Science.gov

Sample records for heart injuries

  1. Iodide Protects Heart Tissue from Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Akiko; Morrison, Michael L.; Roth, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Iodine is an elemental nutrient that is essential for mammals. Here we provide evidence for an acute therapeutic role for iodine in ischemia reperfusion injury. Infusion of the reduced form, iodide, but not the oxidized form iodate, reduces heart damage by as much as 75% when delivered intravenously following temporary loss of blood flow but prior to reperfusion of the heart in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction. Normal thyroid function may be required because loss of thyroid activity abrogates the iodide benefit. Given the high degree of protection and the high degree of safety, iodide should be explored further as a therapy for reperfusion injury. PMID:25379708

  2. Radiation injury to the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.R.; Fajardo, L.F. Gillette, S. M.

    1995-03-30

    For the RTOG Consensus Conference on Late Effects of Cancer Treatment we summarize the clinical manifestations of cardiac complications appearing months to years following incidental irradiation of the heart during treatment of thoracic neoplasms. The most common effects present as pericardial disease, however, it is becoming more clear that precocious or accelerated coronary artery disease is an important late effect, especially in patients treated with radiation before the age of 21 years. To the extent it is known, the pathophysiology of the various syndromes is described and the extensive literature on dose, volume, and fractionation factors is reviewed. Based upon our current understanding of late cardiac effects, a clinical grading system has been developed and is published elsewhere in this issue. 49 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Penetrating Heart Injury due to Screwdriver Assault

    PubMed Central

    Dieng, P. A.; Diop, M. S.; Ciss, A. G.; Ba, P. S.; Diatta, S.; Gaye, M.; Fall, M. L.; Ndiaye, A.; Ndiaye, M.

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating heart injuries cause wounds in the cardiac chambers. Most of them are due to gunshot or stabbing by knives. Screwdriver is an uncommon weapon. Authors report a case of stab wound by screwdriver, treated at cardiovascular center in Dakar. This is a 16-year-old boy who experienced physical aggression. He was assaulted with a screwdriver and had stab wound on the anterior wall of the chest. Physical examination showed a screwdriver penetrating the sternum bone over a right angle. He had a mild pericardial blood effusion and a right ventricle wound 5 mm in diameter with transection of the right coronary vein. The screwdriver was removed without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and the ventricle wound repaired by direct suture of stitches reinforced with Teflon pledgets. The right coronary artery was ligated. Postoperative period was free of events. Screwdriver is uncommonly used as a weapon. It is a dangerous device because of its rigid structure and narrow tip. PMID:25945263

  4. Targeting MMP-2 to treat ischemic heart injury.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Bryan G; Schulz, Richard

    2014-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) are long understood to be involved in remodeling of the extracellular matrix. However, over the past decade, it has become clear that one of the most ubiquitous MMPs, MMP-2, has numerous intracellular targets in cardiac myocytes. Notably, MMP-2 proteolyzes components of the sarcomere, and its intracellular activity contributes to ischemia-reperfusion injury of the heart. Together with the well documented role played by MMPs in the myocardial remodeling that occurs following myocardial infarction, this has led to great interest in targeting MMPs to treat cardiac ischemic injury. In this review we will describe the expanding understanding of intracellular MMP-2 biology, and how this knowledge may lead to improved treatments for ischemic heart injury. We also critically review the numerous preclinical studies investigating the effects of MMP inhibition in animal models of myocardial infarction and ischemia-reperfusion injury, as well as the recent clinical trials that are part of the effort to translate these results into clinical practice. Acknowledging the disappointing results of past clinical trials of MMP inhibitors for other diseases, we discuss the need for carefully designed preclinical and clinical studies to avoid mistakes that have been previously made. We conclude that inhibition of MMPs, and in particular MMP-2, shows promise as a therapy to prevent the progression from ischemic injury to heart failure. However, it is critical that the full breadth of MMP-2 biology be taken into account as such therapies are developed.

  5. Cardiopulmonary Circuit Models for Predicting Injury to the Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Richard; Wing, Sarah; Bassingthwaighte, James; Neal, Maxwell

    2004-11-01

    Circuit models have been used extensively in physiology to describe cardiopulmonary function. Such models are being used in the DARPA Virtual Soldier (VS) Project* to predict the response to injury or physiological stress. The most complex model consists of systemic circulation, pulmonary circulation, and a four-chamber heart sub-model. This model also includes baroreceptor feedback, airway mechanics, gas exchange, and pleural pressure influence on the circulation. As part of the VS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been evaluating various cardiopulmonary circuit models for predicting the effects of injury to the heart. We describe, from a physicist's perspective, the concept of building circuit models, discuss both unstressed and stressed models, and show how the stressed models are used to predict effects of specific wounds. *This work was supported by a grant from the DARPA, executed by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command/TATRC Cooperative Agreement, Contract # W81XWH-04-2-0012. The submitted manuscript has been authored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed for the U.S. DOE by UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purpose.

  6. Burn-induced subepicardial injury in frog heart: a simple model mimicking ST segment changes in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Itsuro

    2016-02-01

    To mimic ischemic heart disease in humans, several animal models have been created, mainly in rodents by surgically ligating their coronary arteries. In the present study, by simply inducing burn injuries on the bullfrog heart, we reproduced abnormal ST segment changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG), mimicking those observed in ischemic heart disease, such as acute myocardial infarction and angina pectoris. The "currents of injury" created by a voltage gradient between the intact and damaged areas of the myocardium, negatively deflected the ECG vector during the diastolic phase, making the ST segment appear elevated during the systolic phase. This frog model of heart injury would be suitable to explain the mechanisms of ST segment changes observed in ischemic heart disease.

  7. [The forensic medical diagnosis of closed injuries to the heart in blunt chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Kapustin, A V

    1997-01-01

    Describes the morphological changes of cardiomyocytes in contusions and concussions of the heart and reflective heart arrest resulting in rapid sudden death after blunt injury to the chest. Presents the principles and criteria of forensic medical diagnosis of death from heart concussions in such cases.

  8. C/EBP Transcription Factors Mediate Epicardial Activation During Heart Development and Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guo N.; Thatcher, Jeffrey E.; McAnally, John; Kong, Yongli; Qi, Xiaoxia; Tan, Wei; DiMaio, J. Michael; Amatruda, James F.; Gerard, Robert D.; Hill, Joseph A.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2013-01-01

    The epicardium encapsulates the heart and functions as a source of multipotent progenitor cells and paracrine factors essential for cardiac development and repair. Injury of the adult heart results in reactivation of a developmental gene program in the epicardium, but the transcriptional basis of epicardial gene expression has not been delineated. We established a mouse embryonic heart organ culture and gene expression system that facilitated the identification of epicardial enhancers activated during heart development and injury. Epicardial activation of these enhancers depends on a combinatorial transcriptional code centered on CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) transcription factors. Disruption of C/EBP signaling in the adult epicardium reduced injury-induced neutrophil infiltration and improved cardiac function. These findings reveal a transcriptional basis for epicardial activation and heart injury, providing a platform for enhancing cardiac regeneration. PMID:23160954

  9. Effects of gender on heart injury after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi; Xie, Qing; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya

    2011-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)-induced brain injury is less in female than in male rats, and estrogen can reduce such injury in males. Myocardial injury occurs after ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and the current study investigated the effects of gender on heart injury after ICH in rats. In the first part of the study, male and female rats had an intracerebral injection of 100 μL autologous blood, and sham-operated rats had a needle insertion. In the second part of the study, male rats were treated with 17β-estrodiol or vehicle 2 h after ICH. All rats were then killed after 3 days and heart samples collected for histology and Western blot analysis. ICH caused heart injury, including petechial hemorrhage in male and female rats. To quantify heart stress following ICH, heat shock proteins (HSP) 32 and 27 were measured by Western blot analysis. We found that heart HSP-32 levels were higher in female compared to male rats after ICH (p<0.01), but there was no effect of gender in sham-operated rats (p>0.05), nor were there gender differences in myocardial HSP27 levels. Treatment with 17β-estrodiol increased HSP-32 levels in male ICH rats (p<0.05). In conclusion, an ICH results in heart injury by an unknown mechanism. Gender and estrogen affect the heart response to ICH.

  10. GATA4 regulates Fgf16 to promote heart repair after injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Huang, Xiuzhen; Tian, Xueying; Zhang, Hui; He, Lingjuan; Wang, Yue; Nie, Yu; Hu, Shengshou; Lin, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William; Lui, Kathy O; Zhou, Bin

    2016-03-15

    Although the mammalian heart can regenerate during the neonatal stage, this endogenous regenerative capacity is lost with age. Importantly, replication of cardiomyocytes has been found to be the key mechanism responsible for neonatal cardiac regeneration. Unraveling the transcriptional regulatory network for inducing cardiomyocyte replication will, therefore, be crucial for the development of novel therapies to drive cardiac repair after injury. Here, we investigated whether the key cardiac transcription factor GATA4 is required for neonatal mouse heart regeneration. Using the neonatal mouse heart cryoinjury and apical resection models with an inducible loss of GATA4 specifically in cardiomyocytes, we found severely depressed ventricular function in the Gata4-ablated mice (mutant) after injury. This was accompanied by reduced cardiomyocyte replication. In addition, the mutant hearts displayed impaired coronary angiogenesis and increased hypertrophy and fibrosis after injury. Mechanistically, we found that the paracrine factor FGF16 was significantly reduced in the mutant hearts after injury compared with littermate controls and was directly regulated by GATA4. Cardiac-specific overexpression of FGF16 via adeno-associated virus subtype 9 (AAV9) in the mutant hearts partially rescued the cryoinjury-induced cardiac hypertrophy, promoted cardiomyocyte replication and improved heart function after injury. Altogether, our data demonstrate that GATA4 is required for neonatal heart regeneration through regulation of Fgf16, suggesting that paracrine factors could be of potential use in promoting myocardial repair.

  11. Prenatal methamphetamine differentially alters myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury in male and female adult hearts.

    PubMed

    Rorabaugh, Boyd R; Seeley, Sarah L; Bui, Albert D; Sprague, Lisanne; D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2016-02-15

    Methamphetamine is one of the most common illicit drugs abused during pregnancy. The neurological effects of prenatal methamphetamine are well known. However, few studies have investigated the potential effects of prenatal methamphetamine on adult cardiovascular function. Previous work demonstrated that prenatal cocaine exposure increases sensitivity of the adult heart to ischemic injury. Methamphetamine and cocaine have different mechanisms of action, but both drugs exert their effects by increasing dopaminergic and adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus the goal of this study was to determine whether prenatal methamphetamine also worsens ischemic injury in the adult heart. Pregnant rats were injected with methamphetamine (5 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or saline throughout pregnancy. When pups reached 8 wk of age, their hearts were subjected to ischemia and reperfusion by means of a Langendorff isolated heart system. Prenatal methamphetamine had no significant effect on infarct size, preischemic contractile function, or postischemic recovery of contractile function in male hearts. However, methamphetamine-treated female hearts exhibited significantly larger infarcts and significantly elevated end-diastolic pressure during recovery from ischemia. Methamphetamine significantly reduced protein kinase Cε expression and Akt phosphorylation in female hearts but had no effect on these cardioprotective proteins in male hearts. These data indicate that prenatal methamphetamine differentially affects male and female sensitivity to myocardial ischemic injury and alters cardioprotective signaling proteins in the adult heart.

  12. Fibronectin is deposited by injury-activated epicardial cells and is necessary for zebrafish heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinhu; Karra, Ravi; Dickson, Amy L.; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike adult mammals, adult zebrafish vigorously regenerate lost heart muscle in response to injury. The epicardium, a mesothelial cell layer enveloping the myocardium, is activated to proliferate after cardiac injury and can contribute vascular support cells or provide mitogens to regenerating muscle. Here, we applied proteomics to identify secreted proteins that are associated with heart regeneration. We found that Fibronectin, a main component of the extracellular matrix, is induced and deposited after cardiac damage. In situ hybridization and transgenic reporter analyses indicated that expression of two fibronectin paralogues, fn1 and fn1b, are induced by injury in epicardial cells, while the itgb3 receptor is induced in cardiomyocytes near the injury site. fn1, the more dynamic of these paralogs, is induced chamber-wide within one day of injury before localizing epicardial Fn1 synthesis to the injury site. fn1 loss-of-function mutations disrupted zebrafish heart regeneration, as did induced expression of a dominant-negative Fibronectin cassette, defects that were not attributable to direct inhibition of cardiomyocyte proliferation. These findings reveal a new role for the epicardium in establishing an extracellular environment that supports heart regeneration. PMID:23988577

  13. Oxygen surrounding the heart during ischemic conservation determines the myocardial injury during reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yansheng; Bopassa, Jean Chrisostome

    2015-01-01

    There is discrepancy regarding the duration of reperfusion required using 2,3,5-triphenyl-2H-tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining to assess myocardial infarction in an isolated, perfused heart model. Several investigators prefer long-term reperfusion (120 minutes) to determine myocardial injury, while others have used a shorter duration (30-40 minutes). We investigated whether oxygen surrounding the myocardium during ischemia plays a critical role in the installation of myocardial infarction during reperfusion. Mice hearts were perfused with a Langendorff apparatus using Krebs Henseleit (KH) buffer oxygenated with 95% O2 plus 5% CO2 at 37°C. Hearts were either immersed in KH or suspended in air during 18 minutes of global ischemia in a normothermic, water-jacketed chamber. Hearts then were reperfused for 40, 60, or 90 minutes. We found that hearts immersed in KH had decreased recovery of function and increased myocardial infarct size, reaching a steady-state level after 40 minutes of reperfusion. In contrast, hearts suspended in air approached steady-state after 90 minutes of reperfusion. Thus, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was much lower in air-maintained hearts than in KH-immersed hearts. To investigate whether an increase in oxygen surrounding the myocardium during ischemia might cause further damage, we bubbled the KH solution with nitrogen (KH+N2) rather than oxygen (KH+O2). With this alteration, recovery of cardiac function was improved and myocardial infarct size and mitochondrial ROS production were reduced compared with hearts immersed in KH+O2. In conclusion, short-term (40 minutes) reperfusion is sufficient to reach steady-state myocardial infarct size when hearts are immersed in physiologic solution during ischemia; however, a longer duration of reperfusion (90 minutes) is required if hearts are suspended in air. Thus, oxygen surrounding the heart during ischemia determines the extent of myocardium injury during reperfusion.

  14. Polyol pathway and modulation of ischemia-reperfusion injury in Type 2 diabetic BBZ rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Hwang, Yuying C; Ananthakrishnan, Radha; Oates, Peter J; Guberski, Dennis; Ramasamy, Ravichandran

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the role of polyol pathway enzymes aldose reductase (AR) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) in mediating injury due to ischemia-reperfusion (IR) in Type 2 diabetic BBZ rat hearts. Specifically, we investigated, (a) changes in glucose flux via cardiac AR and SDH as a function of diabetes duration, (b) ischemic injury and function after IR, (c) the effect of inhibition of AR or SDH on ischemic injury and function. Hearts isolated from BBZ rats, after 12 weeks or 48 weeks diabetes duration, and their non-diabetic littermates, were subjected to IR protocol. Myocardial function, substrate flux via AR and SDH, and tissue lactate:pyruvate (L/P) ratio (a measure of cytosolic NADH/NAD+), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release (a marker of IR injury) were measured. Zopolrestat, and CP-470,711 were used to inhibit AR and SDH, respectively. Myocardial sorbitol and fructose content, and associated changes in L/P ratios were significantly higher in BBZ rats compared to non-diabetics, and increased with disease duration. Induction of IR resulted in increased ischemic injury, reduced ATP levels, increases in L/P ratio, and poor cardiac function in BBZ rat hearts, while inhibition of AR or SDH attenuated these changes and protected hearts from IR injury. These data indicate that AR and SDH are key modulators of myocardial IR injury in BBZ rat hearts and that inhibition of polyol pathway could in principle be used as a therapeutic adjunct for protection of ischemic myocardium in Type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:18957123

  15. Pericardiocentesis followed by thoracotomy and repair of penetrating cardiac injury caused by nail gun injury to the heart

    PubMed Central

    Chirumamilla, Vasu; Prabhakaran, Kartik; Patrizio, Petrone; Savino, John A.; Marini, Corrado P.; Zoha, Zobair

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Work site injuries involving high projectile tools such as nail guns can lead to catastrophic injuries. Generally, penetrating cardiac injuries are associated with a high mortality rate. Presentation of case A construction worker was brought to the emergency room having sustained a nail gun injury to the chest. The patient was hypotensive, tachycardic with prominent jugular venous distention, and had a profound lactic acidosis. Bedside ultrasound confirmed the presence of pericardial fluid. Pericardiocentesis was performed twice using a central venous catheter inserted into the pericardial space, resulting in improvement in the patient’s hemodynamics. Thereafter he underwent left anterolateral thoracotomy and repair of a right atrial laceration. He recovered uneventfully. Discussion Penetrating cardiac injuries caused by nail guns, although rare, have been previously described. However, pericardiocentesis, while retaining a role in the management of medical causes of cardiac tamponade, has been reported only sporadically in the setting of trauma. We report a rare case of penetrating nail gun injury to the heart where pericardiocentesis was used as a temporizing measure to stabilize the patient in preparation for definitive but timely operative intervention. Conclusion We propose awareness that percardiocentesis can serve as a temporary life saving measure in the setting of trauma, particularly as a bridge to definitive therapy. To our knowledge, this represents the first reported case of catheter pericardiocentesis used to stabilize a patient until definitive repair of a penetrating cardiac injury caused by a nail gun. PMID:27107304

  16. Analysis of Heart Rate and Self-Injury with and without Restraint in an Individual with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennett, Heather; Hagopian, Louis P.; Beaulieu, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    The relation between self-injury and heart rate was analyzed for an individual who appeared anxious while engaging in self-injury. The analysis involved manipulating the presence or absence of restraint while simultaneously measuring heart rate. The following findings were obtained and replicated: (a) when some form of restraint was applied, heart…

  17. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field Conditioning Protects against I/R Injury and Contractile Dysfunction in the Isolated Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Bialy, Dariusz; Wawrzynska, Magdalena; Bil-Lula, Iwona; Krzywonos-Zawadzka, Anna; Wozniak, Mieczyslaw; Cadete, Virgilio J J; Sawicki, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Low frequency electromagnetic field (LF-EMF) decreases the formation of reactive oxygen species, which are key mediators of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Therefore, we hypothesized that the LF-EMF protects contractility of hearts subjected to I/R injury. Isolated rat hearts were subjected to 20 min of global no-flow ischemia, followed by 30 min reperfusion, in the presence or absence of LF-EMF. Coronary flow, heart rate, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), and rate pressure product (RPP) were determined for evaluation of heart mechanical function. The activity of cardiac matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and the contents of coronary effluent troponin I (TnI) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured as markers of heart injury. LF-EMF prevented decreased RPP in I/R hearts, while having no effect on coronary flow. In addition, hearts subjected to I/R exhibited significantly increased LVDP when subjected to LF-EMF. Although TnI and IL-6 levels were increased in I/R hearts, their levels returned to baseline aerobic levels in I/R hearts subjected to LF-EMF. The reduced activity of MMP-2 in I/R hearts was reversed in hearts subjected to LF-EMF. The data presented here indicate that acute exposure to LF-EMF protects mechanical function of I/R hearts and reduces I/R injury.

  18. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field Conditioning Protects against I/R Injury and Contractile Dysfunction in the Isolated Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Bialy, Dariusz; Wawrzynska, Magdalena; Bil-Lula, Iwona; Krzywonos-Zawadzka, Anna; Wozniak, Mieczyslaw; Cadete, Virgilio J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Low frequency electromagnetic field (LF-EMF) decreases the formation of reactive oxygen species, which are key mediators of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Therefore, we hypothesized that the LF-EMF protects contractility of hearts subjected to I/R injury. Isolated rat hearts were subjected to 20 min of global no-flow ischemia, followed by 30 min reperfusion, in the presence or absence of LF-EMF. Coronary flow, heart rate, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), and rate pressure product (RPP) were determined for evaluation of heart mechanical function. The activity of cardiac matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and the contents of coronary effluent troponin I (TnI) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured as markers of heart injury. LF-EMF prevented decreased RPP in I/R hearts, while having no effect on coronary flow. In addition, hearts subjected to I/R exhibited significantly increased LVDP when subjected to LF-EMF. Although TnI and IL-6 levels were increased in I/R hearts, their levels returned to baseline aerobic levels in I/R hearts subjected to LF-EMF. The reduced activity of MMP-2 in I/R hearts was reversed in hearts subjected to LF-EMF. The data presented here indicate that acute exposure to LF-EMF protects mechanical function of I/R hearts and reduces I/R injury. PMID:25961016

  19. Ozone protects rat heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury: A role for oxidative preconditioning in attenuating mitochondrial injury.

    PubMed

    Meng, Weixin; Xu, Ying; Li, Dandan; Zhu, Erjun; Deng, Li; Liu, Zonghong; Zhang, Guowei; Liu, Hongyu

    2017-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major cause of cardiac dysfunction during cardiovascular surgery, heart transplantation and cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. The purpose of the present study was to explore, firstly, whether ozone induces oxidative preconditioning by activation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and, secondly, whether ozone oxidative preconditioning (OzoneOP) can protect the heart against IRI by attenuating mitochondrial damage. Rats were subjected to 30min of cardiac ischemia followed by 2h of reperfusion, with or without prior OzoneOP (100μg/kg/day) for 5 days. Antioxidant capacity, myocardial apoptosis and mitochondrial damage were evaluated and compared at the end of reperfusion. OzoneOP was found to increase antioxidant capacity and to protect the myocardium against IRI by attenuating mitochondrial damage and myocardial apoptosis. The study suggests a potential role for OzoneOP in protecting the heart against IRI during cardiovascular surgery, cardiopulmonary bypass procedures or transplantation.

  20. Saffron (Crocus sativus) pretreatment confers cardioprotection against ischemia-reperfusion injuries in isolated rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Nader, Moni; Chahine, Nathalie; Salem, Charelle; Chahine, Ramez

    2016-12-01

    Restoration of blood flow to the ischemic myocardium is imperative to avoid demise of cardiomyocytes, but is paradoxically associated with irreversible damage to cardiac tissues due to the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We have previously reported that saffron, a natural antioxidant, attenuated ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injuries in vitro; however, its role in a meaningful cardiac recovery remains unknown. Here, we show that saffron supplement (oral administration for 6 weeks) reduced myocardial damage and restored cardiac function in an IR model of rabbit hearts. This was evidenced by improved left ventricle pressure, heart rate and coronary flow, and left ventricle end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) in IR hearts (isolated from rabbits pre-exposed to saffron (S/IR)). Electrophysiological recordings revealed a significant decline in both premature ventricle contraction and ventricle tachycardia/fibrillation in S/IR compared to IR hearts. This was paralleled by increased expression of the contractile proteins α-actinin and Troponin C in the myocardium of S/IR hearts. Histological examination combined to biochemical analysis indicated that hearts pre-exposed to saffron exhibited reduced infarct size, lower lipid peroxidation, with increased glutathione peroxidase activity, and oxidation of nitro blue tetrazolium (by reactive oxygen species). Furthermore, in contrast with IR hearts, saffron pretreatment induced restoration of the phosphorylation level of the survival proteins Akt and 4EBP1 and reduced activity of p38. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the natural antioxidant saffron plays a pivotal role in halting IR-associated cardiac injuries and emerges as a novel preventive tool for ischemic heart disease.

  1. Lysophosphatidic Acid Pretreatment Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in the Immature Hearts of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haibo; Liu, Si; Liu, Xuewen; Yang, Jinjing; Wang, Fang; Cong, Xiangfeng; Chen, Xi

    2017-01-01

    The cardioprotection of the immature heart during cardiac surgery remains controversial due to the differences between the adult heart and the newborn heart. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a small bioactive molecule with diverse functions including cell proliferation and survival via its receptor: LPA1–LPA6. We previously reported that the expressions of LPA1 and LPA3 in rat hearts were much higher in immature hearts and then declined rapidly with age. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether LPA signaling plays a potential protective role in immature hearts which had experienced ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The results showed that in Langendorff-perfused immature rat hearts (2 weeks), compared to I/R group, LPA pretreatment significantly enhanced the cardiac function, attenuated myocardial infarct size and CK-MB release, decreased myocardial apoptosis and increased the expression of pro-survival signaling molecules. All these effects could be abolished by Ki16425, an antagonist to LPA1 and LPA3. Similarly, LPA pretreatment protected H9C2 from hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) induced apoptosis and necrosis in vitro. The mechanisms underlying the anti-apoptosis effects were related to activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinas B (AKT) signaling pathways as well as phosphorylation of the downstream effector of AKT, glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β), through LPA1 and/or LPA3. What's more, we found that LPA preconditioning increased glucose uptake of H9C2 subjected to H/R by the activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) but not the translocation of GLUT4. In conclusion, our study indicates that LPA is a potent survival factor for immature hearts against I/R injuries and has the potential therapeutic function as a cardioplegia additive for infantile cardiac surgery. PMID:28377726

  2. Tolerance to ischaemic injury in remodelled mouse hearts: less ischaemic glycogenolysis and preserved metabolic efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Masoud, Waleed G.T.; Abo Al-Rob, Osama; Yang, Yang; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Clanachan, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Post-infarction remodelled failing hearts have reduced metabolic efficiency. Paradoxically, they have increased tolerance to further ischaemic injury. This study was designed to investigate the metabolic mechanisms that may contribute to this phenomenon and to examine the relationship between ischaemic tolerance and metabolic efficiency during post-ischaemic reperfusion. Methods and results Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to coronary artery ligation (CAL) or SHAM surgery. After 4 weeks, in vivo mechanical function was assessed by echocardiography, and then isolated working hearts were perfused in this sequence: 45 min aerobic, 15 min global no-flow ischaemia, and 30 min aerobic reperfusion. Left ventricular (LV) function, metabolic rates, and metabolic efficiency were measured. Relative to SHAM, both in vivo and in vitro CAL hearts had depressed cardiac function under aerobic conditions (45 and 36%, respectively), but they had a greater recovery of LV function during post-ischaemic reperfusion (67 vs. 49%, P < 0.05). While metabolic efficiency (LV work per ATP produced) was 50% lower during reperfusion of SHAM hearts, metabolic efficiency in CAL hearts did not decrease. During ischaemia, glycogenolysis was 28% lower in CAL hearts, indicative of lower ischaemic proton production. There were no differences in mitochondrial abundance, calcium handling proteins, or key metabolic enzymes. Conclusion Compared with SHAM, remodelled CAL hearts are more tolerant to ischaemic injury and undergo no further deterioration of metabolic efficiency during reperfusion. Less glycogen utilization in CAL hearts during ischaemia may contribute to increased ischaemic tolerance by limiting ischaemic proton production that may improve ion homeostasis during early reperfusion. PMID:26150203

  3. Donor pretreatment with carbon monoxide prevents ischemia/reperfusion injury following heart transplantation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fujisaki, Noritomo; Kohama, Keisuke; Nishimura, Takeshi; Yamashita, Hayato; Ishikawa, Michiko; Kanematsu, Akihiro; Yamada, Taihei; Lee, Sungsoo; Yumoto, Tetsuya; Tsukahara, Kohei; Kotani, Joji; Nakao, Atsunori

    2016-01-01

    Because inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) provides potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects against ischemia reperfusion injury, we hypothesized that treatment of organ donors with inhaled CO would decrease graft injury after heart transplantation. Hearts were heterotopically transplanted into syngeneic Lewis rats after 8 hours of cold preservation in University of Wisconsin solution. Donor rats were exposed to CO at a concentration of 250 parts per million for 24 hours via a gas-exposure chamber. Severity of myocardial injury was determined by total serum creatine phosphokinase and troponin I levels at three hours after reperfusion. In addition, Affymetrix gene array analysis of mRNA transcripts was performed on the heart graft tissue prior to implantation. Recipients of grafts from CO-exposed donors had lower levels of serum troponin I and creatine phosphokinase; less upregulation of mRNA for interleukin-6, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and tumor necrosis factor-α; and fewer infiltrating cells. Although donor pretreatment with CO altered the expression of 49 genes expressly represented on the array, we could not obtain meaningful data to explain the mechanisms by which CO potentiated the protective effects. Pretreatment with CO gas before organ procurement effectively protected cardiac grafts from ischemia reperfusion-induced injury in a rat heterotopic cardiac transplant model. A clinical report review indicated that CO-poisoned organ donors may be comparable to non-poisoned donors. PMID:27867479

  4. The vestigial enzyme D-dopachrome tautomerase protects the heart against ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dake; Atsina, Kwame; Qu, Lintao; Hu, Xiaoyue; Wu, Xiaohong; Xu, Bin; Piecychna, Marta; Leng, Lin; Fingerle-Rowson, Günter; Zhang, Jiasheng; Bucala, Richard; Young, Lawrence H

    2014-08-01

    The cellular response to stress involves the recruitment and coordination of molecular signaling pathways that prevent cell death. D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT) is an enzyme that lacks physiologic substrates in mammalian cells, but shares partial sequence and structural homology with macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Here, we observed that DDT is highly expressed in murine cardiomyocytes and secreted by the heart after ischemic stress. Antibody-dependent neutralization of secreted DDT exacerbated both ischemia-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and necrosis. We generated cardiomyocyte-specific DDT knockout mice (Myh6-Cre Ddtfl/fl), which demonstrated normal baseline cardiac size and function, but had an impaired physiologic response to ischemia-reperfusion. Hearts from Myh6-Cre Ddtfl/fl mice exhibited more necrosis and LV contractile dysfunction than control hearts after coronary artery ligation and reperfusion. Furthermore, treatment with DDT protected isolated hearts against injury and contractile dysfunction after ischemia-reperfusion. The protective effect of DDT required activation of the metabolic stress enzyme AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which was mediated by a CD74/CaMKK2-dependent mechanism. Together, our data indicate that cardiomyocyte secretion of DDT has important autocrine/paracrine effects during ischemia-reperfusion that protect the heart against injury.

  5. Clinically Silent Preoperative Brain Injuries Do Not Worsen with Surgery in Newborns with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Block, AJ; McQuillen, PS; Chau, V; Glass, H; Poskitt, KJ; Barkovich, AJ; Esch, M; Soulikias, W; Azakie, A; Campbell, A; Miller, SP

    2010-01-01

    Objective Preoperative brain injury, particularly stroke and white matter injury (WMI), is common in newborns with congenital heart disease (CHD). The objective of this study was to determine the risk of hemorrhage or extension of preoperative brain injury with cardiac surgery. Methods This dual-center prospective cohort study recruited 92 term newborns: 62 with transposition of the great arteries (TGA), and 30 with single ventricle physiology from two tertiary referral centers. Newborns underwent brain MRI scans before and after cardiac surgery. Results Brain injury was identified in 40 (43%) newborns on the preoperative MRI scan (median five days of life): stroke in 23, WMI in 21, and intraventricular hemorrhage in 7. None of the brain lesions presented clinically with overt signs or seizures. Preoperative brain injury was associated with balloon atrial septostomy (BAS) (P=0.003) and lowest SaO2 (P=0.007); in a multivariable model, only the effect of BAS remained significant when adjusting for lowest SaO2. On postoperative MRI in 78 newborns (median 21 days of life), none of the preoperative lesions showed evidence of extension or hemorrhagic transformation (0/40 [95% CI: 0-7%]). The presence of preoperative brain injury was not a significant risk factor for acquiring new injury on the postoperative MRI (P=0.8). Conclusion Clinically silent brain injuries identified preoperatively in newborns with CHD, including stroke, have a low risk of progression with surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass, and should therefore not delay clinically indicated cardiac surgery. In this multi-center cohort, BAS remains an important risk factor for preoperative brain injury, particularly stroke. PMID:20434174

  6. Hydrogen sulfide post-conditioning preserves interfibrillar mitochondria of rat heart during ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Banu, Shakila A; Ravindran, Sriram; Kurian, Gino A

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction is considered to be the main manifestation in the pathology of ischemia reperfusion injury, and by restoring its functional activity, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a novel endogenous gaseotransmitter renders cardioprotection. Given that interfibrillar (IFM) and subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria are the two main types in the heart, the present study investigates the specific H2S-mediated action on IFM and SSM during ischemic reperfusion in the Langendorff rat heart model. Rats were randomly divided into five groups, namely normal, ischemic control, reperfusion control (I/R), ischemic post-conditioning (POC), and H2S post-conditioning (POC_H2S). In reperfusion control, cardiac contractility decreased, and lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and infracted size increased compared to both normal and ischemic group. In hearts post-conditioned with H2S and the classical method improved cardiac mechanical function and decreased cardiac markers in the perfusate and infarct size significantly. Both POC and POC_H2S exerts its cardioprotective effect of preserving the IFM, as evident by significant improvement in electron transport chain enzyme activities and mitochondrial respiration. The in vitro action of H2S on IFM and SSM from normal and I/R rat heart supports H2S and mediates cardioprotection via IFM preservation. Our study indicates that IFM play an important role in POC_H2S mediated cardioprotection from reperfusion injury.

  7. Protective effects of benidipine on hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in rat isolated hearts.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kozo; Ina, Yasuhiro; Sonoda, Rie; Nagashima, Ken; Ohmori, Kenji; Ohno, Tetsuji

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effects of benidipine (hydrochloride), a calcium antagonist, on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced injury in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. The hearts were aerobically perfused at a constant flow and exposed to H(2)O(2) (600 micromol L(-1)) for 4 min, resulting in the oxidative stress-induced myocardial dysfunction (e.g., decrease in the left ventricular developed pressure) and myocardial cell injury (e.g., increase in the release of lactate dehydrogenase). Pretreatment of the hearts with benidipine or nifedipine was performed for 20 min until the start of H(2)O(2) exposure. Benidipine at 1 nmol L(-1) and nifedipine at 10 nmol L(-1) decreased the myocardial contractility and perfusion pressure to a similar degree in the hearts under normal conditions. Benidipine (1 nmol L(-1)) significantly reduced the H(2)O(2)-induced myocardial damage. Nifedipine (10 nmol L(-1)) also tended to exhibit similar effects. Benidipine inhibited the increase in tissue lipid peroxidation induced by H(2)O(2). The results suggest that, in addition to the calcium antagonism, benidipine possesses other actions responsible for the cardioprotective effects, to which the antioxidant activity of benidipine may partly contribute.

  8. Effect of Laser Acupuncture on Heart Rate Variability of Nonpatients and Patients with Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yiu Ming

    2017-01-01

    Sensory loss in a complete spinal cord injury (SCI) can be described as an injury that removes the ability of the brain to receive electrical afferent signals generated below the site of the injury. The sensory nervous system appears to be the same as the meridians in the concept of Oriental medicine, thus, we assumed that a complete SCI would lead to discontinuation of the meridians in humans. In this case series report with a cross-sectional view, we observed quantitative changes in heart rate variability induced by laser acupuncture at bilateral GB34 and ST36 points for 15 minutes in eight patients with complete SCIs between the levels of T8 and T12, and eight healthy individuals as a control group. A comparison between pre- and post-treatment data demonstrated that the physiological effect on the heart rate variability was absent when the laser acupuncture was applied below the level of injury among the patients with complete SCI, while the healthy counterparts showed the opposite pattern. The preliminary data suggest that the purported meridian system may not be different from the known sensory nervous system, as the transected spinal cord leads to interrupted meridians. The findings in the present case series warranted further investigation.

  9. A Retained Bullet in Pericardial Sac: Penetrating Gunshot Injury of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Adnan; Caliskan, Emine; Tatlisu, Mustafa Adem; Hayiroglu, Mert Ilker; Tekessin, Ahmet Ilker; Cakilli, Yasin; Avsar, Sahin; Oz, Ahmet; Uzman, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Penetrating cardiac trauma is rarely seen but when present there is a short time lag to keep the patients alive. Cardiac gunshot injuries are exceptional and it occurs mostly during interpersonal disagreements casualties or a mistakenly fired gun nowadays. Here we present a case of cardiac gunshot injury from the war of Kobani, Syria. The patient was mistakenly diagnosed to have a sole bullet in the left shoulder while he had a penetrating cardiac trauma with a bullet in the heart and pericardial effusion possibly giving rise to pericardial tamponade. Luckily the cardiac gunshot injury was noticed one day later and the patient was referred to a tertiary hospital. Intrapericardial bullet was conservatively followed up. The patient was discharged one week later after resection of the bullet in the shoulder. PMID:26977324

  10. Early biomarkers of doxorubicin-induced heart injury in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Varsha G.; Kwekel, Joshua C.; Vijay, Vikrant; Moland, Carrie L.; Herman, Eugene H.; Lee, Taewon; Han, Tao; Lewis, Sherry M.; Davis, Kelly J.; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Kerr, Susan; Fuscoe, James C.

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac troponins, which are used as myocardial injury markers, are released in plasma only after tissue damage has occurred. Therefore, there is a need for identification of biomarkers of earlier events in cardiac injury to limit the extent of damage. To accomplish this, expression profiling of 1179 unique microRNAs (miRNAs) was performed in a chronic cardiotoxicity mouse model developed in our laboratory. Male B6C3F{sub 1} mice were injected intravenously with 3 mg/kg doxorubicin (DOX; an anti-cancer drug), or saline once a week for 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 weeks, resulting in cumulative DOX doses of 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 mg/kg, respectively. Mice were euthanized a week after the last dose. Cardiac injury was evidenced in mice exposed to 18 mg/kg and higher cumulative DOX dose whereas examination of hearts by light microscopy revealed cardiac lesions at 24 mg/kg DOX. Also, 24 miRNAs were differentially expressed in mouse hearts, with the expression of 1, 1, 2, 8, and 21 miRNAs altered at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 mg/kg DOX, respectively. A pro-apoptotic miR-34a was the only miRNA that was up-regulated at all cumulative DOX doses and showed a significant dose-related response. Up-regulation of miR-34a at 6 mg/kg DOX may suggest apoptosis as an early molecular change in the hearts of DOX-treated mice. At 12 mg/kg DOX, up-regulation of miR-34a was associated with down-regulation of hypertrophy-related miR-150; changes observed before cardiac injury. These findings may lead to the development of biomarkers of earlier events in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity that occur before the release of cardiac troponins. - Highlights: • Upregulation of miR-34a before doxorubicin-induced cardiac tissue injury • Apoptosis might be an early event in mouse heart during doxorubicin treatment. • Expression of miR-150 declined before doxorubicin-induced cardiac tissue injury.

  11. Brain in Congenital Heart Disease Across the Lifespan: The Cumulative Burden of Injury.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Ariane; Miller, Steven P; Marino, Bradley Scott; Jefferson, Angela L; Newburger, Jane W

    2016-05-17

    The number of patients surviving with congenital heart disease (CHD) has soared over the last 3 decades. Adults constitute the fastest-growing segment of the CHD population, now outnumbering children. Research to date on the heart-brain intersection in this population has been focused largely on neurodevelopmental outcomes in childhood and adolescence. Mutations in genes that are highly expressed in heart and brain may cause cerebral dysgenesis. Together with altered cerebral perfusion in utero, these factors are associated with abnormalities of brain structure and brain immaturity in a significant portion of neonates with critical CHD even before they undergo cardiac surgery. In infancy and childhood, the brain may be affected by risk factors related to heart disease itself or to its interventional treatments. As children with CHD become adults, they increasingly develop heart failure, atrial fibrillation, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and coronary disease. These acquired cardiovascular comorbidities can be expected to have effects similar to those in the general population on cerebral blood flow, brain volumes, and dementia. In both children and adults, cardiovascular disease may have adverse effects on achievement, executive function, memory, language, social interactions, and quality of life. Against the backdrop of shifting demographics, risk factors for brain injury in the CHD population are cumulative and synergistic. As neurodevelopmental sequelae in children with CHD evolve to cognitive decline or dementia during adulthood, a growing population of CHD can be expected to require support services. We highlight evidence gaps and future research directions.

  12. Cardioprotective Effects of Astragalin against Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Isolated Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Daoxu; Ren, Huanhuan; Yang, Wenxiao; Zhang, Xinjie; Zheng, Qiusheng; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of astragalin against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in isolated rat heart. The cardioprotective effects of astragalin on myocardial I/R injury were investigated on Langendorff apparatus. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups. The results showed that astragalin pretreatment improved myocardial function. Compared with I/R group, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activities in coronary flow decreased in astragalin pretreatment groups, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratio significantly increased. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) decreased in astragalin-treated groups. The infarct size (IS) and apoptosis rate in hearts from astragalin-treated groups were lower than those in hearts from the I/R group. Western blot analysis also revealed that astragalin preconditioning significantly reduced Bax level, whereas Bcl-2 was increased in the myocardium. Therefore, astragalin exhibited cardioprotective effects via its antioxidative, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:26788251

  13. Long range correlations in the heart rate variability following the injury of cardiac arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Shanbao; Jiang, Dineng; Wang, Ziming; Zhu, Yisheng; Geocadin, Romeryko G.; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2007-07-01

    Cardiovascular and neurological recovery following cardiac arrest (CA) largely influence the morbidity and mortality of the patients. Monitoring the cardiovascular system has been an important clinical issue in intensive care unit (ICU). On the other hand, the rhythms of the heart rate variability following CA are still not fully understood, and there are limited number of literatures reporting the cardiovascular function recovery following CA. In this paper, we studied the scaling properties of heart rate variability (HRV) after CA by centered-moving-average-based detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Our results showed that the scaling factor of the baseline HRV is close to that of Brownian motion, and after a CA event it shifts to a 1/f noise-like rhythm. DFA could be a promising tool in evaluating the cardiovascular long term recovery following CA injury.

  14. Chronic exposure to zinc oxide nanoparticles increases ischemic-reperfusion injuries in isolated rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milivojević, Tamara; Drobne, Damjana; Romih, Tea; Mali, Lilijana Bizjak; Marin, Irena; Lunder, Mojca; Drevenšek, Gorazd

    2016-10-01

    The use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in numerous products is increasing, although possible negative implications of their long-term consumption are not known yet. Our aim was to evaluate the chronic, 6-week oral exposure to two different concentrations of ZnO NPs on isolated rat hearts exposed to ischemic-reperfusion injury and on small intestine morphology. Wistar rats of both sexes ( n = 18) were randomly divided into three groups: (1) 4 mg/kg ZnO NPs, (2) 40 mg/kg ZnO NPs, and (3) control. After 6 weeks of treatment, the hearts were isolated, the left ventricular pressure (LVP), the coronary flow (CF), the duration of arrhythmias and the lactate dehydrogenase release rate (LDH) were measured. A histological investigation of the small intestine was performed. Chronic exposure to ZnO NPs acted cardiotoxic dose-dependently. ZnO NPs in dosage 40 mg/kg maximally decreased LVP (3.3-fold) and CF (2.5-fold) and increased the duration of ventricular tachycardia (all P < 0.01) compared to control, whereas ZnO NPs in dosage 4 mg/kg acted less cardiotoxic. Goblet cells in the small intestine epithelium of rats, treated with 40 mg ZnO NPs/kg, were enlarged, swollen and numerous, the intestinal epithelium width was increased. Unexpectedly, ZnO NPs in both dosages significantly decreased LDH. A 6-week oral exposure to ZnO NPs dose-dependently increased heart injuries and caused irritation of the intestinal mucosa. A prolonged exposure to ZnO NPs might cause functional damage to the heart even with exposures to the recommended daily doses, which should be tested in future studies.

  15. Acute T3 treatment protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury via TRα1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Pantos, Constantinos; Mourouzis, Iordanis; Saranteas, Theodosios; Brozou, Vassiliki; Galanopoulos, Georgios; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Cokkinos, Dennis V

    2011-07-01

    We have previously shown that acute thyroid hormone treatment could limit reperfusion injury and increase post-ischemic recovery of function. In the present study, we further explore potential initiating mechanisms of this response. Thus, isolated rat hearts were subjected to 30 min zero-flow global ischemia (I) followed by 60-min reperfusion (R). Reperfusion injury was assessed by post-ischemic recovery of left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP%) and LDH release. T3 at a dose of 60 nM which had no effect on contractile function of non-ischemic myocardium, significantly increased LVDP% [48% (2.9) vs. 30.2% (3.3) for untreated group, P < 0.05] and reduced LDH release [8.3 (0.3) vs. 10 (0.42) for untreated group, P < 0.05] when administered at R. T4 (60 and 400 nM) had no effect on contractile function either in non-ischemic or ischemic myocardium. Administration of debutyl-dronedarone (DBD), a TRα1 antagonist abolished the T3-limiting effect on reperfusion injury: Thus, co-administration of T3 and DBD resulted in significantly lower LVDP%, [23% (4.7) vs. 48% (2.9) for T3 group, P < 0.05] and higher LDH release [9.9 (0.3) vs. 8.3 (0.3), for T3 group, P < 0.05]. In conclusion, acute T3 and not T4 treatment will be able to protect against reperfusion injury. T3 can exert this beneficial effect on ischemic myocardium at a dose that has no effects on non-ischemic myocardium. Acute T3-limiting effect on reperfusion injury is mediated, at least in part, via TRα1 receptor.

  16. Bcl-2–associated athanogene 3 protects the heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Feifei; Myers, Valerie D.; Knezevic, Tijana; Wang, JuFang; Gao, Erhe; Madesh, Muniswamy; Tahrir, Farzaneh G.; Gupta, Manish K.; Gordon, Jennifer; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Tilley, Douglas G.; Khalili, Kamel; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    2016-01-01

    Bcl-2–associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is an evolutionarily conserved protein expressed at high levels in the heart and the vasculature and in many cancers. While altered BAG3 expression has been associated with cardiac dysfunction, its role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is unknown. To test the hypothesis that BAG3 protects the heart from reperfusion injury, in vivo cardiac function was measured in hearts infected with either recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 9–expressing (rAAV9-expressing) BAG3 or GFP and subjected to I/R. To elucidate molecular mechanisms by which BAG3 protects against I/R injury, neonatal mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes (NMVCs) in which BAG3 levels were modified by adenovirus expressing (Ad-expressing) BAG3 or siBAG3 were exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). H/R significantly reduced NMVC BAG3 levels, which were associated with enhanced expression of apoptosis markers, decreased expression of autophagy markers, and reduced autophagy flux. The deleterious effects of H/R on apoptosis and autophagy were recapitulated by knockdown of BAG3 with Ad-siBAG3 and were rescued by Ad-BAG3. In vivo, treatment of mice with rAAV9-BAG3 prior to I/R significantly decreased infarct size and improved left ventricular function when compared with mice receiving rAAV9-GFP and improved markers of autophagy and apoptosis. These findings suggest that BAG3 may provide a therapeutic target in patients undergoing reperfusion after myocardial infarction. PMID:27882354

  17. Irisin Plays a Pivotal Role to Protect the Heart Against Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Zhao, Yu Tina; Zhang, Shouyan; Dubielecka, Patrycja M; Du, Jianfeng; Yano, Naohiro; Chin, Y Eugene; Zhuang, Shougang; Qin, Gangjian; Zhao, Ting C

    2017-02-09

    Irisin, a newly identified hormone, is critical to modulating body metabolism, thermogenesis and reducing oxidative stresses. However, whether irisin protects the heart against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury remains unknown. In this study, we determine the effect of irisin on myocardial I/R injury in the Langendorff perfused heart and cultured myocytes. Adult C57/BL6 mice were treated with irisin (100mg/kg) or vehicle for 30 minutes to elicit preconditioning. The isolated hearts were subjected to 30 min ischemia followed by 30 min reperfusion. Left ventricular function was measured and infarction size were determined using by tetrazolium staining. Western blot was employed to determine myocardial SOD-1, active-caspase 3, annexin V, p38 and phospho-p38. H9c2 cardiomyoblasts were exposed to hypoxia and reoxygenation for assessment of the effects of irisin on mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Irisin treatment produced remarkable improvements in ventricular functional recovery, as evident by the increase in RPP and attenuation in LVEDP. As compared to the vehicle treatment, irisin resulted in a marked reduction of myocardial infarct size. Notably, irisin treatment increased SOD-1 and p38 phosphorylation, but suppressed levels of active-caspase 3, cleaved PARP, and annexin V. In cardiomyoblasts exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation, irisin treatment significantly attenuated hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R), as indicated by the reduction of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and apoptotic cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, irisin treatments suppressed the opening of mPTP, mitochondrial swelling, and protected mitochondria function. Our results indicate that irisin serves as a novel approach to eliciting cardioprotection, which is associated with the improvement of mitochondrial function. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Lavandula Reduces Heart Injury via Attenuating Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha and Oxidative Stress in A Rat Model of Infarct-Like Myocardial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Vakili, Abedin; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Zahedi khorasani, Mahdi; Darabian, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Objective Lavender is used in herbal medicine for different therapeutic purposes. Nonetheless, potential therapeutic effects of this plant in ischemic heart disease and its possible mechanisms remain to be investigated. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, lavender oil at doses of 200, 400 or 800 mg/kg was administered through gastric gavage for 14 days before infarct-like myocardial injury (MI). The carotid artery and left ventricle were cannulated to record arterial blood pressure (BP) and cardiac function. At the end of experiment, the heart was removed and histopathological alteration, oxidative stress biomarkers as well as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) level were evaluated. Results Induction of M.I caused cardiac dysfunction, increased levels of lipid peroxidation, TNF-α and troponin I in heart tissue (P<0.001). Pretreatment with lavender oil at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg significantly reduced myocardial injury, troponin I and TNF-α. In addition, it improved cardiac function and antioxidant enzyme activity (P<0.01). Conclusion Our finding showed that lavender oil has cardioprotective effect through inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammatory pathway in the rat model with infarct-like MI. We suggest that lavender oil may be helpful in prevention or attenuation of heart injury in patients with high risk of myocardial infarction and/or ischemic heart disease. PMID:28367419

  19. Could heart rate variability predict outcome in patients with severe head injury? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rapenne, T; Moreau, D; Lenfant, F; Vernet, M; Boggio, V; Cottin, Y; Freysz, M

    2001-07-01

    Despite major improvements in the resuscitation of patients with head injury, the outcome of patients with head trauma often remains poor and difficult to establish. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a noninvasive tool used to measure autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate whether HRV analysis might be a useful adjunct for predicting outcome in patients with severe head injury. Twenty patients with severe head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] Heart rate variability was assessed, in both time domain and spectral domain. The authors initially compared (on Day 1) HRV in patients who progressed to brain death to HRV in survivors; then during the awakening period compared HRV in surviving patients with good recovery (GCS >or= 10) to HRV in patients characterized by a worsened neurologic state (GCS < 10). Statistical analysis used the Kruskal-Wallis test, P < .05. To assess whether HRV could predict evolution to brain death, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated the day after trauma for Total Power, natural logarithm of high-frequency component of spectral analysis (LnHF), natural logarithm of low-frequency component of spectral analysis (LnLF), and root mean square for successive interval differences (rMSSD). Seven patients died between Day 1 and Day 5 after trauma. Six of those had progressed to brain death. In these six patients, at Day 1, Global HRV and parasympathetic tone were significantly higher. Referring to the area under the rMSSD ROC curve, HRV might provide useful information in predicting early evolution of patients with severe head trauma. During the awakening period, global HRV and the parasympathetic tone were significantly lower in the worsened neurologic state group. In conclusion, HRV could be helpful as a predictor of imminent brain death

  20. Mitigation Effect of Proanthocyanidin on Secondary Heart Injury in Rats Caused by Mechanical Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shuo; Chen, Chong; Cao, Tingting; Bi, Yue; Zhou, Jicheng; Li, Xintao; Yu, Deqin; Li, Shuzhuang

    2017-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunctional syndrome secondary to mechanical trauma (MT) has attracted considerable research attention. The heart is one of the most important organs of the body, and secondary cardiac insufficiency caused by MT seriously affects the quality of life. This study aims to investigate whether proanthocyanidin can alleviate myocardial injury and improve heart function in the process of MT leading to secondary cardiac insufficiency. Noble-Collip drum wasused to prepare MT model in rats. And myocardial apoptosis index was calculated after TUNEL staining. Ventricular intubation was employed to detect heart function. Changes in myocardial ultrastructure were observed using an electron microscope. ELISA was used to detect the content of TNF-α and reactive oxygen species generated from monocytes and cardiomyocytes. The changes in Ca2+ concentration in cardiomyocyte were observed by confocal microscope. Compared with trauma group, the administration group had a decreased apoptosis index of cardiomyocytes, and increased ±dp/dtmax. Meanwhile, proanthocyanidin can inhibit monocytes’ TNF-α production, and reduce plasma TNF-α concentration. Moreover, proanthocyanidin can attenuate the excessive oxidative stress reaction of cardiomyocyte, and inhibit calcium overload in cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, proanthocyanidin can effectively ease myocardial damage and improve cardiac function, through anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects in secondary cardiac insufficiency caused by MT. PMID:28294148

  1. [Injuries to blood vessels near the heart caused by central venous catheters].

    PubMed

    Abram, J; Klocker, J; Innerhofer-Pompernigg, N; Mittermayr, M; Freund, M C; Gravenstein, N; Wenzel, V

    2016-11-01

    Injuries to blood vessels near the heart can quickly become life-threatening and include arterial injuries during central venous puncture, which can lead to hemorrhagic shock. We report 6 patients in whom injury to the subclavian artery and vein led to life-threatening complications. Central venous catheters are associated with a multitude of risks, such as venous thrombosis, air embolism, systemic or local infections, paresthesia, hemothorax, pneumothorax, and cervical hematoma, which are not always immediately discernible. The subclavian catheter is at a somewhat lower risk of catheter-associated sepsis and symptomatic venous thrombosis than approaches via the internal jugular and femoral veins. Indeed, access via the subclavian vein carries a substantial risk of pneumo- and hemothorax. Damage to the subclavian vein or artery can also occur during deliberate and inadvertent punctures and result in life-threatening complications. Therefore, careful consideration of the access route is required in relation to the patient and the clinical situation, to keep the incidence of complications as low as possible. For catheterization of the subclavian vein, puncture of the axillary vein in the infraclavicular fossa is a good alternative, because ultrasound imaging of the target vessel is easier than in the subclavian vein and the puncture can be performed much further from the lung.

  2. Brain Injury in Autonomic, Emotional, and Cognitive Regulatory Areas in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Mary A.; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Harper, Ronald M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is accompanied by autonomic, emotional, and cognitive deficits, indicating brain alterations. Reduced gray matter volume and isolated white matter infarcts occur in HF, but the extent of damage is unclear. Using magnetic resonance T2 relaxometry, we evaluated the extent of injury across the entire brain in HF. Methods and Results Proton-density and T2-weighted images were acquired from 13 HF (age 54.6 ± 8.3 years; 69% male, LVEF 0.28 ± 0.07) and 49 controls (50.6 ± 7.3 years, 59% male). Whole brain maps of T2 relaxation times were compared at each voxel between groups using analysis of covariance (covariates: age and gender). Higher T2 relaxation values, indicating injured brain areas (p < 0.005), emerged in sites that control autonomic, analgesic, emotional, and cognitive functions (hypothalamus, raphé magnus, cerebellar cortex, deep nuclei and vermis; temporal, parietal, prefrontal, occipital, insular, cingulate, and ventral frontal cortices; corpus callosum; anterior thalamus; caudate nuclei; anterior fornix and hippocampus). No brain areas showed higher T2 values in control vs. HF subjects. Conclusions Brain structural injury emerged in areas involved in autonomic, pain, mood, language, and cognitive function in HF patients. Comorbid conditions accompanying HF may result from neural injury associated with the syndrome. PMID:19327623

  3. Relaxin protects against myocardial injury caused by ischemia and reperfusion in rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Bani, D.; Masini, E.; Bello, M. G.; Bigazzi, M.; Sacchi, T. B.

    1998-01-01

    Myocardial injury caused by ischemia and reperfusion comes from multiple pathogenic events, including endothelial damage, neutrophil extravasation into tissue, platelet and mast cell activation, and peroxidation of cell membrane lipids, which are followed by myocardial cell alterations resulting eventually in cell necrosis. The current study was designed to test the possible cardioprotective effect of the hormone relaxin, which has been found to cause coronary vessel dilation and to inhibit platelet and mast cell activation. Ischemia (for 30 minutes) was induced in rat hearts in vivo by ligature of the left anterior descending coronary artery; reperfusion (for 60 minutes or less if the rats died before this predetermined time) was induced by removal of the ligature. Relaxin (100 ng) was given intravenously 30 minutes before ischemia. The results obtained showed that relaxin strongly reduces 1) the extension of the myocardial areas affected by ischemia-reperfusion-induced damage, 2) ventricular arrhythmias, 3) mortality, 4) myocardial neutrophil number, 5) myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil accumulation, 6) production of malonyldialdehyde, an end product of lipid peroxidation, 7) mast cell granule release, 8) calcium overload, and 9) morphological signs of myocardial cell injury. This study shows that relaxin can be regarded as an agent with a marked cardioprotective action against ischemia-reperfusion-induced myocardial injury. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:9588905

  4. Effects of selective phosphodiesterase-5-inhibition on myocardial contractility and reperfusion injury after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Sivakkanan; Radovits, Tamás; Hirschberg, Kristóf; Korkmaz, Sevil; Barnucz, Eniko; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2008-11-27

    Recently, the infarct reducing and cardioprotective effects of phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors were described. In this study, we investigated these effects on ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat model of heart transplantation. Three groups were assigned for our study: a vardenafil preconditioning group, an ischemic control, and a nonischemic control. Hemodynamic parameters were significantly increased in the vardenafil group (Pmax: 82+/-4 vs. 110+/-12 vs. 127+/-13 mm Hg; dP/dtmax: 1740+/-116 vs. 3197+/-599 vs. 4397+/-602 mm Hg/sec; ischemic control vs. vardenafil vs. nonischemic control; P<0.05 vs. ischemic control). Furthermore, we recorded increased ATP levels and significantly less apoptosis in the treatment group after terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (apoptosis index: 27.23%+/-1.54% vs. 16.77%+/-1.42% vs. 18.86%+/-1.07%; ischemic control vs. vardenafil vs. nonischemic control; P<0.05 vs. ischemic control). Our current results support the concept that the cGMP-PKG-pathway plays an important role in ischemia/reperfusion injury. We could show that up-regulating this pathway has a preconditioning-like effect and can effectively reduce ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  5. Activated c-Kit receptor in the heart promotes cardiac repair and regeneration after injury

    PubMed Central

    Di Siena, S; Gimmelli, R; Nori, S L; Barbagallo, F; Campolo, F; Dolci, S; Rossi, P; Venneri, M A; Giannetta, E; Gianfrilli, D; Feigenbaum, L; Lenzi, A; Naro, F; Cianflone, E; Mancuso, T; Torella, D; Isidori, A M; Pellegrini, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of endogenous c-Kit receptor activation on cardiac cell homeostasis and repair remains largely unexplored. Transgenic mice carrying an activating point mutation (TgD814Y) in the kinase domain of the c-Kit gene were generated. c-KitTgD814Y receptor was expressed in the heart during embryonic development and postnatal life, in a similar timing and expression pattern to that of the endogenous gene, but not in the hematopoietic compartment allowing the study of a cardiac-specific phenotype. c-KitTgD814Y mutation produced a constitutive active c-Kit receptor in cardiac tissue and cells from transgenic mice as demonstrated by the increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT, which are the main downstream molecular effectors of c-Kit receptor signaling. In adult transgenic hearts, cardiac morphology, size and total c-Kit+ cardiac cell number was not different compared with wt mice. However, when c-KitTgD814Y mice were subjected to transmural necrotic heart damage by cryoinjury (CI), all transgenic survived, compared with half of wt mice. In the sub-acute phase after CI, transgenic and wt mice showed similar heart damage. However, 9 days after CI, transgenic mice exhibited an increased number of c-Kit+CD31+ endothelial progenitor cells surrounding the necrotic area. At later follow-up, a consistent reduction of fibrotic area, increased capillary density and increased cardiomyocyte replenishment rate (as established by BrdU incorporation) were observed in transgenic compared with wt mice. Consistently, CD45−c-Kit+ cardiac stem cells isolated from transgenic c-KitTgD814Y mice showed an enhanced endothelial and cardiomyocyte differentiation potential compared with cells isolated from the wt. Constitutive activation of c-Kit receptor in mice is associated with an increased cardiac myogenic and vasculogenic reparative potential after injury, with a significant improvement of survival. PMID:27468693

  6. Transplantation of autologously derived mitochondria protects the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Masuzawa, Akihiro; Black, Kendra M.; Pacak, Christina A.; Ericsson, Maria; Barnett, Reanne J.; Drumm, Ciara; Seth, Pankaj; Bloch, Donald B.; Levitsky, Sidney; Cowan, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial damage and dysfunction occur during ischemia and modulate cardiac function and cell survival significantly during reperfusion. We hypothesized that transplantation of autologously derived mitochondria immediately prior to reperfusion would ameliorate these effects. New Zealand White rabbits were used for regional ischemia (RI), which was achieved by temporarily snaring the left anterior descending artery for 30 min. Following 29 min of RI, autologously derived mitochondria (RI-mitochondria; 9.7 ± 1.7 × 106/ml) or vehicle alone (RI-vehicle) were injected directly into the RI zone, and the hearts were allowed to recover for 4 wk. Mitochondrial transplantation decreased (P < 0.05) creatine kinase MB, cardiac troponin-I, and apoptosis significantly in the RI zone. Infarct size following 4 wk of recovery was decreased significantly in RI-mitochondria (7.9 ± 2.9%) compared with RI-vehicle (34.2 ± 3.3%, P < 0.05). Serial echocardiograms showed that RI-mitochondria hearts returned to normal contraction within 10 min after reperfusion was started; however, RI-vehicle hearts showed persistent hypokinesia in the RI zone at 4 wk of recovery. Electrocardiogram and optical mapping studies showed that no arrhythmia was associated with autologously derived mitochondrial transplantation. In vivo and in vitro studies show that the transplanted mitochondria are evident in the interstitial spaces and are internalized by cardiomyocytes 2–8 h after transplantation. The transplanted mitochondria enhanced oxygen consumption, high-energy phosphate synthesis, and the induction of cytokine mediators and proteomic pathways that are important in preserving myocardial energetics, cell viability, and enhanced post-infarct cardiac function. Transplantation of autologously derived mitochondria provides a novel technique to protect the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:23355340

  7. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 3A1 protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Masayoshi; Wu, Meiping; Lim, Soyeon; Knight, Walter E; Miller, Clint L; Cai, Yujun; Lu, Yan; Blaxall, Burns C; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Abe, Jun-ichi; Yan, Chen

    2013-11-01

    Phosphodiesterase 3A (PDE3A) is a major regulator of cAMP in cardiomyocytes. PDE3 inhibitors are used for acute treatment of congestive heart failure, but are associated with increased incidence of arrhythmias and sudden death with long-term use. We previously reported that chronic PDE3A downregulation or inhibition induced myocyte apoptosis in vitro. However, the cardiac protective effect of PDE3A has not been demonstrated in vivo in disease models. In this study, we examined the role of PDE3A in regulating myocardial function and survival in vivo using genetically engineered transgenic mice with myocardial overexpression of the PDE3A1 isozyme (TG). TG mice have reduced cardiac function characterized by reduced heart rate and ejection fraction (52.5±7.8% vs. 83.9±4.7%) as well as compensatory expansion of left ventricular diameter (4.19±0.19mm vs. 3.10±0.18mm). However, there was no maladaptive increase of fibrosis and apoptosis in TG hearts compared to wild type (WT) hearts, and the survival rates also remained the same. The diminution of cardiac contractile function is very likely attributed to a decrease in beta-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) response in TG mice. Importantly, the myocardial infarct size (4.0±1.8% vs. 24.6±3.8%) and apoptotic cell number (1.3±1.0% vs. 5.6±1.5%) induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury were significantly attenuated in TG mice. This was associated with decreased expression of inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) and increased expression of anti-apoptotic protein BCL-2. To further verify the anti-apoptotic effects of PDE3A1, we performed in vitro apoptosis study in isolated adult TG and WT cardiomyocytes. We found that the apoptotic rates stimulated by hypoxia/reoxygenation or H2O2 were indeed significantly reduced in TG myocytes, and the differences between TG and WT myocytes were completely reversed in the presence of the PDE3 inhibitor milrinone. These together indicate that PDE3A1 negatively regulates β-AR signaling

  8. Akt protects the heart against ischaemia-reperfusion injury by modulating mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Ong, Sang-Bing; Hall, Andrew R; Dongworth, Rachel K; Kalkhoran, Siavash; Pyakurel, Aswin; Scorrano, Luca; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism through which the protein kinase Akt (also called PKB), protects the heart against acute ischaemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is not clear. Here, we investigate whether Akt mediates its cardioprotective effect by modulating mitochondrial morphology. Transfection of HL-1 cardiac cells with constitutively active Akt (caAkt) changed mitochondrial morphology as evidenced by an increase in the proportion of cells displaying predominantly elongated mitochondria (73 ± 5.0 % caAkt vs 49 ± 5.8 % control: N=80 cells/group; p< 0.05). This effect was associated with delayed time taken to induce mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening (by 2.4 ± 0.5 fold; N=80 cells/group: p< 0.05); and reduced cell death following simulated IRI (32.8 ± 1.2 % caAkt vs 63.8 ± 5.6 % control: N=320 cells/group: p< 0.05). Similar effects on mitochondrial morphology, MPTP opening, and cell survival post-IRI, were demonstrated with pharmacological activation of Akt using the known cardioprotective cytokine, erythropoietin (EPO). The effect of Akt on inducing mitochondrial elongation was found to be dependent on the mitochondrial fusion protein, Mitofusin-1 (Mfn1), as ablation of Mfn1 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) abrogated Akt-mediated mitochondrial elongation. Finally, in vivo pre-treatment with EPO reduced myocardial infarct size (as a % of the area at risk) in adult mice subjected to IRI (26.2 ± 2.6 % with EPO vs 46.1 ± 6.5 % in control; N=7/group: p< 0.05), and reduced the proportion of cells displaying myofibrillar disarray and mitochondrial fragmentation observed by electron microscopy in adult murine hearts subjected to ischaemia from 5.8 ± 1.0 % to 2.2 ± 1.0 % (N=5 hearts/group; p< 0.05). In conclusion, we found that either genetic or pharmacological activation of Akt protected the heart against acute ischaemia-reperfusion injury by modulating mitochondrial morphology.

  9. Prehospital Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Increase the Positive Predictive Value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for High-Mortality Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-15

    Prehospital Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Increase the Positive Predictive Value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for High-Mortality Traumatic Brain Injury...pressures have both been associated with higher mortality for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We undertook a retrospective analysis of 1384...pressure; Glasgow Coma Scale; heart rate; prehospital; traumatic brain injury Introduction The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was developed to stan-dardize the

  10. Heart Rate and the Role of the Active Receiver during Contingent Electric Shock for Severe Self-Injurious Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duker, Pieter C.; Van den Munckhof, Marcia

    2007-01-01

    Five individuals, who were treated for severe self-injurious behaviors (SIB) with contingent electric shock, participated. Hereby, each occurrence of the target response was followed by a remotely administered aversive consequence. Participants' heart rates were compared at times when the active device of the equipment for the above procedure was…

  11. Modulation of Mitochondrial Permeability Transition in Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury of the Heart. Advantages and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Di Lisa, Fabio; Bernardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In the last twenty years, numerous reports provided solid evidence on the involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) in myocardial injury caused by ischemia and reperfusion. Indeed, significant cardioprotection is obtained by reducing the open probability of the PTP. This goal has been achieved by pharmacological and genetic interventions aimed at inhibiting cyclophilin D (CyPD), a regulatory protein that favors PTP opening. On the other hand, CyPD inhibition or deletion has been shown to worsen remodeling of the hypertrophic heart, an adverse outcome that must find an explanation within PTP modulation by CyPD. In this review, recent advancements in defining the molecular identity of the PTP are analyzed in relation to its pathophysiological functions and pharmacological modulation. In this respect, advantages and limitations of compounds targeting CyPD are discussed with the analysis of novel PTP inhibitors that do not interact with CyPD.

  12. Differential expression of embryonic epicardial progenitor markers and localization of cardiac fibrosis in adult ischemic injury and hypertensive heart disease.

    PubMed

    Braitsch, Caitlin M; Kanisicak, Onur; van Berlo, Jop H; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Yutzey, Katherine E

    2013-12-01

    During embryonic heart development, the transcription factors Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18 regulate activation and differentiation of epicardium-derived cells, including fibroblast lineages. Expression of these epicardial progenitor factors and localization of cardiac fibrosis were examined in mouse models of cardiovascular disease and in human diseased hearts. Following ischemic injury in mice, epicardial fibrosis is apparent in the thickened layer of subepicardial cells that express Wt1, Tbx18, and Tcf21. Perivascular fibrosis with predominant expression of Tcf21, but not Wt1 or Tbx18, occurs in mouse models of pressure overload or hypertensive heart disease, but not following ischemic injury. Areas of interstitial fibrosis in ischemic and hypertensive hearts actively express Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18. In all areas of fibrosis, cells that express epicardial progenitor factors are distinct from CD45-positive immune cells. In human diseased hearts, differential expression of Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18 also is detected with epicardial, perivascular, and interstitial fibrosis, indicating conservation of reactivated developmental mechanisms in cardiac fibrosis in mice and humans. Together, these data provide evidence for distinct fibrogenic mechanisms that include Tcf21, separate from Wt1 and Tbx18, in different fibroblast populations in response to specific types of cardiac injury.

  13. Lung capillary injury and repair in left heart disease: a new target for therapy?

    PubMed

    Azarbar, Sayena; Dupuis, Jocelyn

    2014-07-01

    The lungs are the primary organs affected in LHD (left heart disease). Increased left atrial pressure leads to pulmonary alveolar-capillary stress failure, resulting in cycles of alveolar wall injury and repair. The reparative process causes the proliferation of MYFs (myofibroblasts) with fibrosis and extracellular matrix deposition, resulting in thickening of the alveolar wall. Although the resultant reduction in vascular permeability is initially protective against pulmonary oedema, the process becomes maladaptive causing a restrictive lung syndrome with impaired gas exchange. This pathological process may also contribute to PH (pulmonary hypertension) due to LHD. Few clinical trials have specifically evaluated lung structural remodelling and the effect of related therapies in LHD. Currently approved treatment for chronic HF (heart failure) may have direct beneficial effects on lung structural remodelling. In the future, novel therapies specifically targeting the remodelling processes may potentially be utilized. In the present review, we summarize data supporting the clinical importance and pathophysiological mechanisms of lung structural remodelling in LHD and propose that this pathophysiological process should be explored further in pre-clinical studies and future therapeutic trials.

  14. Attenuation of Ca paradox injury in guinea pig heart by K+ channel blocker, d-sotalol.

    PubMed

    Tribulova, N; Sosner, I; Varon, D; Manoach, M

    1999-01-01

    D-sotalol was shown to prevent Ca overload and intermyocyte uncoupling. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of d-sotalol in Ca paradox conditions. Guinea pig hearts were perfused at 37 degrees C and constant pressure with oxygenated Tyrode solution. Ca paradox was induced by 10 min Ca free perfusion followed by 10 min Ca repletion. 10(-6) M d-sotalol was administered either during Ca depletion or during Ca repletion period. Electrical activity and ventricular contraction were simultaneously recorded and subcellular alterations were analysed. The contraction terminated in 5 min of Ca free perfusion and electrical activity disappeared within 5 min of Ca repletion. Nonuniform injury of myocardial tissue was observed. The majority of cardiomyocytes were irreversibly injured and profound dissociation of intercellular junctions was detected. Administration of d-sotalol during Ca free period preserved electrical activity and restored ventricular contraction accompanied by apparent protection of the ultrastructure, including intercellular connections. Uniform patterns of sarcomeres reflected synchronous contraction and protection of junctional couplings. In conclusion, d-sotalol attenuates Ca paradox injury. It seems that the protective effect of d-sotalol is most likely related to inhibition of potassium efflux antagonizing Na loading during Ca depletion period, as well as to attenuation of excess of [Ca2+]i via acceleration of sarcoplasmic Ca exchange during Ca repletion.

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects the heart from acute injury caused by inducible Cre recombinase.

    PubMed

    Hull, Travis D; Bolisetty, Subhashini; DeAlmeida, Angela C; Litovsky, Silvio H; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F

    2013-08-01

    The protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cardiovascular disease has been previously demonstrated using transgenic animal models in which HO-1 is constitutively overexpressed in the heart. However, the temporal requirements for protection by HO-1 induction relative to injury have not been investigated, but are essential to employ HO-1 as a therapeutic strategy in human cardiovascular disease states. Therefore, we generated mice with cardiac-specific, tamoxifen (TAM)-inducible overexpression of a human HO-1 (hHO-1) transgene (myosin heavy chain (MHC)-HO-1 mice) by breeding mice with cardiac-specific expression of a TAM-inducible Cre recombinase (MHC-Cre mice), with mice containing an hHO-1 transgene preceded by a floxed-stop signal. MHC-HO-1 mice overexpress HO-1 mRNA and the enzymatically active protein following TAM administration (40 mg/kg body weight on 2 consecutive days). In MHC-Cre controls, TAM administration leads to severe, acute cardiac toxicity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, and 80% mortality by day 3. This cardiac toxicity is accompanied by a significant increase in inflammatory cells in the heart that are predominantly neutrophils. In MHC-HO-1 mice, HO-1 overexpression ameliorates the depression of cardiac function and high mortality rate observed in MHC-Cre mice following TAM administration and attenuates cardiomyocyte necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These results highlight that HO-1 induction is sufficient to prevent the depression of cardiac function observed in mice with TAM-inducible Cre recombinase expression by protecting the heart from necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These findings are important because MHC-Cre mice are widely used in cardiovascular research despite the limitations imposed by Cre-induced cardiac toxicity, and also because inflammation is an important pathological component of many human cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Severe Calorie Restriction Reduces Cardiometabolic Risk Factors and Protects Rat Hearts from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Dirceu S.; Costa-Pereira, Liliane V.; Santos, Carina S.; Mendes, Bruno F.; Costa, Karine B.; Santos, Cynthia Fernandes F.; Rocha-Vieira, Etel; Magalhães, Flávio C.; Esteves, Elizabethe A.; Ferreira, Anderson J.; Guatimosim, Sílvia; Dias-Peixoto, Marco F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Recent studies have proposed that if a severe caloric restriction (SCR) is initiated at the earliest period of postnatal life, it can lead to beneficial cardiac adaptations later on. We investigated the effects of SCR in Wistar rats from birth to adult age on risk factors for cardiac diseases (CD), as well as cardiac function, redox status, and HSP72 content in response to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Methods and Results: From birth to the age of 3 months, CR50 rats were fed 50% of the food that the ad libitum group (AL) was fed. Food intake was assessed daily and body weight were assessed weekly. In the last week of the SCR protocol, systolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured and the double product index was calculated. Also, oral glucose and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests were performed. Thereafter, rats were decapitated, visceral fat was weighed, and blood and hearts were harvested for biochemical, functional, tissue redox status, and western blot analyzes. Compared to AL, CR50 rats had reduced the main risk factors for CD. Moreover, the FR50 rats showed increased cardiac function both at baseline conditions (45% > AL rats) and during the post-ischemic period (60% > AL rats) which may be explained by a decreased cardiac oxidative stress and increased HSP72 content. Conclusion: SCR from birth to adult age reduced risk factors for CD, increased basal cardiac function and protected hearts from the I/R, possibly by a mechanism involving ROS. PMID:27092082

  17. MicroRNA-214 protects the mouse heart from ischemic injury by controlling Ca2+ overload and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, Arin B.; Mahmoud, Ahmed I.; Luo, Xiang; Johnson, Brett A.; van Rooij, Eva; Matsuzaki, Satoshi; Humphries, Kenneth M.; Hill, Joseph A.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Sadek, Hesham A.; Olson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    Early reperfusion of ischemic cardiac tissue remains the most effective intervention for improving clinical outcome following myocardial infarction. However, abnormal increases in intracellular Ca2+ during myocardial reperfusion can cause cardiomyocyte death and consequent loss of cardiac function, referred to as ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. Therapeutic modulation of Ca2+ handling provides some cardioprotection against the paradoxical effects of restoring blood flow to the heart, highlighting the significance of Ca2+ overload to IR injury. Cardiac IR is also accompanied by dynamic changes in the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs); for example, miR-214 is upregulated during ischemic injury and heart failure, but its potential role in these processes is unknown. Here, we show that genetic deletion of miR-214 in mice causes loss of cardiac contractility, increased apoptosis, and excessive fibrosis in response to IR injury. The cardioprotective roles of miR-214 during IR injury were attributed to repression of the mRNA encoding sodium/calcium exchanger 1 (Ncx1), a key regulator of Ca2+ influx; and to repression of several downstream effectors of Ca2+ signaling that mediate cell death. These findings reveal a pivotal role for miR-214 as a regulator of cardiomyocyte Ca2+ homeostasis and survival during cardiac injury. PMID:22426211

  18. Cardioprotective effect of aqueous extract of Chichorium intybus on ischemia-reperfusion injury in isolated rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Najmeh; Dianat, Mahin; Badavi, Mohammad; Malekzadeh, Ahad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Several studies have shown that Chichorium intybus (C. intybus) which possesses flavonoid compounds has an effective role in treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Contractile dysfunction mostly occurs after acute myocardial infarction, cardiac bypass surgery, heart transplantation and coronary angioplasty. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of C. intybus on ischemia- reperfusion injury in isolated rat heart. Materials and Methods: The animals were divided into four groups (Sham, Control, 1 mg/ml and 3 mg/ml of extract) of 8 rats. The aorta was cannulated, and then the heart was mounted on a Langendorff apparatus. Next, a balloon was inserted into the left ventricle (LV) and peak positive value of time derivate of LV pressure (+dp/dt), coronary flow (CF), and left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) in pre-ischemia and reperfusion period were calculated by a Power Lab system. All groups underwent a 30-minute global ischemia followed by a 60-minute reperfusion. Results: The results showed that heart rate (HR), coronary flow, and left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and rate of pressure product (RPP) significantly decreased in the control group during reperfusion, while these values in the groups receiving the extract (3mg/ml) improved significantly during reperfusion (p<0.001). Conclusion: It seems that flavonoid compounds of aqueous extract of C. intybus reduce ischemia - reperfusion injuries, suggesting its protective effect on heart function after ischemia. PMID:26693414

  19. Monoamine oxidases (MAO) in the pathogenesis of heart failure and ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Kaludercic, Nina; Carpi, Andrea; Menabò, Roberta; Lisa, Fabio Di; Paolocci, Nazareno

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence highlights monoamine oxidases (MAO) as another prominent source of oxidative stress. MAO are a class of enzymes located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, deputed to the oxidative breakdown of key neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine, and in the process generate H2O2. All these monoamines are endowed with potent modulatory effects on myocardial function. Thus, when the heart is subjected to chronic neuro-hormonal and/or peripheral hemodynamic stress, the abundance of circulating/tissue monoamines can make MAO-derived H2O2 production particularly prominent. This is the case of acute cardiac damage due to ischemia/reperfusion injury or, on a more chronic stand, of the transition from compensated hypertrophy to overt ventricular dilation/pump failure. Here, we will first briefly discuss mitochondrial status and contribution to acute and chronic cardiac disorders. We will illustrate possible mechanisms by which MAO activity affects cardiac biology and function, along with a discussion as to their role as a prominent source of reactive oxygen species. Finally, we will speculate on why MAO inhibition might have therapeutic value for treating cardiac affections of ischemic and non-ischemic origin. PMID:20869994

  20. Suppression of Excessive Histone Deacetylases Activity in Diabetic Hearts Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury via Mitochondria Apoptosis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Leng, Yan; Meng, Qingtao; Xue, Rui; Zhao, Bo; Zhan, Liying

    2017-01-01

    Background. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a pivotal role in signaling modification and gene transcriptional regulation that are essential for cardiovascular pathophysiology. Diabetic hearts with higher HDACs activity were more vulnerable to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury compared with nondiabetic hearts. We are curious about whether suppression of excessive HDACs activity in diabetic heart protects against MI/R injury. Methods. Diabetic rats were subjected to 45 min of ischemia, followed by 3 h of reperfusion. H9C2 cardiomyocytes were exposed to high glucose for 24 h, followed by 4 h of hypoxia and 2 h of reoxygenation (H/R). Results. Both MI/R injury and diabetes mellitus elevated myocardium HDACs activity. MI/R induced apoptotic cell death was significantly decreased in diabetic rats treated with HDACs inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). TSA administration markedly moderated dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, protected the integrity of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), and decreased cell apoptosis. Notably, cotreatment with Akt inhibitor partly or absolutely inhibited the protective effect of TSA in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, TSA administration activated Akt/Foxo3a pathway, leading to Foxo3a cytoplasm translocation and attenuation proapoptosis protein Bim expression. Conclusions. Both diabetes mellitus and MI/R injury increased cardiac HDACs activity. Suppression of HDACs activity triggered protective effects against MI/R and H/R injury under hyperglycemia conditions through Akt-modulated mitochondrial apoptotic pathways via Foxo3a/Bim. PMID:28191472

  1. Histone Deacetylases Exert Class-Specific Roles in Conditioning the Brain and Heart Against Acute Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Aune, Sverre E.; Herr, Daniel J.; Kutz, Craig J.; Menick, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury comprises a significant portion of morbidity and mortality from heart and brain diseases worldwide. This enduring clinical problem has inspired myriad reports in the scientific literature of experimental interventions seeking to elucidate the pathology of IR injury. Elective cardiac surgery presents perhaps the most viable scenario for protecting the heart and brain from IR injury due to the opportunity to condition the organs prior to insult. The physiological parameters for the preconditioning of vital organs prior to insult through mechanical and pharmacological maneuvers have been heavily examined. These investigations have revealed new insights into how preconditioning alters cellular responses to IR injury. However, the promise of preconditioning remains unfulfilled at the clinical level, and research seeking to implicate cell signals essential to this protection continues. Recent discoveries in molecular biology have revealed that gene expression can be controlled through posttranslational modifications, without altering the chemical structure of the genetic code. In this scenario, gene expression is repressed by enzymes that cause chromatin compaction through catalytic removal of acetyl moieties from lysine residues on histones. These enzymes, called histone deacetylases (HDACs), can be inhibited pharmacologically, leading to the de-repression of protective genes. The discovery that HDACs can also alter the function of non-histone proteins through posttranslational deacetylation has expanded the potential impact of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of human disease. HDAC inhibitors have been applied in a very small number of experimental models of IR. However, the scientific literature contains an increasing number of reports demonstrating that HDACs converge on preconditioning signals in the cell. This review will describe the influence of HDACs on major preconditioning signaling pathways in the heart and brain. PMID

  2. Prostaglandin E Receptor Subtype 4 Signaling in the Heart: Role in Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury and Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yin; Tang, Eva Hoi Ching; Ma, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an endogenous lipid mediator, produced from the metabolism of arachidonic acids, upon the sequential actions of phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenases, and prostaglandin E synthases. The various biological functions governed by PGE2 are mediated through its four distinct prostaglandin E receptors (EPs), designated as EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4, among which the EP4 receptor is the one most widely distributed in the heart. The availability of global or cardiac-specific EP4 knockout mice and the development of selective EP4 agonists/antagonists have provided substantial evidence to support the role of EP4 receptor in the heart. However, like any good drama, activation of PGE2-EP4 signaling exerts both protective and detrimental effects in the ischemic heart disease. Thus, the primary object of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current progress of the PGE2-EP4 signaling in ischemic heart diseases, including cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. A better understanding of PGE2-EP4 signaling should promote the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to treat the ischemic heart diseases without triggering unwanted side effects. PMID:27190998

  3. Nitrative Thioredoxin Inactivation as a Cause of Enhanced Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in the Aging Heart

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hangxiang; Tao, Ling; Jiao, Xiangying; Gao, Erhe; Lopez, Bernard L.; Christopher, Theodore A.; Koch, Walter; Ma, Xin L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Several recent studies have demonstrated that thioredoxin (Trx) is an important anti-apoptotic/cytoprotective molecule. The present study was designed to determine whether Trx activity is altered in the aging heart in a way that may contribute to increased susceptibility to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R). Methods and Results Compared to young animals, MI/R-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and infarct size were increased in aging animals (P<0.01). Trx activity was decreased in the aging heart before MI/R, and this difference was further amplified after MI/R. Trx expression was moderately increased and Trx nitration, a post-translational modification that inhibits Trx activity, was increased in the aging heart. Moreover, Trx-ASK1 complex formation was reduced and activity of p38 MAPK was increased. Treatment with FP15 (a peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst) reduced Trx nitration, increased Trx activity, restored Trx-ASK1 interaction, reduced P38 MAPK activity, attenuated caspase 3 activation and reduced infarct size in aging animals (p<0.01). Conclusions Our results demonstrated that Trx activity is decreased in the aging heart by post-translational nitrative modification. Interventions that restore Trx activity in the aging heart may be novel therapies to attenuate MI/R injury in aging patients. PMID:17561092

  4. The red wine antioxidant resveratrol protects isolated rat hearts from ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Ray, P S; Maulik, G; Cordis, G A; Bertelli, A A; Bertelli, A; Das, D K

    1999-07-01

    The consumption of red wine has been reported to impart a greater benefit in the prevention of coronary heart disease than the consumption of other alcoholic beverages. This beneficial effect is increasingly being attributed to certain antioxidants comprising the polyphenol fraction of red wine such as transresveratrol. In the present study, we investigated the potential cardioprotective effects of resveratrol in the face of ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury. Isolated perfused working rat hearts after stabilization were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit Bicarbonate buffer (KHB) either in the presence or absence of transresveratrol (RVT) at a concentration of 10 microM for 15 min prior to subjecting them to 30 min of global ischemia followed by 2 h of reperfusion. Left ventricular functions were monitored at various timepoints throughout the reperfusion period to assess the extent of postischemic recovery in comparison with baseline values. Coronary perfusate samples were also collected to determine malonaldehyde (MDA) levels. The results demonstrated that RVT exhibited significant myocardial protection. This was evidenced by improved recovery of post-ischemic ventricular function including developed pressure and aortic flow as compared to the control group (KHB). Values for developed pressure in the RVT-treated group were significantly higher than those in the control group throughout the reperfusion period (71.09+/-4.88 mm Hg vs. 58.47+/-3.88 mm Hg, 68.87+/-5.07 mm Hg vs. 49.74+/-2.65 mm Hg and 51.67+/-3.95 mm Hg vs. 30.50+/-4.80 mm Hg at reperfusion timepoints R-15, R-60, and R-120, respectively). From R-30 onwards, aortic flow was markedly higher in the RVT treated group as compared with the control group, the differences being most significant at R-90 (32.45+/-2.19 ml/min vs. 19.83+/-1.62 ml/min) and R-120 (27.15+/-2.27 ml/min vs. 14.10+/-1.69 ml/min). In contrast to the KHB treated group, the RVT-treated group displayed significant reduction in MDA formation

  5. Hypoxic mitophagy regulates mitochondrial quality and platelet activation and determines severity of I/R heart injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weilin; Ren, He; Xu, Chunling; Zhu, Chongzhuo; Wu, Hao; Liu, Dong; Wang, Jun; Liu, Lei; Li, Wei; Ma, Qi; Du, Lei; Zheng, Ming; Zhang, Chuanmao; Liu, Junling; Chen, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction underlies many prevalent diseases including heart disease arising from acute ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Here, we demonstrate that mitophagy, which selectively removes damaged or unwanted mitochondria, regulated mitochondrial quality and quantity in vivo. Hypoxia induced extensive mitochondrial degradation in a FUNDC1-dependent manner in platelets, and this was blocked by in vivo administration of a cell-penetrating peptide encompassing the LIR motif of FUNDC1 only in wild-type mice. Genetic ablation of Fundc1 impaired mitochondrial quality and increased mitochondrial mass in platelets and rendered the platelets insensitive to hypoxia and the peptide. Moreover, hypoxic mitophagy in platelets protected the heart from worsening of I/R injury. This represents a new mechanism of the hypoxic preconditioning effect which reduces I/R injury. Our results demonstrate a critical role of mitophagy in mitochondrial quality control and platelet activation, and suggest that manipulation of mitophagy by hypoxia or pharmacological approaches may be a novel strategy for cardioprotection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21407.001 PMID:27995894

  6. Cordyceps sinensis protects against liver and heart injuries in a rat model of chronic kidney disease: a metabolomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xia; Zhong, Fang; Tang, Xu-long; Lian, Fu-lin; Zhou, Qiao; Guo, Shan-mai; Liu, Jia-fu; Sun, Peng; Hao, Xu; Lu, Ying; Wang, Wei-ming; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Nai-xia

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that the traditional Chinese medicine Cordyceps sinensis could improve the metabolic function of extrarenal organs to achieve its anti-chronic kidney disease (CKD) effects. Methods: Male SD rats were divided into CKD rats (with 5/6-nephrectomy), CKD rats treated with Cordyceps sinensis (4 mg•kg-1•d-1, po), and sham-operated rats. After an 8-week treatment, metabolites were extracted from the hearts and livers of the rats, and then subjected to 1H-NMR-based metabolomic analysis. Results: Oxidative stress, energy metabolism, amino acid and protein metabolism and choline metabolism were considered as links between CKD and extrarenal organ dysfunction. Within the experimental period of 8 weeks, the metabolic disorders in the liver were more pronounced than in the heart, suggesting that CKD-related extrarenal organ dysfunctions occurred sequentially rather than simultaneously. Oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis exerted statistically significant rescue effects on the liver and heart by reversely regulating levels of those metabolites that are typically perturbed in CKD. Conclusion: Oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis significantly attenuates the liver and heart injuries in CKD rats. The 1H NMR-based metabolomic approach has provided a systematic view for understanding of CKD and the drug treatment, which can also be used to elucidate the mechanisms of action of other traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:24632844

  7. Targeting hexokinase II to mitochondria to modulate energy metabolism and reduce ischaemia-reperfusion injury in heart

    PubMed Central

    Nederlof, Rianne; Eerbeek, Otto; Hollmann, Markus W; Southworth, Richard; Zuurbier, Coert J

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrially bound hexokinase II (mtHKII) has long been known to confer cancer cells with their resilience against cell death. More recently, mtHKII has emerged as a powerful protector against cardiac cell death. mtHKII protects against ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in skeletal muscle and heart, attenuates cardiac hypertrophy and remodelling, and is one of the major end-effectors through which ischaemic preconditioning protects against myocardial IR injury. Mechanisms of mtHKII cardioprotection against reperfusion injury entail the maintenance of regulated outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) permeability during ischaemia and reperfusion resulting in stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential, the prevention of OMM breakage and cytochrome C release, and reduced reactive oxygen species production. Increasing mtHK may also have important metabolic consequences, such as improvement of glucose-induced insulin release, prevention of acidosis through enhanced coupling of glycolysis and glucose oxidation, and inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. Deficiencies in expression and distorted cellular signalling of HKII may contribute to the altered sensitivity of diabetes to cardiac ischaemic diseases. The interaction of HKII with the mitochondrion constitutes a powerful endogenous molecular mechanism to protect against cell death in almost all cell types examined (neurons, tumours, kidney, lung, skeletal muscle, heart). The challenge now is to harness mtHKII in the treatment of infarction, stroke, elective surgery and transplantation. Remote ischaemic preconditioning, metformin administration and miR-155/miR-144 manipulations are potential means of doing just that. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24032601

  8. Apigenin attenuates heart injury in lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemic model by suppressing sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianzhu; Yan, Tianhua; Du, Juan; Wang, Shumin; Yang, Huilin

    2015-05-25

    Sepsis is a cluster of heterogeneous syndromes associated with progressive endotoxemic developments, ultimately leading to damage of multiple organs, including the heart. This study is to investigate the effects of apigenin on heart injury in lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemic rat model. Normal Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: control group, LPS group (15 mg/kg), LPS plus apigenin groups with different apigenin doses (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg). Serum levels of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured after the rats were sacrificed. SphK1/S1P signaling pathway proteins, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, Bax and Bcl-2 in heart were measured by Western blot. In vitro, we evaluated the protective effect of apigenin on rat embryonic heart-derived myogenic cell line H9c2 induced by LPS. Apigenin decreased serum levels of CK-MB, LDH, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β. SphK1/S1P signaling pathway proteins, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, Bax in heart were found inhibited and Bcl-2 increased in the apigenin groups in vivo. In addition, apigenin inhibited intracellular calcium, the MAPK pathway and SphK1/S1P signaling pathway in vitro. Apigenin exerts pronounced cardioprotection in rats subjected to LPS likely through suppressing myocardial apoptosis and inflammation by inhibiting the SphK1/S1P signaling pathway.

  9. Peri-operative heart-type fatty acid binding protein is associated with acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Jennifer A.; Garg, Amit X.; Coca, Steven G.; Testani, Jeffrey M.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Eikelboom, John; Kavsak, Peter; McArthur, Eric; Shortt, Colleen; Whitlock, Richard; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) is a common complication after cardiac surgery and is associated with worse outcomes. Since heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) is a myocardial protein that detects cardiac injury, we sought to determine if plasma H-FABP was associated with AKI in the TRIBE-AKI cohort; a multi-center cohort of 1219 patients at high risk for AKI who underwent cardiac surgery. The primary outcomes of interest were any AKI (Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) stage 1 or higher) and severe AKI (AKIN stage 2 or higher). The secondary outcome was long-term mortality after discharge. Patients who developed AKI had higher levels of H-FABP pre- and post-operatively than patients who did not have AKI. In analyses adjusted for known AKI risk factors, first post-operative log(H-FABP) was associated with severe AKI (adjusted OR 5.39 [95% CI, 2.87-10.11] per unit increase), while pre-operative log(H-FABP) was associated with any AKI (2.07 [1.48-2.89]) and mortality (1.67 [1.17-2.37]). These relationships persisted after adjustment for change in serum creatinine (for first postoperative log(H-FABP)) and biomarkers of cardiac and kidney injury, including brain natriuretic peptide, cardiac troponin-I, interleukin-18, liver fatty acid binding protein, kidney injury molecule-1, and neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin. Thus, peri-operative plasma H-FABP levels may be used for risk-stratification of AKI and mortality following cardiac surgery. PMID:25830762

  10. An investigation on cardioprotective potential of Marrubium vulgare aqueous fraction against ischemia-reperfusion injury in isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Garjani, Alireza; Tila, Dena; Hamedeyazdan, Sanaz; Vaez, Haleh; Rameshrad, Maryam; Pashaii, Mahdiyeh; Fathiazad, Fatemeh

    2017-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of aqueous fraction of M. vulgare hydroalcoholic extract on cardiac parameters in ischemic-reperfused isolated rat hearts. The aerial parts of the plant were extracted with methanol 70% by maceration. The water-soluble portion of the total hydroalcoholic extract was prepared with liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Afterwards, the antioxidant activity, total phenolic and flavonoids content of the aqueous fraction were determined. In order to evaluate the effects of the aqueous fraction on cardiac parameters and I/R injury, the Langendroff method was used on Male Wistar rats. Harvested hearts were cannulated immediately to the langendroff apparatus and subjected into 30 min regional ischemia and 2 hrs reperfusion, either by a modified Krebs-Henseleit Buffer Solution (KHBS) or enriched KHBS with plant extract (10, 20, 40 µg/mL). The aqueous fraction was found to be a scavenger of DPPH radical with RC50 value of 47µg/mL. The total phenolic and flavonoids content of the fraction was 6.05g gallic acid equivalent and 36.13mg quercetin equivalent per 100g of dry plant material. In addition, 40 µg/mL of M. vulgare aqueous fraction significantly decreased infarct size in comparison to control group. All doses considerably reduced the total ventricular ectopic beats (VEBs) during 30 min of ischemia. The extract at dose of 40 µg/mL noticeably decreased the arrhythmias during the first 30 min of reperfusion. The results of the study indicated aqueous fraction of M. vulgare possesses a protective effect against I/R injuries in isolated rat hearts.

  11. Role of Opioid Receptors Signaling in Remote Electrostimulation - Induced Protection against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsin-Ju; Huang, Shiang-Suo; Tsou, Meng-Ting; Wang, Hsiao-Ting; Chiu, Jen-Hwey

    2015-01-01

    Aims Our previous studies demonstrated that remote electro-stimulation (RES) increased myocardial GSK3 phosphorylation and attenuated ischemia/ reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat hearts. However, the role of various opioid receptors (OR) subtypes in preconditioned RES-induced myocardial protection remains unknown. We investigated the role of OR subtype signaling in RES-induced cardioprotection against I/R injury of the rat heart. Methods & Results Male Spraque-Dawley rats were used. RES was performed on median nerves area with/without pretreatment with various receptors antagonists such as opioid receptor (OR) subtype receptors (KOR, DOR, and MOR). The expressions of Akt, GSK3, and PKCε expression were analyzed by Western blotting. When RES was preconditioned before the I/R model, the rat's hemodynamic index, infarction size, mortality and serum CK-MB were evaluated. Our results showed that Akt, GSK3 and PKCε expression levels were significantly increased in the RES group compared to the sham group, which were blocked by pretreatment with specific antagonists targeting KOR and DOR, but not MOR subtype. Using the I/R model, the duration of arrhythmia and infarct size were both significantly attenuated in RES group. The mortality rates of the sham RES group, the RES group, RES group + KOR antagonist, RES group + DOR/MOR antagonists (KOR left), RES group + DOR antagonist, and RES group + KOR/MOR antagonists (DOR left) were 50%, 20%, 67%, 13%, 50% and 55%, respectively. Conclusion The mechanism of RES-induced myocardial protection against I/R injury seems to involve multiple target pathways such as Akt, KOR and/or DOR signaling. PMID:26430750

  12. Increased Heme Levels in the Heart Lead to Exacerbated Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sawicki, Konrad Teodor; Shang, Meng; Wu, Rongxue; Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Khechaduri, Arineh; Sato, Tatsuya; Kamide, Christine; Liu, Ting; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Ardehali, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background Heme is an essential iron-containing molecule for cardiovascular physiology, but in excess it may increase oxidative stress. Failing human hearts have increased heme levels, with upregulation of the rate-limiting enzyme in heme synthesis, δ-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2), which is normally not expressed in cardiomyocytes. We hypothesized that increased heme accumulation (through cardiac overexpression of ALAS2) leads to increased oxidative stress and cell death in the heart. Methods and Results We first showed that ALAS2 and heme levels are increased in the hearts of mice subjected to coronary ligation. To determine the causative role of increased heme in the development of heart failure, we generated transgenic mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of ALAS2. While ALAS2 transgenic mice have normal cardiac function at baseline, their hearts display increased heme content, higher oxidative stress, exacerbated cell death, and worsened cardiac function after coronary ligation compared to nontransgenic littermates. We confirmed in cultured cardiomyoblasts that the increased oxidative stress and cell death observed with ALAS2 overexpression is mediated by increased heme accumulation. Furthermore, knockdown of ALAS2 in cultured cardiomyoblasts exposed to hypoxia reversed the increases in heme content and cell death. Administration of the mitochondrial antioxidant MitoTempo to ALAS2-overexpressing cardiomyoblasts normalized the elevated oxidative stress and cell death levels to baseline, indicating that the effects of increased ALAS2 and heme are through elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress. The clinical relevance of these findings was supported by the finding of increased ALAS2 induction and heme accumulation in failing human hearts from patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy compared to nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Conclusions Heme accumulation is detrimental to cardiac function under ischemic conditions, and reducing heme in the heart may be a

  13. miR-361-regulated prohibitin inhibits mitochondrial fission and apoptosis and protects heart from ischemia injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Liu, C-Y; Zhang, X-J; Feng, C; Zhou, L-Y; Zhao, Y; Li, P-F

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Emerging evidences suggest that the abnormal mitochondrial fission participates in pathogenesis of cardiac diseases, including myocardial infarction (MI) and heart failure. However, the molecular components regulating mitochondrial network in the heart remain largely unidentified. Here we report that miR-361 and prohibitin 1 (PHB1) constitute an axis that regulates mitochondrial fission and apoptosis. The results show that PHB1 attenuates mitochondrial fission and apoptosis in response to hydrogen peroxide treatment in cardiomyocytes. Cardiac-specific PHB1 transgenic mice show reduced mitochondrial fission and myocardial infarction sizes after myocardial infarction surgery. MiR-361 is responsible for the dysfunction of PHB1 and suppresses the translation of PHB1. Knockdown of miR-361 reduces mitochondrial fission and apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. MiR-361 cardiac-specific transgenic mice represent elevated mitochondrial fission and myocardial infarction sizes upon myocardial ischemia injury. This study identifies a novel signaling pathway composed of miR-361 and PHB1 that regulates mitochondrial fission program and apoptosis. This discovery will shed new light on the therapy of myocardial infarction and heart failure.

  14. miR-361-regulated prohibitin inhibits mitochondrial fission and apoptosis and protects heart from ischemia injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K; Liu, C-Y; Zhang, X-J; Feng, C; Zhou, L-Y; Zhao, Y; Li, P-F

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Emerging evidences suggest that the abnormal mitochondrial fission participates in pathogenesis of cardiac diseases, including myocardial infarction (MI) and heart failure. However, the molecular components regulating mitochondrial network in the heart remain largely unidentified. Here we report that miR-361 and prohibitin 1 (PHB1) constitute an axis that regulates mitochondrial fission and apoptosis. The results show that PHB1 attenuates mitochondrial fission and apoptosis in response to hydrogen peroxide treatment in cardiomyocytes. Cardiac-specific PHB1 transgenic mice show reduced mitochondrial fission and myocardial infarction sizes after myocardial infarction surgery. MiR-361 is responsible for the dysfunction of PHB1 and suppresses the translation of PHB1. Knockdown of miR-361 reduces mitochondrial fission and apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. MiR-361 cardiac-specific transgenic mice represent elevated mitochondrial fission and myocardial infarction sizes upon myocardial ischemia injury. This study identifies a novel signaling pathway composed of miR-361 and PHB1 that regulates mitochondrial fission program and apoptosis. This discovery will shed new light on the therapy of myocardial infarction and heart failure. PMID:25501599

  15. Pulmonary Instillation of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Promotes Coronary Vasoconstriction and Exacerbates Injury in Isolated Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Leslie C.; Frasier, Chad R.; Sloan, Ruben C.; Mann, Erin E.; Harrison, Benjamin S.; Brown, Jared M.; Brown, David A.; Wingard, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The growing use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) across industry has increased human exposures. We tested the hypothesis that pulmonary instillation of MWCNT would exacerbate cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. One day following intratracheal instillation of 1, 10, or 100 μg MWCNT in Sprague-Dawley rats, we used a Langendorff isolated heart model to examine cardiac I/R injury. In the 100 μg MWCNT group we report increased premature ventricular contractions at baseline and increased myocardial infarction. This was associated with increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) release and depression of coronary flow during early reperfusion. We also tested if isolated coronary vascular responses were affected by MWCNT instillation and found trends for enhanced coronary tone, which were dependent on ET-1, cyclooxygenase, thromboxane, and Rho-kinase. We conclude that instillation of MWCNT promoted cardiac injury by depressing coronary flow, invoking vasoconstrictive mechanisms involving ET-1, cyclooxygenase, thromboxane, and Rho-kinase. PMID:23102262

  16. Voluntary physical activity protects from susceptibility to skeletal muscle contraction-induced injury but worsens heart function in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Hourdé, Christophe; Joanne, Pierre; Medja, Fadia; Mougenot, Nathalie; Jacquet, Adeline; Mouisel, Etienne; Pannerec, Alice; Hatem, Stéphane; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Agbulut, Onnik; Ferry, Arnaud

    2013-05-01

    It is well known that inactivity/activity influences skeletal muscle physiological characteristics. However, the effects of inactivity/activity on muscle weakness and increased susceptibility to muscle contraction-induced injury have not been extensively studied in mdx mice, a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy with dystrophin deficiency. In the present study, we demonstrate that inactivity (ie, leg immobilization) worsened the muscle weakness and the susceptibility to contraction-induced injury in mdx mice. Inactivity also mimicked these two dystrophic features in wild-type mice. In contrast, we demonstrate that these parameters can be improved by activity (ie, voluntary wheel running) in mdx mice. Biochemical analyses indicate that the changes induced by inactivity/activity were not related to fiber-type transition but were associated with altered expression of different genes involved in fiber growth (GDF8), structure (Actg1), and calcium homeostasis (Stim1 and Jph1). However, activity reduced left ventricular function (ie, ejection and shortening fractions) in mdx, but not C57, mice. Altogether, our study suggests that muscle weakness and susceptibility to contraction-induced injury in dystrophic muscle could be attributable, at least in part, to inactivity. It also suggests that activity exerts a beneficial effect on dystrophic skeletal muscle but not on the heart.

  17. Pharmacological induction of transforming growth factor-beta1 in rat models enhances radiation injury in the intestine and the heart.

    PubMed

    Boerma, Marjan; Wang, Junru; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Herbert, Jean-Marc; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer is dose limited by radiation injury in normal tissues such as the intestine and the heart. To identify the mechanistic involvement of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) in intestinal and cardiac radiation injury, we studied the influence of pharmacological induction of TGF-β1 with xaliproden (SR 57746A) in rat models of radiation enteropathy and radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD). Because it was uncertain to what extent TGF-β induction may enhance radiation injury in heart and intestine, animals were exposed to irradiation schedules that cause mild to moderate (acute) radiation injury. In the radiation enteropathy model, male Sprague-Dawley rats received local irradiation of a 4-cm loop of rat ileum with 7 once-daily fractions of 5.6 Gy, and intestinal injury was assessed at 2 weeks and 12 weeks after irradiation. In the RIHD model, male Sprague-Dawley rats received local heart irradiation with a single dose of 18 Gy and were followed for 6 months after irradiation. Rats were treated orally with xaliproden starting 3 days before irradiation until the end of the experiments. Treatment with xaliproden increased circulating TGF-β1 levels by 300% and significantly induced expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β1 target genes in the irradiated intestine and heart. Various radiation-induced structural changes in the intestine at 2 and 12 weeks were significantly enhanced with TGF-β1 induction. Similarly, in the RIHD model induction of TGF-β1 augmented radiation-induced changes in cardiac function and myocardial fibrosis. These results lend further support for the direct involvement of TGF-β1 in biological mechanisms of radiation-induced adverse remodeling in the intestine and the heart.

  18. Chronic Losartan Treatment Up-Regulates AT1R and Increases the Heart Vulnerability to Acute Onset of Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Minwoo A; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is an important therapy in the management of hypertension, particularly in the immediate post-myocardial infarction period. Yet, the role of AT1R in the acute onset of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury still remains controversial. Thus, the present study determined the effects of chronic losartan treatment on heart ischemia and reperfusion injury in rats. Losartan (10 mg/kg/day) was administered to six-month-old male rats via an osmotic pump for 14 days and hearts were then isolated and were subjected to ischemia and reperfusion injury in a Langendorff preparation. Losartan significantly decreased mean arterial blood pressure. However, heart weight, left ventricle to body weight ratio and baseline cardiac function were not significantly altered by the losartan treatment. Of interest, chronic in vivo losartan treatment significantly increased ischemia-induced myocardial injury and decreased post-ischemic recovery of left ventricular function. This was associated with significant increases in AT1R and PKCδ expression in the left ventricle. In contrast, AT2R and PKCε were not altered. Furthermore, losartan treatment significantly increased microRNA (miR)-1, -15b, -92a, -133a, -133b, -210, and -499 expression but decreased miR-21 in the left ventricle. Of importance, addition of losartan to isolated heart preparations blocked the effect of increased ischemic-injury induced by in vivo chronic losartan treatment. The results demonstrate that chronic losartan treatment up-regulates AT1R/PKCδ and alters miR expression patterns in the heart, leading to increased cardiac vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury.

  19. The lightning heart: a case report and brief review of the cardiovascular complications of lightning injury.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, William F; Simpson, Christopher S; Redfearn, Damian P; Abdollah, Hoshiar; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2010-09-05

    Lightning strike is a rare natural phenomenon, which carries a risk of dramatic medical complications to multiple organ systems and a high risk of fatality. The known complications include but are not limited to: myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, cardiac contusion, stroke, cutaneous burns, respiratory disorders, neurological disorders, acute kidney injury and death. We report a case of a healthy young man who suffered a lightning injury and discuss the cardiovascular complications of lightning injury, ranging from ECG changes to death. The patient in our case, a 27-year old previously healthy male, developed a syndrome of rhabdomyolysis and symptomatic cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Electrocardiographic findings included transient T-wave inversions, late transition shift and long QT. His clinical condition improved with supportive measures.Early recognition of lightning injury syndromes and anticipation of complications may help us improve outcomes for these patients. Evaluation of patients having experienced a lightning injury should include a minimum of a detailed history and physical examination, 12-lead ECG and drawing of baseline troponins. Prolonged electrocardiographical monitoring (for monitoring of ventricular arrhythmias) and assessment for signs and symptoms of hemodynamic compromise may be warranted.

  20. [Unique mechanism in heart-shaped balloon burst resulting in blunt ocular injury].

    PubMed

    Brosh, Koby; Bekenstein, Yehonadav; Strassman, Israel

    2014-05-01

    We have previously shown that heart-shaped balloons have a different explosion mechanism than spherical balloons in which the former splits into two rubber parts still attached to the balloon base with a backward whiplash motion. This backward whiplash motion may cause significant blunt ocular trauma if the balloon is inflated by mouth. In this article, the energy of the blunt ocular trauma is estimated by the high speed camera photos analysis of the balloon burst. Furthermore, we describe the followup of eight patients with ocular trauma following inflation of heart-shaped balloons.

  1. beta2 adrenergic agonists in acute lung injury? The heart of the matter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae W

    2009-01-01

    Despite extensive research into its pathophysiology, acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) remains a devastating syndrome with mortality approaching 40%. Pharmacologic therapies that reduce the severity of lung injury in vivo and in vitro have not yet been translated to effective clinical treatment options, and innovative therapies are needed. Recently, the use of beta2 adrenergic agonists as potential therapy has gained considerable interest due to their ability to increase the resolution of pulmonary edema. However, the results of clinical trials of beta agonist therapy for ALI/ARDS have been conflicting in terms of benefit. In the previous issue of Critical Care, Briot and colleagues present evidence that may help clarify the inconsistent results. The authors demonstrate that, in oleic acid lung injury in dogs, the inotropic effect of beta agonists may recruit damaged pulmonary capillaries, leading to increased lung endothelial permeability.

  2. Comparison of Heart Rate Response to Tennis Activity between Persons with and without Spinal Cord Injuries: Implications for a Training Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barfield, J. P.; Malone, Laurie A.; Coleman, Tristica A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to reach a training threshold during on-court sport activity. Monitors collected heart rate (HR) data every 5 s for 11 wheelchair tennis players (WCT) with low paraplegia and 11 able-bodied controls matched on experience and skill level (ABT).…

  3. Human recombinant relaxin reduces heart injury and improves ventricular performance in a swine model of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Perna, Avio-Maria; Masini, Emanuela; Nistri, Silvia; Bani Sacchi, Tatiana; Bigazzi, Mario; Bani, Daniele

    2005-05-01

    This study shows that relaxin can be effective in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. In a swine model of heart ischemia-reperfusion currently used to test cardiotropic drugs because of its similarities with human myocardial infarction, human recombinant relaxin (2.5 and 5 microg/kg body weight), given at reperfusion after a 30-min ischemia, markedly reduced the main serum markers of myocardial damage (myoglobin, CK-MB, and troponin T) and the metabolic and histopathologic parameters of myocardial inflammation and cardiomyocyte injury, resulting in overall improvement of ventricular performance (increased cardiac index) compared to the controls. These results provide a background for future clinical trials with human relaxin as adjunctive therapy to catheter-based coronary angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  4. C1q/TNF-Related Protein 9 Protects Diabetic Rat Heart against Ischemia Reperfusion Injury: Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Sanxing; Cheng, Liang; Yang, Yang; Fan, Chongxi; Zhao, Dajun; Qin, Zhigang; Feng, Xiao; Zhao, Lin; Ma, Jipeng; Wang, Xiaowu; Yang, Jian; Xu, Xuezeng

    2016-01-01

    As a newly identified adiponectin paralog, C1q/TNF-related protein 9 (CTRP9) reduces myocardial ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury through partially understood mechanisms. In the present study, we sought to identify the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) in CTRP9 induced cardioprotection in diabetic heart. Isolated hearts from high-fat-diet (HFD) induced type 2 diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to ex vivo IR protocol via a Langendorff apparatus at the presence of globular CTRP9. CTRP9 significantly improved post-IR heart function and reduced cardiac infarction, cardiomyocytes apoptosis, Caspase-3, Caspase-9, Caspase-12, TNF-α expression, and lactate dehydrogenase activity. The cardioprotective effect of CTRP9 was associated with reduced ERS and increased expression of disulfide-bond A oxidoreductase-like protein (DsbA-L) in diabetic heart. CTRP9 reduced ERS in thapsigargin (TG) treated cardiomyocytes and protected endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stressed H9c2 cells against simulated ischemia reperfusion (SIR) injury, concurrent with increased expression of DsbA-L. Knockdown of DsbA-L increased ERS and attenuated CTRP9 induced protection against SIR injury in H9c2 cells. Our findings demonstrated for the first time that CTRP9 exerts cardioprotection by reducing ERS in diabetic heart through increasing DsbA-L. PMID:27795806

  5. Biomarkers of renal injury and function: diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic implications in heart failure.

    PubMed

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Ruilope, Luis M; Maisel, Alan S; Damman, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Heart failure guidelines suggest evaluating renal function as a routine work-up in every patient with heart failure. Specifically, it is advised to calculate glomerular filtration rate and determine blood urea nitrogen. The reason for this is that renal impairment and worsening renal function (WRF) are common in heart failure, and strongly associate with poor outcome. Renal function, however, consists of more than glomerular filtration alone, and includes tubulointerstitial damage and albuminuria. For each of these renal entities, different biomarkers exist that have been investigated in heart failure. Hypothetically, and in parallel to data in nephrology, these markers may aid in the diagnosis of renal dysfunction, or for risk stratification, or could help in therapeutic decision-making. However, as reviewed in the present manuscript, while these markers may carry prognostic information (although not always additive to established markers of renal function), their role in predicting WRF is limited at best. More importantly, none of these markers have been evaluated as a therapeutic target nor have their serial values been used to guide therapy. The evidence is most compelling for the oldest-serum creatinine (in combination with glomerular filtration rate)-but even for this biomarker, evidence to guide therapy to improve outcome is circumstantial at best. Although many new renal biomarkers have emerged at the horizon, they have only limited usefulness in clinical practice until thoroughly and prospectively studied. For now, routine measurement of (novel) renal biomarkers can help to determine cardiovascular risk, but there is no role for these biomarkers to change therapy to improve clinical outcome in heart failure.

  6. In Nonagenarians, Acute Kidney Injury Predicts In-Hospital Mortality, while Heart Failure Predicts Hospital Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Lin, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Ko, Wen-Je

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The elderly constitute an increasing proportion of admitted patients worldwide. We investigate the determinants of hospital length of stay and outcomes in patients aged 90 years and older. Methods We retrospectively analyzed all admitted patients aged >90 years from the general medical wards in a tertiary referral medical center between August 31, 2009 and August 31, 2012. Patients’ clinical characteristics, admission diagnosis, concomitant illnesses at admission, and discharge diagnosis were collected. Each patient was followed until discharge or death. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was utilized to study factors associated with longer hospital length of stay (>7 days) and in-hospital mortality. Results A total of 283 nonagenarian in-patients were recruited, with 118 (41.7%) hospitalized longer than one week. Nonagenarians admitted with pneumonia (p = 0.04) and those with lower Barthel Index (p = 0.012) were more likely to be hospitalized longer than one week. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with lower Barthel Index (odds ratio [OR] 0.98; p = 0.021) and those with heart failure (OR 3.05; p = 0.046) had hospital stays >7 days, while patients with lower Barthel Index (OR 0.93; p = 0.005), main admission nephrologic diagnosis (OR 4.83; p = 0.016) or acute kidney injury (OR 30.7; p = 0.007) had higher in-hospital mortality. Conclusion In nonagenarians, presence of heart failure at admission was associated with longer hospital length of stay, while acute kidney injury at admission predicted higher hospitalization mortality. Poorer functional status was associated with both prolonged admission and higher in-hospital mortality. PMID:24223127

  7. Expression of inducible stress protein 70 in rat heart myogenic cells confers protection against simulated ischemia-induced injury.

    PubMed Central

    Mestril, R; Chi, S H; Sayen, M R; O'Reilly, K; Dillmann, W H

    1994-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia markedly increases the expression of several members of the stress/heat shock protein (HSP) family, especially the inducible HSP70 isoforms. Increased expression of HSP70 has been shown to exert a protective effect against a lethal heat shock. We have examined the possibility of using this resistance to a lethal heat shock as a protective effect against an ischemic-like stress in vitro using a rat embryonic heart-derived cell line H9c2 (2-1). Myogenic cells in which the heat shock proteins have been induced by a previous heat shock are found to become resistant to a subsequent simulated ischemic stress. In addition, to address the question of how much does the presence of the HSP70 contribute to this protective effect, we have generated stably transfected cell lines overexpressing the human-inducible HSP70. Embryonal rat heart-derived H9c2(2-1) cells were used for this purpose. This stably transfected cell line was found to be significantly more resistant to an ischemic-like stress than control myogenic cells only expressing the selectable marker (neomycin) or the parental cell line H9c2(2-1). This finding implicates the inducible HSP70 protein as playing a major role in protecting cardiac cells against ischemic injury. Images PMID:8113409

  8. Prevention and Treatment of Functional and Structural Radiation Injury in the Rat Heart by Pentoxifylline and Alpha-Tocopherol

    SciTech Connect

    Boerma, Marjan Roberto, Kerrey A.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a severe side effect of thoracic radiotherapy. This study examined the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX) and {alpha}-tocopherol on cardiac injury in a rat model of RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats received fractionated local heart irradiation with a daily dose of 9 Gy for 5 days and were observed for 6 months after irradiation. Rats were treated with a combination of PTX, 100 mg/kg/day, and {alpha}-tocopherol (20 IU/kg/day) and received these compounds either from 1 week before until 6 months after irradiation or starting 3 months after irradiation, a time point at which histopathologic changes become apparent in our model of RIHD. Results: Radiation-induced increases in left ventricular diastolic pressure (in mm Hg: 35 {+-} 6 after sham-irradiation, 82 {+-} 11 after irradiation) were significantly reduced by PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol (early treatment: 48 {+-} 7; late treatment: 53 {+-} 6). PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol significantly reduced deposition of collagen types I (radiation only: 3.5 {+-} 0.2 {mu}m{sup 2} per 100 {mu}m{sup 2}; early treatment: 2.7 {+-} 0.8; late treatment: 2.2 {+-} 0.2) and III (radiation only: 13.9 {+-} 0.8; early treatment: 11.0 {+-} 1.2; late treatment: 10.6 {+-} 0.8). On the other hand, radiation-induced alterations in heart/body weight ratios, myocardial degeneration, left ventricular mast cell densities, and most echocardiographic parameters were not significantly altered by PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol. Conclusions: Treatment with PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol may have beneficial effects on radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular function, both when started before irradiation and when started later during the process of RIHD.

  9. CD38 Deficiency Protects the Heart from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through Activating SIRT1/FOXOs-Mediated Antioxidative Stress Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Hong, Xuan; Zhao, Ning; Xiao, Yun-Fei; Wang, Ling-Fang; Qian, Yi-Song; Deng, Ke-Yu; Ji, Guangju; Fu, Mingui

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury induces irreversible oxidative stress damage to the cardiac muscle. We previously observed that CD38 deficiency remarkably protects mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from oxidative stress-induced injury. However, whether CD38 deficiency protects from I/R injury in the heart is not explored. Here, we showed that the hearts of CD38 deficient mice or wild type mice supplied with exogenous NAD were significantly protected from ischemia/reperfusion injury, seen as reduction of the myocardial infarct sizes when the mice were subjected to 30 min ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Consistently, the protection of CD38 deficiency on hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury was confirmed with a CD38 knockdown H9c2 stable cell line. Furthermore, we observed that knockdown of CD38 remarkably inhibited ROS generation and intracellular Ca2+ overloading induced by H/R in H9c2 cells. The FOXO1 and FOXO3 expressions were significantly elevated by H/R injury in CD38 knockdown cells compared with normal H9c2 cells. The cell immunofluorescence assay showed that FOXO1 nuclear translocation was significantly increased in CD38 knockdown H9c2 cells. In addition, we demonstrated that the increase of FOXO1 nuclear translocation was associated with the increased expressions of antioxidant catalase and SOD2 and the attenuated expression of the ROS generation enzyme NOX4. In conclusion, our results provide new evidence that CD38 deficiency protects the heart from I/R injury through activating SIRT1/FOXOs-mediated antioxidative stress pathway. PMID:27547294

  10. Preoperative heart rate and myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery: results of a predefined secondary analysis of the VISION study

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, T. E. F.; Ackland, G. L.; Archbold, R. A.; Wragg, A.; Kam, E.; Ahmad, T.; Khan, A. W.; Niebrzegowska, E.; Rodseth, R. N.; Devereaux, P. J.; Pearse, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Increased baseline heart rate is associated with cardiovascular risk and all-cause mortality in the general population. We hypothesized that elevated preoperative heart rate increases the risk of myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery (MINS). Methods We performed a secondary analysis of a prospective international cohort study of patients aged ≥45 yr undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Preoperative heart rate was defined as the last measurement before induction of anaesthesia. The sample was divided into deciles by heart rate. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine relationships between preoperative heart rate and MINS (determined by serum troponin concentration), myocardial infarction (MI), and death within 30 days of surgery. Separate models were used to test the relationship between these outcomes and predefined binary heart rate thresholds. Results Patients with missing outcomes or heart rate data were excluded from respective analyses. Of 15 087 patients, 1197 (7.9%) sustained MINS, 454 of 16 007 patients (2.8%) sustained MI, and 315 of 16 037 patients (2.0%) died. The highest heart rate decile (>96 beats min−1) was independently associated with MINS {odds ratio (OR) 1.48 [1.23–1.77]; P<0.01}, MI (OR 1.71 [1.34–2.18]; P<0.01), and mortality (OR 3.16 [2.45–4.07]; P<0.01). The lowest decile (<60 beats min−1) was independently associated with reduced mortality (OR 0.50 [0.29–0.88]; P=0.02), but not MINS or MI. The predefined binary thresholds were also associated with MINS, but more weakly than the highest heart rate decile. Conclusions Preoperative heart rate >96 beats min−1 is associated with MINS, MI, and mortality after non-cardiac surgery. This association persists after accounting for potential confounding factors. Clinical trial registration NCT00512109. PMID:27440628

  11. CD8+ T-Cells Expressing Interferon Gamma or Perforin Play Antagonistic Roles in Heart Injury in Experimental Trypanosoma Cruzi-Elicited Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cipitelli, Márcio da Costa; Vinagre, Nathália Ferreira; Rodrigues, Maurício Martins; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2012-01-01

    In Chagas disease, CD8+ T-cells are critical for the control of Trypanosoma cruzi during acute infection. Conversely, CD8+ T-cell accumulation in the myocardium during chronic infection may cause tissue injury leading to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). Here we explored the role of CD8+ T-cells in T. cruzi-elicited heart injury in C57BL/6 mice infected with the Colombian strain. Cardiomyocyte lesion evaluated by creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme activity levels in the serum and electrical abnormalities revealed by electrocardiogram were not associated with the intensity of heart parasitism and myocarditis in the chronic infection. Further, there was no association between heart injury and systemic anti-T. cruzi CD8+ T-cell capacity to produce interferon-gamma (IFNγ) and to perform specific cytotoxicity. Heart injury, however, paralleled accumulation of anti-T. cruzi cells in the cardiac tissue. In T. cruzi infection, most of the CD8+ T-cells segregated into IFNγ+ perforin (Pfn)neg or IFNγnegPfn+ cell populations. Colonization of the cardiac tissue by anti-T. cruzi CD8+Pfn+ cells paralleled the worsening of CCC. The adoptive cell transfer to T. cruzi-infected cd8−/− recipients showed that the CD8+ cells from infected ifnγ−/−pfn+/+ donors migrate towards the cardiac tissue to a greater extent and caused a more severe cardiomyocyte lesion than CD8+ cells from ifnγ+/+pfn−/− donors. Moreover, the reconstitution of naïve cd8−/− mice with CD8+ cells from naïve ifnγ+/+pfn−/− donors ameliorated T. cruzi-elicited heart injury paralleled IFNγ+ cells accumulation, whereas reconstitution with CD8+ cells from naïve ifnγ−/−pfn+/+ donors led to an aggravation of the cardiomyocyte lesion, which was associated with the accumulation of Pfn+ cells in the cardiac tissue. Our data support a possible antagonist effect of CD8+Pfn+ and CD8+IFNγ+ cells during CCC. CD8+IFNγ+ cells may exert a beneficial role, whereas CD8+Pfn+ may play a detrimental role

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells preconditioned with trimetazidine promote neovascularization of hearts under hypoxia/reoxygenation injury

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaowu; Yang, Junjie; Wang, Ying; Zhang, You; Ii, Masaaki; Shen, Zhenya; Hui, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cell-based angiogenesis is a promising treatment for ischemic diseases; however, survival of implanted cells is impaired by the ischemic microenvironment. In this study, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cell transplantation were preconditioned with trimetazidine (TMZ). We hypothesized that TMZ enhances the survival rate of MSCs under hypoxic stimuli through up-regulation of HIF1-α. Methods and results: Bone marrow-derived rat mesenchymal stem cells were preconditioned with 10 μM TMZ for 6 h. TMZ preconditioning of MSCs remarkably increased cell viability and the expression of HIF1-α and Bcl-2, when cells were under hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) stimuli. But the protective effects of TMZ were abolished after knocking down of HIF-1α. Three days after implantation of the cells into the peri-ischemic zone of rat myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury model, survival of the TMZ-preconditioned MSCs was high. Furthermore, capillary density and cardiac function were significantly better in the rats implanted with TMZ-preconditioned MSCs 28 days after cell injection. Conclusions: TMZ preconditioning increased the survival rate of MSCs, through up-regulation of HIF1-α, thus contributing to neovascularization and improved cardiac function of rats subjected to myocardial I/R injury. PMID:26629255

  13. Cardioprotective Effects of Total Flavonoids Extracted from Xinjiang Sprig Rosa rugosa against Acute Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Myocardial Injury in Isolated Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xuejiao; Han, Jichun; Yuan, Changsheng; Ren, Huanhuan; Zhang, Ya; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Lixia; Zheng, Qiusheng; Chen, Wen

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the antioxidative and cardioprotective effects of total flavonoids extracted from Xinjiang sprig Rosa rugosa on ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury using an isolated Langendorff rat heart model. The possible mechanism of Xinjiang sprig rose total flavonoid (XSRTF) against I/R injury was also studied. XSRTF (5, 10, and 20 µg/mL) dissolved in Krebs-Henseleit buffer was administered to isolated rat heart. The XSRTF showed remarkable scavenging effects against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, hydroxyl, and superoxide anion radicals in vitro. XSRTF pretreatment improved the heart rate, increased LVDP, and decreased CK and LDH levels in coronary flow. This pretreatment also increased SOD activity and GSH/GSSG ratio but decreased MDA, TNF-α, and CRP levels and IL-8 and IL-6 activities. The infarct size and cell apoptosis in the hearts from the XSRTF-treated group were lower than those in the hearts from the I/R group. Therefore, the cardioprotective effects of XSRTF may be attributed to its antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory activities.

  14. Metformin induces cardioprotection against ischaemia/reperfusion injury in the rat heart 24 hours after administration.

    PubMed

    Solskov, Lasse; Løfgren, Bo; Kristiansen, Steen B; Jessen, Niels; Pold, Rasmus; Nielsen, Torsten T; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Schmitz, Ole; Lund, Sten

    2008-07-01

    The UK Prospective Diabetes Study demonstrated that the hypoglycaemic drug metformin is associated with a reduction in cardiovascular events in a group of obese type 2 diabetes patients. The energy sensing enzyme AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been indicated to play an important protective role in the ischaemic heart and is activated by metformin. The aim of this study was to determine whether a single dose of metformin protects the myocardium against experimentally induced ischaemia 24 hr after the administration, and furthermore to determine whether a single dose of metformin results in an acute increase in myocardial AMPK activity. Wistar rats were given either a single oral dose of metformin (250 mg/kg body weight), or a single oral dose of saline. After 24 hr, the hearts were Langendorff-perfused and subjected to 45 min. of coronary artery occlusion. Infarct size was determined by staining with triphenyltetrazoliumchloride (TTC) and Evans Blue and expressed as a percentage of the risk zone (IS/AAR %). Isoform specific AMPK activity was measured 2 hr after administration of metformin or saline. Infarct size was significantly reduced in the metformin treated (I/R: 19.9 +/- 3.9%versus 36.7 +/- 3.6%, P < 0.01, n = 8-14) compared to the control group. A single oral dose of metformin resulted in an approximately ~2-fold increase in AMPK-alpha2 activity 2 hr after administration (P < 0.015, n = 10). In conclusion, a single dose of metformin results in an acute increase in myocardial AMPK activity measured 2 hr after administration and induces a significant reduction in myocardial infarct size 24 hr after metformin administration. Increased AMPK activity may be an important signal mediator involved in the mechanisms behind the cardioprotective effects afforded by metformin.

  15. Molecular Evidence of Stress-Induced Acute Heart Injury in a Mouse Model Simulating Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-25

    exposures lead directly to irreversible changes in the heart, which is reflected by heart pain, cardiac arrhythmias , and heart failure. In addition, our...pro- cess (Fig. 2). The miR-29 family members have been implicated in arrhythmias , myocardial fibrosis, and other heart conditions (22–24). In addition

  16. ROS-Mediated NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Testis Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Minutoli, Letteria; Puzzolo, Domenico; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Irrera, Natasha; Marini, Herbert; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Bitto, Alessandra; Crea, Giovanni; Pisani, Antonina; Squadrito, Francesco; Trichilo, Vincenzo; Bruschetta, Daniele; Micali, Antonio; Altavilla, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) causes a reduction in arterial blood supply to tissues, followed by the restoration of perfusion and consequent reoxygenation. The reestablishment of blood flow triggers further damage to the ischemic tissue through reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, interference with cellular ion homeostasis, and inflammatory responses to cell death. In normal conditions, ROS mediate important beneficial responses. When their production is prolonged or elevated, harmful events are observed with peculiar cellular changes. In particular, during I/R, ROS stimulate tissue inflammation and induce NLRP3 inflammasome activation. The mechanisms underlying the activation of NLRP3 are several and not completely elucidated. It was recently shown that NLRP3 might sense directly the presence of ROS produced by normal or malfunctioning mitochondria or indirectly by other activators of NLRP3. Aim of the present review is to describe the current knowledge on the role of NLRP3 in some organs (brain, heart, kidney, and testis) after I/R injury, with particular regard to the role played by ROS in its activation. Furthermore, as no specific therapy for the prevention or treatment of the high mortality and morbidity associated with I/R is available, the state of the art of the development of novel therapeutic approaches is illustrated. PMID:27127546

  17. Argonaute proteins in cardiac tissue contribute to the heart injury during viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shougang; Ma, Jialiang; Zhang, Quan; Wang, Qiongying; Zhou, Lei; Bai, Feng; Hu, Hao; Chang, Peng; Yu, Jing; Gao, Bingren

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of short, noncoding, regulatory RNA molecules the dysregulation of which contributes to the pathogenesis of myocarditis. Argonaute proteins are essential components of miRNA-induced silencing complex and play important roles during miRNA biogenesis and function. However, the expression pattern of four AGO family members has not yet been detected in the coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced myocarditis tissue samples. In this study, we detected the expression of four AGOs in the CVB3-infected mouse heart tissues and found that AGO1 and AGO3 up-regulated significantly at 4 and 8h after CVB3 infection. Further in vitro research indicated that up-regulated AGO1 and AGO3 are related to the down-regulated TNFAIP3, which is a negative regulator of NF-κB pathway. Subsequently, we confirmed that TNFAIP3 is a direct target of miR-19a/b, and during CVB3 infection, the expression of miR-19a/b and miR-125a/b is not significantly changed. TNFAIP3 level is mainly reduced by up-regulated AGO1 and AGO3. This research sheds light on the relationship between overexpressed AGO proteins and CVB3-induced myocarditis, and this provides potential therapeutic target for viral myocarditis.

  18. Hemidesmus indicus and Hibiscus rosa-sinensis Affect Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Isolated Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Vinoth Kumar Megraj; Balaraman, R.; Pancza, Dezider; Ravingerová, Táňa

    2011-01-01

    Hemidesmus indicus (L.) R. Br. (HI) and Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. (HRS) are widely used traditional medicine. We investigated cardioprotective effects of these plants applied for 15 min at concentrations of 90, 180, and 360 μg/mL in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts prior to 25-min global ischemia/120-min reperfusion (I/R). Functional recovery (left ventricular developed pressure—LVDP, and rate of development of pressure), reperfusion arrhythmias, and infarct size (TTC staining) served as the endpoints. A transient increase in LVDP (32%–75%) occurred at all concentrations of HI, while coronary flow (CF) was significantly increased after HI 180 and 360. Only a moderate increase in LVDP (21% and 55%) and a tendency to increase CF was observed at HRS 180 and 360. HI and HRS at 180 and 360 significantly improved postischemic recovery of LVDP. Both the drugs dose-dependently reduced the numbers of ectopic beats and duration of ventricular tachycardia. The size of infarction was significantly decreased by HI 360, while HRS significantly reduced the infarct size at all concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, it can be concluded that HI might cause vasodilation, positive inotropic effect, and cardioprotection, while HRS might cause these effects at higher concentrations. However, further study is needed to elucidate the exact mechanism of their actions. PMID:20953394

  19. Chronic melatonin consumption prevents obesity-related metabolic abnormalities and protects the heart against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury in a prediabetic model of diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Nduhirabandi, Frederic; Du Toit, Eugene F; Blackhurst, Dee; Marais, David; Lochner, Amanda

    2011-03-01

    Obesity, a major risk factor for ischemic heart disease, is associated with increased oxidative stress and reduced antioxidant status. Melatonin, a potent free radical scavenger and antioxidant, has powerful cardioprotective effects in lean animals but its efficacy in obesity is unknown. We investigated the effects of chronic melatonin administration on the development of the metabolic syndrome as well as ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Male Wistar rats received a control diet, a control diet with melatonin, a high-calorie diet, or a high-calorie diet with melatonin (DM). Melatonin (4 mg/kg/day) was administered in the drinking water. After 16 wk, biometric and blood metabolic parameters were measured. Hearts were perfused ex vivo for the evaluation of myocardial function, infarct size (IFS) and biochemical changes [activation of PKB/Akt, ERK, p38 MAPK, AMPK, and glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 expression). The high-calorie diet caused increases in body weight (BW), visceral adiposity, serum insulin and triglycerides (TRIG), with no change in glucose levels. Melatonin treatment reduced the BW gain, visceral adiposity, blood TRIG, serum insulin, homeostatic model assessment index and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in the DIO group. Melatonin reduced IFS in DIO and control groups and increased percentage recovery of functional performance of DIO hearts. During reperfusion, hearts from melatonin-treated rats had increased activation of PKB/Akt, ERK42/44 and reduced p38 MAPK activation. Chronic melatonin treatment prevented the metabolic abnormalities induced by DIO and protected the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury. These beneficial effects were associated with activation of the reperfusion injury salvage kinases pathway.

  20. Time-to-Surgery and Pre-operative Cerebral Hemodynamics Predict Post-operative White Matter Injury in Neonates with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Jennifer M.; Buckley, Erin M.; Schwab, Peter J.; McCarthy, Ann L.; Winters, Madeline E.; Busch, David R.; Xiao, Rui; Goff, Donna A.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Fuller, Stephanie; Gaynor, J. William; Spray, Thomas L.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Licht, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hypoxic-ischemic white mater brain injury commonly occurs in neonates with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Approximately half of the HLHS survivors exhibit neurobehavioral symptoms believed to be associated with this injury, though the exact timing of the injury is not known. Methods Neonates with HLHS were recruited for pre- and post-operative monitoring of cerebral oxygen saturation (ScO2), cerebral oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral blood flow (CBF) using two non-invasive optical-based techniques, namely diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy. Anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed prior to and approximately one week after surgery in order to quantify the extent and timing of the acquired white matter injury. Risk factors for developing new or worsened white matter injury were assessed using uni- and multi-variate logistic regression. Results Thirty-seven neonates with HLHS were studied. In a univariate analysis, neonates who developed a large volume of new, or worsened, postoperative white matter injury had a significantly longer time-to-surgery (p=0.0003). In a multivariate model, longer time between birth and surgery (i.e., time-to-surgery), delayed sternal closure, and higher pre-operative CBF were predictors of post-operative white matter injury. Additionally, longer time-to-surgery and higher pre-operative CBF on morning of surgery were correlated with lower ScO2 (p=0.03 and p=0.05) and higher OEF (p=0.05 and p=0.05). Conclusions Longer time-to-surgery is associated with new post-operative white matter injury in otherwise healthy neonates with HLHS. The results suggest that earlier Norwood palliation may decrease the likelihood of acquiring postoperative white matter injury. PMID:25109755

  1. Paracrine effect of CXCR4-overexpressing mesenchymal stem cells on ischemic heart injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shi-Zheng; Li, Ying-Lan; Huang, Wei; Cai, Wen-Feng; Liang, Jialiang; Paul, Christian; Jiang, Lin; Wu, Zhi-Chao; Xu, Meifeng; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Yigang

    2017-03-01

    It has been reported that CXCR4-overexpressing mesenchymal stem cells (MSC(CX4) ) can repair heart tissue post myocardial infarction. This study aims to investigate the MSCCX4-derived paracrine cardio-protective signaling in the presence of myocardial infarction. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were divided into 3 groups: MSC only, MSC(CX4) , and CXCR4 gene-specific siRNA-transduced MSC. Mesenchymal stem cells were exposed to hypoxia, and then MSCs-conditioned culture medium was incubated with neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes, respectively. Cell proliferation-regulating genes were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In vitro: The number of cardiomyocytes undergoing DNA synthesis, cytokinesis, and mitosis was increased to a greater extent in MSC(CX4) medium-treated group than control group, while this proproliferative effect was reduced in CXCR4 gene-specific siRNA-transduced MSC-treated cells. Accordingly, the maximal enhancement of vascular endothelial growth factor, cyclin 2, and transforming growth factor-β2 was observed in hypoxia-exposed MSC(CX4) . In vivo: MSCs were labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and engrafted into injured myocardium in rats. The number of EGFP and CD31 positive cells in the MSC(CX4) group was significantly increased than other 2 groups, associated with the reduced left ventricular (LV) fibrosis, the increased LV free wall thickness, the enhanced angiogenesis, and the improved contractile function. CXCR4 overexpression can mobilize MSCs into ischemic area, whereby these cells can promoted angiogenesis and alleviate LV remodeling via paracrine signaling mechanism.

  2. Is oxidative stress primarily involved in reperfusion injury of the ischemic heart

    SciTech Connect

    Nohl, H.; Stolze, K.; Napetschnig, S.; Ishikawa, T. )

    1991-01-01

    Reperfusion injury of ischemic organs is suggested to result from metabolic derangements initiating an imbalanced formation of free oxygen radicals. Most investigators in this field have used the spin-trap 5,5'-dimethyl-N-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) to stabilize these short-lived radicals and make them visible by means of the electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. ESR signals obtained from intravascular DMPO were reported to indicate the formation of free OH. radicals and, in some cases, also carbon-centered radicals. We were unable to confirm these findings. Carbon-centered radicals were not obtained irrespectively of conditions studied, while oxygen-centered DMPO-adducts could only be detected in minor amounts. Instead, we observed an ascorbyl-related ESR signal. The addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), which was used by many investigators in this field, was found to greatly influence ESR-spectra of the reperfusion fluid. The ascorbyl radical concentration was clearly reduced and the DMPO-OH. adduct became more prominent. The addition of iron further stimulated this change eliciting a Fenton-type reaction responsible for DMPO-OH.-related ESR spectra in the perfusate after ischemia. Accordingly, we observed the release of iron and ascorbic acid into the perfusate as a consequence of ischemia. We could demonstrate that iron in the presence of ascorbate and EDTA causes both types of radicals detected in the perfusate. DMPO-OH. generation in the presence of EDTA was found to result from free OH. radicals that were not generated in the absence of EDTA.

  3. Electrical injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage, especially to the heart, muscles, or brain. Electric current can cause injury in three ways: Cardiac arrest ... How long you were in contact with the electricity How the electricity moved through your body Your ...

  4. Ranolazine reduces Ca2+ overload and oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial integrity to protect against ischemia reperfusion injury in isolated hearts.

    PubMed

    Aldakkak, Mohammed; Camara, Amadou K S; Heisner, James S; Yang, Meiying; Stowe, David F

    2011-10-01

    Ranolazine is a clinically approved drug for treating cardiac ventricular dysrhythmias and angina. Its mechanism(s) of protection is not clearly understood but evidence points to blocking the late Na+ current that arises during ischemia, blocking mitochondrial complex I activity, or modulating mitochondrial metabolism. Here we tested the effect of ranolazine treatment before ischemia at the mitochondrial level in intact isolated hearts and in mitochondria isolated from hearts at different times of reperfusion. Left ventricular (LV) pressure (LVP), coronary flow (CF), and O2 metabolism were measured in guinea pig isolated hearts perfused with Krebs-Ringer's solution; mitochondrial (m) superoxide (O2·-), Ca2+, NADH/FAD (redox state), and cytosolic (c) Ca2+ were assessed on-line in the LV free wall by fluorescence spectrophotometry. Ranolazine (5 μM), infused for 1 min just before 30 min of global ischemia, itself did not change O2·-, cCa2+, mCa2+ or redox state. During late ischemia and reperfusion (IR) O2·- emission and m[Ca2+] increased less in the ranolazine group vs. the control group. Ranolazine decreased c[Ca2+] only during ischemia while NADH and FAD were not different during IR in the ranolazine vs. control groups. Throughout reperfusion LVP and CF were higher, and ventricular fibrillation was less frequent. Infarct size was smaller in the ranolazine group than in the control group. Mitochondria isolated from ranolazine-treated hearts had mild resistance to permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening and less cytochrome c release than control hearts. Ranolazine may provide functional protection of the heart during IR injury by reducing cCa2+ and mCa2+ loading secondary to its effect to block the late Na+ current. Subsequently it indirectly reduces O2·- emission, preserves bioenergetics, delays mPTP opening, and restricts loss of cytochrome c, thereby reducing necrosis and apoptosis.

  5. Distinct effects of acute pretreatment with lipophilic and hydrophilic statins on myocardial stunning, arrhythmias and lethal injury in the rat heart subjected to ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Čarnická, S; Adameová, A; Nemčeková, M; Matejíková, J; Pancza, D; Ravingerová, T

    2011-01-01

    Although both lipophilic and more hydrophilic statins share the same pathway of the inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase, their pleiotropic cardioprotective effects associated with the ability to cross cellular membranes, including membranes of heart cells, may differ. To test this hypothesis, isolated rat hearts were Langendorff-perfused either with simvastatin (S, 10 micromol/l) or pravastatin (P, 30 micromol/l), 15 min prior to ischemia. Control untreated hearts (C) were perfused with perfusion medium only. Postischemic contractile dysfunction, reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias and infarct size were investigated after exposure of the hearts to 30-min global ischemia and 2-h reperfusion. Both lipophilic S and hydrophilic P reduced the severity of ventricular arrhythmias (arrhythmia score) from 4.3 +/- 0.2 in C to 3.0 +/- 0 and 2.7 +/- 0.2 in S and P, respectively, (both P < 0.05), decreased the duration of ventricular tachycardia and suppressed ventricular fibrillation. Likewise, the extent of lethal injury (infarct size) determined by tetrazolium staining and expressed in percentage of risk area, was significantly lower in both treated groups, moreover, the effect of P was more pronounced (27 +/- 2 % and 10 +/- 2 % in S and P groups, respectively, vs. 42 +/- 1 % in C; P < 0.05). In contrast, only S, but not P, was able to improve postischemic recovery of left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP; 48 +/- 12 % of preischemic values vs. 25 +/- 4 % in C and 21 +/ -7 % in P groups; P < 0.05). Our results suggest that differences in water solubility of statins indicating a different ability to cross cardiac membranes may underlie their distinct cardioprotective effects on myocardial stunning and lethal injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion.

  6. Endothelial expression of human cytochrome P450 epoxygenase CYP2C8 increases susceptibility to ischemia-reperfusion injury in isolated mouse heart

    PubMed Central

    Edin, Matthew L.; Wang, ZhongJing; Bradbury, J. Alyce; Graves, Joan P.; Lih, Fred B.; DeGraff, Laura M.; Foley, Julie F.; Torphy, Robert; Ronnekleiv, Oline K.; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Lee, Craig R.; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenases CYP2C8 and CYP2J2 generate epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) from arachidonic acid. Mice with expression of CYP2J2 in cardiomyocytes (αMHC-CYP2J2 Tr) or treated with synthetic EETs have increased functional recovery after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R); however, no studies have examined the role of cardiomyocyte- vs. endothelial-derived EETs or compared the effects of different CYP epoxygenase isoforms in the ischemic heart. We generated transgenic mice with increased endothelial EET biosynthesis (Tie2-CYP2C8 Tr and Tie2-CYP2J2 Tr) or EET hydrolysis (Tie2-sEH Tr). Compared to wild-type (WT), αMHC-CYP2J2 Tr hearts showed increased recovery of left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and decreased infarct size after I/R. In contrast, LVDP recovery and infarct size were unchanged in Tie2-CYP2J2 Tr and Tie2-sEH Tr hearts. Surprisingly, compared to WT, Tie2-CYP2C8 Tr hearts had significantly reduced LVDP recovery (from 21 to 14%) and increased infarct size after I/R (from 51 to 61%). Tie2-CYP2C8 Tr hearts also exhibited increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, dihydroxyoctadecenoic acid (DiHOME) formation, and coronary resistance after I/R. ROS scavengers and CYP2C8 inhibition reversed the detrimental effects of CYP2C8 expression in Tie2-CYP2C8 Tr hearts. Treatment of WT hearts with 250 nM 9,10-DiHOME decreased LVDP recovery compared to vehicle (16 vs. 31%, respectively) and increased coronary resistance after I/R. These data demonstrate that increased ROS generation and enhanced DiHOME synthesis by endothelial CYP2C8 impair functional recovery and mask the beneficial effects of increased EET production following I/R.—Edin, M. L., Wang, Z. J., Bradbury, J. A., Graves, J. P., Lih, F. B., DeGraff, L. M., Foley, J. F., Torphy, R., Ronnekleiv, O. K., Tomer, K. B., Lee, C. R., Zeldin, D. C. Endothelial expression of human cytochrome P450 epoxygenase CYP2C8 increases susceptibility to ischemia-reperfusion injury in isolated mouse

  7. On the pivotal role of PPARα in adaptation of the heart to hypoxia and why fat in the diet increases hypoxic injury

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Mark A.; Abd Jamil, Amira H.; Heather, Lisa C.; Murray, Andrew J.; Sutton, Elizabeth R.; Slingo, Mary; Sebag-Montefiore, Liam; Tan, Suat Cheng; Aksentijević, Dunja; Gildea, Ottilie S.; Stuckey, Daniel J.; Yeoh, Kar Kheng; Carr, Carolyn A.; Evans, Rhys D.; Aasum, Ellen; Schofield, Christopher J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Neubauer, Stefan; Robbins, Peter A.; Clarke, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    The role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)-mediated metabolic remodeling in cardiac adaptation to hypoxia has yet to be defined. Here, mice were housed in hypoxia for 3 wk before in vivo contractile function was measured using cine MRI. In isolated, perfused hearts, energetics were measured using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation were measured using [3H] labeling. Compared with a normoxic, chow-fed control mouse heart, hypoxia decreased PPARα expression, fatty acid oxidation, and mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) levels, while increasing glycolysis, all of which served to maintain normal ATP concentrations ([ATP]) and thereby, ejection fractions. A high-fat diet increased cardiac PPARα expression, fatty acid oxidation, and UCP3 levels with decreased glycolysis. Hypoxia was unable to alter the high PPARα expression or reverse the metabolic changes caused by the high-fat diet, with the result that [ATP] and contractile function decreased significantly. The adaptive metabolic changes caused by hypoxia in control mouse hearts were found to have occurred already in PPARα-deficient (PPARα−/−) mouse hearts and sustained function in hypoxia despite an inability for further metabolic remodeling. We conclude that decreased cardiac PPARα expression is essential for adaptive metabolic remodeling in hypoxia, but is prevented by dietary fat.—Cole, M. A., Abd Jamil, A. H., Heather, L. C., Murray, A. J., Sutton, E. R., Slingo, M., Sebag-Montefiore, L., Tan, S. C., Aksentijević, D., Gildea, O. S., Stuckey, D. J., Yeoh, K. K., Carr, C. A., Evans, R. D., Aasum, E., Schofield, C. J., Ratcliffe, P. J., Neubauer, S., Robbins, P. A., Clarke, K. On the pivotal role of PPARα in adaptation of the heart to hypoxia and why fat in the diet increases hypoxic injury. PMID:27103577

  8. A case of marked diuresis by combined dopamine and atrial natriuretic peptide administration without renal injury in acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Masataka; Sato, Naoki; Akiya, Mai; Okazaki, Hirotake; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2013-01-01

    Renal injury is an important factor for worsening outcome in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). An 81-year-old woman was admitted due to ADHF with dyspnea and mild peripheral edema. The patient was managed with intravenous administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) at a dose of 0.0125 μg/kg/minute, which did not control volume overload even at an increased dose of 0.025 μg/kg/minute. After a low dose of dopamine (DA) of 1.0 μg/kg/ minute was added, urine output increased markedly to 120 from 30 mL/hour. Furthermore, her heart rate decreased to 80-100 from 120 bpm and the congestion improved with a reduced brain natriuretic peptide level. Interestingly, the combination of ANP and DA therapy reduced serum creatinine as well as the levels of urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein, a novel reno-tubular stress marker, by 98.9%, and an oxidative stress marker, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, by 88.2% from baseline levels. Thus, this ADHF patient, a nonresponder to ANP alone, improved without renal injury when administered combination therapy consisting of low doses of ANP and DA, suggesting that this combined therapy might be useful for better management of ADHF in patients without diuretic responses with ANP alone. Further prospective studies are warranted.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide preconditions the db/db diabetic mouse heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury by activating Nrf2 signaling in an Erk-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Peake, Bridgette F; Nicholson, Chad K; Lambert, Jonathan P; Hood, Rebecca L; Amin, Hena; Amin, Sana; Calvert, John W

    2013-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) therapy protects nondiabetic animals in various models of myocardial injury, including acute myocardial infarction and heart failure. Here, we sought to examine whether H2S therapy provides cardioprotection in the setting of type 2 diabetes. H2S therapy in the form of sodium sulfide (Na2S) beginning 24 h or 7 days before myocardial ischemia significantly decreased myocardial injury in db/db diabetic mice (12 wk of age). In an effort to evaluate the signaling mechanism responsible for the observed cardioprotection, we focused on the role of nuclear factor E2-related factor (Nrf2) signaling. Our results indicate that diabetes does not alter the ability of H2S to increase the nuclear localization of Nrf2, but does impair aspects of Nrf2 signaling. Specifically, the expression of NADPH quinine oxidoreductase 1 was increased after the acute treatment, whereas the expression of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was only increased after 7 days of treatment. This discrepancy was found to be the result of an increased nuclear expression of Bach1, a known repressor of HO-1 transcription, which blocked the binding of Nrf2 to the HO-1 promoter. Further analysis revealed that 7 days of Na2S treatment overcame this impairment by removing Bach1 from the nucleus in an Erk1/2-dependent manner. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that exogenous administration of Na2S attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in db/db mice, suggesting the potential therapeutic effects of H2S in treating a heart attack in the setting of type 2 diabetes.

  10. Administration of zinc complex of acetylsalicylic acid after the onset of myocardial injury protects the heart by upregulation of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz-Icöz, Sevil; Atmanli, Ayhan; Radovits, Tamás; Li, Shiliang; Hegedüs, Peter; Ruppert, Mihály; Brlecic, Paige; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2016-03-01

    We recently demonstrated that the pre-treatment of rats with zinc and acetylsalicylic acid complex in the form of bis(aspirinato)zinc(II) [Zn(ASA)2] is superior to acetylsalicylic acid in protecting the heart from acute myocardial ischemia. Herein, we hypothesized that Zn(ASA)2 treatment after the onset of an acute myocardial injury could protect the heart. The rats were treated with a vehicle or Zn(ASA)2 after an isoproterenol injection. Isoproterenol-induced cardiac damage [inflammatory infiltration into myocardial tissue, DNA-strand breakage evidenced by TUNEL-assay, increased 11-dehydro thromboxane (TX)B2-levels, elevated ST-segment, widened QRS complex and prolonged QT-interval] was prevented by the Zn(ASA)2 treatment. In isoproterenol-treated rats, load-independent left ventricular contractility parameters were significantly improved after Zn(ASA)2. Furthermore, Zn(ASA)2 significantly increased the myocardial mRNA-expression of superoxide dismutase-1, glutathione peroxidase-4 and decreased the level of Na(+)/K(+)/ATPase. Postconditioning with Zn(ASA)2 protects the heart from acute myocardial ischemia. Its mechanisms of action might involve inhibition of pro-inflammatory prostanoids and upregulation of antioxidant enzymes.

  11. Young Bone-Marrow Sca-1+ Stem Cells Rejuvenate the Aged Heart and Improve Function after Injury through PDGFRβ-Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Hong; Sun, Lu; Yang, Lei; Li, Jiao; Shao, Zhengbo; Du, Guo-Qing; Wu, Jun; Weisel, Richard D.; Li, Ren-Ke

    2017-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) reconstitution with young BM cells in aged recipients restores the functionality of cardiac resident BM-derived progenitors. This study investigated the cell type primarily responsible for this effect. We reconstituted old mice with BM cells from young or old mice and found that the number of stem cell antigen 1 (Sca-1) cells homing to the heart was significantly greater in young than old chimeras. We then reconstituted old mice with young BM Sca-1+ or Sca-1− cells. We found that Sca-1 cells repopulated the recipient BM and homed to the heart. The number of BM-derived cells in the aged myocardium co-expressing PDGFRβ was 3 times greater in Sca-1+ than Sca-1− chimeric mice. Sca-1+ chimeras had more active cell proliferation in the infarcted heart and improved ventricular function after MI. The improved regeneration involved activation of the PDGFRβ/Akt/p27Kip1 pathway. Sca-1+ stem cells rejuvenated cardiac tissue in aged mice. Restoration of the Sca-1+ subset of stem cells by BM reconstitution improved cardiac tissue regeneration after injury in aged mice. PMID:28139736

  12. Overexpression of the rat inducible 70-kD heat stress protein in a transgenic mouse increases the resistance of the heart to ischemic injury.

    PubMed Central

    Marber, M S; Mestril, R; Chi, S H; Sayen, M R; Yellon, D M; Dillmann, W H

    1995-01-01

    Myocardial protection and changes in gene expression follow whole body heat stress. Circumstantial evidence suggests that an inducible 70-kD heat shock protein (hsp70i), increased markedly by whole body heat stress, contributes to the protection. Transgenic mouse lines were constructed with a cytomegalovirus enhancer and beta-actin promoter driving rat hsp70i expression in heterozygote animals. Unstressed, transgene positive mice expressed higher levels of myocardial hsp70i than transgene negative mice after whole body heat stress. This high level of expression occurred without apparent detrimental effect. The hearts harvested from transgene positive mice and transgene negative littermates were Langendorff perfused and subjected to 20 min of warm (37 degrees C) zero-flow ischemia and up to 120 min of reflow while contractile recovery and creatine kinase efflux were measured. Myocardial infarction was demarcated by triphenyltetrazolium. In transgene positive compared with transgene negative hearts, the zone of infarction was reduced by 40%, contractile function at 30 min of reflow was doubled, and efflux of creatine kinase was reduced by approximately 50%. Our findings suggest for the first time that increased myocardial hsp70i expression results in protection of the heart against ischemic injury and that the antiischemic properties of hsp70i have possible therapeutic relevance. Images PMID:7706448

  13. FTY720 prevents ischemia/reperfusion injury-associated arrhythmias in an ex vivo rat heart model via activation of Pak1/Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Egom, E Eroume A; Ke, Yunbo; Musa, Hanny; Mohamed, Tamer M A; Wang, Tao; Cartwright, Elizabeth; Solaro, R John; Lei, Ming

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies demonstrated a role of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in the protection against the stress of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. In experiments reported here, we have investigated the signaling through the S1P cascade by FTY720, a sphingolipid drug candidate displaying structural similarity to S1P, underlying the S1P cardioprotective effect. In ex vivo rat heart and isolated sinoatrial node models, FTY720 significantly prevented arrhythmic events associated with I/R injury including premature ventricular beats, VT, and sinus bradycardia as well as A-V conduction block. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated the expression of the S1P receptor transcript pools and corresponding proteins including S1P1, S1P2, and S1P3 in tissues dissected from sinoatrial node, atrium and ventricle. FTY720 (25 nM) significantly blunted the depression of the levels of phospho-Pak1 and phospho-Akt with ischemia and with reperfusion. There was a significant increase in phospho-Pak1 levels by 35%, 199%, and 205% after 5, 10, and 15 min of treatment with 25 nM FTY720 compared with control nontreated myocytes. However, there was no significant difference in the levels of total Pak1 expression between nontreated and FTY720 treated. Phospho-Akt levels were increased by 44%, 63%, and 61% after 5, 10, and 15 min of treatment with 25 nM FTY720, respectively. Our data provide the first evidence that FTY720 prevents I/R injury-associated arrhythmias and indicate its potential significance as an important and new agent protecting against I/R injury. Our data also indicate, for the first time, that the cardioprotective effect of FTY720 is likely to involve activation of signaling through the Pak1.

  14. Assessing Cardiac Injury in Mice With Dual Energy-MicroCT, 4D-MicroCT, and MicroSPECT Imaging After Partial Heart Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Min, Hooney; Befera, Nicholas; Clark, Darin; Qi, Yi; Das, Shiva; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.; Kirsch, David G.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a mouse model of cardiac injury after partial heart irradiation (PHI) and to test whether dual energy (DE)-microCT and 4-dimensional (4D)-microCT can be used to assess cardiac injury after PHI to complement myocardial perfusion imaging using micro-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods and Materials: To study cardiac injury from tangent field irradiation in mice, we used a small-field biological irradiator to deliver a single dose of 12 Gy x-rays to approximately one-third of the left ventricle (LV) of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} and Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, where 1 or both alleles of p53 are deleted in endothelial cells. Four and 8 weeks after irradiation, mice were injected with gold and iodinated nanoparticle-based contrast agents, and imaged with DE-microCT and 4D-microCT to evaluate myocardial vascular permeability and cardiac function, respectively. Additionally, the same mice were imaged with microSPECT to assess myocardial perfusion. Results: After PHI with tangent fields, DE-microCT scans showed a time-dependent increase in accumulation of gold nanoparticles (AuNp) in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice. In Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, extravasation of AuNp was observed within the irradiated LV, whereas in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} mice, AuNp were restricted to blood vessels. In addition, data from DE-microCT and microSPECT showed a linear correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.97) between the fraction of the LV that accumulated AuNp and the fraction of LV with a perfusion defect. Furthermore, 4D-microCT scans demonstrated that PHI caused a markedly decreased ejection fraction, and higher end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, to develop in Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, which were associated with compensatory cardiac hypertrophy of the heart that was not irradiated. Conclusions: Our results show that DE-microCT and 4D-microCT with nanoparticle-based contrast agents are novel imaging approaches

  15. Absence of malonyl coenzyme A decarboxylase in mice increases cardiac glucose oxidation and protects the heart from ischemic injury

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute pharmacological inhibition of cardiac malonyl coenzyme A decarboxylase (MCD) protects the heart from ischemic damage by inhibiting fatty acid oxidation and stimulating glucose oxidation. However, it is unknown whether chronic inhibition of MCD results in altered cardiac function, energy metabo...

  16. CDK9 and its repressor LARP7 modulate cardiomyocyte proliferation and response to injury in the zebrafish heart

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, Gianfranco; Wilson, Kathryn S.; Maqsood, Sana; Mullins, John J.; Tucker, Carl S.; Denvir, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclin dependent kinase (Cdk)9 acts through the positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb) complex to activate and expand transcription through RNA polymerase II. It has also been shown to regulate cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, with recent evidence linking it to cardiomyocyte proliferation. We hypothesised that modification of CDK9 activity could both impair and enhance the cardiac response to injury by modifying cardiomyocyte proliferation. Cdk9 expression and activity were inhibited in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. We show that dephosphorylation of residue Ser2 on the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II is associated with impaired cardiac structure and function, and cardiomyocyte proliferation and also results in impaired functional recovery following cardiac laser injury. In contrast, de-repression of Cdk9 activity, through knockdown of La-related protein (Larp7) increases phosphorylation of Ser2 in RNA polymerase II and increases cardiomyocyte proliferation. Larp7 knockdown rescued the structural and functional phenotype associated with knockdown of Cdk9. The balance of Cdk9 and Larp7 plays a key role in cardiomyocyte proliferation and response to injury. Larp7 represents a potentially novel therapeutic target to promote cardiomyocyte proliferation and recovery from injury. PMID:26542022

  17. Antioxidative and cardioprotective effects of total flavonoids extracted from Dracocephalum moldavica L. against acute ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial injury in isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiangtao; Yuan, Xuan; Wang, Ting; Chen, Hongmei; Zhao, Hong; Yan, Xinyan; Wang, Zhiping; Sun, Xiling; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluates antioxidative and cardioprotective effects of total flavonoids extracted from Dracocephalum moldavica L. (DML). The total flavonoids showed remarkable scavenging effects against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals in vitro. Compared with the ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) group as demonstrated by the use of improved Langendorff retrograde perfusion technology, the total flavonoids (5 μg/mL) pretreatment improved the heart rate and coronary flow, rised left ventricular developed pressure and decreased creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase levels in coronary flow. The infarct size/ischemic area at risk of DML-treated hearts was smaller than that of I/R group; the superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratio increased and malondialdehyde content reduced obviously (P < 0.01) in total flavonoids treatment groups. In conclusion, the total flavonoids possess obvious protective effects on myocardial I/R injury, which may be related to the improvement of myocardial oxidative stress states.

  18. Expression profiling and ontology analysis of long noncoding RNAs in post-ischemic heart and their implied roles in ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youbin; Li, Guangnan; Lu, Huimin; Li, Wei; Li, Xianglu; Liu, Huimin; Li, Xingda; Li, Tianyu; Yu, Bo

    2014-06-10

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important regulatory roles in cellular physiology. The contributions of lncRNAs to ischemic heart disease remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the profile of myocardial lncRNAs and their potential roles at early stage of reperfusion. lncRNAs and mRNAs were profiled by microarray and the expression of some highly-dysregulated lncRNAs was further validated using polymerase chain reaction. Our results revealed that 64 lncRNAs were up-regulated and 87 down-regulated, while 50 mRNAs were up-regulated and 60 down-regulated in infarct region at all reperfusion sampled. Gene ontology analysis indicated that dysregulated transcripts were associated with immune response, spermine catabolic process, taxis, chemotaxis, polyamine catabolic process, spermine metabolic process, chemokine activity and chemokine receptor binding. Target gene-related pathway analysis showed significant changes in cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, the chemokine signaling pathway and nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor signaling pathway which have a close relationship with myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury (MI/RI). Besides, a gene co-expression network was constructed to identify correlated targets of 10 highly-dysregulated lncRNAs. These lncRNAs may play their roles by this network in post-ischemic heart. Such results provide a foundation for understanding the roles and mechanisms of myocardial lncRNAs at early stage of reperfusion.

  19. Mild Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Reduces the Susceptibility of the Heart to Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury: Identification of Underlying Gene Expression Changes.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz-Icöz, Sevil; Lehner, Alice; Li, Shiliang; Vater, Adrian; Radovits, Tamás; Hegedűs, Péter; Ruppert, Mihály; Brlecic, Paige; Zorn, Markus; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    Despite clinical studies indicating that diabetic hearts are more sensitive to ischemia/reperfusion injury, experimental data is contradictory. Although mild diabetes prior to ischemia/reperfusion may induce a myocardial adaptation, further research is still needed. Nondiabetic Wistar (W) and type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats (16-week-old) underwent 45 min occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery and 24 h reperfusion. The plasma glucose level was significantly higher in diabetic rats compared to the nondiabetics. Diabetes mellitus was associated with ventricular hypertrophy and increased interstitial fibrosis. Inducing myocardial infarction increased the glucose levels in diabetic compared to nondiabetic rats. Furthermore, the infarct size was smaller in GK rats than in the control group. Systolic and diastolic functions were impaired in W + MI and did not reach statistical significance in GK + MI animals compared to the corresponding controls. Among the 125 genes surveyed, 35 genes showed a significant change in expression in GK + MI compared to W + MI rats. Short-term diabetes promotes compensatory mechanisms that may provide cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion injury, at least in part, by increased antioxidants and the upregulation of the prosurvival PI3K/Akt pathway, by the downregulation of apoptotic genes, proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α, profibrogenic TGF-β, and hypertrophic marker α-actin-1.

  20. Reduced heart rate variability in chronic severe traumatic brain injury: Association with impaired emotional and social functioning, and potential for treatment using biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Francis, Heather M; Fisher, Alana; Rushby, Jacqueline A; McDonald, Skye

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) may provide an index of capacity for social functioning and may be remediated by HRV biofeedback. Given reductions in HRV are found following traumatic brain injury (TBI), the present study aimed to determine whether lower HRV in TBI is associated with social function, and whether HRV biofeedback might be a useful remediation technique in this population. Resting state HRV and measures of social and emotional processing were collected in 30 individuals with severe TBI (3-34 years post-injury) and 30 controls. This was followed by a single session of HRV biofeedback. HRV was positively associated with social cognition and empathy, and negatively associated with alexithymia for the TBI group. Both TBI and control groups showed significantly increased HRV on both time-domain (i.e., SDNN, rMSSD) and frequency-domain measures (LF, HF, LF:HF ratio) during biofeedback compared to baseline. These results suggest that decreased HRV is linked to social and emotional function following severe TBI, and may be a novel target for therapy using HRV biofeedback techniques.

  1. Glutamine-induced protection of isolated rat heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury is mediated via the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway and increased protein O-GlcNAc levels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Marchase, Richard B.; Chatham, John C.

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that glutamine protects the heart from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury; however, the mechanisms underlying this protection have not been identfied. Glutamine: fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT) regulates the entry of glucose into the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP) and activation of this pathway has been shown to be cardioprotective. Glutamine is required for metabolism of glucose via GFAT; therefore, the goal of this study was to determine whether glutamine cardioprotection could be attributed to increased flux through the HBP and elevated levels of O-linked N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) on proteins. Hearts from male rats were isolated and perfused with Krebs-Henseliet buffer containing 5mM glucose, and global, no-flow ischemia was induced for 20 minutes followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion. 30 minute pre-treatment with 2.5 mM glutamine significantly improved functional recovery (RPP: 15.6±5.7% Vs. 59.4±6.1%; p<0.05) and decreased cardiac Troponin I release (25.4±3.0 Vs. 4.7±1.9; p<0.05) during reperfusion. This protection was associated with a significant increase in the levels of protein O-GlcNAc and ATP. Pre-treatment with 80 μM azaserine, an inhibitor of GFAT, completely reversed the protection seen with glutamine and prevented the increase in protein O-GlcNAc. O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) catalyzes the formation of O-GlcNAc, and inhibition of OGT with 5mM alloxan also reversed the protection associated with glutamine. These data support the hypothesis that in the ex vivo perfused heart glutamine cardioprotection is due, at least in part, to enhanced flux through the HBP and increased protein O-GlcNAc levels. PMID:17069847

  2. Estrogen Protects the Female Heart from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Phosphorylation by Mitochondrial p38β at Threonine 79 and Serine 106

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tao; Liu, Han; Kim, Jin Kyung

    2016-01-01

    A collective body of evidence indicates that estrogen protects the heart from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, but the underlying mechanism remains incompletely understood. We have previously delineated a novel mechanism of how 17β-estradiol (E2) protects cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes from hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) by identifying a functionally active mitochondrial pool of p38β and E2-driven upregulation of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity via p38β, leading to the suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Here we investigate these cytoprotective actions of E2 in vivo. Left coronary artery ligation and reperfusion was used to produce I/R injury in ovariectomized (OVX) female mice and in estrogen receptor (ER) null female mice. E2 treatment in OVX mice reduced the left ventricular infarct size accompanied by increased activity of mitochondrial p38β and MnSOD. I/R-induced infarct size in ERα knockout (ERKO), ERβ knockout (BERKO) and ERα and β double knockout (DERKO) female mice was larger than that in wild type (WT) mice, with little difference among ERKO, BERKO, and DERKO. Loss of both ERα and ERβ led to reduced activity of mitochondrial p38β and MnSOD at baseline and after I/R. The physical interaction between mitochondrial p38β and MnSOD in the heart was detected by co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP). Threonine 79 (T79) and serine 106 (S106) of MnSOD were identified to be phosphorylated by p38β in kinase assays. Overexpression of WT MnSOD in cardiomyocytes reduced ROS generation during H/R, while point mutation of T79 and S106 of MnSOD to alanine abolished its antioxidative function. We conclude that the protective effects of E2 and ER against cardiac I/R injury involve the regulation of MnSOD via posttranslational modification of the dismutase by p38β. PMID:27930699

  3. Low-Dose Gamma Irradiation of Decellularized Heart Valves Results in Tissue Injury in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Helder, Meghana R. K.; Hennessy, Ryan S.; Spoon, Daniel B.; Tefft, Brandon J.; Witt, Tyra A.; Marler, Ronald J.; Pislaru, Sorin V.; Simari, Robert D.; Stulak, John M.; Lerman, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Background Decellularized heart valves are emerging as a potential alternative to current bioprostheses for valve replacement. While techniques of decellularization have been thoroughly examined, terminal sterilization techniques have not received the same scrutiny. Methods This study evaluated low dose gamma irradiation as a sterilization method for decellularized heart valves. Incubation of valves and transmission electron microscopy evaluation after different doses of gamma irradiation were used to determine the optimal dose of gamma irradiation. Quantitative evaluation of mechanical properties was done by tensile mechanical testing of isolated cusps. Sterilize decellularized heart valves were tested in a sheep model (n=3, 1 1,500 Gy and 2 3,000 Gy) of pulmonary valve replacement. Results Valves sterilized with gamma radiation between 1,000 Gy and 3,000 Gy were found to be optimal with in-vitro testing. However, with in-vivo showed deteriorating valve function within 2 months. On explant the valve with 1,500 Gy gamma irradiation showed signs of endocarditis with neutrophils on hematoxylin and eosin staining, positive gram stain resembling streptococcus infection. The 3,000 Gy valves had no evidence of infection, but the hematoxylin and eosin staining showed evidence of wound remodeling with macrophages and fibroblasts. Tensile strength testing showed decreased strength (0 Gy-2.53±0.98 MPa, 1,500 Gy-2.03±1.23 MPa, 3,000 Gy-1.26±0.90 MPa) with increasing levels of irradiation. Conclusions Low dose gamma irradiation does not maintain the mechanical integrity of valves and the balance between sterilization and damage may not be able to be achieved with gamma irradiation. Other methods of terminal sterilization must be pursued and evaluated. PMID:26453425

  4. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  5. Myocardial injury in coronary artery bypass grafting: On-pump versus off-pump comparison by measuring heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein release.

    PubMed

    Malik, Vishwas; Kale, Shailaja C; Chowdhury, Ujjwal K; Ramakrishnan, Lakshmy; Chauhan, Sandeep; Kiran, Usha

    2006-01-01

    This prospective study uses heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (hFABP) and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) release to compare myocardial injury in on-pump versus off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Fifty patients were randomly assigned to on-pump or off-pump CABG. The hFABP and CK-MB concentrations were measured in serial venous blood samples drawn before heparinization in both groups and after aortic unclamping at 1, 2, 4, 8, 24, 48, and 72 hours in the on-pump group. In the off-pump group, samples were taken after the last distal anastomosis at the same time intervals as in the on-pump group. The total amount of hFABP and CK-MB released was significantly higher in the on-pump than in the off-pump group (hFABP = 100.43 +/- 77.63 vs 3.94 +/- 0.36 ng/mL, P < 0.0001; CK-MB = 33.33 +/- 3.81 vs 28.65 +/- 3.91 log units, P < 0.001). In all patients, hFABP levels peaked as early as 1 hour after declamping (on-pump group) or 2 hours after the last distal anastomosis (off-pump group), whereas CK-MB peaked only at 4 hours after declamping (on-pump group) or 24 hours after the last distal anastomosis (off-pump group). The lower release of hFABP and CK-MB in the off-pump CABG group indicates that on-pump CABG with cardioplegic arrest causes more myocardial damage than does off-pump CABG. Heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein is a more rapid marker of perioperative myocardial damage, peaks earlier than CK-MB, and may predict the requirement for intensive monitoring for postoperative myocardial infarction.

  6. Procyanidines from Vitis vinifera seeds protect rabbit heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury: antioxidant intervention and/or iron and copper sequestering ability.

    PubMed

    Maffei Facinó, R; Carini, M; Aldini, G; Berti, F; Rossoni, G; Bombardelli, E; Morazzoni, P

    1996-12-01

    An isolated rabbit heart Langendorff preparation paced electrically was used to evaluate the effects of a highly purified, high molecular weight fraction of oligomeric procyanidines isolated from Vitis vinifera seeds on myocardial reperfusion injury after 40 minutes of low flow (1 ml/min) ischemia. Infusion of the heart with 100 or 200 micrograms/ml procyanidines dose-dependently reduced ventricular contracture during ischemia (LVEDP values decreased by 28% and 51%), decreased coronary perfusion pressure (CPP), improved cardiac mechanical performance upon reperfusion, increased the release of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha into the perfusate in both the pre-ischemic and the reperfusion periods (by 68% at 200 micrograms/ml), and suppressed rhythm irregularity. This antiarrhythmogenic action was confirmed in a more severe model of ischemia (flow rate 0.2 ml/ min). The cardioprotective agent allopurinol infused at 20 micrograms/ml had effects on the contractility and on the release of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha comparable to those of 200 micrograms/ml procyanidines. The results of the second part of this study show that procyanidines are potent scavengers of several reactive oxygen species involved in the ischemia/reperfusion damage: the superoxide anion (IC50 = 5.64 microM: rate constant K = 7.55 x 10(5) M-1 s-1, determined by the phenazine methosulfate/NADH method); the hydroxyl radical (IC50 = 28 microM; rate constant K = 1.2 x 10(12) M-1 s-1, determined by the electron spin resonance spectroscopy); peroxyl radicals (IC50 = 0.025 microM and 0.35 microM, determined using two different lipid substrates, phosphatidylcholine liposomes and methyl linoleate micelles by UV spectroscopy at 233 nm). Finally, procyanidines interact with Fe2+ and Cu2+ ions (the catalysts of HO. radicals production) giving rise to strong complexes, with stability constants (log K) ranging from 9.35 to approximately 9.

  7. The transplantation of Akt-overexpressing amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YAN; LI, YIGANG; SONG, LEI; LI, YANYAN; JIANG, SHAN; ZHANG, SONG

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSCs) are an attractive cell source for applications in regenerative medicine, due to characteristics such as proliferative capacity and multipotency. In addition, Akt, a serine-threonine kinase, maintains stem cells by promoting viability and proliferation. Whether the transplantation of Akt-overexpressing AFMSCs protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury has yet to be elucidated. Accordingly, the Akt gene was overexpressed in AFMSCs using lentiviral transduction, and Akt-AFMSCs were transplanted into the ischemic myocardium of rabbits prior to reperfusion. Any protective effects resulting from this procedure were subsequently sought after three weeks later. A histological examination revealed that there was a decrease in intramyocardial inflammation and ultrastructural damage, and an increase in capillary density and in the levels of GATA binding protein 4, connexin 43 and cardiac troponin T in the Akt-AFMSC group compared with the control group. A significant decrease in cardiomyocyte apoptosis, accompanying an increase in phosphorylated Akt and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and a decrease in caspase-3, was also observed. Furthermore, the left ventricular function was markedly augmented in the Akt-AFMSC group compared with the control group. These observations suggested that the protective effect of AFMSCs may be due to the delivery of secreted cytokines, promotion of neoangiogenesis, prevention of cardiomyocyte apoptosis, transdifferentiation into cardiomyocytes and promotion of the viability of AFMSCs, which are assisted by Akt gene modification. Taken together, the results of the present study have indicated that transplantation of Akt-AFMSCs is able to alleviate myocardial I/R injury and improve cardiac function. PMID:27151366

  8. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor ligand PD123319 attenuates hyperoxia-induced lung and heart injury at a low dose in newborn rats

    PubMed Central

    Sengers, Rozemarijn M. A.; Laghmani, El Houari; Chen, Xueyu; Lindeboom, Melissa P. H. A.; Roks, Anton J. M.; Folkerts, Gert; Walther, Frans J.

    2014-01-01

    Intervening in angiotensin (Ang)-II type 2 receptor (AT2) signaling may have therapeutic potential for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) by attenuating lung inflammation and preventing arterial hypertension (PAH)-induced right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH). We first investigated the role of AT2 inhibition with PD123319 (0.5 and 2 mg·kg−1·day−1) on the beneficial effect of AT2 agonist LP2–3 (5 μg/kg twice a day) on RVH in newborn rats with hyperoxia-induced BPD. Next we determined the cardiopulmonary effects of PD123319 (0.1 mg·kg−1·day−1) in two models: early treatment during continuous exposure to hyperoxia for 10 days and late treatment starting on day 6 in rat pups exposed postnatally to hyperoxia for 9 days, followed by a 9-day recovery period in room air. Parameters investigated included lung and heart histopathology, fibrin deposition, vascular leakage, and differential mRNA expression. Ten days of coadministration of LP2–3 and PD123319 abolished the beneficial effects of LP2–3 on RVH in experimental BPD. In the early treatment model PD123319 attenuated cardiopulmonary injury by reducing alveolar septal thickness, pulmonary influx of inflammatory cells, including macrophages and neutrophils, medial wall thickness of small arterioles, and extravascular collagen III deposition, and by preventing RVH. In the late treatment model PD123319 diminished PAH and RVH, demonstrating that PAH is reversible in the neonatal period. At high concentrations PD123319 blocks the beneficial effects of the AT2-agonist LP2–3 on RVH. At low concentrations PD123319 attenuates cardiopulmonary injury by reducing pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and preventing PAH-induced RVH but does not affect alveolar and vascular development in newborn rats with experimental BPD. PMID:24951776

  9. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor ligand PD123319 attenuates hyperoxia-induced lung and heart injury at a low dose in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Gerry T M; Sengers, Rozemarijn M A; Laghmani, El Houari; Chen, Xueyu; Lindeboom, Melissa P H A; Roks, Anton J M; Folkerts, Gert; Walther, Frans J

    2014-08-01

    Intervening in angiotensin (Ang)-II type 2 receptor (AT2) signaling may have therapeutic potential for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) by attenuating lung inflammation and preventing arterial hypertension (PAH)-induced right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH). We first investigated the role of AT2 inhibition with PD123319 (0.5 and 2 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) on the beneficial effect of AT2 agonist LP2-3 (5 μg/kg twice a day) on RVH in newborn rats with hyperoxia-induced BPD. Next we determined the cardiopulmonary effects of PD123319 (0.1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) in two models: early treatment during continuous exposure to hyperoxia for 10 days and late treatment starting on day 6 in rat pups exposed postnatally to hyperoxia for 9 days, followed by a 9-day recovery period in room air. Parameters investigated included lung and heart histopathology, fibrin deposition, vascular leakage, and differential mRNA expression. Ten days of coadministration of LP2-3 and PD123319 abolished the beneficial effects of LP2-3 on RVH in experimental BPD. In the early treatment model PD123319 attenuated cardiopulmonary injury by reducing alveolar septal thickness, pulmonary influx of inflammatory cells, including macrophages and neutrophils, medial wall thickness of small arterioles, and extravascular collagen III deposition, and by preventing RVH. In the late treatment model PD123319 diminished PAH and RVH, demonstrating that PAH is reversible in the neonatal period. At high concentrations PD123319 blocks the beneficial effects of the AT2-agonist LP2-3 on RVH. At low concentrations PD123319 attenuates cardiopulmonary injury by reducing pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and preventing PAH-induced RVH but does not affect alveolar and vascular development in newborn rats with experimental BPD.

  10. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  11. A lipophilic nitric oxide donor and a lipophilic antioxidant compound protect rat heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury if given as hybrid molecule but not as a mixture.

    PubMed

    Rastaldo, Raffaella; Raffaella, Rastaldo; Cappello, Sandra; Sandra, Cappello; Di Stilo, Antonella; Antonella, Di Stilo; Folino, Anna; Anna, Folino; Losano, Gianni; Gianni, Losano; Pagliaro, Pasquale; Pasquale, Pagliaro

    2012-03-01

    Low concentrations of a hydrophilic nitric oxide donor (NOD) are reported to reduce myocardial reperfusion injury only when combined with a lipophilic antioxidant (AOX) to form a hybrid molecule (HYB). Here we tested whether liposoluble NOD requires to be combined with AOX to be protective. Isolated rat hearts underwent 30 minutes of ischemia and 120 minutes of reperfusion. To induce postconditioning, 1 μM solutions of the following liposoluble compounds were given during the first 20 minutes of reperfusion: NOD with weak (w-NOD) or strong NO-releasing potency (s-NOD); weak HYB built up with w-NOD and a per se ineffective AOX lead; strong HYB built up with s-NOD and the same AOX; mixtures of w-NOD plus AOX or s-NOD plus AOX. A significant reduction of infarct size with improved recovery of cardiac function was obtained only with weak HYB. We suggest that w-NOD requires the synergy with a per se ineffective AOX to protect. The synergy is possible only if the 2 moieties enter the cell simultaneously as a hybrid, but not as a mixture. It seems that strong HYB was ineffective because an excessive intracellular NO release produces a large amount of reactive species, as shown from the increased nitrotyrosine production.

  12. Comparison of heart rate response to tennis activity between persons with and without spinal cord injuries: implications for a training threshold.

    PubMed

    Barfield, J P; Malone, Laurie A; Coleman, Tristica A

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to reach a training threshold during on-court sport activity. Monitors collected heart rate (HR) data every 5 s for 11 wheelchair tennis players (WCT) with low paraplegia and 11 able-bodied controls matched on experience and skill level (ABT). Average HR was determined for time spent in practice (e.g, drills) and game (i.e., a competitive set), and the ability to surpass 50% peak HR (HRpeak) and 64% HRpeak in each condition was evaluated. Average exercise intensity (%HRpeak) was not significantly different between the groups during practice (M WCT = 68.18, SD = 7.53%, M ABT = 68.78, SD = 5.44%; t = .22, p = .83) or game (M WCT = 68.17, SD = .17%, M ABT = 71.55, SD = 4.75%; t = 1.12, p =.28). Allparticipants averaged an intensity > or = 50% HR-peak during practice and game, and the difference between group participants averaging an intensity > or = 64% HRpeak was not significant during practice (chi2 = .92, p = .34) or game (chi2 = 3.85, p = .05). In terms of reaching a health and fitness training threshold during tennis, individuals with low-level SCI are similar to matched controls.

  13. Drp1 loss-of-function reduces cardiomyocyte oxygen dependence protecting the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Ramiro; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Parra, Valentina; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Pennanen, Christian; Riquelme, Jaime A; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Sánchez, Gina; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondria are key organelles for ATP production in cardiomyocytes, which is regulated by processes of fission and fusion. We hypothesized that the mitochondria fusion protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) inhibition, attenuates ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury through modifications in mitochondrial metabolism. Rats were subjected to I/R through coronary artery ligation, and isolated cardiomyocytes were treated with an ischemia-mimicking solution. In vivo, cardiac function, myocardial infarction area, and mitochondrial morphology were determined, whereas in vitro, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular ATP levels, and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) were assessed. In both models, an adenovirus expressing Drp1 dominant-negative K38A (Drp1K38A) was used to induce Drp1 loss-of-function. Our results showed that I/R stimulated mitochondrial fission. Myocardial infarction size and cell death induced by I/R were significantly reduced, whereas cardiac function after I/R was improved in Drp1K38A-treated rats compared with controls. Drp1K38A-transduced cardiomyocytes showed lower OCR with no decrease in intracellular ATP levels, and on I/R, a larger decrease in OCR with a smaller reduction in intracellular ATP level was observed. However, proton leak-associated oxygen consumption was comparatively higher in Drp1K38A-treated cardiomyocytes, suggesting a protective mitochondrial uncoupling effect against I/R. Collectively, our results show that Drp1 inhibition triggers cardioprotection by reducing mitochondrial metabolism during I/R.

  14. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  15. Towards defining heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Aidan P; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2004-12-01

    Injury to the myocardium disrupts geometric integrity and results in changes to intracardiac pressure, wall stress and tension, and the pattern of blood flow through the heart. Significant disruption to pump function results in heart failure which is defined in terms of symptoms: breathlessness and fatigue, signs of salt and water retention, and neurohormonal activation. This syndrome most commonly occurs in the context of injury due to ischaemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy but because patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) are born with sometimes gross distortions of cardiac anatomy they too are subject to the forces that drive heart failure. This paper explores the available data relating to the clinical and neurohormonal manifestations of heart failure in patients with congenital heart disease and describes how, by additionally exploring events at a cellular level, we may be able to arrive at a definition of heart failure relevant to this population.

  16. Hearts from Mice Fed a Non-Obesogenic High-Fat Diet Exhibit Changes in Their Oxidative State, Calcium and Mitochondria in Parallel with Increased Susceptibility to Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Littlejohns, Ben; Pasdois, Philippe; Duggan, Simon; Bond, Andrew R.; Heesom, Kate; Jackson, Christopher L.; Angelini, Gianni D.; Halestrap, Andrew P.; Suleiman, M.-Saadeh

    2014-01-01

    Rationale High-fat diet with obesity-associated co-morbidities triggers cardiac remodeling and renders the heart more vulnerable to ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, the effect of high-fat diet without obesity and associated co-morbidities is presently unknown. Objectives To characterize a non-obese mouse model of high-fat diet, assess the vulnerability of hearts to reperfusion injury and to investigate cardiac cellular remodeling in relation to the mechanism(s) underlying reperfusion injury. Methods and Results Feeding C57BL/6J male mice high-fat diet for 20 weeks did not induce obesity, diabetes, cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac dysfunction, atherosclerosis or cardiac apoptosis. However, isolated perfused hearts from mice fed high-fat diet were more vulnerable to reperfusion injury than those from mice fed normal diet. In isolated cardiomyocytes, high-fat diet was associated with higher diastolic intracellular Ca2+ concentration and greater damage to isolated cardiomyocytes following simulated ischemia/reperfusion. High-fat diet was also associated with changes in mitochondrial morphology and expression of some related proteins but not mitochondrial respiration or reactive oxygen species turnover rates. Proteomics, western blot and high-performance liquid chromatography techniques revealed that high-fat diet led to less cardiac oxidative stress, higher catalase expression and significant changes in expression of putative components of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Inhibition of the mPTP conferred relatively more cardio-protection in the high-fat fed mice compared to normal diet. Conclusions This study shows for the first time that high-fat diet, independent of obesity-induced co-morbidities, triggers changes in cardiac oxidative state, calcium handling and mitochondria which are likely to be responsible for increased vulnerability to cardiac insults. PMID:24950187

  17. Impact of decreased serum albumin levels on acute kidney injury in patients with acute decompensated heart failure: a potential association of atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Yoichi; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Goto, Yoichi; Anzai, Toshihisa; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Kawano, Yuhei; Kangawa, Kenji

    2017-02-07

    Although hypoalbuminemia at admission is a risk for acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), the clinical significance of decreased serum albumin levels (DAL) during ADHF therapy has not been elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate whether DAL was associated with AKI, and whether intravenous atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) administration, which provides an effective treatment for ADHF but promotes albumin extravasation, was associated with DAL and AKI. A total of 231 consecutive patients with ADHF were enrolled. AKI was defined as ≥0.3 mg/dl absolute or 1.5-fold increase in serum creatinine levels within 48 h. AKI occurred in 73 (32%) of the 231 patients during ADHF therapy. The median value of decreases in serum albumin levels was 0.3 g/dl at 7 days after admission. When DAL was defined as ≥0.3 g/dl decrease in serum albumin levels, DAL occurred in 113 patients, and was independently associated with AKI. Of the 231 patients, 73 (32%) were treated with intravenous ANP. DAL occurred more frequently in patients receiving ANP than in those not receiving ANP (77 vs. 36%, p < 0.001), and ANP was independently associated with DAL. The incidence of AKI was higher in patients receiving ANP than in those not receiving ANP (48 vs. 24%, p < 0.001). ANP was independently associated with AKI. In conclusion, DAL is associated with AKI. Intravenous ANP administration may be one of the promoting factors of DAL, which leads to AKI, indicating a possible novel mechanism of AKI.

  18. A Double-Blinded, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Aminophylline to Prevent Acute Kidney Injury in Children following Congenital Heart Surgery with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, David M.; Sutherland, Scott M.; Anglemyer, Andrew; Grimm, Paul C.; Roth, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs commonly in children following congenital cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Aminophylline, a methylxanthine nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, has been effective in the management of AKI in certain populations. This study sought to determine if post-operative administration of aminophylline attenuates AKI in children undergoing congenital cardiac surgery with CPB. Design Single-center, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial (RCT). Setting Tertiary center, pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit. Patients 144 children after congenital heart surgery with CPB. Interventions Seventy-two patients were randomized to receive aminophylline and 72 patients received placebo. Study drug was administered every six hours for 72 hours. Measurements and Main Results The primary outcome variable was development of any AKI, defined by the serum creatinine criteria of the Kidney Diseases: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. Secondary outcomes included the development of severe AKI, time between CVICU admission and first successful extubation, percent fluid overload, total fluid balance, urine output, bioelectrical impedance, and serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL). The unadjusted rate and severity of AKI were not different between groups; 43/72 (60%) of the treatment group and 36/72 (50%) of the placebo group developed AKI (p=0.32). Stage 2/3 AKI occurred in 23/72 (32%) of the treatment group and 15/72 (21%) of the placebo group (p=0.18). Secondary outcome measures also demonstrated no significant difference between treatment and placebo groups. Aminophylline administration was safe; no deaths occurred in either group, and rates of adverse events were similar (14% in the treatment group versus 18% in the placebo group, p =0.30). Conclusions In this placebo-controlled RCT, we found no effect of

  19. Protective effects of GLP-1 analogues exendin-4 and GLP-1(9-36) amide against ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Sonne, David P; Engstrøm, Thomas; Treiman, Marek

    2008-02-07

    Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin peptide secreted from intestinal L-cells, whose potent plasma glucose-lowering action has prompted intense efforts to develop GLP-1 receptor-targeting drugs for treatment of diabetic hyperglycemia. More recently, GLP-1 and its analogues have been shown to exert cardiovascular effects in a number of experimental models. Here we tested exendin-4 (Exe-4), a peptide agonist at GLP-1 receptors, and GLP-1(9-36) amide, the primary endogenous metabolite of GLP-1 (both in the concentration range 0.03-3.0 nM), for their protective effects against ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in an isolated rat heart preparation. When administered, the agents were only present for the first 15 min of a 120 min reperfusion period (postconditioning protocol). Exe-4, but not GLP-1(9-36) amide, showed a strong infarct-limiting action (from 33.2% +/-2.7% to 14.5% +/-2.2% of the ischemic area, p<0.05). This infarct size-limiting effect of Exe-4 was abolished by exendin(9-39) (Exe(9-39)), a GLP-1 receptor antagonist. In contrast, both Exe-4 and GLP-1(9-36) amide were able to augment left ventricular performance (left ventricular developed pressure and rate-pressure product) during the last 60 min of reperfusion. These effects were only partially antagonized by Exe(9-39). We suggest that Exe-4, in addition to being currently exploited in treatment of diabetes, may present a suitable candidate for postconditioning trials in clinical settings of IRI. The divergent agonist effects of Exe-4 and GLP-1(9-36), along with correspondingly divergent antagonistic efficacy of Exe(9-39), seem consistent with the presence of more than one type of GLP-1 receptor in this system.

  20. Comparing Early Liver Graft Function From Heart Beating and Living-Donors: A Pilot Study Aiming to Identify New Biomarkers of Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi Joy; Kluger, Michael; Goryński, Krzysztof; Pawliszyn, Janusz; Bojko, Barbara; Yu, Ai-Ming; Noh, Keumhan; Selzner, Markus; Jerath, Angela; McCluskey, Stuart; Sandy Pang, K; Wąsowicz, Marcin

    2017-01-19

    Liver and kidney functions among recipients of liver transplantation (LT) surgery with heart beating (HBD, n = 13) or living donors (LD, n = 9) with different cold ischemic times were examined during the neohepatic phase for clearing rocuronium bromide (ROC, cleared by liver and kidney) and tranexamic acid (TXA, cleared by kidney). Solid phase micro-extraction and LC-MS/MS was applied to determine the plasma concentrations of ROC and TXA, and creatinine was determined by standard laboratory methods. Metabolomics and the relative expressions of miRNA122, miRNA148a, and γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT), liver injury biomarkers, were also measured. ROC clearance for HBD was significantly lower than that for LD (0.147 ± 0.052 vs. 0.265 ± 0.148 mL · min(-1)  · g(-1) liver) after intravenous injection (0.6 mg · kg(-1) ). Clearance of TXA, a compound cleared by glomerular filtration, given as a 1 g bolus followed by infusion (10 mg · kg(-1)  · h(-1) ), was similar between HBD and LD (~1 mL · min(-1)  · kg(-1) ). Metabolomics data revealed higher bile acids, phospholipids, and lipid ω-oxidation metabolite clusters for HBD. miR122 and miR148a expressions were similar for HBD and LD whereas GGT expression was significantly increased for HBD. TXA clearance in both groups was lower than GFR, showing a small extent of hepatorenal coupling.

  1. Heart murmurs

    MedlinePlus

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has 4 chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  2. Heart Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... including how to maximize your recovery at home. Congenital Heart Defects • Home • About Congenital Heart Defects • The ... Physical Activity Recommendations for Heart Health • Tools & Resources Congenital Heart Defect Publications If Your Child Has a ...

  3. Nerves Regulate Cardiomyocyte Proliferation and Heart Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Ahmed I; O'Meara, Caitlin C; Gemberling, Matthew; Zhao, Long; Bryant, Donald M; Zheng, Ruimao; Gannon, Joseph B; Cai, Lei; Choi, Wen-Yee; Egnaczyk, Gregory F; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A; Poss, Kenneth D; Lee, Richard T

    2015-08-24

    Some organisms, such as adult zebrafish and newborn mice, have the capacity to regenerate heart tissue following injury. Unraveling the mechanisms of heart regeneration is fundamental to understanding why regeneration fails in adult humans. Numerous studies have revealed that nerves are crucial for organ regeneration, thus we aimed to determine whether nerves guide heart regeneration. Here, we show using transgenic zebrafish that inhibition of cardiac innervation leads to reduction of myocyte proliferation following injury. Specifically, pharmacological inhibition of cholinergic nerve function reduces cardiomyocyte proliferation in the injured hearts of both zebrafish and neonatal mice. Direct mechanical denervation impairs heart regeneration in neonatal mice, which was rescued by the administration of neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and nerve growth factor (NGF) recombinant proteins. Transcriptional analysis of mechanically denervated hearts revealed a blunted inflammatory and immune response following injury. These findings demonstrate that nerve function is required for both zebrafish and mouse heart regeneration.

  4. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... Tiredness and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  5. Urotensin-ⅡReceptor Antagonist SB-710411 Protects Rat Heart against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury via RhoA/ROCK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Sheng-Yong; Chen, Shuo; Qin, Yi-De; Chen, Zhi-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Aim SB-710411 is a rat selective urotensin-II (U-II) receptor antagonist, which can block U-II-induced contraction of the aorta and inhibit U-II-induced myocardial fibrosis in rats. However, the effect of SB-710411 on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is unclear. The present study was designed to investigate whether SB-710411 has a protective effect on myocardial I/R injury in rats and the possible mechanisms. Methods and Results Myocardial I/R injury was induced by occluding the left anterior descending coronary artery in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Hemodynamic parameters, electrocardiogram (ECG), infarct size, histological alteration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine phosphokinase-MB (CK-MB), cardiac troponin I (cTnI), RhoA, and the protein expressions of U-II receptor (UTR), ROCK1 and ROCK2 were evaluated. Cardiac I/R injury significantly up-regulated the expressions of UTR, ROCK1 and ROCK2 proteins in rat myocardium. SB-710411 1.0 and 2.0 μg/kg significantly reduced cardiac I/R-induced the infarct size and histological damage in rat myocardium, markedly inhibited the changes of hemodynamic parameters and the increases of ST-segment in ECG, the serum LDH and CK-MB activities and cTnI level in rats subjected to myocardial I/R injury. Furthermore, SB-710411 obviously prevented myocardial I/R-increased RhoA activity and UTR, ROCK1 and ROCK2 protein expressions. Conclusions Our results indicate that cardiac I/R injury increases myocardial UTR expression, and SB-710411 has a potent protective effect on myocardial I/R injury in rats. The cardioprotection may be associated with the inhibition of UTR-RhoA/ROCK pathway. PMID:26771557

  6. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction; Non-ST - elevation myocardial infarction; NSTEMI; CAD - heart attack; Coronary artery disease - heart attack ... made up of cholesterol and other cells. A heart attack may occur when: A tear in the ...

  7. Heart palpitations

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur. Try deep relaxation or breathing exercises. Practice yoga, meditation, or tai chi. Get regular exercise. Do ... M. Editorial team. Images Heart chambers Heart beat Yoga Arrhythmia Read more Atrial Fibrillation Read more Heart ...

  8. Heart Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  9. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  10. β-Sitosterol enhances cellular glutathione redox cycling by reactive oxygen species generated from mitochondrial respiration: protection against oxidant injury in H9c2 cells and rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Na; Leong, Pou Kuan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2014-07-01

    Herba Cistanches (Cistanche deserticola Y. C. Ma) is a 'Yang-invigorating' tonic herb in Chinese medicine. Preliminary chemical analysis indicated that β-sitosterol (BS) is one of the chemical constituents in an active fraction of Herba Cistanches. To investigate whether BS is an active ingredient of Herba Cistanches, the effects of BS on H9c2 cells and rat hearts were examined. The results indicated that BS stimulated the mitochondrial ATP generation capacity in H9c2 cells, which was associated with the increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. BS also stimulated mitochondrial state 3 and state 4 respiration, with the resultant decrease in coupling efficiency. BS produced an up-regulation of cellular glutathione redox cycling and protected against hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells. However, the protective effect of BS against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury was seen in female but not male rats ex vivo. The cardioprotection afforded by BS was likely mediated by an up-regulation of mitochondrial glutathione redox cycling in female rat hearts. In conclusion, the ensemble of results suggests that BS is an active ingredient of Herba Cistanches. The gender-dependent effect of BS on myocardial protection will further be investigated.

  11. Multi-Strain Probiotics Inhibit Cardiac Myopathies and Autophagy to Prevent Heart Injury in High-Fat Diet-Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chao-Hung; Tsai, Cheng-Chih; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Pai, Pei-ying; Chung, Li-Chin; Huang, Chun-Chih; Wang, Hsueh-Fang; Liao, Po-Hsiang; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-01-01

    High-fat diets induce obesity, leading to cardiomyocyte fibrosis and autophagy imbalance. In addition, no previous studies have indicated that probiotics have potential health effects associated with cardiac fibrosis and autophagy in obese rats. This study investigates the effects of probiotics on high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and cardiac fibrosis and autophagy in rat hearts. Eight-week-old male Wistar rats were separated randomly into five equally sized experimental groups: Normal diet (control) and high-fat (HF) diet groups and groups fed a high-fat diet supplemented with low (HL), medium (HM) or high (HH) doses of multi-strain probiotic powders. These experiments were designed for an 8-week trial period. The myocardial architecture of the left ventricle was evaluated using Masson's trichrome staining and immunohistochemistry staining. Key probiotics-related pathway molecules were analyzed using western blotting. Abnormal myocardial architecture and enlarged interstitial spaces were observed in HF hearts. These interstitial spaces were significantly decreased in groups provided with multi-strain probiotics compared with HF hearts. Western blot analysis demonstrated that key components of the TGF/MMP2/MMP9 fibrosis pathways and ERK5/uPA/ANP cardiac hypertrophy pathways were significantly suppressed in probiotic groups compared to the HF group. Autophagy balance is very important in cardiomyocytes. In this study, we observed that the beclin-1/LC3B/Atg7 autophagy pathway in HF was increased after probiotic supplementation was significantly decreased. Together, these results suggest that oral administration of probiotics may attenuate cardiomyocyte fibrosis and cardiac hypertrophy and the autophagy-signaling pathway in obese rats.

  12. Multi-Strain Probiotics Inhibit Cardiac Myopathies and Autophagy to Prevent Heart Injury in High-Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chao-Hung; Tsai, Cheng-Chih; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Pai, Pei-ying; Chung, Li-Chin; Huang, Chun-Chih; Wang, Hsueh-Fang; Liao, Po-Hsiang; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-01-01

    High-fat diets induce obesity, leading to cardiomyocyte fibrosis and autophagy imbalance. In addition, no previous studies have indicated that probiotics have potential health effects associated with cardiac fibrosis and autophagy in obese rats. This study investigates the effects of probiotics on high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and cardiac fibrosis and autophagy in rat hearts. Eight-week-old male Wistar rats were separated randomly into five equally sized experimental groups: Normal diet (control) and high-fat (HF) diet groups and groups fed a high-fat diet supplemented with low (HL), medium (HM) or high (HH) doses of multi-strain probiotic powders. These experiments were designed for an 8-week trial period. The myocardial architecture of the left ventricle was evaluated using Masson's trichrome staining and immunohistochemistry staining. Key probiotics-related pathway molecules were analyzed using western blotting. Abnormal myocardial architecture and enlarged interstitial spaces were observed in HF hearts. These interstitial spaces were significantly decreased in groups provided with multi-strain probiotics compared with HF hearts. Western blot analysis demonstrated that key components of the TGF/MMP2/MMP9 fibrosis pathways and ERK5/uPA/ANP cardiac hypertrophy pathways were significantly suppressed in probiotic groups compared to the HF group. Autophagy balance is very important in cardiomyocytes. In this study, we observed that the beclin-1/LC3B/Atg7 autophagy pathway in HF was increased after probiotic supplementation was significantly decreased. Together, these results suggest that oral administration of probiotics may attenuate cardiomyocyte fibrosis and cardiac hypertrophy and the autophagy-signaling pathway in obese rats. PMID:27076784

  13. Sex-Specific Association of Sleep Apnea Severity with Subclinical Myocardial Injury, Ventricular Hypertrophy, and Heart Failure Risk in a Community Dwelling Cohort: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities-Sleep Heart Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Gabriela Querejeta; Redline, Susan; Claggett, Brian; Bello, Natalie; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Solomon, Scott D.; Shah, Amil M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and development of subsequent cardiovascular (CV) complications differ by sex. We hypothesize that the relationship between OSA and high sensitivity troponin T (hs-TnT), cardiac structure, and CV outcomes differs by sex. Methods and Results 752 men and 893 women free of CV disease participating in both the Atherosclerosis Risk in the Communities and the Sleep Heart Health Studies were included. All participants (mean age 62.5±5.5 years) underwent polysomnography and measurement of hs-TnT. OSA severity was defined using established clinical categories. Subjects were followed for 13.6±3.2 years for incident coronary disease, heart failure, and CV and all-cause mortality. Surviving subjects underwent an echocardiography after 15.2±0.8 years. OSA was independently associated with hs-TnT among women (p=0.03) but not in men (p=0.94). Similarly, OSA was associated with incident HF or death in women (p=0.01) but not men (p=0.10). This association was no longer significant after adjusting for hs-TnT (p=0.09). Among surviving participants without an incident CV event, OSA assessed in mid-life was independently associated with higher left ventricle mass index only among women (p=0.001). Conclusions Sex-specific differences exist in the relationship between OSA and CV disease. OSA, assessed in mid-life, is independently associated with higher levels of concomitantly measured hs-TnT among women but not men, in whom other comorbidities associated with OSA may play a more important role. During 13-year follow-up, OSA was associated with incident HF or death only among women, and among those without an incident event, was independently associated with LV hypertrophy only in women. PMID:26316620

  14. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 37. Swerdlow CD, Wang PJ, Zipes DP. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. ... and lifestyle Controlling your high blood pressure Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart ...

  15. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... not used to treat first-degree heart block. All types of heart block may increase your risk for other arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation (A-tre-al fih-brih-LA-shun). Talk with your doctor ...

  16. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... a million people in the U.S. have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get ... It's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if someone ...

  17. Cardiac Per2 Functions as Novel Link between Fatty Acid Metabolism and Myocardial Inflammation during Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Stephanie; Kominsky, Doug; Brodsky, Kelley; Eltzschig, Holger; Walker, Lori; Eckle, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of peripheral circadian rhyme pathways dominantly leads to metabolic disorders. Studies on circadian rhythm proteins in the heart indicated a role for Clock or Per2 in cardiac metabolism. In contrast to Clock−/−, Per2−/− mice have larger infarct sizes with deficient lactate production during myocardial ischemia. To test the hypothesis that cardiac Per2 represents an important regulator of cardiac metabolism during myocardial ischemia, we measured lactate during reperfusion in Per1−/−, Per2−/− or wildtype mice. As lactate measurements in whole blood indicated an exclusive role of Per2 in controlling lactate production during myocardial ischemia, we next performed gene array studies using various ischemia-reperfusion protocols comparing wildtype and Per2−/− mice. Surprisingly, high-throughput gene array analysis revealed dominantly lipid metabolism as the differentially regulated pathway in wildtype mice when compared to Per2−/−. In all ischemia-reperfusion protocols used, the enzyme enoyl-CoA hydratase, which is essential in fatty acid beta-oxidation, was regulated in wildtype animals only. Studies using nuclear magnet resonance imaging (NMRI) confirmed altered fatty acid populations with higher mono-unsaturated fatty acid levels in hearts from Per2−/− mice. Unexpectedly, studies on gene regulation during reperfusion revealed solely pro inflammatory genes as differentially regulated ‘Per2-genes’. Subsequent studies on inflammatory markers showed increasing IL-6 or TNFα levels during reperfusion in Per2−/− mice. In summary, these studies reveal an important role of cardiac Per2 for fatty acid metabolism and inflammation during myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, respectively. PMID:23977055

  18. Preventing Musculoskeletal Sports Injuries in Youth: A Guide for Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... of heart and lungs), warm-up exercises, proper coaching, use of safety equipment. Track and Field Common ... males, sunscreen, water. Injury prevention: Proper conditioning and coaching. Football Common injuries and locations: Bruises, sprains, strains, ...

  19. Back Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, ... back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains ...

  20. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  1. Mending broken hearts: cardiac development as a basis for adult heart regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Xin, Mei; Olson, Eric N; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2013-08-01

    As the adult mammalian heart has limited potential for regeneration and repair, the loss of cardiomyocytes during injury and disease can result in heart failure and death. The cellular processes and regulatory mechanisms involved in heart growth and development can be exploited to repair the injured adult heart through 'reawakening' pathways that are active during embryogenesis. Heart function has been restored in rodents by reprogramming non-myocytes into cardiomyocytes, by expressing transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and T-box 5 (TBX5)) and microRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-208 and miR-499) that control cardiomyocyte identity. Stimulating cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation and proliferation by activating mitotic signalling pathways involved in embryonic heart growth represents a complementary approach for heart regeneration and repair. Recent advances in understanding the mechanistic basis of heart development offer exciting opportunities for effective therapies for heart failure.

  2. Protective Effects of Kaempferol against Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Isolated Rat Heart via Antioxidant Activity and Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mingjie; Ren, Huanhuan; Han, Jichun; Wang, Wenjuan; Zheng, Qiusheng; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of kaempferol against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Method. Left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and its maximum up/down rate (±dp/dtmax) were recorded as myocardial function. Infarct size was detected with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was determined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl nick-end labeling (TUNEL). The levels of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratio, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were determined using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Moreover, total glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), phospho-GSK-3β (P-GSK-3β), precaspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, and cytoplasm cytochrome C were assayed using Western blot analysis. Results. Pretreatment with kaempferol significantly improved the recovery of LVDP and ±dp/dtmax, as well as increased the levels of SOD and P-GSK-3β and GSH/GSSG ratio. However, the pretreatment reduced myocardial infarct size and TUNEL-positive cell rate, as well as decreased the levels of cleaved caspase-3, cytoplasm cytochrome C, CK, LDH, MDA, and TNF-α. Conclusion. These results suggested that kaempferol provides cardioprotection via antioxidant activity and inhibition of GSK-3β activity in rats with I/R. PMID:26265983

  3. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  4. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    HLHS; Congenital heart - hypoplastic left heart; Cyanotic heart disease - hypoplastic left heart ... Hypoplastic left heart is a rare type of congenital heart disease. It is more common in males than in females. As ...

  5. A single intracoronary injection of midkine reduces ischemia/reperfusion injury in Swine hearts: a novel therapeutic approach for acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Hisaaki; Horiba, Mitsuru; Takenaka, Hiroharu; Sumida, Arihiro; Opthof, Tobias; Ishiguro, Yuko S; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Murohara, Toyoaki; Kodama, Itsuo

    2011-01-01

    Several growth factors are effective for salvaging myocardium and limiting infarct size in experimental studies with small animals. Their benefit in large animals and feasibility in clinical practice remains to be elucidated. We investigated the cardioprotective effect of midkine (MK) in swine subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). I/R was created by left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion for 45 min using a percutaneous over-the-wire balloon catheter. MK protein was injected as a bolus through the catheter at the initiation of reperfusion [MK-treated (MKT) group]. Saline was injected in controls (CONT). Infarct size/area at risk (24 h after I/R) in MKT was almost five times smaller than in CONT. Echocardiography in MKT revealed a significantly higher percent wall thickening of the interventricular septum, a higher left ventricular (LV) fractional shortening, and a lower E/e(') (ratio of transmitral to annular flow) compared with CONT. LV catheterization in MKT showed a lower LV end-diastolic pressure, and a higher dP/dt(max) compared with CONT. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling-positive myocytes and CD45-positive cell infiltration in the peri-infarct area were significantly less in MKT than in CONT. Here, we demonstrate that a single intracoronary injection of MK protein in swine hearts at the onset of reperfusion dramatically reduces infarct size and ameliorates systolic/diastolic LV function. This beneficial effect is associated with a reduction of apoptotic and inflammatory reactions. MK application during percutaneous coronary intervention may become a promising adjunctive therapy in acute coronary syndromes.

  6. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation affects cardioprotection by induced hypothermia at 34 °C against ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat isolated heart model.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Toshiaki; Jiang, Qiliang; Katoh, Takasumi; Aoki, Katsunori; Sato, Shigehito

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the effects of low- and high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on cardioprotection by induced hypothermia (IH) at 34 °C and examine whether extracellular signal-regulated kinase or endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates this cardioprotection. Left ventricle infarct sizes were evaluated in six groups of rat hearts (n = 6) following Langendorff perfusion and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Controls underwent 30 min of global ischemia at 37 °C, followed by 10 min of simulated low- or high-quality CPR reperfusion and 90 min of reperfusion at 75 mmHg. The IH groups underwent IH at 34 °C during reperfusion. The U0126 group received U0126 (60 μM)-an extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor-during reperfusion at 34 °C. The L-NIO (N-(1-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine dihydrochloride) group received L-NIO (2 μM)-an endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor-5 min before global ischemia at 37 °C to the end of reperfusion at 34 °C. Infarct size did not significantly differ between the control and IH groups receiving low-quality CPR. However, IH with high-quality CPR reduced the infarct size from 47.2% ± 10.2% to 26.0% ± 9.4% (P = 0.005). U0126 reversed the IH-induced cardioprotection (45.9% ± 9.4%, P = 0.010), whereas L-NIO had no significant effect. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality affects IH-induced cardioprotection. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase may mediate IH-induced cardioprotection.

  7. Cilostazol protects the heart against ischaemia reperfusion injury in a rabbit model of myocardial infarction: focus on adenosine, nitric oxide and mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yushan; Muqier; Murakami, Hiroya; Iwasa, Masamitsu; Sumi, Shohei; Yamada, Yoshihisa; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Aoyama, Takuma; Nishigaki, Kazuhiko; Takemura, Genzou; Uno, Bunji; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2011-10-01

    1. The present study examined whether or not cilostazol reduces the myocardial infarct size, and investigated its mechanism in a rabbit model of myocardial infarction. 2. Japanese white rabbits underwent 30 min of coronary occlusion, followed by 48 h of reperfusion. Cilostazol (1 and 5 mg/kg) or vehicle was given intravenously 5 min before ischaemia. 8-p-sulfophenyl theophylline (8SPT; an adenosine receptor blocker, 7.5 mg/kg), Nω-nitro-L-arginine methylester (l-NAME; an NOS inhibitor, 10 mg/kg) or 5-hydroxydecanoic acid sodium salt (5-HD; a mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel blocker, 5 mg/kg) was given intravenously 5 min before cilostazol injection. Infarct size was determined as a percentage of the risk area. 3. The myocardial interstitial levels of adenosine and nitrogen oxide (NOx) during ischaemia and reperfusion, and the intensity of myocardial dihydroethidium staining were determined. 4. Infarct size was significantly reduced in the cilostazol 1 mg/kg (38.4% (2.9%)) and cilostazol 5 mg/kg (30.7% (4.7%)) groups compared with that in the control group (46.5% (4.2%)). The infarct size-reducing effect of cilostazol was completely abolished by 8SPT (46.6% (3.5%)), L-NAME (49.0% (5.5%)), or 5HD (48.5% (5.1%)). 8SPT, L-NAME or 5HD alone did not affect the infarct size. Cilostazol treatment significantly increased myocardial levels of adenosine and NOx during ischaemia, and attenuated the intensity of dihydroethidium staining during reperfusion. 5. These findings show that cilostazol reduces the myocardial infarct size by increasing adenosine and NOx levels, attenuating superoxide production and opening the mitochondrial KATP channels. Cilostazol might provide a new strategy for the treatment of coronary heart disease.

  8. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... catheterization Tests to look for cancer Tissue and blood typing , to help make sure your body will not reject the donated heart Ultrasound of your neck and legs You will ... heart pump enough blood to the body. Most often, this is a ...

  9. Heart Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... español An Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The Heart Valves The Heartbeat Vasculature of the Arm Vasculature of the Head Vasculature of the Leg Vasculature of the Torso ...

  10. Stingray barb injury: a cause of late coronary occlusion and stent failure.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Craig R; Saro, Enrique; Patel, Parag; Swidryk, John; Bacani, Victor O; Russo, Mark J; Stone, Jay H

    2013-11-01

    Stingray injuries to the heart are rare, and survivors of this injury are even rarer. To date, there are only three reported survivors of this mode of penetrating cardiac injury, all inflicted by the living animal itself. The following is a report of a stingray injury, inflicted by a human, causing coronary complications 17 years after the injury was sustained.

  11. Acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-feng; Wang, Xian

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac injury is the most serious adverse event in acupuncture therapy. The causes include needling chest points near the heart, the cardiac enlargement and pericardial effusion that will enlarge the projected area on the body surface and make the proper depth of needling shorter, and the incorrect needling method of the points. Therefore, acupuncture practitioners must be familiar with the points of the heart projected area on the chest and the correct needling methods in order to reduce the risk of acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

  12. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries. Try weightlifting to strengthen your muscles and stretching, Pilates, and yoga to improve your flexibility because ... lead to injuries and inflammation from overuse. Regular stretching can help. After an injury or surgery has ...

  13. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  14. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  15. Wine and heart health

    MedlinePlus

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... more often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and ...

  16. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Arrhythmia Congenital Heart Defects Coronary Heart Disease Heart Valve Disease High Blood Pressure Send a link to NHLBI ... with the heart’s structure are present at birth. Heart valve disease . Occurs if one or more of your heart ...

  17. What Is Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  18. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... yourself MedlinePlus for More Information National Institute on Aging Related Topics Heart Failure High Blood Cholesterol High ... us | Customer Support | site map National Institute on Aging | U.S. National Library of Medicine | National Institutes of ...

  19. Hearts Wish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lethonee A.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates characteristics and themes in 102 drawings by sexually abused children. Themes of the drawings included genitalia, the absence of specific body parts, phallic symbols, inappropriate smiles, distorted body images, kinetic activity, prominent hands and fingers, and hearts. (RJC)

  20. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... for people who can't tolerate ACE inhibitors. Beta blockers. This class of drugs not only slows your ... rhythms and lessen your chance of dying unexpectedly. Beta blockers may reduce signs and symptoms of heart failure, ...

  1. What Is a Heart Murmur?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Murmur Related Topics Anemia Congenital Heart Defects Heart Valve Disease Holes in the Heart How the Heart Works ... heart defect that is present since birth or heart valve disease. Depending on the heart problem causing the abnormal ...

  2. Heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of multidisciplinary interventions for heart failure? What are the effects of exercise in people with heart failure? What are the effects of drug treatments for heart failure? What are the effects of devices for treatment of heart failure? What are the effects of coronary revascularisation for treatment of heart failure? What are the effects of drug treatments in people at high risk of heart failure? What are the effects of treatments for diastolic heart failure? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aldosterone receptor antagonists, amiodarone, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, anticoagulation, antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, calcium

  3. Association of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide with contrast-induced acute kidney injury and long-term mortality in patients with heart failure and mid-range ejection fraction: An observation study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Li, Hua-Long; Chen, Li-Ling; Bei, Wei-Jie; Lin, Kai-Yang; Smyth, Brendan; Chen, Shi-Qun; Guo, Xiao-Sheng; Guo, Wei; Liu, Yuan-Hui; Chen, Peng-Yuan; Chen, Ji-Yan; Chen, Kai-Hong; Liu, Yong; Tan, Ning

    2017-03-01

    The potential value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) for contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) in patients with heart failure and mid-range ejection fraction (HFmrEF) is unclear. We investigated whether NT-proBNP is associated with CI-AKI and long-term mortality following elective cardiac catheterization in patients with HFmrEF.A total of 174 consecutive patients with HFmrEF undergoing elective coronary angiography or intervention were enrolled. The primary endpoint was the development of CI-AKI, defined as an absolute increase of ≥0.3 mg/dL or ≥ 50% from baseline serum creatinine with 48 hours after contrast medium exposure. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was conducted, and Youden index was used to determine the best cutoff NT-proBNP value. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were performed to identify the independent risk factors for CI-AKI and long-term mortality, respectively.The incidence of CI-AKI was 12.1%. Patients with CI-AKI had higher NT-proBNP values than those without (4373[1561.9-7470.5] vs 1303[625.2-2482.3], P = 0.003). Receiver-operating characteristic curve revealed that NT-proBNP was not significantly different from the Mehran risk score in predicting CI-AKI (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.723 vs 0.767, P = 0.516). The best cutoff NT-proBNP value for CI-AKI was 3299 pg/mL, with 70.6% sensitivity and 83.1% specificity. Multivariable analysis demonstrated that NT-proBNP ≥3299 pg/mL is significantly related to CI-AKI (odds ratio = 12.79; 95% confidence interval, 3.18-51.49; P < 0.001). Cox regression analysis showed that NT-proBNP ≥3299 pg/mL is associated with long-term mortality (adjusted hazard ratio = 11.91; 95%CI, 2.16-65.70; P = 0.004) during follow-up.In patients with HFmrEF, NT-proBNP ≥3299 pg/mL is associated with CI-AKI and long-term mortality following elective coronary angiography or

  4. Association of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide with contrast-induced acute kidney injury and long-term mortality in patients with heart failure and mid-range ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Li, Hua-long; Chen, Li-ling; Bei, Wei-jie; Lin, Kai-yang; Smyth, Brendan; Chen, Shi-qun; Guo, Xiao-sheng; Guo, Wei; Liu, Yuan-hui; Chen, Peng-yuan; Chen, Ji-yan; Chen, Kai-hong; Liu, Yong; Tan, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The potential value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) for contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) in patients with heart failure and mid-range ejection fraction (HFmrEF) is unclear. We investigated whether NT-proBNP is associated with CI-AKI and long-term mortality following elective cardiac catheterization in patients with HFmrEF. A total of 174 consecutive patients with HFmrEF undergoing elective coronary angiography or intervention were enrolled. The primary endpoint was the development of CI-AKI, defined as an absolute increase of ≥0.3 mg/dL or ≥ 50% from baseline serum creatinine with 48 hours after contrast medium exposure. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was conducted, and Youden index was used to determine the best cutoff NT-proBNP value. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were performed to identify the independent risk factors for CI-AKI and long-term mortality, respectively. The incidence of CI-AKI was 12.1%. Patients with CI-AKI had higher NT-proBNP values than those without (4373[1561.9–7470.5] vs 1303[625.2–2482.3], P = 0.003). Receiver-operating characteristic curve revealed that NT-proBNP was not significantly different from the Mehran risk score in predicting CI-AKI (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.723 vs 0.767, P = 0.516). The best cutoff NT-proBNP value for CI-AKI was 3299 pg/mL, with 70.6% sensitivity and 83.1% specificity. Multivariable analysis demonstrated that NT-proBNP ≥3299 pg/mL is significantly related to CI-AKI (odds ratio = 12.79; 95% confidence interval, 3.18–51.49; P < 0.001). Cox regression analysis showed that NT-proBNP ≥3299 pg/mL is associated with long-term mortality (adjusted hazard ratio = 11.91; 95%CI, 2.16–65.70; P = 0.004) during follow-up. In patients with HFmrEF, NT-proBNP ≥3299 pg/mL is associated with CI-AKI and long-term mortality following elective coronary

  5. Heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug treatments, and of drug and invasive treatments, for heart failure? What are the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in people at high risk of heart failure? What are the effects of treatments for diastolic heart failure? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 85 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aldosterone receptor antagonists, amiodarone, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, anticoagulation, antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, cardiac resynchronisation therapy, digoxin (in people already receiving diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), exercise, hydralazine plus isosorbide dinitrate, implantable cardiac

  6. Healthy Heart Quizzes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  7. Inhaled matters of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Zaky, Ahmed; Ahmad, Aftab; Dell’Italia, Louis J; Jahromi, Leila; Reisenberg, Lee Ann; Matalon, Sadis; Ahmad, Shama

    2015-01-01

    Inhalations of atmospheric pollutants, especially particulate matters, are known to cause severe cardiac effects and to exacerbate preexisting heart disease. Heart failure is an important sequellae of gaseous inhalation such as that of carbon monoxide. Similarly, other gases such as sulphur dioxide are known to cause detrimental cardiovascular events. However, mechanisms of these cardiac toxicities are so far unknown. Increased susceptibility of the heart to oxidative stress may play a role. Low levels of antioxidants in the heart as compared to other organs and high levels of reactive oxygen species produced due to the high energetic demand and metabolic rate in cardiac muscle are important in rendering this susceptibility. Acute inhalation of high concentrations of halogen gases is often fatal. Severe respiratory injury and distress occurs upon inhalation of halogens gases, such as chlorine and bromine; however, studies on their cardiac effects are scant. We have demonstrated that inhalation of high concentrations of halogen gases cause significant cardiac injury, dysfunction, and failure that can be critical in causing mortalities following exposures. Our studies also demonstrated that cardiac dysfunction occurs as a result of a direct insult independent of coexisting hypoxia, since it is not fully reversed by oxygen supplementation. Therefore, studies on offsite organ effects of inhaled toxic gases can impact development of treatment strategies upon accidental or deliberate exposures to these agents. Here we summarize the knowledge of cardiovascular effects of common inhaled toxic gases with the intent to highlight the importance of consideration of cardiac symptoms while treating the victims. PMID:26665179

  8. Snowboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Pino, E C; Colville, M R

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective survey of 267 snowboarders was undertaken to determine the population at risk and types and mechanisms of injuries sustained in this sport. Snowboarders are young (average age, 21 years), male (greater than 90%), view themselves in average or above average physical condition (96%), and have varied sports interests. One hundred ten injuries that resulted in a physician visit were reported. Ligament sprains, fractures, and contusions were the most frequent types of injury. Fifty percent of all injuries occurred in the lower extremities, with ankle injuries being the most common. Snowboard riders using equipment with increased ankle support seem to be more protected from lower extremity injuries. The lower extremity injuries were concentrated in the forward limb of the snowboarder, where the rider's weight is disproportionately distributed. Differences in the mechanism and spectrum of injury between snowboarding and skiing injuries were noted, including: impact rather than torsion as the major mechanism of injury, a significant lack of thumb injuries, comparative increase in ankle injuries, a decrease in knee injuries, and a higher percentage of upper extremity injuries.

  9. Snowboarding injuries.

    PubMed

    Sachtleben, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    Snowboarding has gained immense popularity during the past 30 years and continues to appeal to many young participants. Injury patterns and characteristics of injuries seen commonly in snowboarders have rapidly evolved during this time. Risk factors have emerged, and various methods of reducing injuries to snowboarders have been investigated. It is important that medical providers are knowledgeable about this growing sport and are prepared to adequately evaluate and treat snowboarding injuries. This article will review the issues and discuss diagnostic and treatment principles regarding injuries seen commonly in snowboarders. Injury prevention should be emphasized, particularly with young riders and beginners.

  10. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart smart substitutions; Wellness - heart smart substitutions

  11. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  12. Heart Health: The Heart Truth Campaign 2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health The Heart Truth Campaign 2009 Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table ... one of the celebrities supporting this year's The Heart Truth campaign. Both R&B singer Ashanti (center) ...

  13. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  14. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  15. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the heart.Usually, a blockage starts with atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is the buildup of fatty deposits (called plaque) ... Americans and native Hawaiians are at greater risk.Atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries)Lack of exerciseStressObesitySex (Gender)-- ...

  16. Heart Truth

    MedlinePlus

    ... trademark of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and American Heart Association. Skip footer links and go to content Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX | ACCESSIBILITY | ... OIG | CONTACT US National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  17. Regenerating new heart with stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Anversa, Piero; Kajstura, Jan; Rota, Marcello; Leri, Annarosa

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses current understanding of myocardial biology, emphasizing the regeneration potential of the adult human heart and the mechanisms involved. In the last decade, a novel conceptual view has emerged. The heart is no longer considered a postmitotic organ, but is viewed as a self-renewing organ characterized by a resident stem cell compartment responsible for tissue homeostasis and cardiac repair following injury. Additionally, HSCs possess the ability to transdifferentiate and acquire the cardiomyocyte, vascular endothelial, and smooth muscle cell lineages. Both cardiac and hematopoietic stem cells may be used therapeutically in an attempt to reverse the devastating consequences of chronic heart failure of ischemic and nonischemic origin. PMID:23281411

  18. Heart disease and diet

    MedlinePlus

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  19. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  20. What Is Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Another type of heart surgery is called off-pump, or beating heart, surgery. It's like traditional open- ... heart-lung bypass machine isn't used. Off-pump heart surgery is limited to CABG. Surgeons can ...

  1. Anatomy of the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... picture of the outside of a normal, healthy, human heart. Heart Exterior Figure A shows the location of ... picture of the inside of a normal, healthy, human heart. Heart Interior Figure A shows the location of ...

  2. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ...

  3. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  4. Corneal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sand or dust Ultraviolet injuries: Caused by sunlight, sun lamps, snow or water reflections, or arc- ... a corneal injury if you: Are exposed to sunlight or artificial ultraviolet light for long periods of ...

  5. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can inhale that can cause acute internal injuries. Particles in the air from fires and toxic ... and lung diseases worse. Symptoms of acute inhalation injuries may include Coughing and phlegm A scratchy throat ...

  6. ACL Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury ...

  7. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... scalp internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  8. Urethral Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Related Injuries (Video) Rotator Cuff Injury (News) Violent Video Games May Not 'Desensitize' Players, Brain Scans ... Comfort Am I Correct? More Videos News HealthDay Violent Video Games May Not 'Desensitize' Players, Brain Scans ...

  9. Cycling injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    Bicycle-related injuries have increased as cycling has become more popular. Most injuries to recreational riders are associated with overuse or improper fit of the bicycle. Injuries to racers often result from high speeds, which predispose riders to muscle strains, collisions, and falls. Cyclists contact bicycles at the pedals, seat, and handlebars. Each is associated with particular cycling injuries. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8471908

  10. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  11. Orienteering injuries

    PubMed Central

    Folan, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    At the Irish National Orienteering Championships in 1981 a survey of the injuries occurring over the two days of competition was carried out. Of 285 individual competitors there was a percentage injury rate of 5.26%. The article discusses the injuries and aspects of safety in orienteering. Imagesp236-ap237-ap237-bp238-ap239-ap240-a PMID:7159815

  12. Twelve-hour reanimation of a human heart following donation after circulatory death.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeldt, Franklin; Ou, Ruchong; Woodard, John; Esmore, Donald; Marasco, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing use of donation after cardiac death (DCD) and encouraging results for non-cardiac transplants, DCD cardiac transplantation has not been widely adopted because, (1) the DCD heart sustains warm ischaemic injury during the death process and (2) conventional static cold storage significantly adds to the ischaemic injury. We have developed a simple system for perfusion of the DCD heart with cold crystalloid solution using gravity-feed that can reduce ischaemic injury and potentially render the heart suitable for transplantation. This report describes the first application of this technique to a human DCD heart with good functional metabolic recovery over 12h on an ex vivo rig.

  13. Heart Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    James Antaki and a group of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine used many elements of the Technology Utilization Program while looking for a way to visualize and track material points within the heart muscle. What they needed were tiny artificial "eggs" containing copper sulfate solution, small enough (about 2 mm in diameter) that they would not injure the heart, and large enough to be seen in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) images; they also had to be biocompatible and tough enough to withstand the beating of the muscle. The group could not make nor buy sufficient containers. After reading an article on microspheres in NASA Tech Briefs, and a complete set of reports on microencapsulation from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), JPL put Antaki in touch with Dr.Taylor Wang of Vanderbilt University who helped construct the myocardial markers. The research is expected to lead to improved understanding of how the heart works and what takes place when it fails.

  14. Waterbike injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, R S; Caiach, S

    1991-01-01

    Jet skiing is a rapidly growing sport. The craft incorporate safety features and the manufacturers issue detailed safety instructions. Racing is conducted with adequate attention to clothing, safety and insurance. However, casual use is widespread and is sometimes irresponsible. Serious injuries to riders are uncommon: dental and knee injuries are described. A case of renal contusion and a head injury were caused by other riders and two potentially fatal injuries illustrate the risk for other water users. The number of injuries associated with the use of personal watercraft is likely to increase and may be influenced by appropriate organization or regulation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1810620

  15. Crosstalk between the heart and peripheral organs in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jahng, James Won Suk; Song, Erfei; Sweeney, Gary

    2016-03-11

    Mediators from peripheral tissues can influence the development and progression of heart failure (HF). For example, in obesity, an altered profile of adipokines secreted from adipose tissue increases the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI). Less appreciated is that heart remodeling releases cardiokines, which can strongly impact various peripheral tissues. Inflammation, and, in particular, activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors with pyrin domain (NLRP3) inflammasome are likely to have a central role in cardiac remodeling and mediating crosstalk with other organs. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to cardiac injury induces the production and secretion of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. In addition to having local effects in the myocardium, these pro-inflammatory cytokines are released into circulation and cause remodeling in the spleen, kidney, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The collective effects of various cardiokines on peripheral organs depend on the degree and duration of myocardial injury, with systematic inflammation and peripheral tissue damage observed as HF progresses. In this article, we review mechanisms regulating myocardial inflammation in HF and the role of factors secreted by the heart in communication with peripheral tissues.

  16. Bicycling injuries.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Marc R

    2013-01-01

    Bicycling injuries can be classified into bicycle contact, traumatic, and overuse injuries. Despite the popularity of cycling, there are few scientific studies regarding injuries. Epidemiological studies are difficult to compare due to different methodologies and the diverse population of cyclists studied. There are only three studies conducted on top level professionals. Ninety-four percent of professionals in 1 year have experienced at least one overuse injury. Most overuse injuries are mild with limited time off the bike. The most common site of overuse injury is the knee, and the most common site of traumatic injury is the shoulder, with the clavicle having the most common fracture. Many overuse and bicycle contact ailments are relieved with simple bike adjustments.

  17. Injury - kidney and ureter

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney damage; Toxic injury of the kidney; Kidney injury; Traumatic injury of the kidney; Fractured kidney; Inflammatory injury of the kidney; Bruised kidney; Ureteral injury; Pre-renal failure - injury, ...

  18. Heart Rate Variability Analysis in General Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gang, Yi; Malik, Marek

    2003-01-01

    Autonomic nervous system plays an integral role in homeostasis. Autonomic modulation can frequently be altered in patients with cardiac disorders as well as in patients with other critical illnesses or injuries. Assessment of heart rate variability is based on analysis of consecutive normal R-R intervals and may provide quantitative information on the modulation of cardiac vagal and sympathetic nerve input. The hypothesis that depressed heart rate variability may occur over a broad range of illness and injury, and may inversely correlated with disease severity and outcome has been tested in various clinical settings over the last decade. This article reviews recent literature concerning the potential clinical implications and limitations of heart rate variability assessment in general medicine. PMID:16943988

  19. Cardiorenal syndrome in children with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Price, Jack F; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2009-09-01

    Concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunction has been termed the cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). This clinical condition usually manifests as heart failure with worsening renal function and occurs frequently in the acute care setting. A consistent definition of CRS has not been universally agreed upon, although a recent classification of CRS describes several subtypes depending on the primary organ injured and the chronicity of the injury. CRS may develop in adults and children and is a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized and ambulatory patients. The underlying physiology of CRS is not well understood, creating a significant challenge for clinicians when treating heart failure patients with renal insufficiency. This review summarizes recent data characterizing the incidence, physiology, and management of children who have heart failure and acute kidney injury.

  20. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart, lungs, and blood vessels make up the circulatory system . The heart is the central pump of this ... Heart Defects Getting an EKG (Video) Your Heart & Circulatory System Heart Murmurs Mitral Valve Prolapse Movie: Heart & Circulatory ...

  1. Unusual attempted suicide by shooting through heart.

    PubMed

    Kadis, P; Pogorevc, L; Sipek, M; Vidovic, D

    2005-01-17

    Gunshot wounds in the heart are frequent suicidal injuries, especially in men. Most of them are lethal, but some cases of survival due to immediate and proper surgical treatment are reported. However, survival without specific treatment is extremely rare. In our case, a 44-year man attempted suicide by home-made shooting device. A special 12 cm long and 2.5 mm wide needle-like missile entered his body at the left anterior part of his chest, passed through the heart and lower lobe of right lung and exited at the right side of his back. The patient was able to move normally and he also looked for medical help immediately after attempting suicide. We found large atypical-shaped entrance wound on the anterior part of the chest, which was surgically treated, and tiny pointed exit wound under the right scapula. The patient was stable from cardio-circulatory and respiratory aspects from the time of admission to discharge from the hospital. We found only minimal pericardial bleeding (up to 10 mm thick) and there was no need for surgical intervention. In the next 2 weeks the haematoma absorbed spontaneously. The gunshot injury healed without any complication. Paranoid psychosis was diagnosed by psychiatrist and this probably had been the cause of attempting suicide. We think that the favorable outcome of the proved heart gunshot injury in our patient was due to the needle-shaped low-energy missile, which caused only tiny gunshot (stab) hole in the heart. Such a heart injury caused only minimal bleeding into the pericardial sac without heart tamponade.

  2. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Julia E.; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg; Fisher, Robyn L.; Vickers, Alison E.M.

    2014-01-15

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100 μM) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24 h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5 mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48 h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70 kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1α, Il-1β, IL-6 and TNFα in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices. - Highlights: • Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury evaluated in heart slices. • Isoproterenol altered apoptosis, energy, inflammation and remodeling pathways. • Human model verified by comparison to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. • Human and rat respond to isoproterenol

  3. Migration of cardiomyocytes is essential for heart regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Itou, Junji; Oishi, Isao; Kawakami, Hiroko; Glass, Tiffany J; Richter, Jenna; Johnson, Austin; Lund, Troy C; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2012-11-01

    Adult zebrafish possess a significant ability to regenerate injured heart tissue through proliferation of pre-existing cardiomyocytes, which contrasts with the inability of mammals to do so after the immediate postnatal period. Zebrafish therefore provide a model system in which to study how an injured heart can be repaired. However, it remains unknown what important processes cardiomyocytes are involved in other than partial de-differentiation and proliferation. Here we show that migration of cardiomyocytes to the injury site is essential for heart regeneration. Ventricular amputation induced expression of cxcl12a and cxcr4b, genes encoding a chemokine ligand and its receptor. We found that cxcl12a was expressed in the epicardial tissue and that Cxcr4 was expressed in cardiomyocytes. We show that pharmacological blocking of Cxcr4 function as well as genetic loss of cxcr4b function causes failure to regenerate the heart after ventricular resection. Cardiomyocyte proliferation was not affected but a large portion of proliferating cardiomyocytes remained localized outside the injury site. A photoconvertible fluorescent reporter-based cardiomyocyte-tracing assay demonstrates that cardiomyocytes migrated into the injury site in control hearts but that migration was inhibited in the Cxcr4-blocked hearts. By contrast, the epicardial cells and vascular endothelial cells were not affected by blocking Cxcr4 function. Our data show that the migration of cardiomyocytes into the injury site is regulated independently of proliferation, and that coordination of both processes is necessary for heart regeneration.

  4. Environmental injuries.

    PubMed

    Leikin, J B; Aks, S E; Andrews, S; Auerbach, P S; Cooper, M A; Jacobsen, T D; Krenzelok, E P; Shicker, L; Weiner, S L

    1997-12-01

    Environmental injuries and illnesses can happen in home, work, or recreational settings. The variety and severity of these injuries might require the clinician to call on skills from internal medicine, emergency medicine, and toxicology. Diseases of thermoregulation are hypothermia and hyperthermia. In each instance, treatment is based on the need to restore the patient's core temperature to normal and on monitoring for complications. The victim of a fire might suffer inhalation injury in addition to burns, and it is more likely that the inhalation injury will be fatal. Oxygen deprivation and inhalation of irritant or asphyxiant chemicals contribute to injury. Toxic plants can be the source of poisoning emergencies, especially in children. Misinformation and myths that surround common plants can create diagnostic problems (i.e., which plants really are toxic and require emergency measures). Venomous marine organisms can cause a wide range of injury, from cutaneous eruption to fatal envenomation. Most are encountered in a recreational setting, such as water sports, but keepers of home aquariums are subject to stings from venomous fish. Lightning injury can present many diagnostic and treatment dilemmas. An important point in this regard is that lightning injury and high-voltage electrical injury are different in pathology and require different approaches for treatment. A discussion of electrical, chemical, and thermal burns makes such differences apparent.

  5. Paragliding injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Krüger-Franke, M; Siebert, C H; Pförringer, W

    1991-01-01

    Regulations controlling the sport of paragliding were issued in April 1987 by the German Department of Transportation. The growing popularity of this sport has led to a steady increase in the number of associated injuries. This study presents the incidence, localization and degree of injuries associated with paragliding documented in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The 283 injuries suffered by 218 paragliders were documented in the period 1987-1989: 181 occurred during landing, 28 during starting procedures and nine during flight. The mean patient age was 29.6 years. There were 34.9% spinal injuries, 13.4% upper extremity injuries and 41.3% lower limb injuries. Over half of these injuries were treated surgically and in 54 instances permanent disability remained. In paragliding the lower extremities are at greatest risk of injury during landing. Proper equipment, especially sturdy footwear, exact training in landing techniques as well as improved instruction in procedures during aborted or crash landings is required to reduce the frequency of these injuries. Images p99-a p100-a p100-b p100-c PMID:1751899

  6. Paragliding injuries.

    PubMed

    Krüger-Franke, M; Siebert, C H; Pförringer, W

    1991-06-01

    Regulations controlling the sport of paragliding were issued in April 1987 by the German Department of Transportation. The growing popularity of this sport has led to a steady increase in the number of associated injuries. This study presents the incidence, localization and degree of injuries associated with paragliding documented in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The 283 injuries suffered by 218 paragliders were documented in the period 1987-1989: 181 occurred during landing, 28 during starting procedures and nine during flight. The mean patient age was 29.6 years. There were 34.9% spinal injuries, 13.4% upper extremity injuries and 41.3% lower limb injuries. Over half of these injuries were treated surgically and in 54 instances permanent disability remained. In paragliding the lower extremities are at greatest risk of injury during landing. Proper equipment, especially sturdy footwear, exact training in landing techniques as well as improved instruction in procedures during aborted or crash landings is required to reduce the frequency of these injuries.

  7. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury, cerebral contusion, cerebral laceration, coma, head trauma, hematoma, impaired consciousness, postconcussion syndrome, skull fracture, skull penetration, stupor, vegetative state Family Health, Infants ...

  8. Hamstring Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... result. Hamstring injury risk factors include: Sports participation. Sports that require sprinting or running, or other activities such as dancing that might require extreme stretching, make a hamstring ...

  9. Injury prevention: the time has come.

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, R

    1995-01-01

    Although cancer, heart disease and stroke occupy much of society's attention to health matters, injuries account for more potential years of life lost before age 65 than all these diseases combined. The time has come to set the record straight and to give injury its rightful place on the health policy agenda. Contrary to popular belief, most injuries are no accident. More than 90% of injuries are both predictable and preventable. Injury prevention, a multidisciplinary effort, is coming of age in Canada. Education alone is not enough. New technology, innovative approaches to safety education and the mobilization of community resources can help to change behaviour and legislation to decrease the risk of injury. Physicians have an important role to play in this process. PMID:7804918

  10. Prometheus's heart: what lies beneath.

    PubMed

    Barile, Lucio; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    A heart attack kills off many cells in the heart. Parts of the heart become thin and fail to contract properly following the replacement of lost cells by scar tissue. However, the notion that the same adult cardiomyocytes beat throughout the lifespan of the organ and organism, without the need for a minimum turnover, gives way to a fascinating investigations. Since the late 1800s, scientists and cardiologists wanted to demonstrate that the cardiomyocytes cannot be generated after the perinatal period in human beings. This curiosity has been passed down in subsequent years and has motivated more and more accurate studies in an attempt to exclude the presence of renewed cardiomyocytes in the tissue bordering the ischaemic area, and then to confirm the dogma of the heart as terminally differentiated organ. Conversely, peri-lesional mitosis of cardiomyocytes were discovered initially by light microscopy and subsequently confirmed by more sophisticated technologies. Controversial evidence of mechanisms underlying myocardial regeneration has shown that adult cardiomyocytes are renewed through a slow turnover, even in the absence of damage. This turnover is ensured by the activation of rare clusters of progenitor cells interspersed among the cardiac cells functionally mature. Cardiac progenitor cells continuously interact with each other, with the cells circulating in the vessels of the coronary microcirculation and myocardial cells in auto-/paracrine manner. Much remains to be understood; however, the limited functional recovery in human beings after myocardial injury clearly demonstrates weak regenerative potential of cardiomyocytes and encourages the development of new approaches to stimulate this process.

  11. Right heart ventriculography

    MedlinePlus

    Angiography - right heart ... moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can ... is injected into the right side of the heart. It helps the cardiologist determine the size and ...

  12. Left heart catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  13. Heart disease and women

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines, ... the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology Foundation endorsed by the World Heart Federation and ...

  14. Honolulu Heart Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Heart Failure, Congestive; Myocardial Infarction; Asthma; Emphysema; Lung Diseases, Obstructive; Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal; Bronchitis; Dementia; Hypertension; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Heart Failure

  15. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Attack Recovery FAQs Updated:Sep 19,2016 Most people ... recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions and Answers What treatments will I ...

  16. Heart Surgery Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hearts of humans who have died (cadavers). Angina pectoris The discomfort experienced by individuals when their heart ... performed during symptoms suggestive of coronary artery disease angina pectoris , abnormalities may confirm the diagnosis of ischemic heart ...

  17. Heart disease and depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  18. Getting a New Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Heart Transplants American Society of Transplantation 1120 Route 73, Suite 200 Mount Laurel, NJ 08054 Phone: ... of heart disease; these patients have no other choice. The best treatment for your heart failure will ...

  19. Mending broken hearts: cardiac development as a basis for adult heart regeneration and repair

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Mei; Olson, Eric N.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    As the adult mammalian heart has limited potential for regeneration and repair, the loss of cardiomyocytes during injury and disease can result in heart failure and death. The cellular processes and regulatory mechanisms involved in heart growth and development can be exploited to repair the injured adult heart through ‘reawakening’ pathways that are active during embryogenesis. Heart function has been restored in rodents by reprogramming non-myocytes into cardiomyocytes, by expressing transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and T-box 5 (TBX5)) and microRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-208 and miR-499) that control cardiomyocyte identity. Stimulating cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation and proliferation by activating mitotic signalling pathways involved in embryonic heart growth represents a complementary approach for heart regeneration and repair. Recent advances in understanding the mechanistic basis of heart development offer exciting opportunities for effective therapies for heart failure. PMID:23839576

  20. Surviving shot through the heart: Management in two cases.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Fraz Anwar; Kabeer, Jamal; Shahabuddin, Syed

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating cardiac injuries after gunshot are usually fatal and are very challenging to manage for surgeons even in fully- equipped centres. Such injuries can cause ventricular septal defect (VSD) or cardiac tamponade depending upon the distance, direction and velocity of the bullet. Stable patients can be subjected to investigations like computed tomography (CT) to avoid unnecessary intervention, but unstable patients should be rushed to the operating room. We discuss management in two cases of traversing bullet injury to the heart. In the first case, traumatic VSD was significant, requiring closure on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) along with repair of right and left ventricular injury. In the second case, only the repair of right and left ventricles was performed without CPB. They both had traversing bullet injury through the heart.

  1. Whiplash injuries.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Gerard; Peter, Jason

    2005-10-01

    Whiplash injuries are very common and usually are associated with rear-end collisions. However, a whiplash injury can be caused by any event that results in hyperextension and flexion of the cervical spine. These injuries are of serious concern to all consumers due to escalating cost of diagnosis, treatment, insurance, and litigation. Most acute whiplash injury cases respond well to conservative treatments, which result in resolution of symptoms usually within weeks to a few months after the injury occurred. Chronic whiplash injuries often are harder to diagnose and treat and often result in poor outcomes. Current research shows that various structures in the cervical spine receive nociceptive innervation and potentially may be the cause of chronic pain symptoms. One potential pain generator showing promise is the facet or zygapophyseal joints. Various researchers have proven that these joints are injured during whiplash injuries and that diagnosis and temporary pain relief can be obtained with facet joint injections. The initial evaluation of any patient should follow an organized and stepwise approach, and more serious causes of neck pain must first be ruled out through the history, physical examination, and diagnostic testing. Treatment regimens should be evidence-based, focusing on treatments that have proven to be effective in treating acute and chronic whiplash injuries.

  2. A Heart of Stone: Cardiac Fibroblasts Turn to Bone in Calcified Hearts.

    PubMed

    Ivey, Kathryn N

    2017-02-02

    The identity of the cells and molecular events driving deleterious calcification of heart muscle remains elusive. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Pillai et al. (2017) report that cardiac fibroblasts respond to injury by adopting an osteogenic cell fate and creating damaging calcific deposits, which can be prevented by inhibiting the activated mineralization process.

  3. Head injuries.

    PubMed

    Yanko, J

    1984-08-01

    In summary, the broad term "head injury" represents a large variety of more specific injuries. In order to anticipate and plan appropriate patient care, nurses need information regarding the cause of injury, the impact site, and the patient's clinical course in addition to current assessment findings. The nurse must also anticipate sequelae from secondary brain injury due to hypoxia, edema, increased intracranial pressure, changes in regional blood flows, or hypovolemic shock due to internal bleeding in another body system or cavity. The head-injured patient is a complex patient requiring intensive nursing care, observation, and assessment. By incorporating knowledge of the mechanisms of injury into nursing observations and assessments, nurses can provide more effective nursing interventions.

  4. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  5. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Questions Glossary Contact Us Visitor Feedback mild Traumatic Brain Injury mild Traumatic Brain Injury VIDEO STORIES What is TBI Measuring Severity ... most common deployment injuries is a mild Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). A mild TBI is an injury ...

  6. Cardiac Fibroblasts Adopt Osteogenic Fates and Can Be Targeted to Attenuate Pathological Heart Calcification.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Indulekha C L; Li, Shen; Romay, Milagros; Lam, Larry; Lu, Yan; Huang, Jie; Dillard, Nathaniel; Zemanova, Marketa; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Wang, Yibin; Lee, Jason; Xia, Ming; Liang, Owen; Xie, Ya-Hong; Pellegrini, Matteo; Lusis, Aldons J; Deb, Arjun

    2017-02-02

    Mammalian tissues calcify with age and injury. Analogous to bone formation, osteogenic cells are thought to be recruited to the affected tissue and induce mineralization. In the heart, calcification of cardiac muscle leads to conduction system disturbances and is one of the most common pathologies underlying heart blocks. However the cell identity and mechanisms contributing to pathological heart muscle calcification remain unknown. Using lineage tracing, murine models of heart calcification and in vivo transplantation assays, we show that cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) adopt an osteoblast cell-like fate and contribute directly to heart muscle calcification. Small-molecule inhibition of ENPP1, an enzyme that is induced upon injury and regulates bone mineralization, significantly attenuated cardiac calcification. Inhibitors of bone mineralization completely prevented ectopic cardiac calcification and improved post injury heart function. Taken together, these findings highlight the plasticity of fibroblasts in contributing to ectopic calcification and identify pharmacological targets for therapeutic development.

  7. Sequential Analysis of Autonomic Arousal and Self-Injurious Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoch, John; Symons, Frank; Sng, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    There have been limited direct tests of the hypothesis that self-injurious behavior (SIB) regulates arousal. In this study, two autonomic biomarkers for physiological arousal (heart rate [HR] and the high-frequency [HF] component of heart rate variability [HRV]) were investigated in relation to SIB for 3 participants with intellectual…

  8. Hypertension, hypertrophy, and reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Pasquale; Penna, Claudia

    2017-03-01

    The heart of patients with hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy is more vulnerable to ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Here we discuss the main mechanisms of IRI and possible targets for cardioprotection. In particular, we consider the viewpoint that hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy may act synergistically in increasing the predisposition to cardiovascular accidents and in worsening IRI. There is no doubt that hypertrophic hearts may be redirected to be less vulnerable to IRI. Some experimental evidences suggest that antihypertensive drugs may have beneficial effects, some of which are not directly related to hypertension-lowering effect. However, more thorough experimental and clinical studies are necessary to understand the mechanisms and to maximize the beneficial effects of reperfusion after a heart attack in the presence of comorbidities, such as hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy.

  9. A new nonpenetrating ballistic injury.

    PubMed

    Carroll, A W; Soderstrom, C A

    1978-12-01

    A new, nonpenetrating ballistic injury mechanism involving individuals protected by soft body armor is described. Experimental studies using laboratory animals have demonstrated that despite stopping missile penetration, the heart, liver, spleen, and spinal cord are vulnerable to injury. The rapid jolting force of an impacting bullet is contrasted with the usually encountered mechanisms producing blunt trauma injury. The experimental methodology used to assess a 20% increase in survival probability and an 80% decrease in the need for surgical intervention with a new soft body armor is reviewed. Five cases of ballistic assaults on law enforcement personnel protected by soft body armor are presented. Four emphasize the potentially lifesaving qualities of the armor, while the fifth indicates the need for torso encircling design. Hospitalization should follow all assaults, regardless of the innocuous appearance of the skin lesion and the apparent well being on the assaulted individual. Therapeutic guidelines for patient management are suggested.

  10. Heart failure.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2013-02-01

    Despite major improvements in the treatment of virtually all cardiac disorders, heart failure (HF) is an exception, in that its prevalence is rising, and only small prolongations in survival are occurring. An increasing fraction, especially older women with diabetes, obesity, and atrial fibrillation exhibit HF with preserved systolic function. Several pathogenetic mechanisms appear to be operative in HF. These include increased hemodynamic overload, ischemia-related dysfunction, ventricular remodeling, excessive neurohumoral stimulation, abnormal myocyte calcium cycling, excessive or inadequate proliferation of the extracellular matrix, accelerated apoptosis, and genetic mutations. Biomarkers released as a consequence of myocardial stretch, imbalance between formation and breakdown of extracellular matrix, inflammation, and renal failure are useful in the identification of the pathogenetic mechanism and, when used in combination, may become helpful in estimating prognosis and selecting appropriate therapy. Promising new therapies that are now undergoing intensive investigation include an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, a naturally-occurring vasodilator peptide, a myofilament sensitizer and several drugs that enhance Ca++ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Cell therapy, using autologous bone marrow and cardiac progenitor cells, appears to be promising, as does gene therapy. Chronic left ventricular assistance with continuous flow pumps is being applied more frequently and successfully as destination therapy, as a bridge to transplantation, and even as a bridge to recovery and explantation. While many of these therapies will improve the care of patients with HF, significant reductions in prevalence will require vigorous, multifaceted, preventive approaches.

  11. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome is a congenital heart condition that occurs during the development of the heart in the ... womb. During the heart's development, parts of the left side of the heart (mitral valve, left ventricle ...

  12. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... get enough calories to heal and grow. After heart surgery, most babies and infants (younger than 12 to 15 months) can take ... valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... open heart surgery References Bernstein D. General principles ...

  13. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Feb 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  14. Testicular Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also, the location of the testicles makes them prime targets to be accidentally struck on the playing ... you might also feel nauseated for a short time. If it's a minor testicular injury, the pain ...

  15. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... devastating types of trauma resulting from exposure to fire and smoke. PREVENT you and your loved ones! ... people die annually in the United States from fire injuries. • Over half of these deaths result from ...

  16. Birth Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... cesarean delivery may be done in certain circumstances. Did You Know... Serious birth injuries are now quite ... are typically not needed. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Sidebar 1 ...

  17. Ear Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors usually give an antibiotic to prevent infection. Did You Know... If left untreated, a swollen, bruised ... can be corrected surgically. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Facial Injuries ...

  18. Lightning Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause internal burns than electrical injuries from generated electricity. However, it can kill a person by instantaneously ... water do not attract lightning but easily transmit electricity once they are hit. Electricity from lightning can ...

  19. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... and drive. Do not dive into pools, lakes, rivers, and other bodies of water, particularly if you cannot determine the depth of the ... Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  20. Congenital complete heart block.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, B.; Sheikh, Z.; Cibils, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital complete heart block in utero has become diagnosed more frequently with the clinical use of fetal echocardiography. The fetus with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic or may develop congestive heart failure. Congenital complete heart block is more frequently seen in infants of mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus, both clinically manifested and subclinical systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antibodies (SS-A and SS-B antibodies). At birth, the neonate with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic and may not require a pacemaker to increase the heart rate. The indications for a pacemaker in neonates with complete heart block have been discussed. Both in-utero and neonatal management of congenital complete heart block are discussed to manage congestive heart failure in a fetus. Four patients with congenital complete heart block are presented covering a broad spectrum of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management both in the fetal and neonatal period. Images Figure 1 PMID:8961692

  1. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries.

  2. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  3. Aquatic Exercise and Heat-Related Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sova, Ruth

    1991-01-01

    Heat-related injuries in aquatics classes are possible, though 100 percent preventable. The article discusses heat-related syndromes; how bodies generate and dissipate heat; how elevated heart rates that burn calories differ from those that dissipate heat; and modification of exercise intensity to provide calorie-burning workouts without…

  4. Intracardiac Penetrating Injury with Right Femoral Artery Embolism due to Blast Injury

    PubMed Central

    Abuzaid, Ahmed Abdulaziz; Al-Abbasi, Thamer; Arekat, Zaid

    2016-01-01

    Embolization due to blast injury with projectiles entering the bloodstream from the heart is a rare event that is unlikely to be suspected during the initial assessment of trauma patients. We report a case in which a missile penetrating the heart chambers managed to embolize and occlude the right common femoral artery. This was successfully managed by means of a multidisciplinary approach that included exploration, cardiorrhaphy, and embolectomy.

  5. Oxidative Stress after Surgery on the Immature Heart

    PubMed Central

    Fudulu, Daniel; Angelini, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric heart surgery is associated with increased inflammation and the production of reactive oxygen species. Use of the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary bypass during correction of congenital heart defects generates reactive oxygen species by various mechanisms: haemolysis, neutrophil activation, ischaemia reperfusion injury, reoxygenation injury, or depletion of the endogenous antioxidants. The immature myocardium is more vulnerable to reactive oxygen species because of developmental differences compared to the adult heart but also because of associated congenital heart diseases that can deplete its antioxidant reserve. Oxidative stress can be manipulated by various interventions: exogenous antioxidants, use of steroids, cardioplegia, blood prime strategies, or miniaturisation of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. However, it is unclear if modulation of the redox pathways can alter clinical outcomes. Further studies powered to look at clinical outcomes are needed to define the role of oxidative stress in paediatric patients. PMID:27123154

  6. Building and re-building the heart by cardiomyocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Foglia, Matthew J.; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    The adult human heart does not regenerate significant amounts of lost tissue after injury. Rather than making new, functional muscle, human hearts are prone to scarring and hypertrophy, which can often lead to fatal arrhythmias and heart failure. The most-cited basis of this ineffective cardiac regeneration in mammals is the low proliferative capacity of adult cardiomyocytes. However, mammalian cardiomyocytes can avidly proliferate during fetal and neonatal development, and both adult zebrafish and neonatal mice can regenerate cardiac muscle after injury, suggesting that latent regenerative potential exists. Dissecting the cellular and molecular mechanisms that promote cardiomyocyte proliferation throughout life, deciphering why proliferative capacity normally dissipates in adult mammals, and deriving means to boost this capacity are primary goals in cardiovascular research. Here, we review our current understanding of how cardiomyocyte proliferation is regulated during heart development and regeneration. PMID:26932668

  7. Renal neurohormonal regulation in heart failure decompensation.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Sofia; Agic, Mediha Becirovic; Narfström, Fredrik; Melville, Jacqueline M; Hultström, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Decompensation in heart failure occurs when the heart fails to balance venous return with cardiac output, leading to fluid congestion and contributing to mortality. Decompensated heart failure can cause acute kidney injury (AKI), which further increases mortality. Heart failure activates signaling systems that are deleterious to kidneys such as renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and vasopressin secretion. All three reduce renal blood flow (RBF) and increase tubular sodium reabsorption, which may increase renal oxygen consumption causing AKI through renal tissue hypoxia. Vasopressin contributes to venous congestion through aquaporin-mediated water retention. Additional water retention may be mediated through vasopressin-induced medullary urea transport and hyaluronan but needs further study. In addition, there are several systems that could protect the kidneys and reduce fluid retention such as natriuretic peptides, prostaglandins, and nitric oxide. However, the effect of natriuretic peptides and nitric oxide are blunted in decompensation, partly due to oxidative stress. This review considers how neurohormonal signaling in heart failure drives fluid retention by the kidneys and thus exacerbates decompensation. It further identifies areas where there is limited data, such as signaling systems 20-HETE, purines, endothelin, the role of renal water retention mechanisms for congestion, and renal hypoxia in AKI during heart failure.

  8. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  9. Risks for Heart Valve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  10. Radiation-associated valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ong, Daniel S; Aertker, Robert A; Clark, Alexandra N; Kiefer, Todd; Hughes, G Chad; Harrison, J Kevin; Bashore, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    Therapeutic ionizing radiation, such as that used in the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma, can cause cardiac valvular damage that may take several years to manifest as radiation-associated valvular heart disease. Treatment can be complicated by comorbid radiation injury to other cardiac and mediastinal structures that lead to traditional surgical valve replacement or repair becoming high-risk. A representative case is presented that demonstrates the complexity of radiation-associated valvular heart disease and its successful treatment with percutaneous transcatheter valve replacement. The prevalence and pathophysiologic mechanism of radiation-associated valvular injury are reviewed. Anthracycline adjuvant therapy appears to increase the risk of valvular fibrosis. Left-sided heart valves are more commonly affected than right-sided heart valves. A particular pattern of calcification has been noted in some patients, and experimental data suggest that radiation induction of an osteogenic phenotype may be responsible. A renewed appreciation of the cardiac valvular effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation for mediastinal malignancies is important, and the treatment of such patients may be assisted by the development of novel, less-invasive approaches.

  11. Lightning injuries.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe Gatewood, Medley; Zane, Richard D

    2004-05-01

    Lightning is persistently one of the leading causes of death caused by environmental or natural disaster. To understand the pathophysiology and treatment of lightning injuries one must first discount the innumerable myths, superstitions, and misconceptions surrounding lightning. The fundamental difference between high voltage electrical injury and lightning is the duration of exposure to current. Reverse triage should be instituted in lightning strike victims because victims in cardiopulmonary arrest might gain the greatest benefit from resuscitation efforts, although there is no good evidence suggesting that lightning strike victims might benefit from longer than usual resuscitation times. Many of the injuries suffered by lightning strike victims are unique to lightning, and long-term sequelae should be anticipated and addressed in the lightning victim.

  12. Blast Injury

    PubMed Central

    de Candole, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    The shock wave generated by an explosion (“blast wave”) may cause injury in any or all of the following: (1) direct impact on the tissues of variations in environmental pressure; (2) flying glass and other debris set in motion by it; (3) propulsion of the body. Injuries in the first category affect gas-containing organs (ears, lungs and intestines), and acute death is attributed to air forced into the coronary vessels via damaged pulmonary alveoli. It is estimated that overpressure sufficient to cause lung injury may occur up to five miles from a 20-megaton nuclear explosion. The greatest single hazard from blast is, however, flying glass, and serious wounding from this cause is possible up to 12 miles from an explosion of this magnitude. PMID:6015742

  13. Hamstring injuries

    PubMed Central

    Guanche, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a continuum of hamstring injuries that can range from musculotendinous strains to avulsion injuries. Although the proximal hamstring complex has a strong bony attachment on the ischial tuberosity, hamstring injuries are common in athletic population and can affect all levels of athletes. Nonoperative treatment is mostly recommended in the setting of low-grade partial tears and insertional tendinosis. However, failure of nonoperative treatment of partial tears may benefit from surgical debridement and repair. The technique presented on this article allows for the endoscopic management of proximal hamstring tears and chronic ischial bursitis, which until now has been managed exclusively with much larger open approaches. The procedure allows for complete exposure of the posterior aspect of the hip in a safe, minimally invasive fashion. PMID:27011828

  14. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation.

  15. Stimulation of Oxytocin Receptor during Early Reperfusion Period Protects the Heart against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury: the Role of Mitochondrial ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel, Nitric Oxide, and Prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Imani, Alireza; Khansari, Maryam; Azizi, Yaser; Rakhshan, Kamran; Faghihi, Mahdieh

    2015-08-01

    Postconditioning is a simple and safe strategy for cardioprotection and infarct size limitation. Our previous study showed that oxytocin (OT) exerts postconditioning effect on ischemic/reperfused isolated rat heart. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of OT receptor, mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel (mKATP), nitric oxide (NO) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways in OT postconditioning. Isolated rat hearts were divided into10 groups and underwent 30 min of regional ischemia followed by 120 min of reperfusion (n =6). In I/R (ischemia/reperfusion) group, ischemia and reperfusion were induced without any treatment. In OT group, oxytocin was perfused 5 min prior to beginning of reperfusion for 25 min. In groups 3-6, atosiban (oxytocin receptor blocker), L-NAME (N-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester, non-specific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), 5-HD (5-hydroxydecanoate, mKATP inhibitor) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) were infused prior to oxytocin administration. In others, the mentioned inhibitors were perfused prior to ischemia without oxytocin infusion. Infarct size, ventricular hemodynamic, coronary effluent, malondialdehyde (MDA) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured at the end of reperfusion. OT perfusion significantly reduced infarct size, MDA and LDH in comparison with IR group. Atosiban, 5HD, L-NAME and indomethacin abolished the postconditioning effect of OT. Perfusion of the inhibitors alone prior to ischemia had no effect on infarct size, hemodynamic parameters, coronary effluent and biochemical markers as compared with I/R group. In conclusion, this study indicates that postconditioning effects of OT are mediated by activation of mKATP and production of NO and Prostaglandins (PGs).

  16. How Can I Live with Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Defects Care & Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects Congenital Heart Defects Tools & Resources Heart Attack About Heart Attacks Warning Signs of a Heart ...

  17. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    Heart nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Mann DL, ... A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  18. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Oct 12,2016 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  19. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  20. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  1. Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Options • Recovery and Healthy Living Goals • Personal Stories Heart Valve Disease Symptoms Dr. Robert Bonow describes the symptoms that may alert you to heart valve disease. Support Network: You're Not Alone Popular Articles ...

  2. Nuclear Heart Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... into your blood and travels to your heart. Nuclear heart scans use single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) to detect the energy from the tracer to make pictures of your ...

  3. Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  4. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart failure - overview Heart pacemaker High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Smoking - tips on how to quit ... ask your doctor How to read food labels Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge Low-salt diet Mediterranean diet ...

  5. Menopause and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... minutes, you can get your own personal heart score and life plan. Live better with Life's Simple ... and wellness. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Target Heart Rates ...

  6. Know Your Heart's Numbers

    MedlinePlus

    ... of body fat based on height and weight), waist circumference, blood sugar and weight. The telephone survey of ... for heart health. Just 36 percent knew that waist circumference is important measure of heart disease risk. The ...

  7. Heart attack - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndromes: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. ... disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice ...

  8. Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease and stroke. Start exploring today ! Printable Arrhythmia Information Sheets What is Arrhythmia? What is Atrial ... Card See all Answers by Heart patient sheets Arrhythmia • Home • About Arrhythmia Introduction Atrial Fibrillation Bradycardia Conduction ...

  9. Types of Heart Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions that make open-heart surgery very risky. Arrhythmia Treatment An arrhythmia (ah-RITH-me-ah) is a problem with ... rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, ...

  10. American Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educator CPR & ECC Shop Causes Advocate Giving Media American Heart Association Check out Scientific Sessions 2016 news -- translated for ... do not always represent the views of the American Heart Association. Keep color fresh and vibrant by knowing how ...

  11. Overview of Heart Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. Most heart tumors are metastatic cancer. Did You Know... Noncancerous tumors can be as deadly ... slow the tumor's growth. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Table 2 ...

  12. Men and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  13. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  14. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... An echocardiogram (Echo) is a test that uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. The picture is much more detailed than a plain ...

  15. How the Heart Works

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your heart is at the center of your circulatory system. This system consists of a network of blood ... the walls contract, blood is pumped into your circulatory system. Inlet and outlet valves in your heart chambers ...

  16. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a ... dozens of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. ...

  17. Heart Murmurs (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Taking Care of Your Ears Taking ... Getting an X-ray Heart Murmurs KidsHealth > For Kids > Heart Murmurs Print A A A What's in ...

  18. About Heart Attacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... called plaque. This slow process is known as atherosclerosis . When a plaque in a heart artery breaks, ... called plaque. This slow process is known as atherosclerosis . When a plaque in a heart artery breaks, ...

  19. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... defect - heartbeat Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) - series References Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend ... ASD) Coarctation of the aorta Ellis-van Creveld syndrome Fetal alcohol syndrome Hypoplastic left heart syndrome Marfan ...

  20. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000166.htm Pericarditis - after heart attack To use the sharing features on this page, ... occur in the days or weeks following a heart attack . Causes Two types of pericarditis can occur after ...

  1. [Understanding heart failure].

    PubMed

    Boo, José Fernando Guadalajara

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure is a disease with several definitions. The term "heart failure" is used by has brougth about confusion in the terminology. For this reason, the value of the ejection fraction (< 0.40 or < 0.35) is used in most meganalyses on the treatment of heart failure, avoiding the term "heart failure" that is a confounding concept. In this paper we carefully analyze the meaning of contractility, ventricular function or performance, preload, afterload, heart failure, compensation mechanisms in heart failure, myocardial oxygen consumption, inadequate, adequate and inappropriate hypertrophy, systole, diastole, compliance, problems of relaxation, and diastolic dysfunction. Their definitions are supported by the original scientific descriptions in an attempt to clarify the concepts about ventricular function and heart failure and, in this way, use the same scientific language about the meaning of ventricular function, heart failure, and diastolic dysfunction.

  2. 2,3,5,4′-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside protects murine hearts against ischemia/reperfusion injury by activating Notch1/Hes1 signaling and attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Yu, Li-ming; Zhao, Hang; Zhou, Xuan-xuan; Yang, Qian; Song, Fan; Yan, Li; Zhai, Meng-en; Li, Bu-ying; Zhang, Bin; Jin, Zhen-xiao; Duan, Wei-xun; Wang, Si-wang

    2017-01-01

    2,3,5,4′-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG) is a water-soluble active component extracted from Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. A number of studies demonstrate that TSG exerts cardioprotective effects. Since endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a key role in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R)-induced cell apoptosis, we sought to determine whether modulation of the ER stress during MI/R injury was involved in the cardioprotective action of TSG. Male mice were treated with TSG (60 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 2 weeks and then were subjected to MI/R surgery. Pre-administration of TSG significantly improved post-operative cardiac function, and suppressed MI/R-induced myocardial apoptosis, evidenced by the reduction in the myocardial apoptotic index, serum levels of LDH and CK after 6 h of reperfusion. TSG (0.1–1000 μmol/L) did not affect the viability of cultured H9c2 cardiomyoblasts in vitro, but pretreatment with TSG dose-dependently decreased simulated ischemia/reperfusion (SIR)-induced cell apoptosis. Furthermore, both in vivo and in vitro studies revealed that TSG treatment activated the Notch1/Hes1 signaling pathway and suppressed ER stress, as evidenced by increasing Notch1, Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD), Hes1, and Bcl-2 expression levels and by decreasing p-PERK/PERK ratio, p-eIF2α/eIF2α ratio, and ATF4, CHOP, Bax, and caspase-3 expression levels. Moreover, the protective effects conferred by TSG on SIR-treated H9c2 cardiomyoblasts were abolished by co-administration of DAPT (the Notch1 signaling inhibitor). In summary, TSG ameliorates MI/R injury in vivo and in vitro by activating the Notch1/Hes1 signaling pathway and attenuating ER stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:28112174

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury Creates Biphasic Systemic Hemodynamic and Organ Blood Flow Responses in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    injury. Fluid percussion brain injury produced an immediate systemic hypertension followed by a hypotension and low cardiac output. Organ blood flows...37.5°C using a heating pad. The right femoral artery was cannulated for blood pressure monitoring using a quartz transducer (Hewlett Packard) and an...Since the hypertensive responses were usually maximal at 30 sec after injury, the mean arterial pressure and heart rate at 30 sec after sham injury

  4. Intravenous Adenosine for Surgical Management of Penetrating Heart Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kokotsakis, John; Hountis, Panagiotis; Antonopoulos, Nikolaos; Skouteli, Elian; Athanasiou, Thanos; Lioulias, Achilleas

    2007-01-01

    Accurate suturing of penetrating cardiac injuries is difficult. Heart motion, ongoing blood loss, arrhythmias due to heart manipulation, and the near-death condition of the patient can all affect the outcome. Rapid intravenous injection of adenosine induces temporary asystole that enables placement of sutures in a motionless surgical field. Use of this technique improves surgical conditions, and it is faster than other methods. Herein, we describe our experience with the use of intravenous adenosine to successfully treat 3 patients who had penetrating heart wounds. PMID:17420798

  5. Electrical Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your injuries are depends on how strong the electric current was, what type of current it was, how it moved through your body, and how long you were exposed. Other factors include how ... you should see a doctor. You may have internal damage and not realize it.

  6. Pediatric Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control and Prevention’s Safe Child website . What is pediatric critical care? Children who have severe or life-threatening injuries ... are staffed by physicians with specialized training in pediatric critical care medicine ("pediatric intensivists"). Because children can experience a ...

  7. How Is Heart Failure Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a pocket, or hung around your neck. Nuclear Heart Scan A nuclear heart scan shows how well blood is flowing ... blood is reaching your heart muscle. During a nuclear heart scan, a safe, radioactive substance called a ...

  8. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  9. Living with Heart Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Valve Disease Heart valve disease is a lifelong condition. However, ... all of your medicines as prescribed. Pregnancy and Heart Valve Disease Mild or moderate heart valve disease during pregnancy ...

  10. Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart disease and stroke prevention Heart Health and Stroke Heart disease and stroke prevention Related information Learn more about healthy eating ... to top More information on Heart disease and stroke prevention Read more from womenshealth.gov A Lifetime ...

  11. Life After a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Life After a Heart Attack Many people survive heart attacks and live active, ... a few weeks. Anxiety and Depression After a Heart Attack After a heart attack, many people worry about ...

  12. What Is a Heart Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Heart Attack? Español A heart attack happens when the flow ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is a heart attack? 05/22/2014 Describes how a heart attack ...

  13. What Happens After Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Happens After Heart Surgery? What are the ICU and CCU? In a ... doctors. This is where patients go after open-heart surgery or a heart attack. You’re watched around ...

  14. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  15. The Heart of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  16. Heart Valve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  17. Working Model Hearts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, David

    2009-01-01

    Despite student interest, the heart is often a poorly understood topic in biology. To help students understand this vital organ's physiology, the author created this investigation activity involving the mammalian heart and its role in the circulatory system. Students design, build, and demonstrate working artificial "hearts" to exhibit what they…

  18. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Heart bypass surgery begins with an incision made in the chest, with the breastbone cut exposing the heart. Next, a portion of the saphenous vein is ... used to bypass the blocked arteries in the heart. The venous graft is sewn to the aorta ...

  19. Cancer and the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 28 chapters. Some of the titles are: Computed tomography of neoplastic disease of the pericardium; Radiation therapy and the heart; Valvular involvement in cancer; Smoking, lung cancer, and coronary heart disease; Carcinoid heart disease; Cardiac amyloidosis; and Anemia of cancer and its cardiac effects.

  20. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  1. Bioengineering Heart Muscle: A Paradigm for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Kathy O.; Tandon, Nina

    2012-01-01

    The idea of extending the lifetime of our organs is as old as humankind, fueled by major advances in organ transplantation, novel drugs, and medical devices. However, true regeneration of human tissue has becoming increasingly plausible only in recent years. The human heart has always been a focus of such efforts, given its notorious inability to repair itself following injury or disease. We discuss here the emerging bioengineering approaches to regeneration of heart muscle as a paradigm for regenerative medicine. Our focus is on biologically inspired strategies for heart regeneration, knowledge gained thus far about how to make a “perfect” heart graft, and the challenges that remain to be addressed for tissue-engineered heart regeneration to become a clinical reality. We emphasize the need for interdisciplinary research and training, as recent progress in the field is largely being made at the interfaces between cardiology, stem cell science, and bioengineering. PMID:21568715

  2. A RAT MODEL OF HEART FAILURE INDUCED BY ISOPROTERENOL AND A HIGH SALT DIET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4wk) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats caused cardiac injury with minimal hypertrophy. O...

  3. Chronic treatment with trimetazidine reduces the upregulation of atrial natriuretic peptide in heart failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trimetazidine (TMZ) is effective for the treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy; however, little is known about the effect of TMZ in established injury-induced heart failure. When rats with established infarct-induced heart failure were treated for 12 weeks with TMZ there was no effect on left ventric...

  4. Heart Failure: A Primer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S; Auld, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure is a complex and multisystem clinical syndrome that results from impaired ventricular contractility and/or relaxation. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease are common antecedents to heart failure. The main pathogenic mechanisms involved in heart failure include sympathetic nervous and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation, as well as inflammation. A detailed history and physical examination and additional diagnostic tests may be needed to diagnose heart failure. Most treatment strategies target neurohormonal systems. Nonpharmacologic interventions and effective engagement in self-care are also important in overall heart failure management. Therapeutic strategies are geared toward prolonging life and optimizing quality of life.

  5. Augmentation of Creatine in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Zervou, Sevasti; Whittington, Hannah J; Russell, Angela J; Lygate, Craig A

    2016-01-01

    Creatine is a principle component of the creatine kinase (CK) phosphagen system common to all vertebrates. It is found in excitable cells, such as cardiomyocytes, where it plays an important role in the buffering and transport of chemical energy to ensure that supply meets the dynamic demands of the heart. Multiple components of the CK system, including intracellular creatine levels, are reduced in heart failure, while ischaemia and hypoxia represent acute crises of energy provision. Elevation of myocardial creatine levels has therefore been suggested as potentially beneficial, however, achieving this goal is not trivial. This mini-review outlines the evidence in support of creatine elevation and critically examines the pharmacological approaches that are currently available. In particular, dietary creatine-supplementation does not sufficiently elevate creatine levels in the heart due to subsequent down-regulation of the plasma membrane creatine transporter (CrT). Attempts to increase passive diffusion and bypass the CrT, e.g. via creatine esters, have yet to be tested in the heart. However, studies in mice with genetic overexpression of the CrT demonstrate proof-of-principle that elevated creatine protects the heart from ischaemia-reperfusion injury. This suggests activation of the CrT as a major unmet pharmacological target. However, translation of this finding to the clinic will require a greater understanding of CrT regulation in health and disease and the development of small molecule activators.

  6. Augmentation of Creatine in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Zervou, Sevasti; Whittington, Hannah J.; Russell, Angela J.; Lygate, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Creatine is a principle component of the creatine kinase (CK) phosphagen system common to all vertebrates. It is found in excitable cells, such as cardiomyocytes, where it plays an important role in the buffering and transport of chemical energy to ensure that supply meets the dynamic demands of the heart. Multiple components of the CK system, including intracellular creatine levels, are reduced in heart failure, while ischaemia and hypoxia represent acute crises of energy provision. Elevation of myocardial creatine levels has therefore been suggested as potentially beneficial, however, achieving this goal is not trivial. This mini-review outlines the evidence in support of creatine elevation and critically examines the pharmacological approaches that are currently available. In particular, dietary creatine-supplementation does not sufficiently elevate creatine levels in the heart due to subsequent down-regulation of the plasma membrane creatine transporter (CrT). Attempts to increase passive diffusion and bypass the CrT, e.g. via creatine esters, have yet to be tested in the heart. However, studies in mice with genetic overexpression of the CrT demonstrate proof-of-principle that elevated creatine protects the heart from ischaemia-reperfusion injury. This suggests activation of the CrT as a major unmet pharmacological target. However, translation of this finding to the clinic will require a greater understanding of CrT regulation in health and disease and the development of small molecule activators. PMID:26202199

  7. Alterations in cardiac autonomic control in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Liu, Nan; Malmqvist, Lasse; Wecht, Jill Maria; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2017-02-15

    A spinal cord injury (SCI) interferes with the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The effect on the cardiovascular system will depend on the extent of damage to the spinal/central component of ANS. The cardiac changes are caused by loss of supraspinal sympathetic control and relatively increased parasympathetic cardiac control. Decreases in sympathetic activity result in heart rate and the arterial blood pressure changes, and may cause arrhythmias, in particular bradycardia, with the risk of cardiac arrest in those with cervical or high thoracic injuries. The objective of this review is to give an update of the current knowledge related to the alterations in cardiac autonomic control following SCI. With this purpose the review includes the following subheadings: 2. Neuro-anatomical plasticity and cardiac control 2.1 Autonomic nervous system and the heart 2.2 Alteration in autonomic control of the heart following spinal cord injury 3. Spinal shock and neurogenic shock 3.1 Pathophysiology of spinal shock 3.2 Pathophysiology of neurogenic shock 4. Autonomic dysreflexia 4.1 Pathophysiology of autonomic dysreflexia 4.2 Diagnosis of autonomic dysreflexia 5. Heart rate/electrocardiography following spinal cord injury 5.1 Acute phase 5.2 Chronic phase 6. Heart rate variability 6.1 Time domain analysis 6.2 Frequency domain analysis 6.3 QT-variability index 6.4 Nonlinear (fractal) indexes 7. Echocardiography 7.1 Changes in cardiac structure following spinal cord injury 7.2 Changes in cardiac function following spinal cord injury 8. International spinal cord injury cardiovascular basic data set and international standards to document the remaining autonomic function in spinal cord injury.

  8. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Julia E; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg; Fisher, Robyn L; Vickers, Alison E M

    2014-01-15

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100μM) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1α, Il-1β, IL-6 and TNFα in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices.

  9. Notch-independent RBPJ controls angiogenesis in the adult heart

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Trelles, Ramón; Scimia, Maria Cecilia; Bushway, Paul; Tran, Danh; Monosov, Anna; Monosov, Edward; Peterson, Kirk; Rentschler, Stacey; Cabrales, Pedro; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Mercola, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Increasing angiogenesis has long been considered a therapeutic target for improving heart function after injury such as acute myocardial infarction. However, gene, protein and cell therapies to increase microvascularization have not been successful, most likely because the studies failed to achieve regulated and concerted expression of pro-angiogenic and angiostatic factors needed to produce functional microvasculature. Here, we report that the transcription factor RBPJ is a homoeostatic repressor of multiple pro-angiogenic and angiostatic factor genes in cardiomyocytes. RBPJ controls angiogenic factor gene expression independently of Notch by antagonizing the activity of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). In contrast to previous strategies, the cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Rbpj increased microvascularization of the heart without adversely affecting cardiac structure or function even into old age. Furthermore, the loss of RBPJ in cardiomyocytes increased hypoxia tolerance, improved heart function and decreased pathological remodelling after myocardial infarction, suggesting that inhibiting RBPJ might be therapeutic for ischaemic injury. PMID:27357444

  10. Iatrogenic Transient Complete Heart Block in a Preexisting LBBB

    PubMed Central

    Kalamkar, Prachi; Bonnet, Christopher A.; Bajwa, Omer A.

    2016-01-01

    Catheter induced cardiac arrhythmia is a well-known complication encountered during pulmonary artery or cardiac catheterization. Injury to the cardiac conducting system often involves the right bundle branch which in a patient with preexisting left bundle branch block can lead to fatal arrhythmia including asystole. Such a complication during central venous cannulation is rare as it usually does not enter the heart. The guide wire or the cannula itself can cause such an injury during central venous cannulation. The length of the guide wire, its rigidity, and lack of set guidelines for its insertion make it theoretically more prone to cause such an injury. We report a case of LBBB that went into transient complete heart block following guide wire insertion during a central venous cannulation procedure. PMID:27478653

  11. Heart transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Mangini, Sandrigo; Alves, Bárbara Rubim; Silvestre, Odílson Marcos; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Pires, Lucas José Tachotti; Curiati, Milena Novaes Cardoso; Bacal, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heart transplantation is currently the definitive gold standard surgical approach in the treatment of refractory heart failure. However, the shortage of donors limits the achievement of a greater number of heart transplants, in which the use of mechanical circulatory support devices is increasing. With well-established indications and contraindications, as well as diagnosis and treatment of rejection through defined protocols of immunosuppression, the outcomes of heart transplantation are very favorable. Among early complications that can impact survival are primary graft failure, right ventricular dysfunction, rejection, and infections, whereas late complications include cardiac allograft vasculopathy and neoplasms. Despite the difficulties for heart transplantation, in particular, the shortage of donors and high mortality while on the waiting list, in Brazil, there is a great potential for both increasing effective donors and using circulatory assist devices, which can positively impact the number and outcomes of heart transplants. PMID:26154552

  12. Swan-Ganz - right heart catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congenital heart disease Heart failure Kidney disease Leaky heart valves (valvular regurgitation) Shock It may also be done ... flow problems, such as heart failure or shock Heart valve disease Lung disease Structural problems with the heart, ...

  13. Heart Rate Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Under a NASA grant, Dr. Robert M. Davis and Dr. William M. Portnoy came up with a new type of electrocardiographic electrode that would enable long term use on astronauts. Their invention was an insulated capacitive electrode constructed of a thin dielectric film. NASA subsequently licensed the electrode technology to Richard Charnitski, inventor of the VersaClimber, who founded Heart Rate, Inc., to further develop and manufacture personal heart monitors and to produce exercise machines using the technology for the physical fitness, medical and home markets. Same technology is on both the Home and Institutional Model VersaClimbers. On the Home Model an infrared heart beat transmitter is worn under exercise clothing. Transmitted heart rate is used to control the work intensity on the VersaClimber using the heart rate as the speedometer of the exercise. This offers advantages to a full range of users from the cardiac rehab patient to the high level physical conditioning of elite athletes. The company manufactures and markets five models of the 1*2*3 HEART RATE monitors that are used wherever people exercise to accurately monitor their heart rate. Company is developing a talking heart rate monitor that works with portable headset radios. A version of the heart beat transmitter will be available to the manufacturers of other aerobic exercise machines.

  14. Texas Heart Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Texas Heart Institute, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, MD Anderson Cancer Center, and The University of Houston. Held most ... for Physicians Fellowships & Residencies School ...

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  16. "Floating shoulder" injuries.

    PubMed

    Heng, Kenneth

    2016-12-01

    "Floating shoulder" is a rare injury complex resulting from high-energy blunt force trauma to the shoulder, resulting in scapulothoracic dissociation. It is commonly associated with catastrophic neurovascular injury. Two cases of motorcyclists with floating shoulder injuries are described.

  17. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of illnesses and disabilities Spinal cord injury Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a ... your health on a daily basis. Living with spinal cord injury — your questions answered top What are pediatric ...

  18. Preventing Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating ... Infographic Five Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Preventing Eye Injuries Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Mar. ...

  19. Eye Injuries at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating ... Numbers — Infographic Five Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Eye Injuries at Work Edited by: Shirley Dang Feb. ...

  20. Eye Injuries at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating ... Numbers — Infographic Five Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran ...

  1. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... happen from a gunshot to the head. Head injuries include: Concussion , in which the brain is shaken, is the most common type of traumatic brain injury. Scalp wounds. Skull fractures. Head injuries ...

  2. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  3. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  4. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... Counseling About Blog Facing Disability Jeff Shannon Donate Spinal Cord Injury Map Loss of function depends on what ... control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the entire family FacingDisability is designed ...

  5. The effect of Ligustrum delavayanum on isolated perfused rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Stankovičová, Tatiana; Frýdl, Miroslav; Kubicová, Mária; Baróniková, Slávka; Nagy, Milan; Grančai, Daniel; Švec, Pavel

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extract of ligustrum leaves (Ligustrum delavayanum Hariot [Oleaceae]) is well known in traditional Chinese medicine. One of the active components, oleuropein, displays vasodilating and hypotensive effects. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of 0.008% lyophilized extract of ligustrum dissolved in 0.5% ethanol on heart function. ANIMALS AND METHODS: Experiments were done on isolated rat hearts perfused by the Langendorff method in control conditions and during ischemic-reperfusion injury. RESULTS: Application of ligustrum induced positive inotropic and vasodilating effects in spontaneously beating hearts. Pretreatment of the hearts with ligustrum reduced left ventricular diastolic pressure measured during reperfusion and improved left ventricular contraction compared with hearts without any pretreatment. Ligustrum significantly suppressed the incidence and duration of cardiac reperfusion arrhythmias, expressed as G-score, from 7.40±0.58 in nontreated rats to 1.97±0.50. DISCUSSION: Application of ligustrum or ethanol alone induced changes in coordination between atria and ventricles during ischemia-reperfusion injury. The ‘g-score’, a new parameter summing the incidence and duration of atrioventricular blocks, atrioventricular dissociation and cardiac arrest, is introduced. The g-scores with ligustrum pretreatment were higher during ischemia than during reperfusion. Ethanol significantly depressed myocardial contractility and coronary flow, and nonsignificantly decreased heart rate of isolated rat hearts. Electrical changes observed during coronary reperfusion in the presence of ethanol were accompanied by deterioration of contractile function. CONCLUSIONS: Ligustrum had a significant protective effect on rat myocardium against ischemic-reperfusion injury. Ethanol partially attenuated the protective effect of ligustrum. PMID:20428448

  6. Nuts and Your Heart: Eating Nuts for Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Heart disease Eating nuts helps your heart. Discover how walnuts, almonds and other nuts can help lower your cholesterol when ... a healthy diet may be good for your heart. Nuts contain unsaturated fatty acids and other nutrients. ...

  7. Dimensional analysis of heart rate variability in heart transplant recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Zbilut, J.P.; Mayer-Kress, G.; Geist, K.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss periodicities in the heart rate in normal and transplanted hearts. We then consider the possibility of dimensional analysis of these periodicities in transplanted hearts and problems associated with the record.

  8. Injuries in orienteering.

    PubMed

    Linde, F

    1986-09-01

    In a one-year prospective study of 42 elite orienteers, 73 recent injuries (1.7 per runner per year) were found. Acute injuries totalled 52% and 48% were due to overuse. Ankle sprains made up 37% of acute injuries while the remaining were mainly contusions caused by falls or bumps against branches or rocks. Medial shin pain, Achilles peritendinitis, peroneal tenosynovitis and iliotibial band friction syndrome were the most frequent overuse injuries. All overuse injuries were located in the lower extremity while 18% of acute injuries was located elsewhere. Acute injuries were most frequent in the competitive season while overuse injuries occurred most often during the continuous training period.

  9. Basketball Injuries: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apple Jr., David F.

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses reasons for the increase in basketball-related injuries, describes common injuries, outlines steps for diagnosis and treatment, and offers recovery and prevention strategies. (IAH)

  10. Uncouple my heart: the benefits of inefficiency.

    PubMed

    Modrianský, Martin; Gabrielová, Eva

    2009-04-01

    Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury leads to structural changes in the heart muscle later followed by functional decline due to progressive fibrous replacement. Hence approaches to minimize IR injury are devised, including ischemic pre-and postconditioning. Mild uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation is one of the mechanisms suggested to be cardioprotective as chemical uncoupling mimics ischemic preconditioning. Uncoupling protein 2 is proposed to be the physiological counterpart of chemical uncouplers and is thought to be a part of the protective machinery of cardiomyocytes. Morphological changes in the mitochondrial network likely accompany the uncoupling with mitochondrial fission dampening the signals leading to cardiomyocyte death. Here we review recent data on the role of uncoupling in cardioprotection and propose that low concentrations of dietary polyphenols may elicit the same cardioprotective effect as dinitrophenol and FCCP, perhaps accounting for the famed "French paradox".

  11. Warm heart surgery eliminates diaphragmatic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Maccherini, M; Davoli, G; Sani, G; Rossi, P; Giani, S; Lisi, G; Mazzesi, G; Toscano, M

    1995-05-01

    Since January 1992, we adopted a new method of myocardial protection: warm blood cardioplegia with continuous ante-retrograde combined delivery during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, (CPB) instead of cold blood intermittent cardioplegia plus topical ice slush in hypothermic CPB. We have compared postoperative chest X-rays of 50 patients who underwent elective coronary artery bypass with normothermic CPB to postoperative chest X-rays, of 50 patients operated upon with hypothermia. In the cold group transitory diaphragmatic paralysis, as well as pleural effusions and thoracentesis related to the hypothermia, and topical cooling, were statistically increased over that of warm group. The data suggest that topical cooling with slush ice is responsible for phrenic nerve injury and that warm heart surgery has no associated incidence of diaphragmatic injury.

  12. Women's Heart Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Dr. Stephen Sinatra - "Should I take a Statin?" - TED TALK by Dr. Noel Bairey Merz - discusses new heart diagnostics for women - TED TALK by Dr. Joel Furhman - discusses how to eat to prevent and reverse heart disease - Women get their own stroke guidelines - AHA - Speak ...

  13. Mapping the Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  14. Heart imaging method

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H. Dale; Gribble, R. Parks; Busse, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for providing an image of the human heart's electrical system derives time-of-flight data from an array of EKG electrodes and this data is transformed into phase information. The phase information, treated as a hologram, is reconstructed to provide an image in one or two dimensions of the electrical system of the functioning heart.

  15. Target Heart Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Lower Your Sodium in 21 Days! Learn how you can lower your sodium and change your salty ways in 21 Days! Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Target Heart Rates 4 Heart ...

  16. Anxiety and Heart Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    disability among women and men in the United States. By the year 2020, CHD is projected to be the number one cause of death worldwide.( American Heart Association , 2002...combined.( American Heart Association , 2002) The effect of various demographic (e.g., age, gender) and clinical (e.g., presence of comorbidities

  17. The total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jason A; Shah, Keyur B; Quader, Mohammed A; Cooke, Richard H; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Rao, Kris K; Smallfield, Melissa C; Tchoukina, Inna; Tang, Daniel G

    2015-12-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a form of mechanical circulatory support in which the patient's native ventricles and valves are explanted and replaced by a pneumatically powered artificial heart. Currently, the TAH is approved for use in end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, with an increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure, the number of patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting heart transplantation now far exceeds the number of available hearts. As a result, the use of mechanical circulatory support, including the TAH and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), is growing exponentially. The LVAD is already widely used as destination therapy, and destination therapy for the TAH is under investigation. While most patients requiring mechanical circulatory support are effectively treated with LVADs, there is a subset of patients with concurrent right ventricular failure or major structural barriers to LVAD placement in whom TAH may be more appropriate. The history, indications, surgical implantation, post device management, outcomes, complications, and future direction of the TAH are discussed in this review.

  18. The total artificial heart

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jason A.; Shah, Keyur B.; Quader, Mohammed A.; Cooke, Richard H.; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Rao, Kris K.; Smallfield, Melissa C.; Tchoukina, Inna

    2015-01-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a form of mechanical circulatory support in which the patient’s native ventricles and valves are explanted and replaced by a pneumatically powered artificial heart. Currently, the TAH is approved for use in end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, with an increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure, the number of patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting heart transplantation now far exceeds the number of available hearts. As a result, the use of mechanical circulatory support, including the TAH and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), is growing exponentially. The LVAD is already widely used as destination therapy, and destination therapy for the TAH is under investigation. While most patients requiring mechanical circulatory support are effectively treated with LVADs, there is a subset of patients with concurrent right ventricular failure or major structural barriers to LVAD placement in whom TAH may be more appropriate. The history, indications, surgical implantation, post device management, outcomes, complications, and future direction of the TAH are discussed in this review. PMID:26793338

  19. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... cardiomyopathy (KAR-de-o-mi-OP-ah-thee). Coronary Heart Disease In CHD, a waxy substance called plaque (plak) ... DHD tend to have less success with some heart disease treatments, such as coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous coronary intervention , also ...

  20. Human heart by art.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Abraham

    2012-11-01

    Heart is of great importance in maintaining the life of the body. Enough to stop working for a few minutes to cause death, and hence the great importance in physiology, medicine, and research. This fact was already emphasized in the Bible in the Book of Proverbs, chapter 4 verse 23: "Keep your heart with all diligence, for out of it is the wellspring of life." Art was able to demonstrate the heart from various aspects; realistically, as done by Leonardo de Vinci who demonstrated the halves of the heart and its blood vessels. Symbolically, as a source of life, the heart was demonstrated by the artist Mrs. Erlondeiel, as a caricature by Salvador Dali, as an open heart by Sawaya, etc. Finally, it should be emphasized that different demonstrations of the human heart by many artworks make this most important organ of our body (that cannot be seen from outside) more familiar and clearer to us. And this is the purpose of this article-to demonstrate the heart through a large number of artworks of different kinds.

  1. Music and the heart.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-11-21

    Music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure (BP), and breathing. Although there is great heterogeneity in methods and quality among previous studies on effects of music on the heart, the following findings emerge from the literature: Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) are higher in response to exciting music compared with tranquilizing music. During musical frissons (involving shivers and piloerection), both HR and RR increase. Moreover, HR and RR tend to increase in response to music compared with silence, and HR appears to decrease in response to unpleasant music compared with pleasant music. We found no studies that would provide evidence for entrainment of HR to musical beats. Corresponding to the increase in HR, listening to exciting music (compared with tranquilizing music) is associated with a reduction of heart rate variability (HRV), including reductions of both low-frequency and high-frequency power of the HRV. Recent findings also suggest effects of music-evoked emotions on regional activity of the heart, as reflected in electrocardiogram amplitude patterns. In patients with heart disease (similar to other patient groups), music can reduce pain and anxiety, associated with lower HR and lower BP. In general, effects of music on the heart are small, and there is great inhomogeneity among studies with regard to methods, findings, and quality. Therefore, there is urgent need for systematic high-quality research on the effects of music on the heart, and on the beneficial effects of music in clinical settings.

  2. Morphogenesis of univentricular hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R H; Becker, A E; Wilkinson, J L; Gerlis, L M

    1976-01-01

    Two main theories exist for the explanation of univentricular hearts. One states that the bulboventricular septum becomes realigned to form the interventricular septum, and that univentricular hearts are a consequence of failure of this realignment. The other states that bulboventricular and interventricular septa are different structures, and that the univentricular heart results from failure of formation of the posterior interventricular septum. Four hearts are described in which both the posterior septum and an anterior bulboventricular septum are present. In each heart, therefore, the right ventricular sinus is separated both from the left ventricular sinus and from a discrete outlet chamber which supports the pulmonary artery. It is argued that these findings militate strongly against theories proposing reorientation of the bulboventricular septum to form the definitive interventricular septum. They support strongly the concept that the definitive right ventricle is formed in part from the bulbus and in part from the primitive ventricle. On the basis of these findings, it is suggested that the distinctive feature of the univentricular heart is absence of the posterior septum. Such hearts can properly be termed 'primitive ventricle'. It is also suggested that hearts with atretic or straddling valves should be included within this category. Images PMID:1275986

  3. Cyanotic heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body and flows through the heart and lungs. Blood that is low in oxygen (blue blood) returns ... the way blood flows through the heart and lungs. This causes non-oxygenated blood to be pumped out to the body without ...

  4. Patterns of Heart Attacks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    36 5.1 Pattern of gradually increasing occurrence of COPD .............................................. 37 5.2 Pattern of...deaths [1]. According to the Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics - 2010 Update from the American Heart Association, the estimated annual incidence of MI...7]. The study combined the insurance claims from the Medicare and the Manitoba Health Services Commission claims database with hospitalization

  5. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Susan M.; Cedars, Ari M.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Geltman, Edward M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    Hospitalizations for acute decompensated heart failure are increasing in the United States. Moreover, the prevalence of heart failure is increasing consequent to an increased number of older individuals, as well as to improvement in therapies for coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death that have enabled patients to live longer with cardiovascular disease. The main treatment goals in the hospitalized patient with heart failure are to restore euvolemia and to minimize adverse events. Common in-hospital treatments include intravenous diuretics, vasodilators, and inotropic agents. Novel pharmaceutical agents have shown promise in the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure and may simplify the treatment and reduce the morbidity associated with the disease. This review summarizes the contemporary management of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:20069075

  6. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic heart disease (DHD) increases the likelihood of earlier and more ... also tend to have less success from certain heart disease treatments, such as coronary artery bypass grafting and ...

  7. Guidelines for Better Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Guidelines for Better Heart Health Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents For ... Heart Association (AHA) released new guidelines for preventing heart disease and stroke ... health. Those guidelines, still in effect today, adopted the ...

  8. What Causes Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Heart Valve Disease? Heart conditions and other disorders, age-related changes, ... valve disease. Other Conditions and Factors Linked to Heart Valve Disease Many other conditions and factors are linked to ...

  9. Signs of a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack Heart Health and Stroke Signs of a heart attack Related information Make the Call. Don't Miss ... to top More information on Signs of a heart attack Read more from womenshealth.gov Make the Call, ...

  10. What Are Congenital Heart Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease. Google+ Hangout on the first large-scale gene sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease 05/ ... in the journal Nature, about the first large-scale sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease. This NHLBI- ...

  11. Types of Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease. Google+ Hangout on the first large-scale gene sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease 05/ ... in the journal Nature, about the first large-scale sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease. This NHLBI- ...

  12. Preparing Children for Heart Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Recommendations for Heart Health • Tools & Resources Web Booklets on Congenital Heart Defects These online publications ... to you or your child’s defect and concerns. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Web Booklet: ...

  13. EPA Heathy Heart Program Webinar

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is raising awareness of heart disease and its link to air pollution and other environmental factors as a partner in the Million Hearts, a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.

  14. Substances and Heart Rhythm Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... that trigger the heartbeat. Caffeine, Diet and Heart Arrhythmias Caffeine is the most common substance linked with abnormal heart rhythms ( arrhythmias ). Some people feel heart palpitations (fast heartbeats) when ...

  15. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Heart Failure For ...

  16. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... vessels and heart valves. Many drugs, such as cocaine, heroin and various forms of amphetamine, affect the ... heart attacks, seizures, and respiratory arrest More about Cocaine - the "perfect heart-attack drug" The powdered form ...

  17. [Heart disease or sick at heart].

    PubMed

    Nager, F

    1993-02-27

    It is attempted to draw attention to the demanding and complementary reality of the modern cardiologist by confronting cardiology and cordiology (symbolistic theory of the heart). After a short survey of the symbolic and mythological world of the heart, the question of compatibility between the apparently opposing poles of cardiologic curative technology and cordiologic emotionalism is posed. With respect to the comprehensive cardiology of tomorrow, it is crucial whether the modern cardiac specialist will be capable of a difficult quadruple synthesis, namely: (1) the harmonious interaction between a rational basic position (raison de la mathématique) and an irrational-emotional standpoint (raison du coeur), (2) the increasing closeness of science and humanity, (3) the balanced care and culture of technology and medical language, and (4) the increasing harmony of male and female norms. Future cardiology must follow the call of the complementary, which reflects the apparent contrast between the scientific and the poetic heart; between having a symbolic heart condition and being heartsick.

  18. Heart to heart - a custodian journal on grassroots ergonomics

    SciTech Connect

    Zalk, D. M., LLNL

    1998-03-04

    When we first requested to speak at the American Society of Safety Engineer`s Professional Development Conference in Seattle, Washington, the theme we had in mind for this program paper was quite different. It definitely was not anything like our title, `Heart to Heart` implies. It was more formal and traditional. Give you figures, diagrams and the like. But two years later, we have come to another conclusion, to tell you the story about how a group of custodians and health & safety professionals dreamed big dreams and they came true. In order to understand what occurred, we first need to start at the very beginning with the Custodian Quality Improvement Team (CQIT). This group had been formed by the Plant Engineering Department at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) located in Livermore, California. LLNL is operated by the University of California for The U.S.Department of Energy. It is the premier applied physics research laboratory in the world. Plant Engineering (PE) is much like a Public Works Department. PE has all of the crafts, such as plumbers and electricians, who do maintenance-type work, as well as the engineering and construction employees. PE maintain the utilities, constructs new buildings and takes care of old ones. They take of the roads and clean the buildings and landscape the campus. So the Custodian Shop and its some 150 employees is a member of the PE family so to speak. The CQIT had decided to investigate ways they could reduce the number of injuries they were having. They invited health and safety professionals, David Zalk (an Industrial Hygienist) and Jack Tolley (Safety Engineer) to consult with them about this. They are both Hazards Control Team 4 members at LLNL. They were both interested in ergonomics and suggested that an approach to reducing their injuries might lie in studying how the custodians actually do their work. David has extensive training in ergonomics, and Jack simply had a long-time interest in ergonomics for

  19. Targeting the Innate Immune Response to Improve Cardiac Graft Recovery after Heart Transplantation: Implications for the Donation after Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Toldo, Stefano; Quader, Mohammed; Salloum, Fadi N.; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Heart transplantation (HTx) is the ultimate treatment for end-stage heart failure. The number of patients on waiting lists for heart transplants, however, is much higher than the number of available organs. The shortage of donor hearts is a serious concern since the population affected by heart failure is constantly increasing. Furthermore, the long-term success of HTx poses some challenges despite the improvement in the management of the short-term complications and in the methods to limit graft rejection. Myocardial injury occurs during transplantation. Injury initiated in the donor as result of brain or cardiac death is exacerbated by organ procurement and storage, and is ultimately amplified by reperfusion injury at the time of transplantation. The innate immune system is a mechanism of first-line defense against pathogens and cell injury. Innate immunity is activated during myocardial injury and produces deleterious effects on the heart structure and function. Here, we briefly discuss the role of the innate immunity in the initiation of myocardial injury, with particular focus on the Toll-like receptors and inflammasome, and how to potentially expand the donor population by targeting the innate immune response. PMID:27322252

  20. Targeting the Innate Immune Response to Improve Cardiac Graft Recovery after Heart Transplantation: Implications for the Donation after Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Toldo, Stefano; Quader, Mohammed; Salloum, Fadi N; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-06-17

    Heart transplantation (HTx) is the ultimate treatment for end-stage heart failure. The number of patients on waiting lists for heart transplants, however, is much higher than the number of available organs. The shortage of donor hearts is a serious concern since the population affected by heart failure is constantly increasing. Furthermore, the long-term success of HTx poses some challenges despite the improvement in the management of the short-term complications and in the methods to limit graft rejection. Myocardial injury occurs during transplantation. Injury initiated in the donor as result of brain or cardiac death is exacerbated by organ procurement and storage, and is ultimately amplified by reperfusion injury at the time of transplantation. The innate immune system is a mechanism of first-line defense against pathogens and cell injury. Innate immunity is activated during myocardial injury and produces deleterious effects on the heart structure and function. Here, we briefly discuss the role of the innate immunity in the initiation of myocardial injury, with particular focus on the Toll-like receptors and inflammasome, and how to potentially expand the donor population by targeting the innate immune response.

  1. Electrical Injury-Induced Complete Atrioventricular Block: Is Permanent Pacemaker Required?

    PubMed Central

    Beton, Osman; Efe, Tolga Han; Kaya, Hakki; Bilgin, Murat; Dinc Asarcikli, Lale; Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2015-01-01

    A considerable percentage of electrical injuries occur as a result of work activities. Electrical injury can lead to various cardiovascular disorders: acute myocardial necrosis, myocardial ischemia, heart failure, arrhythmias, hemorrhagic pericarditis, acute hypertension with peripheral vasospasm, and anomalous, nonspecific ECG alterations. Ventricular fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia resulting from electrical injury and is the leading cause of death in electrical (especially low voltage alternating current) injury cases. Asystole, premature ventricular contractions, ventricular tachycardia, conduction disorders (various degrees of heart blocks, bundle-brunch blocks), supraventricular tachycardia, and atrial fibrillation are the other arrhythmic complications of electrical injury. Complete atrioventricular block has rarely been reported and permanent pacemaker was required for the treatment in some of these cases. Herein, we present a case of reversible complete atrioventricular block due to low voltage electrical injury in a young electrical technician. PMID:26839721

  2. Electrical Injury-Induced Complete Atrioventricular Block: Is Permanent Pacemaker Required?

    PubMed

    Beton, Osman; Efe, Tolga Han; Kaya, Hakki; Bilgin, Murat; Dinc Asarcikli, Lale; Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2015-01-01

    A considerable percentage of electrical injuries occur as a result of work activities. Electrical injury can lead to various cardiovascular disorders: acute myocardial necrosis, myocardial ischemia, heart failure, arrhythmias, hemorrhagic pericarditis, acute hypertension with peripheral vasospasm, and anomalous, nonspecific ECG alterations. Ventricular fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia resulting from electrical injury and is the leading cause of death in electrical (especially low voltage alternating current) injury cases. Asystole, premature ventricular contractions, ventricular tachycardia, conduction disorders (various degrees of heart blocks, bundle-brunch blocks), supraventricular tachycardia, and atrial fibrillation are the other arrhythmic complications of electrical injury. Complete atrioventricular block has rarely been reported and permanent pacemaker was required for the treatment in some of these cases. Herein, we present a case of reversible complete atrioventricular block due to low voltage electrical injury in a young electrical technician.

  3. Injury surveillance in construction: eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Welch, L S; Hunting, K L; Mawudeku, A

    2001-07-01

    Occupational eye injuries are both common and preventable. About 20% of occupational eye injuries occur in construction. To investigate the nature of eye injuries among construction workers, we analyzed a large data set of construction worker injuries. In addition, we interviewed 62 workers with eye injuries to further explore circumstances of eye injury and workers' attitudes and behavior toward the use of eye protection. Eleven percent (363 cases) of the 3,390 construction workers in our data set were treated for eye injuries. Welders, plumbers, insulators, painters/glaziers, supervisors, and electricians had a higher proportion of all injuries due to eye injuries than other trades. Nearly half of the diagnoses were abrasions (46%) followed by foreign objects or splash in the eye (29%), conjunctivitis (10%), and burns (5%). In the interviews with 62 workers, we found that employers very frequently required eye protection for all tasks or for high-risk tasks, and workers report wearing eye protection regularly. However, most did not wear eye protection with top and side shields; if we believe the injuries occurred because a particle or liquid passed between the glasses and the workers' faces, increased use of goggles or full shields would have prevented two-thirds of this group of injuries.

  4. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death.

  5. Ice Hockey Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Franklin H.; Simonet, William T.

    1988-01-01

    The article describes the mechanisms, management, and prevention of each type of injury to which hockey players are prone. It surveys the injuries sustained by ice hockey players and discusses treatment of specific injuries, including those injuries to the head, eye, shoulder, hand, thigh, scalp, and face. (JL)

  6. Repair Injured Heart by Regulating Cardiac Regenerative Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Paul, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac regeneration is a homeostatic cardiogenic process by which the sections of malfunctioning adult cardiovascular tissues are repaired and renewed employing a combination of both cardiomyogenesis and angiogenesis. Unfortunately, while high-quality regeneration can be performed in amphibians and zebrafish hearts, mammalian hearts do not respond in kind. Indeed, a long-term loss of proliferative capacity in mammalian adult cardiomyocytes in combination with dysregulated induction of tissue fibrosis impairs mammalian endogenous heart regenerative capacity, leading to deleterious cardiac remodeling at the end stage of heart failure. Interestingly, several studies have demonstrated that cardiomyocyte proliferation capacity is retained in mammals very soon after birth, and cardiac regeneration potential is correspondingly preserved in some preadolescent vertebrates after myocardial infarction. There is therefore great interest in uncovering the molecular mechanisms that may allow heart regeneration during adult stages. This review will summarize recent findings on cardiac regenerative regulatory mechanisms, especially with respect to extracellular signals and intracellular pathways that may provide novel therapeutics for heart diseases. Particularly, both in vitro and in vivo experimental evidences will be presented to highlight the functional role of these signaling cascades in regulating cardiomyocyte proliferation, cardiomyocyte growth, and maturation, with special emphasis on their responses to heart tissue injury. PMID:27799944

  7. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury and associations with short- and long-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Jennifer A.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is strongly associated with increased mortality and other adverse outcomes. Medical researchers have intensively investigated novel biomarkers to predict short- and long-term outcomes of acute kidney injury in many patient care settings, such as cardiac surgery, intensive care units, heart failure, and transplant. Future research should focus on leveraging this relationship to improve enrollment for clinical trials of acute kidney injury. PMID:27239295

  8. Heart Truth for Women: If You Have Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    THE FOR WO MEN TRUTH THE HEART TRUTH FoR WoMEN: iF You HAVE HEART DisEAsE If you have heart disease, or think you do, it’s vital to take action to protect your heart health. Fortunately, there’s a lot you can do. ...

  9. Heart to Heart Art: Empowering Homeless Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Jerri; Booth, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    This article describes Heart to Heart Art, an after-school program developed for homeless children and youth at the YWCA in Spokane, Washington. Pre-service teacher candidates from a local university create meaningful activities that engage homeless students in visual art, music, drama, cooking, and community service. Heart to Heart Art was…

  10. Intrauterine Arrow Injury

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Jayanta Kumar; Lahiri, Kaushik

    2017-01-01

    Injury of a pregnant lady risks both mother and fetus. Various modes of injuries are possible. But arrow injury is not usually heard of in today's world. We have reported a male child delivered with a cut injury on the face. It was caused by a penetrating arrow hitting his mother in her lower abdomen at term. The injury of the baby was repaired successfully. PMID:28082780

  11. Injury to the prepuce.

    PubMed

    Yip, A; Ng, S K; Wong, W C; Li, M K; Lam, K H

    1989-05-01

    Injury to the prepuce is uncommon. A total of 32 patients were treated within a 3-year period. A difference in the aetiology between boys and adults was noted. Accidental injury to the prepuce occurred in 6 boys, with zipper injuries being the commonest among children. Coital and self-inflicted injuries accounted for 85% of adult cases. In patients with coital injuries, predisposing phimosis or a short frenulum was common.

  12. Valve replacement for appetite suppressant-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S S; Donovan, C L; Forbess, J M; Royal, S H; Landolfo, K P

    1999-06-01

    Valvular heart disease associated with the use of appetite-suppressant medication is a recently described clinical entity. Although the mechanism of valvular injury remains elusive pathologically, the valvular abnormalities resemble those observed in carcinoid syndrome. The incidence of clinically evident valvular heart disease is low with short-term (less than 3 months) exposure to appetite-suppressant drugs. Prolonged exposure to higher doses in addition to combination drug therapy confers an excess risk for valvular pathologic changes. We report the case of a patient with severe mitral regurgitation who had short-term exposure (3 weeks) to the combination of fenfluramine (20 mg) and phenteramine (15 mg).

  13. Cardiovascular responses to heat stress in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical reports have suggested that patients with heart diseases may be particularly vulnerable to heat injury. This review examines the effects of heat stress on cardiovascular and autonomic functions in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Laboratory investigations have shown that cutaneous vasodilator responses to heating are impaired in patients, whereas activation of skin sympathetic nerve activation is not attenuated in CHF as compared to controls. Attenuated cutaneous vasodilation may increase the risk of a heat related illness when CHF subjects are exposed to hyperthermic conditions. PMID:24599558

  14. Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongdong; Wang, Jun; Li, Hui; Xue, Mengzhou; Ji, Ailing; Li, Yanzhang

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is one of the major causes of high morbidity, disability, and mortality in the world. I/R injury remains a complicated and unresolved situation in clinical practice, especially in the field of solid organ transplantation. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third gaseous signaling molecule and plays a broad range of physiological and pathophysiological roles in mammals. H2S could protect against I/R injury in many organs and tissues, such as heart, liver, kidney, brain, intestine, stomach, hind-limb, lung, and retina. The goal of this review is to highlight recent findings regarding the role of H2S in I/R injury. In this review, we present the production and metabolism of H2S and further discuss the effect and mechanism of H2S in I/R injury. PMID:26064416

  15. Heart Surgery: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease, or peripheral arterial disease. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Start Here Cardiac Procedures and Surgeries (American Heart Association) What Is Heart Surgery? (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Latest News Taking Statins May Boost Heart ...

  16. Heart, front view (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. The vessels colored blue indicate the transport of blood with relatively low content of oxygen ... carbon dioxide. The vessels colored red indicate the transport of blood with relatively high content of oxygen ...

  17. [Heart involvement in sarcoglycanopathies].

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Nardi, O; Orlikowski, D; Annane, D

    2012-11-01

    Sarcoglycanopathies (SG) are autosomic recessive muscular dystrophies, secondary to mutations of the sarcoglycan complex. Clinical pictures include muscle weakness affecting mainly the proximal limb girdle musculature. We review heart involvement in this group of disease.

  18. Sleepless Nights, Unhealthy Hearts?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart attack or stroke, a research review from China suggests. "We found that difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty ... fully understood, said He, a graduate student at China Medical University in Shenyang. However, the study doesn' ...

  19. Heart Truth for Latinas

    MedlinePlus

    ... salt and other forms of sodium, getting regular physical activity, maintaining a healthy weight, and, if you drink ... are physically inactive—they do no spare-time physical activity. Regular physical activity lowers your risk of heart ...

  20. Keeping Hearts Pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A collaboration between NASA, Dr. Michael DeBakey, Dr. George Noon, and MicroMed Technology, Inc., resulted in a life-saving heart pump for patients awaiting heart transplants. The MicroMed DeBakey VAD functions as a "bridge to heart transplant" by pumping blood throughout the body to keep critically ill patients alive until a donor heart is available. Weighing less than 4 ounces and measuring 1 inch by 3 inches, the pump is approximately one-tenth the size of other currently marketed pulsatile VADs. This makes it less invasive and ideal for smaller adults and children. Because of the pump's small size, less than 5 percent of the patients implanted developed device-related infections. It can operate up to 8 hours on batteries, giving patients the mobility to do normal, everyday activities.The MicroMed DeBakey VAD is a registered trademark of MicroMed Technology, Inc.

  1. Types of Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... is less serious than Mobitz type II. The animation below shows how your heart's electrical system works. ... block. Click the "start" button to play the animation. Written and spoken explanations are provided with each ...

  2. Heart failure overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart failure: Fast or difficult breathing Leg swelling (edema) Neck veins that stick out (are distended) Sounds ( ... pacemaker High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Pulmonary edema Stable angina Ventricular assist device Patient Instructions ACE ...

  3. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage the heart muscle or valves. Electrical Disorders Arrhythmias that start in the heart’s upper chambers, the ... low blood count) or hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid gland). Arrhythmias that originate in the heart’s lower chambers, the ...

  4. What Causes Heart Block?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of congenital heart block occurs in babies whose mothers have autoimmune diseases, such as lupus. People who have these diseases make proteins called antibodies that attack and damage the body's tissues or ...

  5. Open heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cornwell LD, Bakaeen FG. Acquired heart disease: coronary insufficiency. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, ... Pulmonary atresia Tetralogy of Fallot Total anomalous pulmonary venous return Ventricular septal defect Review Date 4/13/ ...

  6. Hypertensive heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... Updated by: Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, ...

  7. Heart bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. Chest . 2012;141(2 ... surgery Heart failure - overview High blood cholesterol levels Smoking - ...

  8. Heart pacemaker - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. A pacemaker is a small, battery-operated device that senses when your heart is ... pacemaker is placed under your skin. These include: Battery powered cordless tools (such as screwdrivers and drills) ...

  9. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  10. Alcohol and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  11. Meditation and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  12. Protein and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  13. Target Heart Rate Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... try exercising within the upper range of your target zone. (If just beginning an exercise program, consult your doctor first.) Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute ... Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side ...

  14. Heart attack first aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... of patients with unstable angina/non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (updating the 2007 guideline and replacing the 2011 ...

  15. Living with Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... help you in the future. Follow Your Treatment Plan Treatment can relieve your symptoms and make daily ... or nurse about getting flu and pneumonia vaccines. Plan Ahead If you have heart failure, it's important ...

  16. Left heart ventricular angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure when the catheter is inserted. Occasionally, a flushing sensation or a feeling that you need to ... E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  17. Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve . Learn about the different types of stenosis: Aortic stenosis Tricuspid stenosis Pulmonary stenosis Mitral stenosis Outlook for ... Disease "Innocent" Heart Murmur Problem: Valve Stenosis - Problem: Aortic Valve Stenosis - Problem: Mitral Valve Stenosis - Problem: Tricuspid Valve Stenosis - ...

  18. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery - minimally invasive Aortic valve surgery - open Bicuspid aortic valve Endocarditis Heart valve surgery Mitral valve prolapse Mitral valve surgery - minimally invasive Mitral valve surgery - open Pulmonary valve stenosis Smoking - tips on how to quit Patient Instructions ...

  19. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a variety of problems, including high blood pressure , hardening of the arteries, chest pain, heart attacks, and ... teer-ee-oh-skluh-ROW-sus): also called hardening of the arteries, arteriosclerosis means the arteries become ...

  20. Heart transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100086.htm Heart transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  1. Congenital Heart Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright ©1996 - 2016 C.H.I.N. All rights reserved TX4-390-685 Original site design and HTML by Panoptic Communications

  2. Optical imaging of irradiated and non-irradiated hearts (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolin, Stephanie; Chen, Guanchu; Medhora, Meetha M.; Camara, Amadou K. S.; Ranji, Mahsa

    2016-03-01

    Objective: In this study, the metabolic state of the heart tissue is studied in a rodent model of ischemia and reperfusion (IR) in rats exposed to irradiation injury using a cryofluorescence imaging technique. Mitochondrial metabolic state is evaluated by autofluorescence of mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH and FAD. The redox ratio (NADH/FAD) is used as a biochemical/metabolic marker of oxidative stress, before, during and after IR. Materials and methods: Hearts were extracted from non-irradiated (control) and irradiated rats (Irr) given 15 Gy whole thorax irradiation rats (WTI). After 35 days, before the onset of radiation pneumonitis, these two groups of hearts were subjected to one of three treatments; Time control (TC; hearts perfused for the duration of the protocol without ischemia or IR), 25 minutes ischemia with no reperfusion and 25 minutes ischemia followed by 60 minutes reperfusion (IR). Hearts were removed from the Langendorff perfusion system and immediately snap frozen in liquid N2 to preserve the metabolic state after injury; 3-dimensional (3D) cryo-fluorescent imager was used to obtain in fixed time NADH and FAD fluorescence images and their distribution across the entire ventricles. In this study, a 30-μm axial resolution was used resulting in 550 cross-section images per heart. The 3D images of the redox ratio and their respective histograms were calculated in the six groups of hearts. Results: We compared the mean values of the redox ratio in each group, which demonstrate a reduced mitochondrial redox state in both irradiated and non-irradiated ischemic hearts and an oxidized mitochondrial redox state for both irradiated and non-irradiated ischemia-reperfusion hearts compared to control hearts. For non-irradiated hearts, ischemia and IR injuries resulted respectively in 61% increase and 54% decrease in redox ratio when compared with TC. For irradiated hearts, ischemia and IR injuries resulted respectively in 90% increase and 50% decrease

  3. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, Giovanna; Constine, Louis S.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Correa, Candace; Pierce, Lori J.; Allen, Aaron M.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2010-03-01

    The literature is reviewed to identify the main clinical and dose-volume predictors for acute and late radiation-induced heart disease. A clear quantitative dose and/or volume dependence for most cardiac toxicity has not yet been shown, primarily because of the scarcity of the data. Several clinical factors, such as age, comorbidities and doxorubicin use, appear to increase the risk of injury. The existing dose-volume data is presented, as well as suggestions for future investigations to better define radiation-induced cardiac injury.

  4. Heart failure in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, John D

    2012-12-01

    With increasing maternal age and the presence of comorbid conditions such as hypertension, cardiovascular assessment and monitoring is the responsibility of all clinicians caring for pregnant patients. Furthermore, there are specific conditions, such as mitral stenosis, peripartum cardiomyopathy, and preeclampsia, that can be associated with heart failure and secondary maternal (and fetal) mortality and morbidity. The important causes of heart failure in pregnancy are discussed.

  5. Heart Rate Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the mid 70's, NASA saw a need for a long term electrocardiographic electrode suitable for use on astronauts. Heart Rate Inc.'s insulated capacitive electrode is constructed of thin dielectric film applied to stainless steel surface, originally developed under a grant by Texas Technical University. HRI, Inc. was awarded NASA license and continued development of heart rate monitor for use on exercise machines for physical fitness and medical markets.

  6. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes happen every year in the United States. You ... some of your risks for heart disease and stroke, but you can manage many of your risks ...

  7. Heart valve surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four valves in the heart: aortic valve, mitral valve, tricuspid valve, and pulmonary valve. The valves are designed to control the direction of blood flow through the heart. The opening and closing of the heart valves produce the heart-beat sounds.

  8. Decompensated heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Mangini, Sandrigo; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Braga, Fabiana Goulart Marcondes; Bacal, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heart failure is a disease with high incidence and prevalence in the population. The costs with hospitalization for decompensated heart failure reach approximately 60% of the total cost with heart failure treatment, and mortality during hospitalization varies according to the studied population, and could achieve values of 10%. In patients with decompensated heart failure, history and physical examination are of great value for the diagnosis of the syndrome, and also can help the physician to identify the beginning of symptoms, and give information about etiology, causes and prognosis of the disease. The initial objective of decompensated heart failure treatment is the hemodynamic and symptomatic improvement preservation and/or improvement of renal function, prevention of myocardial damage, modulation of the neurohormonal and/or inflammatory activation and control of comorbidities that can cause or contribute to progression of the syndrome. According to the clinical-hemodynamic profile, it is possible to establish a rational for the treatment of decompensated heart failure, individualizing the proceedings to be held, leading to reduction in the period of hospitalization and consequently reducing overall mortality. PMID:24136770

  9. [Heart failure and comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Boully, Clémence; Hanon, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Heart failure is a frequent disease in the elderly. Its clinical presentation is less typical and the prognosis more severe than in younger subjects because heart failure occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities. A comprehensive geriatric assessment should therefore be performed to detect the vulnerabilities and manage the comorbidities. The main diseases associated with heart failure are dementia, depression, malnutrition, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, orthostatic hypotension, renal failure, anemia and iron deficiency. Comorbidities worsen heart failure and makes its treatment more difficult. The identification and treatment of comorbidities improve the prognosis in terms of mortality but especially in terms of quality of life. Caution with drugs is necessary because of pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic changes related to aging and the comorbidities. In this context, clinical and laboratory monitoring should be increased, mostly during an acute event (acute heart failure, infection, dehydration, fall, new therapy…). Therefore, the follow-up of elderly patients with heart failure requires a multidisciplinary approach that involves close cooperation between cardiologists, geriatricians, general practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists.

  10. Long noncoding RNAs (LncRNAs) - The dawning of a new treatment for cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong; Gao, Quansheng; Cao, Feng

    2017-03-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a category of noncoding RNAs with the potential for genetic and epigenetic regulations. As important regulators of gene expression, increasing evidence has proven that lncRNAs play a significant regulatory role in various cardiovascular pathologies. In particular, lncRNAs have been proved to be participating in gene regulatory mechanisms involved in heart growth and development that can be exploited to repair the injured adult heart. Furthermore, lncRNAs have been revealed as possible therapeutic targets for heart failure with different causes and in different stages. In the journey from a healthy heart to heart failure, lncRNAs have been shown to participate in almost every landmark of heart failure pathogenesis including ischemic injury, cardiac hypertrophy, and cardiac fibrosis. Furthermore, the manipulation of lncRNAs palliates the progression of heart failure by attenuating ischemic heart injury, cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis, as well as facilitating heart regeneration and therapeutic angiogenesis. This review will highlight recent updates regarding the involvement of lncRNAs in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure and their potential as novel therapeutic targets. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Genetic and epigenetic control of heart failure - edited by Jun Ren & Megan Yingmei Zhang.

  11. Cardioprotection in ischaemia–reperfusion injury: novel mechanisms and clinical translation

    PubMed Central

    Altamirano, Francisco; Wang, Zhao V; Hill, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In recent decades, robust successes have been achieved in conquering the acutely lethal manifestations of heart disease. Nevertheless, the prevalence of heart disease, especially heart failure, continues to rise. Among the precipitating aetiologies, ischaemic disease is a leading cause of heart failure. In the context of ischaemia, the myocardium is deprived of oxygen and nutrients, which elicits a cascade of events that provokes cell death. This ischaemic insult is typically coupled with reperfusion, either spontaneous or therapeutically imposed, wherein blood supply is restored to the previously ischaemic tissue. While this intervention limits ischaemic injury, it triggers a new cascade of events that is also harmful, viz. reperfusion injury. In recent years, novel insights have emerged regarding mechanisms of ischaemia–reperfusion injury, and some hold promise as targets of therapeutic relevance. Here, we review a select number of these pathways, focusing on recent discoveries and highlighting prospects for therapeutic manipulation for clinical benefit. PMID:26173176

  12. The continuing evolution of the Langendorff and ejecting murine heart: new advances in cardiac phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ronglih; Podesser, Bruno K; Lim, Chee Chew

    2012-07-15

    The isolated retrograde-perfused Langendorff heart and the isolated ejecting heart have, over many decades, resulted in fundamental discoveries that form the underpinnings of our current understanding of the biology and physiology of the heart. These two experimental methodologies have proven invaluable in studying pharmacological effects on myocardial function, metabolism, and vascular reactivity and in the investigation of clinically relevant disease states such as ischemia-reperfusion injury, diabetes, obesity, and heart failure. With the advent of the genomics era, the isolated mouse heart preparation has gained prominence as an ex vivo research tool for investigators studying the impact of gene modification in the intact heart. This review summarizes the historical development of the isolated heart and provides a practical guide for the establishment of the Langendorff and ejecting heart preparations with a particular emphasis on the murine heart. In addition, current applications and novel methods of recording cardiovascular parameters in the isolated heart preparation will be discussed. With continued advances in methodological recordings, the isolated mouse heart preparation will remain physiologically relevant for the foreseeable future, serving as an integral bridge between in vitro assays and in vivo approaches.

  13. The continuing evolution of the Langendorff and ejecting murine heart: new advances in cardiac phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ronglih; Podesser, Bruno K.

    2012-01-01

    The isolated retrograde-perfused Langendorff heart and the isolated ejecting heart have, over many decades, resulted in fundamental discoveries that form the underpinnings of our current understanding of the biology and physiology of the heart. These two experimental methodologies have proven invaluable in studying pharmacological effects on myocardial function, metabolism, and vascular reactivity and in the investigation of clinically relevant disease states such as ischemia-reperfusion injury, diabetes, obesity, and heart failure. With the advent of the genomics era, the isolated mouse heart preparation has gained prominence as an ex vivo research tool for investigators studying the impact of gene modification in the intact heart. This review summarizes the historical development of the isolated heart and provides a practical guide for the establishment of the Langendorff and ejecting heart preparations with a particular emphasis on the murine heart. In addition, current applications and novel methods of recording cardiovascular parameters in the isolated heart preparation will be discussed. With continued advances in methodological recordings, the isolated mouse heart preparation will remain physiologically relevant for the foreseeable future, serving as an integral bridge between in vitro assays and in vivo approaches. PMID:22636675

  14. Rac1-PAK2 pathway is essential for zebrafish heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiangwen; He, Quanze; Li, Guobao; Ma, Jinmin; Zhong, Tao P

    2016-04-15

    P-21 activated kinases, or PAKs, are serine-threonine kinases that play important roles in diverse heart functions include heart development, cardiovascular development and function in a range of models; however, the mechanisms by which PAKs mediate heart regeneration are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that PAK2 and PAK4 expression is induced in cardiomyocytes and vessels, respectively, following zebrafish heart injury. Inhibition of PAK2 and PAK4 using a specific small molecule inhibitor impedes cardiomyocyte proliferation/dedifferentiation and cardiovascular regeneration, respectively. Cdc42 is specifically expressed in the ventricle and may function upstream of PAK2 but not PAK4 under normal conditions and that cardiomyocyte proliferentation during heart regeneration relies on Rac1-mediated activation of Pak2. Our results indicate that PAKs play a key role in heart regeneration.

  15. Traumatic Brachial Artery Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ergunes, Kazim; Yilik, Levent; Ozsoyler, Ibrahim; Kestelli, Mert; Ozbek, Cengiz; Gurbuz, Ali

    2006-01-01

    We performed this retrospective study to analyze our strategies for managing and surgically treating brachial artery injuries. Fifty-seven patients with a total of 58 traumatic brachial artery injuries underwent surgery at our institution, from August 1996 through November 2004. Fifty-four patients were male and 3 were female (age range, 7 to 75 years; mean, 29.4 years). Forty-four of the patients had penetrating injuries (18 had stab wounds; 16, window glass injuries; and 10, industrial accidents), 10 had blunt trauma injuries (traffic accidents), and 3 had gunshot injuries. Fourteen patients (24.6%) had peripheral nerve injury. All patients underwent Doppler ultrasonographic examination. The repair of the 58 arterial injuries involved end-to-end anastomosis for 32 injuries (55.2%), reverse saphenous vein graft interpositional grafts for 18 (31%), and primary repair for 8 (13.8%). Venous continuity was achieved in 11 (84.6%) of 13 patients who had major venous injuries. Nine of the 57 patients (15.8%) required primary fasciotomy. Follow-up showed that 5 of the 14 patients with peripheral nerve injury had apparent disabilities due to nerve injury. One patient underwent amputation. There were no deaths. We believe that good results can be achieved in patients with brachial artery injuries by use of careful physical examination, Doppler ultrasonography, and restoration of viability with vascular repair and dbridement of nonviable tissues. Traumatic neurologic injury frequently leads to disability of the extremities. PMID:16572866

  16. Injury in rugby league.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, W; Pollard, H; Hough, K; Tully, C

    2006-05-01

    It was the purpose of this review to document the range, incidence, location and mechanism of injury occurring in the sport of rugby league. Rugby league is a collision sport played in Europe and the Pacific regions including Australia. The sport is well established and has competitions ranging from junior to elite professional. Due to the contact nature of the game, injury is relatively common. The most common injuries are musculotendinous in nature and afflict the lower limb more frequently than elsewhere. Despite the high incidence of minor (sprains/strains) to moderate musculoskeletal injury (fracture, ligament and joint injury) and minor head injuries such as lacerations, nasal fractures and concussions, rare more serious spinal cord and other injuries causing death have also been recorded. The literature on rugby league injury is small but growing and suffers from a lack of consistent definition of what an injury is, thereby causing variability in the nature and incidence/prevalence of injury. Information is lacking on the injury profiles of different age groups. Importantly, there has been little attempt to establish a coordinated injury surveillance program in rugby league in the junior or professional levels. The implementation of such programs would require a universal definition of injury and a focus on important events and competitions. The implementation could provide important information in the identification and prevention of risk factors for injury.

  17. Optimal Protective Hypothermia in Arrested Mammalian Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Villet, Outi M.; Ge, Ming; Sekhar, Laigam N.; Corson, Marshall A.; Tylee, Tracy S.; Fan, Lu-Ping; Yao, Lin; Zhu, Chun; Olson, Aaron K.; Buroker, Norman E.; Xu, Cheng-Su; Anderson, David L.; Soh, Yong-Kian; Wang, Elise; Chen, Shi-Han; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic hypothermia recommendations have been reported, but the information supporting them is sparse, and reveals a need for the data of target therapeutic hypothermia (TTH) from well-controlled experiments. The core temperature ≤35°C is considered as hypothermia, and 29°C is a cooling injury threshold in pig heart in vivo. Thus, an optimal protective hypothermia (OPH) should be in the range 29–35°C. This study was conducted with a pig cardiopulmonary bypass preparation to decrease the core temperature to 29–35°C range at 20 minutes before and 60 minutes during heart arrest. The left ventricular (LV) developed pressure, maximum of the first derivative of LV (dP/dtmax), cardiac power, heart rate, cardiac output, and myocardial velocity (Vmax) were recorded continuously via an LV pressure catheter and an aortic flow probe. At 20 minutes of off-pump during reperfusion after 60 minutes arrest, 17 hypothermic hearts showed that the recovery of Vmax and dP/dtmax established sigmoid curves that consisted of two plateaus: a good recovery plateau at 29–30.5°C, the function recovered to baseline level (BL) (Vmax=118.4%±3.9% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=120.7%±3.1% of BL, n=6); another poor recovery plateau at 34–35°C (Vmax=60.2%±2.8% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=28.0%±5.9% of BL, p<0.05, n=6; ), which are similar to the four normothermia arrest (37°C) hearts (Vmax=55.9%±4.8% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=24.5%±2.1% of BL, n=4). The 32–32.5°C arrest hearts showed moderate recovery (n=5). A point of inflection (around 30.5–31°C) existed at the edge of a good recovery plateau followed by a steep slope. The point presented an OPH that should be the TTH. The results are concordant with data in the mammalian hearts, suggesting that the TTH should be initiated to cool core temperature at 31°C. PMID:25514569

  18. Heart Alterations after Domoic Acid Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Andres C.; Cifuentes, José Manuel; Bermúdez, Roberto; Ferreiro, Sara F.; Castro, Albina Román; Botana, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is one of the best known marine toxins, causative of important neurotoxic alterations. DA effects are documented both in wildlife and experimental assays, showing that this toxin causes severe injuries principally in the hippocampal area. In the present study we have addressed the long-term toxicological effects (30 days) of DA intraperitoneal administration in rats. Different histological techniques were employed in order to study DA toxicity in heart, an organ which has not been thoroughly studied after DA intoxication to date. The presence of DA was detected by immunohistochemical assays, and cellular alterations were observed both by optical and transmission electron microscopy. Although histological staining methods did not provide any observable tissue damage, transmission electron microscopy showed several injuries: a moderate lysis of myofibrils and loss of mitochondrial conformation. This is the first time the association between heart damage and the presence of the toxin has been observed. PMID:26978401

  19. Applying the Principles of Homicide by Heart Attack.

    PubMed

    Hlavaty, Leigh; Sung, LokMan

    2016-06-01

    Homicide by heart attack is a well-established model in forensic pathology that describes death elicited during or immediately after a criminal act where a threat or fear of physical injury is present. After its introduction nearly 4 decades ago, the principle has undergone a handful of modifications but still maintains its core concepts. All cases of this nature during a 20-year period at the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office were compared and contrasted for demographics, circumstances and scene investigation, and autopsy and toxicology findings. Of the cases fulfilling the previously established criteria for homicide by heart attack, more than 80% displayed significant changes because of hypertension. This finding coincides with the high prevalence of hypertension in our urban population and highlights the significance of this disease. Also present were minor external and internal injuries in select cases, which reinforce the understanding that physical contact between the decedent and assailant does not preclude this diagnosis.

  20. Protective approaches against myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianchi; Liu, Min; Sun, Rongrong; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Peiying

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion is the leading cause for the events of cardiovascular disease, and is considered as a major contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with coronary occlusion. The myocardial damage caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury constitutes the primary pathological manifestation of coronary artery disease. It results from the interaction between the substances that accumulate during ischemia and those that are delivered on reperfusion. The level of this damage can range from a small insult resulting in limited myocardial damage to a large injury culminating in myocyte death. Importantly, major ischemia-reperfusion injury to the heart can result in permanent disability or death. Given the worldwide prevalence of coronary artery disease, developing a strategy to provide cardioprotection against ischemia-reperfusion-induced damage is of great importance. Currently, the treatment of reperfusion injury following ischemia is primarily supportive, since no specific target-oriented therapy has been validated thus far. Nevertheless, therapeutic approaches to protect against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury remain an active area of investigation given the detrimental effects of this phenomenon. PMID:28101167

  1. Bodygraphic Injury Surveillance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Toshiki; Kitamura, Koji; Nishida, Yoshihumi; Motomura, Yoichi; Takano, Tachio; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi

    This paper proposes a new technology,``a bodygraphic injury surveillance system (BISS)'' that not only accumulates accident situation data but also represents injury data based on a human body coordinate system in a standardized and multilayered way. Standardized and multilayered representation of injury enables accumulation, retrieval, sharing, statistical analysis, and modeling causalities of injury across different fields such as medicine, engineering, and industry. To confirm the effectiveness of the developed system, the authors collected 3,685 children's injury data in cooperation with a hospital. As new analyses based on the developed BISS, this paper shows bodygraphically statistical analysis and childhood injury modeling using the developed BISS and Bayesian network technology.

  2. Upper extremity golf injuries.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Michael A; Lee, Steven K; Strauss, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Golf is a global sport enjoyed by an estimated 60 million people around the world. Despite the common misconception that the risk of injury during the play of golf is minimal, golfers are subject to a myriad of potential pathologies. While the majority of injuries in golf are attributable to overuse, acute traumatic injuries can also occur. As the body's direct link to the golf club, the upper extremities are especially prone to injury. A thorough appreciation of the risk factors and patterns of injury will afford accurate diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of further injury.

  3. Rehabilitation of basketball injuries.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Gerard A; Chimes, Gary P

    2006-08-01

    Basketball is one of the most popular sports in the United States and throughout the world, and therefore represents one of the most common sources of sports-related injuries. Basketball injuries should be managed by the same general rehabilitation principles as other sports injuries. Additionally, the clinician should be aware not only of general sports injuries but of those injuries most commonly seen in basketball players. By maintaining knowledge of the most common basketball injuries as well as their diagnosis and treatment, the clinician can help to optimize the athlete's return to play and enjoyment of the sport.

  4. Worsening renal function in heart failure: the need for a consensus definition.

    PubMed

    Sheerin, Noella J; Newton, Phillip J; Macdonald, Peter S; Leung, Dominic Y C; Sibbritt, David; Spicer, Stephen Timothy; Johnson, Kay; Krum, Henry; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-07-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure is a common cause of hospitalisation. This is a period of vulnerability both in altered pathophysiology and also the potential for iatrogenesis due to therapeutic interventions. Renal dysfunction is often associated with heart failure and portends adverse outcomes. Identifying heart failure patients at risk of renal dysfunction is important in preventing progression to chronic kidney disease or worsening renal function, informing adjustment to medication management and potentially preventing adverse events. However, there is no working or consensus definition in international heart failure management guidelines for worsening renal function. In addition, there appears to be no concordance or adaptation of chronic kidney disease guidelines by heart failure guideline development groups for the monitoring of chronic kidney disease in heart failure. Our aim is to encourage the debate for an agreed definition given the prognostic impact of worsening renal function in heart failure. We present the case for the uptake of the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria for acute kidney injury with some minor alterations. This has the potential to inform study design and meta-analysis thereby building the knowledgebase for guideline development. Definition consensus supports data element, clinical registry and electronic algorithm innovation as instruments for quality improvement and clinical research for better patient outcomes. In addition, we recommend all community managed heart failure patients have their baseline renal function classified and routinely monitored in accordance with established renal guidelines to help identify those at increased risk for worsening renal function or progression to chronic kidney disease.

  5. [Heart failure and anemia].

    PubMed

    Reda, S; Motloch, L J; Hoppe, U C

    2013-09-01

    Chronic heart failure has an age-dependent prevalence of 2% and is therefore one of the most frequent diseases in western societies. A reduced hemoglobin concentration according to the definition of the World Health Organization is a common comorbidity affecting more than half of all heart failure patients. Elderly patients, patients suffering from renal impairment and women are more likely to develop anemia but a definitive etiology of anemia is only identified in the minority of cases. Anemia is associated with a poor clinical status and a greater risk of hospitalization and is a predictive factor for increased mortality. The incidence of anemia appears to increase with a poorer functional class. Intravenous iron therapy improves the exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure and iron deficiency and is currently being recommended for patients with persistent symptoms despite optimal medical and device therapy. However, erythropoietin-stimulating agents as a treatment for anemia in chronic heart failure have failed to improve clinical outcome in a large randomized trial. In patients with heart failure but with maintained ejection fraction, anemia is also associated with a poor prognosis. Specific therapeutic recommendations for these patients are still not available.

  6. Preconditioning boosts regenerative programmes in the adult zebrafish heart

    PubMed Central

    de Preux Charles, Anne-Sophie; Bise, Thomas; Baier, Felix; Sallin, Pauline; Jaźwińska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    During preconditioning, exposure to a non-lethal harmful stimulus triggers a body-wide increase of survival and pro-regenerative programmes that enable the organism to better withstand the deleterious effects of subsequent injuries. This phenomenon has first been described in the mammalian heart, where it leads to a reduction of infarct size and limits the dysfunction of the injured organ. Despite its important clinical outcome, the actual mechanisms underlying preconditioning-induced cardioprotection remain unclear. Here, we describe two independent models of cardiac preconditioning in the adult zebrafish. As noxious stimuli, we used either a thoracotomy procedure or an induction of sterile inflammation by intraperitoneal injection of immunogenic particles. Similar to mammalian preconditioning, the zebrafish heart displayed increased expression of cardioprotective genes in response to these stimuli. As zebrafish cardiomyocytes have an endogenous proliferative capacity, preconditioning further elevated the re-entry into the cell cycle in the intact heart. This enhanced cycling activity led to a long-term modification of the myocardium architecture. Importantly, the protected phenotype brought beneficial effects for heart regeneration within one week after cryoinjury, such as a more effective cell-cycle reentry, enhanced reactivation of embryonic gene expression at the injury border, and improved cell survival shortly after injury. This study reveals that exposure to antecedent stimuli induces adaptive responses that render the fish more efficient in the activation of the regenerative programmes following heart damage. Our results open a new field of research by providing the adult zebrafish as a model system to study remote cardiac preconditioning. PMID:27440423

  7. Cardiac troponin assays in the management of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Torre, Matthew; Jarolim, Petr

    2015-02-20

    Cardiac troponins I and T are established biomarkers of cardiac injury. Testing for either of these two cardiac troponins has long been an essential component of the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. In addition, cardiac troponin concentrations after acute myocardial infarction predict future adverse events including development of ischemic heart failure and chronic elevations of cardiac troponin correlate with heart failure severity. These predictions and correlations are particularly obvious when cardiac troponin concentrations are measured using the new high sensitivity cardiac troponin assays. Thus, a growing body of literature suggests that cardiac troponin testing may have important clinical implications for heart failure patients with reduced or preserved ejection fraction. In this review, we explore the prognostic utility of measuring cardiac troponin concentrations in patients with acute or chronic heart failure and in populations at risk of developing heart failure and the relationship between cardiac troponin levels and disease severity. We also summarize the ongoing debates and research on whether serial monitoring of cardiac troponin levels may become a useful tool for guiding therapeutic interventions in patients with heart failure.

  8. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries ... Treatment Coping With an MCL Injury About MCL Injuries A torn medial collateral ligament (MCL) is a ...

  9. PET/MRI assessment of the infarcted mouse heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonincontri, Guido; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T.; Sawiak, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure originating from myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Mouse models of ischaemia and reperfusion injury (I/R) are used to study the effects of novel treatment strategies targeting MI, however staging disease and treatment efficacy is a challenge. Damage and recovery can be assessed on the cellular, tissue or whole-organ scale but these are rarely measured in concert. Here, for the first time, we present data showing measures of injury in infarcted mice using complementary techniques for multi-modal characterisation of the heart. We use in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess heart function with cine-MRI, hindered perfusion with late gadolinium enhancement imaging and muscular function with displacement encoded with stimulated echoes (DENSE) MRI. These measures are followed by positron emission tomography (PET) with 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose to assess cellular metabolism. We demonstrate a protocol combining each of these measures for the same animal in the same imaging session and compare how the different markers can be used to quantify cardiac recovery on different scales following injury.

  10. Football injuries: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Olson, David E; Sikka, Robby Singh; Hamilton, Abigail; Krohn, Austin

    2011-01-01

    Football is one of the most popular sports in the United States and is the leading cause of sports-related injury. A large focus in recent years has been on concussions, sudden cardiac death, and heat illness, all thought to be largely preventable health issues in the young athlete. Injury prevention through better understanding of injury mechanisms, education, proper equipment, and practice techniques and preseason screening may aid in reducing the number of injuries. Proper management of on-field injuries and health emergencies can reduce the morbidity associated with these injuries and may lead to faster return to play and reduced risk of future injury. This article reviews current concepts surrounding frequently seen football-related injuries.

  11. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... care for people with spinal cord injuries and aggressive treatment and rehabilitation can minimize damage to the ... care for people with spinal cord injuries and aggressive treatment and rehabilitation can minimize damage to the ...

  12. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  13. Elbow Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Many things can make your elbow hurt. A common cause is tendinitis, an inflammation or injury to the tendons that attach muscle to bone. Tendinitis of the elbow is a sports injury, often from playing tennis or golf. You ...

  14. Preventing Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a result of a twisting or pivoting motion. This injury may cause susceptibility to repeat injuries and knee instability, and therefore often requires surgery. Occasionally, a twisting or hyperextension force to the knee may result in a tibial ...

  15. Facial Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Face injuries and disorders can cause pain and affect how you look. In severe cases, they can affect sight, ... your nose, cheekbone and jaw, are common facial injuries. Certain diseases also lead to facial disorders. For ...

  16. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  17. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to those nerves. Symptoms ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can occur as a result of shoulder trauma, ...

  18. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Eye Injuries KidsHealth > For Parents > Eye Injuries Print A ... sand, dirt, and other foreign bodies on the eye surface) Wash your hands thoroughly before touching the ...

  19. Wounds and Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... cannot close it yourself, you cannot stop the bleeding or get the dirt out, or it does not heal. Other common types of injuries include Animal bites Bruises Burns Dislocations Electrical injuries Fractures Sprains and strains

  20. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Karl B.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the medical literature on head injuries in soccer and concludes that protective headgear to reduce these injuries may not be as effective as rule changes and other measures, such as padding goal posts. (IAH)

  1. Dealing with Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... happen over time, usually from repetitive training , like running, overhand throwing, or serving a ball in tennis. ... injury in sports that involve a lot of running. Another reason for foot injuries is wearing the ...

  2. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/All-Disorders/Spinal-Cord- ...

  3. Endomorphins and β-Endorphin Do Not Affect Heart Tolerance to the Pathogenic Effect of Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Mukhomedzyanov, A V; Maslov, L N; Tsibulnikov, S Yu; Pei, J M

    2016-11-01

    Selective agonists of μ1- and μ2-opioid receptors endomorphin-2 and endomorphin-1 injected intravenously in a dose of 4500 nmol/kg in 5 min before coronary blood flow resumption had no effect on cardiac reperfusion damage. Consequently, μ1- and μ2-opioid receptors are not involved in the regulation of heart tolerance to reperfusion injury. Nonselective opioid receptor agonist β-endorphin (100 nmol/kg) also did not affect heart tolerance to the pathogenic effect of reperfusion.

  4. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-02-22

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes.

  5. Detrimental or beneficial: the role of TRPM2 in ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Kai-yu; Yu, Pei-lin; Liu, Chun-hui; Luo, Jian-hong; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is the main cause of tissue damage and dysfunction. I/R injury is characterized by Ca(2+) overload and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play critical roles in the process of I/R injury to the brain, heart and kidney, but the underlying mechanisms are largely elusive. Recent evidence demonstrates that TRPM2, a Ca(2+)-permeable cationic channel and ROS sensor, is involved in I/R injury, but whether TRPM2 plays a protective or detrimental role in this process remains controversial. In this review, we discuss the recent progress in understanding the role of TRPM2 in reperfusion process after brain, heart and kidney ischemia and the potential of targeting TRPM2 for the development of therapeutic drugs to treat I/R injury.

  6. Ocular injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Cass, Shane P

    2012-01-01

    Eye injuries are common in sports. Team physicians need to be able to recognize and treat common injuries and know when to refer other problems. This article highlights the current treatment of common sports-related eye injuries and reviews some of the new literature. Nearly 90% of all sports-related eye injuries can be prevented with adequate eye protection and will be discussed in some detail in the article.

  7. Rotator cuff injuries.

    PubMed

    Crusher, R H

    2000-07-01

    Different types of rotator cuff injuries frequently present to Accident and Emergency departments and minor injury units but can be difficult to differentiate clinically. This brief case study describes the examination and diagnosis of related shoulder injuries, specifically rotator cuff tears/disruption and calcifying supraspinatus tendinitis. The relevant anatomy and current therapies for these injuries is also discussed to enable the emergency nurse practitioner to have a greater understanding of the theory surrounding their diagnosis and treatments.

  8. Smoke inhalation injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birky, M.

    The cause of death by fires was studied. The present results and information are, however, not enough to reduce loss of life or inhalation injury. The magnitude and type of inhalation injury for civilians and firefighters represents the most inadequately defined human element of accidental fires. Little information is available on compounds other than carbon monoxide, which are responsible for respiration injury or toxicological syndrome. Effective treatment methods for inhalation victims and studies on fatalities, inhalation injury and animals are suggested.

  9. Editorial. Bicycle injuries and injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Pless, I B

    2014-07-01

    In 1989, long before this journal added injuries to its title, it published two papers on childhood injuries and I was asked to write an editorial for this occasion. I chose the title "Challenges for Injury Prevention: Two Neglected Aspects" because I thought the papers neglected to mention the inadequacy of injury statistics (at the time there were no emergency department data) and also failed to emphasize the public health importance of childhood injuries. It is instructive, therefore, to compare this issue's offerings with how matters stood nearly 25 years ago and see what progress we've made. Papers in this and the previous issue of this journal discuss bicycle safety in general and helmet use in particular. Although this is a somewhat narrow focus, it serves as one indicator of how the field has evolved and what remains to be done to improve both the science and policy in this domain.

  10. Heart rate monitoring mobile applications

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Total number of times a heart beats in a minute is known as the heart rate. Traditionally, heart rate was measured using clunky gadgets but these days it can be measured with a smartphone’s camera. This can help you measure your heart rate anywhere and at anytime, especially during workouts so you can adjust your workout intensity to achieve maximum health benefits. With simple and easy to use mobile app, ‘Unique Heart Rate Monitor’, you can also maintain your heart rate history for personal reflection and sharing with a provider. PMID:28293594

  11. Injuries from break dancing.

    PubMed

    Norman, R A; Grodin, M A

    1984-10-01

    Break dancing is a popular contemporary activity that has important medical implications. Some dancers have complained of lower back pain and difficulty in bending over-the "breakdance back syndrome." Break dancing injuries are often comparable to the orthopedic injuries that occur in unsupervised athletic activities. Careful screening, instruction, supervision and training of break dancers will help prevent injuries.

  12. Lightning injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Ritenour, Amber E; Morton, Melinda J; McManus, John G; Barillo, David J; Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2008-08-01

    Lightning is an uncommon but potentially devastating cause of injury in patients presenting to burn centers. These injuries feature unusual symptoms, high mortality, and significant long-term morbidity. This paper will review the epidemiology, physics, clinical presentation, management principles, and prevention of lightning injuries.

  13. Prevention of Football Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Kirkendall, Donald T; Junge, Astrid; Dvorak, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Every sport has a unique profile of injury and risk of injury. In recent years, there have been numerous attempts at conducting injury prevention trials for specific injuries or for injuries within specific sports to provide evidence useful to the sports medicine and sport community. Football has been a focus of a number of randomized injury prevention trials. Methods MEDLINE was searched with the first order keywords of “injury prevention” and “sport”. This list was restricted to “clinical trial” or “randomized controlled trial” which had been conducted on children and adults whose goal was preventing common football injuries. Our objective was to find studies with an exercise-based training program, thus projects that used mechanical interventions were excluded. Results A structured, generalized warm-up has been shown to be effective at preventing common injuries in football, reducing injuries by about one-third. Conclusion The huge participation numbers in the worldwide family of football would suggest that any reduction in injury should have a public health impact. Professionals in sports medicine need to promote injury prevention programs that have been shown to be effective. PMID:22375195

  14. Mania following head injury.

    PubMed

    Yatham, L N; Benbow, J C; Jeffers, A M

    1988-03-01

    A case of mania following head injury in an individual with a genetic predisposition to schizophrenia is reported. It is argued that the head injury is probably causative in his case and suggested that head injury should be considered as one of the aetiological factors in secondary mania.

  15. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  16. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that happen when too much stress is placed on a part of the body, resulting in inflammation (pain and swelling), muscle strain, or tissue damage. This stress generally occurs from ...

  17. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  18. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  19. Congestive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael C; Winters, Michael E

    2015-08-01

    Patients with acute decompensated heart failure are usually critically ill and require immediate treatment. However, most are not volume overloaded. Emergency department (ED) management is based on rapid initiation of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation and aggressive titration of nitrates. Afterload reduction with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor can be considered. A diuretic should not be administered before optimal preload and afterload reduction has been achieved. Short-term inotropic therapy can be considered in select patients with cardiogenic shock and acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) who fail to respond to standard therapy.

  20. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  1. Expression analysis of Baf60c during heart regeneration in axolotls and neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryo; Koshiba-Takeuchi, Kazuko; Tsuchiya, Megumi; Kojima, Mizuyo; Miyazawa, Asuka; Ito, Kohei; Ogawa, Hidesato; Takeuchi, Jun K

    2016-05-01

    Some organisms, such as zebrafish, urodele amphibians, and newborn mice, have a capacity for heart regeneration following injury. However, adult mammals fail to regenerate their hearts. To know why newborn mice can regenerate their hearts, we focused on epigenetic factors, which are involved in cell differentiation in many tissues. Baf60c (BRG1/BRM-associated factor 60c), a component of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes, has an essential role for cardiomyocyte differentiation at the early heart development. To address the function of Baf60c in postnatal heart homeostasis and regeneration, we examined the detailed expression/localization patterns of Baf60c in both mice and axolotls. In the mouse heart development, Baf60c was highly expressed in the entire heart at the early stages, but gradually downregulated at the postnatal stages. During heart regeneration in neonatal mice and axolotls, Baf60c expression was strongly upregulated after resection. Interestingly, the timing of Baf60c upregulation after resection was consistent with the temporal dynamics of cardiomyocyte proliferation. Moreover, knockdown of Baf60c downregulated proliferation of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes. These data suggested that Baf60c plays an important role in cardiomyocyte proliferation in heart development and regeneration. This is the first study indicating that Baf60c contributes to the heart regeneration in vertebrates.

  2. Xanthine oxidase inhibition attenuates ischemic-reperfusion lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.J.; Grum, C.M.; Gallagher, K.P.; Bolling, S.F.; Deeb, G.M.; Morganroth, M.L.

    1988-05-01

    Ischemic-reperfusion lung injury is a factor potentially limiting the usefulness of distant organ procurement for heart-lung transplantation. Toxic oxygen metabolites are considered a major etiologic factor in reperfusion injury. Although oxygen-free radicals may be generated by many mechanisms, we investigated the role of xanthine oxidase in this injury process by using lodoxamide, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, to inhibit ischemic-reperfusion injury in an isolated rat lung model. Isolated rat lungs were perfused with physiologic salt solution (PSS) osmotically stabilized with Ficoll until circulating blood elements were nondetectable in the pulmonary venous effluent. Lungs were rendered ischemic by interrupting ventilation and perfusion for 2 hr at 37/sup 0/C. After the ischemic interval, the lungs were reperfused with whole blood and lung injury was determined by measuring the accumulation of /sup 125/I-bovine serum albumin in lung parenchyma and alveolar lavage fluid as well as by gravimetric measurements. Lung effluent was collected immediately pre- and postischemia for analysis of uric acid by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Lodoxamide (1 mM) caused significant attenuation of postischemic lung injury. Uric acid levels in the lung effluent confirmed inhibition of xanthine oxidase. Protection from injury was not complete, however, implying that additional mechanisms may contribute to ischemic-reperfusion injury in the lung.

  3. Biochemical dysfunction in heart mitochondria exposed to ischaemia and reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Heart tissue is remarkably sensitive to oxygen deprivation. Although heart cells, like those of most tissues, rapidly adapt to anoxic conditions, relatively short periods of ischaemia and subsequent reperfusion lead to extensive tissue death during cardiac infarction. Heart tissue is not readily regenerated, and permanent heart damage is the result. Although mitochondria maintain normal heart function by providing virtually all of the heart's ATP, they are also implicated in the development of ischaemic damage. While mitochondria do provide some mechanisms that protect against ischaemic damage (such as an endogenous inhibitor of the F1Fo-ATPase and antioxidant enzymes), they also possess a range of elements that exacerbate it, including ROS (reactive oxygen species) generators, the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, and their ability to release apoptotic factors. This review considers the process of ischaemic damage from a mitochondrial viewpoint. It considers ischaemic changes in the inner membrane complexes I–V, and how this might affect formation of ROS and high-energy phosphate production/degradation. We discuss the contribution of various mitochondrial cation channels to ionic imbalances which seem to be a major cause of reperfusion injury. The different roles of the H+, Ca2+ and the various K+ channel transporters are considered, particularly the K+ATP (ATP-dependent K+) channels. A possible role for the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in ischaemic damage is assessed. Finally, we summarize the metabolic and pharmacological interventions that have been used to alleviate the effects of ischaemic injury, highlighting the value of these or related interventions in possible therapeutics. PMID:16108756

  4. Heart Health: Learn the Truth About Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Learn the Truth About Your Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... turn Javascript on. Photo: iStock February is American Heart Month. Now is the time to make sure ...

  5. Women's Heart Disease: Join the Heart Truth Community

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Join The Heart Truth Community Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents National Symbol The centerpiece of The Heart Truth ® is The Red Dress ® which was introduced ...

  6. Million Hearts: Key to Collaboration to Reduce Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkman, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Extension has taught successful classes to address heart disease, yet heart disease remains the number one killer in the United States. The U.S. government's Million Hearts initiative seeks collaboration among colleges, local and state health departments, Extension and other organizations, and medical providers in imparting a consistent message…

  7. The Adrenergic Nervous System in Heart Failure: Pathophysiology and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Rengo, Giuseppe; Koch, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF), the leading cause of death in the western world, develops when a cardiac injury or insult impairs the ability of the heart to pump blood and maintain tissue perfusion. It is characterized by a complex interplay of several neurohormonal mechanisms that get activated in the syndrome in order to try and sustain cardiac output in the face of decompensating function. Perhaps the most prominent among these neurohormonal mechanisms is the adrenergic (or sympathetic) nervous system (ANS), whose activity and outflow are enormously elevated in HF. Acutely, and if the heart works properly, this activation of the ANS will promptly restore cardiac function. However, if the cardiac insult persists over time, chances are the ANS will not be able to maintain cardiac function, the heart will progress into a state of chronic decompensated HF, and the hyperactive ANS will continue to “push” the heart to work at a level much higher than the cardiac muscle can handle. From that point on, ANS hyperactivity becomes a major problem in HF, conferring significant toxicity to the failing heart and markedly increasing its morbidity and mortality. The present review discusses the role of the ANS in cardiac physiology and in HF pathophysiology, the mechanisms of regulation of ANS activity and how they go awry in chronic HF, methods of measuring ANS activity in HF, the molecular alterations in heart physiology that occur in HF along with their pharmacological and therapeutic implications, and, finally, drugs and other therapeutic modalities used in HF treatment that target or affect the ANS and its effects on the failing heart. PMID:23989716

  8. Decellularized zebrafish cardiac extracellular matrix induces mammalian heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, William C. W.; Wang, Zhouguang; Missinato, Maria Azzurra; Park, Dae Woo; Long, Daniel Ward; Liu, Heng-Jui; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan A.; Kim, Kang; Wang, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    Heart attack is a global health problem that leads to significant morbidity, mortality, and health care burden. Adult human hearts have very limited regenerative capability after injury. However, evolutionarily primitive species generally have higher regenerative capacity than mammals. The extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to this difference. Mammalian cardiac ECM may not be optimally inductive for cardiac regeneration because of the fibrotic, instead of regenerative, responses in injured adult mammalian hearts. Given the high regenerative capacity of adult zebrafish hearts, we hypothesize that decellularized zebrafish cardiac ECM (zECM) made from normal or healing hearts can induce mammalian heart regeneration. Using zebrafish and mice as representative species of lower vertebrates and mammals, we show that a single administration of zECM, particularly the healing variety, enables cardiac functional recovery and regeneration of adult mouse heart tissues after acute myocardial infarction. zECM-treated groups exhibit proliferation of the remaining cardiomyocytes and multiple cardiac precursor cell populations and reactivation of ErbB2 expression in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, zECM exhibits pro-proliferative and chemotactic effects on human cardiac precursor cell populations in vitro. These contribute to the structural preservation and correlate with significantly higher cardiac contractile function, notably less left ventricular dilatation, and substantially more elastic myocardium in zECM-treated hearts than control animals treated with saline or decellularized adult mouse cardiac ECM. Inhibition of ErbB2 activity abrogates beneficial effects of zECM administration, indicating the possible involvement of ErbB2 signaling in zECM-mediated regeneration. This study departs from conventional focuses on mammalian ECM and introduces a new approach for cardiac tissue regeneration. PMID:28138518

  9. Intracoronary Delivery of Mitochondria to the Ischemic Heart for Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Douglas B.; Yao, Rouan; Akurathi, Vamsidhar; Snay, Erin R.; Thedsanamoorthy, Jerusha K.; Zurakowski, David; Ericsson, Maria; Friehs, Ingeborg; Wu, Yaotang; Levitsky, Sidney; del Nido, Pedro J.; Packard, Alan B.

    2016-01-01

    integration and widespread distribution throughout the heart and provided cardioprotection from ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:27500955

  10. Triathlon: running injuries.

    PubMed

    Spiker, Andrea M; Dixit, Sameer; Cosgarea, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    The running portion of the triathlon represents the final leg of the competition and, by some reports, the most important part in determining a triathlete's overall success. Although most triathletes spend most of their training time on cycling, running injuries are the most common injuries encountered. Common causes of running injuries include overuse, lack of rest, and activities that aggravate biomechanical predisposers of specific injuries. We discuss the running-associated injuries in the hip, knee, lower leg, ankle, and foot of the triathlete, and the causes, presentation, evaluation, and treatment of each.

  11. 38 CFR 3.310 - Disabilities that are proximately due to, or aggravated by, service-connected disease or injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1110 and 1131) (c) Cardiovascular disease. Ischemic heart disease or other... proximately due to, or aggravated by, service-connected disease or injury. 3.310 Section 3.310 Pensions... are proximately due to, or aggravated by, service-connected disease or injury. (a) General. Except...

  12. 38 CFR 3.310 - Disabilities that are proximately due to, or aggravated by, service-connected disease or injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1110 and 1131) (c) Cardiovascular disease. Ischemic heart disease or other... proximately due to, or aggravated by, service-connected disease or injury. 3.310 Section 3.310 Pensions... are proximately due to, or aggravated by, service-connected disease or injury. (a) General. Except...

  13. 38 CFR 3.310 - Disabilities that are proximately due to, or aggravated by, service-connected disease or injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1110 and 1131) (c) Cardiovascular disease. Ischemic heart disease or other... proximately due to, or aggravated by, service-connected disease or injury. 3.310 Section 3.310 Pensions... are proximately due to, or aggravated by, service-connected disease or injury. (a) General. Except...

  14. 38 CFR 3.310 - Disabilities that are proximately due to, or aggravated by, service-connected disease or injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1110 and 1131) (c) Cardiovascular disease. Ischemic heart disease or other... proximately due to, or aggravated by, service-connected disease or injury. 3.310 Section 3.310 Pensions... are proximately due to, or aggravated by, service-connected disease or injury. (a) General. Except...

  15. How Will I Recover from My Heart Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Defects Care & Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects Congenital Heart Defects Tools & Resources Heart Attack About Heart Attacks Warning Signs of a Heart ...

  16. Panic Attack or Heart Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... with echocardiography. It is a good first-line test for a woman with symptoms and risk factors for heart disease. Echocardiography uses sound waves technology to give detailed information about the heart muscle, ...

  17. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    MedlinePlus

    ... In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook ... In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook ...

  18. Give your heart a workout

    MedlinePlus

    Exercise - heart workout; CAD prevention - workout; Cardiovascular disease prevention - workout ... Exercise helps your heart in several ways. Burns calories. This can help you lose extra pounds (kilograms) or stay at a healthy weight. ...

  19. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement Updated:Feb 15,2017 The ejection fraction (EF) is an important measurement in determining how well your heart is pumping ...

  20. Angioplasty and stent placement - heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndromes: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ... disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ...