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Sample records for heart injuries

  1. Iodide Protects Heart Tissue from Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Akiko; Morrison, Michael L.; Roth, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Iodine is an elemental nutrient that is essential for mammals. Here we provide evidence for an acute therapeutic role for iodine in ischemia reperfusion injury. Infusion of the reduced form, iodide, but not the oxidized form iodate, reduces heart damage by as much as 75% when delivered intravenously following temporary loss of blood flow but prior to reperfusion of the heart in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction. Normal thyroid function may be required because loss of thyroid activity abrogates the iodide benefit. Given the high degree of protection and the high degree of safety, iodide should be explored further as a therapy for reperfusion injury. PMID:25379708

  2. [Heart injury following closed thoracic injury].

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, N; Godier, S; Genevois, A; Kaeffer, N; Dureuil, B

    1996-01-01

    A 60-year-old man, was admitted in the emergency ward, following a motor vehicle accident. At the time of arrival his clinical state was stable. The initial investigations showed a moderate left haemopneumothorax and fractured ribs. After insertion of a thoracostomy tube into the left pleural cavity he had to undergo surgery for an open fracture of the left arm. Following induction of anaesthesia, a cardiovascular collapse occurred rapidly. An emergency thoracotomy was performed which showed a right ventricular perforation by a rib fragment. The authors discuss the role of possible changes in heart position produced by induction of general anaesthesia. Indeed the decrease in functional residual capacity following induction of anaesthesia with a cephalad diaphragmatic shift may have secondarily exposed the right ventricle to the bevel of a fractured rib. PMID:9180985

  3. Acute Kidney Injury in Pediatric Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Riley, Alyssa; Gebhard, Daniel J; Akcan-Arikan, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is very common in pediatric medical and surgical cardiac patients. Not only is it an independent risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in the short run, but repeated episodes of AKI lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD) especially in the most vulnerable hosts with multiple risk factors, such as heart transplant recipients. The cardiorenal syndrome, a term coined to emphasize the bidirectional nature of simultaneous or sequential cardiac-renal dysfunction both in acute and chronic settings, has been recently described in adults but scarcely reported in children. Despite the common occurrence and clinical and financial impact, AKI in pediatric heart failure outside of cardiac surgery populations remains poorly studied and there are no large-scale pediatric specific preventive or therapeutic studies to date. This article will review pediatric aspects of the cardiorenal syndrome in terms of pathophysiology, clinical impact and treatment options.

  4. Penetrating Heart Injury due to Screwdriver Assault

    PubMed Central

    Dieng, P. A.; Diop, M. S.; Ciss, A. G.; Ba, P. S.; Diatta, S.; Gaye, M.; Fall, M. L.; Ndiaye, A.; Ndiaye, M.

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating heart injuries cause wounds in the cardiac chambers. Most of them are due to gunshot or stabbing by knives. Screwdriver is an uncommon weapon. Authors report a case of stab wound by screwdriver, treated at cardiovascular center in Dakar. This is a 16-year-old boy who experienced physical aggression. He was assaulted with a screwdriver and had stab wound on the anterior wall of the chest. Physical examination showed a screwdriver penetrating the sternum bone over a right angle. He had a mild pericardial blood effusion and a right ventricle wound 5 mm in diameter with transection of the right coronary vein. The screwdriver was removed without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and the ventricle wound repaired by direct suture of stitches reinforced with Teflon pledgets. The right coronary artery was ligated. Postoperative period was free of events. Screwdriver is uncommonly used as a weapon. It is a dangerous device because of its rigid structure and narrow tip. PMID:25945263

  5. Oxidative stress and myocardial injury in the diabetic heart

    PubMed Central

    Ansley, David M.; Wang, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen or nitrogen species play an integral role in both myocardial injury and repair. This dichotomy is differentiated at the level of species type, amount, duration of free radical generated. Homeostatic mechanisms designed to prevent free radical generation in the first instance, scavenge, or enzymatically convert them to less toxic forms and water, play crucial roles in maintenance of cellular structure and function. The outcome between functional recovery and dysfunction is dependent upon the inherent ability of these homeostatic antioxidant defenses to withstand acute free radical generation, in the order of seconds to minutes. Alternatively, pre-existent antioxidant capacity (from intracellular and extracellular sources) may regulate the degree of free radical generation. This converts reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to the role of second messenger involved in cell signalling. The adaptive capacity of the cell is altered by the balance between death or survival signal converging at the level of the mitochondria, with distinct pathophysiologic consequences that extends the period of injury from hours to days and weeks. Hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance enhance oxidative stress in diabetic myocardium that cannot adapt to ischemia reperfusion. Altered glucose flux, mitochondrial derangements and nitric oxide synthase uncoupling in the presence of decreased antioxidant defense and impaired prosurvival cell signalling may render the diabetic myocardium more vulnerable to injury, remodelling and heart failure. PMID:23011912

  6. Burn-induced subepicardial injury in frog heart: a simple model mimicking ST segment changes in ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    KAZAMA, Itsuro

    2015-01-01

    To mimic ischemic heart disease in humans, several animal models have been created, mainly in rodents by surgically ligating their coronary arteries. In the present study, by simply inducing burn injuries on the bullfrog heart, we reproduced abnormal ST segment changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG), mimicking those observed in ischemic heart disease, such as acute myocardial infarction and angina pectoris. The “currents of injury” created by a voltage gradient between the intact and damaged areas of the myocardium, negatively deflected the ECG vector during the diastolic phase, making the ST segment appear elevated during the systolic phase. This frog model of heart injury would be suitable to explain the mechanisms of ST segment changes observed in ischemic heart disease. PMID:26346747

  7. GATA4 regulates Fgf16 to promote heart repair after injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Huang, Xiuzhen; Tian, Xueying; Zhang, Hui; He, Lingjuan; Wang, Yue; Nie, Yu; Hu, Shengshou; Lin, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William; Lui, Kathy O; Zhou, Bin

    2016-03-15

    Although the mammalian heart can regenerate during the neonatal stage, this endogenous regenerative capacity is lost with age. Importantly, replication of cardiomyocytes has been found to be the key mechanism responsible for neonatal cardiac regeneration. Unraveling the transcriptional regulatory network for inducing cardiomyocyte replication will, therefore, be crucial for the development of novel therapies to drive cardiac repair after injury. Here, we investigated whether the key cardiac transcription factor GATA4 is required for neonatal mouse heart regeneration. Using the neonatal mouse heart cryoinjury and apical resection models with an inducible loss of GATA4 specifically in cardiomyocytes, we found severely depressed ventricular function in the Gata4-ablated mice (mutant) after injury. This was accompanied by reduced cardiomyocyte replication. In addition, the mutant hearts displayed impaired coronary angiogenesis and increased hypertrophy and fibrosis after injury. Mechanistically, we found that the paracrine factor FGF16 was significantly reduced in the mutant hearts after injury compared with littermate controls and was directly regulated by GATA4. Cardiac-specific overexpression of FGF16 via adeno-associated virus subtype 9 (AAV9) in the mutant hearts partially rescued the cryoinjury-induced cardiac hypertrophy, promoted cardiomyocyte replication and improved heart function after injury. Altogether, our data demonstrate that GATA4 is required for neonatal heart regeneration through regulation of Fgf16, suggesting that paracrine factors could be of potential use in promoting myocardial repair.

  8. DJ-1 protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury by regulating mitochondrial fission.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yuuki; Lambert, Jonathan P; Nicholson, Chad K; Kim, Joshua J; Wolfson, David W; Cho, Hee Cheol; Husain, Ahsan; Naqvi, Nawazish; Chin, Li-Shen; Li, Lian; Calvert, John W

    2016-08-01

    Recent data indicates that DJ-1 plays a role in the cellular response to stress. Here, we aimed to examine the underlying molecular mechanisms mediating the actions of DJ-1 in the heart following myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. In response to I/R injury, DJ-1 KO mice displayed increased areas of infarction and worsened left ventricular function when compared to WT mice, confirming a protective role for DJ-1 in the heart. In an effort to evaluate the potential mechanism(s) responsible for the increased injury in DJ-1 KO mice, we focused on SUMOylation, a post-translational modification process that regulates various aspects of protein function. DJ-1 KO hearts after I/R injury were found to display enhanced accumulation of SUMO-1 modified proteins and reduced SUMO-2/3 modified proteins. Further analysis, revealed that the protein expression of the de-SUMOylation enzyme SENP1 was reduced, whereas the expression of SENP5 was enhanced in DJ-1 KO hearts after I/R injury. Finally, DJ-1 KO hearts were found to display enhanced SUMO-1 modification of dynamin-related protein 1, excessive mitochondrial fission, and dysfunctional mitochondria. Our data demonstrates that the activation of DJ-1 in response to myocardial I/R injury protects the heart by regulating the SUMOylation status of Drp1 and attenuating excessive mitochondrial fission. PMID:27108530

  9. Induction and Assessment of Ischemia-reperfusion Injury in Langendorff-perfused Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Daniel J.; Aune, Sverre E.; Menick, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical events surrounding ischemia reperfusion injury in the acute setting are of great importance to furthering novel treatment options for myocardial infarction and cardiac complications of thoracic surgery. The ability of certain drugs to precondition the myocardium against ischemia reperfusion injury has led to multiple clinical trials, with little success. The isolated heart model allows acute observation of the functional effects of ischemia reperfusion injury in real time, including the effects of various pharmacological interventions administered at any time-point before or within the ischemia-reperfusion injury window. Since brief periods of ischemia can precondition the heart against ischemic injury, in situ aortic cannulation is performed to allow for functional assessment of non-preconditioned myocardium. A saline filled balloon is placed into the left ventricle to allow for real-time measurement of pressure generation. Ischemic injury is simulated by the cessation of perfusion buffer flow, followed by reperfusion. The duration of both ischemia and reperfusion can be modulated to examine biochemical events at any given time-point. Although the Langendorff isolated heart model does not allow for the consideration of systemic events affecting ischemia and reperfusion, it is an excellent model for the examination of acute functional and biochemical events within the window of ischemia reperfusion injury as well as the effect of pharmacological intervention on cardiac pre- and postconditioning. The goal of this protocol is to demonstrate how to perform in situ aortic cannulation and heart excision followed by ischemia/reperfusion injury in the Langendorff model. PMID:26274877

  10. Prenatal methamphetamine differentially alters myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury in male and female adult hearts.

    PubMed

    Rorabaugh, Boyd R; Seeley, Sarah L; Bui, Albert D; Sprague, Lisanne; D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2016-02-15

    Methamphetamine is one of the most common illicit drugs abused during pregnancy. The neurological effects of prenatal methamphetamine are well known. However, few studies have investigated the potential effects of prenatal methamphetamine on adult cardiovascular function. Previous work demonstrated that prenatal cocaine exposure increases sensitivity of the adult heart to ischemic injury. Methamphetamine and cocaine have different mechanisms of action, but both drugs exert their effects by increasing dopaminergic and adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus the goal of this study was to determine whether prenatal methamphetamine also worsens ischemic injury in the adult heart. Pregnant rats were injected with methamphetamine (5 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or saline throughout pregnancy. When pups reached 8 wk of age, their hearts were subjected to ischemia and reperfusion by means of a Langendorff isolated heart system. Prenatal methamphetamine had no significant effect on infarct size, preischemic contractile function, or postischemic recovery of contractile function in male hearts. However, methamphetamine-treated female hearts exhibited significantly larger infarcts and significantly elevated end-diastolic pressure during recovery from ischemia. Methamphetamine significantly reduced protein kinase Cε expression and Akt phosphorylation in female hearts but had no effect on these cardioprotective proteins in male hearts. These data indicate that prenatal methamphetamine differentially affects male and female sensitivity to myocardial ischemic injury and alters cardioprotective signaling proteins in the adult heart.

  11. Caffeine-induced myocardial injury in calcium-free perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Vander Heide, R S; Ganote, C E

    1985-01-01

    Hearts depleted of extracellular calcium become susceptible to injury caused by repletion of extracellular calcium (calcium paradox). It has been suggested that calcium-free perfusion causes weakening of intercalated disks and that the physical stress of contracture may cause sarcolemmal membrane rupture and creatine kinase (CK) release. To further investigate this hypothesis, the effects of caffeine on contracture, cellular morphology, and CK release were studied in control and calcium-free perfused isolated rat hearts. Control hearts perfused with 2.5 mM calcium retained normal ultrastructure for long periods of perfusion. Calcium-free hearts perfused for 12 minutes developed separations of fascia adherens portions of intercalated disks but retained intact nexus junctions. Hearts subjected to 5-minute calcium-free perfusion, followed by calcium repletion, developed a massive CK release and extensive contraction band necrosis (calcium paradox). Ten millimolar caffeine, which causes rapid calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), produced contracture, but not CK release, from control hearts perfused with medium containing 2.5 mM calcium. In calcium-free perfused hearts, caffeine caused sudden CK release accompanied by contracture, development of contraction bands, wide separations of cells at intercalated disks, and sarcolemmal membrane injury. Caffeine-induced injury occurred despite 3 mM amobarbital inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. Hearts perfused with caffeine in the presence of calcium relaxed when made calcium-free and did not release CK. Addition of caffeine following calcium-free perfusion at 22 C, which protects the heart from the calcium paradox, produced a rapid, transient contracture. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that myocardial cell injury in calcium-free hearts is not dependent on repletion of extracellular calcium or mitochondrial function, but can result from contracture following caffeine-induced release of

  12. Infection and White Matter Injury in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Hannah C.; Bowman, Chelsea; Chau, Vann; Moosa, Alisha; Hersh, Adam L.; Campbell, Andrew; Poskitt, Kenneth; Azakie, Anthony; Barkovich, A. James; Miller, Steven P; McQuillen, Patrick S

    2011-01-01

    More than 60 percent of newborns with severe congenital heart disease develop perioperative brain injuries. Known risk factors include: preoperative hypoxemia, cardiopulmonary bypass characteristics, and postoperative hypotension. Infection is an established risk factor for white matter injury in premature newborns. In this study, we examined term infants with congenital heart disease requiring surgical repair to determine whether infection is associated with white matter injury. Acquired infection was specified by site (bloodstream, pneumonia, or surgical site infection) according to strict definitions. Infection was present in 23/127. Pre and post-operative imaging was evaluated for acquired injury by a pediatric neuroradiologist. Overall, there was no difference in newly acquired postoperative white matter injury in infants with infection (30 percent), compared to those without (31 percent). When stratified by anatomy, infants with transposition of the great arteries and bloodstream infection had an estimated doubling of risk of white matter injury that was not significant, whereas those with single ventricle anatomy had no apparent added risk. When considering only infants without stroke, the estimated association was higher, and became significant after adjusting for duration of inotrope therapy. In this study, nosocomial infection was not associated with white matter injury. Nonetheless, when controlling for risk factors, there was an association between bloodstream infection and white matter injury in selected sub-populations. Infection prevention may have the potential to mitigate long-term neurologic impairment as a consequence of white matter injury, which underscores the importance of attention to infection control for these patients. PMID:21554828

  13. Oxygen surrounding the heart during ischemic conservation determines the myocardial injury during reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yansheng; Bopassa, Jean Chrisostome

    2015-01-01

    There is discrepancy regarding the duration of reperfusion required using 2,3,5-triphenyl-2H-tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining to assess myocardial infarction in an isolated, perfused heart model. Several investigators prefer long-term reperfusion (120 minutes) to determine myocardial injury, while others have used a shorter duration (30-40 minutes). We investigated whether oxygen surrounding the myocardium during ischemia plays a critical role in the installation of myocardial infarction during reperfusion. Mice hearts were perfused with a Langendorff apparatus using Krebs Henseleit (KH) buffer oxygenated with 95% O2 plus 5% CO2 at 37°C. Hearts were either immersed in KH or suspended in air during 18 minutes of global ischemia in a normothermic, water-jacketed chamber. Hearts then were reperfused for 40, 60, or 90 minutes. We found that hearts immersed in KH had decreased recovery of function and increased myocardial infarct size, reaching a steady-state level after 40 minutes of reperfusion. In contrast, hearts suspended in air approached steady-state after 90 minutes of reperfusion. Thus, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was much lower in air-maintained hearts than in KH-immersed hearts. To investigate whether an increase in oxygen surrounding the myocardium during ischemia might cause further damage, we bubbled the KH solution with nitrogen (KH+N2) rather than oxygen (KH+O2). With this alteration, recovery of cardiac function was improved and myocardial infarct size and mitochondrial ROS production were reduced compared with hearts immersed in KH+O2. In conclusion, short-term (40 minutes) reperfusion is sufficient to reach steady-state myocardial infarct size when hearts are immersed in physiologic solution during ischemia; however, a longer duration of reperfusion (90 minutes) is required if hearts are suspended in air. Thus, oxygen surrounding the heart during ischemia determines the extent of myocardium injury during reperfusion

  14. Oxygen surrounding the heart during ischemic conservation determines the myocardial injury during reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yansheng; Bopassa, Jean Chrisostome

    2015-01-01

    There is discrepancy regarding the duration of reperfusion required using 2,3,5-triphenyl-2H-tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining to assess myocardial infarction in an isolated, perfused heart model. Several investigators prefer long-term reperfusion (120 minutes) to determine myocardial injury, while others have used a shorter duration (30-40 minutes). We investigated whether oxygen surrounding the myocardium during ischemia plays a critical role in the installation of myocardial infarction during reperfusion. Mice hearts were perfused with a Langendorff apparatus using Krebs Henseleit (KH) buffer oxygenated with 95% O2 plus 5% CO2 at 37°C. Hearts were either immersed in KH or suspended in air during 18 minutes of global ischemia in a normothermic, water-jacketed chamber. Hearts then were reperfused for 40, 60, or 90 minutes. We found that hearts immersed in KH had decreased recovery of function and increased myocardial infarct size, reaching a steady-state level after 40 minutes of reperfusion. In contrast, hearts suspended in air approached steady-state after 90 minutes of reperfusion. Thus, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was much lower in air-maintained hearts than in KH-immersed hearts. To investigate whether an increase in oxygen surrounding the myocardium during ischemia might cause further damage, we bubbled the KH solution with nitrogen (KH+N2) rather than oxygen (KH+O2). With this alteration, recovery of cardiac function was improved and myocardial infarct size and mitochondrial ROS production were reduced compared with hearts immersed in KH+O2. In conclusion, short-term (40 minutes) reperfusion is sufficient to reach steady-state myocardial infarct size when hearts are immersed in physiologic solution during ischemia; however, a longer duration of reperfusion (90 minutes) is required if hearts are suspended in air. Thus, oxygen surrounding the heart during ischemia determines the extent of myocardium injury during reperfusion.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress involved in heart and liver injury in iron-loaded rats.

    PubMed

    Lou, Li-Xia; Geng, Bin; Chen, Yu; Yu, Fang; Zhao, Jing; Tang, Chao-Shu

    2009-07-01

    1. Iron overload contributes to the pathogenesis of various diseases and directly induces tissue injury. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between heart and liver injury induced by iron overload and cellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress to explore the molecular mechanism of iron overload-induced cellular injury. 2. Iron overload in rats was generated by intraperitoneal injection of iron-dextran chronically (30 mg/kg per day for 9 weeks) or acutely (300 mg/kg once). Tissue injury was assessed by determining serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity, as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the heart and liver. The ER stress response was analysed by expression of glucose-response protein 78 (GRP78) and activation of caspase 12. 3. In chronic iron-loaded rats, iron levels in the heart and liver were higher, by approximately 2- and 7.8-fold, respectively (P < 0.01), compared with control. Serum LDH, ALT and AST activity, as well as MDA content, GRP78 expression and caspase 12 activity in the heart and liver, were upregulated in chronically iron-loaded rats. In acute iron-loaded rats, iron content in the heart and liver was 51% and 63% higher than in controls (both P < 0.01). Serum LDH, ALT and AST activity, MDA content in the heart and liver and levels of ER stress markers were all increased in acute iron-loaded rats. N-Acetylcysteine (150 mg/kg, s.c.) lowered the levels of these parameters in acute iron-loaded rats. 4. The results of the present study indicate that ER stress may play an important role in iron-induced tissue injury and that reactive oxygen species may mediate the ER stress response in the pathogenesis of iron-overload cellular injury. PMID:19594550

  16. Pericardiocentesis followed by thoracotomy and repair of penetrating cardiac injury caused by nail gun injury to the heart

    PubMed Central

    Chirumamilla, Vasu; Prabhakaran, Kartik; Patrizio, Petrone; Savino, John A.; Marini, Corrado P.; Zoha, Zobair

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Work site injuries involving high projectile tools such as nail guns can lead to catastrophic injuries. Generally, penetrating cardiac injuries are associated with a high mortality rate. Presentation of case A construction worker was brought to the emergency room having sustained a nail gun injury to the chest. The patient was hypotensive, tachycardic with prominent jugular venous distention, and had a profound lactic acidosis. Bedside ultrasound confirmed the presence of pericardial fluid. Pericardiocentesis was performed twice using a central venous catheter inserted into the pericardial space, resulting in improvement in the patient’s hemodynamics. Thereafter he underwent left anterolateral thoracotomy and repair of a right atrial laceration. He recovered uneventfully. Discussion Penetrating cardiac injuries caused by nail guns, although rare, have been previously described. However, pericardiocentesis, while retaining a role in the management of medical causes of cardiac tamponade, has been reported only sporadically in the setting of trauma. We report a rare case of penetrating nail gun injury to the heart where pericardiocentesis was used as a temporizing measure to stabilize the patient in preparation for definitive but timely operative intervention. Conclusion We propose awareness that percardiocentesis can serve as a temporary life saving measure in the setting of trauma, particularly as a bridge to definitive therapy. To our knowledge, this represents the first reported case of catheter pericardiocentesis used to stabilize a patient until definitive repair of a penetrating cardiac injury caused by a nail gun. PMID:27107304

  17. Analysis of Heart Rate and Self-Injury with and without Restraint in an Individual with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennett, Heather; Hagopian, Louis P.; Beaulieu, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    The relation between self-injury and heart rate was analyzed for an individual who appeared anxious while engaging in self-injury. The analysis involved manipulating the presence or absence of restraint while simultaneously measuring heart rate. The following findings were obtained and replicated: (a) when some form of restraint was applied, heart…

  18. A Rare Etiology of Heart Failure: Traumatic Arteriovenous Fistula Due to Stab Injury 17 Years Ago

    PubMed Central

    Hüseyin, Serhat; Yüksel, Volkan; Güçlü, Orkut; Yılmaztepe, Mustafa; Canbaz, Suat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although traumatic fistula is frequently encountered, high-output heart failure due to fistula is a very rare condition. Despite an indefinitive history of trauma, arteriovenous (AV) fistula may develop insidiously, and therefore identification of a shunt is highly important for treatment. Case Report: Here we report a 46-year-old male patient with heart failure due to traumatic femoral arteriovenous fistula developed following a penetrating stab injury 17 years ago. Conclusion: Traumatic AV fistula is a curable cause of heart failure. Also, careful examination of the patient is as significant as radiological imaging methods. PMID:26185721

  19. Interplanetary travel and permanent injury to normal heart.

    PubMed

    Rowe, W J

    1997-05-01

    This hypothesis is that some crewmen on prolonged space flights may develop permanent myocardial injury despite the absence of coronary atherosclerosis and even without the hazards of radiation beyond orbit. This may resuIt from atrophy of skeletal muscle and bone resulting in magnesium ion deficiency predisposing to a vicious cycle with catecholamine elevations, with the latter aggravated by stress, dehydration-provoked angiotensin elevations, unremitting endurance exercise, and in turn a second vicious cycle with severe ischemia. Toxic free radicals can develop complicating ischemia and potential high radiation, with magnesium ion deficiency and high vascular catecholamines playing contributing roles. These free radicals may lead to inactivation of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) causing coronary endothelial injury by a third vicious cycle, increased peripheral resistance and coronary vasospasm intensifying ischemia. Local and systemic thrombogenesis could contribute ultimately to focal fibrosis of the myocardium, if the ischemia is not recognized. Sufficient magnesium and time for repair are vital.

  20. Musculoskeletal overuse injuries and heart rate variability: Is there a link?

    PubMed

    Gisselman, Angela Spontelli; Baxter, G David; Wright, Alexis; Hegedus, Eric; Tumilty, Steve

    2016-02-01

    Accurate detection and prevention of overuse musculoskeletal injuries is limited by the nature of somatic tissue injury. In the pathogenesis of overuse injuries, it is well recognized that an abnormal inflammatory response occurs within somatic tissue before pain is perceived which can disrupt the normal remodeling process and lead to subsequent degeneration. Current overuse injury prevention methods focused on biomechanical faults or performance standards lack the sensitivity needed to identify the status of tissue injury or repair. Recent evidence has revealed an apparent increase in the prevalence and impact of overuse musculoskeletal injuries in athletics. When compared to acute injuries, overuse injuries have a potentially greater negative impact on athletes' overall health burden. Further, return to sport rehabilitation following overuse injury is complicated by the fact that the absence of pain does not equate to complete physiological healing of the injured tissue. Together, this highlights the need for exercise monitoring and injury prevention methods which incorporate assessment of somatic tissue response to loading. One system primarily involved in the activation of pathways and neuromediators responsible for somatic tissue repair is the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Although not completely understood, emerging research supports the critical importance of peripheral ANS activity in the health and repair of somatic tissue injury. Due to its significant contributions to cardiac function, ANS activity can be measured indirectly with heart rate monitoring. Heart rate variability (HRV) is one index of ANS activity that has been used to investigate the relationship between athletes' physiological response to accumulating training load. Research findings indicated that HRV may provide a reflection of ANS homeostasis, or the body's stress-recovery status. This noninvasive marker of the body's primary driver of recovery has the potential to incorporate

  1. Regulation of the proteasome by ATP: implications for ischemic myocardial injury and donor heart preservation.

    PubMed

    Majetschak, Matthias

    2013-08-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that proteasomes are involved in multiple aspects of myocardial physiology and pathology, including myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. It is well established that the 26S proteasome is an ATP-dependent enzyme and that ischemic heart disease is associated with changes in the ATP content of the cardiomyocyte. A functional link between the 26S proteasome, myocardial ATP concentrations, and ischemic cardiac injury, however, has been suggested only recently. This review discusses the currently available data on the pathophysiological role of the cardiac proteasome during ischemia and reperfusion in the context of the cellular ATP content. Depletion of the myocardial ATP content during ischemia appears to activate the 26S proteasome via direct regulatory effects of ATP on 26S proteasome stability and activity. This implies pathological degradation of target proteins by the proteasome and could provide a pathophysiological basis for beneficial effects of proteasome inhibitors in various models of myocardial ischemia. In contrast to that in the ischemic heart, reduced and impaired proteasome activity is detectable in the postischemic heart. The paradoxical findings that proteasome inhibitors showed beneficial effects when administered during reperfusion in some studies could be explained by their anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive actions, leading to reduction of leukocyte-mediated myocardial reperfusion injury. The direct regulatory effects of ATP on the 26S proteasome have implications for the understanding of the contribution of the 26S proteasome to the pathophysiology of the ischemic heart and its possible role as a therapeutic target.

  2. Tolerance to ischaemic injury in remodelled mouse hearts: less ischaemic glycogenolysis and preserved metabolic efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Masoud, Waleed G.T.; Abo Al-Rob, Osama; Yang, Yang; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Clanachan, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Post-infarction remodelled failing hearts have reduced metabolic efficiency. Paradoxically, they have increased tolerance to further ischaemic injury. This study was designed to investigate the metabolic mechanisms that may contribute to this phenomenon and to examine the relationship between ischaemic tolerance and metabolic efficiency during post-ischaemic reperfusion. Methods and results Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to coronary artery ligation (CAL) or SHAM surgery. After 4 weeks, in vivo mechanical function was assessed by echocardiography, and then isolated working hearts were perfused in this sequence: 45 min aerobic, 15 min global no-flow ischaemia, and 30 min aerobic reperfusion. Left ventricular (LV) function, metabolic rates, and metabolic efficiency were measured. Relative to SHAM, both in vivo and in vitro CAL hearts had depressed cardiac function under aerobic conditions (45 and 36%, respectively), but they had a greater recovery of LV function during post-ischaemic reperfusion (67 vs. 49%, P < 0.05). While metabolic efficiency (LV work per ATP produced) was 50% lower during reperfusion of SHAM hearts, metabolic efficiency in CAL hearts did not decrease. During ischaemia, glycogenolysis was 28% lower in CAL hearts, indicative of lower ischaemic proton production. There were no differences in mitochondrial abundance, calcium handling proteins, or key metabolic enzymes. Conclusion Compared with SHAM, remodelled CAL hearts are more tolerant to ischaemic injury and undergo no further deterioration of metabolic efficiency during reperfusion. Less glycogen utilization in CAL hearts during ischaemia may contribute to increased ischaemic tolerance by limiting ischaemic proton production that may improve ion homeostasis during early reperfusion. PMID:26150203

  3. Air rifle pellet injury to the heart with retrograde caval migration.

    PubMed

    Wascher, R A; Gwinn, B C

    1995-03-01

    Great emphasis is placed on the lethality of modern high-powered street weapons, and their impact on mortality from firearm injuries. Presented is a case of an air rifle BB injury to the chest, resulting in a penetrating injury of the right heart, with apparent retrograde embolization to the inferior vena cava. Although no clinical evidence of pericardial tamponade was present 4 hours following injury, 150 mL of pericardial blood was encountered at median sternotomy, secondary to a right atrial appendage entry wound. This case exemplifies three important principles regarding penetrating chest trauma and air guns: (1) Modern air rifles, capable of muzzle velocities as high as 900 fps, are intrinsically lethal weapons; (2) missiles within the cardiovascular system have a propensity for embolization, and often follow an intuitively unexpected course; and (3) young healthy patients with potentially lethal penetrating cardiac injuries, particularly those caused by low velocity firearms, may appear stable and minimally injured in the emergency room. A strong suspicion of cardiac injury and prompt intervention should be extended to airgun injuries of the thorax.

  4. Curcumin ameliorates streptozotocin-induced heart injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Abo-Salem, Osama M; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Ali, Tarek M; El-Sayed, El-Sayed M; Abou-Elnour, Fatma M

    2014-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of diabetic complications. This work was designed to investigate the possible modulatory effect of curcumin against streptozotocin-induced diabetes and consequently HF in rats. Rats were divided into control, vehicle-treated, curcumin-treated, diabetic-untreated, diabetic curcumin-treated, and diabetic glibenclamide-treated groups. Animal treatment was started 5 days after induction of diabetes and extended for 6 weeks. Diabetic rats showed significant increase in serum glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, nitric oxide, lactate dehydrogenase, cardiac malondialdehyde, plasma levels of interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and also showed marked decrease in serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, cardiac reduced glutathione, and cardiac antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione-S-transferase). However, curcumin or glibenclamide treatment significantly mitigated such changes. In conclusion, curcumin has a beneficial therapeutic effect in diabetes-induced HF, an effect that might be attributable to its antioxidant and suppressive activity on cytokines.

  5. The Protection of Salidroside of the Heart against Acute Exhaustive Injury and Molecular Mechanism in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunru; Xu, Peng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Haiyan; Zhou, Yuwen; Cao, Xuebin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the protection of salidroside of the heart against acute exhaustive injury and its mechanism of antioxidative stress and MAPKs signal transduction. Method. Adult male SD rats were divided into four groups randomly. Cardiomyocytes ultrastructure was observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The contents of CK, CK-MB, LDH, MDA, and SOD were determined by ELISA method, and the phosphorylation degrees of ERK and p38 MAPK were assayed by Western blotting. Cardiac function of isolated rat heart ischemia/reperfusion was detected by Langendorff technique. Results. Salidroside reduced the myocardium ultrastructure injury caused by exhaustive swimming, decreased the contents of CK, CK-MB, and LDH, improved the LVDP, ±LV dp/dtmax under the basic condition, reduced the content of MDA and the phosphorylation degree of p38 MAPK, and increased the content of SOD and the phosphorylation degree of ERK in acute exhaustive rats. Conclusion. Salidroside has the protection of the heart against acute exhaustive injury. The cardioprotection is mainly mediated by antioxidative stress and MAPKs signal transduction through reducing the content of MDA, increasing the content of SOD, and increasing p-ERK and decreasing p-p38 protein expressions in rat myocardium, which might be the mechanisms of the cardioprotective effect of salidroside. PMID:24454984

  6. Heart Rate Response During Underwater Treadmill Training in Adults with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Don W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Walking on a submerged treadmill can improve mobility in persons displaying lower limb muscle weakness and balance deficits. Little is known, however, regarding the effect of water treadmill exercise on cardiac performance in persons with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Objective: To assess heart rate response during underwater treadmill training (UTT) in adults with iSCI. Methods: Seven males and 4 females with iSCI (age = 48 ± 13 years; 5 ± 8 years after injury) completed 8 weeks of UTT (3 sessions per week; 3 walks per session) incorporating individually determined walking speeds, personalized levels of body weight unloading, and gradual, alternating increases in speed and duration. Heart rate was monitored during the last 15 seconds of the final 2 minutes of each walk. Results: Over the course of 3 biweekly periods in which walking speed remained constant, heart rate fell by 7% (7 ± 1 b•min-1; P < .001) in weeks 2 and 3, 14% (17 ± 6 b•min-1; P < .001) in weeks 4 and 5, and 17% (21 ± 11 b•min-1; P < .001) in weeks 6 and 7. Conclusion: In adults with iSCI, progressively greater absolute and relative reductions in submaximal exercise heart rate occurred after 2 months of UTT featuring a systematic increase in training volume. PMID:25762859

  7. Hydrogen sulfide post-conditioning preserves interfibrillar mitochondria of rat heart during ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Banu, Shakila A; Ravindran, Sriram; Kurian, Gino A

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction is considered to be the main manifestation in the pathology of ischemia reperfusion injury, and by restoring its functional activity, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a novel endogenous gaseotransmitter renders cardioprotection. Given that interfibrillar (IFM) and subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria are the two main types in the heart, the present study investigates the specific H2S-mediated action on IFM and SSM during ischemic reperfusion in the Langendorff rat heart model. Rats were randomly divided into five groups, namely normal, ischemic control, reperfusion control (I/R), ischemic post-conditioning (POC), and H2S post-conditioning (POC_H2S). In reperfusion control, cardiac contractility decreased, and lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and infracted size increased compared to both normal and ischemic group. In hearts post-conditioned with H2S and the classical method improved cardiac mechanical function and decreased cardiac markers in the perfusate and infarct size significantly. Both POC and POC_H2S exerts its cardioprotective effect of preserving the IFM, as evident by significant improvement in electron transport chain enzyme activities and mitochondrial respiration. The in vitro action of H2S on IFM and SSM from normal and I/R rat heart supports H2S and mediates cardioprotection via IFM preservation. Our study indicates that IFM play an important role in POC_H2S mediated cardioprotection from reperfusion injury. PMID:26951457

  8. Protective effects of amlodipine on mitochondrial injury in ischemic reperfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Khan, Najam Ali; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Abid, Mohammad; Pawdey, Abhijeet; Kishore, Kamal; Wahi, Arun Kumar

    2012-05-01

    The most significant finding of the present study was the release of nitric oxide (NO). The effect of amlodipine on NO production associated with ischemic reperfused (IR) injury was investigated in rat heart model. Cardiac tissues from animal groups were processed for biochemical, histopathological and electron microscopic studies. There was a significant increase in myocardial catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) enzymes in amlodipine treated group (1.37, 10.27, 6.39) when compared to IR injured group (0.81, 6.87, 4.53). Histopathology studies showed amlodipine reduce cardiocyte damage in cardiac injury during the cardiac IR. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) study confirmed the cardioprotective role of amlodipine against IR induced cardiac injury. On the basis of findings, it is hypothesized that a portion of the beneficial actions of amlodipine may involve the release or action of NO and probably by its antioxidant properties.

  9. A Retained Bullet in Pericardial Sac: Penetrating Gunshot Injury of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Adnan; Caliskan, Emine; Tatlisu, Mustafa Adem; Hayiroglu, Mert Ilker; Tekessin, Ahmet Ilker; Cakilli, Yasin; Avsar, Sahin; Oz, Ahmet; Uzman, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Penetrating cardiac trauma is rarely seen but when present there is a short time lag to keep the patients alive. Cardiac gunshot injuries are exceptional and it occurs mostly during interpersonal disagreements casualties or a mistakenly fired gun nowadays. Here we present a case of cardiac gunshot injury from the war of Kobani, Syria. The patient was mistakenly diagnosed to have a sole bullet in the left shoulder while he had a penetrating cardiac trauma with a bullet in the heart and pericardial effusion possibly giving rise to pericardial tamponade. Luckily the cardiac gunshot injury was noticed one day later and the patient was referred to a tertiary hospital. Intrapericardial bullet was conservatively followed up. The patient was discharged one week later after resection of the bullet in the shoulder. PMID:26977324

  10. Early biomarkers of doxorubicin-induced heart injury in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Varsha G.; Kwekel, Joshua C.; Vijay, Vikrant; Moland, Carrie L.; Herman, Eugene H.; Lee, Taewon; Han, Tao; Lewis, Sherry M.; Davis, Kelly J.; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Kerr, Susan; Fuscoe, James C.

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac troponins, which are used as myocardial injury markers, are released in plasma only after tissue damage has occurred. Therefore, there is a need for identification of biomarkers of earlier events in cardiac injury to limit the extent of damage. To accomplish this, expression profiling of 1179 unique microRNAs (miRNAs) was performed in a chronic cardiotoxicity mouse model developed in our laboratory. Male B6C3F{sub 1} mice were injected intravenously with 3 mg/kg doxorubicin (DOX; an anti-cancer drug), or saline once a week for 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 weeks, resulting in cumulative DOX doses of 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 mg/kg, respectively. Mice were euthanized a week after the last dose. Cardiac injury was evidenced in mice exposed to 18 mg/kg and higher cumulative DOX dose whereas examination of hearts by light microscopy revealed cardiac lesions at 24 mg/kg DOX. Also, 24 miRNAs were differentially expressed in mouse hearts, with the expression of 1, 1, 2, 8, and 21 miRNAs altered at 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 mg/kg DOX, respectively. A pro-apoptotic miR-34a was the only miRNA that was up-regulated at all cumulative DOX doses and showed a significant dose-related response. Up-regulation of miR-34a at 6 mg/kg DOX may suggest apoptosis as an early molecular change in the hearts of DOX-treated mice. At 12 mg/kg DOX, up-regulation of miR-34a was associated with down-regulation of hypertrophy-related miR-150; changes observed before cardiac injury. These findings may lead to the development of biomarkers of earlier events in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity that occur before the release of cardiac troponins. - Highlights: • Upregulation of miR-34a before doxorubicin-induced cardiac tissue injury • Apoptosis might be an early event in mouse heart during doxorubicin treatment. • Expression of miR-150 declined before doxorubicin-induced cardiac tissue injury.

  11. CTGF/CCN2 Postconditioning Increases Tolerance of Murine Hearts towards Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kaasbøll, Ole Jørgen; Moe, Ingvild Tronstad; Ahmed, Mohammad Shakil; Stang, Espen; Hagelin, Else Marie Valbjørn; Attramadal, Håvard

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Previous studies of ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in hearts from mice with cardiac-restricted overexpression of CCN2 have shown that CCN2 increases tolerance towards IRI. The objectives of this study were to investigate to what extent post-ischemic administration of recombinant human CCN2 (rhCCN2) would limit infarct size and improve functional recovery and what signaling pathways are involved. Experimental Approach Isolated mice hearts were perfused ad modum Langendorff, subjected to no-flow, global ischemia, and subsequently, exposed to mammalian cell derived, full-length (38-40kDa) rhCCN2 (250 nM) or vehicle during the first 15 min of a 60 min reperfusion period. Key Results Post-ischemic administration of rhCCN2 resulted in attenuation of infarct size from 58 ± 4% to 34 ± 2% (p < 0.001) which was abrogated by concomitant administration of the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 (45 ± 3% vs. 50 ± 3%, ns). In congruence with reduction of infarct size rhCCN2 also improved recovery of left ventricular developed pressure (p < 0.05). Western blot analyses of extracts of ex vivo-perfused murine hearts also revealed that rhCCN2 evoked concentration-dependent increase of cardiac phospho-GSK3β (serine-9) contents. Conclusions and Implications We demonstrate that post-ischemic administration of rhCCN2 increases the tolerance of ex vivo-perfused murine hearts to IRI. Mechanistically, this postconditioning effect of rhCCN2 appeared to be mediated by activation of the reperfusion injury salvage kinase pathway as demonstrated by sensitivity to PI3 kinase inhibition and increased CCN2-induced phosphorylation of GSK3β (Ser-9). Thus, the rationale for testing rhCCN2-mediated post-ischemic conditioning of the heart in more complex models is established. PMID:26872261

  12. Protective effects of drag-reducing polymers on ischemic reperfusion injury of isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Hu, Feng; Wang, Yali; Gong, Kaizheng; Ge, Gaoyuan; Cao, Mingqiang; Zhao, Pei; Sun, Xiaoning; Zhang, Zhengang

    2016-01-01

    Drag-reducing polymers (DRPs) are blood-soluble macromolecules that can increase blood flow and reduce vascular resistance. The purpose of the present study was to observe the effect of DRPs on ischemic reperfusion (I/R) injury of isolated rat hearts. Experiments were performed on isolated rat hearts subjected to 30 min of ischemia followed by 90 min of reperfusion in Langendorff preparations. Adult Wistar rats were divided into the following five groups: control group, I/R group, group III (I/R and 2×10(-7)  g/ml PEO reperfusion), group IV (I/R and 1×10(-6)  g/ml PEO reperfusion), and group V (I/R and 5×10(-6)  g/ml PEO reperfusion). Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), maximum rate of ventricular pressure increase and decrease ( ± dp/dtmax), heart rate (HR) and coronary flow were measured. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activity and coronary flow, myocardial infarction size and cardiomyocytes apoptosis were also assayed. Our results showed that PEO decreased LVEDP and increased LVSP, ± dP/dtmax in group IV and group V compared with the I/R group (all P <  0.05). The coronary flow significantly increased and the activities of LDH and CK in the coronary flow significantly decreased in group IV and group V compared with those in the I/R group (all P <  0.05). Cell apoptosis and myocardial infarction size were reduced in group IV and group V compared with the I/R group (all P <  0.05). Collectively, these results suggested that DRPs had a protective effect on cardiac I/R injury of isolated rat hearts and it may offer a new potential approach for the treatment of acute ischemic heart diseases.

  13. De novo cardiomyocytes from within the activated adult heart after injury

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Nicola; Bollini, Sveva; Dubé, Karina N.; Vieira, Joaquim M.; Zhou, Bin; Davidson, Sean; Yellon, Derek; Riegler, Johannes; Price, Anthony N.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Pu, William T.; Riley, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    A significant bottleneck in cardiovascular regenerative medicine is the identification of a viable source of stem/progenitor cells that could contribute new muscle after ischaemic heart disease and acute myocardial infarction1. A therapeutic ideal—relative to cell transplantation—would be to stimulate a resident source, thus avoiding the caveats of limited graft survival, restricted homing to the site of injury and host immune rejection. Here we demonstrate in mice that the adult heart contains a resident stem or progenitor cell population, which has the potential to contribute bona fide terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes after myocardial infarction. We reveal a novel genetic label of the activated adult progenitors via re-expression of a key embryonic epicardial gene, Wilm’s tumour 1 (Wt1), through priming by thymosin β4, a peptide previously shown to restore vascular potential to adult epicardium-derived progenitor cells2 with injury. Cumulative evidence indicates an epicardial origin of the progenitor population, and embryonic reprogramming results in the mobilization of this population and concomitant differentiation to give rise to de novo cardiomyocytes. Cell transplantation confirmed a progenitor source and chromosome painting of labelled donor cells revealed transdifferentiation to a myocyte fate in the absence of cell fusion. Derived cardiomyocytes are shown here to structurally and functionally integrate with resident muscle; as such, stimulation of this adult progenitor pool represents a significant step towards residentcell-based therapy in human ischaemic heart disease. PMID:21654746

  14. Cardioprotective Effects of Astragalin against Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Isolated Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Qu, Daoxu; Han, Jichun; Ren, Huanhuan; Yang, Wenxiao; Zhang, Xinjie; Zheng, Qiusheng; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of astragalin against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in isolated rat heart. The cardioprotective effects of astragalin on myocardial I/R injury were investigated on Langendorff apparatus. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups. The results showed that astragalin pretreatment improved myocardial function. Compared with I/R group, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activities in coronary flow decreased in astragalin pretreatment groups, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratio significantly increased. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) decreased in astragalin-treated groups. The infarct size (IS) and apoptosis rate in hearts from astragalin-treated groups were lower than those in hearts from the I/R group. Western blot analysis also revealed that astragalin preconditioning significantly reduced Bax level, whereas Bcl-2 was increased in the myocardium. Therefore, astragalin exhibited cardioprotective effects via its antioxidative, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory activities.

  15. Cardioprotective Effects of Astragalin against Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Isolated Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Daoxu; Ren, Huanhuan; Yang, Wenxiao; Zhang, Xinjie; Zheng, Qiusheng; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of astragalin against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in isolated rat heart. The cardioprotective effects of astragalin on myocardial I/R injury were investigated on Langendorff apparatus. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups. The results showed that astragalin pretreatment improved myocardial function. Compared with I/R group, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activities in coronary flow decreased in astragalin pretreatment groups, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratio significantly increased. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) decreased in astragalin-treated groups. The infarct size (IS) and apoptosis rate in hearts from astragalin-treated groups were lower than those in hearts from the I/R group. Western blot analysis also revealed that astragalin preconditioning significantly reduced Bax level, whereas Bcl-2 was increased in the myocardium. Therefore, astragalin exhibited cardioprotective effects via its antioxidative, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:26788251

  16. Cardiovascular effects of black tea and nicotine alone or in combination against experimental induced heart injury.

    PubMed

    Joukar, Siyavash; Bashiri, Hamideh; Dabiri, Shahriar; Ghotbi, Payam; Sarveazad, Arash; Divsalar, Kouros; Joukar, Farzin; Abbaszadeh, Mahsa

    2012-06-01

    The present study was designed to elucidate the outcome of subchronic co-administration of black tea and nicotine on cardiovascular performance and whether these substances could modulate the isoproterenol-induced cardiac injury. Animal groups were control, black tea, nicotine and black tea plus nicotine. Test groups received nicotine (2 mg/kg s.c.) and black tea brewed (p.o.) each alone and in combination for 4 weeks. On the 28th day, myocardial damage was induced by isoproterenol (50 mg/kg i.p.), and blood samples were taken. On day 29, after hemodynamic parameters recording, hearts were removed for histopathological evaluation. Tea or nicotine consumption had no significant effects on hemodynamic indices of animals without heart damage. When the cardiac injury was induced, tea consumption maintained the maximum dp/dt, and nicotine significantly decreased the pressure-rate product. Moreover, severity of heart lesions was lower in the presence of nicotine or black tea. Concomitant use of these materials did not show extra effects on mentioned parameters more than the effect of each of them alone. The results suggest that subchronic administration of black tea or nicotine for a period of 4 weeks may have a mild cardioprotective effect, while concomitant use of these materials cannot intensify this beneficial effect.

  17. Long range correlations in the heart rate variability following the injury of cardiac arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Shanbao; Jiang, Dineng; Wang, Ziming; Zhu, Yisheng; Geocadin, Romeryko G.; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2007-07-01

    Cardiovascular and neurological recovery following cardiac arrest (CA) largely influence the morbidity and mortality of the patients. Monitoring the cardiovascular system has been an important clinical issue in intensive care unit (ICU). On the other hand, the rhythms of the heart rate variability following CA are still not fully understood, and there are limited number of literatures reporting the cardiovascular function recovery following CA. In this paper, we studied the scaling properties of heart rate variability (HRV) after CA by centered-moving-average-based detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Our results showed that the scaling factor of the baseline HRV is close to that of Brownian motion, and after a CA event it shifts to a 1/f noise-like rhythm. DFA could be a promising tool in evaluating the cardiovascular long term recovery following CA injury.

  18. Protective effect of apigenin on ischemia/reperfusion injury of the isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Li, Zilin; Xu, Li-ting; Sun, Ai-jun; Fu, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Li; Jing, Lin-lin; Lu, An-dong; Dong, Yi-fei; Jia, Zheng-ping

    2015-07-01

    Apigenin (Api), a mainly bioactive component of Apium graveolens L. var. dulce DC. (a traditional Chinese medicinal herb), possesses a wide range of biological activities, including antioxidant effects. It also has been shown to associate with lower prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, but its mechanisms of action remain unclear. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of Api in isolated rat heart model of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Langendorff-perfused isolated rat hearts were used in our study. Api was added to the perfusate before ischemia and during reperfusion in the isolated pulsed rat heart exposed to 30-min ischemia followed by 50-min reperfusion. The treatment with Api conferred a cardioprotective effect, and the treated hearts demonstrated an improved ischemic cardiac functional recovery, a decreased myocardial infarct size, a reduced activities of creatine kinase isoenzyme and lactate dehydrogenase in the coronary flow, a reduced number of apoptotic cardiomyocytes, a reduced activity of caspase-3, up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and down-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax. In addition, Api inhibited the phosphorylation of p38 MAPKS during I/R. In conclusion, these observations provide preliminary evidence that Api can protect cardiomyocytes from I-/R-induced injury, at least partially, through the inhibition of p38 MAPKS signaling pathway. PMID:25377428

  19. Abnormal Mitochondrial L-Arginine Transport Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Heart Failure and Rexoygenation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Melissa; Joshi, Mandar; Horlock, Duncan; Lam, Nicholas T.; Gregorevic, Paul; McGee, Sean L.; Kaye, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired mitochondrial function is fundamental feature of heart failure (HF) and myocardial ischemia. In addition to the effects of heightened oxidative stress, altered nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, generated by a mitochondrial NO synthase, has also been proposed to impact upon mitochondrial function. However, the mechanism responsible for arginine transport into mitochondria and the effect of HF on such a process is unknown. We therefore aimed to characterize mitochondrial L-arginine transport and to investigate the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial L-arginine transport plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure and myocardial injury. Methods and Results In mitochondria isolated from failing hearts (sheep rapid pacing model and mouse Mst1 transgenic model) we demonstrated a marked reduction in L-arginine uptake (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively) and expression of the principal L-arginine transporter, CAT-1 (p<0.001, p<0.01) compared to controls. This was accompanied by significantly lower NO production and higher 3-nitrotyrosine levels (both p<0.05). The role of mitochondrial L-arginine transport in modulating cardiac stress responses was examined in cardiomyocytes with mitochondrial specific overexpression of CAT-1 (mtCAT1) exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation stress. mtCAT1 cardiomyocytes had significantly improved mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and ATP turnover together with significantly decreased reactive oxygen species production and cell death following mitochondrial stress. Conclusion These data provide new insights into the role of L-arginine transport in mitochondrial biology and cardiovascular disease. Augmentation of mitochondrial L-arginine availability may be a novel therapeutic strategy for myocardial disorders involving mitochondrial stress such as heart failure and reperfusion injury. PMID:25111602

  20. Outcomes of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury following congenital heart surgery: A contemporary experience

    PubMed Central

    Alfares, Fahad A.; Hynes, Conor F.; Ansari, Ghedak; Chounoune, Reginald; Ramadan, Manelle; Shaughnessy, Conner; Reilly, Brian K.; Zurakowski, David; Jonas, Richard A.; Nath, Dilip S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve can lead to significant morbidity during congenital cardiac surgery. The objective is to expand on the limited understanding of the severity and recovery of this iatrogenic condition. Design A six-year retrospective review of all congenital heart operations at a single institution from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2013 was performed. All patients with documented vocal cord paralysis on laryngoscopic examination comprised the study cohort. Evaluation of time to vocal cord recovery and need for further surgical intervention was the primary focus. Results The incidence of post-operative vocal cord paralysis was 1.1% (32 out of 3036 patients; 95% confidence interval: 0.7–1.5%). The majority were left-sided injuries (71%). Overall rate of recovery was 61% with a median time of 10 months in those who recovered, and a total follow up of 46 months. Due to feeding complications, 45% of patients required gastrostomy tube after the injury, and these patients were found to have longer duration of post-operative days of intubation (median 10 vs. 5 days, p = 0.03), ICU length of stay (50 vs. 8 days, p = 0.002), and hospital length of stay (92 vs. 41 days, p = 0.01). No pre-operative variables were identified as predictive of recovery or need for gastrostomy placement. Conclusion Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury is a serious complication of congenital heart surgery that impacts post-operative morbidity, in some cases leading to a need for further intervention, in particular, gastrostomy tube placement. A prospective, multi-center study is needed to fully evaluate factors that influence severity and time to recovery. PMID:26778899

  1. Roles of obese-insulin resistance and anti-diabetic drugs on the heart with ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2014-12-01

    The incidence of obesity with insulin resistance is increasing worldwide. This condition is also known as a risk factor of coronary artery disease and associated with increased arrhythmias, impaired left ventricular function, and increased infarct size during cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. The proposed mechanisms are due to impaired glucose utilization and pro-survival signaling molecules, and increased inflammatory cytokines, which have been demonstrated in the I/R hearts in various models of obese-insulin resistance. However, the cardiac effects of diets in the I/R heart are still unsettled since several studies reported that high-caloric diet consumption might protect the heart from I/R injury. Although several therapeutic strategies such as anti-diabetic drugs, natural compounds as well as treadmill exercise have been proposed to exert cardioprotection in the I/R heart in obese-insulin resistant animals, some interventions including ischemic post-conditioning failed to protect the heart from I/R injury. In this comprehensive review, reports from both genetic deletion and dietary-induced obese-insulin resistant animal models regarding the effects of obese-insulin resistance on metabolic parameters, cardiac function, infarct size, and molecular mechanisms under I/R injury are summarized. Moreover, the effects of anti-diabetic drugs and other pharmacological interventions on these parameters in an obese-insulin resistant model under I/R injury are also comprehensively summarized and discussed.

  2. Occult rib fractures and brachial plexus injury following median sternotomy for open-heart operations.

    PubMed

    Baisden, C E; Greenwald, L V; Symbas, P N

    1984-09-01

    The incidence and the sites of rib fractures during open-heart operations through a median sternotomy incision were studied in 36 consecutive patients divided into two groups. In Group 1 (24 patients), a conventional Ankeney retractor was used to expose the heart, and in Group 2 (12 patients), a similar retractor was used but with its uppermost pair of blades removed. Thorough physical examinations and preoperative and postoperative chest roentgenograms were obtained, and postoperative bone scans were done in all patients. No rib fractures were detected on the routine chest roentgenograms in patients in either group. Bone scans, however, showed 44 rib fractures (15 of the first rib, 13 of the second rib, 4 of the third rib, 6 of the fourth rib, 3 of the fifth rib, and 3 of the sixth rib) in 16 patients in Group 1. Six patients in Group 2 had 9 rib fractures (2 of the first rib, 4 of the second rib, and 1 each of the third, fifth, and sixth ribs). None of the patients in Group 2 had brachial plexus injury and neither of the first rib fractures in this group were located posteriorly, whereas 3 patients in Group 1 had both brachial plexus injury and posterior first rib fractures.

  3. Acute kidney injury after using contrast during cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Young Ju; Hyun, Myung Chul; Choi, Bong Seok; Chun, So Young; Cho, Min Hyun

    2014-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is closely associated with the mortality of hospitalized patients and long-term development of chronic kidney disease, especially in children. The purpose of our study was to assess the evidence of contrast-induced AKI after cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease and evaluate the clinical usefulness of candidate biomarkers in AKI. A total of 26 children undergoing cardiac catheterization due to various heart diseases were selected and urine and blood samples were taken at 0 hr, 6 hr, 24 hr, and 48 hr after cardiac catheterization. Until 48 hr after cardiac catheterization, there was no significant increase in serum creatinine level in all patients. Unlike urine kidney injury molecule-1, IL-18 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, urine liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) level showed biphasic pattern and the significant difference in the levels of urine L-FABP between 24 and 48 hr. We suggest that urine L-FABP can be one of the useful biomarkers to detect subclinical AKI developed by the contrast before cardiac surgery.

  4. Relaxin protects against myocardial injury caused by ischemia and reperfusion in rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Bani, D.; Masini, E.; Bello, M. G.; Bigazzi, M.; Sacchi, T. B.

    1998-01-01

    Myocardial injury caused by ischemia and reperfusion comes from multiple pathogenic events, including endothelial damage, neutrophil extravasation into tissue, platelet and mast cell activation, and peroxidation of cell membrane lipids, which are followed by myocardial cell alterations resulting eventually in cell necrosis. The current study was designed to test the possible cardioprotective effect of the hormone relaxin, which has been found to cause coronary vessel dilation and to inhibit platelet and mast cell activation. Ischemia (for 30 minutes) was induced in rat hearts in vivo by ligature of the left anterior descending coronary artery; reperfusion (for 60 minutes or less if the rats died before this predetermined time) was induced by removal of the ligature. Relaxin (100 ng) was given intravenously 30 minutes before ischemia. The results obtained showed that relaxin strongly reduces 1) the extension of the myocardial areas affected by ischemia-reperfusion-induced damage, 2) ventricular arrhythmias, 3) mortality, 4) myocardial neutrophil number, 5) myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil accumulation, 6) production of malonyldialdehyde, an end product of lipid peroxidation, 7) mast cell granule release, 8) calcium overload, and 9) morphological signs of myocardial cell injury. This study shows that relaxin can be regarded as an agent with a marked cardioprotective action against ischemia-reperfusion-induced myocardial injury. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:9588905

  5. Activated c-Kit receptor in the heart promotes cardiac repair and regeneration after injury

    PubMed Central

    Di Siena, S; Gimmelli, R; Nori, S L; Barbagallo, F; Campolo, F; Dolci, S; Rossi, P; Venneri, M A; Giannetta, E; Gianfrilli, D; Feigenbaum, L; Lenzi, A; Naro, F; Cianflone, E; Mancuso, T; Torella, D; Isidori, A M; Pellegrini, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of endogenous c-Kit receptor activation on cardiac cell homeostasis and repair remains largely unexplored. Transgenic mice carrying an activating point mutation (TgD814Y) in the kinase domain of the c-Kit gene were generated. c-KitTgD814Y receptor was expressed in the heart during embryonic development and postnatal life, in a similar timing and expression pattern to that of the endogenous gene, but not in the hematopoietic compartment allowing the study of a cardiac-specific phenotype. c-KitTgD814Y mutation produced a constitutive active c-Kit receptor in cardiac tissue and cells from transgenic mice as demonstrated by the increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT, which are the main downstream molecular effectors of c-Kit receptor signaling. In adult transgenic hearts, cardiac morphology, size and total c-Kit+ cardiac cell number was not different compared with wt mice. However, when c-KitTgD814Y mice were subjected to transmural necrotic heart damage by cryoinjury (CI), all transgenic survived, compared with half of wt mice. In the sub-acute phase after CI, transgenic and wt mice showed similar heart damage. However, 9 days after CI, transgenic mice exhibited an increased number of c-Kit+CD31+ endothelial progenitor cells surrounding the necrotic area. At later follow-up, a consistent reduction of fibrotic area, increased capillary density and increased cardiomyocyte replenishment rate (as established by BrdU incorporation) were observed in transgenic compared with wt mice. Consistently, CD45−c-Kit+ cardiac stem cells isolated from transgenic c-KitTgD814Y mice showed an enhanced endothelial and cardiomyocyte differentiation potential compared with cells isolated from the wt. Constitutive activation of c-Kit receptor in mice is associated with an increased cardiac myogenic and vasculogenic reparative potential after injury, with a significant improvement of survival. PMID:27468693

  6. Eprosartan improves cardiac function in swine working heart model of ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Weymann, Alexander; Sabashnikov, Anton; Patil, Nikhil P.; Konertz, Wolfgang; Modersohn, Diethelm; Dohmen, Pascal M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Eprosartan is an angiotensin II receptor antagonist used as an antihypertensive. We sought to evaluate the regional effect of Eprosartan on postinfarct ventricular remodeling and myocardial function in an isolated swine working heart model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Material/Methods 22 swine hearts were perfused with the Langendorff perfusion apparatus under standard experimental conditions. Myocardial ischemia was induced by a 10-min left anterior descending artery ligation. Hearts were reperfused with either saline (control group, n=11), or Eprosartan (treatment group, n=11). Left ventricular pressure (LVP) and regional heart parameters such as intramyocardial pressure (IMP), wall thickening rate (WTh), and pressure-length-loops (PLL) were measured at baseline and after 30 min of reperfusion. Results Measured parameters were statistically similar between the 2 groups at baseline. The administration of Eprosartan led to a significantly better recovery of IMP and WTh: 44.4±2.5 mmHg vs. 51.2±3.3 mmHg, p<0.001 and 3.8±0.4 μm vs. 4.4±0.3 μm, p=0.001, respectively. PLL were also significantly higher in the treatment group following reperfusion (21694±3259 units vs. 31267±3429 units, p<0.01). There was no difference in the LVP response to Eprosartan versus controls (63.6±3.0 mmHg vs. 62.5±3.1 mmHg, p=0.400). Conclusions Pre-treatment with Eprosartan is associated with a significant improvement in regional cardiac function under ischemic conditions. Pharmacological treatment with eprosartan may exert a direct cardioprotective effect on ischemic myocardium. PMID:24762635

  7. Transplantation of autologously derived mitochondria protects the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Masuzawa, Akihiro; Black, Kendra M.; Pacak, Christina A.; Ericsson, Maria; Barnett, Reanne J.; Drumm, Ciara; Seth, Pankaj; Bloch, Donald B.; Levitsky, Sidney; Cowan, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial damage and dysfunction occur during ischemia and modulate cardiac function and cell survival significantly during reperfusion. We hypothesized that transplantation of autologously derived mitochondria immediately prior to reperfusion would ameliorate these effects. New Zealand White rabbits were used for regional ischemia (RI), which was achieved by temporarily snaring the left anterior descending artery for 30 min. Following 29 min of RI, autologously derived mitochondria (RI-mitochondria; 9.7 ± 1.7 × 106/ml) or vehicle alone (RI-vehicle) were injected directly into the RI zone, and the hearts were allowed to recover for 4 wk. Mitochondrial transplantation decreased (P < 0.05) creatine kinase MB, cardiac troponin-I, and apoptosis significantly in the RI zone. Infarct size following 4 wk of recovery was decreased significantly in RI-mitochondria (7.9 ± 2.9%) compared with RI-vehicle (34.2 ± 3.3%, P < 0.05). Serial echocardiograms showed that RI-mitochondria hearts returned to normal contraction within 10 min after reperfusion was started; however, RI-vehicle hearts showed persistent hypokinesia in the RI zone at 4 wk of recovery. Electrocardiogram and optical mapping studies showed that no arrhythmia was associated with autologously derived mitochondrial transplantation. In vivo and in vitro studies show that the transplanted mitochondria are evident in the interstitial spaces and are internalized by cardiomyocytes 2–8 h after transplantation. The transplanted mitochondria enhanced oxygen consumption, high-energy phosphate synthesis, and the induction of cytokine mediators and proteomic pathways that are important in preserving myocardial energetics, cell viability, and enhanced post-infarct cardiac function. Transplantation of autologously derived mitochondria provides a novel technique to protect the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:23355340

  8. Activated c-Kit receptor in the heart promotes cardiac repair and regeneration after injury.

    PubMed

    Di Siena, S; Gimmelli, R; Nori, S L; Barbagallo, F; Campolo, F; Dolci, S; Rossi, P; Venneri, M A; Giannetta, E; Gianfrilli, D; Feigenbaum, L; Lenzi, A; Naro, F; Cianflone, E; Mancuso, T; Torella, D; Isidori, A M; Pellegrini, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of endogenous c-Kit receptor activation on cardiac cell homeostasis and repair remains largely unexplored. Transgenic mice carrying an activating point mutation (TgD814Y) in the kinase domain of the c-Kit gene were generated. c-Kit(TgD814Y) receptor was expressed in the heart during embryonic development and postnatal life, in a similar timing and expression pattern to that of the endogenous gene, but not in the hematopoietic compartment allowing the study of a cardiac-specific phenotype. c-Kit(TgD814Y) mutation produced a constitutive active c-Kit receptor in cardiac tissue and cells from transgenic mice as demonstrated by the increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT, which are the main downstream molecular effectors of c-Kit receptor signaling. In adult transgenic hearts, cardiac morphology, size and total c-Kit(+) cardiac cell number was not different compared with wt mice. However, when c-Kit(TgD814Y) mice were subjected to transmural necrotic heart damage by cryoinjury (CI), all transgenic survived, compared with half of wt mice. In the sub-acute phase after CI, transgenic and wt mice showed similar heart damage. However, 9 days after CI, transgenic mice exhibited an increased number of c-Kit(+)CD31(+) endothelial progenitor cells surrounding the necrotic area. At later follow-up, a consistent reduction of fibrotic area, increased capillary density and increased cardiomyocyte replenishment rate (as established by BrdU incorporation) were observed in transgenic compared with wt mice. Consistently, CD45(-)c-Kit(+) cardiac stem cells isolated from transgenic c-Kit(TgD814Y) mice showed an enhanced endothelial and cardiomyocyte differentiation potential compared with cells isolated from the wt. Constitutive activation of c-Kit receptor in mice is associated with an increased cardiac myogenic and vasculogenic reparative potential after injury, with a significant improvement of survival. PMID:27468693

  9. Protection from ischemic heart injury by a vigilant heme oxygenase-1 plasmid system.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao Liang; Tang, Yi; Zhang, Y Clare; Qian, Keping; Shen, Leping; Phillips, M Ian

    2004-04-01

    Although human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) could provide a useful approach for cellular protection in the ischemic heart, constitutive overexpression of hHO-1 may lead to unwanted side effects. To avoid this, we designed a hypoxia-regulated hHO-1 gene therapy system that can be switched on and off. This vigilant plasmid system is composed of myosin light chain-2v promoter and a gene switch that is based on an oxygen-dependent degradation domain from the hypoxia inducible factor-1-alpha. The vector can sense ischemia and switch on the hHO-1 gene system, specifically in the heart. In an in vivo experiment, the vigilant hHO-1 plasmid or saline was injected intramyocardially into myocardial infarction mice or sham operation mice. After gene transfer, expression of hHO-1 was only detected in the ischemic heart treated with vigilant hHO-1 plasmids. Masson trichrome staining showed significantly fewer fibrotic areas in vigilant hHO-1 plasmids-treated mice compared with saline control (43.0%+/-4.8% versus 62.5%+/-3.3%, P<0.01). The reduction of interstitial fibrosis is accompanied by an increase in myocardial hHO-1 expression in peri-infarct border areas, concomitant with higher Bcl-2 levels and lower Bax, Bak, and caspase 3 levels in the ischemic myocardium compared with saline control. By use of a cardiac catheter, heart from vigilant hHO-1 plasmids-treated mice showed improved recovery of contractile and diastolic performance after myocardial infarction compared with saline control. This study documents the beneficial regulation and therapeutic potential of vigilant plasmid-mediated hHO-1 gene transfer. This novel gene transfer strategy can provide cardiac-specific protection from future repeated bouts of ischemic injury.

  10. Penetrating heart wounds repaired without cardiopulmonary bypass. Evaluation and follow-up of recent war injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Catipović-Veselica, K; Sincić, V; Durijanĕk, J; Kozmar, D; Burić, D; Juranić, B; Kristek, J; Amidzić, V

    1993-01-01

    Penetrating cardiac injuries requires urgent management. Between September 1991 and June 1992, 10 patients with penetrating cardiac injuries sustained in war were treated at our hospital in Croatia, which does not have cardiopulmonary bypass facilities. Seven of these patients survived cardiorrhaphy and were discharged from the hospital, subject to follow-up. In 5 of the survivors, the injuries were inflicted by fragments from explosive devices; in 1 survivor, by a bullet; and in 1 survivor, by a rib fragment. The left ventricle was lacerated in 4 patients, the right ventricle in 2, the left atrium in 1, and the right atrium in 2. One patient had sustained laceration of the left anterior descending coronary artery in addition to a left ventricular laceration. During early post-cardiorrhaphy evaluation, all patients showed ST segment changes on electrocardiography. The most common echocardiographic findings were pericardial effusion in 5 patients (71%) and intramyocardial foreign bodies in 3 patients (43%). After 5 to 10 months of follow-up, the most common echocardiographic findings were enlargement of the injured chamber in 6 patients (86%), intramyocardial foreign bodies in 3 patients (43%), and hypokinesis of the injured wall in 2 patients (29%). Resting electrocardiographic results and exercise testing results were normal in all patients. One patient had arrhythmias during 24-hour Holter monitoring. Patients surviving operation had a rapid recovery, and were asymptomatic when last seen at follow-up. This demonstrates that treatment of penetrating injuries of the heart can be very successful, at least in the short term, even in hospitals without cardiopulmonary bypass facilities. Images PMID:8334372

  11. Glutamate protects against Ca(2+) paradox-induced injury and inhibits calpain activity in isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Ying; Kong, Ling-Heng; Lai, Dong; Jin, Zhen-Xiao; Gu, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Jing-Jun

    2016-10-01

    This study determined the effects of glutamate on the Ca(2+) paradoxical heart, which is a model for Ca(2+) overload-induced injury during myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion, and evaluated its effect on a known mediator of injury, calpain. An isolated rat heart was retrogradely perfused in a Langendorff apparatus. Ca(2+) paradox was elicited via perfusion with a Ca(2+) -free Krebs-Henseleit (KH) solution for 3 minutes followed by Ca(2+) -containing normal KH solution for 30 minutes. The Ca(2+) paradoxical heart exhibited almost no viable tissue on triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and markedly increased LDH release, caspase-3 activity, cytosolic cytochrome c content, and apoptotic index. These hearts also displayed significantly increased LVEDP and a disappearance of LVDP. Glutamate (5 and 20 mmol/L) significantly alleviated Ca(2+) paradox-induced injury. In contrast, 20 mmol/L mannitol had no effect on Ca(2+) paradox. Ca(2+) paradox significantly increased the extent of the translocation of μ-calpain to the sarcolemmal membrane and the proteolysis of α-fodrin, which suggests calpain activation. Glutamate also blocked these effects. A non-selective inhibitor of glutamate transporters, dl-TBOA (10 μmol/L), had no effect on control hearts, but it reversed glutamate-induced cardioprotection and reduction in calpain activity. Glutamate treatment significantly increased intracellular glutamate content in the Ca(2+) paradoxical heart, which was also blocked by dl-TBOA. We conclude that glutamate protects the heart against Ca(2+) overload-induced injury via glutamate transporters, and the inhibition of calpain activity is involved in this process.

  12. Heart Rate and the Role of the Active Receiver during Contingent Electric Shock for Severe Self-Injurious Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duker, Pieter C.; Van den Munckhof, Marcia

    2007-01-01

    Five individuals, who were treated for severe self-injurious behaviors (SIB) with contingent electric shock, participated. Hereby, each occurrence of the target response was followed by a remotely administered aversive consequence. Participants' heart rates were compared at times when the active device of the equipment for the above procedure was…

  13. Heart block and acute kidney injury due to hyperparathyroidism-induced hypercalcemic crisis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Taylor C; Healy, James M; McDonald, Mary J; Hansson, Joni H; Quinn, Courtney E

    2014-12-01

    We describe a patient who presented with multi-system organ failure due to extreme hypercalcemia (serum calcium 19.8 mg/dL), resulting from primary hyperparathyroidism. He was found to have a 4.8 cm solitary atypical parathyroid adenoma. His course was complicated by complete heart block, acute kidney injury, and significant neurocognitive disturbances. Relevant literature was reviewed and discussed. Hyperparathyroidism-induced hypercalcemic crisis (HIHC) is a rare presentation of primary hyperparathyroidism and only a small minority of these patients develop significant cardiac and renal complications. In cases of HIHC, a multidisciplinary effort can facilitate rapid treatment of life-threatening hypercalcemia and definitive treatment by surgical resection. As such, temporary transvenous cardiac pacing and renal replacement therapy can provide a life-saving bridge to definitive parathyroidectomy in cases of HIHC.

  14. Differential expression of embryonic epicardial progenitor markers and localization of cardiac fibrosis in adult ischemic injury and hypertensive heart disease.

    PubMed

    Braitsch, Caitlin M; Kanisicak, Onur; van Berlo, Jop H; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Yutzey, Katherine E

    2013-12-01

    During embryonic heart development, the transcription factors Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18 regulate activation and differentiation of epicardium-derived cells, including fibroblast lineages. Expression of these epicardial progenitor factors and localization of cardiac fibrosis were examined in mouse models of cardiovascular disease and in human diseased hearts. Following ischemic injury in mice, epicardial fibrosis is apparent in the thickened layer of subepicardial cells that express Wt1, Tbx18, and Tcf21. Perivascular fibrosis with predominant expression of Tcf21, but not Wt1 or Tbx18, occurs in mouse models of pressure overload or hypertensive heart disease, but not following ischemic injury. Areas of interstitial fibrosis in ischemic and hypertensive hearts actively express Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18. In all areas of fibrosis, cells that express epicardial progenitor factors are distinct from CD45-positive immune cells. In human diseased hearts, differential expression of Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18 also is detected with epicardial, perivascular, and interstitial fibrosis, indicating conservation of reactivated developmental mechanisms in cardiac fibrosis in mice and humans. Together, these data provide evidence for distinct fibrogenic mechanisms that include Tcf21, separate from Wt1 and Tbx18, in different fibroblast populations in response to specific types of cardiac injury.

  15. Catestatin improves post-ischemic left ventricular function and decreases ischemia/reperfusion injury in heart.

    PubMed

    Penna, Claudia; Alloatti, Giuseppe; Gallo, Maria Pia; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Levi, Renzo; Tullio, Francesca; Bassino, Eleonora; Dolgetta, Serena; Mahata, Sushil K; Tota, Bruno; Pagliaro, Pasquale

    2010-11-01

    The Chromogranin A (CgA)-derived anti-hypertensive peptide catestatin (CST) antagonizes catecholamine secretion, and is a negative myocardial inotrope acting via a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. It is not known whether CST contributes to ischemia/reperfusion injury or is a component of a cardioprotective response to limit injury. Here, we tested whether CST by virtue of its negative inotropic activity improves post-ischemic cardiac function and cardiomyocyte survival. Three groups of isolated perfused hearts from adult Wistar rats underwent 30-min ischemia and 120-min reperfusion (I/R, Group 1), or were post-conditioned by brief ischemic episodes (PostC, 5-cycles of 10-s I/R at the beginning of 120-min reperfusion, Group 2), or with exogenous CST (75 nM for 20 min, CST-Post, Group-3) at the onset of reperfusion. Perfusion pressure and left ventricular pressure (LVP) were monitored. Infarct size was evaluated with nitroblue-tetrazolium staining. The CST (5 nM) effects were also tested in simulated ischemia/reperfusion experiments on cardiomyocytes isolated from young-adult rats, evaluating cell survival with propidium iodide labeling. Infarct size was 61 ± 6% of risk area in hearts subjected to I/R only. PostC reduced infarct size to 34 ± 5%. Infarct size in CST-Post was 36 ± 3% of risk area (P < 0.05 respect to I/R). CST-Post reduced post-ischemic rise of diastolic LVP, an index of contracture, and significantly improved post-ischemic recovery of developed LVP. In isolated cardiomyocytes, CST increased the cell viability rate by about 65% after simulated ischemia/reperfusion. These results suggest a novel cardioprotective role for CST, which appears mainly due to a direct reduction of post-ischemic myocardial damages and dysfunction, rather than to an involvement of adrenergic terminals and/or endothelium.

  16. Inhibition of KV7 Channels Protects the Rat Heart against Myocardial Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Johnsen, Jacob; Povlsen, Jonas A; Jespersen, Nichlas R; Shanmuganathan, Jeffrey A; Laursen, Mia R; Kristiansen, Steen B; Simonsen, Ulf; Bøtker, Hans Erik

    2016-04-01

    The voltage-gated KV7 (KCNQ) potassium channels are activated by ischemia and involved in hypoxic vasodilatation. We investigated the effect of KV7 channel modulation on cardiac ischemia and reperfusion injury and its interaction with cardioprotection by ischemic preconditioning (IPC). Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed expression of KV7.1, KV7.4, and KV7.5 in the left anterior descending rat coronary artery and all KV7 subtypes (KV7.1-KV7.5) in the left and right ventricles of the heart. Isolated hearts were subjected to no-flow global ischemia and reperfusion with and without IPC. Infarct size was quantified by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Two blockers of KV7 channels, XE991 [10,10-bis(4-pyridinylmethyl)-9(10H)-anthracenone] (10 µM) and linopirdine (10 µM), reduced infarct size and exerted additive infarct reduction to IPC. An opener of KV7 channels, flupirtine (10 µM) abolished infarct size reduction by IPC. Hemodynamics were measured using a catheter inserted in the left ventricle and postischemic left ventricular recovery improved in accordance with reduction of infarct size and deteriorated with increased infarct size. XE991 (10 µM) reduced coronary flow in the reperfusion phase and inhibited vasodilatation in isolated small branches of the left anterior descending coronary artery during both simulated ischemia and reoxygenation. KV7 channels are expressed in rat coronary arteries and myocardium. Inhibition of KV7 channels exerts cardioprotection and opening of KV7 channels abrogates cardioprotection by IPC. Although safety issues should be further addressed, our findings suggest a potential role for KV7 blockers in the treatment of ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:26869667

  17. Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Heart Tissue and Nitric Oxide in Serum of Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Rhesus Monkeys: Association with Heart Injury

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Cristiano Marcelo Espinola; Silverio, Jaline Coutinho; da Silva, Andrea Alice; Pereira, Isabela Resende; Coelho, Janice Mery Chicarino; Britto, Constança Carvalho; Moreira, Otacílio Cruz; Marchevsky, Renato Sergio; Xavier, Sergio Salles; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; da Glória Bonecini-Almeida, Maria; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2012-01-01

    Background The factors contributing to chronic Chagas' heart disease remain unknown. High nitric oxide (NO) levels have been shown to be associated with cardiomyopathy severity in patients. Further, NO produced via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2) is proposed to play a role in Trypanosoma cruzi control. However, the participation of iNOS/NOS2 and NO in T. cruzi control and heart injury has been questioned. Here, using chronically infected rhesus monkeys and iNOS/NOS2-deficient (Nos2−/−) mice we explored the participation of iNOS/NOS2-derived NO in heart injury in T. cruzi infection. Methodology Rhesus monkeys and C57BL/6 and Nos2−/− mice were infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain. Parasite DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction, T. cruzi antigens and iNOS/NOS2+ cells were immunohistochemically detected in heart sections and NO levels in serum were determined by Griess reagent. Heart injury was assessed by electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiogram (ECHO), creatine kinase heart isoenzyme (CK-MB) activity levels in serum and connexin 43 (Cx43) expression in the cardiac tissue. Results Chronically infected monkeys presented conduction abnormalities, cardiac inflammation and fibrosis, which resembled the spectrum of human chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). Importantly, chronic myocarditis was associated with parasite persistence. Moreover, Cx43 loss and increased CK-MB activity levels were primarily correlated with iNOS/NOS2+ cells infiltrating the cardiac tissue and NO levels in serum. Studies in Nos2−/− mice reinforced that the iNOS/NOS2-NO pathway plays a pivotal role in T. cruzi-elicited cardiomyocyte injury and in conduction abnormalities that were associated with Cx43 loss in the cardiac tissue. Conclusion T. cruzi-infected rhesus monkeys reproduce features of CCC. Moreover, our data support that in T. cruzi infection persistent parasite-triggered iNOS/NOS2 in the cardiac tissue and NO overproduction might contribute to CCC

  18. 5-Methoxytryptophan-dependent protection of cardiomyocytes from heart ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Chan, Hong-Lin

    2014-02-01

    5-Methoxytryptophan (5-MTP), a catabolic product of tryptophan, can block Cox-2 overexpression in cancer cells as well as suppress cancer cell growth, migration and invasion. The aim of this study was to in vitro examine whether 5-MTP is able to reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced heart ischemia reperfusion injury and activate the cardiomyocyte's damage surveillance systems. Accordingly, rattus cardiomyocytes were treated with H2O2 as a heart ischemia reperfusion model prior to incubation with/without 5-MTP and proteomic analysis was performed to investigate the physiologic protection of 5-MTP in H2O2-induced ischemia reperfusion in cardiomyocyte. Our data demonstrated that 5-MTP treatment does protect cardiomyocyte in the ROS-induced ischemia reperfusion model. 5-MTP has also been shown to significantly facilitate cell migration and wound healing via cytoskeletal regulations. Additionally, two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) combined matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) analysis showed that 5-MTP might modulate growth-associated proteins, cytoskeleton regulation, redox regulation and protein folding to stimulate wound healing as well as prevent these ischemia reperfusion-damaged cardiomyocytes from cell death through maintaining cellular redox-balance and reducing ER-stress. To our knowledge, we report for the first time the cell repair mechanism of 5-MTP against ischemia reperfusion-damage in cardiomyocytes based on cell biology and proteomic analysis. PMID:24384558

  19. Profile of acute kidney injury after open heart surgeries in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Rather, Fayaz A; Najar, Saleem M; Malla, Hilal A; Ahangar, A G; Bhat, Hilal M; Wani, Imtiyaz A

    2015-11-01

    Our objective is to determine the incidence, etiology, risk factors and outcome of acute kidney injury (AKI) after open heart surgery. A prospective study was conducted on 62 patients who underwent open heart surgery and were followed-up for the development of AKI and to determine its incidence, etiology and outcome. Post-operative AKI was considered when the post-operative serum creatinine was >1.5 mg/dL or there was doubling of serum creatinine above the baseline (pre-operative) with a prior normal renal function. The incidence of AKI in the post-operative period in our study was 17.7%. The common etiological factors for AKI in our study were sepsis, hypotension, prolonged need for ventilator and inotropic support and drugs given in the post-operative period. The important risk factors for the development of AKI in the post-operative period were hypertension, diabetes mellitus, gout, prolonged total bypass time and prolonged aortic cross-clamp time. The overall mortality in our study subjects was 11.3% (seven of 62 died) and the mortality in the patients who developed post-operative AKI was 71.4%.

  20. Severe Calorie Restriction Reduces Cardiometabolic Risk Factors and Protects Rat Hearts from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Dirceu S.; Costa-Pereira, Liliane V.; Santos, Carina S.; Mendes, Bruno F.; Costa, Karine B.; Santos, Cynthia Fernandes F.; Rocha-Vieira, Etel; Magalhães, Flávio C.; Esteves, Elizabethe A.; Ferreira, Anderson J.; Guatimosim, Sílvia; Dias-Peixoto, Marco F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Recent studies have proposed that if a severe caloric restriction (SCR) is initiated at the earliest period of postnatal life, it can lead to beneficial cardiac adaptations later on. We investigated the effects of SCR in Wistar rats from birth to adult age on risk factors for cardiac diseases (CD), as well as cardiac function, redox status, and HSP72 content in response to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Methods and Results: From birth to the age of 3 months, CR50 rats were fed 50% of the food that the ad libitum group (AL) was fed. Food intake was assessed daily and body weight were assessed weekly. In the last week of the SCR protocol, systolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured and the double product index was calculated. Also, oral glucose and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests were performed. Thereafter, rats were decapitated, visceral fat was weighed, and blood and hearts were harvested for biochemical, functional, tissue redox status, and western blot analyzes. Compared to AL, CR50 rats had reduced the main risk factors for CD. Moreover, the FR50 rats showed increased cardiac function both at baseline conditions (45% > AL rats) and during the post-ischemic period (60% > AL rats) which may be explained by a decreased cardiac oxidative stress and increased HSP72 content. Conclusion: SCR from birth to adult age reduced risk factors for CD, increased basal cardiac function and protected hearts from the I/R, possibly by a mechanism involving ROS. PMID:27092082

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects the heart from acute injury caused by inducible Cre recombinase.

    PubMed

    Hull, Travis D; Bolisetty, Subhashini; DeAlmeida, Angela C; Litovsky, Silvio H; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F

    2013-08-01

    The protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cardiovascular disease has been previously demonstrated using transgenic animal models in which HO-1 is constitutively overexpressed in the heart. However, the temporal requirements for protection by HO-1 induction relative to injury have not been investigated, but are essential to employ HO-1 as a therapeutic strategy in human cardiovascular disease states. Therefore, we generated mice with cardiac-specific, tamoxifen (TAM)-inducible overexpression of a human HO-1 (hHO-1) transgene (myosin heavy chain (MHC)-HO-1 mice) by breeding mice with cardiac-specific expression of a TAM-inducible Cre recombinase (MHC-Cre mice), with mice containing an hHO-1 transgene preceded by a floxed-stop signal. MHC-HO-1 mice overexpress HO-1 mRNA and the enzymatically active protein following TAM administration (40 mg/kg body weight on 2 consecutive days). In MHC-Cre controls, TAM administration leads to severe, acute cardiac toxicity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, and 80% mortality by day 3. This cardiac toxicity is accompanied by a significant increase in inflammatory cells in the heart that are predominantly neutrophils. In MHC-HO-1 mice, HO-1 overexpression ameliorates the depression of cardiac function and high mortality rate observed in MHC-Cre mice following TAM administration and attenuates cardiomyocyte necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These results highlight that HO-1 induction is sufficient to prevent the depression of cardiac function observed in mice with TAM-inducible Cre recombinase expression by protecting the heart from necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These findings are important because MHC-Cre mice are widely used in cardiovascular research despite the limitations imposed by Cre-induced cardiac toxicity, and also because inflammation is an important pathological component of many human cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects the heart from acute injury caused by inducible Cre recombinase

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Travis D.; Bolisetty, Subashini; DeAlmeida, Angela; Litovsky, Silvio H.; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F.

    2013-01-01

    The protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cardiovascular disease has been previously demonstrated using transgenic animal models in which HO-1 is constitutively overexpressed in the heart. However, the temporal requirements for protection by HO-1 induction relative to injury have not been investigated, but are essential to employ HO-1 as a therapeutic strategy in human cardiovascular disease states. Therefore, we generated mice with cardiac-specific, tamoxifen (TAM)-inducible overexpression of a human HO-1 (hHO-1) transgene (MHC-HO-1 mice) by breeding mice with cardiac-specific expression of a TAM-inducible Cre recombinase (MHC-Cre mice) with mice containing an hHO-1 transgene preceded by a floxed stop signal (CBA-flox mice). MHC-HO-1 overexpress the HO-1 gene and enzymatically protein following TAM administration (40 mg/kg body weight on two consecutive days). In MHC-Cre controls, TAM administration leads to severe, acute cardiac toxicity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, and 80% mortality by day 3. This cardiac toxicity is accompanied by a significant increase in inflammatory cells in the heart that are predominantly neutrophils. In MHC-HO-1 mice, HO-1 overexpression ameliorates the depression of cardiac function and high mortality rate observed in MHC-Cre mice following TAM administration and attenuates cardiomyocyte necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These results highlight that HO-1 induction is sufficient to prevent the depression of cardiac function observed in mice with TAM-inducible Cre recombinase expression by protecting the heart from necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These findings are important because MHC-Cre mice are widely used in cardiovascular research despite the limitations imposed by Cre-induced cardiac toxicity and also because inflammation is an important pathological component of many human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23732814

  3. Depletion of PHD3 Protects Heart from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury by Inhibiting Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Liang; Pi, Xinchun; Wang, Zhongjing; He, Jun; Willis, Monte S.; Patterson, Cam

    2015-01-01

    PHD3, a member of a family of Prolyl-4 Hydroxylase Domain (PHD) proteins, has long been considered a pro-apoptotic protein. Although the pro-apoptotic effect of PHD3 requires its prolyl hydroxylase activity, it may be independent of HIF-1α, the common substrate of PHDs. PHD3 is highly expressed in the heart, however, its role in cardiomyocyte apoptosis remains unclear. This study was undertaken to determine whether inhibition or depletion of PHD3 inhibits cardiomyocyte apoptosis and attenuates myocardial injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). PHD3 knockout mice and littermate controls were subjected to left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery ligation for 40 minutes followed by reperfusion. Histochemical analysis using Evan’s Blue, triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride and TUNEL staining, demonstrated that myocardial injury and cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced I/R injury were significantly attenuated in PHD3 knockout mice. PHD3 knockout mice exhibited no changes in HIF-1α protein level, the expression of some HIF target genes or the myocardium capillary density at physiological condition. However, depletion of PHD3 further enhanced the induction of HIF-1α protein at hypoxic condition and increased expression of HIF-1α inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by hypoxia. In addition, it has been demonstrated that PHD3 plays an important role in ATR/Chk1/p53 pathway. Consistently, a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor or depletion of PHD3 significantly inhibits the activation of Chk1 and p53 in cardiomyocytes and the subsequent apoptosis induced by doxorubicin, hydrogen peroxide or hypoxia/re-oxygenation. Taken together, these data suggest that depletion of PHD3 leads to increased stabilization of HIF-1α and inhibition of DNA damage response, both of which may contribute to the cardioprotective effect seen with depletion of PHD3. PMID:25633836

  4. Modification of caffeine-induced injury in Ca2+-free perfused rat hearts. Relationship to the calcium paradox.

    PubMed Central

    Vander Heide, R. S.; Altschuld, R. A.; Lamka, K. G.; Ganote, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the calcium paradox has not been established. In calcium-free perfused hearts, caffeine, which releases calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, causes severe myocardial injury, with creatine kinase (CK) release and contraction band necrosis similar in many respects to the calcium paradox. It has been postulated that contracture, initiated by a small rise in intracellular calcium, may cause sarcolemmal injury in both the calcium paradox and caffeine-induced myocardial injury. The present study was initiated to determine whether interventions which modulate caffeine-induced contracture will also correspondingly alter cellular injury. The effects of caffeine dose, procaine, extended calcium-free perfusion, elevated potassium, temperature, and increasing intracellular sodium on caffeine-induced contracture were examined in Langendorff-perfused adult rat hearts. Caffeine-induced contracture at 22 C increased over a dose range of 5-40 mM caffeine. Procaine, which inhibits caffeine-induced calcium release at doses between 5 and 20 mM, progressively reduced contracture caused by addition of 20 mM caffeine at 22 C. Hearts perfused with calcium-free solution containing 16 mM K+ showed a reduction in caffeine-induced contracture. Extended calcium-free perfusion (20 minutes) at temperatures from 18 to 37 C resulted in a progressive reduction of caffeine-induced contracture. Each of these interventions was also found to inhibit caffeine-induced injury at 37 C. Low temperature was found to have complex effects. Hypothermia enhanced caffeine contractures but also protected hearts from cell separations and CK release. Increasing intracellular sodium was found to enhance caffeine-induced contracture at 37 C. There was a direct correlation between measured intracellular sodium levels and the magnitude and duration of caffeine-induced contracture. These results demonstrate a direct correlation between the magnitude of contracture and myocardial injury in calcium

  5. Donor Heart Treatment With COMP-Ang1 Limits Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury and Rejection of Cardiac Allografts.

    PubMed

    Syrjälä, S O; Nykänen, A I; Tuuminen, R; Raissadati, A; Keränen, M A I; Arnaudova, R; Krebs, R; Koh, G Y; Alitalo, K; Lemström, K B

    2015-08-01

    The major cause of death during the first year after heart transplantation is primary graft dysfunction due to preservation and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Angiopoietin-1 is a Tie2 receptor-binding paracrine growth factor with anti-inflammatory properties and indispensable roles in vascular development and stability. We used a stable variant of angiopoietin-1 (COMP-Ang1) to test whether ex vivo intracoronary treatment with a single dose of COMP-Ang1 in donor Dark Agouti rat heart subjected to 4-h cold ischemia would prevent microvascular dysfunction and inflammatory responses in the fully allogeneic recipient Wistar Furth rat. COMP-Ang1 reduced endothelial cell-cell junction disruption of the donor heart in transmission electron microscopy during 4-h cold ischemia, improved myocardial reflow, and reduced microvascular leakage and cardiomyocyte injury of transplanted allografts during IRI. Concurrently, the treatment reduced expression of danger signals, dendritic cell maturation markers, endothelial cell adhesion molecule VCAM-1 and RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase activation and the influx of macrophages and neutrophils. Furthermore, COMP-Ang1 treatment provided sustained anti-inflammatory effects during acute rejection and prevented the development of cardiac fibrosis and allograft vasculopathy. These results suggest donor heart treatment with COMP-Ang1 having important clinical implications in the prevention of primary and subsequent long-term injury and dysfunction in cardiac allografts. PMID:25932532

  6. MMP-12 deficiency attenuates angiotensin II-induced vascular injury, M2 macrophage accumulation, and skin and heart fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stawski, Lukasz; Haines, Paul; Fine, Alan; Rudnicka, Lidia; Trojanowska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    MMP-12, a macrophage-secreted elastase, is elevated in fibrotic diseases, including systemic sclerosis (SSc) and correlates with vasculopathy and fibrosis. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of MMP-12 in cardiac and cutaneous fibrosis induced by angiotensin II infusion. Ang II-induced heart and skin fibrosis was accompanied by a marked increase of vascular injury markers, including vWF, Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) and MMP-12, as well as increased number of PDGFRβ+ cells. Furthermore Ang II infusion led to an accumulation of macrophages (Mac3+) in the skin and in the perivascular and interstitial fibrotic regions of the heart. However, alternatively activated (Arg 1+) macrophages were mainly present in the Ang II infused mice and were localized to the perivascular heart regions and to the skin, but were not detected in the interstitial heart regions. Elevated expression of MMP-12 was primarily found in macrophages and endothelial cells (CD31+) cells, but MMP-12 was not expressed in the collagen producing cells. MMP-12 deficient mice (MMP12KO) showed markedly reduced expression of vWF, TSP1, and PDGFRβ around vessels and attenuation of dermal fibrosis, as well as the perivascular fibrosis in the heart. However, MMP-12 deficiency did not affect interstitial heart fibrosis, suggesting a heterogeneous nature of the fibrotic response in the heart. Furthermore, MMP-12 deficiency almost completely prevented accumulation of Arg 1+ cells, whereas the number of Mac3+ cells was partially reduced. Moreover production of profibrotic mediators such as PDGFBB, TGFβ1 and pSMAD2 in the skin and perivascular regions of the heart was also inhibited. Together, the results of this study show a close correlation between vascular injury markers, Arg 1+ macrophage accumulation and fibrosis and suggest an important role of MMP-12 in regulating these processes.

  7. Cardioprotective effect of aqueous extract of Chichorium intybus on ischemia-reperfusion injury in isolated rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Najmeh; Dianat, Mahin; Badavi, Mohammad; Malekzadeh, Ahad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Several studies have shown that Chichorium intybus (C. intybus) which possesses flavonoid compounds has an effective role in treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Contractile dysfunction mostly occurs after acute myocardial infarction, cardiac bypass surgery, heart transplantation and coronary angioplasty. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of C. intybus on ischemia- reperfusion injury in isolated rat heart. Materials and Methods: The animals were divided into four groups (Sham, Control, 1 mg/ml and 3 mg/ml of extract) of 8 rats. The aorta was cannulated, and then the heart was mounted on a Langendorff apparatus. Next, a balloon was inserted into the left ventricle (LV) and peak positive value of time derivate of LV pressure (+dp/dt), coronary flow (CF), and left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) in pre-ischemia and reperfusion period were calculated by a Power Lab system. All groups underwent a 30-minute global ischemia followed by a 60-minute reperfusion. Results: The results showed that heart rate (HR), coronary flow, and left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and rate of pressure product (RPP) significantly decreased in the control group during reperfusion, while these values in the groups receiving the extract (3mg/ml) improved significantly during reperfusion (p<0.001). Conclusion: It seems that flavonoid compounds of aqueous extract of C. intybus reduce ischemia - reperfusion injuries, suggesting its protective effect on heart function after ischemia. PMID:26693414

  8. Effect of spinal cord injury on the heart and cardiovascular fitness.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W T; Kiratli, B J; Sarkarati, M; Weraarchakul, G; Myers, J; Franklin, B A; Parkash, I; Froelicher, V

    1998-11-01

    The use of various FES protocols to encourage increases in physical activity and to augment physical fitness and reduce heart disease risk is a relatively new, but growing field of investigation. The evidence so far supports its use in improving potential health benefits for patients with SCI. Such benefits may include more efficient and safer cardiac function; greater stimulus for metabolic, cardiovascular, and pulmonary training adaptations; and greater stimulus for skeletal muscle training adaptations. In addition, the availability of relatively inexpensive commercial FES units to elicit muscular contractions, the ease of use of gel-less, reusable electrodes, and the increasing popularity of home and commercial upper body exercise equipment mean that such benefits are likely to be more accessible to the SCI population through increased convenience and decreased cost. The US Department of Health and Human Services has identified those with SCI as a "special population" whose health problems are accentuated, and so need to be specifically addressed. FES presents "a clear opportunity.... For health promotion and disease prevention efforts to improve the health prospects and functional independence of people with disabilities." As a corollary to this, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have recommended the development of techniques to prevent or ameliorate secondary disabilities in persons with a SCI. Patients with SCI have an increased susceptibility to cardiac morbidity and mortality in the acute and early stages of their injury. Most of these patients make an excellent adaptation except when confronted with infection or hypoxia. SCI by itself does not promote atherosclerosis; however, in association with multiple secondary conditions related to SCI, along with advancing age, patients with SCI are predisposed to relatively greater risk of heart disease. The epidemiologic significance of this is reflected in demographic studies that indicate an

  9. Three dimensional electromechanical model of porcine heart with penetrating wound injury.

    PubMed

    Usyk, Taras; Kerckhoffs, Roy

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is development a prototype computational model of the pig heart that can be used to predict physiological responses to a penetrating wound injury. The pig has been chosen for this model studies because it shares many anatomical similarities with humans. Three-dimensional cubic Hermite finite element meshes based on detailed measurements of porcine anatomy combined into an integrated anatomic model. The pig ventricular model includes detailed left and right ventricular geometry and myofiber and laminar sheet orientations throughout the mesh. The cardiac mesh was refined and monodomain equations for action potential propagation solved using well-established collocation-Galerkin finite element methods. The membrane kinetic equations for the action potential model was based on detailed cellular models of transmembrane ionic fluxes and intracellular calcium fluxes in canine ventricular myocytes and human atrial myocytes. We modified the anisotropic myocardial conductivity tensor on the endocardial surface of the ventricles by making use of a surface model fitted to measured of Purkinje fiber network anatomy. The mechanical model compute regional three-dimensional stress and strain distributions using anisotropic constitutive laws referred to local material coordinate axes defined by local myofiber and laminar sheet orientations. Passive myocardial mechanics modeled using exponential orthotropic strain energy functions. Active systolic myocardial stresses computed from a multi-scale model that uses crossbridge theory to predict calcium-activated sarcomere length- and velocity-dependent tension filament tension. Since the electrical and mechanical models use a common finite element mesh as the parent parametric framework and both models are solved within our custom finite element package, it is straightforward to couple these models, as we have recently done for a model of coupled ventricular electromechanics. We apply the coupled electromechanical

  10. Gαi2-mediated protection from ischaemic injury is modulated by endogenous RGS proteins in the mouse heart

    PubMed Central

    Waterson, Rachael E.; Thompson, Corbin G.; Mabe, Nathaniel W.; Kaur, Kuljeet; Talbot, Jeffery N.; Neubig, Richard R.; Rorabaugh, Boyd R.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Regulator of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins act as molecular ‘off switches’ that terminate G protein signalling by catalyzing the hydrolysis of Gα-bound GTP to GDP. Many different Gαi-coupled receptors have been implicated in the cardioprotective effects of ischaemic preconditioning. However, the role of RGS proteins in modulating cardioprotection has not been previously investigated. We used mice that were homozygous (GS/GS) or heterozygous (GS/+) for a mutation in Gαi2 rendering it RGS-insensitive (G184S) to determine whether interactions between endogenous RGS proteins and Gαi2 modulate Gαi-mediated protection from ischaemic injury. Methods and results Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts were subjected to 30 min global ischaemia and 2 h reperfusion. Infarcts in GS/GS (14.5% of area at risk) and GS/+ (22.6% of AAR) hearts were significantly smaller than those of +/+ hearts (37.2% of AAR) and recovery of contractile function was significantly enhanced in GS/GS and GS/+ hearts compared with +/+ hearts. The cardioprotective phenotype was not reversed by wortmannin or U0126 but was reversed by 5-hydroxydecanoic acid and HMR 1098, indicating that RGS-insensitive Gαi2 protects the heart through a mechanism that requires functional ATP-dependent potassium channels but does not require acute activation of extracellular-regulated kinase or Akt signalling pathways. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that Gαi2-mediated cardioprotection is suppressed by RGS proteins. These data suggest that RGS proteins may provide novel therapeutic targets to protect the heart from ischaemic injury. PMID:21349876

  11. Myocardial apoptosis and injury of donor hearts kept in completely beating status with normothermic blood perfusion for transplants

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Jun; Sun, Yanpeng; Wang, Wei; Ke, Han; Ye, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Normothermic blood perfusion is the developing trend of donor heart preservation. Theoretically, donor hearts preserved in a beating status may be the perfect method to reduce time-dependent ischemic injury, resuscitate marginal hearts expanding the donor pool and potentially improve the function of isolated hearts. In this study, to investigate the protective effect of normothermic blood perfusion, we maintained the donor hearts in a beating status and compared the changes of myocardial apoptosis and injury with standard hypothermic and static storage. Methods: Thirty rat hearts were preserved in static cold storage (Group A, n=10, stored in 4°C histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution), or in static normothermic blood perfusion (Group B, n=10, perfused with normothermic blood) or in beating status (Group C, n=10, perfused continuously with normothermic blood) for 9 hours. Myocardial injury markers including creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI), myocardial metabolic rate related indicators including Methane Dicarboxylic Aldehyde (MDA) and Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) were investigated before and after preservation. And also TUNEL staining and mRNA and protein expression of apoptosis markers such as Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3 and Cleaved Caspase-3 were used to evaluated the degree of myocardial apoptosis. Results: It is found that the levels of CK-MB and cTnI in Group C were significantly lower than those of Group A and Group B (P<0.05). However, there was no significant statistical difference of ATP content among three groups. When compared with Group A and B, the quality of MDA in Group C was obviously lower. In addition, it showed that a remarkable reduction in TUNEL-positive nuclear staining in Group C but higher in other two groups. And inhibited apoptosis was also confirmed by the results of mRNA and protein expression of apoptosis markers including Bax and Bcl-2. Conclusions: It is an effective and appropriate approach to

  12. Chin-sternum-heart syndrome type of injury observed in a pedestrian victim of car traffic accident.

    PubMed

    Furumiya, Junichi; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Akinori; Hashimoto, Yoshiaki

    2009-04-01

    We report an autopsy case of a pedestrian victim of car traffic accident with the chin-sternum-heart syndrome type of injury. A drunken man who lay on the road was run over by a car. He died immediately at the scene. The autopsy findings were as follows: large scalp lacerations, abrasions in the chin and the sternal region, a transverse fracture of the sternum, ruptures of the heart, ruptures of the ascending and descending aortae, rupture and hemorrhage of the nuchal muscle, ring fracture of the base of the skull, subarachnoid hemorrhage at the base of the brain, multiple rib fractures, anterior compression fracture of the 11th thoracic vertebra, and small lacerations of the liver. Blood ethanol level was 2.92 mg/g. These findings indicate that there was hyperflexion of the neck and then the victim's heart was strongly compressed and ruptured by the collision of the chin with the sternal region of the chest.

  13. BGP-15, a nicotinic amidoxime derivate protecting heart from ischemia reperfusion injury through modulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed

    Szabados, E; Literati-Nagy, P; Farkas, B; Sumegi, B

    2000-04-15

    The protective effect of O-(3-piperidino-2-hydroxy-1-propyl)nicotinic amidoxime (BGP-15) against ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury was studied in the Langendorff heart perfusion system. To understand the molecular mechanism of the cardioprotection, the effect of BGP-15 on ischemic-reperfusion-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation single-strand DNA break formation, NAD(+) catabolism, and endogenous ADP-ribosylation reactions were investigated. These studies showed that BGP-15 significantly decreased leakage of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and aspartate aminotransferase in reperfused hearts, and reduced the rate of NAD(+) catabolism. In addition, BGP-15 dramatically decreased the ischemia-reperfusion-induced self-ADP-ribosylation of nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase(PARP) and the mono-ADP-ribosylation of an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone GRP78. These data raise the possibility that BGP-15 may have a direct inhibitory effect on PARP. This hypothesis was tested on isolated enzyme, and kinetic analysis showed a mixed-type (noncompetitive) inhibition with a K(i) = 57 +/- 6 microM. Furthermore, BGP-15 decreased levels of ROS, lipid peroxidation, and single-strand DNA breaks in reperfused hearts. These data suggest that PARP may be an important molecular target of BGP-15 and that BGP-15 decreases ROS levels and cell injury during ischemia-reperfusion in the heart by inhibiting PARP activity.

  14. The effect of acute stress exposure on ischemia and reperfusion injury in rat heart: role of oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Moghimian, Maryam; Faghihi, Mahdieh; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Imani, Alireza

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies showed the protective effects of oxytocin (OT) on myocardial injury in ischemic and reperfused rat heart. Moreover, exposure to various stressors not only evokes sudden cardiovascular effects but also triggers the release of OT in the rat. The present study was aimed to evaluate the possible cardioprotective effects of endogenous OT released in response to stress (St), and effects of administration of exogenous OT on the ischemic-reperfused isolated heart of rats previously exposed to St. Wistar rats were divided into six groups: ischemia/reperfusion (IR); St: rats exposed to swim St for 10 min before anesthesia; St+atosiban (ATO): an OT receptor antagonist, was administered (1.5 mg/kg i.p.) prior to St; St+OT: OT was administered (0.03 mg/kg i.p.) prior to St; OT: OT was administrated prior to anesthesia; ATO was given prior to anesthesia. Isolated hearts were perfused with Krebs buffer solution by the Langendorff method and subjected to 30 min of regional ischemia followed by 60 min of reperfusion. The infarct size (IS) and creatine kinase MB isoenzyme (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in coronary effluent were measured. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded throughout the experiment. The plasma concentrations of OT and corticosterone were significantly increased by St. Unexpectedly St decreased IR injury compared with the IR alone group. OT administration significantly inhibited myocardial injury, and administration of ATO with St abolished recovery of the rate pressure product, and increased IS and levels of CK-MB and LDH. These findings indicate that activation of cardiac OT receptors by OT released in response to St may participate in cardioprotection and inhibition of myocardial IR injury.

  15. Histone Deacetylases Exert Class-Specific Roles in Conditioning the Brain and Heart Against Acute Ischemic Injury.

    PubMed

    Aune, Sverre E; Herr, Daniel J; Kutz, Craig J; Menick, Donald R

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury comprises a significant portion of morbidity and mortality from heart and brain diseases worldwide. This enduring clinical problem has inspired myriad reports in the scientific literature of experimental interventions seeking to elucidate the pathology of IR injury. Elective cardiac surgery presents perhaps the most viable scenario for protecting the heart and brain from IR injury due to the opportunity to condition the organs prior to insult. The physiological parameters for the preconditioning of vital organs prior to insult through mechanical and pharmacological maneuvers have been heavily examined. These investigations have revealed new insights into how preconditioning alters cellular responses to IR injury. However, the promise of preconditioning remains unfulfilled at the clinical level, and research seeking to implicate cell signals essential to this protection continues. Recent discoveries in molecular biology have revealed that gene expression can be controlled through posttranslational modifications, without altering the chemical structure of the genetic code. In this scenario, gene expression is repressed by enzymes that cause chromatin compaction through catalytic removal of acetyl moieties from lysine residues on histones. These enzymes, called histone deacetylases (HDACs), can be inhibited pharmacologically, leading to the de-repression of protective genes. The discovery that HDACs can also alter the function of non-histone proteins through posttranslational deacetylation has expanded the potential impact of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of human disease. HDAC inhibitors have been applied in a very small number of experimental models of IR. However, the scientific literature contains an increasing number of reports demonstrating that HDACs converge on preconditioning signals in the cell. This review will describe the influence of HDACs on major preconditioning signaling pathways in the heart and brain.

  16. Prostaglandin E Receptor Subtype 4 Signaling in the Heart: Role in Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury and Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yin; Tang, Eva Hoi Ching; Ma, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an endogenous lipid mediator, produced from the metabolism of arachidonic acids, upon the sequential actions of phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenases, and prostaglandin E synthases. The various biological functions governed by PGE2 are mediated through its four distinct prostaglandin E receptors (EPs), designated as EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4, among which the EP4 receptor is the one most widely distributed in the heart. The availability of global or cardiac-specific EP4 knockout mice and the development of selective EP4 agonists/antagonists have provided substantial evidence to support the role of EP4 receptor in the heart. However, like any good drama, activation of PGE2-EP4 signaling exerts both protective and detrimental effects in the ischemic heart disease. Thus, the primary object of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current progress of the PGE2-EP4 signaling in ischemic heart diseases, including cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. A better understanding of PGE2-EP4 signaling should promote the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to treat the ischemic heart diseases without triggering unwanted side effects. PMID:27190998

  17. Nitrative Thioredoxin Inactivation as a Cause of Enhanced Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in the Aging Heart

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hangxiang; Tao, Ling; Jiao, Xiangying; Gao, Erhe; Lopez, Bernard L.; Christopher, Theodore A.; Koch, Walter; Ma, Xin L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Several recent studies have demonstrated that thioredoxin (Trx) is an important anti-apoptotic/cytoprotective molecule. The present study was designed to determine whether Trx activity is altered in the aging heart in a way that may contribute to increased susceptibility to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R). Methods and Results Compared to young animals, MI/R-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and infarct size were increased in aging animals (P<0.01). Trx activity was decreased in the aging heart before MI/R, and this difference was further amplified after MI/R. Trx expression was moderately increased and Trx nitration, a post-translational modification that inhibits Trx activity, was increased in the aging heart. Moreover, Trx-ASK1 complex formation was reduced and activity of p38 MAPK was increased. Treatment with FP15 (a peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst) reduced Trx nitration, increased Trx activity, restored Trx-ASK1 interaction, reduced P38 MAPK activity, attenuated caspase 3 activation and reduced infarct size in aging animals (p<0.01). Conclusions Our results demonstrated that Trx activity is decreased in the aging heart by post-translational nitrative modification. Interventions that restore Trx activity in the aging heart may be novel therapies to attenuate MI/R injury in aging patients. PMID:17561092

  18. Role of platelet-activating factor in the reperfusion injury of rabbit ischemic heart.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Alloatti, G.; Mariano, F.; de Paulis, R.; Comino, A.; Emanuelli, G.; Camussi, G.

    1990-01-01

    This study shows that the administration of the PAF receptor antagonist SDZ 63.675 (5 mg/kg body weight) before reperfusion significantly reduced the hematologic and hemodynamic alterations, as well as the size of necrotic area in rabbits subjected to 40 minutes of coronary occlusion and reperfusion. Pretreatment with SDZ 63.675 prevented the reduction of platelet counts in the blood obtained from the right ventricle (86.6 +/- 2.8% of the control preischemia value) and the transient bradycardia (85.0 +/- 2.8%), the systemic hypotension (58.0 +/- 2.8%), and the increase in right ventricular pressure (125.0 +/- 3.6%) that were evident in the first minutes of reperfusion in untreated control rabbits. Two as well as 24 hours after reperfusion, the infarct size, judged by staining with tetrazolium, was significantly reduced in rabbits treated with SDZ 63.675 (infarct size in control animals, 66.0 +/- 2.9% and 63.46 +/- 2.09% of the risk region at 2 or 24 hours, respectively, compared with 38.9 +/- 5.2% and 37.11 +/- 2.44% of the risk region at 2 and 24 hours in rabbits treated with SDZ 63.675). This result was confirmed by histologic examination of cardiac tissue 24 hours after reperfusion. In addition, SDZ 63.675 markedly reduced the accumulation of 111In-oxine-labeled platelets that occurs 15 minutes after reperfusion in the central ischemic area of the heart and in the lungs. These results suggest that PAF plays a role in the evolution of myocardial injury observed during reperfusion. Images Figure 8 PMID:2372044

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 and the ischemia-reperfusion injury in the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Masini, Emanuela; Vannacci, A; Marzocca, C; Pierpaoli, S; Giannini, L; Fantappié, O; Mazzanti, R; Mannaioni, P F

    2003-05-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a signaling gas produced intracellularly by heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes using heme as a substrate. During heme breakdown, HO-1 and HO-2 release CO, biliverdin, and Fe(2+). In this study, we investigated the effects of manipulation of the HO-1 system in an in vivo model of focal ischemia-reperfusion (FIR) in the rat heart. Male Wistar albino rats, under general anesthesia and artificial ventilation, underwent thoracotomy, the pericardium was opened, and a silk suture was placed around the left descending coronary artery; ischemia was induced by tightening the suture and was monitored for 30 min. Subsequently, the ligature was released to allow reperfusion lasting for 60 min. The first group of rats was sham operated and injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with saline. The second group underwent FIR. The third group was treated ip 18 hr before FIR with hemin (4 mg/kg). The fourth group was pretreated ip 24 hr before FIR and 6 hr before hemin with zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP-IX, 50 microg/kg). Specimens of the left ventricle were taken for determination of HO expression and activity, infarct size, malonyldialdehyde (MDA) production, and tissue calcium content. FIR led to a significant increase in the generation of MDA and notably raised tissue calcium levels. Induction of HO-1 by hemin significantly decreased infarct size, incidence of reperfusion arrhythmias, MDA generation, and calcium overload induced by FIR. These effects were prevented by the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP-IX. The present experiments show that the concerted actions of CO, iron, and biliverdin/bilirubin modulate the FIR-induced myocardial injury. PMID:12709584

  20. Heart rate-based training intensity and its impact on injury incidence among elite-level professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Owen, Adam L; Forsyth, Jacky J; Wong, Del P; Dellal, Alexandre; Connelly, Sean P; Chamari, Karim

    2015-06-01

    Elite-level professional soccer players are suggested to have increased physical, technical, tactical, and psychological capabilities when compared with their subelite counterparts. Ensuring these players remain at the elite level generally involves training many different bodily systems to a high intensity or level within a short duration. This study aimed to examine whether an increase in training volume at high-intensity levels was related to injury incidence, or increased the odds of sustaining an injury. Training intensity was monitored through time spent in high-intensity (T-HI) and very high-intensity (T-VHI) zones of 85-<90% and ≥90% of maximal heart rate (HRmax), and all injuries were recorded over 2 consecutive seasons. Twenty-three, elite professional male soccer players (mean ± SD age, 25.6 ± 4.6 years; stature, 181.8 ± 6.8 cm; and body mass, 79.3 ± 8.1 kg) were studied throughout the 2-years span of the investigation. The results showed a mean total injury incidence of 18.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.7-22.9) injuries per 1,000 hours of exposure. Significant correlations were found between training volume at T-HI and injury incidence (r = 0.57, p = 0.005). Further analysis revealed how players achieving more time in the T-VHI zone during training increased the odds of sustaining a match injury (odds ratio = 1.87; 95% CI, 1.12-3.12, p = 0.02) but did not increase the odds of sustaining a training injury. Reducing the number of competitive match injuries among elite-level professional players may be possible if greater focus is placed on the training intensity and volume over a period of time ensuring the potential reduction of fatigue or overuse injuries. In addition, it is important to understand the optimal training load at which adaptation occurs without raising the risk of injury. PMID:26010801

  1. C1q/TNF-related protein-1 functions to protect against acute ischemic injury in the heart.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Daisuke; Ohashi, Koji; Shibata, Rei; Mizutani, Naoki; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Kambara, Takahiro; Uemura, Yusuke; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Kanemura, Noriyoshi; Hayakawa, Satoko; Hiramatsu-Ito, Mizuho; Ito, Masanori; Ogawa, Hayato; Murate, Takashi; Murohara, Toyoaki; Ouchi, Noriyuki

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. C1q/TNF-related protein (CTRP)-1 is a poorly characterized adipokine that is up-regulated in association with ischemic heart disease. We investigated the role of CTRP1 in myocardial ischemia injury. CTRP1-knockout mice showed increased myocardial infarct size, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and proinflammatory gene expression after I/R compared with wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, systemic delivery of CTRP1 attenuated myocardial damage after I/R in WT mice. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with CTRP1 led to reduction of hypoxia-reoxygenation-induced apoptosis and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines, which was reversed by inhibition of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with CTRP1 also resulted in the increased production of cAMP, which was blocked by suppression of S1P signaling. The antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory actions of CTRP1 were cancelled by inhibition of adenylyl cyclase or knockdown of adiponectin receptor 1. Furthermore, blockade of S1P signaling reversed CTRP1-mediated inhibition of myocardial infarct size, apoptosis, and inflammation after I/R in vivo. These data indicate that CTRP1 protects against myocardial ischemic injury by reducing apoptosis and inflammatory response through activation of the S1P/cAMP signaling pathways in cardiomyocytes, suggesting that CTRP1 plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease.

  2. Peri-operative heart-type fatty acid binding protein is associated with acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Jennifer A.; Garg, Amit X.; Coca, Steven G.; Testani, Jeffrey M.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Eikelboom, John; Kavsak, Peter; McArthur, Eric; Shortt, Colleen; Whitlock, Richard; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) is a common complication after cardiac surgery and is associated with worse outcomes. Since heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) is a myocardial protein that detects cardiac injury, we sought to determine if plasma H-FABP was associated with AKI in the TRIBE-AKI cohort; a multi-center cohort of 1219 patients at high risk for AKI who underwent cardiac surgery. The primary outcomes of interest were any AKI (Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) stage 1 or higher) and severe AKI (AKIN stage 2 or higher). The secondary outcome was long-term mortality after discharge. Patients who developed AKI had higher levels of H-FABP pre- and post-operatively than patients who did not have AKI. In analyses adjusted for known AKI risk factors, first post-operative log(H-FABP) was associated with severe AKI (adjusted OR 5.39 [95% CI, 2.87-10.11] per unit increase), while pre-operative log(H-FABP) was associated with any AKI (2.07 [1.48-2.89]) and mortality (1.67 [1.17-2.37]). These relationships persisted after adjustment for change in serum creatinine (for first postoperative log(H-FABP)) and biomarkers of cardiac and kidney injury, including brain natriuretic peptide, cardiac troponin-I, interleukin-18, liver fatty acid binding protein, kidney injury molecule-1, and neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin. Thus, peri-operative plasma H-FABP levels may be used for risk-stratification of AKI and mortality following cardiac surgery. PMID:25830762

  3. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of heart mitochondria for evaluating the degree of myocardial injury utilizing atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Lee, Sora; Choi, Samjin; Pak, Youngmi Kim; Kim, Weon; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in mediating both the necrotic and apoptotic components of reperfusion injury. Because mitochondrial swelling is one of the most important indicators of the beginning of mitochondrial permeability transition, quantification of morphological changes in mitochondria would be useful in evaluating the degree of IR injury, as well as the protective effects of various therapies. In this study, we characterized the morphological changes in heart mitochondria caused by the duration and severity of ischemia utilizing particle shape analysis on atomic force microscopy (AFM) topographic images. We also simultaneously investigated the nano-mechanical changes in rat heart mitochondria by injury using force-distance curve measurements. Rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: control group (n=3), myocardial ischemia without reperfusion (PI group, n=3), and myocardial ischemia with reperfusion (IR group, n=4). Normal mitochondria appeared ellipsoidal with a mean area of 3551±1559 nm(2) and mean perimeter of 217.54±52.09 nm (n=60). The mean area and perimeter of mitochondria in the IR groups increased to 28,181±21,248 nm(2) and 595.74±234.29 nm (n=40, p<0.0001 vs. control group, respectively), maintaining oval in shape. But, in the PI group, all parameters showed significant differences compared to parameters of the control group (n=35, p<0.0001). In particular, the mean axial ratio and roundness were significantly different from those in the IR group. Mitochondria in the PI group looked more spherical than those of control and IR groups. Adhesion force is the force before the last event on the retraction half of force-distance curve measurements, corresponding to the point where the tip and the surface loose contact. The adhesion forces of heart mitochondria in the IR and PI groups significantly decreased to 19.56±1.08 nN (n=30, p<0.0001) and 18.65±3.18 nN (n=30, p<0.0001), compared to normal mitochondria which had an adhesion

  4. Increased Heme Levels in the Heart Lead to Exacerbated Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sawicki, Konrad Teodor; Shang, Meng; Wu, Rongxue; Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Khechaduri, Arineh; Sato, Tatsuya; Kamide, Christine; Liu, Ting; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Ardehali, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background Heme is an essential iron-containing molecule for cardiovascular physiology, but in excess it may increase oxidative stress. Failing human hearts have increased heme levels, with upregulation of the rate-limiting enzyme in heme synthesis, δ-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2), which is normally not expressed in cardiomyocytes. We hypothesized that increased heme accumulation (through cardiac overexpression of ALAS2) leads to increased oxidative stress and cell death in the heart. Methods and Results We first showed that ALAS2 and heme levels are increased in the hearts of mice subjected to coronary ligation. To determine the causative role of increased heme in the development of heart failure, we generated transgenic mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of ALAS2. While ALAS2 transgenic mice have normal cardiac function at baseline, their hearts display increased heme content, higher oxidative stress, exacerbated cell death, and worsened cardiac function after coronary ligation compared to nontransgenic littermates. We confirmed in cultured cardiomyoblasts that the increased oxidative stress and cell death observed with ALAS2 overexpression is mediated by increased heme accumulation. Furthermore, knockdown of ALAS2 in cultured cardiomyoblasts exposed to hypoxia reversed the increases in heme content and cell death. Administration of the mitochondrial antioxidant MitoTempo to ALAS2-overexpressing cardiomyoblasts normalized the elevated oxidative stress and cell death levels to baseline, indicating that the effects of increased ALAS2 and heme are through elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress. The clinical relevance of these findings was supported by the finding of increased ALAS2 induction and heme accumulation in failing human hearts from patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy compared to nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Conclusions Heme accumulation is detrimental to cardiac function under ischemic conditions, and reducing heme in the heart may be a

  5. Role of Opioid Receptors Signaling in Remote Electrostimulation - Induced Protection against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsin-Ju; Huang, Shiang-Suo; Tsou, Meng-Ting; Wang, Hsiao-Ting; Chiu, Jen-Hwey

    2015-01-01

    Aims Our previous studies demonstrated that remote electro-stimulation (RES) increased myocardial GSK3 phosphorylation and attenuated ischemia/ reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat hearts. However, the role of various opioid receptors (OR) subtypes in preconditioned RES-induced myocardial protection remains unknown. We investigated the role of OR subtype signaling in RES-induced cardioprotection against I/R injury of the rat heart. Methods & Results Male Spraque-Dawley rats were used. RES was performed on median nerves area with/without pretreatment with various receptors antagonists such as opioid receptor (OR) subtype receptors (KOR, DOR, and MOR). The expressions of Akt, GSK3, and PKCε expression were analyzed by Western blotting. When RES was preconditioned before the I/R model, the rat's hemodynamic index, infarction size, mortality and serum CK-MB were evaluated. Our results showed that Akt, GSK3 and PKCε expression levels were significantly increased in the RES group compared to the sham group, which were blocked by pretreatment with specific antagonists targeting KOR and DOR, but not MOR subtype. Using the I/R model, the duration of arrhythmia and infarct size were both significantly attenuated in RES group. The mortality rates of the sham RES group, the RES group, RES group + KOR antagonist, RES group + DOR/MOR antagonists (KOR left), RES group + DOR antagonist, and RES group + KOR/MOR antagonists (DOR left) were 50%, 20%, 67%, 13%, 50% and 55%, respectively. Conclusion The mechanism of RES-induced myocardial protection against I/R injury seems to involve multiple target pathways such as Akt, KOR and/or DOR signaling. PMID:26430750

  6. Pitx2 promotes heart repair by activating the antioxidant response after cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ge; Kahr, Peter C; Morikawa, Yuka; Zhang, Min; Rahmani, Mahdis; Heallen, Todd R; Li, Lele; Sun, Zhao; Olson, Eric N; Amendt, Brad A; Martin, James F

    2016-06-01

    Myocardial infarction results in compromised myocardial function and heart failure owing to insufficient cardiomyocyte self-renewal. Unlike many vertebrates, mammalian hearts have only a transient neonatal renewal capacity. Reactivating primitive reparative ability in the mature mammalian heart requires knowledge of the mechanisms that promote early heart repair. By testing an established Hippo-deficient heart regeneration mouse model for factors that promote renewal, here we show that the expression of Pitx2 is induced in injured, Hippo-deficient ventricles. Pitx2-deficient neonatal mouse hearts failed to repair after apex resection, whereas adult mouse cardiomyocytes with Pitx2 gain-of-function efficiently regenerated after myocardial infarction. Genomic analyses indicated that Pitx2 activated genes encoding electron transport chain components and reactive oxygen species scavengers. A subset of Pitx2 target genes was cooperatively regulated with the Hippo pathway effector Yap. Furthermore, Nrf2, a regulator of the antioxidant response, directly regulated the expression and subcellular localization of Pitx2. Pitx2 mutant myocardium had increased levels of reactive oxygen species, while antioxidant supplementation suppressed the Pitx2 loss-of-function phenotype. These findings reveal a genetic pathway activated by tissue damage that is essential for cardiac repair. PMID:27251288

  7. Mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channels mediate the antioxidative influence of diosgenin on myocardial reperfusion injury in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Badalzadeh, Reza; Yavari, Raana; Chalabiani, Dorna

    2015-07-01

    The contribution of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury has been supported by many studies. The effect of diosgenin on oxidative stress induced by I/R injury was evaluated in this study. Rat hearts were subjected to 30 minutes of global ischemia followed by 90 minutes of reperfusion. 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) was used before administration of diosgenin and before ischemia. The activities of myocardial creatine kinase (CK), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were measured. Administration of diosgenin before ischemia significantly lowered CK and MDA levels as compared with control group (p < 0.05) and increased GPX (p < 0.05) and SOD (p < 0.01) activities in comparison with control group. Pre-administration of 5-HD significantly attenuated the protective effects of diosgenin. In conclusion, opening of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) channels and attenuating of oxidative stress can be suggested as underlying mechanisms for cardioprotective effect of diosgenin in I/R injury. PMID:26001291

  8. Pulmonary Instillation of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Promotes Coronary Vasoconstriction and Exacerbates Injury in Isolated Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Leslie C.; Frasier, Chad R.; Sloan, Ruben C.; Mann, Erin E.; Harrison, Benjamin S.; Brown, Jared M.; Brown, David A.; Wingard, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The growing use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) across industry has increased human exposures. We tested the hypothesis that pulmonary instillation of MWCNT would exacerbate cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. One day following intratracheal instillation of 1, 10, or 100 μg MWCNT in Sprague-Dawley rats, we used a Langendorff isolated heart model to examine cardiac I/R injury. In the 100 μg MWCNT group we report increased premature ventricular contractions at baseline and increased myocardial infarction. This was associated with increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) release and depression of coronary flow during early reperfusion. We also tested if isolated coronary vascular responses were affected by MWCNT instillation and found trends for enhanced coronary tone, which were dependent on ET-1, cyclooxygenase, thromboxane, and Rho-kinase. We conclude that instillation of MWCNT promoted cardiac injury by depressing coronary flow, invoking vasoconstrictive mechanisms involving ET-1, cyclooxygenase, thromboxane, and Rho-kinase. PMID:23102262

  9. A promising approach for improving the recovery of heart transplants. Prevention of free radical injury through iron chelation by deferoxamine.

    PubMed

    Menasché, P; Grousset, C; Mouas, C; Piwnica, A

    1990-07-01

    Iron catalysis is involved in the generation of the highly cytotoxic hydroxyl radical and in the chain reactions of subsequent lipid peroxidation that lead to irreversible membrane damage. Assuming that ischemically stored heart transplants may incur free radical injury at the time of reoxygenation, we assessed the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine in 70 isolated isovolumic buffer-perfused rat hearts subjected to the following protocol: cardioplegic arrest; cold (2 degrees C) storage for 5 hours; global ischemia at 15 degrees C for 1 hour, intended to simulate the implantation procedure; and normothermic reperfusion for 1 additional hour. During poststorage ischemic arrest, the following techniques of myocardial protection were evaluated: hypothermia alone; high-pressure (60 cm H2O) cardioplegia given at 0, 30, and 55 minutes of arrest; low-pressure (30 cm H2O) cardioplegia given at 0 and 55 minutes of arrest; and low-pressure (30 cm H2O) cardioplegia only given at 55 minutes of arrest. Treated hearts had deferoxamine (6 mumol) added to the cardioplegic solution used throughout the experimental time course. Further, in the treated group subjected to the protocol of single cardioplegic delivery at end ischemia, deferoxamine was given both in the cardioplegic reperfusate and in the Krebs buffer over the 15 initial minutes of reflow. Based on comparisons of postreperfusion ventricular pressure development, maximal rate of rise of ventricular pressure, left ventricular compliance, and coronary flow, the best myocardial protection was afforded by deferoxamine given as an additive to single-dose cardioplegic solution at the end of arrest and to the reperfusate during the initial phase of reoxygenation. As the drug has no inotropic effect, its protective action is most likely related to a decrease in catalytic iron available for free radical production and lipid peroxidation. These results support the hypothesis that oxidative damage may contribute to donor heart

  10. Pharmacological induction of transforming growth factor-beta1 in rat models enhances radiation injury in the intestine and the heart.

    PubMed

    Boerma, Marjan; Wang, Junru; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Herbert, Jean-Marc; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer is dose limited by radiation injury in normal tissues such as the intestine and the heart. To identify the mechanistic involvement of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) in intestinal and cardiac radiation injury, we studied the influence of pharmacological induction of TGF-β1 with xaliproden (SR 57746A) in rat models of radiation enteropathy and radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD). Because it was uncertain to what extent TGF-β induction may enhance radiation injury in heart and intestine, animals were exposed to irradiation schedules that cause mild to moderate (acute) radiation injury. In the radiation enteropathy model, male Sprague-Dawley rats received local irradiation of a 4-cm loop of rat ileum with 7 once-daily fractions of 5.6 Gy, and intestinal injury was assessed at 2 weeks and 12 weeks after irradiation. In the RIHD model, male Sprague-Dawley rats received local heart irradiation with a single dose of 18 Gy and were followed for 6 months after irradiation. Rats were treated orally with xaliproden starting 3 days before irradiation until the end of the experiments. Treatment with xaliproden increased circulating TGF-β1 levels by 300% and significantly induced expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β1 target genes in the irradiated intestine and heart. Various radiation-induced structural changes in the intestine at 2 and 12 weeks were significantly enhanced with TGF-β1 induction. Similarly, in the RIHD model induction of TGF-β1 augmented radiation-induced changes in cardiac function and myocardial fibrosis. These results lend further support for the direct involvement of TGF-β1 in biological mechanisms of radiation-induced adverse remodeling in the intestine and the heart.

  11. Chronic Losartan Treatment Up-Regulates AT1R and Increases the Heart Vulnerability to Acute Onset of Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Minwoo A.; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is an important therapy in the management of hypertension, particularly in the immediate post-myocardial infarction period. Yet, the role of AT1R in the acute onset of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury still remains controversial. Thus, the present study determined the effects of chronic losartan treatment on heart ischemia and reperfusion injury in rats. Losartan (10 mg/kg/day) was administered to six-month-old male rats via an osmotic pump for 14 days and hearts were then isolated and were subjected to ischemia and reperfusion injury in a Langendorff preparation. Losartan significantly decreased mean arterial blood pressure. However, heart weight, left ventricle to body weight ratio and baseline cardiac function were not significantly altered by the losartan treatment. Of interest, chronic in vivo losartan treatment significantly increased ischemia-induced myocardial injury and decreased post-ischemic recovery of left ventricular function. This was associated with significant increases in AT1R and PKCδ expression in the left ventricle. In contrast, AT2R and PKCε were not altered. Furthermore, losartan treatment significantly increased microRNA (miR)-1, -15b, -92a, -133a, -133b, -210, and -499 expression but decreased miR-21 in the left ventricle. Of importance, addition of losartan to isolated heart preparations blocked the effect of increased ischemic-injury induced by in vivo chronic losartan treatment. The results demonstrate that chronic losartan treatment up-regulates AT1R/PKCδ and alters miR expression patterns in the heart, leading to increased cardiac vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury. PMID:26168042

  12. Chronic Losartan Treatment Up-Regulates AT1R and Increases the Heart Vulnerability to Acute Onset of Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Minwoo A; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is an important therapy in the management of hypertension, particularly in the immediate post-myocardial infarction period. Yet, the role of AT1R in the acute onset of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury still remains controversial. Thus, the present study determined the effects of chronic losartan treatment on heart ischemia and reperfusion injury in rats. Losartan (10 mg/kg/day) was administered to six-month-old male rats via an osmotic pump for 14 days and hearts were then isolated and were subjected to ischemia and reperfusion injury in a Langendorff preparation. Losartan significantly decreased mean arterial blood pressure. However, heart weight, left ventricle to body weight ratio and baseline cardiac function were not significantly altered by the losartan treatment. Of interest, chronic in vivo losartan treatment significantly increased ischemia-induced myocardial injury and decreased post-ischemic recovery of left ventricular function. This was associated with significant increases in AT1R and PKCδ expression in the left ventricle. In contrast, AT2R and PKCε were not altered. Furthermore, losartan treatment significantly increased microRNA (miR)-1, -15b, -92a, -133a, -133b, -210, and -499 expression but decreased miR-21 in the left ventricle. Of importance, addition of losartan to isolated heart preparations blocked the effect of increased ischemic-injury induced by in vivo chronic losartan treatment. The results demonstrate that chronic losartan treatment up-regulates AT1R/PKCδ and alters miR expression patterns in the heart, leading to increased cardiac vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury.

  13. Comparison of Heart Rate Response to Tennis Activity between Persons with and without Spinal Cord Injuries: Implications for a Training Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barfield, J. P.; Malone, Laurie A.; Coleman, Tristica A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to reach a training threshold during on-court sport activity. Monitors collected heart rate (HR) data every 5 s for 11 wheelchair tennis players (WCT) with low paraplegia and 11 able-bodied controls matched on experience and skill level (ABT).…

  14. Biomarkers of renal injury and function: diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic implications in heart failure.

    PubMed

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Ruilope, Luis M; Maisel, Alan S; Damman, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Heart failure guidelines suggest evaluating renal function as a routine work-up in every patient with heart failure. Specifically, it is advised to calculate glomerular filtration rate and determine blood urea nitrogen. The reason for this is that renal impairment and worsening renal function (WRF) are common in heart failure, and strongly associate with poor outcome. Renal function, however, consists of more than glomerular filtration alone, and includes tubulointerstitial damage and albuminuria. For each of these renal entities, different biomarkers exist that have been investigated in heart failure. Hypothetically, and in parallel to data in nephrology, these markers may aid in the diagnosis of renal dysfunction, or for risk stratification, or could help in therapeutic decision-making. However, as reviewed in the present manuscript, while these markers may carry prognostic information (although not always additive to established markers of renal function), their role in predicting WRF is limited at best. More importantly, none of these markers have been evaluated as a therapeutic target nor have their serial values been used to guide therapy. The evidence is most compelling for the oldest-serum creatinine (in combination with glomerular filtration rate)-but even for this biomarker, evidence to guide therapy to improve outcome is circumstantial at best. Although many new renal biomarkers have emerged at the horizon, they have only limited usefulness in clinical practice until thoroughly and prospectively studied. For now, routine measurement of (novel) renal biomarkers can help to determine cardiovascular risk, but there is no role for these biomarkers to change therapy to improve clinical outcome in heart failure.

  15. C1q/TNF-Related Protein 9 Protects Diabetic Rat Heart against Ischemia Reperfusion Injury: Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Sanxing; Cheng, Liang; Yang, Yang; Fan, Chongxi; Zhao, Dajun; Qin, Zhigang; Feng, Xiao; Zhao, Lin; Ma, Jipeng; Wang, Xiaowu; Yang, Jian; Xu, Xuezeng

    2016-01-01

    As a newly identified adiponectin paralog, C1q/TNF-related protein 9 (CTRP9) reduces myocardial ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury through partially understood mechanisms. In the present study, we sought to identify the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) in CTRP9 induced cardioprotection in diabetic heart. Isolated hearts from high-fat-diet (HFD) induced type 2 diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to ex vivo IR protocol via a Langendorff apparatus at the presence of globular CTRP9. CTRP9 significantly improved post-IR heart function and reduced cardiac infarction, cardiomyocytes apoptosis, Caspase-3, Caspase-9, Caspase-12, TNF-α expression, and lactate dehydrogenase activity. The cardioprotective effect of CTRP9 was associated with reduced ERS and increased expression of disulfide-bond A oxidoreductase-like protein (DsbA-L) in diabetic heart. CTRP9 reduced ERS in thapsigargin (TG) treated cardiomyocytes and protected endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stressed H9c2 cells against simulated ischemia reperfusion (SIR) injury, concurrent with increased expression of DsbA-L. Knockdown of DsbA-L increased ERS and attenuated CTRP9 induced protection against SIR injury in H9c2 cells. Our findings demonstrated for the first time that CTRP9 exerts cardioprotection by reducing ERS in diabetic heart through increasing DsbA-L. PMID:27795806

  16. Inhibition of inflammation and oxidative stress by an imidazopyridine derivative X22 prevents heart injury from obesity.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yali; Zhong, Peng; Peng, Kesong; Xu, Zheng; Chen, Xuemei; Lu, Kongqin; Chen, Gaozhi; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of obesity-related complications and cardiovascular disease. Benzimidazole and imidazopyridine compounds are a class of compounds with a variety of activities, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-cancer. X22 is an imidazopyridine derivative we synthesized and evaluated previously for anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. However, its ability to alleviate obesity-induced heart injury via its anti-inflammatory actions was unclear. This study was designed to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of X22 using cell culture studies and a high-fat diet rat model. We observed that palmitic acid treatment in cardiac-derived H9c2 cells induced a significant increase in reactive oxygen species, inflammation, apoptosis, fibrosis and hypertrophy. All of these changes were inhibited by treatment with X22. Furthermore, oral administration of X22 suppressed high-fat diet-induced oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, hypertrophy and fibrosis in rat heart tissues and decreased serum lipid concentration. We also found that the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative actions of X22 were associated with Nrf2 activation and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) inhibition, respectively, both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study indicate that X22 may be a promising cardioprotective agent and that Nrf2 and NF-κB may be important therapeutic targets for obesity-related complications. PMID:27019072

  17. Urine and serum microRNA-1 as novel biomarkers for myocardial injury in open-heart surgeries with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xian; Mao, Anqiong; Wang, Xiaobin; Duan, Xiaoxia; Yao, Yi; Zhang, Chunxiang

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA-1 (miR-1) is a cardio-specific/enriched microRNA. Our recent studies have revealed that serum and urine miR-1 could be a novel sensitive biomarker for acute myocardial infarction. Open-heart surgeries with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are often accompanied with surgery injury and CPB-associated injury on the hearts. However, the association of miR-1 and these intra-operative and post-operative cardiac injures is unknown. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that urine and serum miR-1 might be a novel biomarker for myocardial injuries in open-heart surgeries with CPB. Serum and urine miR-1 levels in 20 patients with elective mitral valve surgery were measured at pre-surgery, pre-CPB, 60 min post-CBP, and 24h post-CBP. Serum cardiac troponin-I (cTnI) was used as a positive control biomarker for cardiac injury. Compared with these in pre-operative and pre-CPB groups, the levels of miR-1 in serum and urine from patients after open-heart surgeries and CPB were significant increased at all observed time points. A similar pattern of serum cTnI levels and their strong positive correlation with miR-1 levels were identified in these patients. The results suggest that serum and urine miR-1 may be a novel sensitive biomarker for myocardial injury in open-heart surgeries with CPB.

  18. Prevention and Treatment of Functional and Structural Radiation Injury in the Rat Heart by Pentoxifylline and Alpha-Tocopherol

    SciTech Connect

    Boerma, Marjan Roberto, Kerrey A.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a severe side effect of thoracic radiotherapy. This study examined the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX) and {alpha}-tocopherol on cardiac injury in a rat model of RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats received fractionated local heart irradiation with a daily dose of 9 Gy for 5 days and were observed for 6 months after irradiation. Rats were treated with a combination of PTX, 100 mg/kg/day, and {alpha}-tocopherol (20 IU/kg/day) and received these compounds either from 1 week before until 6 months after irradiation or starting 3 months after irradiation, a time point at which histopathologic changes become apparent in our model of RIHD. Results: Radiation-induced increases in left ventricular diastolic pressure (in mm Hg: 35 {+-} 6 after sham-irradiation, 82 {+-} 11 after irradiation) were significantly reduced by PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol (early treatment: 48 {+-} 7; late treatment: 53 {+-} 6). PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol significantly reduced deposition of collagen types I (radiation only: 3.5 {+-} 0.2 {mu}m{sup 2} per 100 {mu}m{sup 2}; early treatment: 2.7 {+-} 0.8; late treatment: 2.2 {+-} 0.2) and III (radiation only: 13.9 {+-} 0.8; early treatment: 11.0 {+-} 1.2; late treatment: 10.6 {+-} 0.8). On the other hand, radiation-induced alterations in heart/body weight ratios, myocardial degeneration, left ventricular mast cell densities, and most echocardiographic parameters were not significantly altered by PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol. Conclusions: Treatment with PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol may have beneficial effects on radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular function, both when started before irradiation and when started later during the process of RIHD.

  19. CD38 Deficiency Protects the Heart from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through Activating SIRT1/FOXOs-Mediated Antioxidative Stress Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Hong, Xuan; Zhao, Ning; Xiao, Yun-Fei; Wang, Ling-Fang; Qian, Yi-Song; Deng, Ke-Yu; Ji, Guangju; Fu, Mingui

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury induces irreversible oxidative stress damage to the cardiac muscle. We previously observed that CD38 deficiency remarkably protects mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from oxidative stress-induced injury. However, whether CD38 deficiency protects from I/R injury in the heart is not explored. Here, we showed that the hearts of CD38 deficient mice or wild type mice supplied with exogenous NAD were significantly protected from ischemia/reperfusion injury, seen as reduction of the myocardial infarct sizes when the mice were subjected to 30 min ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Consistently, the protection of CD38 deficiency on hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury was confirmed with a CD38 knockdown H9c2 stable cell line. Furthermore, we observed that knockdown of CD38 remarkably inhibited ROS generation and intracellular Ca2+ overloading induced by H/R in H9c2 cells. The FOXO1 and FOXO3 expressions were significantly elevated by H/R injury in CD38 knockdown cells compared with normal H9c2 cells. The cell immunofluorescence assay showed that FOXO1 nuclear translocation was significantly increased in CD38 knockdown H9c2 cells. In addition, we demonstrated that the increase of FOXO1 nuclear translocation was associated with the increased expressions of antioxidant catalase and SOD2 and the attenuated expression of the ROS generation enzyme NOX4. In conclusion, our results provide new evidence that CD38 deficiency protects the heart from I/R injury through activating SIRT1/FOXOs-mediated antioxidative stress pathway. PMID:27547294

  20. CD38 Deficiency Protects the Heart from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through Activating SIRT1/FOXOs-Mediated Antioxidative Stress Pathway.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Hong, Xuan; Zhao, Ning; Xiao, Yun-Fei; Wang, Ling-Fang; Tang, Ling; Jiang, Kai; Qian, Yi-Song; Deng, Ke-Yu; Ji, Guangju; Fu, Mingui; Xin, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury induces irreversible oxidative stress damage to the cardiac muscle. We previously observed that CD38 deficiency remarkably protects mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from oxidative stress-induced injury. However, whether CD38 deficiency protects from I/R injury in the heart is not explored. Here, we showed that the hearts of CD38 deficient mice or wild type mice supplied with exogenous NAD were significantly protected from ischemia/reperfusion injury, seen as reduction of the myocardial infarct sizes when the mice were subjected to 30 min ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Consistently, the protection of CD38 deficiency on hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury was confirmed with a CD38 knockdown H9c2 stable cell line. Furthermore, we observed that knockdown of CD38 remarkably inhibited ROS generation and intracellular Ca(2+) overloading induced by H/R in H9c2 cells. The FOXO1 and FOXO3 expressions were significantly elevated by H/R injury in CD38 knockdown cells compared with normal H9c2 cells. The cell immunofluorescence assay showed that FOXO1 nuclear translocation was significantly increased in CD38 knockdown H9c2 cells. In addition, we demonstrated that the increase of FOXO1 nuclear translocation was associated with the increased expressions of antioxidant catalase and SOD2 and the attenuated expression of the ROS generation enzyme NOX4. In conclusion, our results provide new evidence that CD38 deficiency protects the heart from I/R injury through activating SIRT1/FOXOs-mediated antioxidative stress pathway. PMID:27547294

  1. Attenuation of post-ischemia reperfusion injury by thaliporphine and morphine in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Luen; Lee, Shoei-Sheng; Su, Ming-Jai

    2005-01-01

    Pretreatment with thaliporphine before ischemia affords cardioprotective effects against reperfusion injury via antioxidant activity. This study evaluated whether thaliporphine administered at a certain period after myocardial ischemia conferred the same cardioprotection and assessed its possible new mechanism. The left main coronary artery of anaesthetized rats was occluded for 1 h and then reperfused for 2 h. Thaliporphine was administered at 10 min before reperfusion. Controls received saline only. Morphine, a nonselective opioid receptor agonist, was used as reference compound at 0.3 mg/kg. Thaliporphine at 0.05 and 0.5 mg/kg were found to reduce the infarct size. Recovery of cardiac function was higher in thaliporphine (0.5 mg/kg) group, as assessed by a significant improvement in the rates of pressure development (+dp/dt (max)). This compound also reduced plasma creatine kinase and cardiac MPO activity. These protective effects afforded by thaliporphine were diminished by the opioid receptor antagonists (naloxone or naltrexone) and by the mitochondrial K(ATP) blocker 5HD. In comparison, morphine reduced infarct size and MPO activity in the myocardium but produced slightly improvement in cardiac function after ischemia-reperfusion. These results demonstrate that reperfusion therapy with thaliporphine protect cardiac injury through further mechanism via activation of opioid receptor and opening of mitochondrial K(ATP) channels as morphine but with stronger activity. PMID:16132108

  2. Preoperative heart rate and myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery: results of a predefined secondary analysis of the VISION study

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, T. E. F.; Ackland, G. L.; Archbold, R. A.; Wragg, A.; Kam, E.; Ahmad, T.; Khan, A. W.; Niebrzegowska, E.; Rodseth, R. N.; Devereaux, P. J.; Pearse, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Increased baseline heart rate is associated with cardiovascular risk and all-cause mortality in the general population. We hypothesized that elevated preoperative heart rate increases the risk of myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery (MINS). Methods We performed a secondary analysis of a prospective international cohort study of patients aged ≥45 yr undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Preoperative heart rate was defined as the last measurement before induction of anaesthesia. The sample was divided into deciles by heart rate. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine relationships between preoperative heart rate and MINS (determined by serum troponin concentration), myocardial infarction (MI), and death within 30 days of surgery. Separate models were used to test the relationship between these outcomes and predefined binary heart rate thresholds. Results Patients with missing outcomes or heart rate data were excluded from respective analyses. Of 15 087 patients, 1197 (7.9%) sustained MINS, 454 of 16 007 patients (2.8%) sustained MI, and 315 of 16 037 patients (2.0%) died. The highest heart rate decile (>96 beats min−1) was independently associated with MINS {odds ratio (OR) 1.48 [1.23–1.77]; P<0.01}, MI (OR 1.71 [1.34–2.18]; P<0.01), and mortality (OR 3.16 [2.45–4.07]; P<0.01). The lowest decile (<60 beats min−1) was independently associated with reduced mortality (OR 0.50 [0.29–0.88]; P=0.02), but not MINS or MI. The predefined binary thresholds were also associated with MINS, but more weakly than the highest heart rate decile. Conclusions Preoperative heart rate >96 beats min−1 is associated with MINS, MI, and mortality after non-cardiac surgery. This association persists after accounting for potential confounding factors. Clinical trial registration NCT00512109. PMID:27440628

  3. CD8+ T-cells expressing interferon gamma or perforin play antagonistic roles in heart injury in experimental Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Silverio, Jaline Coutinho; Pereira, Isabela Resende; Cipitelli, Márcio da Costa; Vinagre, Nathália Ferreira; Rodrigues, Maurício Martins; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2012-01-01

    In Chagas disease, CD8(+) T-cells are critical for the control of Trypanosoma cruzi during acute infection. Conversely, CD8(+) T-cell accumulation in the myocardium during chronic infection may cause tissue injury leading to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). Here we explored the role of CD8(+) T-cells in T. cruzi-elicited heart injury in C57BL/6 mice infected with the Colombian strain. Cardiomyocyte lesion evaluated by creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme activity levels in the serum and electrical abnormalities revealed by electrocardiogram were not associated with the intensity of heart parasitism and myocarditis in the chronic infection. Further, there was no association between heart injury and systemic anti-T. cruzi CD8(+) T-cell capacity to produce interferon-gamma (IFNγ) and to perform specific cytotoxicity. Heart injury, however, paralleled accumulation of anti-T. cruzi cells in the cardiac tissue. In T. cruzi infection, most of the CD8(+) T-cells segregated into IFNγ(+) perforin (Pfn)(neg) or IFNγ(neg)Pfn(+) cell populations. Colonization of the cardiac tissue by anti-T. cruzi CD8(+)Pfn(+) cells paralleled the worsening of CCC. The adoptive cell transfer to T. cruzi-infected cd8(-/-) recipients showed that the CD8(+) cells from infected ifnγ(-/-)pfn(+/+) donors migrate towards the cardiac tissue to a greater extent and caused a more severe cardiomyocyte lesion than CD8(+) cells from ifnγ(+/+)pfn(-/-) donors. Moreover, the reconstitution of naïve cd8(-/-) mice with CD8(+) cells from naïve ifnγ(+/+)pfn(-/-) donors ameliorated T. cruzi-elicited heart injury paralleled IFNγ(+) cells accumulation, whereas reconstitution with CD8(+) cells from naïve ifnγ(-/-)pfn(+/+) donors led to an aggravation of the cardiomyocyte lesion, which was associated with the accumulation of Pfn(+) cells in the cardiac tissue. Our data support a possible antagonist effect of CD8(+)Pfn(+) and CD8(+)IFNγ(+) cells during CCC. CD8(+)IFNγ(+) cells may exert a beneficial role

  4. CD8+ T-Cells Expressing Interferon Gamma or Perforin Play Antagonistic Roles in Heart Injury in Experimental Trypanosoma Cruzi-Elicited Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cipitelli, Márcio da Costa; Vinagre, Nathália Ferreira; Rodrigues, Maurício Martins; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2012-01-01

    In Chagas disease, CD8+ T-cells are critical for the control of Trypanosoma cruzi during acute infection. Conversely, CD8+ T-cell accumulation in the myocardium during chronic infection may cause tissue injury leading to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). Here we explored the role of CD8+ T-cells in T. cruzi-elicited heart injury in C57BL/6 mice infected with the Colombian strain. Cardiomyocyte lesion evaluated by creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme activity levels in the serum and electrical abnormalities revealed by electrocardiogram were not associated with the intensity of heart parasitism and myocarditis in the chronic infection. Further, there was no association between heart injury and systemic anti-T. cruzi CD8+ T-cell capacity to produce interferon-gamma (IFNγ) and to perform specific cytotoxicity. Heart injury, however, paralleled accumulation of anti-T. cruzi cells in the cardiac tissue. In T. cruzi infection, most of the CD8+ T-cells segregated into IFNγ+ perforin (Pfn)neg or IFNγnegPfn+ cell populations. Colonization of the cardiac tissue by anti-T. cruzi CD8+Pfn+ cells paralleled the worsening of CCC. The adoptive cell transfer to T. cruzi-infected cd8−/− recipients showed that the CD8+ cells from infected ifnγ−/−pfn+/+ donors migrate towards the cardiac tissue to a greater extent and caused a more severe cardiomyocyte lesion than CD8+ cells from ifnγ+/+pfn−/− donors. Moreover, the reconstitution of naïve cd8−/− mice with CD8+ cells from naïve ifnγ+/+pfn−/− donors ameliorated T. cruzi-elicited heart injury paralleled IFNγ+ cells accumulation, whereas reconstitution with CD8+ cells from naïve ifnγ−/−pfn+/+ donors led to an aggravation of the cardiomyocyte lesion, which was associated with the accumulation of Pfn+ cells in the cardiac tissue. Our data support a possible antagonist effect of CD8+Pfn+ and CD8+IFNγ+ cells during CCC. CD8+IFNγ+ cells may exert a beneficial role, whereas CD8+Pfn+ may play a detrimental role

  5. Cardioprotective Effects of Total Flavonoids Extracted from Xinjiang Sprig Rosa rugosa against Acute Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Myocardial Injury in Isolated Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xuejiao; Han, Jichun; Yuan, Changsheng; Ren, Huanhuan; Zhang, Ya; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Lixia; Zheng, Qiusheng; Chen, Wen

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the antioxidative and cardioprotective effects of total flavonoids extracted from Xinjiang sprig Rosa rugosa on ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury using an isolated Langendorff rat heart model. The possible mechanism of Xinjiang sprig rose total flavonoid (XSRTF) against I/R injury was also studied. XSRTF (5, 10, and 20 µg/mL) dissolved in Krebs-Henseleit buffer was administered to isolated rat heart. The XSRTF showed remarkable scavenging effects against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, hydroxyl, and superoxide anion radicals in vitro. XSRTF pretreatment improved the heart rate, increased LVDP, and decreased CK and LDH levels in coronary flow. This pretreatment also increased SOD activity and GSH/GSSG ratio but decreased MDA, TNF-α, and CRP levels and IL-8 and IL-6 activities. The infarct size and cell apoptosis in the hearts from the XSRTF-treated group were lower than those in the hearts from the I/R group. Therefore, the cardioprotective effects of XSRTF may be attributed to its antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory activities.

  6. Deletion of capn4 Protects the Heart Against Endotoxemic Injury by Preventing ATP Synthase Disruption and Inhibiting Mitochondrial Superoxide Generation

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Rui; Zheng, Dong; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Yong; Chen, Ruizhen; Sun, Tao; Wang, Wang; Fan, Guo-Chang; Greer, Peter A.; Gardiner, Richard B.; Peng, Tianqing

    2015-01-01

    Background Our recent study has demonstrated that inhibition of calpain by transgenic over-expression of calpastatin reduces myocardial pro-inflammatory response and dysfunction in endotoxemia. However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be determined. In this study, we employed cardiomyocyte-specific capn4 knockout mice to investigate whether and how calpain disrupts ATP synthase and induces mitochondrial superoxide generation during endotoxemia. Method and Results Cardiomyocyte-specific capn4 knockout mice and their wild-type littermates were injected with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Four hours later, calpain-1 protein and activity were increased in mitochondria of endotoxemic mouse hearts. Mitochondrial calpain-1 co-localized with and cleaved ATP synthase-α (ATP5A1), leading to ATP synthase disruption and a concomitant increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during LPS stimulation. Deletion of capn4 or up-regulation of ATP5A1 increased ATP synthase activity, prevented mitochondrial ROS generation, and reduced pro-inflammatory response and myocardial dysfunction in endotoxemic mice. In cultured cardiomyocytes, LPS induced mitochondrial superoxide generation which was prevented by over-expression of mitochondria-targeted calpastatin or ATP5A1. Up-regulation of calpain-1 specifically in mitochondria sufficiently induced superoxide generation and pro-inflammatory response, both of which were attenuated by ATP5A1 over-expression or mitochondria-targeted superoxide dismutase mimetics, mito-TEMPO. Conclusions Cardiomyocyte-specific capn4 knockout protects the heart against LPS-induced injury in endotoxemic mice. LPS induces calpain-1 accumulation in mitochondria. Mitochondrial calpain-1 disrupts ATP synthase, leading to mitochondrial ROS generation, which promotes pro-inflammatory response and myocardial dysfunction during endotoxemia. These findings uncover a novel mechanism by which calpain mediates myocardial dysfunction in sepsis. PMID

  7. North American ginseng protects the heart from ischemia and reperfusion injury via upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Lu, Xiangru; Xiang, Fu-Li; Lui, Edmund M K; Feng, Qingping

    2011-09-01

    Emerging evidence suggests ginseng has therapeutic potential in cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the cardioprotective effects of ginseng during myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). Treatment with ginseng extract significantly increased Akt phosphorylation and eNOS protein levels in cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes. Upregulation of eNOS was blocked by LY294002, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, suggesting a PI3-kinase/Akt-dependent mechanism. To simulate I/R, cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes from eNOS(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to anoxia and reoxygenation (A/R). Ginseng treatment inhibited A/R-induced apoptosis in WT, but not in either eNOS(-/-) cardiomyocytes or WT cardiomyocytes treated with LY294002. To further study the cardioprotective effects of ginseng in vivo, WT and eNOS(-/-) mice were pretreated with ginseng extract (50mg/kg/day, oral gavage) for 7 days before they were subjected to myocardial I/R. Treatment with ginseng significantly increased Akt phosphorylation and eNOS protein levels in the myocardium. Furthermore, ginseng-induced myocardial eNOS expression was inhibited by LY294002. Strikingly, ginseng treatment significantly decreased infarct size and myocardial apoptosis following I/R in WT mice, but not in either eNOS(-/-) mice or WT mice treated with LY294002. We conclude that ginseng treatment protects the heart from I/R injury via upregulation of eNOS expression. Our study suggests that ginseng may serve as a potential therapeutic agent to limit myocardial I/R injury.

  8. How Does the Ca(2+)-paradox Injury Induce Contracture in the Heart?-A Combined Study of the Intracellular Ca(2+) Dynamics and Cell Structures in Perfused Rat Hearts.

    PubMed

    Mani, Hiroki; Tanaka, Hideo; Adachi, Tetsuya; Ikegawa, Masaya; Dai, Ping; Fujita, Naohisa; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    The calcium (Ca(2+))-paradox injury of the heart, induced by restoration of extracellular Ca(2+) after its short-term depletion, is known to provoke cardiomyocyte contracture. However, undetermined is how the Ca(2+)-paradox provokes such a distinctive presentation of myocytes in the heart. To address this, we imaged sequential intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics and concomitant structures of the subepicardial ventricular myocytes in fluo3-loaded, Langendorff-perfused rat hearts produced by the Ca(2+) paradox. Under rapid-scanning confocal microscopy, repletion of Ca(2+) following its depletion produced high-frequency Ca(2+) waves in individual myocytes with asynchronous localized contractions, resulting in contracture within 10 min. Such alterations of myocytes were attenuated by 5-mM NiCl2, but not by verapamil, SEA0400, or combination of ryanodine and thapsigargin, indicating a contribution of non-specific transmembrane Ca(2+) influx in the injury. However, saponin-induced membrane permeabilization of Ca(2+) showed no apparent contracture despite the emergence of high-frequency Ca(2+) waves, indicating an essential role of myocyte-myocyte and myocyte-extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanical connections in the Ca(2+) paradox. In immunohistochemistry Ca(2+) depletion produced separation of the intercalated disc that expresses cadherin and dissipation of β-dystroglycan located along the sarcolemma. Taken together, along with the trans-sarcolemmal Ca(2+) influx, disruption of cell-cell and cell-ECM connections is essential for contracture in the Ca(2+)-paradox injury.

  9. Hemidesmus indicus and Hibiscus rosa-sinensis Affect Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Isolated Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Vinoth Kumar Megraj; Balaraman, R.; Pancza, Dezider; Ravingerová, Táňa

    2011-01-01

    Hemidesmus indicus (L.) R. Br. (HI) and Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. (HRS) are widely used traditional medicine. We investigated cardioprotective effects of these plants applied for 15 min at concentrations of 90, 180, and 360 μg/mL in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts prior to 25-min global ischemia/120-min reperfusion (I/R). Functional recovery (left ventricular developed pressure—LVDP, and rate of development of pressure), reperfusion arrhythmias, and infarct size (TTC staining) served as the endpoints. A transient increase in LVDP (32%–75%) occurred at all concentrations of HI, while coronary flow (CF) was significantly increased after HI 180 and 360. Only a moderate increase in LVDP (21% and 55%) and a tendency to increase CF was observed at HRS 180 and 360. HI and HRS at 180 and 360 significantly improved postischemic recovery of LVDP. Both the drugs dose-dependently reduced the numbers of ectopic beats and duration of ventricular tachycardia. The size of infarction was significantly decreased by HI 360, while HRS significantly reduced the infarct size at all concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, it can be concluded that HI might cause vasodilation, positive inotropic effect, and cardioprotection, while HRS might cause these effects at higher concentrations. However, further study is needed to elucidate the exact mechanism of their actions. PMID:20953394

  10. ROS-Mediated NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Testis Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Minutoli, Letteria; Puzzolo, Domenico; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Irrera, Natasha; Marini, Herbert; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Bitto, Alessandra; Crea, Giovanni; Pisani, Antonina; Squadrito, Francesco; Trichilo, Vincenzo; Bruschetta, Daniele; Micali, Antonio; Altavilla, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) causes a reduction in arterial blood supply to tissues, followed by the restoration of perfusion and consequent reoxygenation. The reestablishment of blood flow triggers further damage to the ischemic tissue through reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, interference with cellular ion homeostasis, and inflammatory responses to cell death. In normal conditions, ROS mediate important beneficial responses. When their production is prolonged or elevated, harmful events are observed with peculiar cellular changes. In particular, during I/R, ROS stimulate tissue inflammation and induce NLRP3 inflammasome activation. The mechanisms underlying the activation of NLRP3 are several and not completely elucidated. It was recently shown that NLRP3 might sense directly the presence of ROS produced by normal or malfunctioning mitochondria or indirectly by other activators of NLRP3. Aim of the present review is to describe the current knowledge on the role of NLRP3 in some organs (brain, heart, kidney, and testis) after I/R injury, with particular regard to the role played by ROS in its activation. Furthermore, as no specific therapy for the prevention or treatment of the high mortality and morbidity associated with I/R is available, the state of the art of the development of novel therapeutic approaches is illustrated. PMID:27127546

  11. A dynamic epicardial injury response supports progenitor cell activity during zebrafish heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lepilina, Alexandra; Coon, Ashley N; Kikuchi, Kazu; Holdway, Jennifer E; Roberts, Richard W; Burns, C Geoffrey; Poss, Kenneth D

    2006-11-01

    Zebrafish possess a unique yet poorly understood capacity for cardiac regeneration. Here, we show that regeneration proceeds through two coordinated stages following resection of the ventricular apex. First a blastema is formed, comprised of progenitor cells that express precardiac markers, undergo differentiation, and proliferate. Second, epicardial tissue surrounding both cardiac chambers induces developmental markers and rapidly expands, creating a new epithelial cover for the exposed myocardium. A subpopulation of these epicardial cells undergoes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), invades the wound, and provides new vasculature to regenerating muscle. During regeneration, the ligand fgf17b is induced in myocardium, while receptors fgfr2 and fgfr4 are induced in adjacent epicardial-derived cells. When fibroblast growth factors (Fgf) signaling is experimentally blocked by expression of a dominant-negative Fgf receptor, epicardial EMT and coronary neovascularization fail, prematurely arresting regeneration. Our findings reveal injury responses by myocardial and epicardial tissues that collaborate in an Fgf-dependent manner to achieve cardiac regeneration. PMID:17081981

  12. Estrogen protects the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury via COX-2-derived PGI2.

    PubMed

    Booth, Erin Anne; Flint, RaShonda Renee; Lucas, Kathryn Louise; Knittel, Andrea Kathleen; Lucchesi, Benedict R

    2008-09-01

    There is an accumulating body of data to suggest that estrogen mediates its cardioprotective effects via cyclooxygenase activation and synthesis of prostaglandins (PG), specifically PGI2. We hypothesized that inhibition of COX-2 would prevent estrogen's cardioprotective effects after myocardial ischemia-reperfusion. Acute treatment with 17beta-estradiol (E2; 20 microg/rabbit) increased COX-2 protein expression and activity in the myocardium. To determine the effects of COX-2 inhibition on infarct size after E2 treatment, New Zealand white rabbits were anesthetized and administered the COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide (5 mg/kg) or vehicle intravenously 30 minutes before an intravenous injection of E2. Thirty minutes after estrogen treatment, the coronary artery was occluded for 30 minutes followed by 4 hours of reperfusion. E2 significantly decreased infarct size as a percent of area at risk when compared to vehicle (18.9 +/- 3.1 versus 47.0 +/- 4.1; P < 0.001). Pretreatment with nimesulide nullified the infarct size sparing effect of E2 (55.8 +/- 5.6). Treatment with the PGI2 receptor antagonist RO3244794 also abolished the protective effects of E2 (45.3 +/- 4.5). The results indicate that estrogen protects the myocardium from ischemia-reperfusion injury through increased production of COX-2-derived PGI2. The data indicate that selective COX-2 inhibitors might counteract the potential cytoprotective effects of estrogen in premenopausal or postmenopausal women.

  13. Time-to-Surgery and Pre-operative Cerebral Hemodynamics Predict Post-operative White Matter Injury in Neonates with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Jennifer M.; Buckley, Erin M.; Schwab, Peter J.; McCarthy, Ann L.; Winters, Madeline E.; Busch, David R.; Xiao, Rui; Goff, Donna A.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Fuller, Stephanie; Gaynor, J. William; Spray, Thomas L.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Licht, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hypoxic-ischemic white mater brain injury commonly occurs in neonates with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Approximately half of the HLHS survivors exhibit neurobehavioral symptoms believed to be associated with this injury, though the exact timing of the injury is not known. Methods Neonates with HLHS were recruited for pre- and post-operative monitoring of cerebral oxygen saturation (ScO2), cerebral oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral blood flow (CBF) using two non-invasive optical-based techniques, namely diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy. Anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed prior to and approximately one week after surgery in order to quantify the extent and timing of the acquired white matter injury. Risk factors for developing new or worsened white matter injury were assessed using uni- and multi-variate logistic regression. Results Thirty-seven neonates with HLHS were studied. In a univariate analysis, neonates who developed a large volume of new, or worsened, postoperative white matter injury had a significantly longer time-to-surgery (p=0.0003). In a multivariate model, longer time between birth and surgery (i.e., time-to-surgery), delayed sternal closure, and higher pre-operative CBF were predictors of post-operative white matter injury. Additionally, longer time-to-surgery and higher pre-operative CBF on morning of surgery were correlated with lower ScO2 (p=0.03 and p=0.05) and higher OEF (p=0.05 and p=0.05). Conclusions Longer time-to-surgery is associated with new post-operative white matter injury in otherwise healthy neonates with HLHS. The results suggest that earlier Norwood palliation may decrease the likelihood of acquiring postoperative white matter injury. PMID:25109755

  14. Loss of ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel Surface Expression in Heart Failure Underlies Dysregulation of Action Potential Duration and Myocardial Vulnerability to Injury.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan; Sierra, Ana; Zhu, Zhiyong; Koganti, Siva Rama Krishna; Subbotina, Ekaterina; Maheshwari, Ankit; Anderson, Mark E; Zingman, Leonid V; Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M

    2016-01-01

    The search for new approaches to treatment and prevention of heart failure is a major challenge in medicine. The adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel has been long associated with the ability to preserve myocardial function and viability under stress. High surface expression of membrane KATP channels ensures a rapid energy-sparing reduction in action potential duration (APD) in response to metabolic challenges, while cellular signaling that reduces surface KATP channel expression blunts APD shortening, thus sacrificing energetic efficiency in exchange for greater cellular calcium entry and increased contractile force. In healthy hearts, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) phosphorylates the Kir6.2 KATP channel subunit initiating a cascade responsible for KATP channel endocytosis. Here, activation of CaMKII in a transaortic banding (TAB) model of heart failure is coupled with a 35-40% reduction in surface expression of KATP channels compared to hearts from sham-operated mice. Linkage between KATP channel expression and CaMKII is verified in isolated cardiomyocytes in which activation of CaMKII results in downregulation of KATP channel current. Accordingly, shortening of monophasic APD is slowed in response to hypoxia or heart rate acceleration in failing compared to non-failing hearts, a phenomenon previously shown to result in significant increases in oxygen consumption. Even in the absence of coronary artery disease, failing myocardium can be further injured by ischemia due to a mismatch between metabolic supply and demand. Ischemia-reperfusion injury, following ischemic preconditioning, is diminished in hearts with CaMKII inhibition compared to wild-type hearts and this advantage is largely eliminated when myocardial KATP channel expression is absent, supporting that the myocardial protective benefit of CaMKII inhibition in heart failure may be substantially mediated by KATP channels. Recognition of Ca

  15. Is oxidative stress primarily involved in reperfusion injury of the ischemic heart

    SciTech Connect

    Nohl, H.; Stolze, K.; Napetschnig, S.; Ishikawa, T. )

    1991-01-01

    Reperfusion injury of ischemic organs is suggested to result from metabolic derangements initiating an imbalanced formation of free oxygen radicals. Most investigators in this field have used the spin-trap 5,5'-dimethyl-N-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) to stabilize these short-lived radicals and make them visible by means of the electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. ESR signals obtained from intravascular DMPO were reported to indicate the formation of free OH. radicals and, in some cases, also carbon-centered radicals. We were unable to confirm these findings. Carbon-centered radicals were not obtained irrespectively of conditions studied, while oxygen-centered DMPO-adducts could only be detected in minor amounts. Instead, we observed an ascorbyl-related ESR signal. The addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), which was used by many investigators in this field, was found to greatly influence ESR-spectra of the reperfusion fluid. The ascorbyl radical concentration was clearly reduced and the DMPO-OH. adduct became more prominent. The addition of iron further stimulated this change eliciting a Fenton-type reaction responsible for DMPO-OH.-related ESR spectra in the perfusate after ischemia. Accordingly, we observed the release of iron and ascorbic acid into the perfusate as a consequence of ischemia. We could demonstrate that iron in the presence of ascorbate and EDTA causes both types of radicals detected in the perfusate. DMPO-OH. generation in the presence of EDTA was found to result from free OH. radicals that were not generated in the absence of EDTA.

  16. Chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia protects the heart against ischemia/reperfusion injury through upregulation of antioxidant enzymes in adult guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hui-cai; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Li-nan; Xiong, Chen; Feng, Chen; Liu, Qian; Liu, Xu; Shi, Xiao-lu; Wang, Yong-li

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protection and the anti-oxidative mechanism afforded by chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (CIHH) against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in guinea pig hearts. Methods: Adult male guinea pigs were exposed to CIHH by mimicking a 5000 m high altitude (pB=404 mmHg, pO2=84 mmHg) in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h/day for 28 days. Langendorff-perfused isolated guinea pig hearts were used to measure variables of left ventricular function during baseline perfusion, ischemia and the reperfusion period. The activity and protein expression of antioxidant enzymes in the left myocardium were evaluated using biochemical methods and Western blotting, respectively. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed using ROS-sensitive fluorescence. Results: After 30 min of global no-flow ischemia followed by 60 min of reperfusion, myocardial function had better recovery rates in CIHH guinea pig hearts than in control hearts. The activity and protein expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were significantly increased in the myocardium of CIHH guinea pigs. Pretreatment of control hearts with an antioxidant mixture containing SOD and CAT exerted cardioprotective effects similar to CIHH. The irreversible CAT inhibitor aminotriazole (ATZ) abolished the cardioprotection of CIHH. Cardiac contractile dysfunction and oxidative stress induced by exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were attenuated by CIHH and CAT. Conclusions: These data suggest that CIHH protects the heart against I/R injury through upregulation of antioxidant enzymes in guinea pig. PMID:19543301

  17. Impact of onset time of acute kidney injury on outcomes in patients with acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Yoichi; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Goto, Yoichi; Anzai, Toshihisa; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Kawano, Yuhei

    2016-01-01

    Since acute kidney injury (AKI) is not always related to mortality in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), the aim of this study was to focus on onset time of AKI and its clinical importance. A total of 371 ADHF patients were included. The impact of AKI (≥ 0.3 mg/dl or 1.5-fold increase in serum creatinine level within 48 h) with early onset (≤ 4 days from admission) or late onset (≥ 5 days from admission) was assessed. AKI occurred in 99 patients, who were divided into two groups according to the median onset time of AKI: 50 with early onset of AKI and 49 with late onset of AKI. The maximum increase in serum creatinine level from admission was greater in patients with late onset of AKI than in patients with early onset of AKI (p = 0.012). Patients with late onset of AKI had a higher 12-month mortality rate than that in patients with early onset of AKI (log-rank test, p = 0.014). Late onset of AKI was an independent predictor of mortality (hazard ratio: 3.39, 95 % confidence interval: 1.84-6.18, p < 0.001). Late onset of AKI was associated with high blood urea nitrogen level at admission and intravenous administration of dobutamine. In conclusion, late onset of AKI related to high blood urea nitrogen level and intravenous administration of dobutamine, but not early onset of AKI, is linked to high mortality rate. Onset time of AKI may be useful for risk stratification of mortality in ADHF patients developing AKI.

  18. Time course characterization of serum cardiac troponins, heart fatty acid-binding protein, and morphologic findings with isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Clements, Peter; Brady, Sally; York, Malcolm; Berridge, Brian; Mikaelian, Igor; Nicklaus, Rosemary; Gandhi, Mitul; Roman, Ian; Stamp, Clare; Davies, Dai; McGill, Paul; Williams, Thomas; Pettit, Syril; Walker, Dana; Turton, John

    2010-08-01

    We investigated the kinetics of circulating biomarker elevation, specifically correlated with morphology in acute myocardial injury. Male Hanover Wistar rats underwent biomarker and morphologic cardiac evaluation at 0.5 to seventy-two hours after a single subcutaneous isoproterenol administration (100 or 4000 microg/kg). Dose-dependent elevations of serum cardiac troponins I and T (cTnI, cTnT), and heart fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) occurred from 0.5 hour, peaked at two to three hours, and declined to baseline by twelve hours (H-FABP) or forty-eight to seventy-two hours (Serum cTns). They were more sensitive in detecting cardiomyocyte damage than other serum biomarkers. The Access 2 platform, an automated chemiluminescence analyzer (Beckman Coulter), showed the greatest cTnI fold-changes and low range sensitivity. Myocardial injury was detected morphologically from 0.5 hour, correlating well with loss of cTnI immunoreactivity and serum biomarker elevation at early time points. Ultrastructurally, there was no evidence of cardiomyocyte death at 0.5 hour. After three hours, a clear temporal disconnect occurred: lesion scores increased with declining cTnI, cTnT, and H-FABP values. Serum cTns are sensitive and specific markers for detecting acute/active cardiomyocyte injury in this rat model. Heart fatty acid-binding protein is a good early marker but is less sensitive and nonspecific. Release of these biomarkers begins early in myocardial injury, prior to necrosis. Assessment of cTn merits increased consideration for routine screening of acute/ongoing cardiomyocyte injury in rat toxicity studies.

  19. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart, to help decrease swelling. The Body’s Healing Process From the moment a bone breaks or a ... what happens at each stage of the healing process: At the moment of injury: Chemicals are released ...

  20. Contribution of NO to ischemia-reperfusion injury in the saline-perfused heart: a study in endothelial NO synthase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Flögel, U; Decking, U K; Gödecke, A; Schrader, J

    1999-04-01

    The contribution of endogenous NO to ischemia-reperfusion injury was studied in isolated perfused hearts of wild-type (WT) and endothelial NO synthase knockout (eNOS-) mice. The hearts were subjected to a 16-min period of global no-flow ischemia and were subsequently reperfused for 1 h. Cardiac contractile function was evaluated and 31P-NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor myocardial energy status and the intracellular pH. During both baseline and ischemia, there were neither significant differences in mechanical function nor in energetic parameters between the two groups, for example at baseline left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) was 56.5+/-5.4 mmHg in WT and 58.7+/-5.2 mmHg in eNOS-and phosphocreatine (PCr) level was 12.9+/-1.3 m m in WT and 12.7+/-1.7 m m in eNOS-. In reperfusion, however, a significant improvement of the post-ischemic functional and metabolic recovery became apparent in the eNOS-hearts. While in the WT group, LVDP recovered only to 38. 4+/-5.3 mmHg, LVDP in the eNOS-group attained 49.4+/-5.5 mmHg at the end of 60 min reperfusion (P<0.05, n=8). Similarly, the recovery of PCr was significantly enhanced in the transgenic hearts as compared to WT (10.4+/-1.6 vs 8.1+/-1.3 m m, P<0.05). eNOS-hearts also showed a better restoration of dP/d t and a significant lower left ventricular enddiastolic pressure. In an additional series of wild-type hearts, the NO synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine methyl ester (100 microm) also tended to improve the recovery of both LVDP (43.8+/-6.8 mmHg) and PCr (9.5+/-1.6 m m) in reperfusion (1 h), but the restoration of functional and metabolic parameters was less pronounced when compared with eNOS-. The results provide clear evidence that endogenously formed NO significantly contributes to ischemia-reperfusion injury in the saline-perfused mouse heart, most likely by peroxynitrite formation from NO.

  1. KR-31762, a novel KATP channel opener, exerts cardioprotective effects by opening SarcKATP channels in rat models of ischemia/reperfusion-induced heart injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Hun; Yang, Min-Kyu; Lim, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Ho-Won; Yi, Kyu-Yang; Yoo, Sung-Eun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Won, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Chang-Soo; Choi, Wahn-Soo; Shin, Hwa-Sup

    2008-04-01

    The cardioprotective effects of KR-31762, a newly synthesized K+(ATP) opener, were evaluated in rat models of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) heart injury. In isolated rat hearts subjected to 30-min global ischemia followed by 30-min reperfusion, KR-31762 (3 and 10 microM) significantly increased the left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and double product (heart rate x LVDP) after 30-min reperfusion in a concentration-dependent manner, while decreasing the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP). KR-31762 also significantly increased the time to contracture (TTC) during ischemic period (20.0, 22.4 and 26.4 min for control, 3 and 10 microM, respectively), while decreasing the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the heart during 30 min reperfusion (30.4, 14.3 and 19.7 U/g heart weight, respectively). All these parameters except LDH release were reversed by glyburide (1 microM), a nonselective blocker of K+(ATP) channel, but not by 5-hydroxydecanoate, a selective blocker of mitoK+(ATP) channel. In anesthetized rats subjected to 45-min occlusion of left anterior descending coronary artery followed by 90-min reperfusion, KR-31762 significantly decreased the infarct size (60.8, 40.5 and 37.8% for control, 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg, iv, respectively). KR-31762 slightly relaxed the isolated rat aorta precontracted with methoxamine (IC(50): 23.5 microM). These results suggest that KR-31762 exerts potent cardioprotective effects through the opening of sarcolemmal K(ATP) channel in rat hearts with the minimal vasorelaxant effects.

  2. Ischemic postconditioning protects the heart against ischemia–reperfusion injury via neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Hu, L; Wang, J; Zhu, H; Wu, X; Zhou, L; Song, Y; Zhu, S; Hao, M; Liu, C; Fan, Y; Wang, Y; Li, Q

    2016-01-01

    As a result of its spatial confinement in cardiomyocytes, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is thought to regulate mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function by maintaining nitroso-redox balance and Ca2+ cycling. Thus, we hypothesize that ischemic postconditioning (IPostC) protects hearts against ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury through an nNOS-mediated pathway. Isolated mouse hearts were subjected to I/R injury in a Langendorff apparatus, H9C2 cells and primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) in vitro. IPostC, compared with I/R, decreased infarct size and improved cardiac function, and the selective nNOS inhibitors abolished these effects. IPostC recovered nNOS activity and arginase expression. IPostC also increased AMP kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and alleviated oxidative stress, and nNOS and AMPK inhibition abolished these effects. IPostC increased nitrotyrosine production in the cytosol but decreased it in mitochondria. Enhanced phospholamban (PLB) phosphorylation, normalized SR function and decreased Ca2+ overload were observed following the recovery of nNOS activity, and nNOS inhibition abolished these effects. Similar effects of IPostC were demonstrated in cardiomyocytes in vitro. IPostC decreased oxidative stress partially by regulating uncoupled nNOS and the nNOS/AMPK/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha/superoxide dismutase axis, and improved SR function through increasing SR Ca2+ load. These results suggest that IPostC protected hearts against I/R injury via an nNOS-mediated pathway. PMID:27171264

  3. Ischemic postconditioning protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury via neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Wang, J; Zhu, H; Wu, X; Zhou, L; Song, Y; Zhu, S; Hao, M; Liu, C; Fan, Y; Wang, Y; Li, Q

    2016-01-01

    As a result of its spatial confinement in cardiomyocytes, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is thought to regulate mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function by maintaining nitroso-redox balance and Ca(2+) cycling. Thus, we hypothesize that ischemic postconditioning (IPostC) protects hearts against ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury through an nNOS-mediated pathway. Isolated mouse hearts were subjected to I/R injury in a Langendorff apparatus, H9C2 cells and primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) in vitro. IPostC, compared with I/R, decreased infarct size and improved cardiac function, and the selective nNOS inhibitors abolished these effects. IPostC recovered nNOS activity and arginase expression. IPostC also increased AMP kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and alleviated oxidative stress, and nNOS and AMPK inhibition abolished these effects. IPostC increased nitrotyrosine production in the cytosol but decreased it in mitochondria. Enhanced phospholamban (PLB) phosphorylation, normalized SR function and decreased Ca(2+) overload were observed following the recovery of nNOS activity, and nNOS inhibition abolished these effects. Similar effects of IPostC were demonstrated in cardiomyocytes in vitro. IPostC decreased oxidative stress partially by regulating uncoupled nNOS and the nNOS/AMPK/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha/superoxide dismutase axis, and improved SR function through increasing SR Ca(2+) load. These results suggest that IPostC protected hearts against I/R injury via an nNOS-mediated pathway. PMID:27171264

  4. Activation of Akt and cardioprotection against reperfusion injury are maximal with only five minutes of sevoflurane postconditioning in isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan-yuan; Zhu, Man-hua; Zhang, Feng-jiang; Wen, Chuan-yun; Ma, Lei-lei; Wang, Wen-na; Wang, Can-can; Liu, Xian-bao; Yu, Li-na; Qian, Ling-bo; Wang, Jian-an; Yan, Min

    2013-06-01

    It had been proved that administration of sevoflurane for the first two minutes of reperfusion effectively protects the heart against reperfusion injury in rats in vivo. Our aim was to investigate the duration of effective sevoflurane administration and its underlying mechanism in isolated rat hearts exposed to global ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups (n=12): a sham-operation group, an I/R group, and four sevoflurane postconditioning groups (S2, S5, S10, and S15). In the S2, S5, S10, and S15 groups, the duration times of sevoflurane administration were 2, 5, 10, and 15 min after the onset of reperfusion, respectively. The isolated rat hearts were mounted on the Langendorff system, and after a period of equilibrium were subjected to 40 min global ischemia and 120 min reperfusion. Left ventricular (LV) hemodynamic parameters were monitored throughout each experiment and the data at 30 min of equilibrium and 30, 60, 90, and 120 min of reperfusion were analyzed. Myocardial infarct size at the end of reperfusion (n=7 in each group) and the expression of myocardial phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) after 15-min reperfusion were determined in a duplicate set of six groups of rat hearts (n=5 in each group). Compared with the I/R group, the S5, S10, and S15 groups had significantly improved left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), and the maximal rate of rise or fall of the LV pressure (±dP/dtmax), and decreased myocardial infarct size (P<0.05), but not the S2 group. After 15 min of reperfusion, the expression of p-Akt was markedly up-regulated in the S5, S10, and S15 groups compared with that in the I/R group (P<0.05), but not in the S2 group. Sevoflurane postconditioning for 5 min was sufficient to activate Akt and exert maximal cardioprotection against I/R injury in isolated rat hearts.

  5. A case of marked diuresis by combined dopamine and atrial natriuretic peptide administration without renal injury in acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Masataka; Sato, Naoki; Akiya, Mai; Okazaki, Hirotake; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2013-01-01

    Renal injury is an important factor for worsening outcome in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). An 81-year-old woman was admitted due to ADHF with dyspnea and mild peripheral edema. The patient was managed with intravenous administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) at a dose of 0.0125 μg/kg/minute, which did not control volume overload even at an increased dose of 0.025 μg/kg/minute. After a low dose of dopamine (DA) of 1.0 μg/kg/ minute was added, urine output increased markedly to 120 from 30 mL/hour. Furthermore, her heart rate decreased to 80-100 from 120 bpm and the congestion improved with a reduced brain natriuretic peptide level. Interestingly, the combination of ANP and DA therapy reduced serum creatinine as well as the levels of urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein, a novel reno-tubular stress marker, by 98.9%, and an oxidative stress marker, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, by 88.2% from baseline levels. Thus, this ADHF patient, a nonresponder to ANP alone, improved without renal injury when administered combination therapy consisting of low doses of ANP and DA, suggesting that this combined therapy might be useful for better management of ADHF in patients without diuretic responses with ANP alone. Further prospective studies are warranted.

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Fetal Heart Attenuate Myocardial Injury after Infarction: An In Vivo Serial Pinhole Gated SPECT-CT Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Garikipati, Venkata Naga Srikanth; Jadhav, Sachin; Pal, Lily; Prakash, Prem; Dikshit, Madhu; Nityanand, Soniya

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have emerged as a potential stem cell type for cardiac regeneration after myocardial infarction (MI). Recently, we isolated and characterized mesenchymal stem cells derived from rat fetal heart (fC-MSC), which exhibited potential to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of intravenously injected fC-MSC in a rat model of MI using multi-pinhole gated SPECT-CT system. fC-MSC were isolated from the hearts of Sprague Dawley (SD) rat fetuses at gestation day 16 and expanded ex vivo. One week after induction of MI, 2×106 fC-MSC labeled with PKH26 dye (n = 6) or saline alone (n = 6) were injected through the tail vein of the rats. Initial in vivo tracking of 99mTc-labeled fC-MSC revealed a focal uptake of cells in the anterior mid-ventricular region of the heart. At 4 weeks of fC-MSC administration, the cells labeled with PKH26 were located in abundance in infarct/peri-infarct region and the fC-MSC treated hearts showed a significant increase in left ventricular ejection fraction and a significant decrease in the end diastolic volume, end systolic volume and left ventricular myo-mass in comparison to the saline treated group. In addition, fC-MSC treated hearts had a significantly better myocardial perfusion and attenuation in the infarct size, in comparison to the saline treated hearts. The engrafted PKH26-fC-MSC expressed cardiac troponin T, endothelial CD31 and smooth muscle sm-MHC, suggesting their differentiation into all major cells of cardiovascular lineage. The fC-MSC treated hearts demonstrated an up-regulation of cardio-protective growth factors, anti-fibrotic and anti-apoptotic molecules, highlighting that the observed left ventricular functional recovery may be due to secretion of paracrine factors by fC-MSC. Taken together, our results suggest that fC-MSC therapy may be a new therapeutic strategy for MI and multi

  7. Overexpression of the rat inducible 70-kD heat stress protein in a transgenic mouse increases the resistance of the heart to ischemic injury.

    PubMed Central

    Marber, M S; Mestril, R; Chi, S H; Sayen, M R; Yellon, D M; Dillmann, W H

    1995-01-01

    Myocardial protection and changes in gene expression follow whole body heat stress. Circumstantial evidence suggests that an inducible 70-kD heat shock protein (hsp70i), increased markedly by whole body heat stress, contributes to the protection. Transgenic mouse lines were constructed with a cytomegalovirus enhancer and beta-actin promoter driving rat hsp70i expression in heterozygote animals. Unstressed, transgene positive mice expressed higher levels of myocardial hsp70i than transgene negative mice after whole body heat stress. This high level of expression occurred without apparent detrimental effect. The hearts harvested from transgene positive mice and transgene negative littermates were Langendorff perfused and subjected to 20 min of warm (37 degrees C) zero-flow ischemia and up to 120 min of reflow while contractile recovery and creatine kinase efflux were measured. Myocardial infarction was demarcated by triphenyltetrazolium. In transgene positive compared with transgene negative hearts, the zone of infarction was reduced by 40%, contractile function at 30 min of reflow was doubled, and efflux of creatine kinase was reduced by approximately 50%. Our findings suggest for the first time that increased myocardial hsp70i expression results in protection of the heart against ischemic injury and that the antiischemic properties of hsp70i have possible therapeutic relevance. Images PMID:7706448

  8. Assessing Cardiac Injury in Mice With Dual Energy-MicroCT, 4D-MicroCT, and MicroSPECT Imaging After Partial Heart Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Min, Hooney; Befera, Nicholas; Clark, Darin; Qi, Yi; Das, Shiva; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.; Kirsch, David G.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a mouse model of cardiac injury after partial heart irradiation (PHI) and to test whether dual energy (DE)-microCT and 4-dimensional (4D)-microCT can be used to assess cardiac injury after PHI to complement myocardial perfusion imaging using micro-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods and Materials: To study cardiac injury from tangent field irradiation in mice, we used a small-field biological irradiator to deliver a single dose of 12 Gy x-rays to approximately one-third of the left ventricle (LV) of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} and Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, where 1 or both alleles of p53 are deleted in endothelial cells. Four and 8 weeks after irradiation, mice were injected with gold and iodinated nanoparticle-based contrast agents, and imaged with DE-microCT and 4D-microCT to evaluate myocardial vascular permeability and cardiac function, respectively. Additionally, the same mice were imaged with microSPECT to assess myocardial perfusion. Results: After PHI with tangent fields, DE-microCT scans showed a time-dependent increase in accumulation of gold nanoparticles (AuNp) in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice. In Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, extravasation of AuNp was observed within the irradiated LV, whereas in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} mice, AuNp were restricted to blood vessels. In addition, data from DE-microCT and microSPECT showed a linear correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.97) between the fraction of the LV that accumulated AuNp and the fraction of LV with a perfusion defect. Furthermore, 4D-microCT scans demonstrated that PHI caused a markedly decreased ejection fraction, and higher end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, to develop in Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, which were associated with compensatory cardiac hypertrophy of the heart that was not irradiated. Conclusions: Our results show that DE-microCT and 4D-microCT with nanoparticle-based contrast agents are novel imaging approaches

  9. Absence of malonyl coenzyme A decarboxylase in mice increases cardiac glucose oxidation and protects the heart from ischemic injury

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute pharmacological inhibition of cardiac malonyl coenzyme A decarboxylase (MCD) protects the heart from ischemic damage by inhibiting fatty acid oxidation and stimulating glucose oxidation. However, it is unknown whether chronic inhibition of MCD results in altered cardiac function, energy metabo...

  10. Expression profiling and ontology analysis of long noncoding RNAs in post-ischemic heart and their implied roles in ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youbin; Li, Guangnan; Lu, Huimin; Li, Wei; Li, Xianglu; Liu, Huimin; Li, Xingda; Li, Tianyu; Yu, Bo

    2014-06-10

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important regulatory roles in cellular physiology. The contributions of lncRNAs to ischemic heart disease remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the profile of myocardial lncRNAs and their potential roles at early stage of reperfusion. lncRNAs and mRNAs were profiled by microarray and the expression of some highly-dysregulated lncRNAs was further validated using polymerase chain reaction. Our results revealed that 64 lncRNAs were up-regulated and 87 down-regulated, while 50 mRNAs were up-regulated and 60 down-regulated in infarct region at all reperfusion sampled. Gene ontology analysis indicated that dysregulated transcripts were associated with immune response, spermine catabolic process, taxis, chemotaxis, polyamine catabolic process, spermine metabolic process, chemokine activity and chemokine receptor binding. Target gene-related pathway analysis showed significant changes in cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, the chemokine signaling pathway and nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor signaling pathway which have a close relationship with myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury (MI/RI). Besides, a gene co-expression network was constructed to identify correlated targets of 10 highly-dysregulated lncRNAs. These lncRNAs may play their roles by this network in post-ischemic heart. Such results provide a foundation for understanding the roles and mechanisms of myocardial lncRNAs at early stage of reperfusion.

  11. Mild Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Reduces the Susceptibility of the Heart to Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury: Identification of Underlying Gene Expression Changes

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz-Icöz, Sevil; Lehner, Alice; Li, Shiliang; Vater, Adrian; Radovits, Tamás; Hegedűs, Péter; Ruppert, Mihály; Brlecic, Paige; Zorn, Markus; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    Despite clinical studies indicating that diabetic hearts are more sensitive to ischemia/reperfusion injury, experimental data is contradictory. Although mild diabetes prior to ischemia/reperfusion may induce a myocardial adaptation, further research is still needed. Nondiabetic Wistar (W) and type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats (16-week-old) underwent 45 min occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery and 24 h reperfusion. The plasma glucose level was significantly higher in diabetic rats compared to the nondiabetics. Diabetes mellitus was associated with ventricular hypertrophy and increased interstitial fibrosis. Inducing myocardial infarction increased the glucose levels in diabetic compared to nondiabetic rats. Furthermore, the infarct size was smaller in GK rats than in the control group. Systolic and diastolic functions were impaired in W + MI and did not reach statistical significance in GK + MI animals compared to the corresponding controls. Among the 125 genes surveyed, 35 genes showed a significant change in expression in GK + MI compared to W + MI rats. Short-term diabetes promotes compensatory mechanisms that may provide cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion injury, at least in part, by increased antioxidants and the upregulation of the prosurvival PI3K/Akt pathway, by the downregulation of apoptotic genes, proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α, profibrogenic TGF-β, and hypertrophic marker α-actin-1. PMID:26229969

  12. Curcumin protects hearts from FFA-induced injury by activating Nrf2 and inactivating NF-κB both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chunlai; Zhong, Peng; Zhao, Yunjie; Kanchana, Karvannan; Zhang, Yali; Khan, Zia A; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Wu, Lianpin; Wang, Jingying; Liang, Guang

    2015-02-01

    Obesity and increased free fatty acid (FFA) level are tightly linked, leading to the development of cardiovascular disorders. Curcumin is a natural product from Curcuma longa with multiple bioactivities and is known to have cardioprotective effects in several cellular and animal models. The current study was designed to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of curcumin and demonstrate the underlying mechanism in FFA-induced cardiac injury. Using cell culture studies and high fat in vivo model, we explored the mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of curcumin. We observed that palmitate (PA) treatment in cardiac derived H9C2 cells induced a marked increase in reactive oxygen species, inflammation, apoptosis and hypertrophy. All of these changes were effectively suppressed by curcumin treatment. In addition, oral administration of curcumin at 50mg/kg completely suppressed high fat diet-induced oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, fibrosis, hypertrophy and tissue remodeling in mice. The beneficial actions of curcumin are closely associated with its ability to increase Nrf2 expression and inhibit NF-κB activation. Thus, both in vitro and in vivo studies showed a promising role of curcumin as a cardioprotective agent against palmitate and high fat diet mediated cardiac dysfunction. We indicated the regulatory roles of Nrf2 and NF-κB in obesity-induced heart injury, and suggested that they may be important therapeutic targets in the treatment of obesity-related disorders. PMID:25444713

  13. Resveratrol pretreatment protects rat hearts from ischemia/reperfusion injury partly via a NALP3 inflammasome pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wusong; Yang, Rui; Yang, Jian; Yang, Jun; Ding, Jiawang; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory responses are key players in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Our previous studies showed that resveratrol alleviated I/R injury in myocardial I/R animal models, but whether the NALP3 inflammasome pathway contributes to the mechanisms remains to be elucidated. In this study, we explored the modulation effect of resveratrol on myocardial I/R-induced inflammatory responses in rats. Myocardial I/R rat animal models were induced by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary arteries (LADs) for 30 min, followed by 2 h of reperfusion. Resveratrol was administered in different doses (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg) at the same time as the onset of reperfusion. The serum concentrations of the trinitrotoluene (TnT) and MB isoenzyme creatine kinase (CK-MB) were detected using an automatic biochemical analyzer. Myocardial ultrastructure and morphology were observed with an electron microscope and a light microscope. Myocardial ischemia and infarct sizes were evaluated using Evans blue and tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. The NALP3, Caspase1, interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and interleukin 18 (IL-18) mRNA levels were evaluated using RT-PCR. The NALP3 and Caspase1 protein expression levels were detected by western blotting. The IL-1β and IL-18 content in peripheral blood was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The myocardial structure in myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury (MI/RI) rats was extensively damaged. After preconditioning with different concentrations of resveratrol (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg), the pathology and morphology were significantly improved in a dose-dependent manner. Our results showed that resveratrol treatment significantly reduced the infarct volume and myocardial fibrosis, resulting in myocardial cells that lined up in a more orderly fashion and dose-dependent decreases in TnT and CK-MB levels in the serum of the I/R rats. Resveratrol also significantly modulated mRNA and protein levels by down-regulating NALP3 and

  14. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin protects against reperfusion injury in diabetic heart through STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Das, Anindita; Salloum, Fadi N; Filippone, Scott M; Durrant, David E; Rokosh, Gregg; Bolli, Roberto; Kukreja, Rakesh C

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic patients suffer augmented severity of myocardial infarction. Excessive activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and decreased activation of STAT3 are implicated in diabetic complications. Considering the potent cardioprotective effect of mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, we hypothesized that reperfusion therapy with rapamycin would reduce infarct size in the diabetic hearts through STAT3 signaling. Hearts from adult male db/db or wild type (WT) C57 mice were isolated and subjected to 30 min of normothermic global ischemia and 60 min of reperfusion in Langendorff mode. Rapamycin (100 nM) was infused at the onset of reperfusion. Myocardial infarct size (IS) was significantly reduced in rapamycin-treated mice (13.3 ± 2.4 %) compared to DMSO vehicle control (35.9 ± 0.9 %) or WT mice (27.7 ± 1.1 %). Rapamycin treatment restored phosphorylation of STAT3 and enhanced AKT phosphorylation (target of mTORC2), but significantly reduced ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation (target of mTORC1) in the diabetic heart. To determine the cause and effect relationship of STAT3 in cardioprotection, inducible cardiac-specific STAT3-deficient (MCM TG:STAT3(flox/flox)) and WT mice (MCM TG:STAT3(flox/flox)) were made diabetic by feeding high fat diet (HFD). Rapamycin given at reperfusion reduced IS in WT mice but not in STAT3-deficient mice following I/R. Moreover, cardiomyocytes isolated from HFD-fed WT mice showed resistance against necrosis (trypan blue staining) and apoptosis (TUNEL assay) when treated with rapamycin during reoxygenation following simulated ischemia. Such protection was absent in cardiomyocytes from HFD-fed STAT3-deficient mice. STAT3 signaling plays critical role in reducing IS and attenuates cardiomyocyte death following reperfusion therapy with rapamycin in diabetic heart.

  15. Protective effect of the extract of Yi-Qi-Fu-Mai preparation on hypoxia-induced heart injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ya-Qian; Ju, Ai-Chun; Liu, Chun-Hua; Wang, Ting; Yu, Bo-Yang; Qi, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Yi-Qi-Fu-Mai (YQFM) is extensively used clinically to treat cardiovascular diseases in China. To explore the anti-hypoxia effect of the extract of YQFM preparation (EYQFM), the EYQFM (1.4, 2.8, and 5.5 g·kg(-1)·d(-1)) was assessed for its heart-protective effect in a chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) animal model (oxygen pressure 7%-8%, 20 min per day) for 28 days of treatment. Betaloc (0.151 6 g·kg(-1)·d(-1)) was used as a positive control. The histopathological analyses of heart in CIH mice were conducted. Several cardiac state parameters, such as left ventricular ejection fractions (EF), stroke volume (SV), expression of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured. The results showed that treatment with EYQFM markedly reversed swelling of the endothelial cells and vacuolization in the heart when compared with the model group. Further study demonstrated that EYQFM significantly improved ventricular myocardial contractility by increasing EF and SV. In addition, EYQFM inhibited the activity of CK, LDH, decreased the level of MDA and improved SOD activity. The results demonstrated that EYQFM significantly improved the tolerability of myocardium to hypoxia and ameliorated the cardiac damage in the CIH model. PMID:27473956

  16. Cardioprotective effect of saffron extracts against acute doxorubicin toxicity in isolated rabbit hearts submitted to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Nathalie; Makhlouf, Hassane; Duca, Laurent; Martiny, Laurent; Chahine, Ramez

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an anthracycline antibiotic routinely used as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of solid tumours. However, DOX possesses an acute and cumulative cardiotoxicity due to free radical production. The present study was designed to investigate the possible protective effects of saffron (Crocus sativus) extracts against DOX-induced acute cardiotoxicity in isolated rabbit hearts submitted to 30 min global ischemia followed by 40 min reperfusion. DOX was delivered during reperfusion, without or with saffron given 5 min before ischemia or at reperfusion. Cardiodynamic, biochemical, and histopathological parameters were determined. In addition, to determine the expression of the AKT/mTOR/4EBP1 pathway, the levels of p38 MAPK and cardiac troponin T in heart homogenates were visualized by Western blotting. DOX administration during 40 min of reperfusion increased ischemic tissue damage, but did not act synergistically. Administration of saffron extracts during the first minutes of reperfusion significantly reduced oxidative myocardial damage, but was less effective when given before ischemia. Subsequent Western blot analysis revealed that saffron administration preserved cardiac troponin T proteins, inhibited the p38 MAPK pathway, and activated the AKT/mTOR/4EBP1 pathway in reperfusion- and DOX-treated rabbit hearts. In conclusion, saffron extracts, acting through antioxidant and antiapoptotic mechanisms, exhibited a protective effect against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity under ischemic condition.

  17. Cardiac transplants. Heart and heart-lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Holmquist, T; Gamberg, P L

    1992-02-01

    OR nurses play an important role in organ procurement. They are responsible for gathering the necessary equipment, which includes cardioplegia supplies, normal saline, a sterile container for transplantation of the heart, a sterile retractor, vascular clamps, and dissection instruments. Orthotopic heart transplantation involves excision of the recipient heart with placement of the donor heart in a normal anatomic position. Heterotopic transplant, which consists of placing the donor heart in the right side of the chest parallel to the native heart, is rarely used. In heart-lung transplantation procedures, attention is given to the removal of the heart and each lung separately to prevent injury to the vagus, phrenic, and laryngeal nerves.

  18. Hearts of Hypoxia-inducible Factor Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase-2 Hypomorphic Mice Show Protection against Acute Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Hyvärinen, Jaana; Hassinen, Ilmo E.; Sormunen, Raija; Mäki, Joni M.; Kivirikko, Kari I.; Koivunen, Peppi; Myllyharju, Johanna

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) has a pivotal role in oxygen homeostasis and cardioprotection mediated by ischemic preconditioning. Its stability is regulated by HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylases (HIF-P4Hs), the inhibition of which is regarded as a promising strategy for treating diseases such as anemia and ischemia. We generated a viable Hif-p4h-2 hypomorph mouse line (Hif-p4h-2gt/gt) that expresses decreased amounts of wild-type Hif-p4h-2 mRNA: 8% in the heart; 15% in the skeletal muscle; 34–47% in the kidney, spleen, lung, and bladder; 60% in the brain; and 85% in the liver. These mice have no polycythemia and show no signs of the dilated cardiomyopathy or hyperactive angiogenesis observed in mice with broad spectrum conditional Hif-p4h-2 inactivation. We focused here on the effects of chronic Hif-p4h-2 deficiency in the heart. Hif-1 and Hif-2 were stabilized, and the mRNA levels of glucose transporter-1, several enzymes of glycolysis, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1, angiopoietin-2, and adrenomedullin were increased in the Hif-p4h-2gt/gt hearts. When isolated Hif-p4h-2gt/gt hearts were subjected to ischemia-reperfusion, the recovery of mechanical function and coronary flow rate was significantly better than in wild type, while cumulative release of lactate dehydrogenase reflecting the infarct size was reduced. The preischemic amount of lactate was increased, and the ischemic versus preischemic [CrP]/[Cr] and [ATP] remained at higher levels in Hif-p4h-2gt/gt hearts, indicating enhanced glycolysis and an improved cellular energy state. Our data suggest that chronic stabilization of Hif-1α and Hif-2α by genetic knockdown of Hif-p4h-2 promotes cardioprotection by induction of many genes involved in glucose metabolism, cardiac function, and blood pressure. PMID:20185832

  19. The Long-Term Consumption of Ginseng Extract Reduces the Susceptibility of Intermediate-Aged Hearts to Acute Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Pei; Dong, Gengting; Liu, Liang; Zhou, Hua

    2015-01-01

    susceptibility of intermediate-aged hearts to acute ischemia reperfusion injury in rats. These effects might be mediated through the activation of Akt/eNOS, suppression of Erk/caspase 7 and upregulation of Sirt1 and Sirt3 in intermediate-aged rats. PMID:26650753

  20. Secreted Frizzled-related Protein 5 Diminishes Cardiac Inflammation and Protects the Heart from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuto; Sano, Soichi; Fuster, José J; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Ippei; Ohshima, Kousei; Katanasaka, Yasufumi; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Walsh, Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    Wnt signaling has diverse actions in cardiovascular development and disease processes. Secreted frizzled-related protein 5 (Sfrp5) has been shown to function as an extracellular inhibitor of non-canonical Wnt signaling that is expressed at relatively high levels in white adipose tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Sfrp5 in the heart under ischemic stress. Sfrp5 KO and WT mice were subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Although Sfrp5-KO mice exhibited no detectable phenotype when compared with WT control at baseline, they displayed larger infarct sizes, enhanced cardiac myocyte apoptosis, and diminished cardiac function following I/R. The ischemic lesions of Sfrp5-KO mice had greater infiltration of Wnt5a-positive macrophages and greater inflammatory cytokine and chemokine gene expression when compared with WT mice. In bone marrow-derived macrophages, Wnt5a promoted JNK activation and increased inflammatory gene expression, whereas treatment with Sfrp5 blocked these effects. These results indicate that Sfrp5 functions to antagonize inflammatory responses after I/R in the heart, possibly through a mechanism involving non-canonical Wnt5a/JNK signaling.

  1. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  2. Anthocyanins protected hearts against ischemic injury by reducing MMP-2 activity via Akt/P38 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jie; Du, Hong; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Fan; Lu, Jingchao; Yang, Xiuchun; Cui, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidences suggest that there are close associations between anthocyanins and cardiac protection. However, little is known about the detailed roles of anthocyanins in regulating extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Incubation of primary cultured fibroblasts with anthocyanins reduced both intracellular collagen expression and extracellular collagen secretion. Down-regulation of collagen production was also shown in infarcted cardiac tissues after permanent coronary artery ligation in mice treated with anthocyanins. The phosphorylation levels of Akt and/or P-38 were significantly increased by anthocyanins supplementation in primary cultured fibroblasts. Gelatin zymography analysis of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity in conditioned medium collected from fibroblasts demonstrated that anthocyanins treatment significantly reduced MMP-2 activity. These results demonstrated that anthocyanins play a role in mediating myocardial ECM remodeling and that the Akt/P-38 pathways mediate these protective effects on hearts. PMID:27158396

  3. Baseline Prevalence of Heart Diseases, Hypertension, Diabetes, and Obesity in Persons with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Potential Threats in the Recovery Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic diseases impede the recovery trajectory of acutely injured persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). This study compares the odds of prevalent heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity between persons with TSCI and persons with lower extremity fractures (LEF) who were discharged from acute care facilities. Methods: 1,776 patients with acute TSCI (cases) and 1,780 randomly selected patients with LEF (controls) discharged from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2009, from all nonfederal hospitals were identified. Data extracted from uniform billing files were compared between cases and controls in a multivariable logistic regression model controlling for sociodemographic and clinical covariables. Results: Thirty percent of patients with acute TSCI had at least 1 of 4 conditions compared with 18% of patients with LEF (P < .0001). Persons with acute TSCI were 4 times more likely (odds ratio [OR], 4.05; 95% CI, 1.65–9.97) to have obesity, 2.7 times more likely to have heart disease (P < .001), 2 times more likely to have hypertension (P < .001), and 1.7 times more likely to have diabetes (P = .044) at the onset of TSCI. Disproportionately more Blacks than Whites have TSCI and chronic diseases. Conclusion: This study suggests that there is an increased burden of cardiovascular and cardiometabolic diseases among persons with acute TSCI compared with LEF trauma controls. Unattended comorbid conditions will affect quality of life and the recovery process. This warrants continuous monitoring and management of chronic diseases during the rehabilitation process. PMID:23960701

  4. Vasopressin attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury via reduction of oxidative stress and inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Afshin; Sadr, Seyed Shahabeddin; Faghihi, Mahdieh; Azizi, Yaser; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal; Mobarra, Naser; Tavakoli, Asadollah; Imani, AliReza

    2015-08-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) and oxidative stress in the cardioprotective effect of vasopressin (AVP) on ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Anesthetized male wistar rats were subjected to regional 30 min ischemia and 120 min reperfusion and randomly divided into nine groups: (1) Control; saline was administered intravenously before ischemia, (2) vasopressin was administrated 10 min prior to ischemia, (3, 4) Atractyloside as MPTP opener, was injected 5 min prior to reperfusion without and with vasopressin, (5, 6) Cyclosporine A as a MPTP closer, was injected 5 min prior to reperfusion without and with vasopressin, (7) mitochondria were isolated from control group and CaCl2 was added as MPTP opener and swelling inducer, (8) isolated mitochondria from Control hearts was incubated with Cyclosporine A before adding the CaCl2 (9) CaCl2 was added to isolated mitochondria from vasopressin group. Infusion of vasopressin decreased infarct size (18.6±1.7% vs. control group 37.6±2.4%), biochemical parameters [LDH (Lactate Dehydrogenase), CK-MB (Creatine Kinase-MB) and MDA (Malondialdehyde) plasma levels, PAB (Prooxidant-antioxidant balance)] compared to control group. Atactyloside suppressed the cardioprotective effect of vasopressin (32.5±1.9% vs. 18.6±1.7%) but administration of the Cyclosporine A without and with vasopressin significantly reduced infarct size to 17.7±4% (P<0.001) and 22.7±3% (P<0.01) respectively, vs. 37.6±2.4% in control group. Also, vasopressin, similar to Cyclosporine A, led to decrease in CaCl2-induced swelling. It seems that vasopressin through antioxidant effect and MPTP inhibition has created a cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion injuries.

  5. The transplantation of Akt-overexpressing amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YAN; LI, YIGANG; SONG, LEI; LI, YANYAN; JIANG, SHAN; ZHANG, SONG

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSCs) are an attractive cell source for applications in regenerative medicine, due to characteristics such as proliferative capacity and multipotency. In addition, Akt, a serine-threonine kinase, maintains stem cells by promoting viability and proliferation. Whether the transplantation of Akt-overexpressing AFMSCs protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury has yet to be elucidated. Accordingly, the Akt gene was overexpressed in AFMSCs using lentiviral transduction, and Akt-AFMSCs were transplanted into the ischemic myocardium of rabbits prior to reperfusion. Any protective effects resulting from this procedure were subsequently sought after three weeks later. A histological examination revealed that there was a decrease in intramyocardial inflammation and ultrastructural damage, and an increase in capillary density and in the levels of GATA binding protein 4, connexin 43 and cardiac troponin T in the Akt-AFMSC group compared with the control group. A significant decrease in cardiomyocyte apoptosis, accompanying an increase in phosphorylated Akt and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and a decrease in caspase-3, was also observed. Furthermore, the left ventricular function was markedly augmented in the Akt-AFMSC group compared with the control group. These observations suggested that the protective effect of AFMSCs may be due to the delivery of secreted cytokines, promotion of neoangiogenesis, prevention of cardiomyocyte apoptosis, transdifferentiation into cardiomyocytes and promotion of the viability of AFMSCs, which are assisted by Akt gene modification. Taken together, the results of the present study have indicated that transplantation of Akt-AFMSCs is able to alleviate myocardial I/R injury and improve cardiac function. PMID:27151366

  6. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor ligand PD123319 attenuates hyperoxia-induced lung and heart injury at a low dose in newborn rats

    PubMed Central

    Sengers, Rozemarijn M. A.; Laghmani, El Houari; Chen, Xueyu; Lindeboom, Melissa P. H. A.; Roks, Anton J. M.; Folkerts, Gert; Walther, Frans J.

    2014-01-01

    Intervening in angiotensin (Ang)-II type 2 receptor (AT2) signaling may have therapeutic potential for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) by attenuating lung inflammation and preventing arterial hypertension (PAH)-induced right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH). We first investigated the role of AT2 inhibition with PD123319 (0.5 and 2 mg·kg−1·day−1) on the beneficial effect of AT2 agonist LP2–3 (5 μg/kg twice a day) on RVH in newborn rats with hyperoxia-induced BPD. Next we determined the cardiopulmonary effects of PD123319 (0.1 mg·kg−1·day−1) in two models: early treatment during continuous exposure to hyperoxia for 10 days and late treatment starting on day 6 in rat pups exposed postnatally to hyperoxia for 9 days, followed by a 9-day recovery period in room air. Parameters investigated included lung and heart histopathology, fibrin deposition, vascular leakage, and differential mRNA expression. Ten days of coadministration of LP2–3 and PD123319 abolished the beneficial effects of LP2–3 on RVH in experimental BPD. In the early treatment model PD123319 attenuated cardiopulmonary injury by reducing alveolar septal thickness, pulmonary influx of inflammatory cells, including macrophages and neutrophils, medial wall thickness of small arterioles, and extravascular collagen III deposition, and by preventing RVH. In the late treatment model PD123319 diminished PAH and RVH, demonstrating that PAH is reversible in the neonatal period. At high concentrations PD123319 blocks the beneficial effects of the AT2-agonist LP2–3 on RVH. At low concentrations PD123319 attenuates cardiopulmonary injury by reducing pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and preventing PAH-induced RVH but does not affect alveolar and vascular development in newborn rats with experimental BPD. PMID:24951776

  7. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  8. Drp1 loss-of-function reduces cardiomyocyte oxygen dependence protecting the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Ramiro; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Parra, Valentina; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Pennanen, Christian; Riquelme, Jaime A; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Sánchez, Gina; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondria are key organelles for ATP production in cardiomyocytes, which is regulated by processes of fission and fusion. We hypothesized that the mitochondria fusion protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) inhibition, attenuates ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury through modifications in mitochondrial metabolism. Rats were subjected to I/R through coronary artery ligation, and isolated cardiomyocytes were treated with an ischemia-mimicking solution. In vivo, cardiac function, myocardial infarction area, and mitochondrial morphology were determined, whereas in vitro, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular ATP levels, and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) were assessed. In both models, an adenovirus expressing Drp1 dominant-negative K38A (Drp1K38A) was used to induce Drp1 loss-of-function. Our results showed that I/R stimulated mitochondrial fission. Myocardial infarction size and cell death induced by I/R were significantly reduced, whereas cardiac function after I/R was improved in Drp1K38A-treated rats compared with controls. Drp1K38A-transduced cardiomyocytes showed lower OCR with no decrease in intracellular ATP levels, and on I/R, a larger decrease in OCR with a smaller reduction in intracellular ATP level was observed. However, proton leak-associated oxygen consumption was comparatively higher in Drp1K38A-treated cardiomyocytes, suggesting a protective mitochondrial uncoupling effect against I/R. Collectively, our results show that Drp1 inhibition triggers cardioprotection by reducing mitochondrial metabolism during I/R.

  9. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  10. Drp1 loss-of-function reduces cardiomyocyte oxygen dependence protecting the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Ramiro; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Parra, Valentina; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Pennanen, Christian; Riquelme, Jaime A; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Sánchez, Gina; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondria are key organelles for ATP production in cardiomyocytes, which is regulated by processes of fission and fusion. We hypothesized that the mitochondria fusion protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) inhibition, attenuates ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury through modifications in mitochondrial metabolism. Rats were subjected to I/R through coronary artery ligation, and isolated cardiomyocytes were treated with an ischemia-mimicking solution. In vivo, cardiac function, myocardial infarction area, and mitochondrial morphology were determined, whereas in vitro, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular ATP levels, and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) were assessed. In both models, an adenovirus expressing Drp1 dominant-negative K38A (Drp1K38A) was used to induce Drp1 loss-of-function. Our results showed that I/R stimulated mitochondrial fission. Myocardial infarction size and cell death induced by I/R were significantly reduced, whereas cardiac function after I/R was improved in Drp1K38A-treated rats compared with controls. Drp1K38A-transduced cardiomyocytes showed lower OCR with no decrease in intracellular ATP levels, and on I/R, a larger decrease in OCR with a smaller reduction in intracellular ATP level was observed. However, proton leak-associated oxygen consumption was comparatively higher in Drp1K38A-treated cardiomyocytes, suggesting a protective mitochondrial uncoupling effect against I/R. Collectively, our results show that Drp1 inhibition triggers cardioprotection by reducing mitochondrial metabolism during I/R. PMID:24477044

  11. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and circulation. If necessary, begin rescue breathing and CPR . If the person's breathing and heart rate are normal but the person is unconscious, treat as if there is a spinal injury . Stabilize the head and neck by placing your ...

  12. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack treatment works best when it's given right after symptoms occur. Prompt treatment of a heart attack can help prevent or limit damage to the heart and prevent sudden death. Call 9-1-1 Right Away A heart ...

  13. Heart Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The ... of the Leg Vasculature of the Torso Heart anatomy illustrations and animations for grades K-6. Heart ...

  14. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction; Non-ST - elevation myocardial infarction; NSTEMI; CAD - heart attack; Coronary artery disease - heart attack ... made up of cholesterol and other cells. A heart attack may occur when: A tear in the ...

  15. Heart murmurs

    MedlinePlus

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... classified ("graded") depending on how loud the murmur sounds with a stethoscope. The grading is on a ...

  16. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... heart block. Doctors use a test called an EKG (electrocardiogram) to help diagnose heart block. This test ...

  17. Disturbance effects of PM₁₀ on iNOS and eNOS mRNA expression levels and antioxidant activity induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury in isolated rat heart: protective role of vanillic acid.

    PubMed

    Dianat, Mahin; Radmanesh, Esmat; Badavi, Mohammad; Mard, Seyed Ali; Goudarzi, Gholamraza

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial infarction is the acute condition of myocardial necrosis that occurs as a result of imbalance between coronary blood supply and myocardial demand. Air pollution increases the risk of death from cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of particulate matter (PM) on oxidative stress, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) messenger RNA (mRNA) level induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury, and the protective effects of vanillic acid (VA) in the isolated rat heart. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into eight groups (n = 10), namely control, VAc, sham, VA, PMa (0.5 mg/kg), PMb (2.5 mg/kg), PMc (5 mg/kg), and PMc + VA groups. Particles with an aerodynamic diameter <10 μm (PM10) was instilled into the trachea through a fine intubation tube. Two days following the PM10 instillation, the animal's hearts were isolated and transferred to a Langendorff apparatus. The hearts were subjected to 30 min of global ischemia followed by 60 min of reperfusion. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), xanthine oxidase (XOX), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured using special kits. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine levels of iNOS and eNOS mRNA. An increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), S-T elevation, and oxidative stress in PM10 groups was observed. Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) induction showed a significant augment in the expression of iNOS mRNA level and a significant decrease in the expression eNOS mRNA level. This effect was more pronounced in the PM groups than in the control and sham groups. Vanillic acid caused a significant decrease in LVEDP, S-T elevation, and also a significant difference in eNOS mRNA expression level, antioxidant enzymes, iNOS mRNA expression level, and oxidative stress occurred on myocardial dysfunction

  18. Heart Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  19. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  20. β-Sitosterol enhances cellular glutathione redox cycling by reactive oxygen species generated from mitochondrial respiration: protection against oxidant injury in H9c2 cells and rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Na; Leong, Pou Kuan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2014-07-01

    Herba Cistanches (Cistanche deserticola Y. C. Ma) is a 'Yang-invigorating' tonic herb in Chinese medicine. Preliminary chemical analysis indicated that β-sitosterol (BS) is one of the chemical constituents in an active fraction of Herba Cistanches. To investigate whether BS is an active ingredient of Herba Cistanches, the effects of BS on H9c2 cells and rat hearts were examined. The results indicated that BS stimulated the mitochondrial ATP generation capacity in H9c2 cells, which was associated with the increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. BS also stimulated mitochondrial state 3 and state 4 respiration, with the resultant decrease in coupling efficiency. BS produced an up-regulation of cellular glutathione redox cycling and protected against hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells. However, the protective effect of BS against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury was seen in female but not male rats ex vivo. The cardioprotection afforded by BS was likely mediated by an up-regulation of mitochondrial glutathione redox cycling in female rat hearts. In conclusion, the ensemble of results suggests that BS is an active ingredient of Herba Cistanches. The gender-dependent effect of BS on myocardial protection will further be investigated.

  1. Lipotoxicity in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wende, Adam R.; Abel, E. Dale

    2009-01-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with ectopic lipid deposition in multiple tissues, including the heart. Excess lipid may be stored as triglycerides, but are also shunted into non-oxidative pathways that disrupt normal cellular signaling leading to organ dysfunction and in some cases apoptosis, a process termed lipotoxicity. Various pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed to lead to lipotoxic tissue injury, which might vary by cell type. Specific mechanisms by which lipotoxicity alters cardiac structure and function are incompletely understood, but are beginning to be elucidated. This review will focus on mechanisms that have been proposed to lead to lipotoxic injury in the heart and will review the state of knowledge regarding potential causes and correlates of increased myocardial lipid content in animal models and humans. We will seek to highlight those areas where additional research is warranted. PMID:19818871

  2. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure.

  3. Pathophysiology of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Tanai, Edit; Frantz, Stefan

    2015-12-15

    Heart failure is considered an epidemic disease in the modern world affecting approximately 1% to 2% of adult population. It presents a multifactorial, systemic disease, in which--after cardiac injury--structural, neurohumoral, cellular, and molecular mechanisms are activated and act as a network to maintain physiological functioning. These coordinated, complex processes lead to excessive volume overload, increased sympathetic activity, circulation redistribution, and result in different, parallel developing clinical signs and symptoms. These signs and symptoms sum up to an unspecific clinical picture; thus invasive and noninvasive diagnostic tools are used to get an accurate diagnosis and to specify the underlying cause. The most important, outcome determining factor in heart failure is its constant progression. Constant optimizing of pharmatherapeutical regimes, novel targets, and fine regulation of these processes try to keep these compensatory mechanisms in a physiological range. Beside pharmacological therapy, interventional and surgical therapy options give new chances in the management of heart failure. For the optimization and establishment of these and novel therapeutical approaches, complete and comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms is essentially needed. Besides diagnosis and treatment, efforts should be made for better prevention in heart failure by treatment of risk factors, or identifying and following risk groups. This summary of the pathophysiology of heart failure tries to give a compact overview of basic mechanisms and of the novel unfolding, progressive theory of heart failure to contribute to a more comprehensive knowledge of the disease.

  4. Pathophysiology of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Tanai, Edit; Frantz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is considered an epidemic disease in the modern world affecting approximately 1% to 2% of adult population. It presents a multifactorial, systemic disease, in which--after cardiac injury--structural, neurohumoral, cellular, and molecular mechanisms are activated and act as a network to maintain physiological functioning. These coordinated, complex processes lead to excessive volume overload, increased sympathetic activity, circulation redistribution, and result in different, parallel developing clinical signs and symptoms. These signs and symptoms sum up to an unspecific clinical picture; thus invasive and noninvasive diagnostic tools are used to get an accurate diagnosis and to specify the underlying cause. The most important, outcome determining factor in heart failure is its constant progression. Constant optimizing of pharmatherapeutical regimes, novel targets, and fine regulation of these processes try to keep these compensatory mechanisms in a physiological range. Beside pharmacological therapy, interventional and surgical therapy options give new chances in the management of heart failure. For the optimization and establishment of these and novel therapeutical approaches, complete and comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms is essentially needed. Besides diagnosis and treatment, efforts should be made for better prevention in heart failure by treatment of risk factors, or identifying and following risk groups. This summary of the pathophysiology of heart failure tries to give a compact overview of basic mechanisms and of the novel unfolding, progressive theory of heart failure to contribute to a more comprehensive knowledge of the disease. PMID:26756631

  5. Multi-Strain Probiotics Inhibit Cardiac Myopathies and Autophagy to Prevent Heart Injury in High-Fat Diet-Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chao-Hung; Tsai, Cheng-Chih; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Pai, Pei-ying; Chung, Li-Chin; Huang, Chun-Chih; Wang, Hsueh-Fang; Liao, Po-Hsiang; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-01-01

    High-fat diets induce obesity, leading to cardiomyocyte fibrosis and autophagy imbalance. In addition, no previous studies have indicated that probiotics have potential health effects associated with cardiac fibrosis and autophagy in obese rats. This study investigates the effects of probiotics on high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and cardiac fibrosis and autophagy in rat hearts. Eight-week-old male Wistar rats were separated randomly into five equally sized experimental groups: Normal diet (control) and high-fat (HF) diet groups and groups fed a high-fat diet supplemented with low (HL), medium (HM) or high (HH) doses of multi-strain probiotic powders. These experiments were designed for an 8-week trial period. The myocardial architecture of the left ventricle was evaluated using Masson's trichrome staining and immunohistochemistry staining. Key probiotics-related pathway molecules were analyzed using western blotting. Abnormal myocardial architecture and enlarged interstitial spaces were observed in HF hearts. These interstitial spaces were significantly decreased in groups provided with multi-strain probiotics compared with HF hearts. Western blot analysis demonstrated that key components of the TGF/MMP2/MMP9 fibrosis pathways and ERK5/uPA/ANP cardiac hypertrophy pathways were significantly suppressed in probiotic groups compared to the HF group. Autophagy balance is very important in cardiomyocytes. In this study, we observed that the beclin-1/LC3B/Atg7 autophagy pathway in HF was increased after probiotic supplementation was significantly decreased. Together, these results suggest that oral administration of probiotics may attenuate cardiomyocyte fibrosis and cardiac hypertrophy and the autophagy-signaling pathway in obese rats. PMID:27076784

  6. Multi-Strain Probiotics Inhibit Cardiac Myopathies and Autophagy to Prevent Heart Injury in High-Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chao-Hung; Tsai, Cheng-Chih; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Pai, Pei-ying; Chung, Li-Chin; Huang, Chun-Chih; Wang, Hsueh-Fang; Liao, Po-Hsiang; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-01-01

    High-fat diets induce obesity, leading to cardiomyocyte fibrosis and autophagy imbalance. In addition, no previous studies have indicated that probiotics have potential health effects associated with cardiac fibrosis and autophagy in obese rats. This study investigates the effects of probiotics on high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and cardiac fibrosis and autophagy in rat hearts. Eight-week-old male Wistar rats were separated randomly into five equally sized experimental groups: Normal diet (control) and high-fat (HF) diet groups and groups fed a high-fat diet supplemented with low (HL), medium (HM) or high (HH) doses of multi-strain probiotic powders. These experiments were designed for an 8-week trial period. The myocardial architecture of the left ventricle was evaluated using Masson's trichrome staining and immunohistochemistry staining. Key probiotics-related pathway molecules were analyzed using western blotting. Abnormal myocardial architecture and enlarged interstitial spaces were observed in HF hearts. These interstitial spaces were significantly decreased in groups provided with multi-strain probiotics compared with HF hearts. Western blot analysis demonstrated that key components of the TGF/MMP2/MMP9 fibrosis pathways and ERK5/uPA/ANP cardiac hypertrophy pathways were significantly suppressed in probiotic groups compared to the HF group. Autophagy balance is very important in cardiomyocytes. In this study, we observed that the beclin-1/LC3B/Atg7 autophagy pathway in HF was increased after probiotic supplementation was significantly decreased. Together, these results suggest that oral administration of probiotics may attenuate cardiomyocyte fibrosis and cardiac hypertrophy and the autophagy-signaling pathway in obese rats. PMID:27076784

  7. KR-31761, a novel K+(ATP)-channel opener, exerts cardioprotective effects by opening both mitochondrial K+(ATP) and Sarcolemmal K+(ATP) channels in rat models of ischemia/reperfusion-induced heart injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min-Kyu; Lee, Sung-Hun; Seo, Ho-Won; Yi, Kyu-Yang; Yoo, Sung-Eun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Chung, Hun-Jong; Won, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Chang-Soo; Kwon, Suk-Hyung; Choi, Wahn-Soo; Shin, Hwa-Sup

    2009-02-01

    The cardioprotective effects of KR-31761, a newly synthesized K+(ATP) opener, were evaluated in rat models of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) heart injury. In isolated rat hearts subjected to 30-min global ischemia/30-min reperfusion, KR-31761 perfused prior to ischemia significantly increased both the left ventricular developed pressure (% of predrug LVDP: 17.8, 45.1, 54.2, and 62.6 for the control, 1 microM, 3 microM, and 10 microM, respectively) and double product (DP: heart rate x LVDP; % of predrug DP: 17.5, 44.9, 56.2, and 64.5 for the control, 1 microM, 3 microM, and 10 microM, respectively) at 30-min reperfusion while decreasing the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP). KR-31761 (10 microM) significantly increased the time to contracture during the ischemic period, whereas it concentration-dependently decreased the lactate dehydrogenase release during reperfusion. All these parameters were significantly reversed by 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD, 100 microM) and glyburide (1 microM), selective and nonselective blockers of the mitochondrial K+(ATP) (mitoK+(ATP)) channel and K+(ATP) channel, respectively. In anesthetized rats subjected to 30-min occlusion of left anterior descending coronary artery/2.5-h reperfusion, KR-31761 administered 15 min before the onset of ischemia significantly decreased the infarct size (72.2%, 55.1%, and 47.1% for the control, 0.3 mg/kg, i.v., and 1.0 mg/kg, i.v., respectively); and these effects were completely and almost completely abolished by 5-HD (10 mg/kg, i.v.) and HMR-1098, a selective blocker of sarcolemmal K+(ATP) (sarcK+(ATP)) channel (6 mg/kg, i.v.) administered 5 min prior to KR-31761 (72.3% and 67.9%, respectively). KR-31761 only slightly relaxed methoxamine-precontracted rat aorta (IC50: > 30.0 microM). These results suggest that KR-31761 exerts potent cardioprotective effects through the opening of both mitoK+(ATP) and sarcK+(ATP) channels in rat hearts with a minimal vasorelaxant effect.

  8. Heart palpitations

    MedlinePlus

    ... more than 6 per minute or coming in groups of 3 or more). You have risk factors for heart disease, such as high cholesterol, diabetes, or high blood pressure. You have new or different heart palpitations. ...

  9. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with heart disease? What do my cholesterol and triglyceride numbers mean? How can I lower my cholesterol? ... weight Know your numbers (blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglycerides) You can reduce your chances of getting heart ...

  10. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 28. Bernstein D. Pediatric heart and heart-lung transplantation. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 19th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap ...

  11. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 ounce. Most pacemakers have 2 parts: The generator contains the battery and the information to control ... are wires that connect the heart to the generator and carry the electrical messages to the heart. ...

  12. Variations in Ischemic Heart Disease Burden by Age, Country, and Income: The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries and Risk Factors 2010 Study

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Andrew E.; Tzong, Keane Y.; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.; Roth, Gregory; Mensah, George A.; Ezzati, Majid; Murray, Christopher J.L.; Naghavi, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) was the leading cause of disease burden worldwide in 2010. The majority of IHD burden affected middle income regions. We hypothesized that IHD burden may vary among countries, even within the same broad geographic region. Methods Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) due to IHD were estimated at the region level for seven “super-regions”, 21 regions, and 187 countries using geographically nested models for IHD mortality and prevalent non-fatal IHD(nonfatal acute myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, or ischemic heart failure). Acute myocardial infarction, angina, and heart failure disability weights were applied to prevalent cases. Absolute numbers of DALYs and age-standardized DALYs per 100,000 persons were estimated for each region and country in 1990 and 2010. IHD burden for world regions was analyzed by country, income, and age. Results About two-thirds of 2010 IHD DALYs affected middle income countries. In the North Africa/Middle East and South Asia regions—regions with high IHD burden—more than 29% of males and 24% of females struck by IHD were <50 years old. Age-standardized IHD DALYs decreased in most countries between 1990 and 2010, but increased in a number of countries in the Eastern Europe/Central Asia region (>1,000 per 100,000 increase) and South Asia region (>175 per 100,000). Age-standardized DALYs varied by up to eight fold among countries, by about 9,000 per 100,000 among middle income countries, about 7,400 among low income countries, and about 4,300 among high income countries. Conclusions The majority of IHD burden in 2010 impacted middle income regions, where younger adults were more likely to develop IHD in regions like South Asia and North Africa/Middle East. However, IHD burden varied substantially by country within regions, especially among middle income countries. A global or regional approach to IHD prevention will not be sufficient; research and policy should focus on the highest burden

  13. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... a million people in the U.S. have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get ... It's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if someone ...

  14. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  15. Back Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, ... back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains ...

  16. Targeting downstream transcription factors and epigenetic modifications following Toll-like receptor 7/8 ligation to forestall tissue injury in anti-Ro60 associated heart block.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Robert M; Markham, Androo J; Reed, Joanne H; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Halushka, Marc K; Buyon, Jill P

    2016-02-01

    Based on the consistent demonstration of fibrosis of the atrioventricular node surrounded by macrophages and multinucleated giant cells in anti-Ro antibody exposed fetuses dying with heart block, this study focuses on macrophage signaling stimulated by ssRNA associated with the Ro60 protein and the impact of antagonizing innate cell drivers such as TLR7/8. Transcriptome and epigenetic modifications which affect transcription factors, NF-κB and STAT1, were selected to evaluate the phenotype of macrophages in which TLR7/8 was ligated following treatment with either anti-Ro60/Ro60/hY3 RNA immune complexes or transfection with hY3. Based on microarray, TNF and IL6 were among the most highly upregulated genes in both stimulated conditions, each of which was significantly inhibited by preincubation with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ). In contrast, following stimulation of macrophages with either TNF-α or IFN-α, which do not signal through TLR, the resultant gene expression was refractory to HCQ. Ligation of TLR7/8 resulted in increased histone methylation as measured by increased H3K4me2, a requirement for binding of NF-κB at certain promoters, specifically the kB1 region in the TNF promoter (ChIP-qPCR), which was significantly decreased by HCQ. In summary, these results support that the HCQ-sensitive phenotype of hY3 stimulated macrophages reflects the bifurcation of TLR downstream signals involving NF-κB and STAT 1 pathways and for the former dimethylation of H3K4. Accordingly, HCQ may act more as a preventive measure in downregulating the initial production of IFN-α or TNF-α and not affect the resultant autocoid stimulation reflected in TNF-α and IFN-α responsive genes. The beneficial scope of antimalarials in the prevention of organ damage, inclusive of heart block in an anti-Ro offspring or more broadly SLE, may include in part, a mechanism targeting TLR-dependent epigenetic modification.

  17. Cell migration during heart regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Naoyuki; Brush, Michael; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2016-07-01

    Zebrafish possess the remarkable ability to regenerate injured hearts as adults, which contrasts the very limited ability in mammals. Although very limited, mammalian hearts do in fact have measurable levels of cardiomyocyte regeneration. Therefore, elucidating mechanisms of zebrafish heart regeneration would provide information of naturally occurring regeneration to potentially apply to mammalian studies, in addition to addressing this biologically interesting phenomenon in itself. Studies over the past 13 years have identified processes and mechanisms of heart regeneration in zebrafish. After heart injury, pre-existing cardiomyocytes dedifferentiate, enter the cell cycle, and repair the injured myocardium. This process requires interaction with epicardial cells, endocardial cells, and vascular endothelial cells. Epicardial cells envelope the heart, while endocardial cells make up the inner lining of the heart. They provide paracrine signals to cardiomyocytes to regenerate the injured myocardium, which is vascularized during heart regeneration. In addition, accumulating results suggest that local migration of these major cardiac cell types have roles in heart regeneration. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of various heart injury methods used in the research community and regeneration of the major cardiac cell types. Then, we discuss local migration of these cardiac cell types and immune cells during heart regeneration. Developmental Dynamics 245:774-787, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27085002

  18. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  19. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation affects cardioprotection by induced hypothermia at 34 °C against ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat isolated heart model.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Toshiaki; Jiang, Qiliang; Katoh, Takasumi; Aoki, Katsunori; Sato, Shigehito

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the effects of low- and high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on cardioprotection by induced hypothermia (IH) at 34 °C and examine whether extracellular signal-regulated kinase or endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates this cardioprotection. Left ventricle infarct sizes were evaluated in six groups of rat hearts (n = 6) following Langendorff perfusion and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Controls underwent 30 min of global ischemia at 37 °C, followed by 10 min of simulated low- or high-quality CPR reperfusion and 90 min of reperfusion at 75 mmHg. The IH groups underwent IH at 34 °C during reperfusion. The U0126 group received U0126 (60 μM)-an extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor-during reperfusion at 34 °C. The L-NIO (N-(1-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine dihydrochloride) group received L-NIO (2 μM)-an endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor-5 min before global ischemia at 37 °C to the end of reperfusion at 34 °C. Infarct size did not significantly differ between the control and IH groups receiving low-quality CPR. However, IH with high-quality CPR reduced the infarct size from 47.2% ± 10.2% to 26.0% ± 9.4% (P = 0.005). U0126 reversed the IH-induced cardioprotection (45.9% ± 9.4%, P = 0.010), whereas L-NIO had no significant effect. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality affects IH-induced cardioprotection. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase may mediate IH-induced cardioprotection.

  20. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    HLHS; Congenital heart - hypoplastic left heart; Cyanotic heart disease - hypoplastic left heart ... Hypoplastic left heart is a rare type of congenital heart disease. It is more common in males than in females. As ...

  1. Heart failure.

    PubMed

    2014-12-15

    Essential facts Heart failure affects about 900,000 people in the UK. The condition can affect people of all ages, but it is more common in older people, with more than half of all patients over the age of 75. It is caused by the heart failing to pump enough blood around the body at the right pressure, usually because the heart muscle has become too weak or stiff to work properly. Acute heart failure, which occurs when symptoms develop quickly, is the leading cause of hospital admission in people over 65. PMID:25492766

  2. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It is more common in people who are 65 years old or older, African Americans, people who are ... treatments fail. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  3. Stingray barb injury: a cause of late coronary occlusion and stent failure.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Craig R; Saro, Enrique; Patel, Parag; Swidryk, John; Bacani, Victor O; Russo, Mark J; Stone, Jay H

    2013-11-01

    Stingray injuries to the heart are rare, and survivors of this injury are even rarer. To date, there are only three reported survivors of this mode of penetrating cardiac injury, all inflicted by the living animal itself. The following is a report of a stingray injury, inflicted by a human, causing coronary complications 17 years after the injury was sustained. PMID:24182483

  4. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart ...

  5. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  6. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  7. Blast Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Service Members & Veterans Family & Caregivers Medical Providers Blast Injuries U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Gustavo Olgiati How ... tertiary injury Does a blast cause different brain injuries than blunt trauma? There currently is no evidence ...

  8. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  9. Acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-feng; Wang, Xian

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac injury is the most serious adverse event in acupuncture therapy. The causes include needling chest points near the heart, the cardiac enlargement and pericardial effusion that will enlarge the projected area on the body surface and make the proper depth of needling shorter, and the incorrect needling method of the points. Therefore, acupuncture practitioners must be familiar with the points of the heart projected area on the chest and the correct needling methods in order to reduce the risk of acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

  10. Hamstring injuries.

    PubMed

    Ropiak, Christopher R; Bosco, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Hamstring injuries are a frequent injury in athletes. Proximal injuries are common, ranging from strain to complete tear. Strains are managed nonoperatively, with rest followed by progressive stretching and strengthening. Reinjury is a concern. High grade complete tears are better managed surgically, with reattachment to the injured tendon or ischial tuberosity. Distal hamstring injury is usually associated with other knee injuries, and isolated injury is rare.

  11. Differential Regenerative Capacity of Neonatal Mouse Hearts after Cryoinjury

    PubMed Central

    Darehzereshki, Ali; Rubin, Nicole; Gamba, Laurent; Kim, Jieun; Fraser, James; Huang, Ying; Billings, Joshua; Mohammadzadeh, Robabeh; Wood, John; Warburton, David; Kaartinen, Vesa; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal mouse hearts fully regenerate after ventricular resection similar to adult zebrafish. We established cryoinjury models to determine if different types and varying degrees of severity in cardiac injuries trigger different responses in neonatal mouse hearts. In contrast to ventricular resection, neonatal mouse hearts fail to regenerate and show severe impairment of cardiac function post transmural cryoinjury. However, neonatal hearts fully recover after non-transmural cryoinjury. Interestingly, cardiomyocyte proliferation does not significantly increase in neonatal mouse hearts after cryoinjuries. Epicardial activation and new coronary vessel formation occur after cryoinjury. The profibrotic marker PAI-1 is highly expressed after transmural but not non-transmural cryoinjuries, which may contribute to the differential scarring. Our results suggest that regenerative medicine strategies for heart injuries should vary depending on the nature of the injury. PMID:25555840

  12. Differential regenerative capacity of neonatal mouse hearts after cryoinjury.

    PubMed

    Darehzereshki, Ali; Rubin, Nicole; Gamba, Laurent; Kim, Jieun; Fraser, James; Huang, Ying; Billings, Joshua; Mohammadzadeh, Robabeh; Wood, John; Warburton, David; Kaartinen, Vesa; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal mouse hearts fully regenerate after ventricular resection similar to adult zebrafish. We established cryoinjury models to determine if different types and varying degrees of severity in cardiac injuries trigger different responses in neonatal mouse hearts. In contrast to ventricular resection, neonatal mouse hearts fail to regenerate and show severe impairment of cardiac function post transmural cryoinjury. However, neonatal hearts fully recover after non-transmural cryoinjury. Interestingly, cardiomyocyte proliferation does not significantly increase in neonatal mouse hearts after cryoinjuries. Epicardial activation and new coronary vessel formation occur after cryoinjury. The profibrotic marker PAI-1 is highly expressed after transmural but not non-transmural cryoinjuries, which may contribute to the differential scarring. Our results suggest that regenerative medicine strategies for heart injuries should vary depending on the nature of the injury.

  13. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... lower “bad” cholesterol (also called LDL, or low-density lipoprotein) levels and may help increase “good” cholesterol (also called HDL, or high-density lipoprotein). If you have had a heart attack, ...

  14. Hearts Wish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lethonee A.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates characteristics and themes in 102 drawings by sexually abused children. Themes of the drawings included genitalia, the absence of specific body parts, phallic symbols, inappropriate smiles, distorted body images, kinetic activity, prominent hands and fingers, and hearts. (RJC)

  15. Heart Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Doctors remove the patient's heart by transecting the aorta , the main pulmonary artery and the superior and ... sewing together the recipient and donor vena cavae, aorta, pulmonary artery and left atrium. In patients with ...

  16. Mechanisms of Cardiotoxicity and the Development of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S

    2015-12-01

    Cardiotoxicity is a broad term that refers to the negative effects of toxic substances on the heart. Cancer drugs can cause cardiotoxicity by effects on heart cells, thromboembolic events, and/or hypertension that can lead to heart failure. Rheumatoid arthritis biologics may interfere with ischemic preconditioning and cause/worsen heart failure. Long-term and heavy alcohol use can result in oxidative stress, apoptosis, and decreased contractile protein function. Cocaine use results in sympathetic nervous system stimulation of heart and smooth muscle cells and leads to cardiotoxicity and evolution of heart failure. The definition of cardiotoxicity is likely to evolve along with knowledge about detecting subclinical myocardial injury. PMID:26567492

  17. Wine and heart health

    MedlinePlus

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and liver. ...

  18. What Is Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  19. Rewind to Recover: Dedifferentiation after Cardiac Injury

    PubMed Central

    Morrisey, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    In adult mammals, cardiomyocytes are known to reactivate an embryonic gene-expression program after injury. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Kubin et al. (2011) show that oncostatin M regulates this dedifferentiation which, while beneficial for recovery from acute injury, if persistent results in heart failure in both rodents and humans. PMID:22056133

  20. Hypoxia and fetal heart development.

    PubMed

    Patterson, A J; Zhang, L

    2010-10-01

    Fetal hearts show a remarkable ability to develop under hypoxic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of fetal hearts allows sustained development under low oxygen conditions. In fact, hypoxia is critical for proper myocardial formation. Particularly, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor play central roles in hypoxia-dependent signaling in fetal heart formation, impacting embryonic outflow track remodeling and coronary vessel growth. Although HIF is not the only gene involved in adaptation to hypoxia, its role places it as a central figure in orchestrating events needed for adaptation to hypoxic stress. Although "normal" hypoxia (lower oxygen tension in the fetus as compared with the adult) is essential in heart formation, further abnormal hypoxia in utero adversely affects cardiogenesis. Prenatal hypoxia alters myocardial structure and causes a decline in cardiac performance. Not only are the effects of hypoxia apparent during the perinatal period, but prolonged hypoxia in utero also causes fetal programming of abnormality in the heart's development. The altered expression pattern of cardioprotective genes such as protein kinase c epsilon, heat shock protein 70, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, likely predispose the developing heart to increased vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury later in life. The events underlying the long-term changes in gene expression are not clear, but likely involve variation in epigenetic regulation.

  1. Framingham Heart Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Hypertension; Heart Failure, Congestive; Peripheral Vascular Diseases; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Atherosclerosis; Heart Failure

  2. Inhaled matters of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Zaky, Ahmed; Ahmad, Aftab; Dell’Italia, Louis J; Jahromi, Leila; Reisenberg, Lee Ann; Matalon, Sadis; Ahmad, Shama

    2015-01-01

    Inhalations of atmospheric pollutants, especially particulate matters, are known to cause severe cardiac effects and to exacerbate preexisting heart disease. Heart failure is an important sequellae of gaseous inhalation such as that of carbon monoxide. Similarly, other gases such as sulphur dioxide are known to cause detrimental cardiovascular events. However, mechanisms of these cardiac toxicities are so far unknown. Increased susceptibility of the heart to oxidative stress may play a role. Low levels of antioxidants in the heart as compared to other organs and high levels of reactive oxygen species produced due to the high energetic demand and metabolic rate in cardiac muscle are important in rendering this susceptibility. Acute inhalation of high concentrations of halogen gases is often fatal. Severe respiratory injury and distress occurs upon inhalation of halogens gases, such as chlorine and bromine; however, studies on their cardiac effects are scant. We have demonstrated that inhalation of high concentrations of halogen gases cause significant cardiac injury, dysfunction, and failure that can be critical in causing mortalities following exposures. Our studies also demonstrated that cardiac dysfunction occurs as a result of a direct insult independent of coexisting hypoxia, since it is not fully reversed by oxygen supplementation. Therefore, studies on offsite organ effects of inhaled toxic gases can impact development of treatment strategies upon accidental or deliberate exposures to these agents. Here we summarize the knowledge of cardiovascular effects of common inhaled toxic gases with the intent to highlight the importance of consideration of cardiac symptoms while treating the victims. PMID:26665179

  3. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality.

  4. Snowboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Pino, E C; Colville, M R

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective survey of 267 snowboarders was undertaken to determine the population at risk and types and mechanisms of injuries sustained in this sport. Snowboarders are young (average age, 21 years), male (greater than 90%), view themselves in average or above average physical condition (96%), and have varied sports interests. One hundred ten injuries that resulted in a physician visit were reported. Ligament sprains, fractures, and contusions were the most frequent types of injury. Fifty percent of all injuries occurred in the lower extremities, with ankle injuries being the most common. Snowboard riders using equipment with increased ankle support seem to be more protected from lower extremity injuries. The lower extremity injuries were concentrated in the forward limb of the snowboarder, where the rider's weight is disproportionately distributed. Differences in the mechanism and spectrum of injury between snowboarding and skiing injuries were noted, including: impact rather than torsion as the major mechanism of injury, a significant lack of thumb injuries, comparative increase in ankle injuries, a decrease in knee injuries, and a higher percentage of upper extremity injuries.

  5. Heart Truth

    MedlinePlus

    ... about women’s risk for heart disease―the #1 killer of women in the United States―and share ... t Care What You Wear—It's the #1 Killer of Women ® are registered trademarks of U.S. ...

  6. Basketball injuries.

    PubMed

    Newman, Joel S; Newberg, Arthur H

    2010-11-01

    Basketball injuries are most prevalent in the lower extremity, especially at the ankle and knee. Most basketball injuries are orthopedic in nature and commonly include ligament sprains, musculotendinous strains, and overuse injuries including stress fractures. By virtue of its excellent contrast resolution and depiction of the soft tissues and trabecular bone, magnetic resonance imaging has become the principal modality for evaluating many basketball injuries. In this article, commonly encountered basketball injuries and their imaging appearances are described. The epidemiology of basketball injuries across various age groups and levels of competition and between genders are reviewed.

  7. Skateboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Cass, D T; Ross, F

    1990-08-01

    The recent increase in skateboard injuries is causing concern. Over a 30-month period there were 80 admissions (69 children) to Westmead Hospital because of skateboard injuries. Among children most injuries were minor, involving fractures to the upper limbs (47) or minor head injuries (8). The only serious injuries were a ruptured urethra and a closed head injury. Over the same time period skateboard riding caused five deaths in New South Wales. These all involved head injuries and in four instances collisions with cars. The data strongly support other studies that show skateboard riding is particularly dangerous near traffic and should be proscribed. However, in parkland and around the home the skateboard is an enjoyable toy with an acceptable risk of minor injury. Helmets should be worn and would have prevented all the head injury admissions in this series. Children under 10 have a higher risk of fractures and head injuries due to insufficient motor development to control the boards and the resultant falls. Skateboard injuries are an example of injuries caused by a "fad epidemic". To cope with these types of periodic events up-to-date data collection is needed, followed rapidly by an intervention programme so that serious injuries can be kept to a minimum.

  8. About Heart Attacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... survive. A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced or ... survive. A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced or ...

  9. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... after the baby is born. For others, your child may be able to safely wait for months ...

  10. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... down or stop. A risk factor for heart disease is something that increases your chance of getting ...

  11. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  12. Transfixing cardiac injury with perforations in stomach, diaphragm and lung: unusual scenario in penetrating trauma

    PubMed Central

    Karigyo, Carlos Junior Toshiyuki; Fan, Otavio Goulart; Yoshida, Marcelo Miyazaki; Menescal, Roberto Jonathas; Tarasiewich, Marcos Jose

    2014-01-01

    A 23-year-old man suffered a penetrating injury caused by a metallic fragment thrown from a grass-cutting tool, resulting in perforating injuries in the stomach, diaphragm, heart, and lungs. PMID:24896170

  13. Cardiac injuries caused by blunt trauma: an autopsy based assessment of the injury pattern.

    PubMed

    Turan, Arzu Akcay; Karayel, Ferah Anik; Akyildiz, Elif; Pakis, Isil; Uzun, Ibrahim; Gurpinar, Kagan; Atilmis, Umit; Kir, Ziya

    2010-01-01

    Nonpenetrating chest trauma with injury to the heart and aorta has become increasingly common, particularly as a result of rapid deceleration in high-speed vehicular accidents, over the past 2-3 decades. The high mortality rate of cardiac injuries and possible late onset complications make blunt cardiac injuries an important challenging point for legal medicine. One hundred and ninety cases with blunt cardiac injuries in a period of 3 years were analyzed retrospectively in terms of patterns of cardiac injury, survival times, and demographic profiles of the cases in this study.

  14. Corneal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sand or dust Ultraviolet injuries: Caused by sunlight, sun lamps, snow or water reflections, or arc- ... a corneal injury if you: Are exposed to sunlight or artificial ultraviolet light for long periods of ...

  15. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can inhale that can cause acute internal injuries. Particles in the air from fires and toxic ... and lung diseases worse. Symptoms of acute inhalation injuries may include Coughing and phlegm A scratchy throat ...

  16. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. Alternative Names Spinal cord injury; SCI Images Skeletal spine Vertebra, cervical (neck) Vertebra, lumbar (low back) Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Vertebral column Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  17. Cell lineages, growth and repair of the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Lescroart, Fabienne; Meilhac, Sigolène M

    2012-01-01

    The formation of the heart involves diversification of lineages which differentiate into distinct cardiac cell types or contribute to different regions such as the four cardiac chambers. The heart is the first organ to form in the embryo. However, in parallel with the growth of the organism, before or after birth, the heart has to adapt its size to maintain pumping efficiency. The adult heart has only a mild regeneration potential; thus, strategies to repair the heart after injury are based on the mobilisation of resident cardiac stem cells or the transplantation of external sources of stem cells. We discuss current knowledge on these aspects and raise questions for future research.

  18. Targeted Laser Ablation of the Zebrafish Larval Heart Induces Models of Heart Block, Valvular Regurgitation, and Outflow Tract Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, Gianfranco; Maqsood, Sana; Taylor, Jonathan; Mullins, John J.; Tucker, Carl S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian models of cardiac disease have provided unique and important insights into human disease but have become increasingly challenging to produce. The zebrafish could provide inexpensive high-throughput models of cardiac injury and repair. We used a highly targeted laser, synchronized to fire at specific phases of the cardiac cycle, to induce regional injury to the ventricle, atrioventricular (AV) cushion, and bulbus arteriosus (BA). We assessed the impact of laser injury on hearts of zebrafish early larvae at 72 h postfertilization, to different regions, recording the effects on ejection fraction (EF), heart rate (HR), and blood flow at 2 and 24 h postinjury (hpi). Laser injury to the apex, midzone, and outflow regions of the ventricle resulted in reductions of the ventricle EF at 2 hpi with full recovery of function by 24 hpi. Laser injury to the ventricle, close to the AV cushion, was more likely to cause bradycardia and atrial–ventricular dysfunction, suggestive of an electrical conduction block. At 2 hpi, direct injury to the AV cushion resulted in marked regurgitation of blood from the ventricle to the atrium. Laser injury to the BA caused temporary outflow tract obstruction with cessation of ventricle contraction and circulation. Despite such damage, 80% of embryos showed complete recovery of the HR and function within 24 h of laser injury. Precision laser injury to key structures in the zebrafish developing heart provides a range of potentially useful models of hemodynamic overload, injury, and repair. PMID:25272304

  19. Heart Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    James Antaki and a group of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine used many elements of the Technology Utilization Program while looking for a way to visualize and track material points within the heart muscle. What they needed were tiny artificial "eggs" containing copper sulfate solution, small enough (about 2 mm in diameter) that they would not injure the heart, and large enough to be seen in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) images; they also had to be biocompatible and tough enough to withstand the beating of the muscle. The group could not make nor buy sufficient containers. After reading an article on microspheres in NASA Tech Briefs, and a complete set of reports on microencapsulation from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), JPL put Antaki in touch with Dr.Taylor Wang of Vanderbilt University who helped construct the myocardial markers. The research is expected to lead to improved understanding of how the heart works and what takes place when it fails.

  20. Transcriptional profiling of regenerating embryonic mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Magarin, Manuela; Schulz, Herbert; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Drenckhahn, Jörg-Detlef

    2016-09-01

    The postnatal mammalian heart is considered a terminally differentiated organ unable to efficiently regenerate after injury. In contrast, we have recently shown a remarkable regenerative capacity of the prenatal heart using myocardial tissue mosaicism for mitochondrial dysfunction in mice. This model is based on inactivation of the X-linked gene encoding holocytochrome c synthase (Hccs) specifically in the developing heart. Loss of HCCS activity results in respiratory chain dysfunction, disturbed cardiomyocyte differentiation and reduced cell cycle activity. The Hccs gene is subjected to X chromosome inactivation, such that in females heterozygous for the heart conditional Hccs knockout approximately 50% of cardiac cells keep the defective X chromosome active and develop mitochondrial dysfunction while the other 50% remain healthy. During heart development the contribution of HCCS deficient cells to the cardiac tissue decreases from 50% at mid-gestation to 10% at birth. This regeneration of the prenatal heart is mediated by increased proliferation of the healthy cardiac cell population, which compensates for the defective cells allowing the formation of a fully functional heart by birth. Here we performed microarray RNA expression analyses on 13.5 dpc control and heterozygous Hccs knockout hearts to identify molecular mechanisms that drive embryonic heart regeneration. Array data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE72054. PMID:27583204

  1. Head injury.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  2. Crosstalk between the heart and peripheral organs in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jahng, James Won Suk; Song, Erfei; Sweeney, Gary

    2016-03-11

    Mediators from peripheral tissues can influence the development and progression of heart failure (HF). For example, in obesity, an altered profile of adipokines secreted from adipose tissue increases the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI). Less appreciated is that heart remodeling releases cardiokines, which can strongly impact various peripheral tissues. Inflammation, and, in particular, activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors with pyrin domain (NLRP3) inflammasome are likely to have a central role in cardiac remodeling and mediating crosstalk with other organs. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to cardiac injury induces the production and secretion of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. In addition to having local effects in the myocardium, these pro-inflammatory cytokines are released into circulation and cause remodeling in the spleen, kidney, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The collective effects of various cardiokines on peripheral organs depend on the degree and duration of myocardial injury, with systematic inflammation and peripheral tissue damage observed as HF progresses. In this article, we review mechanisms regulating myocardial inflammation in HF and the role of factors secreted by the heart in communication with peripheral tissues.

  3. Crosstalk between the heart and peripheral organs in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Jahng, James Won Suk; Song, Erfei; Sweeney, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Mediators from peripheral tissues can influence the development and progression of heart failure (HF). For example, in obesity, an altered profile of adipokines secreted from adipose tissue increases the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI). Less appreciated is that heart remodeling releases cardiokines, which can strongly impact various peripheral tissues. Inflammation, and, in particular, activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors with pyrin domain (NLRP3) inflammasome are likely to have a central role in cardiac remodeling and mediating crosstalk with other organs. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to cardiac injury induces the production and secretion of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. In addition to having local effects in the myocardium, these pro-inflammatory cytokines are released into circulation and cause remodeling in the spleen, kidney, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The collective effects of various cardiokines on peripheral organs depend on the degree and duration of myocardial injury, with systematic inflammation and peripheral tissue damage observed as HF progresses. In this article, we review mechanisms regulating myocardial inflammation in HF and the role of factors secreted by the heart in communication with peripheral tissues. PMID:26964833

  4. Bicycling injuries.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Marc R

    2013-01-01

    Bicycling injuries can be classified into bicycle contact, traumatic, and overuse injuries. Despite the popularity of cycling, there are few scientific studies regarding injuries. Epidemiological studies are difficult to compare due to different methodologies and the diverse population of cyclists studied. There are only three studies conducted on top level professionals. Ninety-four percent of professionals in 1 year have experienced at least one overuse injury. Most overuse injuries are mild with limited time off the bike. The most common site of overuse injury is the knee, and the most common site of traumatic injury is the shoulder, with the clavicle having the most common fracture. Many overuse and bicycle contact ailments are relieved with simple bike adjustments.

  5. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Julia E.; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg; Fisher, Robyn L.; Vickers, Alison E.M.

    2014-01-15

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100 μM) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24 h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5 mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48 h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70 kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1α, Il-1β, IL-6 and TNFα in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices. - Highlights: • Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury evaluated in heart slices. • Isoproterenol altered apoptosis, energy, inflammation and remodeling pathways. • Human model verified by comparison to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. • Human and rat respond to isoproterenol

  6. CNS-disease affecting the heart: brain-heart disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Wahbi, Karim

    2014-10-15

    There are a number of hereditary and non-hereditary central nervous system (CNS) disorders, which directly or indirectly affect the heart (brain-heart disorders). The most well-known of these CNS-disorders are epilepsy, stroke, subarachanoid bleeding, bacterial meningitis, and head injury. In addition, a number of hereditary and non-hereditary neurodegenerative disorders may impair cardiac functions. Affection of the heart may manifest as arrhythmias, cardiomyopathy, or autonomic dysfunction. Rarer cardiac complications of CNS disorders include heart failure, systolic or diastolic dysfunction, myocardial infarction, arterial hypertension, or pulmonary hypertension. Cardiomyopathy induced by hereditary CNS disease mainly include stress-induced myocardial dysfunction, known as Takotsubo syndrome (TTS). CNS disease triggering TTS includes epilepsy, ischemic stroke, subarachnoid bleeding, or PRES syndrome. Arrhythmias induced by hereditary CNS disease include supraventricular or ventricular arrhythmias leading to palpitations, dizziness, vertigo, fainting, syncope, (near) sudden cardiac death, or sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Appropriate management of cardiac involvement in CNS-disorders is essential to improve outcome of affected patients. PMID:25034054

  7. Skiing Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    In the broad spectrum of orthopedic skiing injuries, ‘second aid’ on the mountain and at the base by the physician is very important. All skiing physicians should carry minimal medical supplies, including narcotic medication. Diagnosis and treatment of injuries at the hospital are outlined. Most ski fractures of the tibia can be treated by conservative methods. A more aggressive approach to diagnosis and treatment of ligamentous injuries of the knee is recommended. PMID:20469236

  8. Diving injuries.

    PubMed

    Dickey, L S

    1984-01-01

    This is a collective review about the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of SCUBA and diving injuries by the emergency physician. These injuries can be classified into those resulting from the toxic effects of the inhaled gas, from the pressure changes in the water and gas mixture while diving, and from decompression sickness. With the increasing popularity of SCUBA diving, it is hoped that this discussion will enable a recognition of these injuries and therefore minimize the morbidity and mortality from them.

  9. How the Heart Works

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public » Health Topics » How the Heart Works Explore How the Heart Works What Is... Anatomy Contraction Circulation Electrical System Heart ... Heart Disease Heart Valve Disease How the Lungs Work Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ...

  10. Heart Health for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs of a heart attack. 1. Eat a heart healthy diet. The nutrition facts on the food label can help you make ... heart health for women . (PDF 190KB) Get the facts about heart attacks in women . Learn More About Heart Disease: ...

  11. "Homicide by heart attack" revisited.

    PubMed

    Turner, Staci A; Barnard, Jeffrey J; Spotswood, Sheila D; Prahlow, Joseph A

    2004-05-01

    The sudden death of a person caused by an arrhythmia that is induced by physical and/or emotional stress provoked by the criminal activity of another person is sometimes referred to as "homicide by heart attack." Published criteria for such an event relate to situations where no physical contact occurs between the perpetrator and the victim. Situations involving physical contact, but with absence of lethal injuries, are frequently treated is a similar fashion by forensic pathologists. Herein, we propose a set of modified criteria, which include cases where physical contact has occurred. Five examples of so-called "homicide by heart attack" are presented, including a 40-year-old man who was struck in the head with a wooden statue, a 74-year-old man who was punched in the jaw by a robber, a 66-year-old woman who was started awake by a home-intruder, a 67-year-old woman who struggled with a would-be purse-snatcher in a parking lot, and a 52-year-old man who was in a physical altercation with a younger man. In each instance, autopsy revealed the presence of severe, underlying heart disease, as well as absence of lethal injuries. In each case, investigative information was such that the emotional and/or physical stress associated with the criminal activity of another individual was deemed contributory to the death. The presumed mechanism of death in each case was a cardiac dysrhythmia related to underlying heart disease, but initiated by the emotional and/or physical stress.

  12. Heart and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Conditions » The Heart & Down Syndrome The Heart & Down Syndrome Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are common in ... the Most Common Heart Defects in Children With Down Syndrome? The most common defects are Atrioventricular Septal Defect ( ...

  13. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart bypass surgery begins with an incision made in the chest, with the breastbone cut exposing the heart. Next, ... of this great vein will be used to bypass the blocked arteries in the heart. The venous ...

  14. Honolulu Heart Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Heart Failure, Congestive; Myocardial Infarction; Asthma; Emphysema; Lung Diseases, Obstructive; Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal; Bronchitis; Dementia; Hypertension; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Heart Failure

  15. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart, leading to heart failure. High Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the ... weaken your heart and lead to plaque buildup. Blood pressure is considered high if it stays at or ...

  16. Right heart ventriculography

    MedlinePlus

    Angiography - right heart ... moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can ... is injected into the right side of the heart. It helps the cardiologist determine the size and ...

  17. Left heart catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye will be injected into your ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  18. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Heart Attack Recovery FAQs Updated:Aug 24,2016 Most people ... recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions and Answers What treatments will I ...

  19. Heart Murmurs (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... than normal. You also might get an electrocardiogram (EKG), which measures electrical activity of the heart. None ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC The Heart Getting an EKG (Video) Your Heart & Circulatory System Mitral Valve Prolapse ...

  20. Cyanotic heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart) may be absent or unable to open wide enough. Pulmonary valve (the valve between the heart ... lungs) may be absent or unable to open wide enough . Aortic valve (the valve between the heart ...

  1. Left heart ventricular angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... through the left side of the heart. Blood volumes and pressures are also normal. ... of the catheter Heart failure due to the volume of the dye Infection Kidney failure from the dye Low blood pressure Heart attack Hemorrhage Stroke

  2. Medicinal Chemistry Approaches to Heart Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schade, Dennis; Plowright, Alleyn T

    2015-12-24

    Because of the minimal and clearly insufficient ability of the adult heart to regenerate after ischemic injury, there is a great opportunity to identify biological mechanisms, substances, and factors that enhance this process. Hence, innovative therapeutic management of heart failure following infarction requires a paradigm shift in pharmacotherapy. Spurred by tremendous progress in the field of stem cell and cardiac biology, several attractive approaches for regeneration of lost cardiomyocytes and supporting vasculature have emerged. Research in this area focuses on restoring the hearts' original function via proliferation and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells, proliferation of pre-existing cardiomyocytes, and reprogramming of cardiac fibroblasts. In this review, we outline these principal strategies, putative biological targets or signaling pathways and chemical agents, with a focus on small molecules, to achieve therapeutic heart regeneration. We also point out the many remaining questions and challenges, particularly for translating in vitro discoveries to in vivo application.

  3. Mending broken hearts: cardiac development as a basis for adult heart regeneration and repair

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Mei; Olson, Eric N.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    As the adult mammalian heart has limited potential for regeneration and repair, the loss of cardiomyocytes during injury and disease can result in heart failure and death. The cellular processes and regulatory mechanisms involved in heart growth and development can be exploited to repair the injured adult heart through ‘reawakening’ pathways that are active during embryogenesis. Heart function has been restored in rodents by reprogramming non-myocytes into cardiomyocytes, by expressing transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and T-box 5 (TBX5)) and microRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-208 and miR-499) that control cardiomyocyte identity. Stimulating cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation and proliferation by activating mitotic signalling pathways involved in embryonic heart growth represents a complementary approach for heart regeneration and repair. Recent advances in understanding the mechanistic basis of heart development offer exciting opportunities for effective therapies for heart failure. PMID:23839576

  4. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... or stomach. Diagnosis Key heart tests include: Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) —This records the electrical activity of the heart as it contracts and relaxes. The ECG can detect abnormal heartbeats, some areas of damage, ...

  5. Injury Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christophersen, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Injuries are now the cause of more deaths to children than the next six most frequent causes combined. Reviews the research evidence on the effectiveness of approaches to injury control such as legislation, health education, and behavioral strategies. Suggests avenues of further research. (Author/BJV)

  6. Rowing Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hosea, Timothy M.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Rowing is one of the original modern Olympic sports and was one of the most popular spectator sports in the United States. Its popularity has been increasing since the enactment of Title IX. The injury patterns in this sport are unique because of the stress applied during the rowing stroke. Evidence Acquisition: This review summarizes the existing literature describing the biomechanics of the rowing stroke and rowing-related injury patterns. Data were obtained from previously published peer-reviewed literature through a search of the entire PubMed database (up to December, 2011) as well as from textbook chapters and rowing coaching manuals. Results: Rowing injuries are primarily overuse related. The knee, lumbar spine, and ribs are most commonly affected. The injury incidence is directly related to the volume of training and technique. Conclusion: Familiarity of the injury patterns and the biomechanical forces affecting the rowing athlete will aid in prompt diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:23016093

  7. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart surgery - discharge; Patent ductus arteriosus ligation - discharge; Hypoplastic left heart repair - discharge; Tetralogy of Fallot repair - discharge; Coarctation of the aorta repair - discharge; ...

  8. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  9. Myocardial NF-κB activation is essential for zebrafish heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Karra, Ravi; Knecht, Anne K; Kikuchi, Kazu; Poss, Kenneth D

    2015-10-27

    Heart regeneration offers a novel therapeutic strategy for heart failure. Unlike mammals, lower vertebrates such as zebrafish mount a strong regenerative response following cardiac injury. Heart regeneration in zebrafish occurs by cardiomyocyte proliferation and reactivation of a cardiac developmental program, as evidenced by induction of gata4 regulatory sequences in regenerating cardiomyocytes. Although many of the cellular determinants of heart regeneration have been elucidated, how injury triggers a regenerative program through dedifferentiation and epicardial activation is a critical outstanding question. Here, we show that NF-κB signaling is induced in cardiomyocytes following injury. Myocardial inhibition of NF-κB activity blocks heart regeneration with pleiotropic effects, decreasing both cardiomyocyte proliferation and epicardial responses. Activation of gata4 regulatory sequences is also prevented by NF-κB signaling antagonism, suggesting an underlying defect in cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation. Our results implicate NF-κB signaling as a key node between cardiac injury and tissue regeneration.

  10. Myocardial NF-κB activation is essential for zebrafish heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Karra, Ravi; Knecht, Anne K.; Kikuchi, Kazu; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Heart regeneration offers a novel therapeutic strategy for heart failure. Unlike mammals, lower vertebrates such as zebrafish mount a strong regenerative response following cardiac injury. Heart regeneration in zebrafish occurs by cardiomyocyte proliferation and reactivation of a cardiac developmental program, as evidenced by induction of gata4 regulatory sequences in regenerating cardiomyocytes. Although many of the cellular determinants of heart regeneration have been elucidated, how injury triggers a regenerative program through dedifferentiation and epicardial activation is a critical outstanding question. Here, we show that NF-κB signaling is induced in cardiomyocytes following injury. Myocardial inhibition of NF-κB activity blocks heart regeneration with pleiotropic effects, decreasing both cardiomyocyte proliferation and epicardial responses. Activation of gata4 regulatory sequences is also prevented by NF-κB signaling antagonism, suggesting an underlying defect in cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation. Our results implicate NF-κB signaling as a key node between cardiac injury and tissue regeneration. PMID:26472034

  11. Badminton injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Krøner, K; Schmidt, S A; Nielsen, A B; Yde, J; Jakobsen, B W; Møller-Madsen, B; Jensen, J

    1990-01-01

    In a one year period, from 1 January 1986 to 31 December 1986, 4303 patients with sports injuries were treated at Aarhus Amtssygehus and Aarhus Kommunehospital. The mean age was 21.6 years (range 7-72 years) and 2830 were men. Two hundred and seventeen badminton injuries occurred in 208 patients (136 men) with a mean age of 29.6 years (range 7-57 years), constituting 4.1 percent of all sport injuries in Aarhus. Joints and ligaments were injured in 58.5 percent of the patients, most frequently located in the lower limb and significantly more often among patients younger than 30 years of age. Muscle injury occurred in 19.8 percent of the patients. This type of injury was significantly more frequent among patients older than 30 years of age. Most injuries were minor. However, 6.8 percent of the patients were hospitalized and 30.9 percent received additional treatment by a physician. As the risk of injury varies with age, attempts to plan training individually and to institute prophylactic measures should be made. PMID:2078802

  12. Heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Takeshi

    2009-06-01

    A total of 59 heart transplantations (HTx) have been performed in Japan as of September, 2008, since the Organ Transplantation Law was settled in October 1997. The majority of recipients were suffered from dilated cardiomyopathy and waiting condition of all recipients were status 1. The mean waiting time was 777 day; 50 patients (85%) were supported by several types of left ventricular assist systems (LVAS) and the mean duration of support was 780 days. The majority of patients underwent operation by modified bicaval method with Celsior solution for cardiac preservation, and 64% of recipients were administered triple therapy with cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid as the initial immunosuppressive regimen. The 9-year survival rate was 94%, which was superior to that of the international registry. HTx in Japan has been very limited by a severe shortage of donors, but the results have been excellent even though the majority of recipients were waiting for long-term with a LVAS as a bridge to HTx.

  13. Sequential Analysis of Autonomic Arousal and Self-Injurious Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoch, John; Symons, Frank; Sng, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    There have been limited direct tests of the hypothesis that self-injurious behavior (SIB) regulates arousal. In this study, two autonomic biomarkers for physiological arousal (heart rate [HR] and the high-frequency [HF] component of heart rate variability [HRV]) were investigated in relation to SIB for 3 participants with intellectual…

  14. Activation of EGFR/ERBB2 via pathways involving ERK1/2, P38 MAPK, AKT and FOXO enhances recovery of diabetic hearts from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saghir; Yousif, Mariam H M; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2012-01-01

    This study characterized the effects of diabetes and/or ischemia on epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR, and/or erbB2 signaling pathways on cardiac function. Isolated heart perfusion model of global ischemia was used to study the effect of chronic inhibition or acute activation of EGFR/erbB2 signaling on cardiac function in a rat model of type-1 diabetes. Induction of diabetes with streptozotocin impaired recovery of cardiac function (cardiac contractility and hemodynamics) following 40 minutes of global ischemia in isolated hearts. Chronic treatment with AG825 or AG1478, selective inhibitors of erbB2 and EGFR respectively, did not affect hyperglycemia but led to an exacerbation whereas acute administration of the EGFR ligand, epidermal growth factor (EGF), led to an improvement in cardiac recovery in diabetic hearts. Diabetes led to attenuated dimerization and phosphorylation of cardiac erbB2 and EGFR receptors that was associated with reduced signaling via extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase and AKT (protein kinase B). Ischemia was also associated with reduced cardiac signaling via these molecules whereas EGF-treatment opposed diabetes and/or ischemia induced changes in ERK1/2, p38 MAP kinase, and AKT-FOXO signaling. Losartan treatment improved cardiac function in diabetes but also impaired EGFR phosphorylation in diabetic heart. Co-administration of EGF rescued Losartan-mediated reduction in EGFR phosphorylation and significantly improved cardiac recovery more than with either agent alone. EGFR/erbB2 signaling is an important cardiac survival pathway whose activation, particularly in diabetes, ischemia or following treatment with drugs that inhibit this cascade, significantly improves cardiac function. These findings may have clinical relevance particularly in the treatment of diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction.

  15. Propeller injuries.

    PubMed

    Mann, R J

    1976-05-01

    Water skiing, boat racing, skin and scuba diving, and pleasure boat cruising are increasing in popularity. As a result the incidence of injuries secondary to motor propellers is becoming more frequent. In a ten-year period from 1963 to 1973, I collected a total of nine cases. In some amputations were necessary, and in other cases amputations occurred at the time of injury. Problems with bacterial flora occurring in open sea water versus salt water enclosed near docks and fresh lake water are discussed. A review of the orthopedic literature revealed sparse information regarding propeller injuries.

  16. Lightning Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... both chest compressions and artificial respiration. If an automated external defibrillator (AED) is available, it should be used (see Figure: Automated External Defibrillator: Jump-Starting the Heart ). A person ...

  17. A new nonpenetrating ballistic injury.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, A W; Soderstrom, C A

    1978-01-01

    A new, nonpenetrating ballistic injury mechanism involving individuals protected by soft body armor is described. Experimental studies using laboratory animals have demonstrated that despite stopping missile penetration, the heart, liver, spleen, and spinal cord are vulnerable to injury. The rapid jolting force of an impacting bullet is contrasted with the usually encountered mechanisms producing blunt trauma injury. The experimental methodology used to assess a 20% increase in survival probability and an 80% decrease in the need for surgical intervention with a new soft body armor is reviewed. Five cases of ballistic assaults on law enforcement personnel protected by soft body armor are presented. Four emphasize the potentially lifesaving qualities of the armor, while the fifth indicates the need for torso encircling design. Hospitalization should follow all assaults, regardless of the innocuous appearance of the skin lesion and the apparent well being on the assaulted individual. Therapeutic guidelines for patient management are suggested. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:736653

  18. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome is a congenital heart condition that occurs during the development of the heart in the ... womb. During the heart's development, parts of the left side of the heart (mitral valve, left ventricle ...

  19. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Oct 8,2015 When heart failure (HF) ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  20. Who Needs Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease (CHD) Fix heart valves that don't work well Control abnormal heart rhythms Place medical devices Replace a damaged heart with a healthy one If other treatments—such as lifestyle changes, medicines, and medical ... surgeon will work with you to decide whether you need heart ...

  1. Injuries associated with resuscitation - An overview.

    PubMed

    Olds, Kelly; Byard, Roger W; Langlois, Neil E I

    2015-07-01

    External cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a potentially lifesaving intervention aimed at preserving the cerebral function of a person in cardiac arrest. However, certain injuries can be caused by the various techniques employed. Although these are seldom consequential, they may complicate the forensic evaluation of cases. Fractures of the ribs and sternum are the most common internal injuries and are frequently acknowledged as a consequence of resuscitation. Nonethlesss, the recognition that less common fractures such as of the larynx or injuries involving the stomach, spleen, heart and liver can occur due to resuscitation will assist the forensic examiner assess the significance of these findings when they present in cases of sudden death.

  2. Traumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, S R; Bhagwat, R A; Shahane, A G; Cheema, B S

    1990-09-01

    Five cases of traumatic heart disease (THD) who sustained blunt chest injury in road accidents are reported. In addition to fracture of the ribs (observed in all the cases), there was fracture of the sternum and rupture of the liver and spleen in one case each. Two patients had flail chest. One presented with recurrent ventricular tachycardia lasting for 72 hours followed by changes suggestive of subendocardial infarction. The second case also had changes like subendocardial infarction and it was preceded by junctional tachycardia with aberrant conduction during the first 48 hours. Ventricular premature beats (VPB) were the only abnormality noted in one case and the remaining two had ST-T wave changes suggestive of inferolateral ischaemia without any arrhythmias. The patient with VPB developed pericardial rub without effusion. There was one death and postmortem revealed ruptured liver and spleen in addition to laceration of the right ventricle and haemopericardium. The electrocardiographic changes persisted for two to eight weeks. All four cases were symptom-free at 12 weeks and treadmill exercise test done after 12 to 18 weeks was normal. PMID:2266073

  3. Heart rate variability in isolated rabbit hearts.

    PubMed

    Frey, B; Heger, G; Mayer, C; Kiegler, B; Stöhr, H; Steurer, G

    1996-11-01

    The presence of heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with cardiac denervation after heart transplantation raised our interest in HRV of isolated, denervated hearts. Hearts from seven adult white ELCO rabbits were transferred to a perfusion apparatus. All hearts were perfused in the working mode and in the Langendorff mode for 20 minutes each. HRV was analyzed in the frequency domain. A computer simulated test ECG at a constant rate of 2 Hz was used for error estimation of the system. In the isolated, denervated heart, HRV was of random, broadband fluctuations, different from the well-characterized oscillations at specific frequencies in intact animals. Mean NN was 423 +/- 51 ms in the Langendorff mode, 406 +/- 33 ms in the working heart mode, and 500 ms in the test ECG. Total power was 663 +/- 207 ms2, 817 +/- 318 ms2, and 3.7 ms2, respectively. There was no significant difference in any measure of HRV between Langendorff and working heart modes. The data provide evidence for the presence of HRV in isolated, denervated rabbit hearts. Left atrial and ventricular filling, i.e., the working heart mode, did not alter HRV, indicating that left atrial or ventricular stretch did not influence the sinus nodal discharge rate.

  4. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  5. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries.

  6. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries. PMID:10645833

  7. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart.

    PubMed

    Lesnefsky, Edward J; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L

    2016-05-13

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area, there is ≈50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. PMID:27174952

  8. Aquatic Exercise and Heat-Related Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sova, Ruth

    1991-01-01

    Heat-related injuries in aquatics classes are possible, though 100 percent preventable. The article discusses heat-related syndromes; how bodies generate and dissipate heat; how elevated heart rates that burn calories differ from those that dissipate heat; and modification of exercise intensity to provide calorie-burning workouts without…

  9. [Heart arrest].

    PubMed

    Chiarella, F; Giovannini, E; Bozzano, A; Caristo, G; Delise, P; Fedele, F; Fera, M S; Lavalle, C; Roghi, A; Valagussa, F

    2001-03-01

    Cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of mortality in industrialized countries and is mainly due to ischemic heart disease. According to ISTAT estimates, approximately 45,000 sudden deaths occur annually in Italy whereas according to the World Health Organization, its incidence is 1 per 1000 persons. The most common cause of cardiac arrest is ventricular fibrillation due to an acute ischemic episode. During acute ischemia the onset of a ventricular tachyarrhythmia is sudden, unpredictable and often irreversible and lethal. Each minute that passes, the probability that the patient survives decreases by 10%. For this reason, the first 10 min are considered to be priceless for an efficacious first aid. The possibility of survival depends on the presence of witnesses, on the heart rhythm and on the resolution of the arrhythmia. In the majority of cases, the latter is possible by means of electrical defibrillation followed by the reestablishment of systolic function. An increase in equipment alone does not suffice for efficacious handling of cardiac arrest occurring outside the hospital premises. Above all, an adequate intervention strategy is required. Ambulance personnel must be well trained and capable of intervening rapidly, possibly within the first 5 min. The key to success lies in the diffusion and proper use of defibrillators. The availability of new generation instruments, the external automatic defibrillators, encourages their widespread use. On the territory, these emergencies are the responsibility of the 118 organization based, according to the characteristics specific to each country, on the regulated coordination between the operative command, the crews and the first-aid means. Strategies for the handling of these emergencies within hospitals have been proposed by the Conference of Bethesda and tend to guarantee an efficacious resuscitation with a maximum latency of 2 min between cardiac arrest and the first electric shock. The diffusion of external

  10. Building and re-building the heart by cardiomyocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Foglia, Matthew J; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-03-01

    The adult human heart does not regenerate significant amounts of lost tissue after injury. Rather than making new, functional muscle, human hearts are prone to scarring and hypertrophy, which can often lead to fatal arrhythmias and heart failure. The most-cited basis of this ineffective cardiac regeneration in mammals is the low proliferative capacity of adult cardiomyocytes. However, mammalian cardiomyocytes can avidly proliferate during fetal and neonatal development, and both adult zebrafish and neonatal mice can regenerate cardiac muscle after injury, suggesting that latent regenerative potential exists. Dissecting the cellular and molecular mechanisms that promote cardiomyocyte proliferation throughout life, deciphering why proliferative capacity normally dissipates in adult mammals, and deriving means to boost this capacity are primary goals in cardiovascular research. Here, we review our current understanding of how cardiomyocyte proliferation is regulated during heart development and regeneration.

  11. Oxidative Stress after Surgery on the Immature Heart

    PubMed Central

    Fudulu, Daniel; Angelini, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric heart surgery is associated with increased inflammation and the production of reactive oxygen species. Use of the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary bypass during correction of congenital heart defects generates reactive oxygen species by various mechanisms: haemolysis, neutrophil activation, ischaemia reperfusion injury, reoxygenation injury, or depletion of the endogenous antioxidants. The immature myocardium is more vulnerable to reactive oxygen species because of developmental differences compared to the adult heart but also because of associated congenital heart diseases that can deplete its antioxidant reserve. Oxidative stress can be manipulated by various interventions: exogenous antioxidants, use of steroids, cardioplegia, blood prime strategies, or miniaturisation of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. However, it is unclear if modulation of the redox pathways can alter clinical outcomes. Further studies powered to look at clinical outcomes are needed to define the role of oxidative stress in paediatric patients. PMID:27123154

  12. Renal neurohormonal regulation in heart failure decompensation.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Sofia; Agic, Mediha Becirovic; Narfström, Fredrik; Melville, Jacqueline M; Hultström, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Decompensation in heart failure occurs when the heart fails to balance venous return with cardiac output, leading to fluid congestion and contributing to mortality. Decompensated heart failure can cause acute kidney injury (AKI), which further increases mortality. Heart failure activates signaling systems that are deleterious to kidneys such as renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and vasopressin secretion. All three reduce renal blood flow (RBF) and increase tubular sodium reabsorption, which may increase renal oxygen consumption causing AKI through renal tissue hypoxia. Vasopressin contributes to venous congestion through aquaporin-mediated water retention. Additional water retention may be mediated through vasopressin-induced medullary urea transport and hyaluronan but needs further study. In addition, there are several systems that could protect the kidneys and reduce fluid retention such as natriuretic peptides, prostaglandins, and nitric oxide. However, the effect of natriuretic peptides and nitric oxide are blunted in decompensation, partly due to oxidative stress. This review considers how neurohormonal signaling in heart failure drives fluid retention by the kidneys and thus exacerbates decompensation. It further identifies areas where there is limited data, such as signaling systems 20-HETE, purines, endothelin, the role of renal water retention mechanisms for congestion, and renal hypoxia in AKI during heart failure.

  13. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  14. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  15. Find a Heart Rhythm Specialist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace IBHRE Heart Rhythm Journal Heart Rhythm Case Reports EP Buyer's Guide Connect With Us ... Heart Rhythm Society 2016 Privacy Policy | Linking Policy | Patient Education Disclaimer You ...

  16. Hamstring injuries

    PubMed Central

    Guanche, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a continuum of hamstring injuries that can range from musculotendinous strains to avulsion injuries. Although the proximal hamstring complex has a strong bony attachment on the ischial tuberosity, hamstring injuries are common in athletic population and can affect all levels of athletes. Nonoperative treatment is mostly recommended in the setting of low-grade partial tears and insertional tendinosis. However, failure of nonoperative treatment of partial tears may benefit from surgical debridement and repair. The technique presented on this article allows for the endoscopic management of proximal hamstring tears and chronic ischial bursitis, which until now has been managed exclusively with much larger open approaches. The procedure allows for complete exposure of the posterior aspect of the hip in a safe, minimally invasive fashion. PMID:27011828

  17. Fingertip injuries

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Sanjay; Tiwari, VK

    2007-01-01

    Background: Fingertip injuries are extremely common. Out of the various available reconstructive options, one needs to select an option which achieves a painless fingertip with durable and sensate skin cover. The present analysis was conducted to evaluate the management and outcome of fingertip injuries. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 150 cases of fingertip Injuries of patients aged six to 65 years managed over a period of two years. Various reconstructive options were considered for the fingertip lesions greater than or equal to 1 cm2. The total duration of treatment varied from two to six weeks with follow-up from two months to one year. Results: The results showed preservation of finger length and contour, retention of sensation and healing without significant complication. Conclusion: The treatment needs to be individualized and all possible techniques of reconstruction must be known to achieve optimal recovery. PMID:21139772

  18. Wrestling injuries.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Laurel

    2008-01-01

    The sport of wrestling has a history dating back to ancient times as one of the original Olympic sports. It particularly appeals to adolescents as equally matched opponents engage in competition. There can be no argument that participation in sports helps promote a physically active lifestyle. However, despite the documented health benefits of increased physical activity, those who participate in athletics are at risk for sports-related injuries. This article will discuss wrestling injuries and recommend prevention strategies to keep athletes safe. PMID:18521035

  19. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation alterations in heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fillmore, N; Mori, J; Lopaschuk, G D

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. In many forms of heart disease, including heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathies, changes in cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolism contribute to contractile dysfunction and to a decrease in cardiac efficiency. Specific metabolic changes include a relative increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates and an uncoupling of glycolysis from glucose oxidation. In heart failure, overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism can be impaired while, in ischaemic heart disease, energy production is impaired due to a limitation of oxygen supply. In both of these conditions, residual mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation dominates over mitochondrial glucose oxidation. In diabetes, the ratio of cardiac fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation also increases, although primarily due to an increase in fatty acid oxidation and an inhibition of glucose oxidation. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutically regulating cardiac energy metabolism by reducing fatty acid oxidation and/or increasing glucose oxidation can improve cardiac function of the ischaemic heart, the failing heart and in diabetic cardiomyopathies. In this article, we review the cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolic changes that occur in these forms of heart disease, what role alterations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation have in contributing to cardiac dysfunction and the potential for targeting fatty acid oxidation to treat these forms of heart disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24147975

  20. Eye Injuries at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the severity of the injury. Tap this spinal column to see how the level of injury affects loss of function and control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the ...

  2. Stimulation of Oxytocin Receptor during Early Reperfusion Period Protects the Heart against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury: the Role of Mitochondrial ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel, Nitric Oxide, and Prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Imani, Alireza; Khansari, Maryam; Azizi, Yaser; Rakhshan, Kamran; Faghihi, Mahdieh

    2015-08-01

    Postconditioning is a simple and safe strategy for cardioprotection and infarct size limitation. Our previous study showed that oxytocin (OT) exerts postconditioning effect on ischemic/reperfused isolated rat heart. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of OT receptor, mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel (mKATP), nitric oxide (NO) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways in OT postconditioning. Isolated rat hearts were divided into10 groups and underwent 30 min of regional ischemia followed by 120 min of reperfusion (n =6). In I/R (ischemia/reperfusion) group, ischemia and reperfusion were induced without any treatment. In OT group, oxytocin was perfused 5 min prior to beginning of reperfusion for 25 min. In groups 3-6, atosiban (oxytocin receptor blocker), L-NAME (N-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester, non-specific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), 5-HD (5-hydroxydecanoate, mKATP inhibitor) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) were infused prior to oxytocin administration. In others, the mentioned inhibitors were perfused prior to ischemia without oxytocin infusion. Infarct size, ventricular hemodynamic, coronary effluent, malondialdehyde (MDA) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured at the end of reperfusion. OT perfusion significantly reduced infarct size, MDA and LDH in comparison with IR group. Atosiban, 5HD, L-NAME and indomethacin abolished the postconditioning effect of OT. Perfusion of the inhibitors alone prior to ischemia had no effect on infarct size, hemodynamic parameters, coronary effluent and biochemical markers as compared with I/R group. In conclusion, this study indicates that postconditioning effects of OT are mediated by activation of mKATP and production of NO and Prostaglandins (PGs).

  3. Open heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - open ... lung machine is used in most cases during open heart surgery. While the surgeon works on the ... with these procedures, the surgeon may have to open the chest to do the surgery.

  4. Structure of the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Central Nervous System Peripheral Nervous System Review Quiz Endocrine System Characteristics of Hormones Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Pituitary & ... Thyroid & Parathyroid Glands Adrenal Gland Pancreas Gonads Other Endocrine Glands ... Cardiovascular System Heart Structure of the Heart Physiology of the ...

  5. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  6. Men and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  7. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivable, manageable, yet in the routine years between infancy and adulthood, sometimes forgettable. The Adult Congenital Heart ... understand the continuum of the disease from its infancy. The Adult Congential Heart Association brings together valuable ...

  8. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Balance › Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease January 2014 Download PDFs English ... nervous system, body temperature, and weight. What is hypothyroidism and what are its symptoms? Hypothyroidism, also called ...

  9. Heart failure - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... NOT smoke . Stay active. Walk or ride a stationary bicycle. Your provider can provide a safe and ... with or without stenting may help improve blood flow to the damaged or weakened heart muscle. Heart ...

  10. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  11. Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  12. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... An echocardiogram (Echo) is a test that uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. The picture is much more detailed than a plain ...

  13. Overview of Heart Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. Most heart tumors are metastatic cancer. Did You Know... Noncancerous tumors can be as deadly ... slow the tumor's growth. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Table 2 ...

  14. Aspirin and heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the diagnosis and management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology ... NE, et al. Antithrombotic and thrombolytic therapy for ischemic ... of coronary heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, et ...

  15. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... about genetic counseling and screening if you have a family history of cogenital heart disease. ... Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  16. Sleep Troubles, Heart Troubles?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161037.html Sleep Troubles, Heart Troubles? American Heart Association says it's ... 19, 2016 MONDAY, Sept. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep disorders -- including too little or too much sleep -- ...

  17. Types of Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... the P and the R waves on the EKG (electrocardiogram). First-degree heart block may not cause ...

  18. Target Heart Rate Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Saved Articles » My ACS » + - Text Size Target Heart Rate Calculator Compute your best workout Enter your age ... is your age? years. How to Check Your Heart Rate Right after you stop exercising, take your pulse: ...

  19. Getting a New Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in place, the donor's main arteries—the aorta and pulmonary arteries—are sewn to yours. o ... heart and cause strokes and heart attacks. 4. Diabetes Mellitus Anti-rejection medications can cause diabetes. If ...

  20. Electrical Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your injuries are depends on how strong the electric current was, what type of current it was, how it moved through your body, and how long you were exposed. Other factors include how ... you should see a doctor. You may have internal damage and not realize it.

  1. Patient Injuries?

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    An injured patient may be the last thing dentists want to think about. However, in reality, patients can be injured during dental treatment or as the result of an incident such as a slip and fall in the office. Treatment-related injuries can run the gamut and include burns, lacerations, swallowed objects and allergic reactions, according to The Dentists Insurance Company.

  2. Heart Valve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  3. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and it happens slowly over time. It's the ...

  4. The Heart of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  5. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  6. Working Model Hearts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, David

    2009-01-01

    Despite student interest, the heart is often a poorly understood topic in biology. To help students understand this vital organ's physiology, the author created this investigation activity involving the mammalian heart and its role in the circulatory system. Students design, build, and demonstrate working artificial "hearts" to exhibit what they…

  7. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... signal to your heart. The signal makes your heart beat at the correct pace. Pacemakers may be used: To correct abnormal heart rhythms. The heart may beat too slowly, too fast, or in an irregular ...

  8. How Is Heart Failure Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a pocket, or hung around your neck. Nuclear Heart Scan A nuclear heart scan shows how well blood is flowing ... blood is reaching your heart muscle. During a nuclear heart scan, a safe, radioactive substance called a ...

  9. The zebrafish as a model of heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Raya, Angel; Consiglio, Antonella; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Rodriguez-Esteban, Concepcion; Izpisúa-Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Regeneration is a complex biological process by which animals can restore the shape, structure and function of body parts lost after injury, or after experimental amputation. Only a few species of vertebrates display the capacity to regenerate body parts during adulthood. In the case of the heart, newts display a remarkable ability to regenerate large portions of myocardium after amputation, although the mechanisms underlying this process have not been addressed. Recently, it has been shown that adult zebrafish can also regenerate their hearts, thus offering new possibilities for experimentally approaching this fascinating biological phenomenon. The first insights into heart regeneration gained by studying this model organism are reviewed here. PMID:15671662

  10. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    Dressler syndrome; Post-MI pericarditis; Post-cardiac injury syndrome; Postcardiotomy pericarditis ... pericarditis: This is also called Dressler syndrome (or post-cardiac injury syndrome or postcardiotomy pericarditis). It most ...

  11. Bioengineering Heart Muscle: A Paradigm for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Kathy O.; Tandon, Nina

    2012-01-01

    The idea of extending the lifetime of our organs is as old as humankind, fueled by major advances in organ transplantation, novel drugs, and medical devices. However, true regeneration of human tissue has becoming increasingly plausible only in recent years. The human heart has always been a focus of such efforts, given its notorious inability to repair itself following injury or disease. We discuss here the emerging bioengineering approaches to regeneration of heart muscle as a paradigm for regenerative medicine. Our focus is on biologically inspired strategies for heart regeneration, knowledge gained thus far about how to make a “perfect” heart graft, and the challenges that remain to be addressed for tissue-engineered heart regeneration to become a clinical reality. We emphasize the need for interdisciplinary research and training, as recent progress in the field is largely being made at the interfaces between cardiology, stem cell science, and bioengineering. PMID:21568715

  12. Long-term organ cultures of newt hearts.

    PubMed

    Piatkowski, Tanja; Braun, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Adult newts regenerate their hearts after injury by initiating proliferation of cardiac muscle and non-muscle cells. Mechanistic studies in vivo to analyze heart regeneration are challenging due to the long reproduction cycle of newts and the complexity of the genome. Culture of primary newt cells might offer alternative experimental approaches, but monolayers of newt cardiomyocytes and slice cultures of newt hearts show extensive morphological changes during cultivation. Hence, we developed a protocol to culture intact newt hearts in vitro, avoiding major morphological changes of explanted organs during a 5-week cultivation. The model provides improved accessibility and allows manipulation of cultured organs by small molecules and viral vectors. We found that dedifferentiation and S-phase entry of cardiomyocytes, which are hallmarks of cardiac regeneration in vivo, can be recapitulated in cultured hearts in vitro. We reason that long-term organ cultures of newts are a versatile tool for mechanistic studies on organ regeneration.

  13. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease » Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Explore Diabetic Heart Disease What Is... Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Cardiomyopathy Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Failure Send ...

  14. A RAT MODEL OF HEART FAILURE INDUCED BY ISOPROTERENOL AND A HIGH SALT DIET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat models of heart failure (HF) show varied pathology and time to disease outcome, dependent on induction method. We found that subchronic (4wk) isoproterenol (ISO) infusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rats caused cardiac injury with minimal hypertrophy. O...

  15. Chronic treatment with trimetazidine reduces the upregulation of atrial natriuretic peptide in heart failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trimetazidine (TMZ) is effective for the treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy; however, little is known about the effect of TMZ in established injury-induced heart failure. When rats with established infarct-induced heart failure were treated for 12 weeks with TMZ there was no effect on left ventric...

  16. Narrative Discourse in Young Children with Histories of Early Corrective Heart Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, Lowry; Uccelli, Paola; Winner, Kendra; Chang, Chien-ju; Bellinger, David

    2002-01-01

    Narrative attainment was assessed in 76 four-year-old children at risk for brain injury because of histories of early corrective heart surgery. Despite considerable heterogeneity in narrative performance, children with early corrective heart surgery produced fewer narrative components than typically developing children. Implications for clinical…

  17. Rehospitalization for heart failure in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ogbemudia, Ehimwenma J.; Asekhame, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the burden of preventable rehospitalization for decompensated heart failure in the elderly. Methods: This was a retrospective study performed in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital,. Demographic variables, etiology, and participants of heart failure were retrieved from data of elderly patients with heart failure admitted between January 2014 and December 2015. The participants were classified and described as either preventable, or unpreventable to determine whether the hospitalizations were preventable or not. The frequency of the groups with preventable participants (hospitalization) was derived. Results: Five groups of participants were preventable (55.5%), while 4 groups (44.5%) were unpreventable. The preventable participants were poor drug compliance (24 [23.4%]), uncontrolled hypertension (7 [6.9%]), infectious (34 [33.3%]), pulmonary thromboembolism (1 [1%]), and anemia (1 [1%]). The unpreventable participants include arrhythmias (19 [18.6%]), acute kidney injury (2 [2%]), acute coronary syndrome (1 [1%]), and progressive ventricular dysfunction (13 [12.7%]). Conclusion: Multiple rehospitalization for heart failure is a challenge for the elderly, but 55.5% of these readmissions are preventable. Poor drug compliance and pulmonary infections were the most common preventable participants. Multidisciplinary measures involving patient education, home based care, and physician training will reduce the number of hospitalizations for heart failure in the elderly. PMID:27652368

  18. Augmentation of Creatine in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Zervou, Sevasti; Whittington, Hannah J; Russell, Angela J; Lygate, Craig A

    2016-01-01

    Creatine is a principle component of the creatine kinase (CK) phosphagen system common to all vertebrates. It is found in excitable cells, such as cardiomyocytes, where it plays an important role in the buffering and transport of chemical energy to ensure that supply meets the dynamic demands of the heart. Multiple components of the CK system, including intracellular creatine levels, are reduced in heart failure, while ischaemia and hypoxia represent acute crises of energy provision. Elevation of myocardial creatine levels has therefore been suggested as potentially beneficial, however, achieving this goal is not trivial. This mini-review outlines the evidence in support of creatine elevation and critically examines the pharmacological approaches that are currently available. In particular, dietary creatine-supplementation does not sufficiently elevate creatine levels in the heart due to subsequent down-regulation of the plasma membrane creatine transporter (CrT). Attempts to increase passive diffusion and bypass the CrT, e.g. via creatine esters, have yet to be tested in the heart. However, studies in mice with genetic overexpression of the CrT demonstrate proof-of-principle that elevated creatine protects the heart from ischaemia-reperfusion injury. This suggests activation of the CrT as a major unmet pharmacological target. However, translation of this finding to the clinic will require a greater understanding of CrT regulation in health and disease and the development of small molecule activators.

  19. Augmentation of Creatine in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Zervou, Sevasti; Whittington, Hannah J.; Russell, Angela J.; Lygate, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Creatine is a principle component of the creatine kinase (CK) phosphagen system common to all vertebrates. It is found in excitable cells, such as cardiomyocytes, where it plays an important role in the buffering and transport of chemical energy to ensure that supply meets the dynamic demands of the heart. Multiple components of the CK system, including intracellular creatine levels, are reduced in heart failure, while ischaemia and hypoxia represent acute crises of energy provision. Elevation of myocardial creatine levels has therefore been suggested as potentially beneficial, however, achieving this goal is not trivial. This mini-review outlines the evidence in support of creatine elevation and critically examines the pharmacological approaches that are currently available. In particular, dietary creatine-supplementation does not sufficiently elevate creatine levels in the heart due to subsequent down-regulation of the plasma membrane creatine transporter (CrT). Attempts to increase passive diffusion and bypass the CrT, e.g. via creatine esters, have yet to be tested in the heart. However, studies in mice with genetic overexpression of the CrT demonstrate proof-of-principle that elevated creatine protects the heart from ischaemia-reperfusion injury. This suggests activation of the CrT as a major unmet pharmacological target. However, translation of this finding to the clinic will require a greater understanding of CrT regulation in health and disease and the development of small molecule activators. PMID:26202199

  20. Cardiac injury complicating traumatic asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Rosato, R M; Shapiro, M J; Keegan, M J; Connors, R H; Minor, C B

    1991-10-01

    During a 3-year period (1986-1989), 8 patients were seen at St. Louis University Medical Center exhibiting the stigmata of traumatic asphyxia. Fewer than 200 cases of traumatic asphyxia have been reported and there is only a single report of a cardiac injury. In this series, 3 of 8 (37.5%) patients were found to have an injury to the heart: two cardiac contusions and a ventricular rupture. Five patients were crushed in motor vehicle collisions, one by an elevator counterweight, and two patients by river barges. Injuries associated with these patients include pulmonary contusion, hemopneumothorax, traumatic pneumatocele, traumatic retinopathy, bone fractures, mental confusion, and liver contusion. There was one death in the series, a patient with rupture of the right ventricle and severe splenic and liver injuries. The cardiac status of the patients was evaluated by serial serum cardiac enzyme determinations, electrocardiograms, and echocardiography. This report illustrates the importance of complete cardiac evaluation in patients with traumatic asphyxia. PMID:1942148

  1. Apoptosis and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Havasi, Andrea; Borkan, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Improved mechanistic understanding of renal cell death in acute kidney injury (AKI) has generated new therapeutic targets. Clearly, the classic lesion of acute tubular necrosis is not adequate to describe the consequences of renal ischemia, nephrotoxin exposure, or sepsis on glomerular filtration rate. Experimental evidence supports a pathogenic role for apoptosis in AKI. Interestingly, proximal tubule epithelial cells are highly susceptible to apoptosis, and injury at this site contributes to organ failure. During apoptosis, well-orchestrated events converge at the mitochondrion, the organelle that integrates life and death signals generated by the BCL2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) protein family. Death requires the ‘perfect storm’ for outer mitochondrial membrane injury to release its cellular ‘executioners’. The complexity of this process affords new targets for effective interventions, both before and after renal insults. Inhibiting apoptosis appears to be critical, because circulating factors released by the injured kidney induce apoptosis and inflammation in distant organs including the heart, lung, liver, and brain, potentially contributing to the high morbidity and mortality associated with AKI. Manipulation of known stress kinases upstream of mitochondrial injury, induction of endogenous, anti-apoptotic proteins, and improved understanding of the timing and consequences of renal cell apoptosis will inevitably improve the outcome of human AKI. PMID:21562469

  2. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Julia E; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg; Fisher, Robyn L; Vickers, Alison E M

    2014-01-15

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100μM) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1α, Il-1β, IL-6 and TNFα in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices.

  3. Notch-independent RBPJ controls angiogenesis in the adult heart

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Trelles, Ramón; Scimia, Maria Cecilia; Bushway, Paul; Tran, Danh; Monosov, Anna; Monosov, Edward; Peterson, Kirk; Rentschler, Stacey; Cabrales, Pedro; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Mercola, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Increasing angiogenesis has long been considered a therapeutic target for improving heart function after injury such as acute myocardial infarction. However, gene, protein and cell therapies to increase microvascularization have not been successful, most likely because the studies failed to achieve regulated and concerted expression of pro-angiogenic and angiostatic factors needed to produce functional microvasculature. Here, we report that the transcription factor RBPJ is a homoeostatic repressor of multiple pro-angiogenic and angiostatic factor genes in cardiomyocytes. RBPJ controls angiogenic factor gene expression independently of Notch by antagonizing the activity of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). In contrast to previous strategies, the cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Rbpj increased microvascularization of the heart without adversely affecting cardiac structure or function even into old age. Furthermore, the loss of RBPJ in cardiomyocytes increased hypoxia tolerance, improved heart function and decreased pathological remodelling after myocardial infarction, suggesting that inhibiting RBPJ might be therapeutic for ischaemic injury. PMID:27357444

  4. Heart transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Mangini, Sandrigo; Alves, Bárbara Rubim; Silvestre, Odílson Marcos; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Pires, Lucas José Tachotti; Curiati, Milena Novaes Cardoso; Bacal, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heart transplantation is currently the definitive gold standard surgical approach in the treatment of refractory heart failure. However, the shortage of donors limits the achievement of a greater number of heart transplants, in which the use of mechanical circulatory support devices is increasing. With well-established indications and contraindications, as well as diagnosis and treatment of rejection through defined protocols of immunosuppression, the outcomes of heart transplantation are very favorable. Among early complications that can impact survival are primary graft failure, right ventricular dysfunction, rejection, and infections, whereas late complications include cardiac allograft vasculopathy and neoplasms. Despite the difficulties for heart transplantation, in particular, the shortage of donors and high mortality while on the waiting list, in Brazil, there is a great potential for both increasing effective donors and using circulatory assist devices, which can positively impact the number and outcomes of heart transplants. PMID:26154552

  5. [Survived stab to the heart in a schizophrenic man].

    PubMed

    Fieseler, Sybille; Zinka, Bettina; Kunz, Sebastian N

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with a significant risk of suicide. According to recent research, 10-15 % of all schizophrenic patients die by suicide. It is not uncommon that the victims show sharp force injuries, so that the forensic pathologist first has to differentiate between self-infliction and involvement of another person. The authors' case report presents a 68-year-old schizophrenic patient who committed suicide by jumping out of a window of his apartment located on the second floor after inflicting multiple stab wounds to his thoracic region. At autopsy, an older stab wound to the apex of the heart was detected. In the criminal investigation, a suicide attempt made 13 days before could be ascertained. As the patient did not want to be taken to a hospital at that time, the injury had never been examined or documented. Since there was no evidence suggesting homicide, the older stab to the heart was interpreted as a tentative injury. PMID:22039699

  6. Iatrogenic Transient Complete Heart Block in a Preexisting LBBB

    PubMed Central

    Kalamkar, Prachi; Bonnet, Christopher A.; Bajwa, Omer A.

    2016-01-01

    Catheter induced cardiac arrhythmia is a well-known complication encountered during pulmonary artery or cardiac catheterization. Injury to the cardiac conducting system often involves the right bundle branch which in a patient with preexisting left bundle branch block can lead to fatal arrhythmia including asystole. Such a complication during central venous cannulation is rare as it usually does not enter the heart. The guide wire or the cannula itself can cause such an injury during central venous cannulation. The length of the guide wire, its rigidity, and lack of set guidelines for its insertion make it theoretically more prone to cause such an injury. We report a case of LBBB that went into transient complete heart block following guide wire insertion during a central venous cannulation procedure. PMID:27478653

  7. Texas Heart Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016 Resources Texas Heart Institute Journal Scientific Publications Library & Learning Resources Resources for Physicians Fellowships & Residencies School of Perfusion Technology Please contact our Webmaster with ...

  8. Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention & Treatment of High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources ... signals in the heart's upper chambers fire abnormally, which interferes with electrical signals coming from ...

  9. Heart Rate Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Under a NASA grant, Dr. Robert M. Davis and Dr. William M. Portnoy came up with a new type of electrocardiographic electrode that would enable long term use on astronauts. Their invention was an insulated capacitive electrode constructed of a thin dielectric film. NASA subsequently licensed the electrode technology to Richard Charnitski, inventor of the VersaClimber, who founded Heart Rate, Inc., to further develop and manufacture personal heart monitors and to produce exercise machines using the technology for the physical fitness, medical and home markets. Same technology is on both the Home and Institutional Model VersaClimbers. On the Home Model an infrared heart beat transmitter is worn under exercise clothing. Transmitted heart rate is used to control the work intensity on the VersaClimber using the heart rate as the speedometer of the exercise. This offers advantages to a full range of users from the cardiac rehab patient to the high level physical conditioning of elite athletes. The company manufactures and markets five models of the 1*2*3 HEART RATE monitors that are used wherever people exercise to accurately monitor their heart rate. Company is developing a talking heart rate monitor that works with portable headset radios. A version of the heart beat transmitter will be available to the manufacturers of other aerobic exercise machines.

  10. The Hippo pathway in heart development, regeneration, and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Li, Li; Zhao, Bin; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The heart is the first organ formed during mammalian development. A properly sized and functional heart is vital throughout the entire lifespan. Loss of cardiomyocytes due to injury or diseases leads to heart failure, which is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, regenerative potential of the adult heart is very limited. The Hippo pathway is a recently identified signaling cascade that plays an evolutionarily conserved role in organ size control by inhibiting cell proliferation, promoting apoptosis, regulating fates of stem/ progenitor cells, and in some circumstances, limiting cell size. Interestingly, research indicates a key role of this pathway in regulation of cardiomyocyte proliferation and heart size. Inactivation of the Hippo pathway or activation of its downstream effector, the Yes-associated protein (YAP) transcription co-activator, improves cardiac regeneration. Several known upstream signals of the Hippo pathway such as mechanical stress, G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, and oxidative stress, are known to play critical roles in cardiac physiology. In addition, YAP has been shown to regulate cardiomyocyte fate through multiple transcriptional mechanisms. In this review, we summarize and discuss current findings regarding the roles and mechanisms of the Hippo pathway in heart development, injury, and regeneration. PMID:25858067

  11. Mitochondrial respiratory control and early defects of oxidative phosphorylation in the failing human heart.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Hélène; Semsroth, Severin; Antretter, Herwig; Höfer, Daniel; Gnaiger, Erich

    2011-12-01

    Heart failure is a consequence of progressive deterioration of cardiac performance. Little is known about the role of impaired oxidative phosphorylation in the progression of the disease, since previous studies of mitochondrial injuries are restricted to end-stage chronic heart failure. The present study aimed at evaluating the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of human heart failure. We measured the control of oxidative phosphorylation with high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized myocardial fibres from donor hearts (controls), and patients with no or mild heart failure but presenting with heart disease, or chronic heart failure due to dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy. The capacity of the phosphorylation system exerted a strong limitation on oxidative phosphorylation in the human heart, estimated at 121 pmol O(2)s(-1)mg(-1) in the healthy left ventricle. In heart disease, a specific defect of the phosphorylation system, Complex I-linked respiration, and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation were identified. These early defects were also significant in chronic heart failure, where the capacities of the oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer systems per cardiac tissue mass were decreased with all tested substrate combinations, suggesting a decline of mitochondrial density. Oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer system capacities were higher in ventricles compared to atria, but the impaired mitochondrial quality was identical in the four cardiac chambers of chronic heart failure patients. Coupling was preserved in heart disease and chronic heart failure, in contrast to the mitochondrial dysfunction observed after prolonged cold storage of cardiac tissue. Mitochondrial defects in the phosphorylation system, Complex I respiration and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation occurred early in the development of heart failure. Targeting these mitochondrial injuries with metabolic therapy may offer a promising approach to delay

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  13. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center PTACs Workspaces Log-in Search for: Traumatic Brain Injury A legacy resource from NICHCY Disability Fact ... in her. Back to top What is Traumatic Brain Injury? A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an ...

  14. Eye Injuries at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 20,000 workplace eye injuries happen each year. Injuries on the job often ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reports that workplace eye injuries cost an estimated $300 million a year in ...

  15. Wounds and Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    An injury is damage to your body. It is a general term that refers to harm caused by accidents, ... millions of people injure themselves every year. These injuries range from minor to life-threatening. Injuries can ...

  16. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  17. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  18. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  19. The Role of the Proteasome in Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Fan; Wang, Xuejun

    2010-01-01

    Intensive investigations into the pathophysiological significance of the proteasome in the heart did not start until the beginning of the past decade but exciting progresses have been made and are summarized here as two fronts. First, strong evidence continues to emerge to support a novel hypothesis that proteasome functional insufficiency represents a common pathological phenomenon in a large subset of heart disease, compromises protein quality control in heart muscle cells, and thereby acts as a major pathogenic factor promoting the progression of the subset of heart disease to congestive heart failure. This front is represented by the studies on the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in cardiac proteinopathy, which have taken advantage of a transgenic mouse model expressing a fluorescence reporter for UPS proteolytic function. Second, pharmacological inhibition of the proteasome has been explored experimentally as a potential therapeutic strategy to intervene some forms of heart disease, such as pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy, viral myocarditis, and myocardial ischemic injury. Not only between the two fronts but also within each one, a multitude of inconsistency and controversy remain to be explained and clarified. At present, the controversy perhaps reflects the sophistication of cardiac proteasomes in terms of the composition, assembly, and regulation, as well as the intricacy and diversity of heart disease in terms of its etiology and pathogenesis. A definitive role of altered proteasome function in the development of various forms of heart disease remains to be established. PMID:20840877

  20. The effect of Ligustrum delavayanum on isolated perfused rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Stankovičová, Tatiana; Frýdl, Miroslav; Kubicová, Mária; Baróniková, Slávka; Nagy, Milan; Grančai, Daniel; Švec, Pavel

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extract of ligustrum leaves (Ligustrum delavayanum Hariot [Oleaceae]) is well known in traditional Chinese medicine. One of the active components, oleuropein, displays vasodilating and hypotensive effects. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of 0.008% lyophilized extract of ligustrum dissolved in 0.5% ethanol on heart function. ANIMALS AND METHODS: Experiments were done on isolated rat hearts perfused by the Langendorff method in control conditions and during ischemic-reperfusion injury. RESULTS: Application of ligustrum induced positive inotropic and vasodilating effects in spontaneously beating hearts. Pretreatment of the hearts with ligustrum reduced left ventricular diastolic pressure measured during reperfusion and improved left ventricular contraction compared with hearts without any pretreatment. Ligustrum significantly suppressed the incidence and duration of cardiac reperfusion arrhythmias, expressed as G-score, from 7.40±0.58 in nontreated rats to 1.97±0.50. DISCUSSION: Application of ligustrum or ethanol alone induced changes in coordination between atria and ventricles during ischemia-reperfusion injury. The ‘g-score’, a new parameter summing the incidence and duration of atrioventricular blocks, atrioventricular dissociation and cardiac arrest, is introduced. The g-scores with ligustrum pretreatment were higher during ischemia than during reperfusion. Ethanol significantly depressed myocardial contractility and coronary flow, and nonsignificantly decreased heart rate of isolated rat hearts. Electrical changes observed during coronary reperfusion in the presence of ethanol were accompanied by deterioration of contractile function. CONCLUSIONS: Ligustrum had a significant protective effect on rat myocardium against ischemic-reperfusion injury. Ethanol partially attenuated the protective effect of ligustrum. PMID:20428448

  1. Dimensional analysis of heart rate variability in heart transplant recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Zbilut, J.P.; Mayer-Kress, G.; Geist, K.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss periodicities in the heart rate in normal and transplanted hearts. We then consider the possibility of dimensional analysis of these periodicities in transplanted hearts and problems associated with the record.

  2. Basketball Injuries: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apple Jr., David F.

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses reasons for the increase in basketball-related injuries, describes common injuries, outlines steps for diagnosis and treatment, and offers recovery and prevention strategies. (IAH)

  3. Baseball and softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quincy

    2006-05-01

    Baseball and softball injuries can be a result of both acute and overuse injuries. Soft tissue injuries include contusions, abrasions, and lacerations. Return to play is allowed when risk of further injury is minimized. Common shoulder injuries include those to the rotator cuff, biceps tendon, and glenoid labrum. Elbow injuries are common in baseball and softball and include medial epicondylitis, ulnar collateral ligament injury, and osteochondritis dissecans. Typically conservative treatment with relative rest, medication, and a rehabilitation program will allow return to play. Surgical intervention may be needed for certain injuries or conservative treatment failure.

  4. Music and the heart.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-11-21

    Music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure (BP), and breathing. Although there is great heterogeneity in methods and quality among previous studies on effects of music on the heart, the following findings emerge from the literature: Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) are higher in response to exciting music compared with tranquilizing music. During musical frissons (involving shivers and piloerection), both HR and RR increase. Moreover, HR and RR tend to increase in response to music compared with silence, and HR appears to decrease in response to unpleasant music compared with pleasant music. We found no studies that would provide evidence for entrainment of HR to musical beats. Corresponding to the increase in HR, listening to exciting music (compared with tranquilizing music) is associated with a reduction of heart rate variability (HRV), including reductions of both low-frequency and high-frequency power of the HRV. Recent findings also suggest effects of music-evoked emotions on regional activity of the heart, as reflected in electrocardiogram amplitude patterns. In patients with heart disease (similar to other patient groups), music can reduce pain and anxiety, associated with lower HR and lower BP. In general, effects of music on the heart are small, and there is great inhomogeneity among studies with regard to methods, findings, and quality. Therefore, there is urgent need for systematic high-quality research on the effects of music on the heart, and on the beneficial effects of music in clinical settings.

  5. Heart imaging method

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H. Dale; Gribble, R. Parks; Busse, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for providing an image of the human heart's electrical system derives time-of-flight data from an array of EKG electrodes and this data is transformed into phase information. The phase information, treated as a hologram, is reconstructed to provide an image in one or two dimensions of the electrical system of the functioning heart.

  6. Mapping the Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  7. Human heart by art.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Abraham

    2012-11-01

    Heart is of great importance in maintaining the life of the body. Enough to stop working for a few minutes to cause death, and hence the great importance in physiology, medicine, and research. This fact was already emphasized in the Bible in the Book of Proverbs, chapter 4 verse 23: "Keep your heart with all diligence, for out of it is the wellspring of life." Art was able to demonstrate the heart from various aspects; realistically, as done by Leonardo de Vinci who demonstrated the halves of the heart and its blood vessels. Symbolically, as a source of life, the heart was demonstrated by the artist Mrs. Erlondeiel, as a caricature by Salvador Dali, as an open heart by Sawaya, etc. Finally, it should be emphasized that different demonstrations of the human heart by many artworks make this most important organ of our body (that cannot be seen from outside) more familiar and clearer to us. And this is the purpose of this article-to demonstrate the heart through a large number of artworks of different kinds.

  8. The total artificial heart

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jason A.; Shah, Keyur B.; Quader, Mohammed A.; Cooke, Richard H.; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Rao, Kris K.; Smallfield, Melissa C.; Tchoukina, Inna

    2015-01-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a form of mechanical circulatory support in which the patient’s native ventricles and valves are explanted and replaced by a pneumatically powered artificial heart. Currently, the TAH is approved for use in end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, with an increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure, the number of patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting heart transplantation now far exceeds the number of available hearts. As a result, the use of mechanical circulatory support, including the TAH and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), is growing exponentially. The LVAD is already widely used as destination therapy, and destination therapy for the TAH is under investigation. While most patients requiring mechanical circulatory support are effectively treated with LVADs, there is a subset of patients with concurrent right ventricular failure or major structural barriers to LVAD placement in whom TAH may be more appropriate. The history, indications, surgical implantation, post device management, outcomes, complications, and future direction of the TAH are discussed in this review. PMID:26793338

  9. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health • Watch, Learn & Live Animations Library Answers by Heart Fact Sheets Learn and live with our downloadable patient information sheets . Dozens of topics in a question-and-answer format that's brief, easy to follow and easy to read. ... Sodium and Salt 3 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 4 What are the Symptoms of ...

  10. Sports injuries of the ear.

    PubMed

    Wagner, G A

    1972-07-01

    The author describes common sports injuries involving the ear. Such injuries include hematoma, lacerations, foreign bodies (tattoo), and thermal injuries. Ear canal injuries include swimmer's ear and penetrating injuries. Tympanum injuries include tympanic membrane perforations, ossicular discontinuity, eustachian tube dysfunction, temporal bone fractures and traumatic facial nerve palsy. Inner ear injuries include traumatic sensorineural deafness. The author emphasizes the management of these injuries.

  11. Theory of heart

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, L. . Dept. of Physiology); Hunter, P. . Dept. of Engineering Science); McCulloch, A. )

    1991-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growth in interest in studying the heart from the perspective of the physical sciences: mechanics, fluid flow, electromechanics. This volume is the result of a workshop held in July 1989 at the Institute for Nonlinear Sciences at the University of California at San Diego that brought together scientists and clinicians with graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who share an interest in the heart. The chapters were prepared by the invited speakers as didactic reviews of their subjects but also include up-to-date results in their fields. Topics covered include the structure, mechanical properties, and function of the heart and the myocardium, electrical activity of the heart and myocardium, and mathematical models of heart function. Individual chapters are abstracted separately.

  12. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Susan M.; Cedars, Ari M.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Geltman, Edward M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    Hospitalizations for acute decompensated heart failure are increasing in the United States. Moreover, the prevalence of heart failure is increasing consequent to an increased number of older individuals, as well as to improvement in therapies for coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death that have enabled patients to live longer with cardiovascular disease. The main treatment goals in the hospitalized patient with heart failure are to restore euvolemia and to minimize adverse events. Common in-hospital treatments include intravenous diuretics, vasodilators, and inotropic agents. Novel pharmaceutical agents have shown promise in the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure and may simplify the treatment and reduce the morbidity associated with the disease. This review summarizes the contemporary management of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:20069075

  13. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Cardiology; American Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism; American Heart Association Interdisciplinary Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research. State of the science: promoting self-care in persons with heart failure: ...

  14. Heart Failure Society of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Review Course in Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiology is now available OnDemand! Monday, August 29, 2016! ... than expected, and the FDA... European Society of Cardiology – Heart Failure 2017 October 11, 2016 ESC: Heart ...

  15. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Heart Failure For ...

  16. Signs of a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack Heart Health and Stroke Signs of a heart attack Related information Make the Call. Don't Miss ... to top More information on Signs of a heart attack Read more from womenshealth.gov Make the Call, ...

  17. Lifestyle Changes for Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... about Alcohol and Heart Disease . Avoiding or limiting caffeine Consume only a moderate amount of caffeine per day, no more than a cup or two of coffee. Learn more about Caffeine and Heart Disease . Eating a heart-healthy diet ...

  18. Genomic variation and neurohormonal intervention in heart failure.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Dennis M

    2010-01-01

    Neurohormonal activation is an important driver of heart-failure progression, and all pharmacologic interventions that improve heart-failure survival inhibit this systemic response to myocardial injury. Adrenergic stimulation of beta(1) receptors in the kidney results in the release of plasma renin, the conversion of peptide precursors to angiotensin II (a2), and ultimately the production of aldosterone. beta(1)-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and aldosterone receptor antagonists all act by inhibiting the activity of critical protein of this core pathway: the beta(1) receptor, ACE, the a2 receptor, and aldosterone synthase. Investigation of the pharmacogenetic interactions of the ACE D/I polymorphism and heart-failure therapy demonstrates the power of genomics to target therapeutics. This review explores how genetic variation in genes involved in neurohormonal activation influences heart-failure outcomes and the impact of pharmacotherapy.

  19. The mechanism of myocardial reperfusion injury in neonates.

    PubMed

    Otani, H; Engelman, R M; Rousou, J A; Breyer, R H; Lemeshow, S; Das, D K

    1987-11-01

    Oxygen free radicals and phospholipid degradation have been implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemia and reperfusion injury. The present study examines the involvement of such mechanisms in myocardial reperfusion injury in neonatal hearts. The isolated neonatal pig hearts from two different age groups, 0 to 2 days old (newborn) and 7 to 9 days old (week-old), were subjected to 60 min of normothermic global ischemia followed by 60 min of reperfusion. Although myocardial ischemia reduced superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities in both age groups, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities remained significantly lower in the newborn pig heart during ischemia and reperfusion. Oxidized glutathione release from the neonatal pig hearts was at minimum levels before ischemia, but it increased 10-fold at the onset of reperfusion and was significantly higher in the newborn heart. This indicates that generation of oxygen free radicals was enhanced in the newborn compared with that in the week-old heart. The increase in phospholipase A2 activity and decrease in acyl CoA synthetase and lysophosphatidylcholine acyl transferase activities during ischemia and reperfusion were associated with comparable loss of membrane phospholipids and accumulation of lysophosphatidylcholine and free fatty acids in both age groups, except that oleic acid content was significantly higher in the newborn heart during reperfusion. Myocardial damage appears to be potentiated in the newborn heart during reperfusion, as evidenced by higher release of creatine kinase and a lower content of high-energy phosphates. These results indicate that oxygen free radicals may play a crucial role in the occurrence of reperfusion injury in immature hearts. PMID:3665015

  20. Heart to heart - a custodian journal on grassroots ergonomics

    SciTech Connect

    Zalk, D. M., LLNL

    1998-03-04

    When we first requested to speak at the American Society of Safety Engineer`s Professional Development Conference in Seattle, Washington, the theme we had in mind for this program paper was quite different. It definitely was not anything like our title, `Heart to Heart` implies. It was more formal and traditional. Give you figures, diagrams and the like. But two years later, we have come to another conclusion, to tell you the story about how a group of custodians and health & safety professionals dreamed big dreams and they came true. In order to understand what occurred, we first need to start at the very beginning with the Custodian Quality Improvement Team (CQIT). This group had been formed by the Plant Engineering Department at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) located in Livermore, California. LLNL is operated by the University of California for The U.S.Department of Energy. It is the premier applied physics research laboratory in the world. Plant Engineering (PE) is much like a Public Works Department. PE has all of the crafts, such as plumbers and electricians, who do maintenance-type work, as well as the engineering and construction employees. PE maintain the utilities, constructs new buildings and takes care of old ones. They take of the roads and clean the buildings and landscape the campus. So the Custodian Shop and its some 150 employees is a member of the PE family so to speak. The CQIT had decided to investigate ways they could reduce the number of injuries they were having. They invited health and safety professionals, David Zalk (an Industrial Hygienist) and Jack Tolley (Safety Engineer) to consult with them about this. They are both Hazards Control Team 4 members at LLNL. They were both interested in ergonomics and suggested that an approach to reducing their injuries might lie in studying how the custodians actually do their work. David has extensive training in ergonomics, and Jack simply had a long-time interest in ergonomics for

  1. Targeting the Innate Immune Response to Improve Cardiac Graft Recovery after Heart Transplantation: Implications for the Donation after Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Toldo, Stefano; Quader, Mohammed; Salloum, Fadi N; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Heart transplantation (HTx) is the ultimate treatment for end-stage heart failure. The number of patients on waiting lists for heart transplants, however, is much higher than the number of available organs. The shortage of donor hearts is a serious concern since the population affected by heart failure is constantly increasing. Furthermore, the long-term success of HTx poses some challenges despite the improvement in the management of the short-term complications and in the methods to limit graft rejection. Myocardial injury occurs during transplantation. Injury initiated in the donor as result of brain or cardiac death is exacerbated by organ procurement and storage, and is ultimately amplified by reperfusion injury at the time of transplantation. The innate immune system is a mechanism of first-line defense against pathogens and cell injury. Innate immunity is activated during myocardial injury and produces deleterious effects on the heart structure and function. Here, we briefly discuss the role of the innate immunity in the initiation of myocardial injury, with particular focus on the Toll-like receptors and inflammasome, and how to potentially expand the donor population by targeting the innate immune response.

  2. Targeting the Innate Immune Response to Improve Cardiac Graft Recovery after Heart Transplantation: Implications for the Donation after Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Toldo, Stefano; Quader, Mohammed; Salloum, Fadi N; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Heart transplantation (HTx) is the ultimate treatment for end-stage heart failure. The number of patients on waiting lists for heart transplants, however, is much higher than the number of available organs. The shortage of donor hearts is a serious concern since the population affected by heart failure is constantly increasing. Furthermore, the long-term success of HTx poses some challenges despite the improvement in the management of the short-term complications and in the methods to limit graft rejection. Myocardial injury occurs during transplantation. Injury initiated in the donor as result of brain or cardiac death is exacerbated by organ procurement and storage, and is ultimately amplified by reperfusion injury at the time of transplantation. The innate immune system is a mechanism of first-line defense against pathogens and cell injury. Innate immunity is activated during myocardial injury and produces deleterious effects on the heart structure and function. Here, we briefly discuss the role of the innate immunity in the initiation of myocardial injury, with particular focus on the Toll-like receptors and inflammasome, and how to potentially expand the donor population by targeting the innate immune response. PMID:27322252

  3. Targeting the Innate Immune Response to Improve Cardiac Graft Recovery after Heart Transplantation: Implications for the Donation after Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Toldo, Stefano; Quader, Mohammed; Salloum, Fadi N.; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Heart transplantation (HTx) is the ultimate treatment for end-stage heart failure. The number of patients on waiting lists for heart transplants, however, is much higher than the number of available organs. The shortage of donor hearts is a serious concern since the population affected by heart failure is constantly increasing. Furthermore, the long-term success of HTx poses some challenges despite the improvement in the management of the short-term complications and in the methods to limit graft rejection. Myocardial injury occurs during transplantation. Injury initiated in the donor as result of brain or cardiac death is exacerbated by organ procurement and storage, and is ultimately amplified by reperfusion injury at the time of transplantation. The innate immune system is a mechanism of first-line defense against pathogens and cell injury. Innate immunity is activated during myocardial injury and produces deleterious effects on the heart structure and function. Here, we briefly discuss the role of the innate immunity in the initiation of myocardial injury, with particular focus on the Toll-like receptors and inflammasome, and how to potentially expand the donor population by targeting the innate immune response. PMID:27322252

  4. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death.

  5. The second heart field.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    Ten years ago, a population of cardiac progenitor cells was identified in pharyngeal mesoderm that gives rise to a major part of the amniote heart. These multipotent progenitor cells, termed the second heart field (SHF), contribute progressively to the poles of the elongating heart tube during looping morphogenesis, giving rise to myocardium, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells. Research into the mechanisms of SHF development has contributed significantly to our understanding of the properties of cardiac progenitor cells and the origins of congenital heart defects. Here recent data concerning the regulation, clinically relevant subpopulations, evolution and lineage relationships of the SHF are reviewed. Proliferation and differentiation of SHF cells are controlled by multiple intercellular signaling pathways and a transcriptional regulatory network that is beginning to be elucidated. Perturbation of SHF development results in common forms of congenital heart defects and particular progenitor cell subpopulations are highly relevant clinically, including cells giving rise to myocardium at the base of the pulmonary trunk and the interatrial septum. A SHF has recently been identified in amphibian, fish, and agnathan embryos, highlighting the important contribution of these cells to the evolution of the vertebrate heart. Finally, SHF-derived parts of the heart share a lineage relationship with craniofacial skeletal muscles revealing that these progenitor cells belong to a broad cardiocraniofacial field of pharyngeal mesoderm. Investigation of the mechanisms underlying the dynamic process of SHF deployment is likely to yield further insights into cardiac development and pathology.

  6. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death. PMID:24215748

  7. Injury surveillance in construction: eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Welch, L S; Hunting, K L; Mawudeku, A

    2001-07-01

    Occupational eye injuries are both common and preventable. About 20% of occupational eye injuries occur in construction. To investigate the nature of eye injuries among construction workers, we analyzed a large data set of construction worker injuries. In addition, we interviewed 62 workers with eye injuries to further explore circumstances of eye injury and workers' attitudes and behavior toward the use of eye protection. Eleven percent (363 cases) of the 3,390 construction workers in our data set were treated for eye injuries. Welders, plumbers, insulators, painters/glaziers, supervisors, and electricians had a higher proportion of all injuries due to eye injuries than other trades. Nearly half of the diagnoses were abrasions (46%) followed by foreign objects or splash in the eye (29%), conjunctivitis (10%), and burns (5%). In the interviews with 62 workers, we found that employers very frequently required eye protection for all tasks or for high-risk tasks, and workers report wearing eye protection regularly. However, most did not wear eye protection with top and side shields; if we believe the injuries occurred because a particle or liquid passed between the glasses and the workers' faces, increased use of goggles or full shields would have prevented two-thirds of this group of injuries.

  8. Electrical Injury-Induced Complete Atrioventricular Block: Is Permanent Pacemaker Required?

    PubMed

    Beton, Osman; Efe, Tolga Han; Kaya, Hakki; Bilgin, Murat; Dinc Asarcikli, Lale; Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2015-01-01

    A considerable percentage of electrical injuries occur as a result of work activities. Electrical injury can lead to various cardiovascular disorders: acute myocardial necrosis, myocardial ischemia, heart failure, arrhythmias, hemorrhagic pericarditis, acute hypertension with peripheral vasospasm, and anomalous, nonspecific ECG alterations. Ventricular fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia resulting from electrical injury and is the leading cause of death in electrical (especially low voltage alternating current) injury cases. Asystole, premature ventricular contractions, ventricular tachycardia, conduction disorders (various degrees of heart blocks, bundle-brunch blocks), supraventricular tachycardia, and atrial fibrillation are the other arrhythmic complications of electrical injury. Complete atrioventricular block has rarely been reported and permanent pacemaker was required for the treatment in some of these cases. Herein, we present a case of reversible complete atrioventricular block due to low voltage electrical injury in a young electrical technician. PMID:26839721

  9. Head Injuries in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  10. Sports-specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Plancher, K D; Minnich, J M

    1996-04-01

    Injuries to the upper extremities can happen in any sport. Injury patterns are common to specific sports. Understanding which injuries occur with these sports allows the examiner to diagnose and treat the athlete easily. This article reviews some of the injuries common in sports such as bicycling, golf, gymnastics, martial arts, racquet sports, and weightlifting.

  11. Repair Injured Heart by Regulating Cardiac Regenerative Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Paul, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac regeneration is a homeostatic cardiogenic process by which the sections of malfunctioning adult cardiovascular tissues are repaired and renewed employing a combination of both cardiomyogenesis and angiogenesis. Unfortunately, while high-quality regeneration can be performed in amphibians and zebrafish hearts, mammalian hearts do not respond in kind. Indeed, a long-term loss of proliferative capacity in mammalian adult cardiomyocytes in combination with dysregulated induction of tissue fibrosis impairs mammalian endogenous heart regenerative capacity, leading to deleterious cardiac remodeling at the end stage of heart failure. Interestingly, several studies have demonstrated that cardiomyocyte proliferation capacity is retained in mammals very soon after birth, and cardiac regeneration potential is correspondingly preserved in some preadolescent vertebrates after myocardial infarction. There is therefore great interest in uncovering the molecular mechanisms that may allow heart regeneration during adult stages. This review will summarize recent findings on cardiac regenerative regulatory mechanisms, especially with respect to extracellular signals and intracellular pathways that may provide novel therapeutics for heart diseases. Particularly, both in vitro and in vivo experimental evidences will be presented to highlight the functional role of these signaling cascades in regulating cardiomyocyte proliferation, cardiomyocyte growth, and maturation, with special emphasis on their responses to heart tissue injury. PMID:27799944

  12. Smoking Thickens Heart Wall, Leading to Heart Failure: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160932.html Smoking Thickens Heart Wall, Leading to Heart Failure: Study The more you smoke and the ... Sept. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking leads to heart failure by causing thickened heart walls and reducing ...

  13. Heart to Heart Art: Empowering Homeless Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Jerri; Booth, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    This article describes Heart to Heart Art, an after-school program developed for homeless children and youth at the YWCA in Spokane, Washington. Pre-service teacher candidates from a local university create meaningful activities that engage homeless students in visual art, music, drama, cooking, and community service. Heart to Heart Art was…

  14. Eye injuries in childhood.

    PubMed

    Grin, T R; Nelson, L B; Jeffers, J B

    1987-07-01

    A 3-year survey was conducted of all children with eye injuries admitted to Wills Eye Hospital to determine demographic, etiologic, and prophylactic factors. There were 278 cases, representing 22% of all ocular injuries in children requiring admission. The frequency of childhood ocular injuries is high, often resulting in serious visual impairment. Many of these injuries are preventable. The causes of pediatric eye injuries and preventive measures are discussed.

  15. Pediatric Hand Injuries.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Matthew A; Cogan, Charles J; Adkinson, Joshua M

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric hand injuries are extremely common. Although many hand injuries are adequately managed in the emergency department, some may need evaluation and treatment by a pediatric hand surgeon to ensure a good functional outcome. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of the most common pediatric hand maladies: fingertip injuries/amputation, tendon injuries, and phalangeal and metacarpal fractures. The plastic surgery nurse should be familiar with hand injuries that require intervention to facilitate efficient management and optimal postoperative care. PMID:27606586

  16. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury and associations with short- and long-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Jennifer A.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is strongly associated with increased mortality and other adverse outcomes. Medical researchers have intensively investigated novel biomarkers to predict short- and long-term outcomes of acute kidney injury in many patient care settings, such as cardiac surgery, intensive care units, heart failure, and transplant. Future research should focus on leveraging this relationship to improve enrollment for clinical trials of acute kidney injury. PMID:27239295

  17. [Advance in diagnosis and treatment of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease with traditional Chinese medicines].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Rong; Wang, Jiel; Liu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    To discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, therapies and prescriptions of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease. According to the advance in modern diagnosis and treatment, the authors believed that psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease is closely related with mental stresses, like anxiety, depression and insomnia. It is mostly caused by emotional injury and expressed in heart, liver, spleen and kidney. The pathogenesis is heart-liver hyperactivity, yin deficiency in heart and kidney, and insufficiency in heart and spleen. The full recognition of etiology and pathogenesis of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease and the combined treatment of disease and syndromes are of great significance to reduce mental stress and other risk factors, prevent and treat coronary heart disease and improve prognosis.

  18. Measuring heart beats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Frank

    2014-03-01

    A simple instrument has been constructed to measure heart beats via an earlobe sensor. The pulse rate is determined from a Picoscope trace and pupils may wish to see how this rate changes after modest exertion.

  19. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan of the heart Stress tests (many different types of stress tests exist) Vascular ultrasound, such as carotid ultrasound Venous ultrasound of the arms and legs SURGERIES AND INTERVENTIONS ... these types of procedures, a catheter is inserted through the ...

  20. Hyperkalemia in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Chaudhry M S; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Pitt, Bertram; Piña, Ileana; Zannad, Faiez; Anker, Stefan D; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-10-01

    Disorders of potassium homeostasis can potentiate the already elevated risk of arrhythmia in heart failure. Heart failure patients have a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, which further heightens the risk of hyperkalemia, especially when renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors are used. Acute treatment for hyperkalemia may not be tolerated in the long term. Recent data for patiromer and sodium zirconium cyclosilicate, used to treat and prevent high serum potassium levels on a more chronic basis, have sparked interest in the treatment of hyperkalemia, as well as the potential use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors in patients who were previously unable to take these drugs or tolerated only low doses. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and outcomes of hyperkalemia in heart failure; provides an overview of traditional and novel ways to approach management of hyperkalemia; and discusses the need for further research to optimally treat heart failure.

  1. Hyperkalemia in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Chaudhry M S; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Pitt, Bertram; Piña, Ileana; Zannad, Faiez; Anker, Stefan D; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-10-01

    Disorders of potassium homeostasis can potentiate the already elevated risk of arrhythmia in heart failure. Heart failure patients have a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, which further heightens the risk of hyperkalemia, especially when renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors are used. Acute treatment for hyperkalemia may not be tolerated in the long term. Recent data for patiromer and sodium zirconium cyclosilicate, used to treat and prevent high serum potassium levels on a more chronic basis, have sparked interest in the treatment of hyperkalemia, as well as the potential use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors in patients who were previously unable to take these drugs or tolerated only low doses. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and outcomes of hyperkalemia in heart failure; provides an overview of traditional and novel ways to approach management of hyperkalemia; and discusses the need for further research to optimally treat heart failure. PMID:27687200

  2. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... very fast, but steady, heartbeat. Sick Sinus Syndrome ( SSS ) Sick sinus syndrome is not a disease, but ... the sinus node, is not working properly. In SSS , the heart rate can alternate between slow ( bradycardia ) ...

  3. Keeping Hearts Pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A collaboration between NASA, Dr. Michael DeBakey, Dr. George Noon, and MicroMed Technology, Inc., resulted in a life-saving heart pump for patients awaiting heart transplants. The MicroMed DeBakey VAD functions as a "bridge to heart transplant" by pumping blood throughout the body to keep critically ill patients alive until a donor heart is available. Weighing less than 4 ounces and measuring 1 inch by 3 inches, the pump is approximately one-tenth the size of other currently marketed pulsatile VADs. This makes it less invasive and ideal for smaller adults and children. Because of the pump's small size, less than 5 percent of the patients implanted developed device-related infections. It can operate up to 8 hours on batteries, giving patients the mobility to do normal, everyday activities.The MicroMed DeBakey VAD is a registered trademark of MicroMed Technology, Inc.

  4. Target Heart Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  5. Alcohol and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  6. Protein and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  7. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  8. Meditation and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  9. Stress and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  10. Heart valve surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Valve replacement; Valve repair; Heart valve prosthesis; Mechanical valves, Prosthetic valves ... place. The main types of new valves are: Mechanical -- made of man-made materials, such as metal ( ...

  11. Types of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. This content was last ... heart failure. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  12. Classes of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. HF Resources For Life ... heart failure. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  13. Heart attack first aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... of patients with unstable angina/non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (updating the 2007 guideline and replacing the 2011 ...

  14. Sarcoid heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Dubrey, Simon W; Bell, Alex; Mittal, Tarun K

    2007-01-01

    To this day the aetiology of sarcoidosis continues to elude definition. Partially as a consequence of this, little in the way of new therapies has evolved. The enigma of this condition is that, unusually for a disease with the potential for devastating consequences, many patients show spontaneous resolution and recover. Cardiac involvement can affect individuals of any age, gender or race and has a predilection for the conduction system of the heart. Heart involvement can also cause a dilated cardiomyopathy with consequent progressive heart failure. The most common presentation of this systemic disease is with pulmonary infiltration, but many cases will be asymptomatic and are detected on routine chest radiography revealing lymphadenopathy. Current advances lie in the newer methods of imaging and diagnosing this unusual heart disease. This review describes the pathology and diagnosis of this condition and the newer imaging techniques that have developed for determining cardiac involvement. PMID:17916869

  15. Anatomy of the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... upper chambers, the right and left atria (AY-tree-uh), are shown in purple. The heart's lower chambers, the right and left ventricles (VEN-trih-kuls), are shown in red. Some of the main blood vessels (arteries and ...

  16. Heart, front view (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. The vessels colored blue indicate the transport of blood with relatively low content of oxygen ... carbon dioxide. The vessels colored red indicate the transport of blood with relatively high content of oxygen ...

  17. Picturing the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information You are here Home » SCIENCE EDUCATION SCIENCE EDUCATION SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ... Links for Students Glossary Picturing the Heart SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ...

  18. Stress and your heart

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary heart disease - stress; Coronary artery disease - stress ... Your body responds to stress on many levels. First, it releases stress hormones that make you breathe faster. Your blood pressure goes up. Your muscles ...

  19. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. Circulation . 2013 Oct 15;128(16):e240-327. Epub 2013 Jun 5. PMID: 23741058 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ ...

  20. Heart failure - home monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. Circulation . 2013 Oct 15;128(16):e240-327. Epub 2013 Jun 5. PMID: 23741058 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ ...

  1. Heart Truth for Latinas

    MedlinePlus

    ... for about a fifth. Latinas also have high rates of some factors that increase the risk of developing heart disease, such as diabetes, overweight and obesity, and physical inactivity. But there’s good news too: ...

  2. Heart Murmurs and Your Child (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Heart Murmurs and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Heart ... to know how the heart works. How the Heart Works The normal heart has four chambers and ...

  3. Heart Rate Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the mid 70's, NASA saw a need for a long term electrocardiographic electrode suitable for use on astronauts. Heart Rate Inc.'s insulated capacitive electrode is constructed of thin dielectric film applied to stainless steel surface, originally developed under a grant by Texas Technical University. HRI, Inc. was awarded NASA license and continued development of heart rate monitor for use on exercise machines for physical fitness and medical markets.

  4. Music and the heart.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-11-21

    Music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure (BP), and breathing. Although there is great heterogeneity in methods and quality among previous studies on effects of music on the heart, the following findings emerge from the literature: Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) are higher in response to exciting music compared with tranquilizing music. During musical frissons (involving shivers and piloerection), both HR and RR increase. Moreover, HR and RR tend to increase in response to music compared with silence, and HR appears to decrease in response to unpleasant music compared with pleasant music. We found no studies that would provide evidence for entrainment of HR to musical beats. Corresponding to the increase in HR, listening to exciting music (compared with tranquilizing music) is associated with a reduction of heart rate variability (HRV), including reductions of both low-frequency and high-frequency power of the HRV. Recent findings also suggest effects of music-evoked emotions on regional activity of the heart, as reflected in electrocardiogram amplitude patterns. In patients with heart disease (similar to other patient groups), music can reduce pain and anxiety, associated with lower HR and lower BP. In general, effects of music on the heart are small, and there is great inhomogeneity among studies with regard to methods, findings, and quality. Therefore, there is urgent need for systematic high-quality research on the effects of music on the heart, and on the beneficial effects of music in clinical settings. PMID:26354957

  5. Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongdong; Wang, Jun; Li, Hui; Xue, Mengzhou; Ji, Ailing; Li, Yanzhang

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is one of the major causes of high morbidity, disability, and mortality in the world. I/R injury remains a complicated and unresolved situation in clinical practice, especially in the field of solid organ transplantation. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third gaseous signaling molecule and plays a broad range of physiological and pathophysiological roles in mammals. H2S could protect against I/R injury in many organs and tissues, such as heart, liver, kidney, brain, intestine, stomach, hind-limb, lung, and retina. The goal of this review is to highlight recent findings regarding the role of H2S in I/R injury. In this review, we present the production and metabolism of H2S and further discuss the effect and mechanism of H2S in I/R injury. PMID:26064416

  6. Congenital Heart Defects and CCHD

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart. Heart valves. These open and close to control blood flow to and from the heart. Arteries and veins. Arteries are blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart to the body. Veins are blood vessels that carry blood from ...

  7. [Obesity and heart].

    PubMed

    Svačina, Štěpán

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular complications of obesity are traditionally considered an important complication of obesity. Obesity itself is probably not direct cause of atherosclerosis or coronary heart disease. This may occur indirectly in metabolic complications of obesity, especially diabetes and metabolic syndrome. However, thrombogenicity potential of obesity contributes to embolism and atherosclerosis development. In cardiology is well-known a phenomenon of obesity paradox when obese patients have better prognosis than thin. This is the case of heart failure and some other cardiovascular diseases. Recently, a new concept has emerged of myokines - hormones from muscle tissue that have extensive protective effects on organism and probably on heart. Whether heart is a source of myokines is uncertain. However, undoubted importance has epicardial and pericardial fatty tissue. The epicardial fatty tissue has mainly protective effects on myocardium. This fatty tissue may produce factors of inflammation affecting the myocardium. Relationship between amount of epicardial fatty tissue and coronary heart disease is rather pathogenic. Currently, it is certain that obesity brings more metabolic and cancer complications than cardiovascular and accurate contribution to pathogenic or protective character of fatty tissue in cardiology requires further research. Nevertheless, the conclusion is that adipose tissue of organism and around the heart may be in some circumstances beneficial.

  8. Decompensated heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Mangini, Sandrigo; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Braga, Fabiana Goulart Marcondes; Bacal, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heart failure is a disease with high incidence and prevalence in the population. The costs with hospitalization for decompensated heart failure reach approximately 60% of the total cost with heart failure treatment, and mortality during hospitalization varies according to the studied population, and could achieve values of 10%. In patients with decompensated heart failure, history and physical examination are of great value for the diagnosis of the syndrome, and also can help the physician to identify the beginning of symptoms, and give information about etiology, causes and prognosis of the disease. The initial objective of decompensated heart failure treatment is the hemodynamic and symptomatic improvement preservation and/or improvement of renal function, prevention of myocardial damage, modulation of the neurohormonal and/or inflammatory activation and control of comorbidities that can cause or contribute to progression of the syndrome. According to the clinical-hemodynamic profile, it is possible to establish a rational for the treatment of decompensated heart failure, individualizing the proceedings to be held, leading to reduction in the period of hospitalization and consequently reducing overall mortality. PMID:24136770

  9. Troponins in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Omland, T; Røsjø, H; Giannitsis, E; Agewall, S

    2015-03-30

    The signs and symptoms of heart failure are frequently unspecific and correlate poorly with objective indices of cardiac function. Objective assessment of cardiac function by echocardiography or other imaging modalities also correlate poorly with symptomatic status and functional capacity. Accordingly, there is a need for circulating biomarkers that can provide incremental diagnostic and prognostic information to the existing armamentarium of tests. The introduction of more sensitive assays that allow determination of very low circulating concentrations of the myofibrillar proteins cardiac troponin I and T has not only resulted in improved diagnostic accuracy in the setting of acute coronary syndromes. The high sensitivity assays have also shown that cardiac troponins are frequently found chronically circulating in a variety of acute and chronic, cardiac and non-cardiac disease conditions, including acute heart failure and chronic symptomatic and asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction. Cardiac troponin I and T provide may provide clinically useful prognostic information both concerning the future risk of developing heart failure in asymptomatic subjects and the risk of fatal events and hospital admissions in those with already established heart failure This review summarizes current literature on the clinical performance and utility of cardiac troponin measurements as diagnostic and prognostic tools in patients with symptomatic heart failure, as well as in those with asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction, and clinical phenotypes at high risk for developing heart failure, including stable coronary artery disease, left ventricular hypertrophy, and aortic stenosis.

  10. Optical imaging of irradiated and non-irradiated hearts (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolin, Stephanie; Chen, Guanchu; Medhora, Meetha M.; Camara, Amadou K. S.; Ranji, Mahsa

    2016-03-01

    Objective: In this study, the metabolic state of the heart tissue is studied in a rodent model of ischemia and reperfusion (IR) in rats exposed to irradiation injury using a cryofluorescence imaging technique. Mitochondrial metabolic state is evaluated by autofluorescence of mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH and FAD. The redox ratio (NADH/FAD) is used as a biochemical/metabolic marker of oxidative stress, before, during and after IR. Materials and methods: Hearts were extracted from non-irradiated (control) and irradiated rats (Irr) given 15 Gy whole thorax irradiation rats (WTI). After 35 days, before the onset of radiation pneumonitis, these two groups of hearts were subjected to one of three treatments; Time control (TC; hearts perfused for the duration of the protocol without ischemia or IR), 25 minutes ischemia with no reperfusion and 25 minutes ischemia followed by 60 minutes reperfusion (IR). Hearts were removed from the Langendorff perfusion system and immediately snap frozen in liquid N2 to preserve the metabolic state after injury; 3-dimensional (3D) cryo-fluorescent imager was used to obtain in fixed time NADH and FAD fluorescence images and their distribution across the entire ventricles. In this study, a 30-μm axial resolution was used resulting in 550 cross-section images per heart. The 3D images of the redox ratio and their respective histograms were calculated in the six groups of hearts. Results: We compared the mean values of the redox ratio in each group, which demonstrate a reduced mitochondrial redox state in both irradiated and non-irradiated ischemic hearts and an oxidized mitochondrial redox state for both irradiated and non-irradiated ischemia-reperfusion hearts compared to control hearts. For non-irradiated hearts, ischemia and IR injuries resulted respectively in 61% increase and 54% decrease in redox ratio when compared with TC. For irradiated hearts, ischemia and IR injuries resulted respectively in 90% increase and 50% decrease

  11. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, Giovanna; Constine, Louis S.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Correa, Candace; Pierce, Lori J.; Allen, Aaron M.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2010-03-01

    The literature is reviewed to identify the main clinical and dose-volume predictors for acute and late radiation-induced heart disease. A clear quantitative dose and/or volume dependence for most cardiac toxicity has not yet been shown, primarily because of the scarcity of the data. Several clinical factors, such as age, comorbidities and doxorubicin use, appear to increase the risk of injury. The existing dose-volume data is presented, as well as suggestions for future investigations to better define radiation-induced cardiac injury.

  12. Cardioprotection in ischaemia–reperfusion injury: novel mechanisms and clinical translation

    PubMed Central

    Altamirano, Francisco; Wang, Zhao V; Hill, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In recent decades, robust successes have been achieved in conquering the acutely lethal manifestations of heart disease. Nevertheless, the prevalence of heart disease, especially heart failure, continues to rise. Among the precipitating aetiologies, ischaemic disease is a leading cause of heart failure. In the context of ischaemia, the myocardium is deprived of oxygen and nutrients, which elicits a cascade of events that provokes cell death. This ischaemic insult is typically coupled with reperfusion, either spontaneous or therapeutically imposed, wherein blood supply is restored to the previously ischaemic tissue. While this intervention limits ischaemic injury, it triggers a new cascade of events that is also harmful, viz. reperfusion injury. In recent years, novel insights have emerged regarding mechanisms of ischaemia–reperfusion injury, and some hold promise as targets of therapeutic relevance. Here, we review a select number of these pathways, focusing on recent discoveries and highlighting prospects for therapeutic manipulation for clinical benefit. PMID:26173176

  13. Rac1-PAK2 pathway is essential for zebrafish heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiangwen; He, Quanze; Li, Guobao; Ma, Jinmin; Zhong, Tao P

    2016-04-15

    P-21 activated kinases, or PAKs, are serine-threonine kinases that play important roles in diverse heart functions include heart development, cardiovascular development and function in a range of models; however, the mechanisms by which PAKs mediate heart regeneration are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that PAK2 and PAK4 expression is induced in cardiomyocytes and vessels, respectively, following zebrafish heart injury. Inhibition of PAK2 and PAK4 using a specific small molecule inhibitor impedes cardiomyocyte proliferation/dedifferentiation and cardiovascular regeneration, respectively. Cdc42 is specifically expressed in the ventricle and may function upstream of PAK2 but not PAK4 under normal conditions and that cardiomyocyte proliferentation during heart regeneration relies on Rac1-mediated activation of Pak2. Our results indicate that PAKs play a key role in heart regeneration.

  14. Optimal Protective Hypothermia in Arrested Mammalian Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Villet, Outi M.; Ge, Ming; Sekhar, Laigam N.; Corson, Marshall A.; Tylee, Tracy S.; Fan, Lu-Ping; Yao, Lin; Zhu, Chun; Olson, Aaron K.; Buroker, Norman E.; Xu, Cheng-Su; Anderson, David L.; Soh, Yong-Kian; Wang, Elise; Chen, Shi-Han; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic hypothermia recommendations have been reported, but the information supporting them is sparse, and reveals a need for the data of target therapeutic hypothermia (TTH) from well-controlled experiments. The core temperature ≤35°C is considered as hypothermia, and 29°C is a cooling injury threshold in pig heart in vivo. Thus, an optimal protective hypothermia (OPH) should be in the range 29–35°C. This study was conducted with a pig cardiopulmonary bypass preparation to decrease the core temperature to 29–35°C range at 20 minutes before and 60 minutes during heart arrest. The left ventricular (LV) developed pressure, maximum of the first derivative of LV (dP/dtmax), cardiac power, heart rate, cardiac output, and myocardial velocity (Vmax) were recorded continuously via an LV pressure catheter and an aortic flow probe. At 20 minutes of off-pump during reperfusion after 60 minutes arrest, 17 hypothermic hearts showed that the recovery of Vmax and dP/dtmax established sigmoid curves that consisted of two plateaus: a good recovery plateau at 29–30.5°C, the function recovered to baseline level (BL) (Vmax=118.4%±3.9% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=120.7%±3.1% of BL, n=6); another poor recovery plateau at 34–35°C (Vmax=60.2%±2.8% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=28.0%±5.9% of BL, p<0.05, n=6; ), which are similar to the four normothermia arrest (37°C) hearts (Vmax=55.9%±4.8% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=24.5%±2.1% of BL, n=4). The 32–32.5°C arrest hearts showed moderate recovery (n=5). A point of inflection (around 30.5–31°C) existed at the edge of a good recovery plateau followed by a steep slope. The point presented an OPH that should be the TTH. The results are concordant with data in the mammalian hearts, suggesting that the TTH should be initiated to cool core temperature at 31°C. PMID:25514569

  15. Bodygraphic Injury Surveillance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Toshiki; Kitamura, Koji; Nishida, Yoshihumi; Motomura, Yoichi; Takano, Tachio; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi

    This paper proposes a new technology,``a bodygraphic injury surveillance system (BISS)'' that not only accumulates accident situation data but also represents injury data based on a human body coordinate system in a standardized and multilayered way. Standardized and multilayered representation of injury enables accumulation, retrieval, sharing, statistical analysis, and modeling causalities of injury across different fields such as medicine, engineering, and industry. To confirm the effectiveness of the developed system, the authors collected 3,685 children's injury data in cooperation with a hospital. As new analyses based on the developed BISS, this paper shows bodygraphically statistical analysis and childhood injury modeling using the developed BISS and Bayesian network technology.

  16. Upper extremity golf injuries.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Michael A; Lee, Steven K; Strauss, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Golf is a global sport enjoyed by an estimated 60 million people around the world. Despite the common misconception that the risk of injury during the play of golf is minimal, golfers are subject to a myriad of potential pathologies. While the majority of injuries in golf are attributable to overuse, acute traumatic injuries can also occur. As the body's direct link to the golf club, the upper extremities are especially prone to injury. A thorough appreciation of the risk factors and patterns of injury will afford accurate diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of further injury.

  17. Neuropathophysiology of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Quillinan, Nidia; Herson, Paco S; Traystman, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Every year in the United States, millions of individuals incur ischemic brain injury from stroke, cardiac arrest, or traumatic brain injury. These acquired brain injuries can lead to death or long-term neurologic and neuropsychological impairments. The mechanisms of ischemic and traumatic brain injury that lead to these deficiencies result from a complex interplay of interdependent molecular pathways, including excitotoxicity, acidotoxicity, ionic imbalance, oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. This article reviews several mechanisms of brain injury and discusses recent developments. Although much is known from animal models of injury, it has been difficult to translate these effects to humans. PMID:27521191

  18. Rehabilitation of basketball injuries.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Gerard A; Chimes, Gary P

    2006-08-01

    Basketball is one of the most popular sports in the United States and throughout the world, and therefore represents one of the most common sources of sports-related injuries. Basketball injuries should be managed by the same general rehabilitation principles as other sports injuries. Additionally, the clinician should be aware not only of general sports injuries but of those injuries most commonly seen in basketball players. By maintaining knowledge of the most common basketball injuries as well as their diagnosis and treatment, the clinician can help to optimize the athlete's return to play and enjoyment of the sport.

  19. Heart Alterations after Domoic Acid Administration in Rats.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Andres C; Cifuentes, José Manuel; Bermúdez, Roberto; Ferreiro, Sara F; Castro, Albina Román; Botana, Luis M

    2016-03-10

    Domoic acid (DA) is one of the best known marine toxins, causative of important neurotoxic alterations. DA effects are documented both in wildlife and experimental assays, showing that this toxin causes severe injuries principally in the hippocampal area. In the present study we have addressed the long-term toxicological effects (30 days) of DA intraperitoneal administration in rats. Different histological techniques were employed in order to study DA toxicity in heart, an organ which has not been thoroughly studied after DA intoxication to date. The presence of DA was detected by immunohistochemical assays, and cellular alterations were observed both by optical and transmission electron microscopy. Although histological staining methods did not provide any observable tissue damage, transmission electron microscopy showed several injuries: a moderate lysis of myofibrils and loss of mitochondrial conformation. This is the first time the association between heart damage and the presence of the toxin has been observed.

  20. Applying the Principles of Homicide by Heart Attack.

    PubMed

    Hlavaty, Leigh; Sung, LokMan

    2016-06-01

    Homicide by heart attack is a well-established model in forensic pathology that describes death elicited during or immediately after a criminal act where a threat or fear of physical injury is present. After its introduction nearly 4 decades ago, the principle has undergone a handful of modifications but still maintains its core concepts. All cases of this nature during a 20-year period at the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office were compared and contrasted for demographics, circumstances and scene investigation, and autopsy and toxicology findings. Of the cases fulfilling the previously established criteria for homicide by heart attack, more than 80% displayed significant changes because of hypertension. This finding coincides with the high prevalence of hypertension in our urban population and highlights the significance of this disease. Also present were minor external and internal injuries in select cases, which reinforce the understanding that physical contact between the decedent and assailant does not preclude this diagnosis. PMID:27049661

  1. Heart Alterations after Domoic Acid Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Andres C.; Cifuentes, José Manuel; Bermúdez, Roberto; Ferreiro, Sara F.; Castro, Albina Román; Botana, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is one of the best known marine toxins, causative of important neurotoxic alterations. DA effects are documented both in wildlife and experimental assays, showing that this toxin causes severe injuries principally in the hippocampal area. In the present study we have addressed the long-term toxicological effects (30 days) of DA intraperitoneal administration in rats. Different histological techniques were employed in order to study DA toxicity in heart, an organ which has not been thoroughly studied after DA intoxication to date. The presence of DA was detected by immunohistochemical assays, and cellular alterations were observed both by optical and transmission electron microscopy. Although histological staining methods did not provide any observable tissue damage, transmission electron microscopy showed several injuries: a moderate lysis of myofibrils and loss of mitochondrial conformation. This is the first time the association between heart damage and the presence of the toxin has been observed. PMID:26978401

  2. Applying the Principles of Homicide by Heart Attack.

    PubMed

    Hlavaty, Leigh; Sung, LokMan

    2016-06-01

    Homicide by heart attack is a well-established model in forensic pathology that describes death elicited during or immediately after a criminal act where a threat or fear of physical injury is present. After its introduction nearly 4 decades ago, the principle has undergone a handful of modifications but still maintains its core concepts. All cases of this nature during a 20-year period at the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office were compared and contrasted for demographics, circumstances and scene investigation, and autopsy and toxicology findings. Of the cases fulfilling the previously established criteria for homicide by heart attack, more than 80% displayed significant changes because of hypertension. This finding coincides with the high prevalence of hypertension in our urban population and highlights the significance of this disease. Also present were minor external and internal injuries in select cases, which reinforce the understanding that physical contact between the decedent and assailant does not preclude this diagnosis.

  3. [Mechanobiology and the Heart].

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Yoshiki

    2016-05-01

    Mechanobiology has been focusing on biological research regarding mechanisms of muscle force generation, or recently sensing and response to the force applied to the tissue or each cell. Therefore, the heart has been one of the target organs and studied extensively for a long time since late 19th century. Its force-length relationship was demonstrated as the Starling's law of the heart, which is one of the most important findings in mechanobiology. In late 20th century, excitation-contraction coupling in the muscle was demonstrated and then, molecular mechanisms are gradually elucidated including calcium homeostasis and signal transductions in various situations: under the effects of catecholamines, other vasoactive agents, or ischemia. Among them, recent findings suggest possible involvement of titin, the giant elastic protein connected with both actin and myosin, with basic mechanism of the Starling's law of the heart Pathological proliferation of the heart as hypertrophic remodeling has also been extensively studied in recent years, and its signal transduction from pressure overload and volume overload to respective morphological changes of the heart chamber are partially clarified.

  4. Unchain my heart: the scientific foundations of cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Dimmeler, Stefanie; Zeiher, Andreas M.; Schneider, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    In humans, the biological limitations to cardiac regenerative growth create both a clinical imperative — to offset cell death in acute ischemic injury and chronic heart failure — and a clinical opportunity; that is, for using cells, genes, and proteins to rescue cardiac muscle cell number or in other ways promote more efficacious cardiac repair. Recent experimental studies and early-phase clinical trials lend credence to the visionary goal of enhancing cardiac repair as an achievable therapeutic target. PMID:15765139

  5. Preconditioning boosts regenerative programmes in the adult zebrafish heart

    PubMed Central

    de Preux Charles, Anne-Sophie; Bise, Thomas; Baier, Felix; Sallin, Pauline; Jaźwińska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    During preconditioning, exposure to a non-lethal harmful stimulus triggers a body-wide increase of survival and pro-regenerative programmes that enable the organism to better withstand the deleterious effects of subsequent injuries. This phenomenon has first been described in the mammalian heart, where it leads to a reduction of infarct size and limits the dysfunction of the injured organ. Despite its important clinical outcome, the actual mechanisms underlying preconditioning-induced cardioprotection remain unclear. Here, we describe two independent models of cardiac preconditioning in the adult zebrafish. As noxious stimuli, we used either a thoracotomy procedure or an induction of sterile inflammation by intraperitoneal injection of immunogenic particles. Similar to mammalian preconditioning, the zebrafish heart displayed increased expression of cardioprotective genes in response to these stimuli. As zebrafish cardiomyocytes have an endogenous proliferative capacity, preconditioning further elevated the re-entry into the cell cycle in the intact heart. This enhanced cycling activity led to a long-term modification of the myocardium architecture. Importantly, the protected phenotype brought beneficial effects for heart regeneration within one week after cryoinjury, such as a more effective cell-cycle reentry, enhanced reactivation of embryonic gene expression at the injury border, and improved cell survival shortly after injury. This study reveals that exposure to antecedent stimuli induces adaptive responses that render the fish more efficient in the activation of the regenerative programmes following heart damage. Our results open a new field of research by providing the adult zebrafish as a model system to study remote cardiac preconditioning. PMID:27440423

  6. Worsening renal function in heart failure: the need for a consensus definition.

    PubMed

    Sheerin, Noella J; Newton, Phillip J; Macdonald, Peter S; Leung, Dominic Y C; Sibbritt, David; Spicer, Stephen Timothy; Johnson, Kay; Krum, Henry; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-07-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure is a common cause of hospitalisation. This is a period of vulnerability both in altered pathophysiology and also the potential for iatrogenesis due to therapeutic interventions. Renal dysfunction is often associated with heart failure and portends adverse outcomes. Identifying heart failure patients at risk of renal dysfunction is important in preventing progression to chronic kidney disease or worsening renal function, informing adjustment to medication management and potentially preventing adverse events. However, there is no working or consensus definition in international heart failure management guidelines for worsening renal function. In addition, there appears to be no concordance or adaptation of chronic kidney disease guidelines by heart failure guideline development groups for the monitoring of chronic kidney disease in heart failure. Our aim is to encourage the debate for an agreed definition given the prognostic impact of worsening renal function in heart failure. We present the case for the uptake of the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria for acute kidney injury with some minor alterations. This has the potential to inform study design and meta-analysis thereby building the knowledgebase for guideline development. Definition consensus supports data element, clinical registry and electronic algorithm innovation as instruments for quality improvement and clinical research for better patient outcomes. In addition, we recommend all community managed heart failure patients have their baseline renal function classified and routinely monitored in accordance with established renal guidelines to help identify those at increased risk for worsening renal function or progression to chronic kidney disease.

  7. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brachial Plexus Injuries Information Page Synonym(s): Erb's Palsy Table of Contents ( ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What are Brachial Plexus Injuries? The brachial plexus is a network of nerves ...

  8. Teeth Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Teeth Injuries KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Teeth Injuries ... or young child injures the gums or baby teeth: Apply pressure to the area (if it's bleeding) ...

  9. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  10. What Are Sports Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 06:02 Size: 11.7 MB November 2014 What Are Sports Injuries? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Research Is Being Done on Treating Sports Injuries? What’s the Difference Between an Acute and a Chronic ...

  11. Football injuries: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Olson, David E; Sikka, Robby Singh; Hamilton, Abigail; Krohn, Austin

    2011-01-01

    Football is one of the most popular sports in the United States and is the leading cause of sports-related injury. A large focus in recent years has been on concussions, sudden cardiac death, and heat illness, all thought to be largely preventable health issues in the young athlete. Injury prevention through better understanding of injury mechanisms, education, proper equipment, and practice techniques and preseason screening may aid in reducing the number of injuries. Proper management of on-field injuries and health emergencies can reduce the morbidity associated with these injuries and may lead to faster return to play and reduced risk of future injury. This article reviews current concepts surrounding frequently seen football-related injuries.

  12. Facial Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Face injuries and disorders can cause pain and affect how you look. In severe cases, they can affect sight, ... your nose, cheekbone and jaw, are common facial injuries. Certain diseases also lead to facial disorders. For ...

  13. Hip Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... or falling can all sometimes lead to hip injuries. These include Strains Bursitis Dislocations Fractures Certain diseases also lead to hip injuries or problems. Osteoarthritis can cause pain and limited ...

  14. Arm Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of muscles, joints, tendons and other connective tissue. Injuries to any of these parts of the arm ... a fall or an accident. Types of arm injuries include Tendinitis and bursitis Sprains Dislocations Broken bones ...

  15. Hand Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wrist, often making your fingers feel numb Injuries that result in fractures, ruptured ligaments and dislocations ... deformity Tendinitis - irritation of the tendons Disorders and injuries of your fingers and thumb

  16. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to those nerves. Symptoms ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can occur as a result of shoulder trauma, ...

  17. Recreational softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Shesser, R; Smith, M; Ellis, P; Brett, S; Ott, J E

    1985-05-01

    Every patient who presented to an urban teaching hospital's emergency department during one season complaining of an injury sustained while playing softball was interviewed to determine the parameters of play associated with the injury. Trends were noticed toward increased frequency of injury to experienced players late in the season. A fall was the most common mechanism of injury, and player location at the time of injury was equally divided between the basepath and defense. Very few players were injured at bat. No conclusion could be drawn about the protection afforded a player from the use of a mitt or cleats. The relative rate of injury was estimated to be 2.26 injuries per 1,000 players per day, making the risk of injury for softball participants about 50% of that for recreational skiers.

  18. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Karl B.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the medical literature on head injuries in soccer and concludes that protective headgear to reduce these injuries may not be as effective as rule changes and other measures, such as padding goal posts. (IAH)

  19. Eye Injuries in Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... these injuries can be prevented. Overall, basketball and baseball cause the most eye injuries, followed by water ... involve body contact. Some high-risk sports are baseball, basketball, hockey, football, lacrosse, tennis and other racquet ...

  20. Robotic heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Zenati, M A

    2001-01-01

    Advances in computer and robotic technology are transforming cardiac surgery, overcoming the limitations of conventional endoscopic tools. Using minimal access through 5 millimeter ports, computer-enhanced instruments provide superhuman dexterity through tremor filtration and motion scaling, and are capable of precise manipulation in confined body cavities. Using these technologies, endoscopic beating heart coronary bypass surgery as well as complex mitral valve repairs have been performed in the last few years. However, the current world experience with robotic heart surgery is mostly anecdotal, retrospective, and noncontrolled. Results of rigorous prospective randomized studies in the United States under Food and Drug Administration approved protocols, are awaited. The use of robotic telemanipulation technology for heart surgery is restricted in the United States to patients enrolled in clinical studies in a few elite centers. Further refinement in robotic and image-guided technology for cardiac surgery may further expand the use of computer enhanced instrumentation in the near future.

  1. Syndecans in heart fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Ida G; Herum, Kate M; Carlson, Cathrine C; Christensen, Geir

    2016-09-01

    Heart disease is a deadly syndrome affecting millions worldwide. It reflects an unmet clinical need, and the disease mechanisms are poorly understood. Cardiac fibrosis is central to heart disease. The four-membered family of transmembrane proteoglycans, syndecan-1 to -4, is believed to regulate fibrosis. We review the current literature concerning syndecans in cardiac fibrosis. Syndecan expression is up-regulated in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli in various forms of heart disease with fibrosis. Mice lacking syndecan-1 and -4 show reduced activation of pro-fibrotic signaling and increased cardiac rupture upon infarction indicating an important role for these molecules. Whereas the short cytoplasmic tail of syndecans regulates signaling, their extracellular part, substituted with heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains, binds a plethora of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules involved in fibrosis, e.g., collagens, growth factors, cytokines, and immune cell adhesion proteins. Full-length syndecans induce pro-fibrotic signaling, increasing the expression of collagens, myofibroblast differentiation factors, ECM enzymes, growth factors, and immune cell adhesion molecules, thereby also increasing cardiac stiffness and preventing cardiac rupture. Upon pro-inflammatory stimuli, syndecan ectodomains are enzymatically released from heart cells (syndecan shedding). Shed ectodomains affect the expression of ECM molecules, promoting ECM degradation and cardiac rupture upon myocardial infarction. Blood levels of shed syndecan-1 and -4 ectodomains are associated with hospitalization, mortality, and heart remodeling in patients with heart failure. Improved understanding of syndecans and their modifying enzymes in cardiac fibrosis might contribute to the development of compounds with therapeutic potential, and enzymatically shed syndecan ectodomains might constitute a future prognostic tool for heart diseases with fibrosis. Graphical Abstract Graphical abstract summarizing

  2. PET/MRI assessment of the infarcted mouse heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonincontri, Guido; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T.; Sawiak, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure originating from myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Mouse models of ischaemia and reperfusion injury (I/R) are used to study the effects of novel treatment strategies targeting MI, however staging disease and treatment efficacy is a challenge. Damage and recovery can be assessed on the cellular, tissue or whole-organ scale but these are rarely measured in concert. Here, for the first time, we present data showing measures of injury in infarcted mice using complementary techniques for multi-modal characterisation of the heart. We use in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess heart function with cine-MRI, hindered perfusion with late gadolinium enhancement imaging and muscular function with displacement encoded with stimulated echoes (DENSE) MRI. These measures are followed by positron emission tomography (PET) with 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose to assess cellular metabolism. We demonstrate a protocol combining each of these measures for the same animal in the same imaging session and compare how the different markers can be used to quantify cardiac recovery on different scales following injury.

  3. Softball Pitching and Injury.

    PubMed

    Lear, Aaron; Patel, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    The windmill softball pitch generates considerable forces about the athlete's shoulder and elbow. The injury pattern of softball pitchers seems to be primarily overuse injury, and they seem not to suffer the same volume of injury that baseball pitchers do. This article will explore softball pitching techniques, kinetics and kinematics of the windmill pitch, epidemiology of softball pitchers, and discuss possible etiologies of softball pitching injuries.

  4. Baseball/lacrosse injuries.

    PubMed

    Casazza, B A; Rossner, K

    1999-02-01

    With the expansion of baseball into all age groups, the game is becoming as much a recreational sport as a youth sport. Throwing arm injuries eventually limit the participation of most players. Analysis is made of these injuries with the goal of complete rehabilitation for the baseball player. Lacrosse has also seen an increase in popularity as a recreational sport. Analysis of lacrosse injuries and rehabilitation of the most common injuries is reviewed.

  5. Softball Pitching and Injury.

    PubMed

    Lear, Aaron; Patel, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    The windmill softball pitch generates considerable forces about the athlete's shoulder and elbow. The injury pattern of softball pitchers seems to be primarily overuse injury, and they seem not to suffer the same volume of injury that baseball pitchers do. This article will explore softball pitching techniques, kinetics and kinematics of the windmill pitch, epidemiology of softball pitchers, and discuss possible etiologies of softball pitching injuries. PMID:27618243

  6. Acute inflammation stimulates a regenerative response in the neonatal mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunyong; Nie, Yu; Lian, Hong; Liu, Rui; He, Feng; Huang, Huihui; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac injury in neonatal 1-day-old mice stimulates a regenerative response characterized by reactive cardiomyocyte proliferation, which is distinguished from the fibrotic repair process in adults. Acute inflammation occurs immediately after heart injury and has generally been believed to exert a negative effect on heart regeneration by promoting scar formation in adults; however, little is known about the role of acute inflammation in the cardiac regenerative response in neonatal mice. Here, we show that acute inflammation induced cardiomyocyte proliferation after apical intramyocardial microinjection of immunogenic zymosan A particles into the neonatal mouse heart. We also found that cardiac injury-induced regenerative response was suspended after immunosuppression in neonatal mice, and that cardiomyocytes could not be reactivated to proliferate after neonatal heart injury in the absence of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), the major downstream effector of IL-6 signaling, decreased reactive cardiomyocyte proliferation after apical resection. Our results indicate that acute inflammation stimulates the regenerative response in neonatal mouse heart, and suggest that modulation of inflammatory signals might have important implications in cardiac regenerative medicine.

  7. Changing Role of Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kittleson, Michelle M

    2016-07-01

    Heart transplantation has become standard of care for end-stage heart failure. Challenges include the limited supply of donor organs and the increased complexity of heart transplant candidates who are at higher risk for poor outcomes. Recent advances may address these challenges, including proposed changes in heart transplant allocation policy, a better understanding of the definition and management of primary graft dysfunction, and advances in the management of sensitized heart transplant candidates. Developments in these areas may result in more equitable distribution and expansion of the donor pool and improved quality of life and survival for heart transplant recipients. PMID:27371517

  8. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  9. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  10. Prevention of Football Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Kirkendall, Donald T; Junge, Astrid; Dvorak, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Every sport has a unique profile of injury and risk of injury. In recent years, there have been numerous attempts at conducting injury prevention trials for specific injuries or for injuries within specific sports to provide evidence useful to the sports medicine and sport community. Football has been a focus of a number of randomized injury prevention trials. Methods MEDLINE was searched with the first order keywords of “injury prevention” and “sport”. This list was restricted to “clinical trial” or “randomized controlled trial” which had been conducted on children and adults whose goal was preventing common football injuries. Our objective was to find studies with an exercise-based training program, thus projects that used mechanical interventions were excluded. Results A structured, generalized warm-up has been shown to be effective at preventing common injuries in football, reducing injuries by about one-third. Conclusion The huge participation numbers in the worldwide family of football would suggest that any reduction in injury should have a public health impact. Professionals in sports medicine need to promote injury prevention programs that have been shown to be effective. PMID:22375195

  11. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  12. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  13. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that happen when too much stress is placed on a part of the body, resulting in inflammation (pain and swelling), muscle strain, or tissue damage. This stress generally occurs from ...

  14. Postoperative management of heart failure in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Yuerek, Mahsun; Rossano, Joseph W; Mascio, Christopher E; Shaddy, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) is a well-described entity occurring in 25-65% of pediatric patients undergoing open-heart surgery. With judicious intensive care management of LCOS, most patients have an uncomplicated postoperative course, and within 24 h after cardiopulmonary bypass, the cardiac function returns back to baseline. Some patients have severe forms of LCOS not responsive to medical management alone, requiring temporary mechanical circulatory support to prevent end-organ injury and to decrease myocardial stress and oxygen demand. Occasionally, cardiac function does not recover and heart transplantation is necessary. Long-term mechanical circulatory support devices are used as a bridge to transplantation because of limited availability of donor hearts. Experience in usage of continuous flow ventricular assist devices in the pediatric population is increasing. PMID:26560361

  15. Endogenous cardiac stem cells for the treatment of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Tania; Kearns-Jonker, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies hold promise for regenerating the myocardium after injury. Recent data obtained from phase I clinical trials using endogenous cardiovascular progenitors isolated directly from the heart suggest that cell-based treatment for heart patients using stem cells that reside in the heart provides significant functional benefit and an improvement in patient outcome. Methods to achieve improved engraftment and regeneration may extend this therapeutic benefit. Endogenous cardiovascular progenitors have been tested extensively in small animals to identify cells that improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction. However, the relative lack of large animal models impedes translation into clinical practice. This review will exclusively focus on the latest research pertaining to humans and large animals, including both endogenous and induced sources of cardiovascular progenitors. PMID:24426784

  16. Postoperative management of heart failure in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Yuerek, Mahsun; Rossano, Joseph W; Mascio, Christopher E; Shaddy, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) is a well-described entity occurring in 25-65% of pediatric patients undergoing open-heart surgery. With judicious intensive care management of LCOS, most patients have an uncomplicated postoperative course, and within 24 h after cardiopulmonary bypass, the cardiac function returns back to baseline. Some patients have severe forms of LCOS not responsive to medical management alone, requiring temporary mechanical circulatory support to prevent end-organ injury and to decrease myocardial stress and oxygen demand. Occasionally, cardiac function does not recover and heart transplantation is necessary. Long-term mechanical circulatory support devices are used as a bridge to transplantation because of limited availability of donor hearts. Experience in usage of continuous flow ventricular assist devices in the pediatric population is increasing.

  17. Prometheus’s heart: what lies beneath

    PubMed Central

    Barile, Lucio; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A heart attack kills off many cells in the heart. Parts of the heart become thin and fail to contract properly following the replacement of lost cells by scar tissue. However, the notion that the same adult cardiomyocytes beat throughout the lifespan of the organ and organism, without the need for a minimum turnover, gives way to a fascinating investigations. Since the late 1800s, scientists and cardiologists wanted to demonstrate that the cardiomyocytes cannot be generated after the perinatal period in human beings. This curiosity has been passed down in subsequent years and has motivated more and more accurate studies in an attempt to exclude the presence of renewed cardiomyocytes in the tissue bordering the ischaemic area, and then to confirm the dogma of the heart as terminally differentiated organ. Conversely, peri-lesional mitosis of cardiomyocytes were discovered initially by light microscopy and subsequently confirmed by more sophisticated technologies. Controversial evidence of mechanisms underlying myocardial regeneration has shown that adult cardiomyocytes are renewed through a slow turnover, even in the absence of damage. This turnover is ensured by the activation of rare clusters of progenitor cells interspersed among the cardiac cells functionally mature. Cardiac progenitor cells continuously interact with each other, with the cells circulating in the vessels of the coronary microcirculation and myocardial cells in auto-/paracrine manner. Much remains to be understood; however, the limited functional recovery in human beings after myocardial injury clearly demonstrates weak regenerative potential of cardiomyocytes and encourages the development of new approaches to stimulate this process. PMID:22099480

  18. Expression analysis of Baf60c during heart regeneration in axolotls and neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryo; Koshiba-Takeuchi, Kazuko; Tsuchiya, Megumi; Kojima, Mizuyo; Miyazawa, Asuka; Ito, Kohei; Ogawa, Hidesato; Takeuchi, Jun K

    2016-05-01

    Some organisms, such as zebrafish, urodele amphibians, and newborn mice, have a capacity for heart regeneration following injury. However, adult mammals fail to regenerate their hearts. To know why newborn mice can regenerate their hearts, we focused on epigenetic factors, which are involved in cell differentiation in many tissues. Baf60c (BRG1/BRM-associated factor 60c), a component of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes, has an essential role for cardiomyocyte differentiation at the early heart development. To address the function of Baf60c in postnatal heart homeostasis and regeneration, we examined the detailed expression/localization patterns of Baf60c in both mice and axolotls. In the mouse heart development, Baf60c was highly expressed in the entire heart at the early stages, but gradually downregulated at the postnatal stages. During heart regeneration in neonatal mice and axolotls, Baf60c expression was strongly upregulated after resection. Interestingly, the timing of Baf60c upregulation after resection was consistent with the temporal dynamics of cardiomyocyte proliferation. Moreover, knockdown of Baf60c downregulated proliferation of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes. These data suggested that Baf60c plays an important role in cardiomyocyte proliferation in heart development and regeneration. This is the first study indicating that Baf60c contributes to the heart regeneration in vertebrates. PMID:27125315

  19. Heart Health: Learn the Truth About Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Learn the Truth About Your Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... turn Javascript on. Photo: iStock February is American Heart Month. Now is the time to make sure ...

  20. Living with Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... should be. This includes advice on daily activities, work, leisure time, sex, and exercise. Your level of activity will depend on the stage of your heart failure (how severe it is). Keep all of your ... to get tests and lab work. Your doctor needs the results of these tests ...

  1. Sweet & Simple Clay Hearts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Nothing pleases parents more than receiving handmade gifts from their children, especially if the gift is in the shape of a heart. Nothing pleases an art teacher more than having a lesson that is easy to follow, teaches basic skills, and enables students to be successful with the activity. In this article, the author describes how to create a…

  2. Heart Ed 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lynne E.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Risk factors and health behaviors combine over time to contribute to the disease process. College communities provide a unique environment for health promotion, risk reduction, and primary intervention. Heart health should be an integral part of college…

  3. Feedback on heart attack.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-04-13

    The Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust in London is the largest heart and lung centre in the UK. This article explores a project carried out by nurses at the trust looking at the experiences of having an acute myocardial infarction, and how patients felt about taking part in a research study. PMID:27532071

  4. Educating the Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Sherry

    2007-01-01

    Japan's elementary and junior high schools have a formal, nationally mandated moral curriculum called Kokoro-no-kyoiku--education of the heart. Japanese educators include moral growth as an integral part of one's intellectual growth and believe that democratic societies must promote virtuous decision making. Moral education in Japan nurtures the…

  5. Congenital Heart Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Barmash and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright ©1996 - 2016 C.H.I.N. All rights reserved TX4-390-685 Original site design and HTML by Panoptic Communications

  6. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... obesity and metabolic syndrome —interact to cause harmful physical changes to the heart. Third, diabetes raises the risk ... outlook. The good news is that many lifestyle changes help control multiple risk factors. For example, physical activity can lower your blood pressure, help control ...

  7. Exercise and Your Heart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This pamphlet presents information on the effects of physical activity on the heart and practical guidelines for starting and staying on an exercise program. The following topics are discussed: (1) the benefits of getting sufficient exercise; (2) possible risks in exercising compared to benefits; (3) when to seek doctor's advice and prevention of…

  8. Feedback on heart attack.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-04-13

    The Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust in London is the largest heart and lung centre in the UK. This article explores a project carried out by nurses at the trust looking at the experiences of having an acute myocardial infarction, and how patients felt about taking part in a research study.

  9. Pete Maravich's incredible heart.

    PubMed

    Choi, J H; Kornblum, R N

    1990-07-01

    Postmortem examination of a former professional basketball player revealed an abnormal heart, most notably a single coronary artery. The literature on single coronary arteries is briefly reviewed, and the possible mechanism which caused the patient's condition is considered. This case is particularly unusual because of the patient's profession, which is so physically demanding.

  10. Be Still My Heart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Betsy; Ball, Rhonda

    This project description is designed to show how graphing calculators and calculator-based laboratories (CBLs) can be used to explore topics in physics and health sciences. The activities address such topics as respiration, heart rate, and the circulatory system. Teaching notes and calculator instructions are included as are blackline masters. (MM)

  11. [Trampoline injuries in children].

    PubMed

    Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Antila, Eeva; Korhonen, Jussi; Rättyä, Johanna; Serlo, Willy

    2012-01-01

    Trampolines for home use have become common in Finland during the past ten years, being especially favored by children. Trampoline jumping is beneficial and constructive physical exercise, but poses a significant risk for injuries. The most common injuries include sprains and strains. During summertime, trampoline injuries account for as many as 13% of children's accidents requiring hospital care. Fractures are by far the most common trampoline injuries requiring hospital care. Injuries can be prevented by using safety nets. Only one child at a time is allowed to jump on the trampoline.

  12. Indoor racquet sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Silko, G J; Cullen, P T

    1994-08-01

    Family physicians can care for most patients injured while participating in indoor racquet sports. However, patients with injuries to the eye usually require ophthalmologic referral. The most common injuries that occur in persons participating in indoor racquet sports include contusions, sprains and strains, lacerations, eye injuries, bursitis and tendinitis. Musculoskeletal injuries that merit special consideration include lateral epicondylitis, DeQuervain's tenosynovitis, wrist intersection syndrome, patellar pain syndrome, meniscal injuries, Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis. The family physician plays a critical role in providing patients with information about preventive measures.

  13. Triathlon: running injuries.

    PubMed

    Spiker, Andrea M; Dixit, Sameer; Cosgarea, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    The running portion of the triathlon represents the final leg of the competition and, by some reports, the most important part in determining a triathlete's overall success. Although most triathletes spend most of their training time on cycling, running injuries are the most common injuries encountered. Common causes of running injuries include overuse, lack of rest, and activities that aggravate biomechanical predisposers of specific injuries. We discuss the running-associated injuries in the hip, knee, lower leg, ankle, and foot of the triathlete, and the causes, presentation, evaluation, and treatment of each.

  14. Intracoronary Delivery of Mitochondria to the Ischemic Heart for Cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Douglas B; Yao, Rouan; Akurathi, Vamsidhar; Snay, Erin R; Thedsanamoorthy, Jerusha K; Zurakowski, David; Ericsson, Maria; Friehs, Ingeborg; Wu, Yaotang; Levitsky, Sidney; Del Nido, Pedro J; Packard, Alan B; McCully, James D

    2016-01-01

    integration and widespread distribution throughout the heart and provided cardioprotection from ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:27500955

  15. Intracoronary Delivery of Mitochondria to the Ischemic Heart for Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Douglas B.; Yao, Rouan; Akurathi, Vamsidhar; Snay, Erin R.; Thedsanamoorthy, Jerusha K.; Zurakowski, David; Ericsson, Maria; Friehs, Ingeborg; Wu, Yaotang; Levitsky, Sidney; del Nido, Pedro J.; Packard, Alan B.

    2016-01-01

    integration and widespread distribution throughout the heart and provided cardioprotection from ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:27500955

  16. Give your heart a workout

    MedlinePlus

    ... JM, Ard JD, et al. American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ... risk: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ...

  17. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nutrition (PDF) Obesity (PDF) Peripheral Artery Disease (PDF) ... statistics, please contact the American Heart Association National Center, Office of Science & Medicine at statistics@heart.org . Please direct all ...

  18. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Apr ... topic from the list below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: ...

  19. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... MIDCAB; Robot assisted coronary artery bypass; RACAB; Keyhole heart surgery ... To perform this surgery: The heart surgeon will make a 3- to 5-inch-long surgical cut in the left part of your chest between your ribs ...

  20. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More All About Heart Rate (Pulse) Updated:Apr 19,2016 ... Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure 4 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 5 How to Eat ...

  1. Infant open heart surgery (image)

    MedlinePlus

    During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia. ... During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia.

  2. About the Operation: Heart Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Short gut syndrome Living with Devices Artificial hearts LVADS ICDs Pacemakers Hemodialysis Peritoneal dialysis About Organ Allocation ... because the new heart can act as an assist device if complications occur. Your physician can explain ...

  3. Panic Attack or Heart Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... with echocardiography. It is a good first-line test for a woman with symptoms and risk factors for heart disease. Echocardiography uses sound waves technology to give detailed information about the heart muscle, ...

  4. Injuries in Swedish skydiving

    PubMed Central

    Westman, Anton; Björnstig, Ulf

    2007-01-01

    Objective To create a basis for prevention of modern skydiving injuries. Design Descriptive epidemiological study. Setting National total material. Patients Data on all reported injury events (n = 257) in Swedish skydiving 1999–2003 (total 539 885 jumps) were retrieved from the Swedish Parachute Association. Non‐fatally injured skydivers were sent a questionnaire asking for event and injury details (response rate 89%), and supplementary hospital records were retrieved for the most serious injuries (n = 85). Human, equipment and environmental factors were assessed for risk. Main Outcome Measurements Frequency and severity of injuries. Results Incidence of non‐fatal injury events was 48 per 100 000 jumps. The lower extremities, spine and shoulders were important regions of injury. The most serious injuries were experienced by licensed skydivers, but students in training had a higher injury rate and more often left the sport because of the injury. Of two student‐training systems, one had an incidence less than half that of the other. Conclusions A basis for prevention was created, showing a potential for reduction of frequency and severity of injuries with training and technical interventions. PMID:17224436

  5. Modelling heart rate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual's cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women).

  6. Modelling Heart Rate Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual’s cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women). PMID:25876164

  7. Spinal injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Babcock, J L

    1975-05-01

    Spinal injuries with neurologic sequelae are a rare but catastrophic injury. Many of these injuries might be preventable through proper parent and child education, particularly in water sports and vehicles accidents. A significant number of neurologic injuries are incomplete at the time of injury and proper rescue and initial care may make the difference between life as a quadriplegic and life as a normal individual. Because of the complexity of the management of the child with spinal injuries and their relative rarity, the definitive care is best undertaken at hospitals which specialize in the care of spinal injuries. Progressive deformity of the spine, a problem unique to childhood and adolescent paralysis, is often preventable with prolonged immobilization and protection of the spine. Progressive deformities which interfere with function or result in neurologic deterioration require an aggressive surgical approach. PMID:1124228

  8. Recreational mountain biking injuries.

    PubMed

    Aitken, S A; Biant, L C; Court-Brown, Charles M

    2011-04-01

    Mountain biking is increasing in popularity worldwide. The injury patterns associated with elite level and competitive mountain biking are known. This study analysed the incidence, spectrum and risk factors for injuries sustained during recreational mountain biking. The injury rate was 1.54 injuries per 1000 biker exposures. Men were more commonly injured than women, with those aged 30-39 years at highest risk. The commonest types of injury were wounding, skeletal fracture and musculoskeletal soft tissue injury. Joint dislocations occurred more commonly in older mountain bikers. The limbs were more commonly injured than the axial skeleton. The highest hospital admission rates were observed with head, neck and torso injuries. Protective body armour, clip-in pedals and the use of a full-suspension bicycle may confer a protective effect. PMID:20659880

  9. Acute Kidney Injury Predicts Mortality after Charcoal Burning Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chin; Tseng, Yi-Chia; Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jen-Fen; Lin, Wey-Ran; Wang, I-Kuan; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-01-01

    A paucity of literature exists on risk factors for mortality in charcoal burning suicide. In this observational study, we analyzed the data of 126 patients with charcoal burning suicide that seen between 2002 and 2013. Patients were grouped according to status of renal damage as acute kidney injury (N = 49) or non-acute kidney injury (N = 77). It was found that patients with acute kidney injury suffered severer complications such as respiratory failure (P = 0.002), myocardial injury (P = 0.049), hepatic injury (P < 0.001), rhabdomyolysis (P = 0.045) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (P = 0.028) than patients without acute kidney injury. Moreover, patients with acute kidney injury suffered longer hospitalization duration (16.9 ± 18.3 versus 10.7 ± 10.9, P = 0.002) and had higher mortality rate (8.2% versus 0%, P = 0.011) than patients without injury. In a multivariate Cox regression model, it was demonstrated that serum creatinine level (P = 0.019) and heart rate (P = 0.022) were significant risk factors for mortality. Finally, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with acute kidney injury suffered lower cumulative survival than without injury (P = 0.016). In summary, the overall mortality rate of charcoal burning suicide population was 3.2%, and acute kidney injury was a powerful predictor of mortality. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27430168

  10. Acute Kidney Injury Predicts Mortality after Charcoal Burning Suicide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chin; Tseng, Yi-Chia; Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jen-Fen; Lin, Wey-Ran; Wang, I-Kuan; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-01-01

    A paucity of literature exists on risk factors for mortality in charcoal burning suicide. In this observational study, we analyzed the data of 126 patients with charcoal burning suicide that seen between 2002 and 2013. Patients were grouped according to status of renal damage as acute kidney injury (N = 49) or non-acute kidney injury (N = 77). It was found that patients with acute kidney injury suffered severer complications such as respiratory failure (P = 0.002), myocardial injury (P = 0.049), hepatic injury (P < 0.001), rhabdomyolysis (P = 0.045) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (P = 0.028) than patients without acute kidney injury. Moreover, patients with acute kidney injury suffered longer hospitalization duration (16.9 ± 18.3 versus 10.7 ± 10.9, P = 0.002) and had higher mortality rate (8.2% versus 0%, P = 0.011) than patients without injury. In a multivariate Cox regression model, it was demonstrated that serum creatinine level (P = 0.019) and heart rate (P = 0.022) were significant risk factors for mortality. Finally, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with acute kidney injury suffered lower cumulative survival than without injury (P = 0.016). In summary, the overall mortality rate of charcoal burning suicide population was 3.2%, and acute kidney injury was a powerful predictor of mortality. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27430168

  11. Multimodality Imaging of Myocardial Injury and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Sosnovik, David E.; French, Brent A.; Bengel, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiovascular molecular imaging have come at a rapid pace over the last several years. Multiple approaches have been taken to better understand the structural, molecular, and cellular events that underlie the progression from myocardial injury to myocardial infarction (MI) and, ultimately, to congestive heart failure. Multimodality molecular imaging including SPECT, PET, cardiac MRI, and optical approaches is offering new insights into the pathophysiology of MI and left ventricular remodeling in small-animal models. Targets that are being probed include, among others, angiotensin receptors, matrix metalloproteinases, integrins, apoptosis, macrophages, and sympathetic innervation. It is only a matter of time before these advances are applied in the clinical setting to improve post-MI prognostication and identify appropriate therapies in patients to prevent the onset of congestive heart failure. PMID:20395347

  12. HEART OF MYTH – HEART OF SCIENCE Part I

    PubMed Central

    Bound Alberti, Fay

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the history and meanings of the heart and its diseases as aspects of the histories of science and emotion. Analyzing the twofold meanings of the heart as both bodily object and cultural symbol, it explores the reasons for the apparent conflict in meanings of the heart of science and the heart of emotion in Western medical culture since the 19th century. In Part I, a case study of the writer, economist, and philosopher Harriet Martineau is used to demonstrate and trace that conflict, while Part II highlights the manifold meanings of the heart both in the past and in the present. PMID:26167117

  13. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Aug 24,2016 An important part of ... content was last reviewed on 04/16/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  14. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Mar 25,2016 Patients with ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  15. Heart failure in South America.

    PubMed

    Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-05-01

    Continued assessment of temporal trends in mortality and epidemiology of specific heart failure in South America is needed to provide a scientific basis for rational allocation of the limited health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk and predict the future burden of heart failure. The epidemiology of heart failure in South America was reviewed. Heart failure is the main cause of hospitalization based on available data from approximately 50% of the South American population. The main etiologies of heart failure are ischemic, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, valvular, hypertensive and chagasic etiologies. In endemic areas, Chagas heart disease may be responsible by 41% of the HF cases. Also, heart failure presents high mortality especially in patients with Chagas etiology. Heart failure and etiologies associated with heart failure may be responsible for 6.3% of causes of deaths. Rheumatic fever is the leading cause of valvular heart disease. However, a tendency to reduction of HF mortality due to Chagas heart disease from 1985 to 2006, and reduction in mortality due to HF from 1999 to 2005 were observed in selected states in Brazil. The findings have important public health implications because the allocation of health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk of heart failure should also consider the control of neglected Chagas disease and rheumatic fever in South American countries.

  16. Heart Failure in South America

    PubMed Central

    Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Continued assessment of temporal trends in mortality and epidemiology of specific heart failure in South America is needed to provide a scientific basis for rational allocation of the limited health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk and predict the future burden of heart failure. The epidemiology of heart failure in South America was reviewed. Heart failure is the main cause of hospitalization based on available data from approximately 50% of the South American population. The main etiologies of heart failure are ischemic, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, valvular, hypertensive and chagasic etiologies. In endemic areas, Chagas heart disease may be responsible by 41% of the HF cases. Also, heart failure presents high mortality especially in patients with Chagas etiology. Heart failure and etiologies associated with heart failure may be responsible for 6.3% of causes of deaths. Rheumatic fever is the leading cause of valvular heart disease. However, a tendency to reduction of HF mortality due to Chagas heart disease from 1985 to 2006, and reduction in mortality due to HF from 1999 to 2005 were observed in selected states in Brazil. The findings have important public health implications because the allocation of health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk of heart failure should also consider the control of neglected Chagas disease and rheumatic fever in South American countries. PMID:23597301

  17. TRPM2 Channels Protect against Cardiac Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Barbara A.; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Merali, Salim; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Wang, JuFang; Rajan, Sudarsan; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Gao, Erhe; Barrero, Carlos A.; Mallilankaraman, Karthik; Song, Jianliang; Gu, Tongda; Hirschler-Laszkiewicz, Iwona; Koch, Walter J.; Feldman, Arthur M.; Madesh, Muniswamy; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac TRPM2 channels were activated by intracellular adenosine diphosphate-ribose and blocked by flufenamic acid. In adult cardiac myocytes the ratio of GCa to GNa of TRPM2 channels was 0.56 ± 0.02. To explore the cellular mechanisms by which TRPM2 channels protect against cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, we analyzed proteomes from WT and TRPM2 KO hearts subjected to I/R. The canonical pathways that exhibited the largest difference between WT-I/R and KO-I/R hearts were mitochondrial dysfunction and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Complexes I, III, and IV were down-regulated, whereas complexes II and V were up-regulated in KO-I/R compared with WT-I/R hearts. Western blots confirmed reduced expression of the Complex I subunit and other mitochondria-associated proteins in KO-I/R hearts. Bioenergetic analyses revealed that KO myocytes had a lower mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, ATP levels, and O2 consumption but higher mitochondrial superoxide levels. Additionally, mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU) currents were lower in KO myocytes, indicating reduced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was likely due to both lower ψm and MCU activity. Similar to isolated myocytes, O2 consumption and ATP levels were also reduced in KO hearts. Under a simulated I/R model, aberrant mitochondrial bioenergetics was exacerbated in KO myocytes. Reactive oxygen species levels were also significantly higher in KO-I/R compared with WT-I/R heart slices, consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction in KO-I/R hearts. We conclude that TRPM2 channels protect the heart from I/R injury by ameliorating mitochondrial dysfunction and reducing reactive oxygen species levels. PMID:24492610

  18. What Is a Nuclear Heart Scan?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Nuclear Heart Scan? A nuclear heart scan is a test that provides important ... use it to create pictures of your heart. Nuclear heart scans are used for three main purposes: ...

  19. Lightning injury: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Y L; Tsai, M C; Wu, M H

    1993-08-01

    Lightning injury can cause severe damage to many systems and often results in a high mortality. We report a case of sustained lightning injury in which a 54-year-old woman presented with heart failure, pulmonary edema and consciousness disturbance. The patient was found unconscious, lying face down on the ground of a trash dump on the day of a thunderstorm. No deformities were seen in the extremities, but scattered third degree burns (less than 1%) were found on her neck where her necklace had been. Ventilator and inotropic agents with an adequate fluid supply were used. A Swan-Ganz catheter was inserted for monitoring. The patient was discharged two weeks later with an uneventful clinical course, except for mild neurologic sequelae (amnesia, disorientation).

  20. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease.