [1]. By calculating a HF survival risk score based on patient-specific characteristics from Electronic Health Records (EHRs), we can identify high-risk patients and apply individualized treatment and healthy living choices to potentially reduce their mortality risk. The Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) is one of the most popular models to calculate HF survival risk that uses multiple clinical variables to predict HF prognosis and also incorporates impact of HF therapy on patient outcomes. Although the SHFM has been validated across multiple cohorts [1–5], these studies were primarily done using clinical trials databases that do not reflect routine clinical care in the community. Further, the impact of contemporary therapeutic interventions, such as beta-blockers or defibrillators, was incorporated in SHFM by extrapolation from external trials. In this study, we assess the performance of SHFM using EHRs at Mayo Clinic, and sought to develop a risk prediction model using machine learning techiniques that applies routine clinical care data. Our results shows the models which were built using EHR data are more accurate (11% improvement in AUC) with the convenience of being more readily applicable in routine clinical care. Furthermore, we demonstrate that new predictive markers (such as co-morbidities) when incorporated into our models improve prognostic performance significantly (8% improvement in AUC). PMID:26262006

  12. [Chronic heart failure and cachexia: role of endocrine system].

    PubMed

    Dei Cas, A; Muoio, A; Zavaroni, I

    2011-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a major health problem that carries a devastating prognosis. The prognosis worsens considerably once cardiac cachexia has been diagnosed. Neurohormonal, metabolic, hemodynamic and immunological alterations are involved in the initiation and progression of cardiac cachexia. Cachexia is characterized by a hypothalamic inappropriate response to the mechanisms controlling energy homeostasis. Levels of the anorexigenic hormone leptin are decreased whereas the orexigenic gherlin hormone levels are normal or elevated. Nevertheless, energy intake is not increased as expected due to a persistent activation of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) system (anorexigenic) paralleled by a decreased activity of the neuropeptide Y (NPY, orexigenic) neurons. Cachexia is also characterized by an imbalance in anabolic (impairment in the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I axis, insulin resistance) and catabolic (increased levels of catecholamines, increased cortisol/dehydroepiandrosterone ratio and activation of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleuchin-6, interleuchin-1') at the basis of the wasting process. This review discusses the complex role of the endocrine system in modulating energy balance, appetite and metabolism in patients with chronic heart failure. A joint multidisciplinary effort of the cardiologists, immunologists and endocrinologists might be useful to identify the precise mechanisms involved in the neuroendocrine alteration and to develop therapeutic strategies able to improve the prognosis of CHF patients.

  13. Nonlinear dynamics of congestive heart failure (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernjak, Alan; Clarkson, Peter B. M.; McClintock, Peter V. E.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2005-05-01

    Preliminary results are reported from a research project analysing congestive heart failure in terms a stochastic coupled-oscillator model of the cardiovascular system. Measurements of blood flow by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) have been processed by use of the wavelet transform to separate its oscillatory components, which number at least five. Particular attention was concentrated on the frequency content near 0.01 Hz, which is known to be associated with endothelial function. The LDF was carried out in conjunction with iontophoretically administered acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in order to evaluate endothelial reactivity. Measurements were made on 17 congestive heart failure (CHF) patients (a) on first diagnosis, and (b) again several weeks later after their treatment with a β-blocker had been stabilised. The results of these two sets of measurements are being compared with each other, and with data from an age and sex-matched group of healthy controls. It is confirmed that endothelial reactivity is reduced in CHF patients, as compared to healthy controls, and it is found that one effect of the Beta-blocker is to ameliorate the loss of endothelial function in CHF. The implications of these results are discussed.

  14. The role of the kidney in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Metra, Marco; Cotter, Gad; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Dei Cas, Livio; Voors, Adriaan A

    2012-09-01

    Renal dysfunction is common in patients with heart failure and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Cardiac and renal dysfunction may worsen each other through multiple mechanisms such as fluid overload and increased venous pressure, hypo-perfusion, neurohormonal and inflammatory activation, and concomitant treatment. The interaction between cardiac and renal dysfunction may be critical for disease progression and prognosis. Renal dysfunction is conventionally defined by a reduced glomerular filtration rate, calculated from serum creatinine levels. This definition has limitations as serum creatinine is dependent on age, gender, muscle mass, volume status, and renal haemodynamics. Changes in serum creatinine related to treatment with diuretics or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are not necessarily associated with worse outcomes. New biomarkers might be of additional value to detect an early deterioration in renal function and to improve the prognostic assessment, but they need further validation. Thus, the evaluation of renal function in patients with heart failure is important as it may reflect their haemodynamic status and provide a better prognostic assessment. The prevention of renal dysfunction with new therapies might also improve outcomes although strong evidence is still lacking.

  15. The Emerging Epidemic of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, A. Afşin; Rich, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), which currently represents approximately 50 % of heart failure (HF) cases, is common and associated with high morbidity and mortality. Understanding the epidemiology of HFpEF has been difficult due to the challenges in HFpEF diagnosis and the heterogeneous etiologies and pathophysiologies that underlie HFpEF. Nevertheless, several high-quality epidemiology and observational registry studies of HFpEF demonstrate that an increasing prevalence of HFpEF in both the outpatient and inpatient settings, coupled with a lack of evidence-based effective treatments for HFpEF, is resulting in an emerging epidemic of HFpEF. In this review, we discuss the emerging HFpEF epidemic, focusing on: (1) reasons for the rising prevalence of HFpEF; (2) the abnormalities in cardiac structure and function that dictate the transition from risk factors to HFpEF; (3) novel HFpEF mechanisms that may underlie the increase in HFpEF prevalence; (4) prognosis of HFpEF; and (5) risk prediction in HFpEF. We conclude with 10 unanswered questions on HFpEF epidemiology that will be important areas for future investigation. PMID:24078336

  16. The right heart and pulmonary circulation (III). The pulmonary circulation in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Juan F

    2010-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease is a pathophysiological and hemodynamic state which is present in a wide range of clinical conditions that affect left heart structures. Although the pulmonary circulation has traditionally received little attention, it is reasonable to say that today it is a fundamental part of cardiological evaluation. In patients with heart failure, the most important clinical factors are the presence of pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular function. These factors are also essential for determining prognosis and must be taken into account when making some of the most important therapeutic decisions. The pathophysiological process starts passively but later transforms into a reactive process. This latter process, in turn, has one component that can be reversed with vasodilators and another component that is fixed, in which the underlying mechanism is congestive vasculopathy (i.e. essentially medial hypertrophy and pulmonary arterial intimal fibrosis). Currently no specific therapy is available for this type of pulmonary hypertension and treatment is the same as for heart failure itself. The drugs that have been shown to be effective in pulmonary arterial hypertension have generally had a neutral effect in clinical trials. Nevertheless, we are involved in the clinical development of a number of groups of pharmacological compounds that will enable us to make progress in the near future.

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Heart Rate Variability and Baroreflex Sensitivity in Rats with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Sharon Del Bem Velloso; da Silva, Luiz Eduardo Virgilio; Lataro, Renata Maria; Silva, Carlos Alberto Aguiar; de Oliveira, Luciano Fonseca Lemos; de Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira; Simões, Marcus Vinicius; da Silva Meirelles, Lindolfo; Fazan, Rubens

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure induced by myocardial infarct (MI) attenuates the heart rate variability (HRV) and baroreflex sensitivity, which are important risk factors for life-threatening cardiovascular events. Therapies with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown promising results after MI. However, the effects of MSCs on hemodynamic (heart rate and arterial pressure) variability and baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure (CHF) following MI have not been evaluated thus far. Male Wistar rats received MSCs or saline solution intravenously 1 week after ligation of the left coronary artery. Control (noninfarcted) rats were also evaluated. MI size was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was evaluated using radionuclide ventriculography. Four weeks after MSC injection, the animals were anesthetized and instrumented for chronic ECG recording and catheters were implanted in the femoral artery to record arterial pressure. Arterial pressure and HRVs were determined in time and frequency domain (spectral analysis) while HRV was also examined using nonlinear methods: DFA (detrended fluctuation analysis) and sample entropy. The initial MI size was the same among all infarcted rats but was reduced by MSCs. CHF rats exhibited increased myocardial interstitial collagen and sample entropy combined with the attenuation of the following cardiocirculatory parameters: DFA indices, LVEF, baroreflex sensitivity, and HRV. Nevertheless, MSCs hampered all these alterations, except the LVEF reduction. Therefore, 4 weeks after MSC therapy was applied to CHF rats, MI size and myocardial interstitial fibrosis decreased, while baroreflex sensitivity and HRV improved. PMID:26059001

  18. Low-dose copper infusion into the coronary circulation induces acute heart failure in diabetic rats: New mechanism of heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Carlos Chun Ho; Soon, Choong Yee; Chuang, Chia-Lin; Phillips, Anthony R J; Zhang, Shaoping; Cooper, Garth J S

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes impairs copper (Cu) regulation, causing elevated serum Cu and urinary Cu excretion in patients with established cardiovascular disease; it also causes cardiomyopathy and chronic cardiac impairment linked to defective Cu homeostasis in rats. However, the mechanisms that link impaired Cu regulation to cardiac dysfunction in diabetes are incompletely understood. Chronic treatment with triethylenetetramine (TETA), a Cu²⁺-selective chelator, improves cardiac function in diabetic patients, and in rats with heart disease; the latter displayed ∼3-fold elevations in free Cu²⁺ in the coronary effluent when TETA was infused into their coronary arteries. To further study the nature of defective cardiac Cu regulation in diabetes, we employed an isolated-perfused, working-heart model in which we infused micromolar doses of Cu²⁺ into the coronary arteries and measured acute effects on cardiac function in diabetic and non-diabetic-control rats. Infusion of CuCl₂ solutions caused acute dose-dependent cardiac dysfunction in normal hearts. Several measures of baseline cardiac function were impaired in diabetic hearts, and these defects were exacerbated by low-micromolar Cu²⁺ infusion. The response to infused Cu²⁺ was augmented in diabetic hearts, which became defective at lower infusion levels and underwent complete pump failure (cardiac output = 0 ml/min) more often (P < 0.0001) at concentrations that only moderately impaired function of control hearts. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the acute effects on cardiac function of pathophysiological elevations in coronary Cu²⁺. The effects of Cu²⁺ infusion occur within minutes in both control and diabetic hearts, which suggests that they are not due to remodelling. Heightened sensitivity to the acute effects of small elevations in Cu²⁺ could contribute substantively to impaired cardiac function in patients with diabetes and is thus identified as a new mechanism of heart disease.

  19. Methods of failure and reliability assessment for mechanical heart pumps.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sonna M; Allaire, Paul E; Wood, Houston G; Throckmorton, Amy L; Tribble, Curt G; Olsen, Don B

    2005-01-01

    Artificial blood pumps are today's most promising bridge-to-recovery (BTR), bridge-to-transplant (BTT), and destination therapy solutions for patients suffering from intractable congestive heart failure (CHF). Due to an increased need for effective, reliable, and safe long-term artificial blood pumps, each new design must undergo failure and reliability testing, an important step prior to approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), for clinical testing and commercial use. The FDA has established no specific standards or protocols for these testing procedures and there are only limited recommendations provided by the scientific community when testing an overall blood pump system and individual system components. Product development of any medical device must follow a systematic and logical approach. As the most critical aspects of the design phase, failure and reliability assessments aid in the successful evaluation and preparation of medical devices prior to clinical application. The extent of testing, associated costs, and lengthy time durations to execute these experiments justify the need for an early evaluation of failure and reliability. During the design stages of blood pump development, a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) should be completed to provide a concise evaluation of the occurrence and frequency of failures and their effects on the overall support system. Following this analysis, testing of any pump typically involves four sequential processes: performance and reliability testing in simple hydraulic or mock circulatory loops, acute and chronic animal experiments, human error analysis, and ultimately, clinical testing. This article presents recommendations for failure and reliability testing based on the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Society for Thoracic Surgeons (STS) and American Society for Artificial Internal Organs (ASAIO), American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the Association for Advancement of

  20. Molecular profiling of dilated cardiomyopathy that progresses to heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Michael A.; Chang, Stephen; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Gorham, Joshua M.; Conner, David A.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Parfenov, Michael G.; DePalma, Steve R.; Eminaga, Seda; Konno, Tetsuo; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined by progressive functional and structural changes. We performed RNA-seq at different stages of disease to define molecular signaling in the progression from pre-DCM hearts to DCM and overt heart failure (HF) using a genetic model of DCM (phospholamban missense mutation, PLNR9C/+). Pre-DCM hearts were phenotypically normal yet displayed proliferation of nonmyocytes (59% relative increase vs. WT, P = 8 × 10–4) and activation of proinflammatory signaling with notable cardiomyocyte-specific induction of a subset of profibrotic cytokines including TGFβ2 and TGFβ3. These changes progressed through DCM and HF, resulting in substantial fibrosis (17.6% of left ventricle [LV] vs. WT, P = 6 × 10–33). Cardiomyocytes displayed a marked shift in metabolic gene transcription: downregulation of aerobic respiration and subsequent upregulation of glucose utilization, changes coincident with attenuated expression of PPARα and PPARγ coactivators -1α (PGC1α) and -1β, and increased expression of the metabolic regulator T-box transcription factor 15 (Tbx15). Comparing DCM transcriptional profiles with those in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) revealed similar and distinct molecular mechanisms. Our data suggest that cardiomyocyte-specific cytokine expression, early fibroblast activation, and the shift in metabolic gene expression are hallmarks of cardiomyopathy progression. Notably, key components of these profibrotic and metabolic networks were disease specific and distinguish DCM from HCM. PMID:27239561

  1. Metabolomic Fingerprint of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Zordoky, Beshay N.; Sung, Miranda M.; Ezekowitz, Justin; Mandal, Rupasri; Han, Beomsoo; Bjorndahl, Trent C.; Bouatra, Souhaila; Anderson, Todd; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Wishart, David S.; Dyck, Jason R. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is increasingly recognized as an important clinical entity. Preclinical studies have shown differences in the pathophysiology between HFpEF and HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Therefore, we hypothesized that a systematic metabolomic analysis would reveal a novel metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that will help understand its pathophysiology and assist in establishing new biomarkers for its diagnosis. Methods and Results Ambulatory patients with clinical diagnosis of HFpEF (n = 24), HFrEF (n = 20), and age-matched non-HF controls (n = 38) were selected for metabolomic analysis as part of the Alberta HEART (Heart Failure Etiology and Analysis Research Team) project. 181 serum metabolites were quantified by LC-MS/MS and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Compared to non-HF control, HFpEF patients demonstrated higher serum concentrations of acylcarnitines, carnitine, creatinine, betaine, and amino acids; and lower levels of phosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, and sphingomyelins. Medium and long-chain acylcarnitines and ketone bodies were higher in HFpEF than HFrEF patients. Using logistic regression, two panels of metabolites were identified that can separate HFpEF patients from both non-HF controls and HFrEF patients with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of 0.942 and 0.981, respectively. Conclusions The metabolomics approach employed in this study identified a unique metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that is distinct from that of HFrEF. This metabolomic fingerprint has been utilized to identify two novel panels of metabolites that can separate HFpEF patients from both non-HF controls and HFrEF patients. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02052804 PMID:26010610

  2. Validation of the chronic heart failure questionnaire (Chinese version).

    PubMed

    Lee, Diana T F; Yu, Doris S F; Woo, Jean

    2005-06-01

    A striking rise in the incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure (CHF) in the Chinese population has been reported. While promoting the quality of life (QOL) of these patients is widely recognized as an important clinical priority, there is not a validated Chinese disease-specific QOL measure for CHF patients. The aim of this study was to validate the Chinese version of Chronic Heart Failure Questionnaire (CHQ-C) which measures the disease-specific QOL of patients with CHF. A sample of 110 CHF elderly patients and a comparison group of 64 healthy elderly people was recruited. Structured questionnaires were administered by a research nurse. Criterion and construct validity of CHQ-C was demonstrated by its significant correlation with the New York Heart Association classification (Spearman r = -0.52, p < 0.001) and the Chinese version of Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (Pearson r = -0.74, p < 0.001), respectively. Known-groups comparison also demonstrated the ability of CHQ-C to differentiate the QOL of people with or without CHF. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the original four-factor structure of CHQ. In terms of internal consistency and test-retest reliability, CHQ-C demonstrated a Cronbach's alpha of 0.95 and an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.75, respectively. The responsiveness coefficient of CHQ-C was 0.63. In conclusion, CHQ-C is recommended as a valid and reliable tool for evaluating the QOL of Chinese patients with CHF.

  3. Myocardial energetics and the role of micronutrients in heart failure: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ang-Peng; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a multifactorial disease with poor prognosis. There are many hypotheses regarding the cause of heart failure. Leading among them are the hemodynamic and the neuro-hormonal hypotheses. Although the energy depletion hypothesis has been fairly recent, there is evidence suggesting that declining bioenergy plays a major role in heart failure. This review explored the myocardial energy depletion hypothesis from the role of micronutrients in correcting and alleviating symptoms of heart failure. Even though focus was on key nutrients such as coenzyme Q10, thiamine, riboflavin, L-carnitine, and taurine, emphasis was on the combined effect of multiple micronutrients as a whole. Search from databases from 2000 to 2015 produced four clinical studies using multiple micronutrients on heart failure. Evidence from the studies show that using high doses of multiple micronutrients may have positive effects on heart failure and simultaneously support the myocardial energy depletion hypothesis.

  4. Myocardial energetics and the role of micronutrients in heart failure: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ang-Peng; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a multifactorial disease with poor prognosis. There are many hypotheses regarding the cause of heart failure. Leading among them are the hemodynamic and the neuro-hormonal hypotheses. Although the energy depletion hypothesis has been fairly recent, there is evidence suggesting that declining bioenergy plays a major role in heart failure. This review explored the myocardial energy depletion hypothesis from the role of micronutrients in correcting and alleviating symptoms of heart failure. Even though focus was on key nutrients such as coenzyme Q10, thiamine, riboflavin, L-carnitine, and taurine, emphasis was on the combined effect of multiple micronutrients as a whole. Search from databases from 2000 to 2015 produced four clinical studies using multiple micronutrients on heart failure. Evidence from the studies show that using high doses of multiple micronutrients may have positive effects on heart failure and simultaneously support the myocardial energy depletion hypothesis. PMID:27679743

  5. Stratification of the Risk of Sudden Death in Nonischemic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Maurício; Zimerman, Leandro Ioschpe; Rohde, Luis Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant therapeutic advancements, heart failure remains a highly prevalent clinical condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In 30%-40% patients, the etiology of heart failure is nonischemic. The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is capable of preventing sudden death and decreasing total mortality in patients with nonischemic heart failure. However, a significant number of patients receiving ICD do not receive any kind of therapy during follow-up. Moreover, considering the situation in Brazil and several other countries, ICD cannot be implanted in all patients with nonischemic heart failure. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify patients at an increased risk of sudden death because these would benefit more than patients at a lower risk, despite the presence of heart failure in both risk groups. In this study, the authors review the primary available methods for the stratification of the risk of sudden death in patients with nonischemic heart failure. PMID:25352509

  6. Myocardial energetics and the role of micronutrients in heart failure: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ang-Peng; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a multifactorial disease with poor prognosis. There are many hypotheses regarding the cause of heart failure. Leading among them are the hemodynamic and the neuro-hormonal hypotheses. Although the energy depletion hypothesis has been fairly recent, there is evidence suggesting that declining bioenergy plays a major role in heart failure. This review explored the myocardial energy depletion hypothesis from the role of micronutrients in correcting and alleviating symptoms of heart failure. Even though focus was on key nutrients such as coenzyme Q10, thiamine, riboflavin, L-carnitine, and taurine, emphasis was on the combined effect of multiple micronutrients as a whole. Search from databases from 2000 to 2015 produced four clinical studies using multiple micronutrients on heart failure. Evidence from the studies show that using high doses of multiple micronutrients may have positive effects on heart failure and simultaneously support the myocardial energy depletion hypothesis. PMID:27679743

  7. Myocardial energetics and the role of micronutrients in heart failure: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ang-Peng; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a multifactorial disease with poor prognosis. There are many hypotheses regarding the cause of heart failure. Leading among them are the hemodynamic and the neuro-hormonal hypotheses. Although the energy depletion hypothesis has been fairly recent, there is evidence suggesting that declining bioenergy plays a major role in heart failure. This review explored the myocardial energy depletion hypothesis from the role of micronutrients in correcting and alleviating symptoms of heart failure. Even though focus was on key nutrients such as coenzyme Q10, thiamine, riboflavin, L-carnitine, and taurine, emphasis was on the combined effect of multiple micronutrients as a whole. Search from databases from 2000 to 2015 produced four clinical studies using multiple micronutrients on heart failure. Evidence from the studies show that using high doses of multiple micronutrients may have positive effects on heart failure and simultaneously support the myocardial energy depletion hypothesis.

  8. No Link Between Caffeine, Irregular Heartbeat in Heart Failure Patient Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_161526.html No Link Between Caffeine, Irregular Heartbeat in Heart Failure Patient Study Stress ... with heart disease might drink moderate doses of caffeine-rich beverages with no major risks," said lead ...

  9. Water and Sodium in Heart Failure: A Spotlight on Congestion

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Stephen J.; Torres, Daniele; Alderman, Michael; Bonventre, Joseph Vincent; Di Pasquale, Pietro; Gargani, Luna; Nohria, Anju; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Butler, Javed; Paterna, Salvatore; Stevenson, Lynne Warner; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Despite all available therapies, the rates of hospitalization and death from heart failure (HF) remain unacceptably high. The most common reasons for hospital admission are symptoms related to congestion. During hospitalization, most patients respond well to standard therapy and are discharged with significantly improved symptoms. Post-discharge, many patients receive diligent and frequent follow-up. However, rehospitalization rates remain high. One potential explanation is a persistent failure by clinicians to adequately manage congestion in the outpatient setting. The failure to successfully manage these patients post-discharge may represent an unmet need to improve the way congestion is both recognized and treated. A primary aim of future HF management may be to improve clinical surveillance to prevent and manage chronic fluid overload while simultaneously maximizing the use of evidence-based therapies with proven long-term benefit. Improvement in cardiac function is the ultimate goal and maintenance of a “dry” clinical profile is important to prevent hospital admission and improve prognosis. This paper focuses on methods for monitoring congestion, and strategies for water and sodium management in the context of the complex interplay between the cardiac and renal systems. A rationale for improving recognition and treatment of congestion is also proposed. PMID:24942806

  10. Mitochondrial dynamics and cell death in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Marín-García, José; Akhmedov, Alexander T

    2016-03-01

    The highly regulated processes of mitochondrial fusion (joining), fission (division) and trafficking, collectively called mitochondrial dynamics, determine cell-type specific morphology, intracellular distribution and activity of these critical organelles. Mitochondria are critical for cardiac function, while their structural and functional abnormalities contribute to several common cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure (HF). The tightly balanced mitochondrial fusion and fission determine number, morphology and activity of these multifunctional organelles. Although the intracellular architecture of mature cardiomyocytes greatly restricts mitochondrial dynamics, this process occurs in the adult human heart. Fusion and fission modulate multiple mitochondrial functions, ranging from energy and reactive oxygen species production to Ca(2+) homeostasis and cell death, allowing the heart to respond properly to body demands. Tightly controlled balance between fusion and fission is of utmost importance in the high energy-demanding cardiomyocytes. A shift toward fission leads to mitochondrial fragmentation, while a shift toward fusion results in the formation of enlarged mitochondria and in the fusion of damaged mitochondria with healthy organelles. Mfn1, Mfn2 and OPA1 constitute the core machinery promoting mitochondrial fusion, whereas Drp1, Fis1, Mff and MiD49/51 are the core components of fission machinery. Growing evidence suggests that fusion/fission factors in adult cardiomyocytes play essential noncanonical roles in cardiac development, Ca(2+) signaling, mitochondrial quality control and cell death. Impairment of this complex circuit causes cardiomyocyte dysfunction and death contributing to heart injury culminating in HF. Pharmacological targeting of components of this intricate network may be a novel therapeutic modality for HF treatment. PMID:26872674

  11. Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors: targets for agonist drugs to treat heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brian C; O'Connell, Timothy D; Simpson, Paul C

    2011-10-01

    Evidence from cell, animal, and human studies demonstrates that α1-adrenergic receptors mediate adaptive and protective effects in the heart. These effects may be particularly important in chronic heart failure, when catecholamine levels are elevated and β-adrenergic receptors are down-regulated and dysfunctional. This review summarizes these data and proposes that selectively activating α1-adrenergic receptors in the heart might represent a novel and effective way to treat heart failure. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Key Signaling Molecules in Hypertrophy and Heart Failure."

  12. Non-pharmacological modulation of the autonomic tone to treat heart failure.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagmeet P; Kandala, Jagdesh; Camm, A John

    2014-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system has a significant role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart failure. The absence of any recent breakthrough advances in the medical therapy of heart failure has led to the evolution of innovative non-pharmacological interventions that can favourably modulate the cardiac autonomic tone. Several new therapeutic modalities that may act at different levels of the autonomic nervous system are being investigated for their role in the treatment of heart failure. The current review examines the role of renal denervation, vagal nerve stimulators, carotid baroreceptors, and spinal cord stimulators in the treatment of heart failure.

  13. Reversing heart failure-associated pathophysiology with exercise: what actually improves and by how much?

    PubMed

    Adams, Volker; Niebauer, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Until the late 1980s, physical exercise training was a contraindication in patients with heart failure. Extensive research has demonstrated that exercise training reverses heart failure-associated pathology at the clinical and molecular levels. Exercise training has emerged as a class I recommendation in all major national and international guidelines for the treatment of chronic heart failure. Knowledge gained in clinical trials and molecular research builds a strong case for exercise training as a key therapeutic component of an evidence-based treatment of chronic heart failure. It is long overdue to provide patients with an infrastructure that enables them to benefit from this class I intervention.

  14. Influence of sex on treatment and outcome in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Frankenstein, Lutz; Clark, Andrew L; Ribeiro, Jorge P

    2012-06-01

    The population is aging, the prevalence of heart failure increases with age, and on average women live longer than men. There is evidence for sex-specific effects of individual, guideline-recommended drugs used for treatment of chronic heart failure. Women are underrepresented in most clinical trials and only a minority of drug applications to regulatory authorities have included sex analyses. The present review focuses on the potential female survival benefit in heart failure, the influence of sex on medical treatment in a broader sense, and the potential benefit to be derived from guideline recommended treatment and common adjunctive heart failure medication. PMID:21599874

  15. Influence of sex on treatment and outcome in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Frankenstein, Lutz; Clark, Andrew L; Ribeiro, Jorge P

    2012-06-01

    The population is aging, the prevalence of heart failure increases with age, and on average women live longer than men. There is evidence for sex-specific effects of individual, guideline-recommended drugs used for treatment of chronic heart failure. Women are underrepresented in most clinical trials and only a minority of drug applications to regulatory authorities have included sex analyses. The present review focuses on the potential female survival benefit in heart failure, the influence of sex on medical treatment in a broader sense, and the potential benefit to be derived from guideline recommended treatment and common adjunctive heart failure medication.

  16. Reversing heart failure-associated pathophysiology with exercise: what actually improves and by how much?

    PubMed

    Adams, Volker; Niebauer, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Until the late 1980s, physical exercise training was a contraindication in patients with heart failure. Extensive research has demonstrated that exercise training reverses heart failure-associated pathology at the clinical and molecular levels. Exercise training has emerged as a class I recommendation in all major national and international guidelines for the treatment of chronic heart failure. Knowledge gained in clinical trials and molecular research builds a strong case for exercise training as a key therapeutic component of an evidence-based treatment of chronic heart failure. It is long overdue to provide patients with an infrastructure that enables them to benefit from this class I intervention. PMID:25432471

  17. Predicting outcomes among patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure receiving anticoagulation with warfarin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Jeong; Ozonoff, Al; Hylek, Elaine M; Berlowitz, Dan R; Ash, Aelene S; Miller, Donald R; Zhao, Shibei; Reisman, Joel I; Jasuja, Guneet K; Rose, Adam J

    2015-07-01

    Among patients receiving oral anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation (AF), heart failure (HF) is associated with poor anticoagulation control. However, it is not known which patients with heart failure are at greatest risk of adverse outcomes. We evaluated 62,156 Veterans Health Administration (VA) patients receiving warfarin for AF between 10/1/06-9/30/08 using merged VA-Medicare dataset. We predicted time in therapeutic range (TTR) and rates of adverse events by categorising patients into those with 0, 1, 2, or 3+ of five putative markers of HF severity such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST)> 80 U/l, alkaline phosphatase> 150 U/l, serum sodium< 130 mEq/l, any receipt of metolazone, and any inpatient admission for HF exacerbation. These risk categories predicted TTR: patients without HF (referent) had a mean TTR of 65.0 %, while HF patients with 0, 1, 2, 3 or more markers had mean TTRs of 62.2 %, 57.2 %, 53.5 %, and 50.7 %, respectively (p< 0.001). These categories also discriminated for major haemorrhage well; compared to patients without HF, HF patients with increasing severity had hazard ratios of 1.84, 3.06, 3.52 and 5.14 respectively (p< 0.001). However, although patients with HF had an elevated hazard for bleeding compared to those without HF, these categories did not effectively discriminate risk of ischaemic stroke across HF. In conclusion, we developed a HF severity model using easily available clinical characteristics that performed well to risk-stratify patients with HF who are receiving anticoagulation for AF with regard to major haemorrhage. PMID:25948532

  18. Skeletal muscle electrical stimulation improves baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability in heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Lazzarotto Rucatti, Ananda; Jaenisch, Rodrigo Boemo; Rossato, Douglas Dalcin; Bonetto, Jéssica Hellen Poletto; Ferreira, Janaína; Xavier, Leder Leal; Sonza, Anelise; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation (ES) on the arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and cardiovascular autonomic control in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF). Male Wistar rats were designated to one of four groups: placebo sham (P-Sham, n=9), ES sham (ES-Sham, n=9), placebo CHF (P-CHF, n=9) or ES CHF (ES-CHF, n=9). The ES was adjusted at a low frequency (30 Hz), duration of 250 μs, with hold and rest time of 8s (4 weeks, 30 min/day, 5 times/week). It was applied on the gastrocnemius muscle with intensity to produce a visible muscle contraction. The rats assigned to the placebo groups performed the same procedures with the equipment turned off. The two-way ANOVA and the post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls tests (P<0.05) were used to data comparison. The BRS was higher in ES-Sham group compared to the P-Sham group and the ES-CHF group compared to the P-CHF group. ES was able to decrease heart rate sympatho-vagal modulation and peripheral sympathetic modulation in ES-CHF compared to P-CHF group. Interestingly, heart rate sympatho-vagal modulation was similar between ES-CHF and P-Sham groups. Thus, ES enhances heart rate parasympathetic modulation on heart failure (ES-CHF) compared to placebo (P-CHF), with consequent decrease of sympatho-vagal balance in the ES-CHF group compared to the P-CHF. The results show that a 4 week ES protocol in CHF rats enhances arterial BRS and cardiovascular autonomic control.

  19. Isosorbide Mononitrate in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Redfield, Margaret M.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Levine, James A.; Koepp, Gabe A.; Borlaug, Barry A.; Chen, Horng H.; LeWinter, Martin M.; Joseph, Susan M.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Semigran, Marc J.; Felker, G. Michael; Cole, Robert T.; Reeves, Gordon R.; Tedford, Ryan J.; Tang, W.H. Wilson; McNulty, Steven E.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Shah, Monica R.; Braunwald, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nitrates are commonly prescribed to enhance activity tolerance in patients with heart failure and a preserved ejection fraction. We compared the effect of isosorbide mononitrate or placebo on daily activity in such patients. METHODS In this multicenter, double-blind, crossover study, 110 patients with heart failure and a preserved ejection fraction were randomly assigned to a 6-week dose-escalation regimen of isosorbide mononitrate (from 30 mg to 60 mg to 120 mg once daily) or placebo, with subsequent crossover to the other group for 6 weeks. The primary end point was the daily activity level, quantified as the average daily accelerometer units during the 120-mg phase, as assessed by patient-worn accelerometers. Secondary end points included hours of activity per day during the 120-mg phase, daily accelerometer units during all three dose regimens, quality-of-life scores, 6-minute walk distance, and levels of N-terminal pro–brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). RESULTS In the group receiving the 120-mg dose of isosorbide mononitrate, as compared with the placebo group, there was a nonsignificant trend toward lower daily activity (−381 accelerometer units; 95% confidence interval [CI], −780 to 17; P = 0.06) and a significant decrease in hours of activity per day (−0.30 hours; 95% CI, −0.55 to −0.05; P = 0.02). During all dose regimens, activity in the isosorbide mononitrate group was lower than that in the placebo group (−439 accelerometer units; 95% CI, −792 to −86; P = 0.02). Activity levels decreased progressively and significantly with increased doses of isosorbide mononitrate (but not placebo). There were no significant between-group differences in the 6-minute walk distance, quality-of-life scores, or NT-proBNP levels. CONCLUSIONS Patients with heart failure and a preserved ejection fraction who received isosorbide mononitrate were less active and did not have better quality of life or submaximal exercise capacity than did

  20. The risk of heart failure and cardiometabolic complications in obesity may be masked by an apparent healthy status of normal blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shuchita; Mishra, Manish; Jadhav, Ashok; Gerger, Courtney; Lee, Paul; Weber, Lynn; Ndisang, Joseph Fomusi

    2013-01-01

    Although many obese individuals are normoglycemic and asymptomatic of cardiometabolic complications, this apparent healthy state may be a misnomer. Since heart failure is a major cause of mortality in obesity, we investigated the effects of heme-oxygenase (HO) on heart failure and cardiometabolic complications in obese normoglycemic Zucker-fatty rats (ZFs). Treatment with the HO-inducer, hemin, reduced markers of heart failure, such as osteopontin and osteoprotegerin, abated left-ventricular (LV) hypertrophy/fibrosis, extracellular matrix/profibrotic proteins including collagen IV, fibronectin, TGF-β1, and reduced cardiac lesions. Furthermore, hemin suppressed inflammation by abating macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage-inflammatory protein-1 alpha, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β but enhanced adiponectin, atrial-natriuretic peptide (ANP), HO activity, insulin sensitivity, and glucose metabolism. Correspondingly, hemin improved several hemodynamic/echocardiographic parameters including LV-diastolic wall thickness, LV-systolic wall thickness, mean-arterial pressure, arterial-systolic pressure, arterial-diastolic pressure, LV-developed pressure, +dP/dt, and cardiac output. Contrarily, the HO-inhibitor, stannous mesoporphyrin nullified the hemin effect, exacerbating inflammatory/oxidative insults and aggravated insulin resistance (HOMA-index). We conclude that perturbations in insulin signaling and cardiac function may be forerunners to overt hyperglycemia and heart failure in obesity. Importantly, hemin improves cardiac function by suppressing markers of heart failure, LV hypertrophy, cardiac lesions, extracellular matrix/profibrotic proteins, and inflammatory/oxidative mediators, while concomitantly enhancing the HO-adiponectin-ANP axis.