Science.gov

Sample records for heart muscle cells

  1. Virgin birth: engineered heart muscle from parthenogenetic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    McSweeney, Sara J.; Schneider, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac muscle restitution, or true regeneration, is an unmet need in the treatment of myocardial infarction (MI), prompting a decade of study with stem cells of many kinds. Among key obstacles to effective cardiac cell grafting are the cost of autologous stem cell–derived cardiomyocytes, the ethical implications of using embryonic stem cell (ESC) products, immunological barriers to allogeneic cells, functional maturation beyond just the correct lineage decision, and the lack of durable engraftment. In this issue of the JCI, Didié and colleagues show that cardiomyocytes made from parthenogenetic stem cells (PSCs) and deployed as engineered heart muscle (EHM) may overcome all of these formidable barriers. PMID:23434596

  2. Cardiac muscle plasticity in adult and embryo by heart-derived progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hidemasa; Chi, Xuan; Bradfute, Steven B; Mishina, Yuji; Pocius, Jennifer; Michael, Lloyd H; Behringer, Richard R; Schwartz, Robert J; Entman, Mark L; Schneider, Michael D

    2004-05-01

    The evidence of cardiomyocyte proliferation in damaged heart implied cardiac regeneration might occur by resident or extra cardiac stem cells. However, the specification and origin of these cells remain unknown. Here, we report using fluorescence-activated cell sorting that cardiac progenitor cells resided in adult heart and colocalized with small capillary vessels, within the stem cell antigen (Sca-1) population expressing high telomerase activity. Notably, hematopoietic stem cells capable of efflux Hoechst 33342, termed side population cells, also were identified within the heart-derived cells. The cardiac progenitor cells (CD45(-)/CD34(-)) express neither cardiac muscle nor endothelial cell markers at an undifferentiated stage. The exposure of 5-azacytidine induced cardiac differentiation, which depends, in part, on Bmpr1a, a type IA receptor for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). The capability of adult Sca1(+) cells to adopt a cardiac muscle in embryogenesis was substantiated by blastocyst injection, using progenitors from the adult hearts of transgenic mice that harbor a bacterial artificial chromosome expressing GFP via the Nkx-2.5 locus. Intravenously injected progenitors, shortly after ischemic/reperfusion, homed and functionally differentiated 3.5% of total left ventricle in the host myocardium. Differentiation included both fusion-independent and fusion-associated components, proved by the Cre/loxP donor/recipient system. Our studies suggest that endogenous cardiac progenitors reside in the adult heart, regenerate cardiomyocytes functionally, and integrate into the existing heart circuitry.

  3. Embryonic and embryonic-like stem cells in heart muscle engineering.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2011-02-01

    Cardiac muscle engineering is evolving rapidly and may ultimately be exploited to (1) model cardiac development, physiology, and pathology; (2) identify and validate drug targets; (3) assess drug safety and efficacy; and (4) provide therapeutic substitute myocardium. The ultimate success in any of these envisioned applications depends on the utility of human cells and their assembly into myocardial equivalents with structural and functional properties of mature heart muscle. Embryonic stem cells appear as a promising cell source in this respect, because they can be cultured reliably and differentiated robustly into cardiomyocytes. Despite their unambiguous cardiogenicity, data on advanced maturation and seamless myocardial integration of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in vivo are sparse. Additional concerns relate to the limited control over cardiomyogenic specification and cardiomyocyte maturation in vitro as well as the risk of teratocarcinoma formation and immune rejection of stem cell implants in vivo. Through the invent of embryonic-like stem cells - such as parthenogenetic stem cells, male germline stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells - some but certainly not all of these issues may be addressed, albeit at the expense of additional concerns. This review will discuss the applicability of embryonic and embryonic-like stem cells in myocardial tissue engineering and address issues that require particular attention before the potential of stem cell-based heart muscle engineering may be fully exploited. This article is part of a special issue entitled, "Cardiovascular Stem Cells Revisited".

  4. Toward Physiological Conditions for Cell Analyses: Forces of Heart Muscle Cells Suspended Between Elastic Micropillars☆

    PubMed Central

    Kajzar, A.; Cesa, C.M.; Kirchgeßner, N.; Hoffmann, B.; Merkel, R.

    2008-01-01

    Almost each mammalian cell permanently applies forces to its environment. These forces are essential for many vital processes such as tissue formation or cell movement. In turn, the environmental conditions of cells strongly affect force production. Here we report on the development of an array of elastomeric micropillars as cellular environment. Within these micropillar arrays, we cultivated rat heart muscle cells (cardiac myocytes). For lattice constants between 20 and 30 μm, cells strongly preferred spanning between the elastic micropillars over adhering to the underlying flat substrate. In addition, the architectures of the cytoskeleton and of protein complexes formed for adhesion were strongly dependent on the environment of the cell. On flat parts of the substrates, we observed prominent stress fibers and focal adhesion sites. In contrast, cells suspended between micropillars exhibited well organized myofibers and costameric adhesions at the locations of Z-bands. These observations argue for close-to-nature environmental conditions within micropillar arrays. Resting as well as contraction forces of myocytes resulted in measurable pillar bending. Using an approximate theoretical treatment of elastically founded micropillars, we calculated average cell forces of 140 nN in the relaxed and 400 nN in the contracted state. PMID:17981895

  5. Loss of Notch3 Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Promotes Severe Heart Failure Upon Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ragot, Hélène; Monfort, Astrid; Baudet, Mathilde; Azibani, Fériel; Fazal, Loubina; Merval, Régine; Polidano, Evelyne; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Delcayre, Claude; Vodovar, Nicolas; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Samuel, Jane-Lise

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension, which is a risk factor of heart failure, provokes adaptive changes at the vasculature and cardiac levels. Notch3 signaling plays an important role in resistance arteries by controlling the maturation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Notch3 deletion is protective in pulmonary hypertension while deleterious in arterial hypertension. Although this latter phenotype was attributed to renal and cardiac alterations, the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. To investigate the role of Notch3 signaling in the cardiac adaptation to hypertension, we used mice with either constitutive Notch3 or smooth muscle cell-specific conditional RBPJκ knockout. At baseline, both genotypes exhibited a cardiac arteriolar rarefaction associated with oxidative stress. In response to angiotensin II-induced hypertension, the heart of Notch3 knockout and SM-RBPJκ knockout mice did not adapt to pressure overload and developed heart failure, which could lead to an early and fatal acute decompensation of heart failure. This cardiac maladaptation was characterized by an absence of media hypertrophy of the media arteries, the transition of smooth muscle cells toward a synthetic phenotype, and an alteration of angiogenic pathways. A subset of mice exhibited an early fatal acute decompensated heart failure, in which the same alterations were observed, although in a more rapid timeframe. Altogether, these observations indicate that Notch3 plays a major role in coronary adaptation to pressure overload. These data also show that the hypertrophy of coronary arterial media on pressure overload is mandatory to initially maintain a normal cardiac function and is regulated by the Notch3/RBPJκ pathway. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Concise Review: Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells and Cardiac Lineage: Potential for Heart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Narmeen; Tchao, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Valuable and ample resources have been spent over the last two decades in pursuit of interventional strategies to treat the unmet demand of heart failure patients to restore myocardial structure and function. At present, it is clear that full restoration of myocardial structure and function is outside our reach from both clinical and basic research studies, but it may be achievable with a combination of ongoing research, creativity, and perseverance. Since the 1990s, skeletal myoblasts have been extensively investigated for cardiac cell therapy of congestive heart failure. Whereas the Myoblast Autologous Grafting in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy (MAGIC) trial revealed that transplanted skeletal myoblasts did not integrate into the host myocardium and also did not transdifferentiate into cardiomyocytes despite some beneficial effects on recipient myocardial function, recent studies suggest that skeletal muscle-derived stem cells have the ability to adopt a cardiomyocyte phenotype in vitro and in vivo. This brief review endeavors to summarize the importance of skeletal muscle stem cells and how they can play a key role to surpass current results in the future and enhance the efficacious implementation of regenerative cell therapy for heart failure. PMID:24371329

  7. Embryonic even skipped-Dependent Muscle and Heart Cell Fates Are Required for Normal Adult Activity, Heart Function, and Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Miki; Wessells, Robert J.; Han, Zhe; Liu, Jiandong; Fitzgerald, Kerry; Yusibova, Galina L.; Zamora, Monica; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Bodmer, Rolf; Jaynes, James B.

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila pair-rule gene even skipped (eve) is required for embryonic segmentation and later in specific cell lineages in both the nervous system and the mesoderm. We previously generated eve mesoderm-specific mutants by combining an eve null mutant with a rescuing transgene that includes the entire locus, but with the mesodermal enhancer removed. This allowed us to analyze in detail the defects that result from a precisely targeted elimination of mesodermal eve expression in the context of an otherwise normal embryo. Absence of mesodermal eve causes a highly selective loss of the entire eve-expressing lineage in this germ layer, including those progeny that do not continue to express eve, suggesting that mesodermal eve precursor specification is not implemented. Despite the resulting absence of a subset of muscles and pericardial cells, mesoderm-specific eve mutants survive to fertile adulthood, providing an opportunity to examine the effects of these developmental abnormalities on adult fitness and heart function. We find that in these mutants, flying ability, myocardial performance under normal and stressed conditions, and lifespan are severely reduced. These data imply a nonautonomous role of the affected pericardial cells and body wall muscles in developing and/or maintaining cardiac performance and possibly other functions contributing to normal lifespan. Given the similarities of molecular-genetic control between Drosophila and vertebrates, these findings suggest that peri/epicardial influences may well be important for proper myocardial function. PMID:16239588

  8. New muscle for old hearts: engineering tissue from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are considered to be promising and innovative therapeutic strategies for heart repair. Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are now available, which combine the advantages of autologous adult stem cells with the unlimited potential of embryonic stem cells for proliferation and differentiation. Intense research has driven dramatic progress in various areas of iPSC technology relevant for clinically applicable iPSC-based cellular therapies. At this point, it is already possible to generate transgene-free autologous iPSCs from small blood samples or hair, to scale up the expansion and differentiation of iPSCs to clinically required dimensions, and to obtain highly enriched cardiomyocyte preparations. On the other hand, critical hurdles such as the targeted specification of distinct cardiomyocyte subpopulations, survival and proper functional integration of cellular transplants after myocardial infarction, and in vitro engineering of prevascularized muscle patches have yet to be overcome. Nevertheless, concepts of cellular cardiomyoplasty seem to have come of age and the first clinical applications of iPSC-based heart repair can be expected within the coming years.

  9. The contribution of stem cell therapy to skeletal muscle remodeling in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Chiara; Vescovo, Giorgio; Ravara, Barbara; Franzin, Chiara; Pozzobon, Michela; Tavano, Regina; Gorza, Luisa; Papini, Emanuele; Vettor, Roberto; De Coppi, Paolo; Thiene, Gaetano; Angelini, Annalisa

    2013-10-03

    The aim of our study was to investigate whether stem cell (SC) therapy with human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFS, fetal stem cells) and rat adipose tissue stromal vascular fraction cells-GFP positive cells (rSVC-GFP) was able to produce favorable effects on skeletal muscle (SM) remodeling in a well-established rat model of right heart failure (RHF). RHF was induced by monocrotaline (MCT) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Three weeks later, four millions of hAFS or rSVC-GFP cells were injected via tail vein. SM remodeling was assessed by Soleus muscle fiber cross sectional area (CSA), myocyte apoptosis, myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition, satellite cells pattern, and SC immunohistochemistry. hAFS and rSVC-GFP injection produced significant SC homing in Soleus (0.68 ± 1.0 and 0.67 ± 0.75% respectively), with a 50% differentiation toward smooth muscle and endothelial cells. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were down regulated to levels similar to those of controls. SC-treated (SCT) rats showed increased CSA (p<0.004 vs MCT) similarly to controls with a reshift toward the slow MHC1 isoform. Apoptosis was significantly decreased (11.12.± 8.8 cells/mm(3) hAFS and 13.1+7.6 rSVC-GFP) (p<0.001 vs MCT) and similar to controls (5.38 ± 3.0 cells/mm(3)). RHF rats showed a dramatic reduction of satellite cells(MCT 0.2 ± 0.06% Pax7 native vs controls 2.60 ± 2.46%, p<0.001), while SCT induced a repopulation of both native and SC derived satellite cells (p<0.005). SC treatment led to SM remodeling with satellite cell repopulation, decreased atrophy and apoptosis. Modulation of the cytokine milieu might play a crucial pathophysiological role with a possible scenario for autologous transplantation of SC in pts with CHF myopathy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. G protein-mediated FMRFamidergic modulation of calcium influx in dissociated heart muscle cells from squid, Loligo forbesii

    PubMed Central

    Chrachri, Abdesslam; Ödblom, Maria; Williamson, Roddy

    2000-01-01

    The actions of the neuropeptide FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2) on the L-type (ICa,L) and T-type (ICa,T) calcium currents were investigated in muscle cells dissociated from the heart of squid, Loligo forbseii. The heart muscle cells could be divided into type I and type II cells, on the basis of morphological differences in the dissociated myocytes. FMRFamide induced a substantial block of the L-type calcium current seen in type I cells; this inhibition was rapid, reversible and dose dependent (IC50 = 0.1 μm). FMRFamide induced an increase in the amplitude of the L-type calcium current in the type II heart muscle cells, but had no effect on the T-type calcium current in either type of dissociated heart muscle cell, even at concentrations much higher than those found to affect the L-type calcium current. Internal dialysis of isolated type I heart muscle cells with guanosine 5′-O-(3-thiotriphosphate (GTPγS, 100 μm), a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, mimicked the FMRFamide inhibition of the Ca2+ current and occluded any further FMRFamide-induced inhibition. Internal dialysis of these cells with guanosine 5′-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDPβS, 100 μm) reduced the FMRFamide-induced inhibition of the peak Ca2+ current. The inhibitory effects of FMRFamide were abolished by pre-incubation of the cells with pertussis toxin (200 ng ml−1). The activation kinetics of ICa,L were not affected by FMRFamide application, nor by internal perfusion with GTPγS, and the FMRFamide-induced reduction in ICa,L was not relieved by large depolarising prepulses. These data indicate that FMRFamide can modulate ICa,L, but not ICa,T, in squid heart muscle cells, and that the underlying G protein pathway is dissimilar to that commonly associated with transmitter modulation of channel activity. The FMRFamide-modulated increase in ICa,L seen in the type II heart muscle cells was not mediated by a PTX-sensitive G protein pathway. PMID:10835048

  11. Modifiers of muscle and heart cell fate specification identified by gain-of-function screen in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bidet, Yannick; Jagla, Teresa; Da Ponte, Jean-Philippe; Dastugue, Bernard; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2003-09-01

    The homeobox genes ladybird in Drosophila and their vertebrate counterparts Lbx1 genes display restricted expression patterns in a subset of muscle precursors and are both implicated in diversification of muscle cell fates. In order to gain new insights into mechanisms controlling conserved aspects of cell fate specification, we have performed a gain-of-function (GOF) screen for modifiers of the mesodermal expression of ladybird genes using a collection of EP element carrying Drosophila lines. Amongst the identified genes, several have been previously implicated in cell fate specification processes, thus validating the strategy of our screen. Observed GOF phenotypes have led us to identification of an important number of candidate genes, whose myogenic and/or cardiogenic functions remain to be investigated. Amongst them, the EP insertions close to rhomboid, yan and rac2 suggest new roles for these genes in diversification of muscle and/or heart cell lineages. The analysis of loss and GOF of rhomboid and yan reveals their new roles in specification of ladybird-expressing precursors of adult muscles (LaPs) and ladybird/tinman-positive pericardial cells. Observed phenotypes strongly suggest that rhomboid and yan act at the level of progenitor and founder cells and contribute to the diversification of mesodermal fates. Our analysis of rac2 phenotypes clearly demonstrates that the altered mesodermal level of Rho-GTPase Rac2 can influence specification of a number of cardiac and muscular cell types including those expressing ladybird. Finding that in rac2 mutants ladybird and even skipped-positive muscle founders are overproduced, indicate a new early function for this gene during segregation of muscle progenitors and/or specification of founder cells. Intriguingly, rhomboid, yan and rac2 act as conserved components of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) signalling pathways, suggesting that RTK signalling constitutes a part of a conserved regulatory network governing

  12. Immunological Properties of Murine Parthenogenetic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes and Engineered Heart Muscle.

    PubMed

    Didié, Michael; Galla, Satish; Muppala, Vijayakumar; Dressel, Ralf; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2017-01-01

    Pluripotent parthenogenetic stem cells (pSCs) can be derived by pharmacological activation of unfertilized oocytes. Homozygosity of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in pSCs makes them an attractive cell source for applications in allogeneic tissue repair. This was recently demonstrated for pSC-based tissue-engineered heart repair. A detailed analysis of immunological properties of pSC-derived cardiomyocytes and engineered heart muscle (EHM) thereof is, however, lacking. The aim of this study was to determine baseline and cytokine-inducible MHC class I and MHC class II as well as programmed death ligand-1 (PDL-1) and co-stimulatory protein (CD40, CD80, CD86) expression in pSC-derived cardiomyocytes and pSC-EHM in vitro and in vivo. Cardiomyocytes from an MHC-homologous (H2(d/d)) pSC-line were enriched to ~90% by making use of a recently developed cardiomyocyte-specific genetic selection protocol. MHC class I and MHC class II expression in cardiomyocytes could only be observed after stimulation with interferon gamma (IFN-γ). PDL-1 was markedly upregulated under IFN-γ. CD40, CD80, and CD86 were expressed at low levels and not upregulated by IFN-γ. EHM constructed from H2(d/d) cardiomyocytes expressed similarly low levels of MHC class I, MHC class II, and costimulatory molecules under basal conditions. However, in EHM only MHC class I, but not MHC class II, molecules were upregulated after IFN-γ-stimulation. We next employed a cocultivation system with MHC-matched and MHC-mismatched splenocytes and T-cells to analyze the immune stimulatory properties of EHMs. Despite MHC-mismatched conditions, EHM did not induce splenocyte or T-cell proliferation in vitro. To evaluate the immunogenicity of pSC-derived cardiomyocytes in vivo, we implanted pSC-derived embryoid bodies after elimination of non-cardiomyocytes (cardiac bodies) under the kidney capsules of MHC-matched and -mismatched mice. Spontaneous beating of cardiac bodies could be observed for 28 days in

  13. miRNA-146a induces vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in a rat model of coronary heart disease via NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z W; Liu, Y F; Wang, S; Li, B

    2015-12-29

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miRNA-146a in modulating the function of vascular smooth muscle cells in a rat model of coronary heart disease. Vascular smooth muscle cells were isolated and cultured from the rat coronary heart disease model and normal rats (controls). miRNA-146a levels were measured in vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease and control rats. The proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and activation of the NF-κB pathway in the vascular smooth muscle cells were detected using the MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The role of the NF-κB pathway in modulating the apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells was investigated by measuring the reactivity of the cells to an NF-κB pathway inhibitor (TPCA-1). Vascular smooth muscle cells from the disease model exhibited higher levels of miRNA-146a than that by the normal controls (P = 0.0024). The vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease showed decreased proliferation and growth and increased apoptosis. miRNA-146a overexpression elevated the rate of cell apoptosis. The NF-κB pathway was activated in vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease. Inhibition of the NF- κB pathway significantly decreased the rate of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in coronary heart disease rats (P = 0.0038). In conclusion, miRNA- 146a was found to induce vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in rats with coronary heart disease via the activation of the NF-κB signal pathway.

  14. Isoproterenol directs hair follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells to differentiate in vitro to cardiac muscle cells which can be induced to form beating heart-muscle tissue sheets.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Aiko; Yashiro, Masateru; Mii, Sumiyuki; Aki, Ryoichi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Nestin-expressing hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells are located in the bulge area of the follicle. Previous studies have shown that HAP stem cells can differentiate to neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. HAP stem cells effected nerve and spinal cord regeneration in mouse models. Recently, we demonstrated that HAP stem cells differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells. The differentiation potential to cardiac muscle cells was greatest in the upper part of the follicle. The beat rate of the cardiac muscle cells was stimulated by isoproterenol. In the present study, we observed that isoproterenol directs HAP stem cells to differentiate to cardiac muscle cells in large numbers in culture compared to HAP stem cells not supplemented with isoproterenol. The addition of activin A, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and basic fibroblast growth factor, along with isoproternal, induced the cardiac muscle cells to form tissue sheets of beating heart muscle cells. These results demonstrate that HAP stem cells have great potential to form beating cardiac muscle cells in tissue sheets.

  15. Expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and downstream muscle-specific proteins in ground squirrel skeletal and heart muscle during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichi; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    The thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) undergoes remarkable adaptive changes during hibernation. Interestingly, skeletal muscle remodelling occurs during the torpor-arousal cycle of hibernation to prevent net muscle loss despite inactivity. Reversible cardiomyocyte hypertrophy occurs in cardiac muscle, allowing the heart to preserve cardiac output during hibernation, while avoiding chronic maladaptive hypertrophy post-hibernation. We propose that calcium signalling proteins [calcineurin (Cn), calmodulin (CaM), and calpain], the nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) family of transcription factors, and the NFAT targets myoferlin and myomaker contribute significantly to adaptations taking place in skeletal and cardiac muscle during hibernation. Protein-level analyses were performed over several conditions: euthermic room temperature (ER), euthermic cold room (EC), entrance into (EN), early (ET), and late torpor (LT) time points, in addition to early (EA), interbout (IA), and late arousal (LA) time points using immunoblotting and DNA-protein interaction (DPI) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISAs). In skeletal and cardiac muscle, NFATc2 protein levels were elevated during torpor. NFATc4 increased throughout the torpor-arousal cycle in both tissues, and NFATc1 showed this trend in cardiac muscle only. NFATc3 showed an elevation in DNA-binding activity but not expression during torpor. Myoferlin protein levels dramatically increased during torpor in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. Myomaker levels also increased significantly in cardiac muscle during torpor. Cardiac Cn levels remained stable, whereas CaM and calpain decreased throughout the torpor-arousal cycle. Activation and/or upregulation of NFATc2, c3, myoferlin, and myomaker at torpor could be part of a stress-response mechanism to preserve skeletal muscle mass, whereas CaM and calpain appear to initiate the rapid reversal of cardiac hypertrophy during arousal through

  16. Bone marrow cells migrate to the heart and skeletal muscle and participate in tissue repair after Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Souza, Bruno S d F; Azevedo, Carine M; d Lima, Ricardo S; Kaneto, Carla M; Vasconcelos, Juliana F; Guimarães, Elisalva T; dos Santos, Ricardo R; Soares, Milena B P

    2014-10-01

    Infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, causes an intense inflammatory reaction in several tissues, including the myocardium. We have previously shown that transplantation of bone marrow cells (BMC) ameliorates the myocarditis in a mouse model of chronic Chagas disease. We investigated the participation of BMC in lesion repair in the heart and skeletal muscle, caused by T. cruzi infection in mice. Infection with a myotropic T. cruzi strain induced an increase in the percentage of stem cells and monocytes in the peripheral blood, as well as in gene expression of chemokines SDF-1, MCP1, 2, and 3 in the heart and skeletal muscle. To investigate the fate of BMC within the damaged tissue, chimeric mice were generated by syngeneic transplantation of green fluorescent protein (GFP(+) ) BMC into lethally irradiated mice and infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Migration of GFP(+) BMC to the heart and skeletal muscle was observed during and after the acute phase of infection. GFP(+) cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells were present in heart sections of chimeric chagasic mice. GFP(+) myofibres were observed in the skeletal muscle of chimeric mice at different time points following infection. In conclusion, BMC migrate and contribute to the formation of new resident cells in the heart and skeletal muscle, which can be detected both during the acute and the chronic phase of infection. These findings reinforce the role of BMC in tissue regeneration. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2014 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  17. Bone marrow cells migrate to the heart and skeletal muscle and participate in tissue repair after Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Bruno S d F; Azevedo, Carine M; Lima, Ricardo S d; Kaneto, Carla M; Vasconcelos, Juliana F; Guimarães, Elisalva T; dos Santos, Ricardo R; Soares, Milena B P

    2014-01-01

    Infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, causes an intense inflammatory reaction in several tissues, including the myocardium. We have previously shown that transplantation of bone marrow cells (BMC) ameliorates the myocarditis in a mouse model of chronic Chagas disease. We investigated the participation of BMC in lesion repair in the heart and skeletal muscle, caused by T. cruzi infection in mice. Infection with a myotropic T. cruzi strain induced an increase in the percentage of stem cells and monocytes in the peripheral blood, as well as in gene expression of chemokines SDF-1, MCP1, 2, and 3 in the heart and skeletal muscle. To investigate the fate of BMC within the damaged tissue, chimeric mice were generated by syngeneic transplantation of green fluorescent protein (GFP+) BMC into lethally irradiated mice and infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Migration of GFP+ BMC to the heart and skeletal muscle was observed during and after the acute phase of infection. GFP+ cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells were present in heart sections of chimeric chagasic mice. GFP+ myofibres were observed in the skeletal muscle of chimeric mice at different time points following infection. In conclusion, BMC migrate and contribute to the formation of new resident cells in the heart and skeletal muscle, which can be detected both during the acute and the chronic phase of infection. These findings reinforce the role of BMC in tissue regeneration. PMID:24976301

  18. Voltage-Independent Calcium Release in Heart Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niggli, Ernst; Lederer, W. Jonathan

    1990-10-01

    The Ca2+ that activates contraction in heart muscle is regulated as in skeletal muscle by processes that depend on voltage and intracellular Ca2+ and involve a positive feedback system. How the initial electrical signal is amplified in heart muscle has remained controversial, however. Analogous protein structures from skeletal muscle and heart muscle have been identified physiologically and sequenced; these include the Ca2+ channel of the sarcolemma and the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although the parallels found in cardiac and skeletal muscles have provoked valuable experiments in both tissues, separation of the effects of voltage and intracellular Ca2+ on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release in heart muscle has been imperfect. With the use of caged Ca2+ and flash photolysis in voltage-clamped heart myocytes, effects of membrane potential in heart muscle cells on Ca2+ release from intracellular stores have been studied. Unlike the response in skeletal muscle, voltage across the sarcolemma of heart muscle does not affect the release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, suggesting that other regulatory processes are needed to control Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release.

  19. Erythroblast transformation-specific 2 correlates with vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in rat heterotopic heart transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Yan, Daliang; Li, Yangcheng; Sha, Xilin; Wu, Kunpeng; Zhao, Jianhua; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) decreases the long-term survival of heart transplantation recipients. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis is an important pathological feature of CAV. Erythroblast transformation-specific 2 (Ets-2), as a transcription factor, participates in cell apoptosis and plays an important role in organ transplantation. Methods Hearts from Wistar-Furth (WF:RT1u) rats were heterotopically transplanted into Lewis (Lew:RT1l) rats without immunosuppression. Additional syngeneic heterotopic cardiac transplantations were performed in Lewis rats. HE staining was used to identify CAV. Ets-2 expression was examined by western blot. Ets-2 tissue location was examined by immunohistochemical assay and double immunostaining. Cleaved caspase 3 expression was detected by western blot. Co-localization of Ets-2 and cleaved caspase 3 was detected by double immunostaining. Ets-2, p53, cleaved caspase 3 and Bcl-xl expression in rat VSMC line A7R5 was examined after Ets-2 siRNA transfection. TUNEL assay was applied to detect A7R5 apoptosis with or without ETS-2 siRNA transfection. Immunoprecipitation was performed to explore the interaction between Ets-2 and p53. Results Ets-2 expression decreased in the allograft group but had no obvious change in the isograft group. Meanwhile, the phenomenon of CAV was observed in the allograft group and there is neointima formation in the isograft group which is not obvious compared with allograft group. Additionally, Ets-2 expression was opposite to VSMC apoptosis in the allograft group. In vitro, Ets-2 siRNA transfection in A7R5cells resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis. Finally, Ets-2 interacted with p53. Conclusions Ets-2 might inhibit VSMC apoptosis via p53 pathway. The results further elucidate the molecular mechanism of VSMC apoptosis after heart transplantation during CAV and provide theoretical basis for seeking new specific drug targets for CAV prevention and treatment. PMID:27621856

  20. [Cell death in inflammatory heart muscle diseases--apoptosis or necrosis?].

    PubMed

    Pankuweit, S; Jobmann, M; Crombach, M; Portig, I; Alter, P; Kruse, T; Hufnagel, G; Maisch, B

    1999-05-01

    Cell death can be induced by 2 different mechanisms: necrosis and apoptosis. Necrosis, on the one hand, is usually caused by unphysiological stress factors such as hyperthermia or hypoxia, apoptosis, on the other hand, is part of the normal organ development and controls for example immune responses. Morphologically, necrosis is characterized by swelling of cells and their organelles leading to the disruption of the cell membrane, which in turn causes an inflammatory reaction in the surrounding tissue. Morphological and biochemical criteria (Figure 1, Table 1) of apoptosis are the condensation of chromatin leading to the development of apoptotic bodies or membrane-enclosed vesicles containing oligonucleosomal DNA fragments. Important diagnostic tools of cell death (Table 2), such as the TUNEL test (Figure 2) or gel electrophoresis of extracted DNA (Figure 3) are based on the above mentioned biochemical characteristics, but a reliable differentiation of apoptotic versus necrotic processes is not always possible. Experimental studies in animals and studies in various diseases of the cardiovascular system were able to show that apoptosis in myocytes can be induced, an issue that has long been discussed controversially. Ischemia, reperfusion, and myocardial infarction were also shown to lead to apoptosis in cardiomyocytes, whereas cell destruction was caused mainly by necrosis. Several authors (Table 3) demonstrated apoptotic indices in cardiomyocytes of patients with dilatated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and patients with acute infarction from 0.25 to 35% by the use of the TUNEL test. Others were able to demonstrate an elevated expression of Fas-receptor in cells of atheroslerotic plaques in patients with atherosclerosis and high indices of apoptotic cardiomyocytes in patients with chronic heart failure. We investigated endomyocardial biopsies of patients with inflammatory cardiomyopathy, DCM without inflammatory reaction but the

  1. Cat Heart Muscle in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Page, Ernest; Storm, S. R.

    1965-01-01

    The cells of cat right ventricular papillary muscles were depleted of K and caused to accumulate Na and water by preincubation at 2–3°C. The time courses of changes in cellular ion content and volume and of the resting membrane potential (Vm) were then followed after abrupt rewarming to 27–28°C. At physiological external K concentration ([K]o = 5.32 mM) recovery of cellular ion and water contents was complete within 30 minutes, the maximal observable rates of K uptake and Na extrusion (Δmmol cell ion/(kg dry weight) (min.)) being 3.4 and 3.6, respectively. The recovery rate was markedly slowed at [K]o = 1.0 mM. Rewarming caused Vm measured in cells at the muscle surface to recover within from <1 to 9 minutes, but only slight restoration of cellular ion contents (measured in whole muscles) had occurred after 10 minutes. Studies of recovery in NaCl-free sucrose Ringer's solution made it possible to separate the ouabain-insensitive outward diffusion of Na as a salt from a simultaneous ouabain-sensitive Na extrusion which is associated with a net cellular K uptake. A hypothesis consistent with these observations is that rewarming may activate a ouabain-sensitive "electrogenic" mechanism, most probably the net active transport of Na out of the cell, from which net K uptake may then follow passively. PMID:14324999

  2. Genetic deletion of myostatin from the heart prevents skeletal muscle atrophy in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Heineke, Joerg; Auger-Messier, Mannix; Xu, Jian; Sargent, Michelle; York, Allen; Welle, Stephen; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2010-01-26

    Cardiac cachexia is characterized by an exaggerated loss of skeletal muscle, weakness, and exercise intolerance, although the cause of these effects remains unknown. Here, we hypothesized that the heart functions as an endocrine organ in promoting systemic cachexia by secreting peptide factors such as myostatin. Myostatin is a cytokine of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily that is known to control muscle wasting. We used a Cre/loxP system to ablate myostatin (Mstn gene) expression in a cell type-specific manner. As expected, elimination of Mstn selectively in skeletal muscle with a myosin light chain 1f (MLC1f)-cre allele induced robust hypertrophy in all skeletal muscle. However, heart-specific deletion of Mstn with an Nkx2.5-cre allele did not alter baseline heart size or secondarily affect skeletal muscle size, but the characteristic wasting and atrophy of skeletal muscle that typify heart failure were not observed in these heart-specific null mice, indicating that myocardial myostatin expression controls muscle atrophy in heart failure. Indeed, myostatin levels in the plasma were significantly increased in wild-type mice subjected to pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy but not in Mstn heart-specific deleted mice. Moreover, cardiac-specific overexpression of myostatin, which increased circulating levels of myostatin by 3- to 4-fold, caused a reduction in weight of the quadriceps, gastrocnemius, soleus, and even the heart itself. Finally, to investigate myostatin as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of muscle wasting in heart failure, we infused a myostatin blocking antibody (JA-16), which promoted greater maintenance of muscle mass in heart failure. Myostatin released from cardiomyocytes induces skeletal muscle wasting in heart failure. Targeted inhibition of myostatin in cardiac cachexia might be a therapeutic option in the future.

  3. Engineering human ventricular heart muscles based on a highly efficient system for purification of human pluripotent stem cell-derived ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Yang, Hui; Wang, Xiaochen; Zhan, Yongkun; Sheng, Wei; Cai, Huanhuan; Xin, Haoyang; Liang, Qianqian; Zhou, Ping; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe; Chen, Sifeng; Yang, Pengyuan; Zhang, Jianyi; Shou, Weinian; Huang, Guoying; Liang, Ping; Sun, Ning

    2017-09-29

    Most infarctions occur in the left anterior descending coronary artery and cause myocardium damage of the left ventricle. Although current pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and directed cardiac differentiation techniques are able to generate fetal-like human cardiomyocytes, isolation of pure ventricular cardiomyocytes has been challenging. For repairing ventricular damage, we aimed to establish a highly efficient purification system to obtain homogeneous ventricular cardiomyocytes and prepare engineered human ventricular heart muscles in a dish. The purification system used TALEN-mediated genomic editing techniques to insert the neomycin or EGFP selection marker directly after the myosin light chain 2 (MYL2) locus in human pluripotent stem cells. Purified early ventricular cardiomyocytes were estimated by immunofluorescence, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, quantitative PCR, microelectrode array, and patch clamp. In subsequent experiments, the mixture of mature MYL2-positive ventricular cardiomyocytes and mesenchymal cells were cocultured with decellularized natural heart matrix. Histological and electrophysiology analyses of the formed tissues were performed 2 weeks later. Human ventricular cardiomyocytes were efficiently isolated based on the purification system using G418 or flow cytometry selection. When combined with the decellularized natural heart matrix as the scaffold, functional human ventricular heart muscles were prepared in a dish. These engineered human ventricular muscles can be great tools for regenerative therapy of human ventricular damage as well as drug screening and ventricular-specific disease modeling in the future.

  4. The area composita of adhering junctions connecting heart muscle cells of vertebrates. I. Molecular definition in intercalated disks of cardiomyocytes by immunoelectron microscopy of desmosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Franke, Werner W; Borrmann, Carola M; Grund, Christine; Pieperhoff, Sebastian

    2006-02-01

    Among sarcomeric muscles the cardiac muscle cells are unique by, inter alia, a systemic and extended cell-cell contact structure, the intercalated disk (ID), comprising frequent and closely spaced arrays of plaque-coated cell-cell adhering junctions (AJs). As some of these junctions may look somewhat like desmosomes and others like fasciae adhaerentes, the dogma has emerged in the literature that IDs contain - like epithelial cells - both kinds of AJs formed by - for the most - mutually exclusive molecular ensembles. This, however, is not the case. In comprehensive immunoelectron microscopic studies of mammalian (human, bovine, rat, mouse) and non-mammalian (chicken, amphibia, fishes) heart muscle tissues, we have localized major constituents of the desmosomal plaques of polar epithelia, desmoplakin, plakophilin-2 and plakoglobin, as well as the desmosomal cadherins, desmoglein Dsg2 and desmocollin Dsc2, in both kinds of ID AJs, independent of the specific morphological appearance. The desmosomal molecules are not restricted to the desmosome-like-looking junctions but can also be detected in junctions appearing similar to the zonula or fascia adhaerens structures. These AJs of cardiac ID are therefore subsumed under the collective term area composita. We discuss our results with respect to the importance of ID junction molecules for the formation, maintenance and function of the heart, particularly in relation to recent findings that deletions of - or mutations in - genes encoding such proteins can cause severe, sometimes lethal damages.

  5. Calcium homeostasis of isolated heart muscle cells exposed to pulsed high-frequency electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wolke, S.; Gollnick, F.; Meyer, R.; Neibig, U.; Elsner, R.

    1996-05-01

    The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) of isolated ventricular cardiac myocytes of the guinea pig was measured during the application of pulsed high-frequency electromagnetic fields. The high-frequency fields were applied in a transverse electromagnetic cell designed to allow microscopic observation of the myocytes during the presence of the high-frequency fields. The [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was measured as fura-2 fluorescence by means of digital image analysis. Both the carrier frequency and the square-wave pulse-modulation pattern were varied during the experiments (carrier frequencies: 900, 1,300, and 1,800 MHz pulse modulated at 217 Hz with 14% duty cycle; pulsation pattern at 900 MHz; continuous wave, 16 Hz,and 50 Hz modulation with 50% duty cycle and 30 kHz modulation with 80% duty cycle). The mean specific absorption rate (SAR) values in the solution were within one order of magnitude of 1 mW/kg. They varied depending on the applied carrier frequency and pulse pattern. The experiments were designed in three phases: 500 s of sham exposure, followed by 500 s of field exposure, then chemical stimulation without field. The chemical stimulation (K{sup +}-depolarization) indicated the viability of the cells. The K{sup +} depolarization yielded a significant increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Significant differences between sham exposure and high-frequency field exposure were not found except when a very small but statistically significant difference was detected in the case of 900 MHz/50 Hz. However, this small difference was not regarded as a relevant effect of the exposure.

  6. Repairing skeletal muscle: regenerative potential of skeletal muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Dellavalle, Arianna; Diaz-Manera, Jordi; Messina, Graziella; Cossu, Giulio

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle damaged by injury or by degenerative diseases such as muscular dystrophy is able to regenerate new muscle fibers. Regeneration mainly depends upon satellite cells, myogenic progenitors localized between the basal lamina and the muscle fiber membrane. However, other cell types outside the basal lamina, such as pericytes, also have myogenic potency. Here, we discuss the main properties of satellite cells and other myogenic progenitors as well as recent efforts to obtain myogenic cells from pluripotent stem cells for patient-tailored cell therapy. Clinical trials utilizing these cells to treat muscular dystrophies, heart failure, and stress urinary incontinence are also briefly outlined. PMID:20051632

  7. Influence of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors on ubiquinone levels in rat skeletal muscle and heart: relationship to cytotoxicity and inhibitory activity for cholesterol synthesis in human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Mahomi; Aoki, Taro; Morikawa, Shigeru; Maejima, Takashi; Sato, Fumiyasu; Sawanobori, Kimio; Kitahara, Masaki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Saito, Yasushi

    2006-12-01

    Although statins are prescribed as relatively safe and effective drugs for hypercholesterolemic patients, it has been reported that a significant side effect, myopathy, occurs infrequently during medication. Moreover, because statins decrease cardiac ubiquinone levels, the risk of cardiac dysfunction has been suggested. This study sought to evaluate and compare the cytotoxicity of statins (cerivastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin and pravastatin) in cultured human skeletal muscle cells (HSkMCs) and the effects on ubiquinone levels in statin-treated rat skeletal muscle and heart. Cerivastatin, the most potent inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, showed the strongest cytotoxicity (over 10-fold) among the statins examined, while the effects of the others were in a similar range. In rat experiments, neither pitavastatin nor cerivastatin decreased ubiquinone levels in skeletal muscle, but both dose-dependently lowered ubiquinone levels in the heart. As the rates of reduction by pitavastatin (9.6% at 30 mg/kg) and cerivastatin (9.7% at 0.3 mg/kg) were almost equal, it was estimated that cerivastatin reduced ubiquinone levels in the rat heart approximately 100-fold more strongly than pitavastatin, based on the effective doses. We found that cerivastatin showed the most potent cytotoxicity in HSkMCs and strongly lowered ubiquinone levels in the rat heart.

  8. Subminiature transducers for measuring forces and deformation of heart muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Osher, J. V.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Duran, E. N.

    1975-01-01

    Two subminiature transducers, one measuring muscle forces and one measuring muscle displacement, can be inserted into heart muscle without interfering with it. Probe, approximately 1 mm (0.04 in), causes no damage to heart muscle. Probe can be rotated to different positions to measure muscle forces from various directions.

  9. Heart muscle performance after experimental viral myocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Adesanya, C O; Goldberg, A H; Phear, W P; Thorp, K A; Young, N A; Abelmann, W H

    1976-01-01

    As part of an inquiry into possible antecedents of idiopathic cardiomyopathy, acute experimental coxsackie virus myocarditis was studied for late structural and functional sequelae. Myocarditis was induced in 12- and 22-day-old hamsters by inoculation with coxsackie virus B3. Early viremia occurred, followed by virus replication in heart muscle. Maximum peak developed tension (Tpd) of isometrically contracting isolated heart muscle was depressed 17 and 43% in the animals inoculated at 12 days, and studied 18 and 90 days later, respectively, as compared to their uninoculated controls. In both infected groups, less muscle stretch was required to reach the length at which Tpd was produced. Animals studied 180 days after inoculation did not differ from controls. The muscles from animals inoculated at 22 days of age and studied 18 days later showed a 15% depression of Tpd compared to their controls. Glycerinated muscles from this infected group developed 50% less tension than their controls. The muscles of hamsters inoculated with virus at 22 days and studied 90 and 180 days later showed no change in Tpd. The data suggest that contractility and compliance of heart muscle are decreased 18 days after inoculation, but recover by 90 days if the animals are inoculated at age 22 days. However, if the animals are inoculated at a younger age (12 days), depression of myocardial performance persists for at least an additional 90 days. It is concluded that the inflammatory stage of experimental acute coxsackie virus B3 myocarditis in the Syrian golden hamster may be followed by residual alterations in contractile proteins and myocardial function. PMID:1249200

  10. Independent and combined association of muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness in youth with insulin resistance and β-cell function in young adulthood: the European Youth Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Anders; Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Ekelund, Ulf; Froberg, Karsten; Brage, Søren; Andersen, Lars B

    2013-09-01

    To examine the independent and combined association of isometric muscle strength of the abdomen and back and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in youth with indices of glucose metabolism in young adulthood among boys and girls from the European Youth Heart Study. We used data from a population-based prospective cohort study among youth followed up for up to 12 years (n = 317). In youth, maximal voluntary contractions during isometric back extension and abdominal flexion were determined using a strain-gauge dynamometer and CRF was obtained from a maximal cycle ergometer test. Insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) and β-cell function (homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function [HOMA-B]) were estimated from fasting serum insulin and glucose that were obtained in youth and at follow-up in young adulthood. For each 1-SD difference in isometric muscle strength (0.16 N/kg) in youth, fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-B in young adulthood changed by -11.3% (95% CI -17.0 to -5.2), -12.2% (-18.2 to -5.7), and -8.9% (-14.4 to -3.0), respectively, in young adulthood after adjustment for CRF and personal lifestyle and demographic factors. Results for CRF were very similar in magnitude, and the magnitude of associations for both exposures was unchanged with additional adjustment for general or abdominal adiposity in youth. Combined associations of muscle strength and CRF with fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-B were additive, and adolescents in the highest sex-specific tertile for both isometric muscle strength and CRF had the lowest levels of these glucose metabolism outcomes. Increasing muscle strength and CRF should be targets in youth primordial prevention strategies of insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction.

  11. Bioengineering Heart Muscle: A Paradigm for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Kathy O.; Tandon, Nina

    2012-01-01

    The idea of extending the lifetime of our organs is as old as humankind, fueled by major advances in organ transplantation, novel drugs, and medical devices. However, true regeneration of human tissue has becoming increasingly plausible only in recent years. The human heart has always been a focus of such efforts, given its notorious inability to repair itself following injury or disease. We discuss here the emerging bioengineering approaches to regeneration of heart muscle as a paradigm for regenerative medicine. Our focus is on biologically inspired strategies for heart regeneration, knowledge gained thus far about how to make a “perfect” heart graft, and the challenges that remain to be addressed for tissue-engineered heart regeneration to become a clinical reality. We emphasize the need for interdisciplinary research and training, as recent progress in the field is largely being made at the interfaces between cardiology, stem cell science, and bioengineering. PMID:21568715

  12. Gene Expressions Underlying Mishandled Calcium Clearance and Elevated Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species in the Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells of Chronic Heart Failure Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liang; Su, Xian-Xiu; Zhang, Wen-Hui; Xu, Yu-Xiang; Pan, Xue-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Background: The calcium clearance and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generations in the coronary artery smooth muscle cells in chronic heart failure (HF) have not been fully investigated. Therefore, we attempted to understand the gene expressions underlying the mishandling of calcium clearance and the accumulations of ROS. Methods: We initially established an animal model of chronic HF by making the left anterior descending coronary artery ligation (CAL) in rats, and then isolated the coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells from the ischemic and the nonischemic parts of the coronary artery vessels in 12 weeks after CAL operation. The intracellular calcium concentration and ROS level were measured using flow cytometry, and the gene expressions of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a), encoding sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2a, encoding sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX), and p47phox encoding a subunit of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase were examined using real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. Results: We found that the calcium accumulation and ROS generation in the coronary artery smooth muscle cells isolated from either the ischemic or the nonischemic part of the CAL coronary artery vessel were significantly increased irrespective of blood supply (all P < 0.01). Moreover, these were accompanied by the increased expressions of NCX and p47phox, the decreased expression of SERCA2a, and the increased amount of phosphorylated forms of p47phox in NADPH oxidase (all P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that the disordered calcium clearance and the increased ROS generation occurred in the coronary artery smooth muscle cells in rats with chronic HF produced by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (CAL), and which was found to be disassociated from blood supply, and the increased generation of ROS in the cells was found to make

  13. [Heart tissue from embryonic stem cells].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, W-H

    2008-09-01

    Embryonic stem cells can give rise to all somatic cells, making them an attractive cell source for tissue engineering applications. The propensity of cells to form tissue-like structures in a culture dish has been well documented. We and others made use of this intrinsic property to generate bioartificial heart muscle. First proof-of-concept studies involved immature heart cells mainly from fetal chicken, neonatal rats and mice. They eventually provided evidence that force-generating heart muscle can be engineered in vitro. Recently, the focus shifted to the application of stem cells to eventually enable the generation of human heart muscle and reach following long-term goals: (1) development of a simplified in vitro model of heart muscle development; (2) generation of a human test-bed for drug screening and development; (3) allocation of surrogate heart tissue to myocardial repair applications. This overview will provide the background for cell-based myocardial repair, introduce the main myocardial tissue engineering concepts, discuss the use of embryonic and non-embryonic stem cells, and lays out the potential direct and indirect therapeutic use of human tissue engineered myocardium.

  14. Age-dependent magnetosensitivity of heart muscle ouabain receptors.

    PubMed

    Narinyan, Lilia Yu; Ayrapetyan, Gayane S; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik N

    2013-05-01

    In our previous work we have shown that the age-dependent decrease in the magnetosensitivity of heart muscle hydration is accompanied by a dysfunction of the Na(+) /K(+) pump. The reciprocal relation between the Na(+/) K(+) pump and Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchange in development was suggested as a possible pathway for the age-dependent decrease in the magnetosensitivity of heart muscle hydration (water content). Because high and low affinity ouabain receptors in cell membranes are involved in Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchange and Na(+) /K(+) pump functions, respectively, the effect of a 0.2 T static magnetic field (SMF) on dose-dependent, ouabain-induced hydration and [(3) H]-ouabain binding with heart muscle tissues in young, adult and older rats was studied. Three populations of receptors in membranes with high (10(-11) -10(-9)  M), middle (10(-9) -10(-7)  M) and low (10(-7) -10(-4)  M) affinity to [(3) H]-ouabain were distinguished, which had specific dose-dependent [(3) H]-ouabain binding kinetics and effects on muscle hydration. The magnetosensitivity of [(3) H]-ouabain binding kinetics with high affinity receptors was prominent in all the three age groups of animals, while with low affinity receptors it was more expressed only in the young group of animals. All three types of receptors that caused modulations of muscle hydration were age dependent and magnetosensitive. Based on the obtained data we came to the conclusion that heart muscle hydration in young animals is more magnetosensitive due to the intense expression of high affinity ouabain receptors, which declines with aging.

  15. A kinetic study of the oxidation by molecular oxygen of the cytochrome chain of intact yeast cells, Acetobacter suboxydans cells, and of particulate suspensions of heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, G D; Kuby, S A; Edelman, G M; Chance, B

    1983-01-01

    The pre-steady state kinetics of the cytochrome c oxidase reaction with oxygen were studied by a variation in the reaction time between approximately 6 and 25 ms at oxygen concentrations less than 6 mumol/l. For baker's yeast, a pseudo-first-order velocity constant of approximately 150 s-1 at 1.3 mumol/l O2 was obtained corresponding to a second-order reaction between O2 and a3 at a forward velocity constant (k+1) of approximately 3 X 10(7) liter equiv.-1s-1. Thus, the membrane-bound oxidase in the intact cell exhibits one of the most rapid enzyme-substrate reactions to be reported. The value is identical with that of Greenwood and Gibson on an isolated, solubilized cytochrome c oxidase. Similar values of k+1 are calculated from the turnover numbers [k+2 (a+2)] divided by the Km values (formula; see text) measured for these yeast preparations, which points to an almost negligible reverse reaction (k-1) compared to k+2(a+2). Similar calculations for the membrane-bound cytochrome c oxidase of heart muscle give a value of k+1 approximately equal to 10(7) liter equiv.-1s-1. The concordance of the different values of k+1 supports the view that the yeast cell wall does not impart a significant diffusion barrier to the transport of molecular oxygen. In contrast, Acetobacter suboxydans exhibits a much larger value for Km, and has a terminal oxidase of different kinetic parameters.

  16. Smooth Muscle Cells Derived From Second Heart Field and Cardiac Neural Crest Reside in Spatially Distinct Domains in the Media of the Ascending Aorta-Brief Report.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Hisashi; Rateri, Debra L; Moorleghen, Jessica J; Majesky, Mark W; Daugherty, Alan

    2017-09-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of the proximal thoracic aorta are embryonically derived from the second heart field (SHF) and cardiac neural crest (CNC). However, distributions of these embryonic origins are not fully defined. The regional distribution of SMCs of different origins is speculated to cause region-specific aortopathies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the distribution of SMCs of SHF and CNC origins in the proximal thoracic aorta. Mice with repressed LacZ in the ROSA26 locus were bred to those expressing Cre controlled by either the Wnt1 or Mef2c (myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2c) promoter to trace CNC- and SHF-derived SMCs, respectively. Thoracic aortas were harvested, and activity of β-galactosidase was determined. Aortas from Wnt1-Cre mice had β-galactosidase-positive areas throughout the region from the proximal ascending aorta to just distal of the subclavian arterial branch. Unexpectedly, β-galactosidase-positive areas in Mef2c-Cre mice extended from the aortic root throughout the ascending aorta. This distribution occurred independent of sex and aging. Cross and sagittal aortic sections demonstrated that CNC-derived cells populated the inner medial aspect of the anterior region of the ascending aorta and transmurally in the media of the posterior region. Interestingly, outer medial cells throughout anterior and posterior ascending aortas were derived from the SHF. β-Galactosidase-positive medial cells of both origins colocalized with an SMC marker, α-actin. Both CNC- and SHF-derived SMCs populate the media throughout the ascending aorta. The outer medial cells of the ascending aorta form a sleeve populated by SHF-derived SMCs. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Regenerating new heart with stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Anversa, Piero; Kajstura, Jan; Rota, Marcello; Leri, Annarosa

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses current understanding of myocardial biology, emphasizing the regeneration potential of the adult human heart and the mechanisms involved. In the last decade, a novel conceptual view has emerged. The heart is no longer considered a postmitotic organ, but is viewed as a self-renewing organ characterized by a resident stem cell compartment responsible for tissue homeostasis and cardiac repair following injury. Additionally, HSCs possess the ability to transdifferentiate and acquire the cardiomyocyte, vascular endothelial, and smooth muscle cell lineages. Both cardiac and hematopoietic stem cells may be used therapeutically in an attempt to reverse the devastating consequences of chronic heart failure of ischemic and nonischemic origin. PMID:23281411

  18. Fixed charges of the heart muscle interstitium.

    PubMed Central

    Parent, L; Caillé, J P

    1985-01-01

    The interstitium of the heart muscle is primarily composed of ground substance. The glycoproteins and proteoglycans that formed the ground substance bore negative charges at neutral pH like the glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans of the water-rich phase of the interstitium. Microelectrodes were used to look for the existence of an electrical potential between the interstitium of the rabbit papillary muscle and an ambient medium. Evidence is presented for the existence of such an electrical potential. When the ambient solution was a Krebs solution, this potential was evaluated at -5.7 mV. This electrical potential is dependent on the filling solution of the microelectrodes and on the ambient medium; in rabbit serum, the electrical potential diminished to -0.6 mV. Assuming that this potential is a measure of the Donnan potential, the Cl and Na activities in the interstitium were evaluated to 76 and 135 mM when the rabbit papillary muscle was superfused with a Kreb's solution. PMID:4016191

  19. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  20. Skeletal muscle inflammation and atrophy in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lavine, Kory J; Sierra, Oscar L

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure represents a systemic disease with profound effects on multiple peripheral tissues including skeletal muscle. Within the context of heart failure, perturbations in skeletal muscle physiology, structure, and function strongly contribute to exercise intolerance and the morbidity of this devastating disease. There is growing evidence that chronic heart failure imparts specific pathological changes within skeletal muscle beds resulting in muscle dysfunction and tissue atrophy. Mechanistically, systemic and local inflammatory responses drive critical aspects of this pathology. In this review, we will discuss pathological mechanisms that drive skeletal muscle inflammation and highlight emerging roles for distinct innate immune subsets that reside within damage muscle tissue focusing on the recently described embryonic and monocyte-derived macrophage lineages. Within this context, we will discuss how immune mechanisms can be differentially targeted to stimulate skeletal muscle inflammation, catabolism, fiber atrophy, and regeneration.

  1. The oldest, toughest cells in the heart.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robert P; Reckova, Maria; deAlmeida, Angela; Bigelow, Michael R; Stanley, Chiffvon P; Spruill, Joshua B; Trusk, Thomas T; Sedmera, David

    2003-01-01

    We review here the evolution and development of the earliest components of the cardiac pacemaking and conduction system (PCS) and the turnover or persistence of such cells into old age in the adult vertebrate heart. Heart rate is paced by upstream foci of cardiac muscle near the future sinoatrial junction even before contraction begins. As the tubular heart loops, directional blood flow is maintained through coordinated sphincter function in the forming atrioventricular (AV) canal and outflow segments. Propagation of initially peristaltoid contraction along and between these segments appears to be influenced by physical conditioning and orientation of inner muscle layers as well as by their slow relaxation; all characteristic of definitive conduction tissue. As classical elements of the mature conduction system emerge, such inner 'contour fibres' maintain muscular and electrical continuity between atrial and ventricular compartments. Elements of such primordial architecture are visible also in histological and optical electrical study of fish and frog hearts. In the maturing chick heart, cells within core conducting tissues retain early thymidine labels from the tubular heart stage into adult life, dividing only slowly, if at all. Preliminary evidence from mammals suggest similar function and kinetics for these 'oldest, toughest' cells in the hearts of all vertebrates.

  2. Heart and Skeletal Muscle Are Targets of Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Doris Martha; Eltit, José Miguel; Mansfield, Keith; Panqueba, César; Castro, Dolly; Vega, Martha Rocio; Xhaja, Kris; Schmidt, Diane; Martin, Katherine J.; Allen, Paul D.; Rodriguez, Jairo Antonio; Dinsmore, Jonathan H.; López, José Rafael; Bosch, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Background Dengue fever is one of the most significant re-emerging tropical diseases, despite our expanding knowledge of the disease, viral tropism is still not known to target heart tissues or muscle. Methods A prospective pediatric clinical cohort of 102 dengue hemorrhagic fever patients from Colombia, South America, was followed for 1 year. Clinical diagnosis of myocarditis was routinely performed. Electrocardiograph and echocardiograph analysis were performed to confirm those cases. Immunohistochemistry for detection of dengue virus and inflammatory markers was performed on autopsied heart tissue. In vitro studies of human striated skeletal fibers (myotubes) infected with dengue virus were used as a model for myocyte infection. Measurements of intracellular Ca2+ concentration as well as immunodetection of dengue virus and inflammation markers in infected myotubes were performed. Results Eleven children with dengue hemorrhagic fever presented with symptoms of myocarditis. Widespread viral infection of the heart, myocardial endothelium, and cardiomyocytes, accompanied by inflammation was observed in 1 fatal case. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed that myotubes were infected by dengue virus and had increased expression of the inflammatory genes and protein IP-10. The infected myotubes also had increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Conclusions Vigorous infection of heart tissues in vivo and striated skeletal cells in vitro are demonstrated. Derangements of Ca2+ storage in the infected cells may directly contribute to the presentation of myocarditis in pediatric patients. PMID:20032806

  3. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  4. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Matthew E; Pavlath, Grace K

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease.

  5. Genetic deletion of myostatin from the heart prevents skeletal muscle atrophy in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Heineke, Joerg; Auger-Messier, Mannix; Xu, Jian; Sargent, Michelle; York, Allen; Welle, Stephen; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiac cachexia is characterized by an exaggerated loss of skeletal muscle, weakness, and exercise intolerance, although the etiology of these effects remains unknown. Here we hypothesized that the heart functions as an endocrine organ in promoting systemic cachexia by secreting peptide factors such as myostatin. Myostatin is a cytokine of the transforming growth factor β(TGFβ) superfamily that is known to control muscle wasting. Methods and Results We used a Cre/loxP system to ablate myostatin (Mstn gene) expression in a celltype-specific manner. As expected, elimination of Mstn selectively in skeletal muscle with a myosin light chain 1f (MLC1f)-cre allele induced robust hypertrophy in all skeletal muscle. However, heart-specific deletion of Mstn with a Nkx2.5-cre allele did not alter baseline heart size or secondarily affect skeletal muscle size, but the characteristic wasting and atrophy of skeletal muscle that typifies heart failure was not observed in these heart-specific null mice, indicating that myocardial myostatin expression controls muscle atrophy in heart failure. Indeed, myostatin levels in the plasma were significantly increased in wildtype mice subjected to pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy, but not in Mstn heart-specific deleted mice. Moreover, cardiac-specific overexpression of myostatin, which increased circulating levels of myostatin by 3–4-fold, caused a reduction in weight of the quadriceps, gastrocnemius, soleus, and even the heart itself. Lastly, to investigate myostatin as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of muscle wasting in heart failure, we infused a myostatin blocking antibody (JA-16), which promoted greater maintenance of muscle mass in heart failure. Conclusions Myostatin released from cardiomyocytes induces skeletal muscle wasting in heart failure. Targeted inhibition of myostatin in cardiac cachexia might be a therapeutic option in the future. PMID:20065166

  6. Formation of highly organized intracellular structure and energy metabolism in cardiac muscle cells during postnatal development of rat heart.

    PubMed

    Anmann, Tiia; Varikmaa, Minna; Timohhina, Natalja; Tepp, Kersti; Shevchuk, Igor; Chekulayev, Vladimir; Saks, Valdur; Kaambre, Tuuli

    2014-08-01

    Adult cardiomyocytes have highly organized intracellular structure and energy metabolism whose formation during postnatal development is still largely unclear. Our previous results together with the data from the literature suggest that cytoskeletal proteins, particularly βII-tubulin, are involved in the formation of complexes between mitochondria and energy consumption sites. The aim of this study was to examine the arrangement of intracellular architecture parallel to the alterations in regulation of mitochondrial respiration in rat cardiomyocytes during postnatal development, from 1 day to 6 months. Respirometric measurements were performed to study the developmental alterations of mitochondrial function. Changes in the mitochondrial arrangement and cytoarchitecture of βII- and αIV-tubulin were examined by confocal microscopy. Our results show that functional maturation of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria is completed much earlier than efficient feedback regulation is established between mitochondria and ATPases via creatine kinase system. These changes are accompanied by significant remodeling of regular intermyofibrillar mitochondrial arrays aligned along the bundles of βII-tubulin. Additionally, we demonstrate that formation of regular arrangement of mitochondria is not sufficient per se to provide adult-like efficiency in metabolic feed-back regulation, but organized tubulin networks and reduction in mitochondrial outer membrane permeability for ADP are necessary as well. In conclusion, cardiomyocytes in rat heart become mature on the level of intracellular architecture and energy metabolism at the age of 3 months. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling myocardial growth and hypertrophy in engineered heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Tiburcy, Malte; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of biomimetic culture paradigms has advanced myocardial tissue engineering fundamentally, enabling today the provision of engineered rodent and human heart muscle with features characteristically found in postnatal myocardium. This is in marked contrasts to "flat" cardiomyocyte cultures with their typically low degree of organotypic maturation. Here, we discuss the collagen hydrogel-based engineered heart muscle (EHM) technology and provide background information on its use in simulations of myocardial growth and disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Exposure of piglet coronary arterial muscle cells to low concentrations of Mg2+ found in blood of ischemic heart disease patients result in rapid elevation of cytosolic Ca2+: relevance to sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Altura, B M; Zhang, A; Altura, B T

    1997-11-05

    Exposure of cultured piglet primary neonatal coronary arterial smooth muscle cells to concentrations of ionized Mg2+ ([Mg2+]o (i.e., 0.48, 0.3, 0.15 mM) found in blood of patients presenting with ischemic heart disease and in hypoxic neonates resulted in concentration-dependent elevation in intracellular free Ca2+ ions ([Ca2+]i; the lower the [Mg2+]o, the higher the [Ca2+]i rise. The lowest concentration of [Mg2+]o tested, i.e., 0.15 mM, resulted in a clear rounding-up (i.e., contraction) of many of the coronary smooth muscle cells; reintroduction of normal 1.2 mM [Mg2+]o failed to restore either normal [Ca2+]i or cell shape.

  9. Artificial muscle for end-stage heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Michalis, Alexandre; Hayoz, Daniel; Locca, Didier; von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2012-01-01

    We describe a device made of artificial muscle for the treatment of end-stage heart failure as an alternative to current heart assist devices. The key component is a matrix of nitinol wires and aramidic fibers called Biometal muscle (BM). When heated electrically, it produces a motorless, smooth, and lifelike motion. The BM is connected to a carbon fiber scaffold, tightening the heart and providing simultaneous assistance to the left and right ventricles. A pacemaker-like microprocessor drives the contraction of the BM. We tested the device in a dedicated bench model of diseased heart. It generated a systolic pressure of 75 mm Hg and ejected a maximum of 330 ml/min, with an ejection fraction of 12%. The device required a power supply of 6 V, 250 mA. This could be the beginning of an era in which BMs integrate or replace the mechanical function of natural muscles.

  10. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for muscle wasting in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Masakazu; Dos Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues; Anker, Markus; Anker, Stefan D; von Haehling, Stephan; Springer, Jochen

    2016-12-15

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) seems to be safe and beneficial in improvement in functional capacity, muscle strength, and quality of life when compared with conventional aerobic exercise, while the change in muscle fiber composition and muscle size was conflicting in patients with heart failure (HF). Moreover, NMES studies seem to have beneficial effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine, oxidative enzyme activity, and protein anabolic and catabolic metabolism that are the key molecular mechanism of muscle wasting in patients with HF. We review specific issues related to the effects of NMES on muscle wasting in patients with HF, whether NMES seems to be an alternative exercise modality preventing or improving in muscle wasting for HF patients who are unable or unwilling to engage in conventional exercise training; however no established strategies currently exist to focus on the patients with HF accompanied by muscle wasting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Expression of the dignity of organs: the heart, a muscle].

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Reinhard

    2004-02-01

    As the muscular nature of the heart had been recognized and it had become evident that the heart was nothing but a hollow muscle, it lost its position as the centre of man. This became likewise true for its position within the body studied with anatomical and physiological methods as with the notion of the heart being an organ of sensibility, emotions, intellect, and will revealed in a particular "heart language". The dignity of the heart assigned to it from ancient time was treated with contempt as a but empty phrase. When, however, in the various attempts to study its myocardial architecture its highly sophisticated engeneering became evident, the real marvel of the heart was demonstrated engendering even in men and women of science an "element of aesthetic awe". Thus, in a certain sense, the heart has recovered its dignity.

  12. Programming and reprogramming a human heart cell.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Makoto; Santoro, Federica; Chien, Kenneth R

    2015-03-12

    The latest discoveries and advanced knowledge in the fields of stem cell biology and developmental cardiology hold great promise for cardiac regenerative medicine, enabling researchers to design novel therapeutic tools and approaches to regenerate cardiac muscle for diseased hearts. However, progress in this arena has been hampered by a lack of reproducible and convincing evidence, which at best has yielded modest outcomes and is still far from clinical practice. To address current controversies and move cardiac regenerative therapeutics forward, it is crucial to gain a deeper understanding of the key cellular and molecular programs involved in human cardiogenesis and cardiac regeneration. In this review, we consider the fundamental principles that govern the "programming" and "reprogramming" of a human heart cell and discuss updated therapeutic strategies to regenerate a damaged heart.

  13. Establishing the framework to support bioartificial heart fabrication using fibrin-based three-dimensional artificial heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Matthew; Mohamed, Mohamed; Tao, Ze-Wei; Gutierrez, Laura; Birla, Ravi

    2015-02-01

    Only 3000 heart transplants are performed in the USA every year, leaving some 30 000-70 000 Americans without proper care. Current treatment modalities for heart failure have saved many lives yet still do not correct the underlying problems of congestive heart failure. Tissue engineering represents a potential field of study wherein a combination of cells, scaffolds, and/or bioreactors can be utilized to create constructs to mimic, replace, and/or repair defective tissue. The focus of this study was to generate a bioartificial heart (BAH) model using artificial heart muscle (AHM), composed of fibrin gel and neonatal rat cardiac myocytes, and a decellularized scaffold, formed by subjecting an adult rat heart to a series of decellularization solutions. By suturing the AHM around the outside of the decellularized heart and culturing while suspended in media, we were able to retain functional cardiac cells on the scaffold as evinced by visible contractility. Observed contractility rate was correlated with biopotential measurements to confirm essential functionality of cardiac constructs. Cross-sections of the BAH show successful decellularization of the scaffold and contiguous cell-rich AHM around the perimeter of the heart. Copyright © 2014 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Inspiratory muscle endurance in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, J. T.; Andrews, R.; Johnson, P.; Phillips, L.; Cowley, A. J.; Kinnear, W. J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the significance of changes in respiratory muscle endurance in relation to respiratory and limb muscle strength in patients with mild to moderate chronic heart failure using a threshold loading technique. SUBJECTS: 20 patients with chronic heart failure (17 male) aged 63.8 (SD 7.4) years and 10 healthy men aged 63.1 (5.6) years. Heart failure severity was New York Heart Association (NYHA) grade II (n = 11) and NYHA grade III/IV (n = 9). METHODS: Respiratory muscle strength was measured from mouth pressures during maximum inspiratory effort (MIP) at functional residual capacity (FRC) and limb muscle strength was measured using a hand grip dynamometer. Inspiratory muscle endurance was measured using a threshold loading technique. The total endurance duration, the maximum threshold pressure achieved (P-Max), and the inspiratory load (% ratio of P-Max/MIP) were recorded in all subjects. RESULTS: Inspiratory muscles were weaker in patients with heart failure than in the controls [MIP 53.6 (16.5) v 70.9 (20.2) cm H2O, P < 0.05]. Hand grip strength was similar in both subject groups [31.6 (SD) v 36.1 (15.9) dynes]. Total endurance duration was significantly reduced in the patient group [494 (223) v 996 (267) s, P < 0.01], as was the maximal threshold pressure achieved [P-Max 18.5 (6.4) v 30.7 (6.6) cm H2O, P < 0.01]. When expressed as a percentage of MIP, P-Max was also lower in the patients [35.2 (11.8) v 44.8 (11.4)%, P < 0.05]. There was no significant correlation between any measure of endurance and limb muscle strength. CONCLUSIONS: Respiratory muscle endurance is reduced in patients with chronic heart failure. These changes probably reflect a generalised skeletal myopathy and provide further evidence of respiratory muscle dysfunction in patients with this disease. Respiratory muscle endurance needs now to be related to symptoms and the effects of treatment and respiratory muscle training should also be explored. PMID:8983680

  15. Heart-on-a-chip based on stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Jastrzebska, Elzbieta; Tomecka, Ewelina; Jesion, Iwona

    2016-01-15

    Heart diseases are one of the main causes of death around the world. The great challenge for scientists is to develop new therapeutic methods for these types of ailments. Stem cells (SCs) therapy could be one of a promising technique used for renewal of cardiac cells and treatment of heart diseases. Conventional in vitro techniques utilized for investigation of heart regeneration do not mimic natural cardiac physiology. Lab-on-a-chip systems may be the solution which could allow the creation of a heart muscle model, enabling the growth of cardiac cells in conditions similar to in vivo conditions. Microsystems can be also used for differentiation of stem cells into heart cells, successfully. It will help better understand of proliferation and regeneration ability of these cells. In this review, we present Heart-on-a-chip systems based on cardiac cell culture and stem cell biology. This review begins with the description of the physiological environment and the functions of the heart. Next, we shortly described conventional techniques of stem cells differentiation into the cardiac cells. This review is mostly focused on describing Lab-on-a-chip systems for cardiac tissue engineering. Therefore, in the next part of this article, the microsystems for both cardiac cell culture and SCs differentiation into cardiac cells are described. The section about SCs differentiation into the heart cells is divided in sections describing biochemical, physical and mechanical stimulations. Finally, we outline present challenges and future research concerning Heart-on-a-chip based on stem cell biology.

  16. Effects of (-)-desmethoxyverapamil on heart and vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrath, H.; Raschack, M.

    1987-09-01

    (-)-Desmethoxyverapamil (also known as (-)-devapamil or (-)-D888) has been developed as a verapamil type radioligand for the study of calcium channels. In the present investigation, the effects of (-)-desmethoxyverapamil on action potential (AP) and force of contraction in heart muscle preparations and on tension and /sup 45/Ca influx in vascular smooth muscle are described. In part, the effects were compared with the (+)-isomer of desmethoxyverapamil and the isomers of both verapamil and methoxyverapamil. In atrial and/or ventricular heart muscle preparations from guinea pigs, cats and man, (-)-desmethoxyverapamil decreased the force of contraction and shortened the AP duration. Slow response APs were depressed, whereas dV/dtmax of phase 0 of the AP remained unchanged. The rank order of potency of the (-)-isomers was as follows: desmethoxyverapamil greater than methoxyverapamil greater than verapamil. Potassium-induced contractures and /sup 45/Ca influx were depressed by the (-)-isomers of desmethoxyverapamil, methoxyverapamil and verapamil in the same potency rank order as observed in heart muscle. The (+)-isomers exerted qualitatively similar effects at about 10 to 200 times higher concentrations. Correspondingly, the increase in potency of the racemic mixtures of the drugs was accompanied by increases in stereoselectivity. It is concluded that (-)-desmethoxyverapamil is the most potent stereoselective calcium antagonist of the verapamil type with respect to its effects on heart and vascular smooth muscle.

  17. Dissemination of Walker 256 carcinoma cells to rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ueoka, H.; Hayashi, K.; Namba, T.; Grob, D.

    1986-03-05

    After injection of 10/sup 6/ Walker 256 carcinoma cells labelled with /sup 125/I-5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine into the tail vein, peak concentration in skeletal muscle was 46 cells/g at 60 minutes, which was lower than 169202, 1665, 555, 198 and 133 cells/g, respectively, at 30 or 60 minutes in lung, liver, spleen, kidney and heart. Because skeletal muscle constitutes 37.4% of body weight, the total number of tumor cells was 2323 cells, which was much greater than in spleen, kidney and heart with 238, 271, and 85 cells, respectively, and only less than in lung and liver, at 222857 and 11700 cells, respectively. The total number in skeletal muscle became greater than in liver at 4 hours and than in lung at 24 hours. Ten minutes after injection of 7.5 x 10/sup 6/ Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the abdominal aorta of rats, a mean of 31 colony-forming cells were recovered from the gastrocnemius, while 106 cells were recovered from the lung after injection into the tail vein. These results indicate that a large number of viable tumor cells can be arrested in skeletal muscle through circulation. The rare remote metastasis of malignancies into skeletal muscle despite constantly circulating tumor cells does not appear to be due to poor dissemination of tumor cells into muscle but due to unhospitable environment of skeletal muscle.

  18. Physiological roles of taurine in heart and muscle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Taurine (aminoethane sulfonic acid) is an ubiquitous compound, found in very high concentrations in heart and muscle. Although taurine is classified as an amino acid, it does not participate in peptide bond formation. Nonetheless, the amino group of taurine is involved in a number of important conjugation reactions as well as in the scavenging of hypochlorous acid. Because taurine is a fairly inert compound, it is an ideal modulator of basic processes, such as osmotic pressure, cation homeostasis, enzyme activity, receptor regulation, cell development and cell signalling. The present review discusses several physiological functions of taurine. First, the observation that taurine depletion leads to the development of a cardiomyopathy indicates a role for taurine in the maintenance of normal contractile function. Evidence is provided that this function of taurine is mediated by changes in the activity of key Ca2+ transporters and the modulation Ca2+ sensitivity of the myofibrils. Second, in some species, taurine is an established osmoregulator, however, in mammalian heart the osmoregulatory function of taurine has recently been questioned. Third, taurine functions as an indirect regulator of oxidative stress. Although this action of taurine has been widely discussed, its mechanism of action is unclear. A potential mechanism for the antioxidant activity of taurine is discussed. Fourth, taurine stabilizes membranes through direct interactions with phospholipids. However, its inhibition of the enzyme, phospholipid N-methyltransferase, alters the phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine content of membranes, which in turn affects the function of key proteins within the membrane. Finally, taurine serves as a modulator of protein kinases and phosphatases within the cardiomyocyte. The mechanism of this action has not been studied. Taurine is a chemically simple compound, but it has profound effects on cells. This has led to the suggestion that taurine is an

  19. Physiological roles of taurine in heart and muscle.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Stephen W; Jong, Chian Ju; Ramila, K C; Azuma, Junichi

    2010-08-24

    Taurine (aminoethane sulfonic acid) is an ubiquitous compound, found in very high concentrations in heart and muscle. Although taurine is classified as an amino acid, it does not participate in peptide bond formation. Nonetheless, the amino group of taurine is involved in a number of important conjugation reactions as well as in the scavenging of hypochlorous acid. Because taurine is a fairly inert compound, it is an ideal modulator of basic processes, such as osmotic pressure, cation homeostasis, enzyme activity, receptor regulation, cell development and cell signalling. The present review discusses several physiological functions of taurine. First, the observation that taurine depletion leads to the development of a cardiomyopathy indicates a role for taurine in the maintenance of normal contractile function. Evidence is provided that this function of taurine is mediated by changes in the activity of key Ca2+ transporters and the modulation Ca2+ sensitivity of the myofibrils. Second, in some species, taurine is an established osmoregulator, however, in mammalian heart the osmoregulatory function of taurine has recently been questioned. Third, taurine functions as an indirect regulator of oxidative stress. Although this action of taurine has been widely discussed, its mechanism of action is unclear. A potential mechanism for the antioxidant activity of taurine is discussed. Fourth, taurine stabilizes membranes through direct interactions with phospholipids. However, its inhibition of the enzyme, phospholipid N-methyltransferase, alters the phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine content of membranes, which in turn affects the function of key proteins within the membrane. Finally, taurine serves as a modulator of protein kinases and phosphatases within the cardiomyocyte. The mechanism of this action has not been studied. Taurine is a chemically simple compound, but it has profound effects on cells. This has led to the suggestion that taurine is an

  20. Arrhythmogenic inherited heart muscle diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Towbin, J A; Bowles, N E

    2001-01-01

    The left ventricle (LV) plays a central role in the maintenance of health of children and adults due to its role as the major pump of the heart. In cases of LV dysfunction, a significant percentage of affected individuals develop signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure, leading to the need for therapeutic intervention. Therapy for these patients include anticongestive medications and, in some, placement of devices such as aortic balloon pump or left ventricular assist device, or cardiac transplantation. In the majority of patients the origin is unknown, leading to the term idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. During the past decade, the basis of LV dysfunction has begun to unravel. In approximately 30% to 40% of cases, the disorder is inherited; autosomal dominant inheritance is most common (although X-linked, autosomal recessive and mitochondrial inheritance occurs). In the remaining patients, the disorder is presumed to be acquired, with inflammatory heart disease playing an important role. In the case of familial dilated cardiomyopathy, the genetic basis is beginning to unfold. To date, 2 genes for X-linked familial dilated cardiomyopathy (dystrophin, G4.5) have been identified and 4 genes for the autosomal dominant form (actin, desmin, lamin A/C, delta-sarcoglycan) have been described. In 1 form of inflammatory heart disease, coxsackievirus myocarditis, inflammatory mediators, and dystrophin cleavage play a role in the development of LV dysfunction. This review describes the molecular genetics of LV dysfunction and provide evidence for a "final common pathway" responsible for the phenotype.

  1. Manganese depresses rat heart muscle respiration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It has previously been reported that moderately high dietary manganese (Mn) in combination with marginal magnesium (Mg) resulted in ultrastructural damage to heart mitochondria. Manganese may replace Mg in biological functions, including the role of enzyme cofactor. Manganese may accumulate and subs...

  2. Skeletal muscle molecular alterations precede whole-muscle dysfunction in NYHA Class II heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Godard, Michael P; Whitman, Samantha A; Song, Yao-Hua; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF), a debilitating disease in a growing number of adults, exerts structural and neurohormonal changes in both cardiac and skeletal muscles. However, these alterations and their affected molecular pathways remain uncharacterized. Disease progression is known to transform skeletal muscle fiber composition by unknown mechanisms. In addition, perturbation of specific hormonal pathways, including those involving skeletal muscle insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 (IGFB-5) appears to occur, likely affecting muscle metabolism and regeneration. We hypothesized that changes in IGF-1 and IGFB-5 mRNA levels correlate with the transformation of single-skeletal muscle fiber myosin heavy chain isoforms early in disease progression, making these molecules valuable markers of skeletal muscle changes in heart failure. To investigate these molecules during "early" events in HF patients, we obtained skeletal muscle biopsies from New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class II HF patients and controls for molecular analyses of single fibers, and we also quantified isometric strength and muscle size. There were more (P < 0.05) single muscle fibers coexpressing two or more myosin heavy chains in the HF patients (30% ± 7%) compared to the control subjects (13% ± 2%). IGF-1 and IGFBP-5 expression was fivefold and 15-fold lower in patients with in HF compared to control subjects (P < 0.05), respectively. Strikingly, there was a correlation in IGF-1 expression and muscle cross-sectional area (P < 0.05) resulting in a decrease in whole-muscle quality (P < 0.05) in the HF patients, despite no significant decrease in isometric strength or whole-muscle size. These data indicate that molecular alterations in myosin heavy chain isoforms, IGF-1, and IGFB-5 levels precede the gross morphological and functional deficits that have previously been associated with HF, and may be used as a predictor of functional outcome in patients.

  3. Mechanism for Mechanical Wave Break in the Heart Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, L. D.; Panfilov, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    Using a reaction-diffusion-mechanics model we identify a mechanism for mechanical wave break in the heart muscle. For a wide range of strengths and durations an external mechanical load causes wave front dissipation leading to formation and breakup of spiral waves. We explain the mechanism, and discuss under which conditions it can cause or abolish cardiac arrhythmias.

  4. The Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cell

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The skeletal muscle satellite cell was first described and named based on its anatomic location between the myofiber plasma and basement membranes. In 1961, two independent studies by Alexander Mauro and Bernard Katz provided the first electron microscopic descriptions of satellite cells in frog and rat muscles. These cells were soon detected in other vertebrates and acquired candidacy as the source of myogenic cells needed for myofiber growth and repair throughout life. Cultures of isolated myofibers and, subsequently, transplantation of single myofibers demonstrated that satellite cells were myogenic progenitors. More recently, satellite cells were redefined as myogenic stem cells given their ability to self-renew in addition to producing differentiated progeny. Identification of distinctively expressed molecular markers, in particular Pax7, has facilitated detection of satellite cells using light microscopy. Notwithstanding the remarkable progress made since the discovery of satellite cells, researchers have looked for alternative cells with myogenic capacity that can potentially be used for whole body cell-based therapy of skeletal muscle. Yet, new studies show that inducible ablation of satellite cells in adult muscle impairs myofiber regeneration. Thus, on the 50th anniversary since its discovery, the satellite cell’s indispensable role in muscle repair has been reaffirmed. PMID:22147605

  5. Intramyocardial cell delivery: observations in murine hearts.

    PubMed

    Poggioli, Tommaso; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Rosenthal, Nadia; Santini, Maria P

    2014-01-24

    Previous studies showed that cell delivery promotes cardiac function amelioration by release of cytokines and factors that increase cardiac tissue revascularization and cell survival. In addition, further observations revealed that specific stem cells, such as cardiac stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and cardiospheres have the ability to integrate within the surrounding myocardium by differentiating into cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. Here, we present the materials and methods to reliably deliver noncontractile cells into the left ventricular wall of immunodepleted mice. The salient steps of this microsurgical procedure involve anesthesia and analgesia injection, intratracheal intubation, incision to open the chest and expose the heart and delivery of cells by a sterile 30-gauge needle and a precision microliter syringe. Tissue processing consisting of heart harvesting, embedding, sectioning and histological staining showed that intramyocardial cell injection produced a small damage in the epicardial area, as well as in the ventricular wall. Noncontractile cells were retained into the myocardial wall of immunocompromised mice and were surrounded by a layer of fibrotic tissue, likely to protect from cardiac pressure and mechanical load.

  6. Intramyocardial Cell Delivery: Observations in Murine Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Poggioli, Tommaso; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Rosenthal, Nadia; Santini, Maria P.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that cell delivery promotes cardiac function amelioration by release of cytokines and factors that increase cardiac tissue revascularization and cell survival. In addition, further observations revealed that specific stem cells, such as cardiac stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and cardiospheres have the ability to integrate within the surrounding myocardium by differentiating into cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. Here, we present the materials and methods to reliably deliver noncontractile cells into the left ventricular wall of immunodepleted mice. The salient steps of this microsurgical procedure involve anesthesia and analgesia injection, intratracheal intubation, incision to open the chest and expose the heart and delivery of cells by a sterile 30-gauge needle and a precision microliter syringe. Tissue processing consisting of heart harvesting, embedding, sectioning and histological staining showed that intramyocardial cell injection produced a small damage in the epicardial area, as well as in the ventricular wall. Noncontractile cells were retained into the myocardial wall of immunocompromised mice and were surrounded by a layer of fibrotic tissue, likely to protect from cardiac pressure and mechanical load. PMID:24513973

  7. Satellite cells: the architects of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha C; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle is attributed to the resident muscle stem cell termed satellite cell. Satellite cells are essential for skeletal muscle regeneration as they ultimately provide the myogenic precursors that rebuild damaged muscle tissue. Satellite cells characteristically are a heterogeneous population of stem cells and committed progenitor cells. Delineation of cellular hierarchy and understanding how lineage fate choices are determined within the satellite cell population will be invaluable for the advancement of muscle regenerative therapies.

  8. Respiratory muscle function and exercise intolerance in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jorge P; Chiappa, Gaspar R; Neder, J Alberto; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2009-06-01

    Inspiratory muscle weakness (IMW) is prevalent in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) caused by left ventricular systolic dysfunction, which contributes to reduced exercise capacity and the presence of dyspnea during daily activities. Inspiratory muscle strength (estimated by maximal inspiratory pressure) has independent prognostic value in CHF. Overall, the results of trials with inspiratory muscle training (IMT) indicate that this intervention improves exercise capacity and quality of life, particularly in patients with CHF and IMW. Some benefit from IMT may be accounted for by the attenuation of the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex. Moreover, IMT results in improved cardiovascular responses to exercise and to those obtained with standard aerobic training. These findings suggest that routine screening for IMW is advisable in patients with CHF, and specific IMT and/or aerobic training are of practical value in the management of these patients.

  9. Regulation of heart muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.; Denton, Richard M.

    1974-01-01

    1. The activity of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase was assayed by the incorporation of [32P]phosphate from [γ-32P]ATP into the dehydrogenase complex. There was a very close correlation between this incorporation and the loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity with all preparations studied. 2. Nucleoside triphosphates other than ATP (at 100μm) and cyclic 3′:5′-nucleotides (at 10μm) had no significant effect on kinase activity. 3. The Km for thiamin pyrophosphate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 0.76μm. Sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate, ADP and GTP were competitive inhibitors against thiamin pyrophosphate in the dehydrogenase reaction. 4. The Km for ATP of the intrinsic kinase assayed in three preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase was in the range 13.9–25.4μm. Inhibition by ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate was predominantly competitive, but there was nevertheless a definite non-competitive element. Thiamin pyrophosphate and sodium pyrophosphate were uncompetitive inhibitors against ATP. It is suggested that ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate inhibit the kinase mainly by binding to the ATP site and that the adenosine moiety may be involved in this binding. It is suggested that thiamin pyrophosphate, sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate and ADP may inhibit the kinase by binding through pyrophosphate or imidodiphosphate moieties at some site other than the ATP site. It is not known whether this is the coenzyme-binding site in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction. 5. The Km for pyruvate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 35.5μm. 2-Oxobutyrate and 3-hydroxypyruvate but not glyoxylate were also substrates; all three compounds inhibited pyruvate oxidation. 6. In preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase free of thiamin pyrophosphate, pyruvate inhibited the kinase reaction at all concentrations in the range 25–500μm. The inhibition was uncompetitive. In the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate

  10. Clonal analysis reveals common lineage relationships between head muscles and second heart field derivatives in the mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Lescroart, Fabienne; Kelly, Robert G; Le Garrec, Jean-François; Nicolas, Jean-François; Meilhac, Sigolène M; Buckingham, Margaret

    2010-10-01

    Head muscle progenitors in pharyngeal mesoderm are present in close proximity to cells of the second heart field and show overlapping patterns of gene expression. However, it is not clear whether a single progenitor cell gives rise to both heart and head muscles. We now show that this is the case, using a retrospective clonal analysis in which an nlaacZ sequence, converted to functional nlacZ after a rare intragenic recombination event, is targeted to the alpha(c)-actin gene, expressed in all developing skeletal and cardiac muscle. We distinguish two branchiomeric head muscle lineages, which segregate early, both of which also contribute to myocardium. The first gives rise to the temporalis and masseter muscles, which derive from the first branchial arch, and also to the extraocular muscles, thus demonstrating a contribution from paraxial as well as prechordal mesoderm to this anterior muscle group. Unexpectedly, this first lineage also contributes to myocardium of the right ventricle. The second lineage gives rise to muscles of facial expression, which derive from mesoderm of the second branchial arch. It also contributes to outflow tract myocardium at the base of the arteries. Further sublineages distinguish myocardium at the base of the aorta or pulmonary trunk, with a clonal relationship to right or left head muscles, respectively. We thus establish a lineage tree, which we correlate with genetic regulation, and demonstrate a clonal relationship linking groups of head muscles to different parts of the heart, reflecting the posterior movement of the arterial pole during pharyngeal morphogenesis.

  11. Muscle size explains low passive skeletal muscle force in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Maiorana, Andrew J.; Naylor, Louise H.; Dembo, Lawrence G.; Lloyd, David G.; Green, Daniel J.; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Background Alterations in skeletal muscle function and architecture have been linked to the compromised exercise capacity characterizing chronic heart failure (CHF). However, how passive skeletal muscle force is affected in CHF is not clear. Understanding passive force characteristics in CHF can help further elucidate the extent to which altered contractile properties and/or architecture might affect muscle and locomotor function. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate passive force in a single muscle for which non-invasive measures of muscle size and estimates of fiber force are possible, the soleus (SOL), both in CHF patients and age- and physical activity-matched control participants. Methods Passive SOL muscle force and size were obtained by means of a novel approach combining experimental data (dynamometry, electromyography, ultrasound imaging) with a musculoskeletal model. Results We found reduced passive SOL forces (∼30%) (at the same relative levels of muscle stretch) in CHF vs. healthy individuals. This difference was eliminated when force was normalized by physiological cross sectional area, indicating that reduced force output may be most strongly associated with muscle size. Nevertheless, passive force was significantly higher in CHF at a given absolute muscle length (non length-normalized) and likely explained by the shorter muscle slack lengths and optimal muscle lengths measured in CHF compared to the control participants. This later factor may lead to altered performance of the SOL in functional tasks such gait. Discussion These findings suggest introducing exercise rehabilitation targeting muscle hypertrophy and, specifically for the calf muscles, exercise that promotes muscle lengthening. PMID:27672504

  12. Mechanical stimulation in the engineering of heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Norman Yu; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2016-01-15

    Recreating the beating heart in the laboratory continues to be a formidable bioengineering challenge. The fundamental feature of the heart is its pumping action, requiring considerable mechanical forces to compress a blood filled chamber with a defined in- and outlet. Ventricular output crucially depends on venous loading of the ventricles (preload) and on the force generated by the preloaded ventricles to overcome arterial blood pressure (afterload). The rate of contraction is controlled by the spontaneously active sinus node and transmission of its electrical impulses into the ventricles. The underlying principles for these physiological processes are described by the Frank-Starling mechanism and Bowditch phenomenon. It is essential to consider these principles in the design and evaluation of tissue engineered myocardium. This review focuses on current strategies to evoke mechanical loading in hydrogel-based heart muscle engineering. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Nkx2-5 Lineage Tracing Visualizes the Distribution of Second Heart Field-Derived Aortic Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Andrew W.; Nakano, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development, smooth muscle within the ascending aorta arises from two distinct sources: second heart field progenitors and the neural crest. It has recently been hypothesized that the boundary between smooth muscle from these distinct origins may be particularly susceptible to acute aortic dissection. While the contribution of second heart field progenitors to the ascending aorta is well established, detailed mapping of the anatomical distribution of second heart field-derived smooth muscle at this smooth muscle boundary has yet to be observed using a committed cardiac progenitor Cre-lineage. Using Nkx2-5-Cre knockin mice, the anatomical distribution of second heart field derived aortic smooth muscle was mapped in detail. Specifically, Nkx2-5-Cre-labeled cells constitute the entirety of the smooth muscle layer at the aortic base and then become restricted to the adventitial side of the ascending aortic media. This distribution pattern is present by E12.5 in the embryo and persists throughout embryonic development. These data reveal previously unappreciated details regarding the anatomical distribution of second heart field-derived smooth muscle within the aorta as well as the non-cardiomyocyte fates labeled by the Nkx2-5-Cre lineage. PMID:24133047

  14. Latest aspects of aldosterone actions on the heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Kritis, A A; Gouta, C P; Liaretidou, E I; Kallaras, K I

    2016-02-01

    The genomic action of aldosterone has already been known to the scientific community and is well-documented to a satisfactory degree. However, the existence of rapid, non-genomic aldosterone actions has repeatedly been proven. These actions are apparent to a lot of tissues, among which the cardiac tissue, with the cardiac cells being responsible for the secretion of endogenous aldosterone. In the genomic pathway, the connection between the hormone and its receptor results increased reabsorption of sodium and water and excretion of potassium. Thus, the genomic procedure reacts indirectly on cardiovascular system by altering the blood pressure. New studies have shed light on unknown aspects of the non-genomic mechanism, which is sometimes performed by means of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), while others through an MR-independent pathway. It is believed that aldosterone exerts its non-genomic action with the help of a different receptor, probably a G protein coupled receptor. A possible target is protein kinase C (PKC), and PKCε is postulated increase the permeability of the membrane of the cardiac cells to sodium, resulting in delayed repolarization and prolongation of action potential. These findings totally agree with and account for the serendipitous finding of our laboratory, that there is a positive correlation between plasma aldosterone levels and left ventricle (LV) contraction duration. Also, aldosterone has been proven to exacerbate the oxidative stress and induce vasoconstriction by acting on the vascular resistance and the cardiac output. Finally, this article deals with the role of aldosterone in cardiac fibrosis and the latest aspects of aldosterone actions on the heart muscle as well as providing a historical overview of the landmarks pertaining aldosterone's research.

  15. Muscle function in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kröönström, Linda Ashman; Johansson, Linda; Zetterström, Anna-Klara; Dellborg, Mikael; Eriksson, Peter; Cider, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to assess muscle function in a sample of Swedish adult men and women with congenital heart disease (ACHD) and to compare the results with published reference values in healthy adults. From April 2009 to December 2010, 762 adult outpatients were assessed for their suitability and individual need for tests of physical fitness. The patients performed five muscle function tests, two isotonic tests and three isometric tests. Of the 762 patients, 315 (41.3%) patients performed the tests. Patients with ACHD had lower isotonic muscle function compared to healthy reference values. In the heel lift test, men with ACHD performed at 63% and women at 58% of the healthy reference values and in the shoulder flexion test the corresponding performance level was 60% for men with ACHD and 85% for the women. Multiple regression analyses showed that NYHA class II-IV was a significant predictor for a lower isotonic muscle function i.e. heel lift in women (p<0.001) and men (p=0.05) and in shoulder flexion (p<0.001) in women, as well as in isometric knee extension (p=0.04) and isometric shoulder abduction (p<0.001) in women. This is the first report of muscle function in a broad and unselected group of patients with ACHD. Our data shows that patients with ACHD have lower isotonic muscle function. The impacts of low muscle function in activities of daily living and the question of whether muscle function could be improved with exercise training need further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Eosinophils from hypereosinophilic patients damage endocardium of isolated feline heart muscle preparations.

    PubMed

    Shah, A M; Brutsaert, D L; Meulemans, A L; Andries, L J; Capron, M

    1990-03-01

    Persistent eosinophilia in humans is often associated with endocardial damage to the heart, but a causal relation has not been established. We investigated the effect of eosinophils and eosinophil supernatants obtained from eight hypereosinophilic patients on the contractile performance and endocardial morphology of isolated, electrically stimulated cat papillary muscle preparations (n = 16). All these eosinophil suspensions contained high proportions of "hypodense" or "activated" cells. Eosinophils (5-15 x 10(6) ml organ bath) or eosinophil culture supernatants (prepared by overnight incubation at 37 degrees C) when added to papillary muscles produced acute changes in contractile behavior of these muscles identical to the previously reported effects of selective endocardial damage: a reduction in time to peak isometric twitch tension causing a reduction in peak isometric tension but with no significant reduction in rate of tension development or in maximum unloaded shortening velocity. All of these muscle preparations showed severely damaged endocardium at scanning electron microscopy. Addition of eosinophils from hypereosinophilic patients to muscles with selectively damaged endocardium (by previous transient [1-second] exposure to 1% Triton X-100) produced no further change in contractile performance. No significant change in contractile performance or endocardial morphology of papillary muscles (n = 16) was observed after addition of eosinophils (7.5-10 x 10(6] or neutrophils (8-15 x 10(6] from normal subjects or of cell-free culture medium. Thus, activated human eosinophils produce specific morphological and functional changes suggestive of specific damage to endocardium of isolated feline cardiac muscle.

  17. Can Stem Cell 'Patch' Help Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164475.html Can Stem Cell 'Patch' Help Heart Failure? Small improvement seen over ... Scientists report another step in the use of stem cells to help treat people with debilitating heart failure. ...

  18. Oracle, a novel PDZ-LIM domain protein expressed in heart and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Passier, R; Richardson, J A; Olson, E N

    2000-04-01

    In order to identify novel genes enriched in adult heart, we performed a subtractive hybridization for genes expressed in mouse heart but not in skeletal muscle. We identified two alternative splicing variants of a novel PDZ-LIM domain protein, which we named Oracle. Both variants contain a PDZ domain at the amino-terminus and three LIM domains at the carboxy-terminus. Highest homology of Oracle was found with the human and rat enigma proteins in the PDZ domain (62 and 61%, respectively) and in the LIM domains (60 and 69%, respectively). By Northern hybridization analysis, we showed that expression is highest in adult mouse heart, low in skeletal muscle and undetectable in other adult mouse tissues. In situ hybridization in mouse embryos confirmed and extended these data by showing high expression of Oracle mRNA in atrial and ventricular myocardial cells from E8.5. From E9.5 low expression of Oracle mRNA was detectable in myotomes. These data suggest a role for Oracle in the early development and function of heart and skeletal muscle.

  19. Myostatin from the heart: local and systemic actions in cardiac failure and muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, Astrid; Auger-Messier, Mannix; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Heineke, Joerg

    2011-06-01

    A significant proportion of heart failure patients develop skeletal muscle wasting and cardiac cachexia, which is associated with a very poor prognosis. Recently, myostatin, a cytokine from the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family and a known strong inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth, has been identified as a direct mediator of skeletal muscle atrophy in mice with heart failure. Myostatin is mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, although basal expression is also detectable in heart and adipose tissue. During pathological loading of the heart, the myocardium produces and secretes myostatin into the circulation where it inhibits skeletal muscle growth. Thus, genetic elimination of myostatin from the heart reduces skeletal muscle atrophy in mice with heart failure, whereas transgenic overexpression of myostatin in the heart is capable of inducing muscle wasting. In addition to its endocrine action on skeletal muscle, cardiac myostatin production also modestly inhibits cardiomyocyte growth under certain circumstances, as well as induces cardiac fibrosis and alterations in ventricular function. Interestingly, heart failure patients show elevated myostatin levels in their serum. To therapeutically influence skeletal muscle wasting, direct inhibition of myostatin was shown to positively impact skeletal muscle mass in heart failure, suggesting a promising strategy for the treatment of cardiac cachexia in the future.

  20. Myostatin from the heart: local and systemic actions in cardiac failure and muscle wasting

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, Astrid; Auger-Messier, Mannix; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2011-01-01

    A significant proportion of heart failure patients develop skeletal muscle wasting and cardiac cachexia, which is associated with a very poor prognosis. Recently, myostatin, a cytokine from the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family and a known strong inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth, has been identified as a direct mediator of skeletal muscle atrophy in mice with heart failure. Myostatin is mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, although basal expression is also detectable in heart and adipose tissue. During pathological loading of the heart, the myocardium produces and secretes myostatin into the circulation where it inhibits skeletal muscle growth. Thus, genetic elimination of myostatin from the heart reduces skeletal muscle atrophy in mice with heart failure, whereas transgenic overexpression of myostatin in the heart is capable of inducing muscle wasting. In addition to its endocrine action on skeletal muscle, cardiac myostatin production also modestly inhibits cardiomyocyte growth under certain circumstances, as well as induces cardiac fibrosis and alterations in ventricular function. Interestingly, heart failure patients show elevated myostatin levels in their serum. To therapeutically influence skeletal muscle wasting, direct inhibition of myostatin was shown to positively impact skeletal muscle mass in heart failure, suggesting a promising strategy for the treatment of cardiac cachexia in the future. PMID:21421824

  1. Faster and stronger manifestation of mitochondrial diseases in skeletal muscle than in heart related to cytosolic inorganic phosphate (Pi) accumulation.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    A model of the cell bioenergetic system was used to compare the effect of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiencies in a broad range of moderate ATP demand in skeletal muscle and heart. Computer simulations revealed that kinetic properties of the system are similar in both cases despite the much higher mitochondria content and "basic" OXPHOS activity in heart than in skeletal muscle, because of a much higher each-step activation (ESA) of OXPHOS in skeletal muscle than in heart. Large OXPHOS deficiencies lead in both tissues to a significant decrease in oxygen consumption (V̇o2) and phosphocreatine (PCr) and increase in cytosolic ADP, Pi, and H(+) The main difference between skeletal muscle and heart is a much higher cytosolic Pi concentration in healthy tissue and much higher cytosolic Pi accumulation (level) at low OXPHOS activities in the former, caused by a higher PCr level in healthy tissue (and higher total phosphate pool) and smaller Pi redistribution between cytosol and mitochondria at OXPHOS deficiency. This difference does not depend on ATP demand in a broad range. A much greater Pi increase and PCr decrease during rest-to-moderate work transition in skeletal muscle at OXPHOS deficiencies than at normal OXPHOS activity significantly slows down the V̇o2 on-kinetics. Because high cytosolic Pi concentrations cause fatigue in skeletal muscle and can compromise force generation in skeletal muscle and heart, this system property can contribute to the faster and stronger manifestation of mitochondrial diseases in skeletal muscle than in heart. Shortly, skeletal muscle with large OXPHOS deficiencies becomes fatigued already during low/moderate exercise. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Faster and stronger manifestation of mitochondrial diseases in skeletal muscle than in heart related to cytosolic inorganic phosphate (Pi) accumulation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A model of the cell bioenergetic system was used to compare the effect of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiencies in a broad range of moderate ATP demand in skeletal muscle and heart. Computer simulations revealed that kinetic properties of the system are similar in both cases despite the much higher mitochondria content and “basic” OXPHOS activity in heart than in skeletal muscle, because of a much higher each-step activation (ESA) of OXPHOS in skeletal muscle than in heart. Large OXPHOS deficiencies lead in both tissues to a significant decrease in oxygen consumption (V̇o2) and phosphocreatine (PCr) and increase in cytosolic ADP, Pi, and H+. The main difference between skeletal muscle and heart is a much higher cytosolic Pi concentration in healthy tissue and much higher cytosolic Pi accumulation (level) at low OXPHOS activities in the former, caused by a higher PCr level in healthy tissue (and higher total phosphate pool) and smaller Pi redistribution between cytosol and mitochondria at OXPHOS deficiency. This difference does not depend on ATP demand in a broad range. A much greater Pi increase and PCr decrease during rest-to-moderate work transition in skeletal muscle at OXPHOS deficiencies than at normal OXPHOS activity significantly slows down the V̇o2 on-kinetics. Because high cytosolic Pi concentrations cause fatigue in skeletal muscle and can compromise force generation in skeletal muscle and heart, this system property can contribute to the faster and stronger manifestation of mitochondrial diseases in skeletal muscle than in heart. Shortly, skeletal muscle with large OXPHOS deficiencies becomes fatigued already during low/moderate exercise. PMID:27283913

  3. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and skeletal muscle physiology.

    PubMed

    Farris, Stephen D; Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Stempien-Otero, April

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) accounts for half of all heart failure in the USA, increases in prevalence with aging, and has no effective therapies. Intriguingly, the pathophysiology of HFpEF has many commonalities with the aged cardiovascular system including reductions in diastolic compliance, chronotropic defects, increased resistance in the peripheral vasculature, and poor energy substrate utilization. Decreased exercise capacity is a cardinal symptom of HFpEF. However, its severity is often out of proportion to changes in cardiac output. This observation has led to studies of muscle function in HFpEF revealing structural, biomechanical, and metabolic changes. These data, while incomplete, support a hypothesis that similar to aging, HFPEF is a systemic process. Understanding the mechanisms leading to exercise intolerance in this condition may lead to strategies to improve morbidity in both HFpEF and aging.

  4. Distinct contributions of the thin and thick filaments to length-dependent activation in heart muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuemeng; Kampourakis, Thomas; Yan, Ziqian; Sevrieva, Ivanka; Irving, Malcolm; Sun, Yin-Biao

    2017-01-01

    The Frank-Starling relation is a fundamental auto-regulatory property of the heart that ensures the volume of blood ejected in each heartbeat is matched to the extent of venous filling. At the cellular level, heart muscle cells generate higher force when stretched, but despite intense efforts the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown. We applied a fluorescence-based method, which reports structural changes separately in the thick and thin filaments of rat cardiac muscle, to elucidate that mechanism. The distinct structural changes of troponin C in the thin filaments and myosin regulatory light chain in the thick filaments allowed us to identify two aspects of the Frank-Starling relation. Our results show that the enhanced force observed when heart muscle cells are maximally activated by calcium is due to a change in thick filament structure, but the increase in calcium sensitivity at lower calcium levels is due to a change in thin filament structure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24081.001 PMID:28229860

  5. Deep breathing heart rate variability is associated with inspiratory muscle weakness in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Reis, Michel Silva; Arena, Ross; Archiza, Bruno; de Toledo, Carlos Fischer; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2014-03-01

    There is a synchronism between the respiratory and cardiac cycles. However, the relationship of inspiratory muscle weakness in chronic heart failure (CHF) on cardiac autonomic modulation is unknown. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate the impact of inspiratory muscle strength on the magnitude of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Ten CHF (62 ± 7 years--left ventricle eject fraction of 40 ± 5% and New York Heart Association class I-III) and nine matched-age healthy volunteers (64 ± 5 years) participated in this study. Heart rate variability (HRV) was obtained at rest and during deep breathing manoeuvre (DB-M) by electrocardiograph. CHF patients demonstrated impaired cardiac autonomic modulation at rest and during DB-M when compared with healthy subjects (p < 0.05). Moreover, significant and positive correlations between maximal inspiratory pressure and inspiratory-expiratory differences (r = 0.79), expiratory/inspiratory ratio (r = 0.83), root mean square of the successive differences (r = 0.77), standard deviation of NN intervals (r = 0.77), low frequency (r = 0.77), and high frequency (r = 0.70) were found during DB-M. At rest, significant correlations were found also. Patients with CHF presented impaired cardiac autonomic modulation at rest. In addition, cardiac autonomic control of heart rate was associated with inspiratory muscle weakness in CHF. Based on this evidence, recommendations for future research applications of respiratory muscle training can bring to light a potentially valuable target for rehabilitation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Optical probes of membrane potential in heart muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Morad, M; Salama, G

    1979-01-01

    1. The fluorescent dye Merocyanine-540 and the two weakly fluoresecnet dyes Merocyanine-rhodanine and Merocyanine-oxazolone are shown to respond as optical probes of membrane potential in heart muscle. 2. In frog hearts stained with Merocyanine-540, the absorption at 540 nm decreases by 0.1-1.0% and increase at 570 nm excitation wave-length, the fluorescence increases by 1-2%. The time course of all three optical measurements follows the kinetics of the action potential. 3. Merocyanine-rhodanine exhibits potential-dependent optical responses through a 0.5% decrease in absorption at 750 nm, and Merocyanine-oxazolone has a 1.0% decrease in absorption at 720 nm. Their optical responses have a signal-to-noise ratio of 100/1 and 500/1, respectively. 4. The action spectrum of Merocyanine-rhodanine is triphasic in frog heart with an increase in transmittance from 780 to 700, a decrease from 700 to 600, and increase from 600 to 450 nm. Merocyanine-oxazolone shows only increases in transmittance during membrane depolarization. 5. The optical responses of these probes are linear with respect to changes in membrane potential. 6. Pharmacological agents or ionic interventions do not alter the membrane potential sensitivity of Merocyanine-540. 7. Rapid spectrophotometric measurements at various phases of the action potential indicate that the potential dependent optical signals of Merocyanine-540 are produced by changes in amplitude of fluorescence and absorption bands. The lack of wave-length displacement as a function of membrane potential, i.e. electrochromism, is not the mechanism governing the voltage sensitivity of Merocyanine-540. 8. The data suggest that these Merocyanine dyes bind to the plasma membrane and serve as linear optical probes of membrane potential in heart muscle. PMID:314976

  7. NK4 Antagonizes Tbx1/10 to Promote Cardiac versus Pharyngeal Muscle Fate in the Ascidian Second Heart Field

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Razy-Krajka, Florian; Siu, Eric; Ketcham, Alexandra; Christiaen, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    The heart and head muscles share common developmental origins and genetic underpinnings in vertebrates, including humans. Parts of the heart and cranio-facial musculature derive from common mesodermal progenitors that express NKX2-5, ISL1, and TBX1. This ontogenetic kinship is dramatically reflected in the DiGeorge/Cardio-Velo-Facial syndrome (DGS/CVFS), where mutations of TBX1 cause malformations in the pharyngeal apparatus and cardiac outflow tract. Cardiac progenitors of the first heart field (FHF) do not require TBX1 and segregate precociously from common progenitors of the second heart field (SHF) and pharyngeal muscles. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern heart versus pharyngeal muscle specification within this lineage remain elusive. Here, we harness the simplicity of the ascidian larva to show that, following asymmetric cell division of common progenitors, NK4/NKX2-5 promotes GATAa/GATA4/5/6 expression and cardiac specification in the second heart precursors by antagonizing Tbx1/10-mediated inhibition of GATAa and activation of Collier/Olf/EBF (COE), the determinant of atrial siphon muscle (ASM) specification. Our results uncover essential regulatory connections between the conserved cardio-pharyngeal factor Tbx1/10 and muscle determinant COE, as well as a mutual antagonism between NK4 and Tbx1/10 activities upstream of GATAa and COE. The latter cross-antagonism underlies a fundamental heart versus pharyngeal muscle fate choice that occurs in a conserved lineage of cardio-pharyngeal progenitors. We propose that this basic ontogenetic motif underlies cardiac and pharyngeal muscle development and evolution in chordates. PMID:24311985

  8. NK4 antagonizes Tbx1/10 to promote cardiac versus pharyngeal muscle fate in the ascidian second heart field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Razy-Krajka, Florian; Siu, Eric; Ketcham, Alexandra; Christiaen, Lionel

    2013-12-01

    The heart and head muscles share common developmental origins and genetic underpinnings in vertebrates, including humans. Parts of the heart and cranio-facial musculature derive from common mesodermal progenitors that express NKX2-5, ISL1, and TBX1. This ontogenetic kinship is dramatically reflected in the DiGeorge/Cardio-Velo-Facial syndrome (DGS/CVFS), where mutations of TBX1 cause malformations in the pharyngeal apparatus and cardiac outflow tract. Cardiac progenitors of the first heart field (FHF) do not require TBX1 and segregate precociously from common progenitors of the second heart field (SHF) and pharyngeal muscles. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern heart versus pharyngeal muscle specification within this lineage remain elusive. Here, we harness the simplicity of the ascidian larva to show that, following asymmetric cell division of common progenitors, NK4/NKX2-5 promotes GATAa/GATA4/5/6 expression and cardiac specification in the second heart precursors by antagonizing Tbx1/10-mediated inhibition of GATAa and activation of Collier/Olf/EBF (COE), the determinant of atrial siphon muscle (ASM) specification. Our results uncover essential regulatory connections between the conserved cardio-pharyngeal factor Tbx1/10 and muscle determinant COE, as well as a mutual antagonism between NK4 and Tbx1/10 activities upstream of GATAa and COE. The latter cross-antagonism underlies a fundamental heart versus pharyngeal muscle fate choice that occurs in a conserved lineage of cardio-pharyngeal progenitors. We propose that this basic ontogenetic motif underlies cardiac and pharyngeal muscle development and evolution in chordates.

  9. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  10. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial–mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  11. Effects of chronic heart disease on skeletal muscle fiber size.

    PubMed

    Mattiello-Sverzut, A C; Chimelli, L; Teixeira, S; Pierre, M; Oliveira, L

    2005-02-01

    Size changes in muscle fibers of subjects with chronic heart disease (CHD) have been reported, although a consensus has not been achieved. The aims of the present study were to investigate a possible association between CHD and fiber size changes in the brachial biceps compared to subjects without heart disease. Forty-six muscle samples were obtained in autopsies of individuals (13 to 84 years) without neuromuscular disorders, 19 (10 males and 9 females) with, and 27 (14 males and 13 females) without CHD. In all cases muscle sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and processed for the visualization of myofibrillar ATPase activity. The lesser diameter of type 1 and type 2 fibers was obtained tracing their outlines (at least 150 fibers of each type per sample) onto an image analyzer connected to a computer. The results were analyzed statistically comparing males and females with and without CHD. Type 1 fiber mean lesser diameters were 51.51 and 54.52 microm in males (normal range 34-71 microm) and 45.65 and 55.42 microm in females (normal range 34-65 microm) without and with CHD, respectively; type 2 fibers measured 54.31, 58.23, 41.15, and 49.57 microm, respectively (normal range 36-79 microm for males and 32-59 microm for females). No significant difference in fiber size was detected in 24 males with and without CHD, while in 22 females there was a significant increase in size in those with cardiomyopathy. We concluded that CHD does not determine significant changes in fiber size. However, in females, there is some hypertrophy which, despite within normal range, may reflect morphologic heterogeneity of the sample, or the daily life activities in the upper limbs as a compensatory mechanism to fatigability that affect predominantly the lower limbs in subjects with CHD.

  12. The area composita of adhering junctions connecting heart muscle cells of vertebrates. VI. Different precursor structures in non-mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Pieperhoff, Sebastian; Franke, Werner W

    2008-07-01

    Recent studies on the formation and molecular organization of the mammalian heart have emphasized the architectural and functional importance of the adhering junctions (AJs), which are densely clustered in the bipolar end regions (intercalated disks, IDs) connecting the elongated cardiomyocytes of the adult heart. Moreover, we learned from genetic studies of mutated AJ proteins that desmosomal proteins, which for the most part are integral components of ID-specific composite AJs (areae compositae, AC), are essential in heart development and function. Developmental studies have shown that the bipolar concentration of cardiomyocyte AJs in IDs is a rather late process and only completed postnatally. Here we report that in the adult hearts of diverse lower vertebrates (fishes, amphibia, birds) most AJs remain separate and distinct in molecular character, representing either fasciae adhaerentes, maculae adhaerentes (desmosomes) or--less frequently--some form of AC. In the mature hearts of the amphibian and fish species examined a large proportion of the AJs connecting cardiomyocytes is not clustered in the IDs but remains located on the lateral surfaces where they appear either as puncta adhaerentia or as desmosomes. In many places, these puncta connect parallel cardiomyocytes in spectacular ladder-like regular arrays (scalae adhaerentes) correlated with--and connected by--electron-dense plaque-like material to sarcomeric Z-bands. In the avian hearts, on the other hand, most AJs are clustered in the IDs but only a small proportion of the desmosomes appears as AC, compared to the dominance of distinct fasciae adhaerentes. We conclude that the fusion and amalgamation of AJs and desmosomes to ACs is a late process both in ontogenesis and in evolution. The significance and possible functional implications of the specific junctional structures in vertebrate evolution and the class-specific requirements of architectural and molecular assembly adaptation during regeneration

  13. Muscle precursor cells invade and repopulate freeze-killed muscles.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J E; Coulton, G R; Partridge, T A

    1987-10-01

    A problem with the use of muscle grafting as a therapeutic procedure is to produce a graft functionally adequate to replace a muscle of complex architecture, such as a sphincter muscle. We thought it might be possible to use dead cadaver muscles, repopulated by the patient's own muscle precursor cells (mpc), to reconstruct muscles whose anatomy would be imposed by the framework of dead muscle and whose genetic constitution would be determined by the mpc. Here we show, in the mouse, that an extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle, killed by repeated freezing and thawing, repopulated with mpc and grafted into a nu/nu or tolerant AKR host mouse, is capable of supporting muscle formation. By using the allotypic isoenzyme forms of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase as markers, we have shown that the newly regenerated muscle in such grafts is derived mainly from the implanted mpc, but also to some extent from the host mouse's own mpc. By 50-70 days after grafting, new muscle fibres were found to constitute up to 70% of the graft. Many fibres had assumed diameters in the normal range for mouse muscle, often having peripherally placed nuclei. These findings raise the possibility of the therapeutic use of such grafts. To our surprise, dead EDL muscle grafts into which no mpc had been implanted were also the site of good muscle regeneration. New-formed muscle in these grafts was shown to be derived entirely from mpc which must have migrated into the graft from the host. Investigation of the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon should further our knowledge of factors which regulate the proliferation and movement of dormant mpc in adult animals.

  14. Mesp1 Marked Cardiac Progenitor Cells Repair Infarcted Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Li; Diaz, Andrea Diaz; Benham, Ashley; Xu, Xueping; Wijaya, Cori S.; Fa’ak, Faisal; Luo, Weijia; Soibam, Benjamin; Azares, Alon; Yu, Wei; Lyu, Qiongying; Stewart, M. David; Gunaratne, Preethi; Cooney, Austin; McConnell, Bradley K.; Schwartz, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesp1 directs multipotential cardiovascular cell fates, even though it’s transiently induced prior to the appearance of the cardiac progenitor program. Tracing Mesp1-expressing cells and their progeny allows isolation and characterization of the earliest cardiovascular progenitor cells. Studying the biology of Mesp1-CPCs in cell culture and ischemic disease models is an important initial step toward using them for heart disease treatment. Because of Mesp1’s transitory nature, Mesp1-CPC lineages were traced by following EYFP expression in murine Mesp1Cre/+; Rosa26EYFP/+ ES cells. We captured EYFP+ cells that strongly expressed cardiac mesoderm markers and cardiac transcription factors, but not pluripotent or nascent mesoderm markers. BMP2/4 treatment led to the expansion of EYFP+ cells, while Wnt3a and Activin were marginally effective. BMP2/4 exposure readily led EYFP+ cells to endothelial and smooth muscle cells, but inhibition of the canonical Wnt signaling was required to enter the cardiomyocyte fate. Injected mouse pre-contractile Mesp1-EYFP+ CPCs improved the survivability of injured mice and restored the functional performance of infarcted hearts for at least 3 months. Mesp1-EYFP+ cells are bona fide CPCs and they integrated well in infarcted hearts and emerged de novo into terminally differentiated cardiac myocytes, smooth muscle and vascular endothelial cells. PMID:27538477

  15. Challenges to success in heart failure: Cardiac cell therapies in patients with heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hidemasa; Ito, Hiroshi; Sano, Shunji

    2016-11-01

    Heart failure remains the leading cause of death worldwide, and is a burgeoning problem in public health due to the limited capacity of postnatal hearts to self-renew. The pathophysiological changes in injured hearts can sometimes be manifested as scar formation or myocardial degradation, rather than supplemental muscle regeneration to replenish lost tissue during the healing processes. Stem cell therapies have been investigated as a possible treatment approach for children and adults with potentially fatal cardiovascular disease that does not respond to current medical therapies. Although the heart is one of the least regenerative organs in mammals, discoveries made during the past few decades have improved our understanding of cardiac development and resident stem/progenitor pools, which may be lineage-restricted subpopulations during the post-neonatal stage of cardiac morphogenesis. Recently, investigation has specifically focused on factors that activate either endogenous progenitor cells or preexisting cardiomyocytes, to regenerate cardiovascular cells and replace the damaged heart tissues. The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells has advanced our technological capability to direct cardiac reprogramming by essential factors that are crucial for heart field completion in each stage. Cardiac tissue engineering technology has recently shown progress in generating myocardial tissue on human native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds. This review summarizes recent advances in the field of cardiac cell therapies with an emphasis on cellular mechanisms, such as bone marrow stem cells and cardiac progenitor cells, which show the high potential for success in preclinical and clinical meta-analysis studies. Expanding our current understanding of mechanisms of self-renewal in the neonatal mammalian heart may lead to the development of novel cardiovascular regenerative medicines for pediatric heart diseases. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology

  16. Muscle reflex in heart failure: the role of exercise training.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han-Jun; Zucker, Irving H; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Exercise evokes sympathetic activation and increases blood pressure and heart rate (HR). Two neural mechanisms that cause the exercise-induced increase in sympathetic discharge are central command and the exercise pressor reflex (EPR). The former suggests that a volitional signal emanating from central motor areas leads to increased sympathetic activation during exercise. The latter is a reflex originating in skeletal muscle which contributes significantly to the regulation of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems during exercise. The afferent arm of this reflex is composed of metabolically sensitive (predominantly group IV, C-fibers) and mechanically sensitive (predominately group III, A-delta fibers) afferent fibers. Activation of these receptors and their associated afferent fibers reflexively adjusts sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity during exercise. In heart failure, the sympathetic activation during exercise is exaggerated, which potentially increases cardiovascular risk and contributes to exercise intolerance during physical activity in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients. A therapeutic strategy for preventing or slowing the progression of the exaggerated EPR may be of benefit in CHF patients. Long-term exercise training (ExT), as a non-pharmacological treatment for CHF increases exercise capacity, reduces sympatho-excitation and improves cardiovascular function in CHF animals and patients. In this review, we will discuss the effects of ExT and the mechanisms that contribute to the exaggerated EPR in the CHF state.

  17. Intercostal and forearm muscle deoxygenation during respiratory fatigue in patients with heart failure: potential role of a respiratory muscle metaboreflex.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A M; Castro, R R T; Silva, B M; Villacorta, H; Sant'Anna Junior, M; Nóbrega, A C L

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of respiratory muscle fatigue on intercostal and forearm muscle perfusion and oxygenation in patients with heart failure. Five clinically stable heart failure patients with respiratory muscle weakness (age, 66 ± 12 years; left ventricle ejection fraction, 34 ± 3%) and nine matched healthy controls underwent a respiratory muscle fatigue protocol, breathing against a fixed resistance at 60% of their maximal inspiratory pressure for as long as they could sustain the predetermined inspiratory pressure. Intercostal and forearm muscle blood volume and oxygenation were continuously monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy with transducers placed on the seventh left intercostal space and the left forearm. Data were compared by two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni correction. Respiratory fatigue occurred at 5.1 ± 1.3 min in heart failure patients and at 9.3 ± 1.4 min in controls (P<0.05), but perceived effort, changes in heart rate, and in systolic blood pressure were similar between groups (P>0.05). Respiratory fatigue in heart failure reduced intercostal and forearm muscle blood volume (P<0.05) along with decreased tissue oxygenation both in intercostal (heart failure, -2.6 ± 1.6%; controls, +1.6 ± 0.5%; P<0.05) and in forearm muscles (heart failure, -4.5 ± 0.5%; controls, +0.5 ± 0.8%; P<0.05). These results suggest that respiratory fatigue in patients with heart failure causes an oxygen demand/delivery mismatch in respiratory muscles, probably leading to a reflex reduction in peripheral limb muscle perfusion, featuring a respiratory metaboreflex.

  18. Skeletal muscle electrical stimulation improves baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability in heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Lazzarotto Rucatti, Ananda; Jaenisch, Rodrigo Boemo; Rossato, Douglas Dalcin; Bonetto, Jéssica Hellen Poletto; Ferreira, Janaína; Xavier, Leder Leal; Sonza, Anelise; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation (ES) on the arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and cardiovascular autonomic control in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF). Male Wistar rats were designated to one of four groups: placebo sham (P-Sham, n=9), ES sham (ES-Sham, n=9), placebo CHF (P-CHF, n=9) or ES CHF (ES-CHF, n=9). The ES was adjusted at a low frequency (30 Hz), duration of 250 μs, with hold and rest time of 8s (4 weeks, 30 min/day, 5 times/week). It was applied on the gastrocnemius muscle with intensity to produce a visible muscle contraction. The rats assigned to the placebo groups performed the same procedures with the equipment turned off. The two-way ANOVA and the post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls tests (P<0.05) were used to data comparison. The BRS was higher in ES-Sham group compared to the P-Sham group and the ES-CHF group compared to the P-CHF group. ES was able to decrease heart rate sympatho-vagal modulation and peripheral sympathetic modulation in ES-CHF compared to P-CHF group. Interestingly, heart rate sympatho-vagal modulation was similar between ES-CHF and P-Sham groups. Thus, ES enhances heart rate parasympathetic modulation on heart failure (ES-CHF) compared to placebo (P-CHF), with consequent decrease of sympatho-vagal balance in the ES-CHF group compared to the P-CHF. The results show that a 4 week ES protocol in CHF rats enhances arterial BRS and cardiovascular autonomic control.

  19. Coaxing stem cells for skeletal muscle repair

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, Karl J.A.; Perlingeiro, Rita C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has a tremendous ability to regenerate, attributed to a well-defined population of muscle stem cells called satellite cells. However, this ability to regenerate diminishes with age and can also be dramatically affected by multiple types of muscle diseases, or injury. Extrinsic and/or intrinsic defects in the regulation of satellite cells are considered to be major determinants for the diminished regenerative capacity. Maintenance and replenishment of the satellite cell pool is one focus for muscle regenerative medicine, which will be discussed. There are other sources of progenitor cells with myogenic capacity, which may also support skeletal muscle repair. However, all of these myogenic cell populations have inherent difficulties and challenges in maintaining or coaxing their derivation for therapeutic purpose. This review will highlight recent reported attributes of these cells and new bioengineering approaches to creating a supply of myogenic stem cells or implants applicable for acute and/or chronic muscle disorders. PMID:25049085

  20. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide induces the apoptosis of cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ki-Chan; Chae, Han-Jung; Piao, Cheng-Shi; Kim, Suhn-Hee; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Soo-Wan

    2005-01-01

    Early heart failure is characterized by elevated plasma Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide-like immunoreactivity (DNP-LI). However, the direct effects of DNP on heart or the heart-associated cell system are not well known. Therefore, we investigated whether DNP induces the apoptosis of H9c2 cardiac muscle cells. H9c2 cardiac muscle cells and rat neonatal cardiomyocytes were treated with various concentrations of DNP. Cell viability and nuclear morphology change were determined by trypan blue staining and Hoechst 33258 staining, respectively. Caspase-3-like activity was measured using specific fluorogenic substrates. Pro-and antiapoptotic proteins were assayed by Western blotting. DNP induced the apoptosis of H9c2 cardiac muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner. Maximum effects occurred at 100 nM concentration of DNP, with a 7-8-fold increase in apoptotic cells, to reach a maximum apoptotic index of 17%. We also identified that H9c2 cardiac muscle cells expressed Natriuretic peptide reactor -A and -B, which respond to DNP to generate cGMP. The treatment with DNP also markedly reduced levels of Bcl-2, inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1, and inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2 and increased the level of Bax and cytochrome c release into cytoplasm and subsequent caspase-3 activation, which co-occurred with increased apoptosis. DNP-induced apoptosis was mediated by cyclic GMP, and this effect was mimicked by dibutylyl-cGMP (30 microM), a membrane permeable analog of cGMP. Furthermore, DNP-induced apoptosis was observed in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. These results suggest that DNP induces the apoptosis of H9c2 cardiac muscle cells and of cardiomyocytes via cGMP and demonstrate that the operative mechanism includes the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins.

  1. Self-oscillating gels beating like a heart muscle

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    So far stimuli-responsive polymer gels and their application to smart materials have been widely studied. On the other hand, as a novel biomimetic gel, we developed gels with an autonomous self-oscillating function like a heart muscle, which was firstly reported in 1996. We designed the self-oscillating polymers and gels by utilizing the oscillating reaction, called the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. The self-oscillating polymer is composed of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) network in which the catalyst for the BZ reaction is covalently immobilized. In the presence of the reactants, the polymer gel undergoes spontaneous cyclic swelling–deswelling changes without any on–off switching of external stimuli. Potential applications of the self-oscillating polymers and gels include several kinds of functional material systems, such as bio-mimetic actuators and mass transport surface. In this review, recent progress on the polymer gels is introduced. PMID:27493533

  2. Congenital Heart Disease in Adolescents With Gluteal Muscle Contracture

    PubMed Central

    You, Tian; Zhang, Xin-tao; Zha, Zhen-gang; Zhang, Wen-tao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC), presented with hip abduction and external rotation when crouching, is common in several ethnicities, particularly in Chinese. It remains unclear that the reasons why these children are weak and have no choice to accept repeated intramuscular injection. Here, we found some unique cases which may be useful to explain this question. We describe a series of special GMC patients, who are accompanied with congenital heart disease (CHD). These cases were first observed in preoperative examinations of a patient with atrial septal defect (ASD), which was proved by chest X-ray and cardiac ultrasound. From then on, we gradually identified additional 3 GMC patients with CHD. The original patient with ASD was sent to cardiosurgery department to repair atrial septal first and received arthroscopic surgery later. While the other 3 were cured postoperative of ventricular septal defect (VSD), tetralogy of fallot (TOF), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), respectively, and had surgery directly. The study gives us 3 proposals: (1) as to CHD children, it is essential to decrease the use of intramuscular injection, (2) paying more attention to cardiac examination especially cardiac ultrasound in perioperative period, and (3) taking 3D-CT to reconstruct gluteal muscles for observing contracture bands clearly in preoperation. However, more larger series of patients are called for to confirm these findings. PMID:25654394

  3. Congenital heart disease in adolescents with gluteal muscle contracture.

    PubMed

    You, Tian; Zhang, Xin-tao; Zha, Zhen-gang; Zhang, Wen-tao

    2015-02-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC), presented with hip abduction and external rotation when crouching, is common in several ethnicities, particularly in Chinese. It remains unclear that the reasons why these children are weak and have no choice to accept repeated intramuscular injection. Here, we found some unique cases which may be useful to explain this question. We describe a series of special GMC patients, who are accompanied with congenital heart disease (CHD). These cases were first observed in preoperative examinations of a patient with atrial septal defect (ASD), which was proved by chest X-ray and cardiac ultrasound. From then on, we gradually identified additional 3 GMC patients with CHD. The original patient with ASD was sent to cardiosurgery department to repair atrial septal first and received arthroscopic surgery later. While the other 3 were cured postoperative of ventricular septal defect (VSD), tetralogy of fallot (TOF), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), respectively, and had surgery directly. The study gives us 3 proposals: (1) as to CHD children, it is essential to decrease the use of intramuscular injection, (2) paying more attention to cardiac examination especially cardiac ultrasound in perioperative period, and (3) taking 3D-CT to reconstruct gluteal muscles for observing contracture bands clearly in preoperation. However, more larger series of patients are called for to confirm these findings.

  4. Chronic heart failure-induced skeletal muscle atrophy, necrosis, and changes in myogenic regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Paula F; Okoshi, Katashi; Zornoff, Leonardo A M; Carvalho, Robson F; Oliveira Junior, Silvio A; Lima, Aline R R; Campos, Dijon H S; Damatto, Ricardo L; Padovani, Carlos R; Nogueira, Celia R; Dal Pai-Silva, Maeli; Okoshi, Marina P

    2010-12-01

    Although intrinsic skeletal muscle abnormalities can influence exercise intolerance during heart failure (HF), the factors responsible for muscle changes have not been elucidated. In this study we evaluated the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRF), myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms, and fiber trophism in the soleus muscle of rats with myocardial infarction-induced heart failure. Six months after surgery, 2 groups of rats were studied: sham, and infarcted rats with HF (MI/HF+, MI size: 41.1±6.3% of total left ventricular area). In the infarcted group, microscopic evaluation revealed scattered foci of fiber necrosis in combination with inflammatory cells, phagocytosis, and increased fibrous tissue. The frequency of necrotic fibers was significantly higher in the MI/HF+ group than in the sham. The MI/HF+ group had atrophy of type I, IC/IIC, and IIA fibers compared to the sham group (P<0.05). MyoD gene expression was higher in the MI/HF+ group (sham: 1.00±0.49; MI/HF+: 2.53±0.71 arbitrary units; P<0.001). Myogenin and MRF4 gene expression was similar in both groups. Myogenin protein levels were reduced in the MI/HF+ group (sham: 1.00±0.21; MI/HF+: 0.74±0.21 arbitrary units; P=0.026). MyoD and MRF4 protein levels, as well as the MyHC distribution, were not different between groups. The MI/HF+ group had higher TNF-α and IL-6 serum concentrations than the sham group. Heart failure-induced skeletal muscle atrophy is combined with fiber necrosis, increased MyoD gene expression and decreased myogenin protein levels.

  5. Do inflammatory cells influence skeletal muscle hypertrophy?

    PubMed

    Koh, Timothy J; Pizza, Francis X

    2009-06-01

    Most research on muscle hypertrophy has focused on the responses of muscle cells to mechanical loading; however, a number of studies also suggest that inflammatory cells may influence muscle hypertrophy. Neutrophils and macrophages accumulate in skeletal muscle following increased mechanical loading, and we have demonstrated that macrophages are essential for hypertrophy following synergist ablation. Whether neutrophils are required remains to be determined. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs impair adaptive responses of skeletal muscle in both human and animal experiments suggesting that the routine use of such drugs could impair muscle performance. Much remains to be learned about the role of inflammatory cells in muscle hypertrophy, including the molecular signals involved in calling neutrophils and macrophages to skeletal muscle as well as those that regulate their function in muscle. In addition, although we have demonstrated that macrophages produce growth promoting factors during muscle hypertrophy, the full range of functional activities involved in muscle hypertrophy remains to be determined. Further investigation should provide insight into the intriguing hypothesis that inflammatory cells play integral roles in regulating muscle hypertrophy.

  6. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Generate Muscle Cells and Repair Muscle Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezawa, Mari; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Itokazu, Yutaka; Yoshihara, Tomoyuki; Hoshino, Mikio; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Ide, Chizuka; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2005-07-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) have great potential as therapeutic agents. We report a method for inducing skeletal muscle lineage cells from human and rat general adherent MSCs with an efficiency of 89%. Induced cells differentiated into muscle fibers upon transplantation into degenerated muscles of rats and mdx-nude mice. The induced population contained Pax7-positive cells that contributed to subsequent regeneration of muscle upon repetitive damage without additional transplantation of cells. These MSCs represent a more ready supply of myogenic cells than do the rare myogenic stem cells normally found in muscle and bone marrow.

  7. Programming and reprogramming a human heart cell

    PubMed Central

    Sahara, Makoto; Santoro, Federica; Chien, Kenneth R

    2015-01-01

    The latest discoveries and advanced knowledge in the fields of stem cell biology and developmental cardiology hold great promise for cardiac regenerative medicine, enabling researchers to design novel therapeutic tools and approaches to regenerate cardiac muscle for diseased hearts. However, progress in this arena has been hampered by a lack of reproducible and convincing evidence, which at best has yielded modest outcomes and is still far from clinical practice. To address current controversies and move cardiac regenerative therapeutics forward, it is crucial to gain a deeper understanding of the key cellular and molecular programs involved in human cardiogenesis and cardiac regeneration. In this review, we consider the fundamental principles that govern the “programming” and “reprogramming” of a human heart cell and discuss updated therapeutic strategies to regenerate a damaged heart. PMID:25712211

  8. Interstitial Cells: Regulators of Smooth Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα+ cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα+ cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues. PMID:24987007

  9. Interstitial cells: regulators of smooth muscle function.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-07-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα(+) cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα(+) cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues.

  10. Respiratory Muscle Training Improves Diaphragm Citrate Synthase Activity and Hemodynamic Function in Rats with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Jaenisch, Rodrigo Boemo; Bertagnolli, Mariane; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Arena, Ross; Lago, Pedro Dal

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced respiratory muscle strength in patients with heart failure positively alters the clinical trajectory of heart failure. In an experimental model, respiratory muscle training in rats with heart failure has been shown to improve cardiopulmonary function through mechanisms yet to be entirely elucidated. The present report aimed to evaluate the respiratory muscle training effects in diaphragm citrate synthase activity and hemodynamic function in rats with heart failure. Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: sedentary sham (Sed-Sham, n=8), trained sham (RMT-Sham, n=8), sedentary heart failure (Sed-HF, n=7) and trained heart failure (RMT-HF, n=7). The animals were submitted to a RMT protocol performed 30 minutes a day, 5 days/week, for 6 weeks. In rats with heart failure, respiratory muscle training decreased pulmonary congestion and right ventricular hypertrophy. Deleterious alterations in left ventricular pressures, as well as left ventricular contractility and relaxation, were assuaged by respiratory muscle training in heart failure rats. Citrate synthase activity, which was significantly reduced in heart failure rats, was preserved by respiratory muscle training. Additionally, a negative correlation was found between citrate synthase and left ventricular end diastolic pressure and positive correlation was found between citrate synthase and left ventricular systolic pressure. Respiratory muscle training produces beneficial adaptations in the diaphragmatic musculature, which is linked to improvements in left ventricular hemodynamics and blood pressure in heart failure rats. The RMT-induced improvements in cardiac architecture and the oxidative capacity of the diaphragm may improve the clinical trajectory of patients with heart failure.

  11. Human Engineered Heart Muscles Engraft and Survive Long Term in a Rodent Myocardial Infarction Model.

    PubMed

    Riegler, Johannes; Tiburcy, Malte; Ebert, Antje; Tzatzalos, Evangeline; Raaz, Uwe; Abilez, Oscar J; Shen, Qi; Kooreman, Nigel G; Neofytou, Evgenios; Chen, Vincent C; Wang, Mouer; Meyer, Tim; Tsao, Philip S; Connolly, Andrew J; Couture, Larry A; Gold, Joseph D; Zimmermann, Wolfram H; Wu, Joseph C

    2015-09-25

    Tissue engineering approaches may improve survival and functional benefits from human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte transplantation, thereby potentially preventing dilative remodeling and progression to heart failure. Assessment of transport stability, long-term survival, structural organization, functional benefits, and teratoma risk of engineered heart muscle (EHM) in a chronic myocardial infarction model. We constructed EHMs from human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and released them for transatlantic shipping following predefined quality control criteria. Two days of shipment did not lead to adverse effects on cell viability or contractile performance of EHMs (n=3, P=0.83, P=0.87). One month after ischemia/reperfusion injury, EHMs were implanted onto immunocompromised rat hearts to simulate chronic ischemia. Bioluminescence imaging showed stable engraftment with no significant cell loss between week 2 and 12 (n=6, P=0.67), preserving ≤25% of the transplanted cells. Despite high engraftment rates and attenuated disease progression (change in ejection fraction for EHMs, -6.7±1.4% versus control, -10.9±1.5%; n>12; P=0.05), we observed no difference between EHMs containing viable and nonviable human cardiomyocytes in this chronic xenotransplantation model (n>12; P=0.41). Grafted cardiomyocytes showed enhanced sarcomere alignment and increased connexin 43 expression at 220 days after transplantation. No teratomas or tumors were found in any of the animals (n=14) used for long-term monitoring. EHM transplantation led to high engraftment rates, long-term survival, and progressive maturation of human cardiomyocytes. However, cell engraftment was not correlated with functional improvements in this chronic myocardial infarction model. Most importantly, the safety of this approach was demonstrated by the lack of tumor or teratoma formation. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Regulatory T cells and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schiaffino, Stefano; Pereira, Marcelo G; Ciciliot, Stefano; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2017-02-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration results from the activation and differentiation of myogenic stem cells, called satellite cells, located beneath the basal lamina of the muscle fibers. Inflammatory and immune cells have a crucial role in the regeneration process. Acute muscle injury causes an immediate transient wave of neutrophils followed by a more persistent infiltration of M1 (proinflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory/proregenerative) macrophages. New studies show that injured muscle is also infiltrated by a specialized population of regulatory T (Treg) cells, which control both the inflammatory response, by promoting the M1-to-M2 switch, and the activation of satellite cells. Treg cells accumulate in injured muscle in response to specific cytokines, such as IL-33, and promote muscle growth by releasing growth factors, such as amphiregulin. Muscle repair during aging is impaired due to reduced number of Treg cells and can be enhanced by IL-33 supplementation. Migration of Treg cells could also contribute to explain the effect of heterochronic parabiosis, whereby muscle regeneration of aged mice can be improved by a parabiotically linked young partners. In mdx dystrophin-deficient mice, a model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy, muscle injury, and inflammation is mitigated by expansion of the Treg-cell population but exacerbated by Treg-cell depletion. These findings support the notion that immunological mechanisms are not only essential in the response to pathogenic microbes and tumor cells but also have a wider homeostatic role in tissue repair, and open new perspectives for boosting muscle growth in chronic muscle disease and during aging.

  13. Oxygen consumption of human heart cells in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Kaori; Kagawa, Yuki; Maeyama, Erina; Ota, Hiroki; Haraguchi, Yuji; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2014-09-26

    Tissue engineering in cardiovascular regenerative therapy requires the development of an efficient oxygen supply system for cell cultures. However, there are few studies which have examined human cardiomyocytes in terms of oxygen consumption and metabolism in culture. We developed an oxygen measurement system equipped with an oxygen microelectrode sensor and estimated the oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) by using the oxygen concentration profiles in culture medium. The heart is largely made up of cardiomyocytes, cardiac fibroblasts, and cardiac endothelial cells. Therefore, we measured the oxygen consumption of human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), cardiac fibroblasts, human cardiac microvascular endothelial cell and aortic smooth muscle cells. Then we made correlations with their metabolisms. In hiPSC-CMs, the value of the OCR was 0.71±0.38pmol/h/cell, whereas the glucose consumption rate and lactate production rate were 0.77±0.32pmol/h/cell and 1.61±0.70pmol/h/cell, respectively. These values differed significantly from those of the other cells in human heart. The metabolism of the cells that constitute human heart showed the molar ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption (L/G ratio) that ranged between 1.97 and 2.2. Although the energy metabolism in adult heart in vivo is reported to be aerobic, our data demonstrated a dominance of anaerobic glycolysis in an in vitro environment. With our measuring system, we clearly showed the differences in the metabolism of cells between in vivo and in vitro monolayer culture. Our results regarding cell OCRs and metabolism may be useful for future tissue engineering of human heart.

  14. Electrical Stimulation of Artificial Heart Muscle: A Look Into the Electrophysiologic and Genetic Implications.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed A; Islas, Jose F; Schwartz, Robert J; Birla, Ravi K

    Development of tissue-engineered hearts for treatment of myocardial infarction or biologic pacemakers has been hindered by the production of mostly arrhythmic or in-synergistic constructs. Electrical stimulation (ES) of these constructs has been shown to produce tissues with greater twitch force and better adrenergic response. To further our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the effect of ES, we fabricated a bioreactor capable of delivering continuous or intermittent waveforms of various types to multiple constructs simultaneously. In this study, we examined the effect of an intermittent biphasic square wave on our artificial heart muscle (AHM) composed of neonatal rat cardiac cells and fibrin gel. Twitch forces, spontaneous contraction rates, biopotentials, gene expression profiles, and histologic observations were examined for the ES protocol over a 12 day culture period. We demonstrate improved consistency between samples for twitch force and contraction rate, and higher normalized twitch force amplitudes for electrically stimulated AHMs. Improvements in electrophysiology within the AHM were noted by higher conduction velocities and lower latency in electrical response for electrically stimulated AHMs. Genes expressing key electrophysiologic and structural markers peaked at days 6 and 8 of culture, only a few days after the initiation of ES. These results may be used for optimization strategies to establish protocols for producing AHMs capable of replacing damaged heart tissue in either a contractile or electrophysiologic capacity. Optimized AHMs can lead to alternative treatments to heart failure and alleviate the limited donor supply crisis.

  15. Skeletal muscle beta-receptors and isoproterenol-stimulated vasodilation in canine heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, M.J.; Lanoce, V.; Molinoff, P.B.; Wilson, J.R. )

    1989-11-01

    To investigate whether heart failure alters beta-adrenergic receptors on skeletal muscle and its associated vasculature, the density of beta-adrenergic receptors, isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, and coupling of the guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein were compared in 18 control dogs and 16 dogs with heart failure induced by 5-8 wk of ventricular pacing at 260 beats/min. Hindlimb vascular responses to isoproterenol were compared in eight controls and eight of the dogs with heart failure. In dogs with heart failure, the density of beta-receptors on skeletal muscle was reduced in both gastrocnemius (control: 50 +/- 5; heart failure: 33 +/- 8 fmol/mg of protein) and semitendinosus muscle (control: 43 +/- 9; heart failure: 27 +/- 9 fmol/mg of protein, both P less than 0.05). Receptor coupling to the ternary complex, as determined by isoproterenol competition curves with and without guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), was unchanged. Isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was significantly decreased in semitendinosus muscle (control: 52.4 +/- 4.6; heart failure: 36.5 +/- 9.5 pmol.mg-1.min-1; P less than 0.05) and tended to be decreased in gastrocnemius muscle (control: 40.1 +/- 8.5; heart failure: 33.5 +/- 4.5 pmol.mg-1.min-1; P = NS). Isoproterenol-induced hindlimb vasodilation was not significantly different in controls and in dogs with heart failure. These findings suggest that heart failure causes downregulation of skeletal muscle beta-adrenergic receptors, probably due to receptor exposure to elevated catecholamine levels, but does not reduce beta-receptor-mediated vasodilation in muscle.

  16. Satellite Cells and Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Nicolas A; Bentzinger, C Florian; Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Skeletal muscles are essential for vital functions such as movement, postural support, breathing, and thermogenesis. Muscle tissue is largely composed of long, postmitotic multinucleated fibers. The life-long maintenance of muscle tissue is mediated by satellite cells, lying in close proximity to the muscle fibers. Muscle satellite cells are a heterogeneous population with a small subset of muscle stem cells, termed satellite stem cells. Under homeostatic conditions all satellite cells are poised for activation by stimuli such as physical trauma or growth signals. After activation, satellite stem cells undergo symmetric divisions to expand their number or asymmetric divisions to give rise to cohorts of committed satellite cells and thus progenitors. Myogenic progenitors proliferate, and eventually differentiate through fusion with each other or to damaged fibers to reconstitute fiber integrity and function. In the recent years, research has begun to unravel the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms controlling satellite cell behavior. Nonetheless, an understanding of the complex cellular and molecular interactions of satellite cells with their dynamic microenvironment remains a major challenge, especially in pathological conditions. The goal of this review is to comprehensively summarize the current knowledge on satellite cell characteristics, functions, and behavior in muscle regeneration and in pathological conditions.

  17. Potential of laryngeal muscle regeneration using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dirja, Bayu Tirta; Yoshie, Susumu; Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Nomoto, Yukio; Wada, Ikuo; Hazama, Akihiro; Omori, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells may be a new potential cell source for laryngeal muscle regeneration in the treatment of vocal fold atrophy after recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Objectives Unilateral vocal fold paralysis can lead to degeneration, atrophy, and loss of force of the thyroarytenoid muscle. At present, there are some treatments such as thyroplasty, arytenoid adduction, and vocal fold injection. However, such treatments cannot restore reduced mass of the thyroarytenoid muscle. iPS cells have been recognized as supplying a potential resource for cell transplantation. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the use of iPS cells for the regeneration of laryngeal muscle through the evaluation of both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods Skeletal muscle cells were generated from tdTomato-labeled iPS cells using embryoid body formation. Differentiation into skeletal muscle cells was analyzed by gene expression and immunocytochemistry. The tdTomato-labeled iPS cell-derived skeletal muscle cells were transplanted into the left atrophied thyroarytenoid muscle. To evaluate the engraftment of these cells after transplantation, immunohistochemistry was performed. Results The tdTomato-labeled iPS cells were successfully differentiated into skeletal muscle cells through an in vitro experiment. These cells survived in the atrophied thyroarytenoid muscle after transplantation.

  18. Relation of systemic and local muscle exercise capacity to skeletal muscle characteristics in men with congestive heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, B. M.; Simonini, A.; Sahgal, P.; Wells, L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The present study was undertaken to further characterize changes in skeletal muscle morphology and histochemistry in congestive heart failure and to determine the relation of these changes to abnormalities of systemic and local muscle exercise capacity. BACKGROUND. Abnormalities of skeletal muscle appear to play a role in the limitation of exercise capacity in congestive heart failure, but information on the changes in muscle morphology and biochemistry and their relation to alterations in muscle function is limited. METHODS. Eighteen men with predominantly mild to moderate congestive heart failure (mean +/- SEM New York Heart Association functional class 2.6 +/- 0.2, ejection fraction 24 +/- 2%) and eight age- and gender-matched sedentary control subjects underwent measurements of peak systemic oxygen consumption (VO2) during cycle ergometry, resistance to fatigue of the quadriceps femoris muscle group and biopsy of the vastus lateralis muscle. RESULTS. Peak VO2 and resistance to fatigue were lower in the patients with heart failure than in control subjects (15.7 +/- 1.2 vs. 25.1 +/- 1.5 ml/min-kg and 63 +/- 2% vs. 85 +/- 3%, respectively, both p < 0.001). Patients had a lower proportion of slow twitch, type I fibers than did control subjects (36 +/- 3% vs. 46 +/- 5%, p = 0.048) and a higher proportion of fast twitch, type IIab fibers (18 +/- 3% vs. 7 +/- 2%, p = 0.004). Fiber cross-sectional area was smaller, and single-fiber succinate dehydrogenase activity, a mitochondrial oxidative marker, was lower in patients (both p < or = 0.034). Likewise, the ratio of average fast twitch to slow twitch fiber cross-sectional area was lower in patients (0.780 +/- 0.06 vs. 1.05 +/- 0.08, p = 0.019). Peak VO2 was strongly related to integrated succinate dehydrogenase activity in patients (r = 0.896, p = 0.001). Peak VO2, resistance to fatigue and strength also correlated significantly with several measures of fiber size, especially of fast twitch fibers, in

  19. Relation of systemic and local muscle exercise capacity to skeletal muscle characteristics in men with congestive heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, B. M.; Simonini, A.; Sahgal, P.; Wells, L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The present study was undertaken to further characterize changes in skeletal muscle morphology and histochemistry in congestive heart failure and to determine the relation of these changes to abnormalities of systemic and local muscle exercise capacity. BACKGROUND. Abnormalities of skeletal muscle appear to play a role in the limitation of exercise capacity in congestive heart failure, but information on the changes in muscle morphology and biochemistry and their relation to alterations in muscle function is limited. METHODS. Eighteen men with predominantly mild to moderate congestive heart failure (mean +/- SEM New York Heart Association functional class 2.6 +/- 0.2, ejection fraction 24 +/- 2%) and eight age- and gender-matched sedentary control subjects underwent measurements of peak systemic oxygen consumption (VO2) during cycle ergometry, resistance to fatigue of the quadriceps femoris muscle group and biopsy of the vastus lateralis muscle. RESULTS. Peak VO2 and resistance to fatigue were lower in the patients with heart failure than in control subjects (15.7 +/- 1.2 vs. 25.1 +/- 1.5 ml/min-kg and 63 +/- 2% vs. 85 +/- 3%, respectively, both p < 0.001). Patients had a lower proportion of slow twitch, type I fibers than did control subjects (36 +/- 3% vs. 46 +/- 5%, p = 0.048) and a higher proportion of fast twitch, type IIab fibers (18 +/- 3% vs. 7 +/- 2%, p = 0.004). Fiber cross-sectional area was smaller, and single-fiber succinate dehydrogenase activity, a mitochondrial oxidative marker, was lower in patients (both p < or = 0.034). Likewise, the ratio of average fast twitch to slow twitch fiber cross-sectional area was lower in patients (0.780 +/- 0.06 vs. 1.05 +/- 0.08, p = 0.019). Peak VO2 was strongly related to integrated succinate dehydrogenase activity in patients (r = 0.896, p = 0.001). Peak VO2, resistance to fatigue and strength also correlated significantly with several measures of fiber size, especially of fast twitch fibers, in

  20. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P.; McKay, Bryon R.; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models. PMID:26557092

  1. Cell sheet transplantation for heart tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2013-08-10

    Cell transplantation is attracting considerable attention as the next-generation therapy for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We have developed cell sheet engineering as a type of scaffold-less tissue engineering for application in myocardial tissue engineering and the repair of injured heart tissue by cell transplantation. Various types of cell sheet transplantation have improved cardiac function in animal models and clinical settings. Furthermore, cell-based tissue engineering with human induced pluripotent stem cell technology is about to create thick vascularized cardiac tissue for cardiac grafts and heart tissue models. In this review, we summarize the current cardiac cell therapies for treating heart failure with cell sheet technology and cell sheet-based tissue engineering.

  2. Exercise training in chronic heart failure: improving skeletal muscle O2 transport and utilization

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Daniel M.; Musch, Timothy I.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) impairs critical structural and functional components of the O2 transport pathway resulting in exercise intolerance and, consequently, reduced quality of life. In contrast, exercise training is capable of combating many of the CHF-induced impairments and enhancing the matching between skeletal muscle O2 delivery and utilization (Q̇mO2 and V̇mO2, respectively). The Q̇mO2/V̇mO2 ratio determines the microvascular O2 partial pressure (PmvO2), which represents the ultimate force driving blood-myocyte O2 flux (see Fig. 1). Improvements in perfusive and diffusive O2 conductances are essential to support faster rates of oxidative phosphorylation (reflected as faster V̇mO2 kinetics during transitions in metabolic demand) and reduce the reliance on anaerobic glycolysis and utilization of finite energy sources (thus lowering the magnitude of the O2 deficit) in trained CHF muscle. These adaptations contribute to attenuated muscle metabolic perturbations (e.g., changes in [PCr], [Cr], [ADP], and pH) and improved physical capacity (i.e., elevated critical power and maximal V̇mO2). Preservation of such plasticity in response to exercise training is crucial considering the dominant role of skeletal muscle dysfunction in the pathophysiology and increased morbidity/mortality of the CHF patient. This brief review focuses on the mechanistic bases for improved Q̇mO2/V̇mO2 matching (and enhanced PmvO2) with exercise training in CHF with both preserved and reduced ejection fraction (HFpEF and HFrEF, respectively). Specifically, O2 convection within the skeletal muscle microcirculation, O2 diffusion from the red blood cell to the mitochondria, and muscle metabolic control are particularly susceptive to exercise training adaptations in CHF. Alternatives to traditional whole body endurance exercise training programs such as small muscle mass and inspiratory muscle training, pharmacological treatment (e.g., sildenafil and pentoxifylline), and dietary

  3. Exercise training in chronic heart failure: improving skeletal muscle O2 transport and utilization.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Daniel M; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2015-11-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) impairs critical structural and functional components of the O2 transport pathway resulting in exercise intolerance and, consequently, reduced quality of life. In contrast, exercise training is capable of combating many of the CHF-induced impairments and enhancing the matching between skeletal muscle O2 delivery and utilization (Q̇mO2 and V̇mO2 , respectively). The Q̇mO2 /V̇mO2 ratio determines the microvascular O2 partial pressure (PmvO2 ), which represents the ultimate force driving blood-myocyte O2 flux (see Fig. 1). Improvements in perfusive and diffusive O2 conductances are essential to support faster rates of oxidative phosphorylation (reflected as faster V̇mO2 kinetics during transitions in metabolic demand) and reduce the reliance on anaerobic glycolysis and utilization of finite energy sources (thus lowering the magnitude of the O2 deficit) in trained CHF muscle. These adaptations contribute to attenuated muscle metabolic perturbations (e.g., changes in [PCr], [Cr], [ADP], and pH) and improved physical capacity (i.e., elevated critical power and maximal V̇mO2 ). Preservation of such plasticity in response to exercise training is crucial considering the dominant role of skeletal muscle dysfunction in the pathophysiology and increased morbidity/mortality of the CHF patient. This brief review focuses on the mechanistic bases for improved Q̇mO2 /V̇mO2 matching (and enhanced PmvO2 ) with exercise training in CHF with both preserved and reduced ejection fraction (HFpEF and HFrEF, respectively). Specifically, O2 convection within the skeletal muscle microcirculation, O2 diffusion from the red blood cell to the mitochondria, and muscle metabolic control are particularly susceptive to exercise training adaptations in CHF. Alternatives to traditional whole body endurance exercise training programs such as small muscle mass and inspiratory muscle training, pharmacological treatment (e.g., sildenafil and pentoxifylline), and dietary

  4. Hierarchical signaling transduction of the immune and muscle cell crosstalk in muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjun; Hu, Ping

    2017-08-24

    The muscle regeneration is a complicated bioprocess that involved in many cell types, including necrotic muscle cells, satellite cells, mesenchymal cells, pericytes, immune cells, and other cell types present at the injury site. Immune cells involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses regulate the progress of muscle regeneration. In this review, we discussed the roles of different immune cells in muscle regeneration. The immune cells regulate muscle regeneration through cytokine production, cell-cell contacts, and general immune environment regulation. We also describe the current known mechanism of how immune cells regulating muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Stem cells in pediatric heart failure.

    PubMed

    Pillekamp, F; Khalil, M; Emmel, M; Brockmeier, K; Hescheler, J

    2008-06-01

    Pediatric heart failure could be a target for regenerative therapy. Stem cell-based therapy has the potential to provide functional cardiomyocytes. Whereas adult stem cells have shown no or only minimal therapeutic benefit in adults with no evidence of transdifferentiation, embryonic stem cells can differentiate to any cell type, including cardiomyocytes. However, ethical concerns and immunological problems are associated with embryonic stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts. Recently, somatic cells could be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state (i.e. induced pluripotent stem cells) with the help of transcription factors. This technique removes ethical and probably also immunological concerns. Nevertheless extensive experimental research will be necessary before cell replacement strategies become clinically applicable. Because the underlying pathophysiology differs significantly with age, caution is warranted extrapolating data obtained in experimental models of cardiac ischemia and clinical studies in adults to the pediatric population. Pediatric heart failure has a good prognosis if causal therapy is possible. However, some forms of congenital heart disease and especially dilated cardiomyopathy still have limited therapeutic options. Almost half of children with symptomatic cardiomyopathy receive a transplant or die within two years. The authors will review the relevant stem cell sources for cell-based treatments. And, given the differences of the underlying diseases between adult and pediatric patients with heart failure, it is contemplated which condition of pediatric patients with heart failure is most likely to benefit and which cell type would be appropriate.

  6. Cell sheet engineering for heart tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Shinako; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2008-01-14

    Recently, myocardial tissue engineering has emerged as one of the most promising therapies for patients suffering from severe heart failure. Nevertheless, conventional methods in tissue engineering involving the seeding of cells into biodegradable scaffolds have intrinsic shortcomings, such as inflammatory reactions and fibrous tissue formation caused by scaffold degradation. On the other hand, we have developed cell sheet engineering as scaffoldless tissue engineering, and applied it for myocardial tissue engineering. Using temperature-responsive culture surfaces, cells can be harvested as intact sheets and cell-dense thick tissues are constructed by layering these cell sheets. Myocardial cell sheets non-invasively harvested from temperature-responsive culture surfaces are successfully layered, resulting in electrically communicative 3-dimensional (3-D) cardiac constructs. Transplantation of cell sheets onto damaged hearts improved heart function in several animal models. In this review, we summarize the development of myocardial tissue engineering using cell sheets harvested from temperature-responsive culture surfaces and discuss about future views.

  7. Exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation and treadmill exercise test responses in individuals without overt heart disease.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Rafael Amorim Belo; Giampaoli, Viviana; de Freitas, Humberto Felício Gonçalves; da Costa Pereira, Alexandre; Araújo, Fernando; Correia, Gustavo Ferreira; Rondon, Maria Urbana Pinto Brandão; Negrão, Carlos Eduardo; Mansur, Alfredo José

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effects of exercise on cardiovascular health may be related to the improvement in several physiologic pathways, including peripheral vascular function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between cardiovascular responses during the treadmill exercise test and exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation in individuals without overt heart disease. The study included 796 asymptomatic subjects (431 females and 365 males) without overt heart disease. We evaluated the heart rate (chronotropic reserve and heart rate recovery), blood pressure (maximum systolic and diastolic blood pressure as well as systolic blood pressure recovery) and exercise capacity during symptom-limited treadmill exercise testing. Exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation was studied with venous occlusion plethysmography and estimated by forearm blood flow and vascular conductance responses during a 3-min handgrip maneuver. Forearm blood flow increase during the handgrip exercise was positively associated with heart rate recovery during treadmill exercise testing (p < 0.001). Forearm vascular conductance increase during the handgrip exercise was inversely associated with exercise diastolic blood pressure during exercise treadmill testing (p = 0.038). No significant association was found between exercise capacity and exercise-induced muscle vasodilation. In a sample of individuals without overt heart disease, exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation was associated with heart rate and blood pressure responses during treadmill exercise testing, but was not associated with exercise capacity. These findings suggest that favorable hemodynamic and chronotropic responses are associated with better vasodilator capacity, but exercise capacity does not predict muscle vasodilatation.

  8. Stem cell therapy for ischemic heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Lu, Kai; Zhu, Jinyun; Wang, Jian'an

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic heart diseases, especially the myocardial infarction, is a major hazard problem to human health. Despite substantial advances in control of risk factors and therapies with drugs and interventions including bypass surgery and stent placement, the ischemic heart diseases usually result in heart failure (HF), which could aggravate social burden and increase the mortality rate. The current therapeutic methods to treat HF stay at delaying the disease progression without repair and regeneration of the damaged myocardium. While heart transplantation is the only effective therapy for end-stage patients, limited supply of donor heart makes it impossible to meet the substantial demand from patients with HF. Stem cell-based transplantation is one of the most promising treatment for the damaged myocardial tissue. Key recent published literatures and ClinicalTrials.gov. Stem cell-based therapy is a promising strategy for the damaged myocardial tissue. Different kinds of stem cells have their advantages for treatment of Ischemic heart diseases. The efficacy and potency of cell therapies vary significantly from trial to trial; some clinical trials did not show benefit. Diverged effects of cell therapy could be affected by cell types, sources, delivery methods, dose and their mechanisms by which delivered cells exert their effects. Understanding the origin of the regenerated cardiomyocytes, exploring the therapeutic effects of stem cell-derived exosomes and using the cell reprogram technology to improve the efficacy of cell therapy for cardiovascular diseases. Recently, stem cell-derived exosomes emerge as a critical player in paracrine mechanism of stem cell-based therapy. It is promising to exploit exosomes-based cell-free therapy for ischemic heart diseases in the future.

  9. Types of muscle tissue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The 3 types of muscle tissue are cardiac, smooth, and skeletal. Cardiac muscle cells are located in ... heart, appear striated, and are under involuntary control. Smooth muscle fibers are located in walls of hollow ...

  10. Engineered heart tissue graft derived from somatic cell nuclear transferred embryonic stem cells improve myocardial performance in infarcted rat heart.

    PubMed

    Lü, Shuanghong; Li, Ying; Gao, Shaorong; Liu, Sheng; Wang, Haibin; He, Wenjun; Zhou, Jin; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Ye; Lin, Qiuxia; Duan, Cumi; Yang, Xiangzhong Jerry; Wang, Changyong

    2010-12-01

    The concept of regenerating diseased myocardium by implanting engineered heart tissue (EHT) is intriguing. Yet it was limited by immune rejection and difficulties to be generated at a size with contractile properties. Somatic cell nuclear transfer is proposed as a practical strategy for generating autologous histocompatible stem (nuclear transferred embryonic stem [NT-ES]) cells to treat diseases. Nevertheless, it is controversial as NT-ES cells may pose risks in their therapeutic application. EHT from NT-ES cell-derived cardiomyocytes was generated through a series of improved techniques in a self-made mould to keep the EHTs from contraction and provide static stretch simultaneously. After 7 days of static and mechanical stretching, respectively, the EHTs were implanted to the infarcted rat heart. Four weeks after transplantation, the suitability of EHT in heart muscle repair after myocardial infarction was evaluated by histological examination, echocardiography and multielectrode array measurement. The results showed that large (thickness/diameter, 2-4 mm/10 mm) spontaneously contracting EHTs was generated successfully. The EHTs, which were derived from NT-ES cells, inte grated and electrically coupled to host myocardium and exerted beneficial effects on the left ventricular function of infarcted rat heart. No teratoma formation was observed in the rat heart implanted with EHTs for 4 weeks. NT-ES cells can be used as a source of seeding cells for cardiac tissue engineering. Large contractile EHT grafts can be constructed in vitro with the ability to survive after implantation and improve myocardial performance of infarcted rat hearts.

  11. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Ameliorates Skeletal Muscle Abnormalities, Cachexia and Exercise Intolerance in Mice with Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Okutsu, Mitsuharu; Call, Jarrod A.; Lira, Vitor A.; Zhang, Mei; Donet, Jean A.; French, Brent A.; Martin, Kyle S.; Peirce-Cottler, Shayn M.; Rembold, Christopher M.; Annex, Brian H.; Yan, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Background Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cachexia (muscle wasting) and the hallmark symptom, exercise intolerance. We have previously shown that a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent antioxidant defense renders oxidative skeletal muscle resistant to catabolic wasting. Here, we aimed to identify and determine the functional role of the NO-inducible antioxidant enzyme(s) in protection against cardiac cachexia and exercise intolerance in CHF. Methods and Results We demonstrated that systemic administration of endogenous nitric oxide donor S-Nitrosoglutathione in mice blocked the reduction of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EcSOD) protein expression, the induction of MAFbx/Atrogin-1 mRNA expression and muscle atrophy induced by glucocorticoid. We further showed that endogenous EcSOD, expressed primarily by type IId/x and IIa myofibers and enriched at endothelial cells, is induced by exercise training. Muscle-specific overexpression of EcSOD by somatic gene transfer or transgenesis [muscle creatine kinase (MCK)-EcSOD] in mice significantly attenuated muscle atrophy. Importantly, when crossbred into a mouse genetic model of CHF [α-myosin heavy chain (MHC)-calsequestrin] MCK-EcSOD transgenic mice had significant attenuation of cachexia with preserved whole body muscle strength and endurance capacity in the absence of reduced heart failure. Enhanced EcSOD expression significantly ameliorated CHF-induced oxidative stress, MAFbx/Atrogin-1 mRNA expression, loss of mitochondria and vascular rarefaction in skeletal muscle. Conclusions EcSOD plays an important antioxidant defense function in skeletal muscle against cardiac cachexia and exercise intolerance in CHF. PMID:24523418

  12. Electrical constants of trabecular muscle from mammalian heart.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, S

    1970-11-01

    1. The passive electrical properties of muscle bundles obtained from the right ventricle of sheep or calf hearts were determined. Preparations were kept in silicon oil; through extracellular electrodes constant current pulses were made to flow between the ends of the bundles.2. Using micro-electrodes for potential recording, the following data were obtained: (i) a space constant of 880 mu; (ii) a membrane time constant of 4.4 msec; (iii) a ratio of intra-to-extracellular longitudinal resistance of 3.5: 1; (iv) a conduction velocity of 0.75 m/sec.3. The intracellular specific resistance (R(i)) in the longitudinal direction was 470Omega cm, corresponding to 3 times R(i) of Purkinje fibres or 9 times the specific resistance of Tyrode solution.4. A calculation of specific membrane resistance (R(m)) and capacity (C(m)) was up against uncertainties in estimating the surface area. Taking morphological data as obtained by light microscopy, R(m) works out at 9100Omega cm(2), C(m) 0.81 muF/cm(2). Electron micrographs suggest that the true surface membrane might be either larger (T-tubules) or smaller (tight junctions between parallel fibres) than the surface area as seen by the light microscope.5. The apparently small value of C(m) seems to indicate that the flow of current between ;outside' and ;inside' is restricted to only a fraction of the fibre surface, while a considerable part of the contact area between parallel fibres is of the low-resistance type. This would provide for functional connexions not only at the level of intercalated disks, but also along parallel-running fibres.

  13. Muscle Interstitial Cells: A Brief Field Guide to Non-satellite Cell Populations in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Moyle, Louise A; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is mainly enabled by a population of adult stem cells known as satellite cells. Satellite cells have been shown to be indispensable for adult skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last two decades, other stem/progenitor cell populations resident in the skeletal muscle interstitium have been identified as "collaborators" of satellite cells during regeneration. They also appear to have a key role in replacing skeletal muscle with adipose, fibrous, or bone tissue in pathological conditions. Here, we review the role and known functions of these different interstitial skeletal muscle cell types and discuss their role in skeletal muscle tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and disease, including their therapeutic potential for cell transplantation protocols.

  14. Human Engineered Heart Muscles Engraft and Survive Long-Term in a Rodent Myocardial Infarction Model

    PubMed Central

    Riegler, Johannes; Tiburcy, Malte; Ebert, Antje; Tzatzalos, Evangeline; Raaz, Uwe; Abilez, Oscar J.; Shen, Qi; Kooreman, Nigel G.; Neofytou, Evgenios; Chen, Vincent C.; Wang, Mouer; Meyer, Tim; Tsao, Philip S.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Couture, Larry A.; Gold, Joseph D.; Zimmermann, Wolfram H.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Rational Tissue engineering approaches may improve survival and functional benefits from human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocte (ESC-CM) transplantation, thereby potentially preventing dilative remodelling and progression to heart failure. Objective Assessment of transport stability, long term survival, structural organisation, functional benefits, and teratoma risk of engineered heart muscle (EHM) in a chronic myocardial infarction (MI) model. Methods and Results We constructed EHMs from ESC-CMs and released them for transatlantic shipping following predefined quality control criteria. Two days of shipment did not lead to adverse effects on cell viability or contractile performance of EHMs (n=3, P=0.83, P=0.87). After ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, EHMs were implanted onto immunocompromised rat hearts at 1 month to simulate chronic ischemia. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) showed stable engraftment with no significant cell loss between week 2 and 12 (n=6, P=0.67), preserving up to 25% of the transplanted cells. Despite high engraftment rates and attenuated disease progression (change in ejection fraction for EHMs −6.7±1.4% vs control −10.9±1.5%, n>12, P=0.05), we observed no difference between EHMs containing viable or non-viable human cardiomyocytes in this chronic xenotransplantation model (n>12, P=0.41). Grafted cardiomyocytes showed enhanced sarcomere alignment and increased connexin 43 expression at 220 days after transplantation. No teratomas or tumors were found in any of the animals (n=14) used for long-term monitoring. Conclusions EHM transplantation led to high engraftment rates, long term survival, and progressive maturation of human cardiomyocytes. However, cell engraftment was not correlated with functional improvements in this chronic MI model. Most importantly, the safety of this approach was demonstrated by the lack of tumor or teratoma formation. PMID:26291556

  15. Autonomic control of the heart during exercise in humans: role of skeletal muscle afferents.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James P

    2014-02-01

    What is the topic of this review? The autonomic nervous system plays a key role in bringing about the cardiovascular responses to exercise necessitated by the increased metabolic requirements of the active skeletal muscle. The complex interaction of central and peripheral neural control mechanisms evokes a decrease in parasympathetic activity and an increase sympathetic activity to the heart during exercise. What advances does it highlight? This review presents some of the recent insights provided by human studies into the role of mechanically and metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents in the regulation of cardiac autonomic control during exercise. The autonomic responses to exercise are orchestrated by the interactions of several central and peripheral neural mechanisms. This report focuses on the role of peripheral feedback from skeletal muscle afferents in the autonomic control of the heart during exercise in humans. Heart rate responses to passive calf stretch are abolished with cardiac parasympathetic blockade, indicating that the activation of mechanically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle mechanoreceptors) can inhibit cardiac parasympathetic activity and is likely to contribute to the increase in heart rate at the onset of exercise. Recent experiments show that the partial restriction of blood flow to the exercising skeletal muscles, to augment the activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreceptors) in humans, evokes an increase in heart rate that is attenuated with β1-adrenergic blockade, thus suggesting that this response is principally mediated via an increase in cardiac sympathetic activity. Heart rate remains at resting levels during isolated activation of muscle metaboreceptors with postexercise ischaemia following hand grip, unless cardiac parasympathetic activity is inhibited, whereupon a sympathetically mediated increase in heart rate is unmasked. During postexercise ischaemia following leg

  16. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Porcine Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo-Jiang; Li, Ping-Hua; Huang, Rui-Hua; Sun, Wen-Xing; Wang, Han; Li, Qi-Fa; Chen, Jie; Wu, Wang-Jun; Liu, Hong-Lin

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the optimum protocol for the isolation and culture of porcine muscle satellite cells. Mononuclear muscle satellite cells are a kind of adult stem cell, which is located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and is the primary source of myogenic precursor cells in postnatal muscle. Muscle satellite cells are a useful model to investigate the mechanisms of muscle growth and development. Although the isolation and culture protocols of muscle satellite cells in some species (e.g. mouse) have been established successfully, the culture system for porcine muscle satellite cells is very limited. In this study, we optimized the isolation procedure of porcine muscle satellite cells and elaborated the isolation and culture process in detail. Furthermore, we characterized the porcine muscle satellite cells using the immunofluorecence. Our study provides a reference for the isolation of porcine muscle satellite cells and will be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms in these cells.

  17. Coaxing stem cells for skeletal muscle repair.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Karl J A; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2015-04-01

    Skeletal muscle has a tremendous ability to regenerate, attributed to a well-defined population of muscle stem cells called satellite cells. However, this ability to regenerate diminishes with age and can also be dramatically affected by multiple types of muscle diseases, or injury. Extrinsic and/or intrinsic defects in the regulation of satellite cells are considered to be major determinants for the diminished regenerative capacity. Maintenance and replenishment of the satellite cell pool is one focus for muscle regenerative medicine, which will be discussed. There are other sources of progenitor cells with myogenic capacity, which may also support skeletal muscle repair. However, all of these myogenic cell populations have inherent difficulties and challenges in maintaining or coaxing their derivation for therapeutic purpose. This review will highlight recent reported attributes of these cells and new bioengineering approaches to creating a supply of myogenic stem cells or implants applicable for acute and/or chronic muscle disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Toad heart utilizes exclusively slow skeletal muscle troponin T: an evolutionary adaptation with potential functional benefits.

    PubMed

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Chen, Xuequn; Hossain, M Moazzem; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2012-08-24

    The three isoforms of vertebrate troponin T (TnT) are normally expressed in a muscle type-specific manner. Here we report an exception that the cardiac muscle of toad (Bufo) expresses exclusively slow skeletal muscle TnT (ssTnT) together with cardiac forms of troponin I and myosin as determined using immunoblotting, cDNA cloning, and/or LC-MS/MS. Using RT-PCR and 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends on toad cardiac mRNA, we cloned full-length cDNAs encoding two alternatively spliced variants of ssTnT. Expression of the cloned cDNAs in Escherichia coli confirmed that the toad cardiac muscle expresses solely ssTnT, predominantly the low molecular weight variant with the exon 5-encoded NH(2)-terminal segment spliced out. Functional studies were performed in ex vivo working toad hearts and compared with the frog (Rana) hearts. The results showed that toad hearts had higher contractile and relaxation velocities and were able to work against a significantly higher afterload than that of frog hearts. Therefore, the unique evolutionary adaptation of utilizing exclusively ssTnT in toad cardiac muscle corresponded to a fitness value from improving systolic function of the heart. The data demonstrated a physiological importance of the functional diversity of TnT isoforms. The structure-function relationship of TnT may be explored for the development of new treatment of heart failure.

  19. Heart failure alters matrix metalloproteinase gene expression and activity in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Dariolli, Rafael; Justulin Junior, Luis Antonio; Sugizaki, Mário Mateus; Politi Okoshi, Marina; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos; Felisbino, Sérgio Luis; Dal Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2006-12-01

    Heart failure is associated with a skeletal muscle myopathy with cellular and extracellular alterations. The hypothesis of this investigation is that extracellular changes may be associated with enhanced mRNA expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). We examined MMP mRNA expression and MMP activity in Soleus (SOL), extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and diaphragm (DIA) muscles of young Wistar rat with monocrotaline-induced heart failure. Rats injected with saline served as age-matched controls. MMP2 and MMP9 mRNA contents were determined by RT-PCR and MMP activity by electrophoresis in gelatin-containing polyacrylamide gels in the presence of SDS under non-reducing conditions. Heart failure increased MMP9 mRNA expression and activity in SOL, EDL and DIA and MMP2 mRNA expression in DIA. These results suggest that MMP changes may contribute to the skeletal muscle myopathy during heart failure.

  20. SMAD signaling drives heart and muscle dysfunction in a Drosophila model of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jeffery A.; Kelly, Sean M.; LoPresti, Peter P.; Heydemann, Ahlke; Earley, Judy U.; Ferguson, Edwin L.; Wolf, Matthew J.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the genes encoding dystrophin and the associated membrane proteins, the sarcoglycans, produce muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy. The dystrophin complex provides stability to the plasma membrane of striated muscle during muscle contraction. Increased SMAD signaling due to activation of the transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway has been described in muscular dystrophy; however, it is not known whether this canonical TGFβ signaling is pathogenic in the muscle itself. Drosophila deleted for the γ/δ-sarcoglycan gene (Sgcd) develop progressive muscle and heart dysfunction and serve as a model for the human disorder. We used dad-lacZ flies to demonstrate the signature of TGFβ activation in response to exercise-induced injury in Sgcd null flies, finding that those muscle nuclei immediately adjacent to muscle injury demonstrate high-level TGFβ signaling. To determine the pathogenic nature of this signaling, we found that partial reduction of the co-SMAD Medea, homologous to SMAD4, or the r-SMAD, Smox, corrected both heart and muscle dysfunction in Sgcd mutants. Reduction in the r-SMAD, MAD, restored muscle function but interestingly not heart function in Sgcd mutants, consistent with a role for activin but not bone morphogenic protein signaling in cardiac dysfunction. Mammalian sarcoglycan null muscle was also found to exhibit exercise-induced SMAD signaling. These data demonstrate that hyperactivation of SMAD signaling occurs in response to repetitive injury in muscle and heart. Reduction of this pathway is sufficient to restore cardiac and muscle function and is therefore a target for therapeutic reduction. PMID:21138941

  1. The contribution of Islet1-expressing splanchnic mesoderm cells to distinct branchiomeric muscles reveals significant heterogeneity in head muscle development.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Elisha; Monovich, Amir; Tirosh-Finkel, Libbat; Harrelson, Zachary; Rousso, Tal; Rinon, Ariel; Harel, Itamar; Evans, Sylvia M; Tzahor, Eldad

    2008-02-01

    During embryogenesis, paraxial mesoderm cells contribute skeletal muscle progenitors, whereas cardiac progenitors originate in the lateral splanchnic mesoderm (SpM). Here we focus on a subset of the SpM that contributes to the anterior or secondary heart field (AHF/SHF), and lies adjacent to the cranial paraxial mesoderm (CPM), the precursors for the head musculature. Molecular analyses in chick embryos delineated the boundaries between the CPM, undifferentiated SpM progenitors of the AHF/SHF, and differentiating cardiac cells. We then revealed the regionalization of branchial arch mesoderm: CPM cells contribute to the proximal region of the myogenic core, which gives rise to the mandibular adductor muscle. SpM cells contribute to the myogenic cells in the distal region of the branchial arch that later form the intermandibular muscle. Gene expression analyses of these branchiomeric muscles in chick uncovered a distinct molecular signature for both CPM- and SpM-derived muscles. Islet1 (Isl1) is expressed in the SpM/AHF and branchial arch in both chick and mouse embryos. Lineage studies using Isl1-Cre mice revealed the significant contribution of Isl1(+) cells to ventral/distal branchiomeric (stylohyoid, mylohyoid and digastric) and laryngeal muscles. By contrast, the Isl1 lineage contributes to mastication muscles (masseter, pterygoid and temporalis) to a lesser extent, with virtually no contribution to intrinsic and extrinsic tongue muscles or extraocular muscles. In addition, in vivo activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in chick embryos resulted in marked inhibition of Isl1, whereas inhibition of this pathway increased Isl1 expression. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, the contribution of Isl1(+) SpM cells to a subset of branchiomeric skeletal muscles.

  2. Myosin types in cultured muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Fluorescent antibodies against fast skeletal, slow skeletal, and ventricular myosins were applied to muscle cultures from embryonic pectoralis and ventricular myocadium of the chicken. A number of spindle-shaped mononucleated cells, presumably myoblasts, and all myotubes present in skeletal muscle cultures were labeled by all three antimyosin antisera. In contrast, in cultures from ventricular myocardium all muscle cells were labeled by anti-ventricular myosin, whereas only part of them were stained by anti-slow skeletal myosin and rare cells reacted with anti-fast skeletal myosin. The findings indicate that myosin(s) present in cultured embryonic skeletal muscle cells contains antigenic determinants similar to those present in adult fast skeletal, slow skeletal, and ventricular myosins. PMID:6156177

  3. Muscle cells provide instructions for planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Witchley, Jessica N; Mayer, Mirjam; Wagner, Daniel E; Owen, Jared H; Reddien, Peter W

    2013-08-29

    Regeneration requires both potential and instructions for tissue replacement. In planarians, pluripotent stem cells have the potential to produce all new tissue. The identities of the cells that provide regeneration instructions are unknown. Here, we report that position control genes (PCGs) that control regeneration and tissue turnover are expressed in a subepidermal layer of nonneoblast cells. These subepidermal cells coexpress many PCGs. We propose that these subepidermal cells provide a system of body coordinates and positional information for regeneration, and identify them to be muscle cells of the planarian body wall. Almost all planarian muscle cells express PCGs, suggesting a dual function: contraction and control of patterning. PCG expression is dynamic in muscle cells after injury, even in the absence of neoblasts, suggesting that muscle is instructive for regeneration. We conclude that planarian regeneration involves two highly flexible systems: pluripotent neoblasts that can generate any new cell type and muscle cells that provide positional instructions for the regeneration of any body region. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sonic hedgehog acts cell-autonomously on muscle precursor cells to generate limb muscle diversity

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Claire; Williams, Victoria C.; Moyon, Benjamin; Daubas, Philippe; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Buckingham, Margaret E.; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Hughes, Simon M.; Borycki, Anne-Gaëlle

    2012-01-01

    How muscle diversity is generated in the vertebrate body is poorly understood. In the limb, dorsal and ventral muscle masses constitute the first myogenic diversification, as each gives rise to distinct muscles. Myogenesis initiates after muscle precursor cells (MPCs) have migrated from the somites to the limb bud and populated the prospective muscle masses. Here, we show that Sonic hedgehog (Shh) from the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) drives myogenesis specifically within the ventral muscle mass. Shh directly induces ventral MPCs to initiate Myf5 transcription and myogenesis through essential Gli-binding sites located in the Myf5 limb enhancer. In the absence of Shh signaling, myogenesis is delayed, MPCs fail to migrate distally, and ventral paw muscles fail to form. Thus, Shh production in the limb ZPA is essential for the spatiotemporal control of myogenesis and coordinates muscle and skeletal development by acting directly to regulate the formation of specific ventral muscles. PMID:22987640

  5. Gene expression changes controlling distinct adaptations in the heart and skeletal muscle of a hibernating mammal

    PubMed Central

    Vermillion, Katie L.; Anderson, Kyle J.; Hampton, Marshall

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the hibernation season, the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) experiences extreme fluctuations in heart rate, metabolism, oxygen consumption, and body temperature, along with prolonged fasting and immobility. These conditions necessitate different functional requirements for the heart, which maintains contractile function throughout hibernation, and the skeletal muscle, which remains largely inactive. The adaptations used to maintain these contractile organs under such variable conditions serves as a natural model to study a variety of medically relevant conditions including heart failure and disuse atrophy. To better understand how two different muscle tissues maintain function throughout the extreme fluctuations of hibernation we performed Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing of cDNAs to compare the transcriptome of heart and skeletal muscle across the circannual cycle. This analysis resulted in the identification of 1,076 and 1,466 differentially expressed genes in heart and skeletal muscle, respectively. In both heart and skeletal muscle we identified a distinct cold-tolerant mechanism utilizing peroxisomal metabolism to make use of elevated levels of unsaturated depot fats. The skeletal muscle transcriptome also shows an early increase in oxidative capacity necessary for the altered fuel utilization and increased oxygen demand of shivering. Expression of the fetal gene expression profile is used to maintain cardiac tissue, either through increasing myocyte size or proliferation of resident cardiomyocytes, while skeletal muscle function and mass are protected through transcriptional regulation of pathways involved in protein turnover. This study provides insight into how two functionally distinct muscles maintain function under the extreme conditions of mammalian hibernation. PMID:25572546

  6. MLP (muscle LIM protein) as a stress sensor in the heart.

    PubMed

    Buyandelger, Byambajav; Ng, Keat-Eng; Miocic, Snjezana; Piotrowska, Izabela; Gunkel, Sylvia; Ku, Ching-Hsin; Knöll, Ralph

    2011-07-01

    Muscle LIM protein (MLP, also known as cysteine rich protein 3 (CSRP3, CRP3)) is a muscle-specific-expressed LIM-only protein. It consists of 194 amino-acids and has been described initially as a factor involved in myogenesis (Arber et al. Cell 79:221-231, 1994). MLP soon became an important model for experimental cardiology when it was first demonstrated that MLP deficiency leads to myocardial hypertrophy followed by a dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure phenotype (Arber et al. Cell 88:393-403, 1997). At this time, this was the first genetically altered animal model to develop this devastating disease. Interestingly, MLP was also found to be down-regulated in humans with heart failure (Zolk et al. Circulation 101:2674-2677, 2000) and MLP mutations are able to cause hypertrophic and dilated forms of cardiomyopathy in humans (Bos et al. Mol Genet Metab 88:78-85, 2006; Geier et al. Circulation 107:1390-1395, 2003; Hershberger et al. Clin Transl Sci 1:21-26, 2008; Knöll et al. Cell 111:943-955, 2002; Knöll et al. Circ Res 106:695-704, 2010; Mohapatra et al. Mol Genet Metab 80:207-215, 2003). Although considerable efforts have been undertaken to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms-how MLP mutations, either in model organisms or in the human setting cause these diseases are still unclear. In contrast, only precise knowledge of the underlying molecular mechanisms will allow the development of novel and innovative therapeutic strategies to combat this otherwise lethal condition. The focus of this review will be on the function of MLP in cardiac mechanosensation and we shall point to possible future directions in MLP research.

  7. Muscle reflex control of sympathetic nerve activity in heart failure: the role of exercise conditioning.

    PubMed

    Khan, M H; Sinoway, L I

    2000-03-01

    Muscle reflex control of sympathetic nerve activity has been an area of considerable investigation. During exercise, the capacity of the peripheral vasculature to dilate far exceeds the maximal attainable levels of cardiac output. The activation of sympathetic nervous system and engagement of the myogenic reflex serve as the controlling influence between the heart and the muscle vasculature to maintain blood pressure (BP). Two basic theories of neural control have evolved. The first termed "central command", suggests that a volitional signal emanating from central motor areas leads to increased sympathetic activation during exercise. According to the second theory the stimulation of mechanical and chemical afferents in exercising muscle lead to engagement of the "exercise pressor reflex". Some earlier studies suggested that group III muscle afferent fibers are predominantly mechanically sensitive whereas unmyelinated group IV muscle afferents respond to chemical stimuli. In recent years new evidence is emerging which challenges the concept of functional differentiation of muscle afferents as well as the classic description of muscle "mechano" and "metabo" receptors. Studies measuring concentrations of interstitial substances during exercise suggest that K(+) and phosphate, but not H(+) and lactate, may be important muscle afferent stimulants. The role of adenosine as a muscle afferent stimulant remains an area of debate. There is strong evidence that sympathetic vasoconstriction due to muscle reflex engagement plays an important role in restricting blood flow to the exercising muscle. In heart failure (HF), exercise leads to premature fatigue and accumulation of muscle metabolites resulting in a greater degree of muscle reflex engagement and in the process further decreasing the muscle blood flow. Conditioning leads to an increased ability of the muscle to maintain aerobic metabolism, lower interstitial accumulation of metabolites, less muscle reflex engagement and

  8. Molecular and functional analysis of Popeye genes: A novel family of transmembrane proteins preferentially expressed in heart and skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Andrée, Birgit; Fleige, Anne; Hillemann, Tina; Arnold, Hans-Henning; Kessler-Icekson, Gania; Brand, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Popeye (Pop) genes encode novel transmembrane proteins, of which three family members are present in vertebrates, while in Drosophila a single gene is found. By northern blot analysis a restricted expression pattern is observed; Pop genes are predominantly expressed in the heart, skeletal and smooth muscle. Using homologous recombination, a null mutation was generated in the case of Pop1. The homozygous mutants are viable and do not display any obvious phenotype. They display an impaired ability to regenerate skeletal muscle while the hypertropic response of the heart after isoproterenol infusion revealed no difference between genotypes. Recently a function for Pop1 as a prototype of a novel class of cell adhesion molecules was proposed. Further work is required to substantiate these findings and to extend it to other members of the family. PMID:19649231

  9. Highly efficient, functional engraftment of skeletal muscle stem cells in dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Cerletti, Massimiliano; Jurga, Sara; Witczak, Carol A; Hirshman, Michael F; Shadrach, Jennifer L; Goodyear, Laurie J; Wagers, Amy J

    2008-07-11

    Satellite cells reside beneath the basal lamina of skeletal muscle fibers and include cells that act as precursors for muscle growth and repair. Although they share a common anatomical localization and typically are considered a homogeneous population, satellite cells actually exhibit substantial heterogeneity. We used cell-surface marker expression to purify from the satellite cell pool a distinct population of skeletal muscle precursors (SMPs) that function as muscle stem cells. When engrafted into muscle of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, purified SMPs contributed to up to 94% of myofibers, restoring dystrophin expression and significantly improving muscle histology and contractile function. Transplanted SMPs also entered the satellite cell compartment, renewing the endogenous stem cell pool and participating in subsequent rounds of injury repair. Together, these studies indicate the presence in adult skeletal muscle of prospectively isolatable muscle-forming stem cells and directly demonstrate the efficacy of myogenic stem cell transplant for treating muscle degenerative disease.

  10. Uniform sarcomere shortening behavior in isolated cardiac muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    We have observed the dynamics of sarcomere shortening and the diffracting action of single, functionally intact, unattached cardiac muscle cells enzymatically isolated from the ventricular tissue of adult rats. Sarcomere length was measured either (a) continuously by a light diffraction method or (b) by direct inspection of the cell's striated image as recorded on videotape or by cinemicroscopy (120--400 frames/s). At physiological levels of added CaCl2 (0.5--2.0 mM), many cells were quiescent (i.e., they did not beat spontaneously) and contracted in response to electrical stimulation (less than or equal to 1.0-ms pulse width). Sarcomere length in the quiescent, unstimulated cells (1.93 +/- 0.10 [SD] micrometers), at peak shortening (1.57 +/- 0.13 micrometers, n = 49), and the maximum velocity of sarcomere shortening and relengthening were comparable to previous observations in intact heart muscle preparations. The dispersion of light diffracted by the cell remained narrow, and individual striations remained distinct and laterally well registered throughout the shortening- relengthening cycle. In contrast, appreciable nonuniformity and internal buckling were seen at sarcomere lengths < 1.8 micrometers when the resting cell, embedded in gelatin, was longitudinally compressed These results indicate (a) that shortening and relengthening is characterized by uniform activation between myofibrils within the cardiac cell and (b) that physiologically significant relengthening forces in living heart muscle originate at the level of the cell rather than in extracellular connections. First-order diffracted light intensity, extremely variable during sarcomere shortening, was always greatest during midrelaxation preceding the onset of a very slow and uniform phase of sarcomere relengthening. PMID:7441197

  11. Effect of heart transplantation on skeletal muscle metabolic enzyme reserve and fiber type in end-stage heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Gary L; Magyari, Peter M; Aranda, Juan M; Edwards, David G; Hamlin, Scott A; Hill, James A; Braith, Randy W

    2007-01-01

    Skeletal muscle myopathy is a hallmark of chronic heart failure (HF). Phenotypic changes involve shift in myosin heavy chain (MHC) fiber type from oxidative, MHC type I, towards more glycolytic MHC IIx fibers, reductions in oxidative enzyme activity, and increase in glycolytic enzyme activity. However, it is unknown if muscle myopathy is reversed following heart transplantation. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of heart transplantation on skeletal muscle metabolic enzyme reserve and MHC fiber type in end-stage HF patients. Thirteen HF subjects were prospectively studied before and two months after heart transplantation and a subgroup (n = 6) at eight months after transplantation. Skeletal muscle biopsy of the vastus lateralis was performed and relative MHC composition was determined using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), citrate synthase (CS), and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase (HACoA) enzyme activity assays were performed to assess glycolytic, oxidative, and beta-oxidative metabolic enzyme reserves, respectively. Lactate dehydrogenase activity (130.5 +/- 13.3 vs. 106.1 +/- 13.2 micromol/g wet wt/min, p < 0.05), CS activity (14.0 +/- 1.2 vs. 9 +/- 0.9 micromol/g wet wt/min, p < 0.05), and HACoA activity (4.5 +/- 0.48 vs. 3.6 +/- 0.3 micromol/g wet wt/min, p < 0.05) decreased two months after heart transplantation. At eight months, LDH activity was restored (139.0 +/- 11 micromol/g wet wt/min), but not CS or HACoA activity compared with before transplantation. There was no significant change in muscle %MHC type I (28.7 +/- 3.5% vs. 25.3 +/- 3.0%, p = NS), %MHC type IIa (33.2 +/- 2.0% vs. 34.6 +/- 1.9%, p = NS), or %MHC type IIx (38.1 +/- 2.8% vs. 40.1 +/- 3.7%, p = NS) fiber type two months after heart transplantation. However, %MHC type I (19.3 +/- 6.6%) was decreased and %MHC type IIx (51.0 +/- 6.5%) was increased at eight months after (p < 0.05) compared with before transplantation

  12. Transmembrane chloride flux in tissue-cultured chick heart cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    To evaluate the transmembrane movement of chloride in a preparation of cardiac muscle lacking the extracellular diffusion limitations of natural specimens, intracellular chloride concentration ( [Cl] i) and transmembrane 36Cl efflux have been determined in growth-oriented embryonic chick heart cells in tissue culture. Using the method of isotopic equilibrium, [Cl]i was 25.1 +/- 7.3 mmol x (liter cell water)- 1, comparable to the value of 24.9 +/- 5.4 mmol x (liter cell water)-1 determined by coulometric titration. Two cellular 36Cl compartments were found; one exchanged with a rate constant of 0.67 +/- 0.12 min-1 and was associated with the cardiac muscle cells; the other, attributed to the fibroblasts, exchanged with a rate constant of 0.18 +/- 0.05 min- 1. At 37 degrees C, transmembrane Cl flux of cardiac muscle under steady-state conditions was 30 pmol x cm-2 x s-1. In K-free, normal, or high-Ko solutions, the responses of the membrane potential to changes in external Cl concentration suggested that chloride conductance was low. These results indicate that Cl transport across the myocardial cell membrane is more rapid than K transport and is largely electrically silent. PMID:6864192

  13. Replication of Muscle Cell Using Bioimprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsuri, Fahmi; Mitchell, John S.; Alkaisi, Maan M.; Evans, John J.

    2009-07-01

    In our earlier study a heat-curable PDMS or a UV curable elastomer, was used as the replicating material to introduce Bioimprint methodology to facilitate cell imaging [1-2] But, replicating conditions for thermal polymerization is known to cause cell dehydration during curing. In this study, a new type of polymer was developed for use in living cell replica formation, and it was tested on human muscle cells. The cells were incubated and cultured according to standard biological culturing procedures, and they were grown for about 10 days. The replicas were then separated from the muscle cells and taken for analysis under an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The new polymer was designed to be biocompatible with higher resolution and fast curing process compared to other types of silicon-based organic polymers such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Muscle cell imprints were achieved and higher resolution images were able to show the micro structures of the muscle cells, including the cellular fibers and cell membranes. The AFM is able to image features at nanoscale resolution. This capacity enables a number of characteristics of biological cells to be visualized in a unique manner. Polymer and muscle cells preparations were developed at Hamilton, in collaboration between Plant and Food Research and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Canterbury. Tapping mode was used for the AFM image analysis as it has low tip-sample forces and non-destructive imaging capability. We will be presenting the bioimprinting processes of muscle cells, their AFM imaging and characterization of the newly developed polymer.

  14. Muscle cell attachment in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the body wall muscles exert their force on the cuticle to generate locomotion. Interposed between the muscle cells and the cuticle are a basement membrane and a thin hypodermal cell. The latter contains bundles of filaments attached to dense plaques in the hypodermal cell membranes, which together we have called a fibrous organelle. In an effort to define the chain of molecules that anchor the muscle cells to the cuticle we have isolated five mAbs using preparations enriched in these components. Two antibodies define a 200-kD muscle antigen likely to be part of the basement membrane at the muscle/hypodermal interface. Three other antibodies probably identify elements of the fibrous organelles in the adjacent hypodermis. The mAb IFA, which reacts with mammalian intermediate filaments, also recognizes these structures. We suggest that the components recognized by these antibodies are likely to be involved in the transmission of tension from the muscle cell to the cuticle. PMID:1860880

  15. Bioenergetics of the aging heart and skeletal muscles: Modern concepts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Tepp, Kersti; Timohhina, Natalja; Puurand, Marju; Klepinin, Aleksandr; Chekulayev, Vladimir; Shevchuk, Igor; Kaambre, Tuuli

    2016-07-01

    Age-related alterations in the bioenergetics of the heart and oxidative skeletal muscle tissues are of crucial influence on their performance. Until now the prevailing concept of aging was the mitochondrial theory, the increased production of reactive oxygen species, mediated by deficiency in the activity of respiratory chain complexes. However, studies with mitochondria in situ have presented results which, to some extent, disagree with previous ones, indicating that the mitochondrial theory of aging may be overestimated. The studies reporting age-related decline in mitochondrial function were performed using mainly isolated mitochondria. Measurements on this level are not able to take into account the system level properties. The relevant information can be obtained only from appropriate studies using cells or tissue fibers. The functional interactions between the components of Intracellular Energetic Unit (ICEU) regulate the energy production and consumption in oxidative muscle cells. The alterations of these interactions in ICEU should be studied in order to find a more effective protocol to decelerate the age-related changes taking place in the energy metabolism. In this article, an overview is given of the present theories and controversies of causes of age-related alterations in bioenergetics. Also, branches of study, which need more emphasis, are indicated. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Skeletal muscle signaling and the heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise: insight from heart rate pacing during exercise with a trained and a deconditioned muscle group.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Svendsen, Jesper H; Ersbøll, Mads; Hellsten, Ylva; Secher, Niels H; Saltin, Bengt

    2013-05-01

    Endurance training lowers heart rate and blood pressure responses to exercise, but the mechanisms and consequences remain unclear. To determine the role of skeletal muscle for the cardioventilatory response to exercise, 8 healthy young men were studied before and after 5 weeks of 1-legged knee-extensor training and 2 weeks of deconditioning of the other leg (leg cast). Hemodynamics and muscle interstitial nucleotides were determined during exercise with the (1) deconditioned leg, (2) trained leg, and (3) trained leg with atrial pacing to the heart rate obtained with the deconditioned leg. Heart rate was ≈ 15 bpm lower during exercise with the trained leg (P<0.05), but stroke volume was higher (P<0.05) and cardiac output was similar. Arterial and central venous pressures, rate-pressure product, and ventilation were lower during exercise with the trained leg (P<0.05), whereas pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was similar. When heart rate was controlled by atrial pacing, stroke volume decreased (P<0.05), but cardiac output, peripheral blood flow, arterial pressures, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure remained unchanged. Circulating [norepinephrine], [lactate] and [K(+)] were lower and interstitial [ATP] and pH were higher in the trained leg (P<0.05). The lower cardioventilatory response to exercise with the trained leg is partly coupled to a reduced signaling from skeletal muscle likely mediated by K(+), lactate, or pH, whereas the lower cardiac afterload increases stroke volume. These results demonstrate that skeletal muscle training reduces the cardioventilatory response to exercise without compromising O2 delivery, and it can therefore be used to reduce the load on the heart during physical activity.

  17. Challenges for heart disease stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hoover-Plow, Jane; Gong, Yanqing

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death worldwide. The use of stem cells to improve recovery of the injured heart after myocardial infarction (MI) is an important emerging therapeutic strategy. However, recent reviews of clinical trials of stem cell therapy for MI and ischemic heart disease recovery report that less than half of the trials found only small improvements in cardiac function. In clinical trials, bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood cells were used as the source of stem cells delivered by intracoronary infusion. Some trials administered only a stem cell mobilizing agent that recruits endogenous sources of stem cells. Important challenges to improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy for CVD include: (1) improved identification, recruitment, and expansion of autologous stem cells; (2) identification of mobilizing and homing agents that increase recruitment; and (3) development of strategies to improve stem cell survival and engraftment of both endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. This review is an overview of stem cell therapy for CVD and discusses the challenges these three areas present for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy for heart disease, and new strategies in progress. PMID:22399855

  18. Regulation of Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscle Function by Interstitial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Kito, Yoshihiko; Hwang, Sung Jin; Ward, Sean M

    2016-09-01

    Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin form gap junctions with smooth muscle cells in visceral smooth muscles and provide important regulatory functions. In gastrointestinal (GI) muscles, there are two distinct classes of interstitial cells, c-Kit(+) interstitial cells of Cajal and PDGFRα(+) cells, that regulate motility patterns. Loss of these cells may contribute to symptoms in GI motility disorders.

  19. Isoproterenol-produced damage in amphibian heart could be mediated by adrenergic receptors located in the heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Cano-Martínez, Agustina; Vargas-González, Alvaro; Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Prado-Zayago, Esteban

    2004-01-01

    In mammals, isoproterenol may produce heart damage in part by binding to adrenergic receptors in the coronary arteries. Previously we showed evidence that isoproterenol produces cellular necrosis and interstitial fibrosis in the ventricle of the heart of an amphibian, which has no coronary arteries. The present study examines responses to 3-adrenergic receptor stimulation in the heart of urodele amphibians. The hearts from three amphibians; Ambystoma mexicanum, A. tigrinum and A. dumerilii were mounted in an organ bath at 16+/-2 degrees C. The spontaneous isometric contractions (heart rate and isometric tension) were recorded using a tension transducer connected to polygraph. Concentration-response to isoproterenol in the presence and absence of propranolol (10(-6)) was recorded. The basal heart rate in the A. mexicanum heart was 19+/-2 beats/min and in A. tigrinum and A. dumerilii was 14+/-2 beats/min. The auricular tension was 284+/-15, 190+/-10, 140+/-8 mg, while the ventricular tension was of 62+/-3, 55+/-2 and 29+/-2 mg for A. mexicanum, A. tigrinum and A. dumenrilii respectively. Isoproterenol (10(-9), 10(-6), 10(-3) M) increased the heart rate and tension in a dose-dependent manner, and the effect was reversed in presence of propranolol. Our results indicate that isoproterenol-induced heart damage in urodele amphibians can be mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors located in the heart muscle. In the future, it will be necessary to characterize adrenergic receptor subtypes directly in these species, in order to understand the mechanism underlying the use of isoproterenol in experimental models of cardiac injury in non- mammalian vertebrates.

  20. An α-Smooth Muscle Actin (acta2/αsma) Zebrafish Transgenic Line Marking Vascular Mural Cells and Visceral Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Alyson D.; Rollins, Evvi-Lynn; Georgijevic, Sonja; Santoro, Massimo M.; Childs, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Mural cells of the vascular system include vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and pericytes whose role is to stabilize and/or provide contractility to blood vessels. One of the earliest markers of mural cell development in vertebrates is α smooth muscle actin (acta2; αsma), which is expressed by pericytes and SMCs. In vivo models of vascular mural cell development in zebrafish are currently lacking, therefore we developed two transgenic zebrafish lines driving expression of GFP or mCherry in acta2-expressing cells. These transgenic fish were used to trace the live development of mural cells in embryonic and larval transgenic zebrafish. acta2:EGFP transgenic animals show expression that largely mirrors native acta2 expression, with early pan-muscle expression starting at 24 hpf in the heart muscle, followed by skeletal and visceral muscle. At 3.5 dpf, expression in the bulbus arteriosus and ventral aorta marks the first expression in vascular smooth muscle. Over the next 10 days of development, the number of acta2:EGFP positive cells and the number of types of blood vessels associated with mural cells increases. Interestingly, the mural cells are not motile and remain in the same position once they express the acta2:EGFP transgene. Taken together, our data suggests that zebrafish mural cells develop relatively late, and have little mobility once they associate with vessels. PMID:24594685

  1. Nonmyogenic cells in skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Paylor, Ben; Natarajan, Anuradha; Zhang, Regan-Heng; Rossi, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Although classical dogma dictates that satellite cells are the primary cell type involved in skeletal muscle regeneration, alternative cell types such as a variety of inflammatory and stromal cells are also actively involved in this process. A model describing myogenic cells as direct contributors to regeneration and nonmyogenic cells from other developmental sources as important accessories has emerged, with similar systems having been described in numerous other tissues in the body. Increasing evidence supports the notion that inflammatory cells function as supportive accessory cells, and are not merely involved in clearing damage following skeletal muscle injury. Additionally, recent studies have highlighted the role of tissue resident mesenchymal cell populations as playing a central role in regulating regeneration. These "accessory" cell populations are proposed to influence myogenesis via direct cell contact and secretion of paracrine trophic factors. The basic foundations of accessory cell understanding should be recognized as a crucial component to all prospects of regenerative medicine, and this chapter intends to provide a comprehensive background on the current literature describing immune and tissue-resident mesenchymal cells' role in skeletal muscle regeneration.

  2. Gene and Cell Therapy for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac gene and cell therapy have both entered clinical trials aimed at ameliorating ventricular dysfunction in patients with chronic congestive heart failure. The transduction of myocardial cells with viral constructs encoding a specific cardiomyocyte Ca2+ pump in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), SRCa2+-ATPase has been shown to correct deficient Ca2+ handling in cardiomyocytes and improvements in contractility in preclinical studies, thus leading to the first clinical trial of gene therapy for heart failure. In cell therapy, it is not clear whether beneficial effects are cell-type specific and how improvements in contractility are brought about. Despite these uncertainties, a number of clinical trials are under way, supported by safety and efficacy data from trials of cell therapy in the setting of myocardial infarction. Safety concerns for gene therapy center on inflammatory and immune responses triggered by viral constructs, and for cell therapy with myoblast cells, the major concern is increased incidence of ventricular arrhythmia after cell transplantation. Principles and mechanisms of action of gene and cell therapy for heart failure are discussed, together with the potential influence of reactive oxygen species on the efficacy of these treatments and the status of myocardial-delivery techniques for viral constructs and cells. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 2025–2042. PMID:19416058

  3. Satellite cells and the muscle stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Price, Feodor; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle in mammals is a stable tissue under normal circumstances but has remarkable ability to repair after injury. Skeletal muscle regeneration is a highly orchestrated process involving the activation of various cellular and molecular responses. As skeletal muscle stem cells, satellite cells play an indispensible role in this process. The self-renewing proliferation of satellite cells not only maintains the stem cell population but also provides numerous myogenic cells, which proliferate, differentiate, fuse, and lead to new myofiber formation and reconstitution of a functional contractile apparatus. The complex behavior of satellite cells during skeletal muscle regeneration is tightly regulated through the dynamic interplay between intrinsic factors within satellite cells and extrinsic factors constituting the muscle stem cell niche/microenvironment. For the last half century, the advance of molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics has greatly improved our understanding of skeletal muscle biology. Here, we review some recent advances, with focuses on functions of satellite cells and their niche during the process of skeletal muscle regeneration.

  4. Satellite Cells and the Muscle Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Price, Feodor

    2013-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle in mammals is a stable tissue under normal circumstances but has remarkable ability to repair after injury. Skeletal muscle regeneration is a highly orchestrated process involving the activation of various cellular and molecular responses. As skeletal muscle stem cells, satellite cells play an indispensible role in this process. The self-renewing proliferation of satellite cells not only maintains the stem cell population but also provides numerous myogenic cells, which proliferate, differentiate, fuse, and lead to new myofiber formation and reconstitution of a functional contractile apparatus. The complex behavior of satellite cells during skeletal muscle regeneration is tightly regulated through the dynamic interplay between intrinsic factors within satellite cells and extrinsic factors constituting the muscle stem cell niche/microenvironment. For the last half century, the advance of molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics has greatly improved our understanding of skeletal muscle biology. Here, we review some recent advances, with focuses on functions of satellite cells and their niche during the process of skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:23303905

  5. [Preliminary study of the expression of connective tissue growth factor in papillary muscles of the patients with rheumatic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y N; Li, T; Gu, J R; Yu, B Y

    2016-04-19

    To investigate the expression and the effect of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) on rheumatic myocardial fibrosis of rheumatic heart disease (RHD). The papillary muscles samples were obtained from patients with RHD during mitral valve replacement.The expression of TGF-β1, CTGF mRNA and CTGF protein were detected with semiquantitative RT-PCR technique and immunohistochemistry technologyin the papillary muscles cell from 41RHD patients and 20 normal papillary muscles samples.The area of myocardial fibrosis was measured by imaging analysis system. SPSS package was used to analyze the relationship between the expression of CTGF and the area of myocardial fibrosis. Compared with normal controls (PU 2.4±0.9), the mean level of CTGF protein expression in the papillary muscles samples of the RHD patients (PU 44.7±6.0) was significantly increased(P<0.01). The expression of CTGF protein in papillary muscles of RHD was positivelycorrelated with the expression of CTGFmRNA (r=0.862, P<0.01) and the area of myocardial fibrosis (r=0.856, P<0.01). Compared with normal controls, CTGF expression in the papillary muscles of the RHD patients is significantly increased, which suggests CTGF may play animportant role in myocardial fibrosis of RHD.

  6. Degradable Chitosan-Collagen Composites Seeded with Cells as Tissue Engineered Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Man; Lin, Yan-Rong; Tian, Xu-Dong; Wang, Ya-Dong; Wang, Zhen-Xing; Wang, Le-Xin

    2017-01-01

    Degradable collagen-chitosan composite materials have been used to fabricate tissue engineered heart valves. The aims of this study were to demonstrate that the collagen-chitosan composite scaffolds are cytocompatible, and endothelial cells can be differentiated from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) when seeded onto the scaffolds. The adhesion and biological activities of the seeded cells were also investigated. Collagen-chitosan composite material was used as the cell matrix, and smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts and BMSCs were used as seed cells. After four weeks of in vitro culture, the smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, and BMSCs were sequentially seeded into the collagen-chitosan composite material. After four weeks in culture, the cellular density and activity were assessed on segments of the tissue engineered heart valve scaffolds to determine the cell viability and proliferation in the collagen-chitosan composite material. The tissue engineered heart valves stained positively for both smooth muscle actin and endothelial cell factor VIII, suggesting that the seeded cells were in fact smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. The 6-ketone prostaglandin content, as measured by radioimmunoassay, of the collagen-chitosan cell culture fluid was higher than that of the serum-free medium (P <0.01). Light and electron microscopy showed that the seeded cells had shapes similar to the morphology of smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Endothelial cells can be differentiated from BMSCs when seeded onto the collagen-chitosan composite scaffolds. The seeded cells retained their biological activity after being cultured in vitro and seeded into the collagen-chitosan composite material. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Plant cells - young at heart?

    PubMed

    Schnittger, A; Schellmann, S; Hülskamp, M

    1999-12-01

    Dolly has become a synonym for one of the greatest breakthroughs in animal reproductive biology: the regeneration of a whole mammal from a somatic cell nucleus. The equivalent experiments in plants - the regeneration of whole plants from single differentiated cells - are comparatively easy. Does this apparent difference in the developmental potential of animal and plant somatic cells reflect mechanistic differences in the regulation and maintenance of their respective cell differentiation?

  8. Arterial wall mechanics as a function of heart rate: role of vascular smooth muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvucci, Fernando Pablo; Schiavone, Jonathan; Craiem, Damian; Barra, Juan Gabriel

    2007-11-01

    Vascular wall viscoelasticity can be evaluated using a first-order lumped model. This model consists of a spring with elastic constant E and a dashpot with viscous constant η. More importantly, this viscoelastic model can be fitted in-vivo measuring arterial pressure and diameter. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of heart rate over E and η. In two anesthetized sheep, diameter in thoracic aorta and intravascular pressure has been registered. The right atrium was connected to a programmable stimulator through a pair of pace-maker wires to produce changes in stimulation heart rate (HR) from 80 to 160 bpm. Additionally, local activation of vascular smooth muscle was induced with phenylephrine. After converting pressure and diameter signals into stress and strain respectively, E y η were calculated in control state and during muscle activation. The elastic modulus E did not present significant changes with heart rate. The viscous modulus η decreased 49% with a two-fold acceleration in heart rate from 80 to 160 bpm. However, the product η HR remained stable. The viscous modulus η increased 39% with smooth muscle activation. No significant pressure changes were registered during the experiment. The contractile action of vascular smooth muscle could contribute to increasing arterial wall viscosity. The decrease of η when HR increased might be related to smooth muscle relaxation mediated by endothelium activity, which was stimulated by flow increase. We conclude that HR can modulate arterial wall viscoelasticity through endothelium-dependent mechanisms.

  9. Muscle activation and heart rate responses to a side-step interval exercise.

    PubMed

    Thiebaud, Robert S; Abe, Takashi; Bravo, Jonathan C; Giovannitti, Nicolas; Sullivan, Avery P

    2017-02-16

    The side-step test is commonly used to assess agility. Side-step interval exercise may also be a potential way to improve cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness. However, the acute heart rate and muscle activation response to this type of exercise is not well established. In addition, different tempos can influence these responses. The purpose of this study was to determine the acute heart rate and muscle activation responses of a side-step interval exercise to different exercise tempos. Ten participants completed a V˙O2 max test and performed a side-step interval exercise for 4 × 1 min intervals separated by 1-min rest intervals at a slow (84 bpm) and fast (112 bpm) tempo. Muscle activation of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis and heart rate were measured during exercise. During the slow tempo, vastus lateralis muscle activation varied from 45% to 48% of maximum muscle activation (EMGmax ) while vastus medialis muscle activation varied from 51% to 54% EMGmax . During the fast tempo, vastus lateralis muscle activation varied from 53% to 65% EMGmax while vastus medialis muscle activation varied from 64% to 76% EMGmax . Heart rates varied from 80-84% HRmax from set 1 to set 4 for the fast tempo and varied from 67% to 72% HRmax from set 1 to set 4 for the slow speeds. Exercise intensity of a side-step interval exercise reached adequate levels to suggest that it may be possible to use this type of exercise to improve cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Hamster thecal cells express muscle characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Self, D.A.; Schroeder, P.C.; Gown, A.M.

    1988-08-01

    Contraction of the follicular wall about the time of ovulation appears to be a coordinated event; however, the cells that mediate it remain poorly studied. We examined the theca externa cells in the wall of hamster follicles for the presence of a functional actomyosin system, both in developing follicles and in culture. We used a monoclonal antibody (HHF35) that recognizes the alpha and gamma isoelectric variants of actin normally found in muscle, but not the beta variant associated with non-muscle sources, to evaluate large preovulatory follicles for actin content and composition. Antibody staining of sectioned ovaries showed intense circumferential reactivity in the outermost wall of developing follicles. Immunoblots from two-dimensional gels of theca externa lysates demonstrated the presence of the two muscle-specific isozymes of actin. Immunofluorescence of cultured follicular cells pulse-labeled with (3H) thymidine (for autoradiographic detection of DNA replication) revealed the presence, in many dividing cells, of actin filaments aligned primarily along the longitudinal axis of the cells. In cultures exposed to the calcium ionophore A23187 (10(-4) M) for varying periods (5 min to 1 h), contraction of many individual muscle-actin-positive cells was observed. Immunofluorescence of these cells, fixed immediately after ionophore-induced contraction, revealed compaction of the actin filaments. Our findings demonstrate that the cells of the theca externa contain muscle actins from an early stage and that these cells are capable of contraction even while proliferating in subconfluent cultures. They suggest that follicular growth may include a naturally occurring developmental sequence in which a contractile cell type proliferates in the differentiated state.

  11. Metabolic adaptations of skeletal muscle to voluntary wheel running exercise in hypertensive heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Schultz, R L; Kullman, E L; Waters, R P; Huang, H; Kirwan, J P; Gerdes, A M; Swallow, J G

    2013-01-01

    The Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rat mimics the human progression of hypertension from hypertrophy to heart failure. However, it is unknown whether SHHF animals can exercise at sufficient levels to observe beneficial biochemical adaptations in skeletal muscle. Thirty-seven female SHHF and Wistar-Furth (WF) rats were randomized to sedentary (SHHFsed and WFsed) and exercise groups (SHHFex and WFex). The exercise groups had access to running wheels from 6-22 months of age. Hindlimb muscles were obtained for metabolic measures that included mitochondrial enzyme function and expression, and glycogen utilization. The SHHFex rats ran a greater distance and duration as compared to the WFex rats (P<0.05), but the WFex rats ran at a faster speed (P<0.05). Skeletal muscle citrate synthase and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase enzyme activity was not altered in the SHHFex group, but was increased (P<0.05) in the WFex animals. Citrate synthase protein and gene expression were unchanged in SHHFex animals, but were increased in WFex rats (P<0.05). In the WFex animals muscle glycogen was significantly depleted after exercise (P<0.05), but not in the SHHFex group. We conclude that despite robust amounts of aerobic activity, voluntary wheel running exercise was not sufficiently intense to improve the oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle in adult SHHF animals, indicating an inability to compensate for declining heart function by improving peripheral oxidative adaptations in the skeletal muscle.

  12. Effect of streptomycin on the active force of bioengineered heart muscle in response to controlled stretch.

    PubMed

    Birla, R K; Huang, Y C; Dennis, R G

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we describe a bioreactor system to deliver controlled stretch protocols to bioengineered heart muscle (BEHMs) and test the system when streptomycin (an aminoglycoside antibiotic, which blocks stretch-activated channels) is either added to or excluded from the culture medium. Streptomycin is a very commonly used component of cell culture antibiotic-antimycotic media additives, so its effects on muscle development and functional response to mechanical signals in vitro is worthy of investigation. Our hypothesis is that BEHMs will not adapt to the applied mechanical stretch protocol when streptomycin is present in the culture medium, but will do so when streptomycin is excluded. Bioengineered heart muscles were formed by culturing primary neonatal cardiac myocytes in a fibrin gel using a method previously developed in our laboratory. A custom bioreactor system was designed using SolidWorks and structural components manufactured using fusion deposition modeling. We utilized a stretch protocol of 1 Hz, 10% strain for 7 d. BEHMs were stretched in the presence and absence of streptomycin. As controls, BEHMs were maintained in a cell culture incubator with and without streptomycin. The contractile properties of all BEHMs were evaluated to determine the active force. We were able to demonstrate compatibility of the bioreactor system with BEHMs and were able to stretch 58 constructs with zero incidence of failure. When the BEHMs were stretched in the absence of streptomycin, the active force increased from a mean value of 51.7 +/- 5.6 (N = 10) to 102.4 +/- 16.3 microN (N = 10), with p < 0.05. However, BEHMs that were stretched in the presence of streptomycin did not show any significant increase in active force generation. The average active force of BEHMs increased from a mean value of 57.6 +/- 10.2 (N = 10) to 91.4 +/- 19.8 microN (N = 10) when stretched in the presence of streptomycin. In this study, we demonstrate compatibility of the a bioreactor system

  13. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A.J.

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  14. The emergence of Pax7-expressing muscle stem cells during vertebrate head muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Julia Meireles; Hawrot, Katarzyna; Sharpe, Colin; Noble, Anna; Wood, William M.; Jorge, Erika C.; Goldhamer, David J.; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Pax7 expressing muscle stem cells accompany all skeletal muscles in the body and in healthy individuals, efficiently repair muscle after injury. Currently, the in vitro manipulation and culture of these cells is still in its infancy, yet muscle stem cells may be the most promising route toward the therapy of muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophies. It is often overlooked that muscular dystrophies affect head and body skeletal muscle differently. Moreover, these muscles develop differently. Specifically, head muscle and its stem cells develop from the non-somitic head mesoderm which also has cardiac competence. To which extent head muscle stem cells retain properties of the early head mesoderm and might even be able to switch between a skeletal muscle and cardiac fate is not known. This is due to the fact that the timing and mechanisms underlying head muscle stem cell development are still obscure. Consequently, it is not clear at which time point one should compare the properties of head mesodermal cells and head muscle stem cells. To shed light on this, we traced the emergence of head muscle stem cells in the key vertebrate models for myogenesis, chicken, mouse, frog and zebrafish, using Pax7 as key marker. Our study reveals a common theme of head muscle stem cell development that is quite different from the trunk. Unlike trunk muscle stem cells, head muscle stem cells do not have a previous history of Pax7 expression, instead Pax7 expression emerges de-novo. The cells develop late, and well after the head mesoderm has committed to myogenesis. We propose that this unique mechanism of muscle stem cell development is a legacy of the evolutionary history of the chordate head mesoderm. PMID:26042028

  15. Spectrum of Ventricular Arrhythmias Arising from Papillary Muscle in the Structurally Normal Heart.

    PubMed

    Naksuk, Niyada; Kapa, Suraj; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2016-09-01

    Papillary muscle is an endocavitary structure that can give rise to ventricular arrhythmias in a structurally normal heart. Its manifestation is generally benign. The papillary muscle's complex anatomy and the presence of intermixed Purkinje fibers can create a substrate for idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. Although differentiating ventricular arrhythmias originating from the papillary muscle and the fascicles is challenging and not always possible, the distinction may be helpful for planning ablation. The propensity for difficulty with ablation of papillary arrhythmias results in a variable success rate. Improvement in techniques to stabilize the catheter, use of imaging, and methods of energy delivery are required to improve ablation outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Adiponectin resistance in skeletal muscle: pathophysiological implications in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Van Berendoncks, An M; Hoymans, Vicky Y; Vrints, Christiaan J

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Skeletal muscle wasting is a common complication of chronic heart failure (CHF) and linked to poor patient prognosis. In recent years, adiponectin was postulated to be centrally involved in CHF‐associated metabolic failure and muscle wasting. This review discusses current knowledge on the role of adiponectin in CHF. Particular emphasis will be given to the complex interaction mechanisms and the intracellular pathways underlying adiponectin resistance in skeletal muscle of CHF patients. In this review, we propose that the resistance process is multifactorial, integrating abnormalities emanating from insulin signalling, mitochondrial biogenesis, and ceramide metabolism. PMID:27239409

  17. Pathology of Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection in Newborn Mice. Muscle, Heart and Brown Fat Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, G.

    1974-01-01

    Newborn mice were inoculated intracerebrally with murine cytomegalovirus and studies were made of the pathological changes in the striate and cardiac muscle and brown fat. Widespread necrosis was seen in muscle and brown fat in the early stages of the infection. Necrotic lesions became calcified. By 56 days lesions were not resolved in the heart and brown fat but were completely resolved in skeletal muscle. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8.Fig. 9. PMID:4363374

  18. Three-dimensional segmentation of the heart muscle using image statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nillesen, Maartje M.; Lopata, Richard G. P.; Gerrits, Inge H.; Kapusta, Livia; Huisman, Henkjan H.; Thijssen, Johan M.; de Korte, Chris L.

    2006-03-01

    Segmentation of the heart muscle in 3D echocardiographic images provides a tool for visualization of cardiac anatomy and assessment of heart function, and serves as an important pre-processing step for cardiac strain imaging. By incorporating spatial and temporal information of 3D ultrasound image sequences (4D), a fully automated method using image statistics was developed to perform 3D segmentation of the heart muscle. 3D rf-data were acquired with a Philips SONOS 7500 live 3D ultrasound system, and an X4 matrix array transducer (2-4 MHz). Left ventricular images of five healthy children were taken in transthoracial short/long axis view. As a first step, image statistics of blood and heart muscle were investigated. Next, based on these statistics, an adaptive mean squares filter was selected and applied to the images. Window size was related to speckle size (5x2 speckles). The degree of adaptive filtering was automatically steered by the local homogeneity of tissue. As a result, discrimination of heart muscle and blood was optimized, while sharpness of edges was preserved. After this pre-processing stage, homomorphic filtering and automatic thresholding were performed to obtain the inner borders of the heart muscle. Finally, a deformable contour algorithm was used to yield a closed contour of the left ventricular cavity in each elevational plane. Each contour was optimized using contours of the surrounding planes (spatial and temporal) as limiting condition to ensure spatial and temporal continuity. Better segmentation of the ventricle was obtained using 4D information than using information of each plane separately.

  19. Stem cell engineering for treatment of heart diseases: potentials and challenges.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengwen Calvin; Wang, Lang; Jiang, Hong; Acevedo, Julyana; Chang, Anthony Christopher; Loudon, William Gunter

    2009-03-01

    Heart disorders are a major health concern worldwide responsible for millions of deaths every year. Among the many disorders of the heart, myocardial infarction, which can lead to the development of congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, or even death, has the most severe social and economic ramifications. Lack of sufficient available donor hearts for heart transplantation, the only currently viable treatment for heart failure other than medical management options (ACE inhibition, beta blockade, use of AICDs, etc.) that improve the survival of patients with heart failure emphasises the need for alternative therapies. One promising alternative replaces cardiac muscle damaged by myocardial infarction with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels obtained through stem cell-based regeneration. We report on the state of the art of recovery of cardiac functions by using stem cell engineering. Current research focuses on (a) inducing stem cells into becoming cardiac cells before or after injection into a host, (b) growing replacement heart tissue in vitro, and (c) stimulating the proliferation of the post-mitotic cardiomyocytes in situ. The most promising treatment option for patients is the engineering of new heart tissue that can be implanted into damaged areas. Engineering of cardiac tissue currently employs the use of co-culture of stem cells with scaffold microenvironments engineered to improve tissue survival and enhance differentiation. Growth of heart tissue in vitro using scaffolds, soluble collagen, and cell sheets has unique advantages. To compensate for the loss of ventricular mass and contractility of the injured cardiomyocytes, different stem cell populations have been extensively studied as potential sources of new cells to ameliorate the injured myocardium and eventually restore cardiac function. Unresolved issues including insufficient cell generation survival, growth, and differentiation have led to mixed results in preclinical and clinical studies

  20. Esophageal muscle cell interaction with biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Mevlit; Yakut, Tahsin; Narci, Adnan; Güvenç, B Haluk; Güilten, Tuna; Yağmurca, Murat; Yiğit, Barbaros; Bilir, Ayhan

    2007-02-01

    The in vitro interactions of esophageal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) with synthetic absorbable polymers were tested and artificial muscle tissues harvested from subcutaneous implantation were examined. Esophageal tissue samples from adult and fetal (25-day gestational age) rabbits were cut into small pieces and cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. Growing cells were identified as SMCs by immunostaining for anti-actin and anti-myosin antibodies. Equal volumes of agar gel and medium were mixed and used for 3-D culture. 5x10(5) cells and 1 mg polyglycolic acid (PGA) and poly-lactide-co-glycolide acid (PLGA) fibers were seeded in six-well tissue culture plates. On days 2 and 7 growing cells were counted by a hemocytometer and cell-polymer interactions were evaluated with light microscopy. Adult and fetal SMCs were seeded onto the PGA and PLGA scaffolds, cultivated for two weeks, and implanted subcutaneously on the backs of the rabbits. Cell-polymer implants were retrieved after four weeks and muscle formation was evaluated histologically and immunohistochemically. Growing cells stained positive for actin and myosin proteins. Cell-polymer interactions were poor after 24 hours, whereas intensive attachment to the fibers was detected 48 hours following cultivation. Both fiber materials supported cell proliferation. PLGA scaffolds improved muscle formation more efficiently than PGA, and fetal and adult SMCs showed similar mass quality. Scaffolds are important as cell-carrying vehicles, and material-cell interactions should be tested before application. A 3-D culture prepared with agar gel and medium is practical for testing material toxicity.

  1. Heart cell contractions measured using a micromachined polysilicon force transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Gisela; Pister, Kristofer S. J.; Roos, Kenneth P.

    1995-09-01

    A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) force transducer, with a volume less than one cubic millimeter, is being developed to measure forces generated by living, isolated cardiac muscle cells in order to resolve the complex mechanisms of muscle contraction. The force transducer consists of two movable clamps facing each other. Each clamp contains two vertical, parallel hinged polysilicon plates attached to a moveable shuttle, and the entire structure is suspended 2 micrometers above the substrate via support beams attached to the substrate at one end. Each end of a living rat heart cell is glued between a pair of vertical plates. Calcium is then introduced into the cell's nutrient bath and stimulates the cell to contract. Upon contraction the support beams bend, and the amount of deflection is translated to force via the known spring constant in the beams. Typcially the 70 micrometers long central portion of a 120 micrometers long cell will contract approximately 6-7 micrometers in full activating solution, resulting in forces up to 16 (mu) N. The average value obtained for Fmax per cross-sectional area was 21.8mN/mm2 which is comparable to the value found in other laboratories using standard transducer technology.

  2. Autophagic regulation of smooth muscle cell biology.

    PubMed

    Salabei, Joshua K; Hill, Bradford G

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy regulates the metabolism, survival, and function of numerous cell types, including those comprising the cardiovascular system. In the vasculature, changes in autophagy have been documented in atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions and in hypertensive vessels. The biology of vascular smooth muscle cells appears particularly sensitive to changes in the autophagic program. Recent evidence indicates that stimuli or stressors evoked during the course of vascular disease can regulate autophagic activity, resulting in modulation of VSMC phenotype and viability. In particular, certain growth factors and cytokines, oxygen tension, and pharmacological drugs have been shown to trigger autophagy in smooth muscle cells. Importantly, each of these stimuli has a redox component, typically associated with changes in the abundance of reactive oxygen, nitrogen, or lipid species. Collective findings support the hypothesis that autophagy plays a critical role in vascular remodeling by regulating smooth muscle cell phenotype transitions and by influencing the cellular response to stress. In this graphical review, we summarize current knowledge on the role of autophagy in the biology of the smooth muscle cell in (patho)physiology. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Skeletal muscle stem cells from animals I. Basic cell biology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Skeletal muscle stem cells from food-producing animals have been of interest to agricultural life scientists seeking to develop a better understanding of the molecular regulation of lean tissue (skeletal muscle protein hypertrophy) and intramuscular fat (marbling) development. Enhanced understanding...

  4. Morphological variations of papillary muscles in the mitral valve complex in human cadaveric hearts.

    PubMed

    Gunnal, Sandhya Arvind; Wabale, Rajendra Namdeo; Farooqui, Mujeebuddin Samsamuddin

    2013-01-01

    Papillary muscle rupture and dysfunction can lead to complications of prolapsed mitral valve and mitral regurgitation. Multiple operative procedures of the papillary muscles, such as resection, repositioning and realignment, are carried out to restore normal physiological function. Therefore, it is important to know both the variations and the normal anatomy of papillary muscles. This study was carried out on 116 human cadaveric hearts. The left ventricles were opened along the left border in order to view the papillary muscles. The number, shape, position and pattern of the papillary muscles were observed. In this series, the papillary muscles were mostly found in groups instead of in twos, as is described in standard textbooks. Four different shapes of papillary muscles were identified - conical, broad-apexed, pyramidal and fan-shaped. We also discovered various patterns of papillary muscles. No two mitral valve complexes have the same architectural arrangement. Each case seems to be unique. Therefore, it is important for scientists worldwide to study the variations in the mitral valve complex in order to ascertain the reason behind each specific architectural arrangement. This will enable cardiothoracic surgeons to tailor the surgical procedures according to the individual papillary muscle pattern.

  5. The Effects of a High School Stress Management Unit on Student's Heart Rate and Muscle Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Glenn E.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Attempted to determine effectiveness of three-week stress management unit for high school students. Measures of heart rate and muscle tension were used to determine the amount of control demonstrated during a period of relaxation and a period of induced stress. Results of the study indicate that a stress management unit for high school students…

  6. Isolation of satellite cells from single muscle fibers from young, aged, or dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Di Foggia, Valentina; Robson, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contains an identified resident stem cell population called the satellite cells. This cell is responsible for the majority of the postnatal growth and regenerative potential of skeletal muscle. Other cells do contribute to skeletal muscle regeneration and in cultures of minced whole muscle these cells are cultured along with the satellite cells and it is impossible to dissect out their contribution compared to the satellite cells. Therefore, a method to culture pure satellite cells has been developed to study the signaling pathways that control their proliferation and differentiation. In our studies into the role of the resident myogenic stem cells in regeneration, myopathic conditions, and aging, we have optimized the established techniques that already exist to isolate pure satellite cell cultures from single muscle fibers. We have successfully isolated satellite cells from young adults through to 24-month-old muscles and obtained populations of cells that we are studying for the signaling events that regulate their proliferative potential.

  7. Abcg2-Labeled Cells Contribute to Different Cell Populations in the Embryonic and Adult Heart.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Michelle J; Maher, Travis J; Li, Qinglu; Garry, Mary G; Sorrentino, Brian P; Martin, Cindy M

    2016-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily G member 2 (Abcg2)-expressing cardiac-side population cells have been identified in the developing and adult heart, although the role they play in mammalian heart growth and regeneration remains unclear. In this study, we use genetic lineage tracing to follow the cell fate of Abcg2-expressing cells in the embryonic and adult heart. During cardiac embryogenesis, the Abcg2 lineage gives rise to multiple cardiovascular cell types, including cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells. This capacity for Abcg2-expressing cells to contribute to cardiomyocytes decreases rapidly during the postnatal period. We further tested the role of the Abcg2 lineage following myocardial injury. One month following ischemia reperfusion injury, Abcg2-expressing cells contributed significantly to the endothelial cell lineage, however, there was no contribution to regenerated cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, consistent with previous results showing that Abcg2 plays an important cytoprotective role during oxidative stress, we show an increase in Abcg2 labeling of the vasculature, a decrease in the scar area, and a moderate improvement in cardiac function following myocardial injury. We have uncovered a difference in the capacity of Abcg2-expressing cells to generate the cardiovascular lineages during embryogenesis, postnatal growth, and cardiac regeneration.

  8. Telocytes and putative stem cells in ageing human heart.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Curici, Antoanela; Wang, Enshi; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Tradition considers that mammalian heart consists of about 70% non-myocytes (interstitial cells) and 30% cardiomyocytes (CMs). Anyway, the presence of telocytes (TCs) has been overlooked, since they were described in 2010 (visit www.telocytes.com). Also, the number of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) has not accurately estimated in humans during ageing. We used electron microscopy to identify and estimate the number of cells in human atrial myocardium (appendages). Three age-related groups were studied: newborns (17 days-1 year), children (6-17 years) and adults (34-60 years). Morphometry was performed on low-magnification electron microscope images using computer-assisted technology. We found that interstitial area gradually increases with age from 31.3 ± 4.9% in newborns to 41 ± 5.2% in adults. Also, the number of blood capillaries (per mm(2) ) increased with several hundreds in children and adults versus newborns. CMs are the most numerous cells, representing 76% in newborns, 88% in children and 86% in adults. Images of CMs mitoses were seen in the 17-day newborns. Interestingly, no lipofuscin granules were found in CMs of human newborns and children. The percentage of cells that occupy interstitium were (depending on age): endothelial cells 52-62%; vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes 22-28%, Schwann cells with nerve endings 6-7%, fibroblasts 3-10%, macrophages 1-8%, TCs about 1% and stem cells less than 1%. We cannot confirm the popular belief that cardiac fibroblasts are the most prevalent cell type in the heart and account for about 20% of myocardial volume. Numerically, TCs represent a small fraction of human cardiac interstitial cells, but because of their extensive telopodes, they achieve a 3D network that, for instance, supports CSCs. The myocardial (very) low capability to regenerate may be explained by the number of CSCs, which decreases fivefold by age (from 0.5% to 0.1% in newborns versus adults).

  9. Cyclic AMP-dependent signaling system is a primary metabolic target for non-thermal effect of microwaves on heart muscle hydration.

    PubMed

    Narinyan, Lilia; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we have suggested that cell hydration is a universal and extra-sensitive sensor for the structural changes of cell aqua medium caused by the impact of weak chemical and physical factors. The aim of present work is to elucidate the nature of the metabolic messenger through which physiological solution (PS) treated by non-thermal (NT) microwaves (MW) could modulate heart muscle hydration of rats. For this purpose, the effects of NT MW-treated PS on heart muscle hydration, [(3)H]-ouabain binding with cell membrane, (45)Ca(2+) uptake and intracellular cyclic nucleotides contents in vivo and in vitro experiments were studied. It is shown that intraperitoneal injections of both Sham-treated PS and NT MW-treated PS elevate heart muscle hydration. However, the effect of NT MW-treated PS on muscle hydration is more pronounced than the effect of Sham-treated PS. In vitro experiments NT MW-treated PS has dehydration effect on muscle, which is not changed by decreasing Na(+) gradients on membrane. Intraperitoneal injection of Sham- and NT MW-treated PS containing (45)Ca(2+) have similar dehydration effect on muscle, while NT MW-treated PS has activation effect on Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange in reverse mode. The intraperitoneal injection of NT MW-treated PS depresses [(3)H]-ouabain binding with its high-affinity membrane receptors, elevates intracellular cAMP and decreases cGMP contents. Based on the obtained data, it is suggested that cAMP-dependent signaling system serves as a primary metabolic target for NT MW effect on heart muscle hydration.

  10. Cystic tumor of papillary muscle of heart: a rare finding in sudden death.

    PubMed

    Murty, O P

    2009-06-01

    Primary cystic tumors of papillary muscles of the heart are extremely rare. Here, one case of unusual cystic tumor in papillary muscle of the heart in a 37-year-old Myanmar migrant worker has been reported. He came to Malaysia 2 weeks before and one morning was found dead in sleep. Autopsy revealed cystic lesion in the papillary muscle of the mitral valve of heart, which was prolapsing into ventricular cavity. The cyst had white-jelly like sticky mucus material. The cyst was present in papillary muscle with slight invasion in septum area; it was lined by cuboidal-columnar epithelium and contained mucinous contents. There was no evidence of an inflammatory reaction in the cyst and in cardiac muscles. In addition to cystic neoplasm, the deceased also had histoplasmosis of the lungs. The case is presented with macroscopic and microscopic photographs of the cyst and histoplasmosis of the lungs. This case is reported because of its rarity, unique position, and unusual appearance.

  11. Skeletal muscle mass and exercise performance in stable ambulatory patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lang, C C; Chomsky, D B; Rayos, G; Yeoh, T K; Wilson, J R

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether skeletal muscle atrophy limits the maximal exercise capacity of stable ambulatory patients with heart failure. Body composition and maximal exercise capacity were measured in 100 stable ambulatory patients with heart failure. Body composition was assessed by using dual-energy X-ray absorption. Peak exercise oxygen consumption (VO2peak) and the anaerobic threshold were measured by using a Naughton treadmill protocol and a Medical Graphics CardioO2 System. VO2peak averaged 13.4 +/- 3.3 ml.min-1.kg-1 or 43 +/- 12% of normal. Lean body mass averaged 52.9 +/- 10.5 kg and leg lean mass 16.5 +/- 3.6 kg. Leg lean mass correlated linearly with VO2peak (r = 0.68, P < 0.01), suggesting that exercise performance is influences by skeletal muscle mass. However, lean body mass was comparable to levels noted in 1,584 normal control subjects, suggesting no decrease in muscle mass. Leg muscle mass was comparable to levels noted in 34 normal control subjects, further supporting this conclusion. These findings suggest that exercise intolerance in stable ambulatory patients with heart failure is not due to skeletal muscle atrophy.

  12. Time course of ubiquitin-proteasome and macroautophagy-lysosome pathways in skeletal muscle in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoto; Fujino, Hidemi; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Takegaki, Jyunya; Deie, Masataka

    2015-01-01

    Patients with heart failure have limited exercise capacity due to not only the myocardial dysfunction but also skeletal muscle atrophy. However, the mechanisms and time course of protein degradation in skeletal muscle during heart failure remain unclear, and there is no established standard treatment. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the time course of major protein degradation pathways in skeletal muscle during heart failure. Four-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to heart failure induced by monocrotaline or control groups. At 14 and 21 days after monocrotaline injection, the lungs, heart, and gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were removed and analyzed. There was no significant difference in body weight between the groups at 14 days after monocrotaline injection. Although there were no morphological changes in the skeletal muscle of the monocrotaline group at this time point, ubiquitin-proteasome and macroautophagylysosome pathways were activated in the monocrotaline group. Additionally, the pathways were less strongly activated in the soleus muscle than in the gastrocnemius muscle. These results suggest that physical exercise that shifts to slow muscle characteristics should begin when there is no indication of skeletal muscle atrophy to prevent exercise intolerance with heart failure.

  13. Growing vascularized heart tissue from stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shiang Y; Hernández, Damián; Dusting, Gregory J

    2013-08-01

    The promise of stem cells to repair the heart after damage or heart attack has not been realized because most such cells are lost after transplantation. A new approach is to grow substantial viable pieces of cardiac tissue from human stem cells by cardiac tissue engineering. Such constructs must be fully vascularized and perfused to ensure the viability of clinically relevant volumes of tissue. This requires careful choice of cells, culture conditions, a biomaterial to act as scaffold, and crucial strategies for vascularization. Autologous stem cells with high plasticity, which would avoid the need for antirejection therapies after transplantation, are an attractive source of both cardiomyocytes and vascular cells. Most stem cells also have inherent paracrine activity, releasing cytoprotective factors and growth-promoting cytokines that can further stimulate tissue regeneration and neovascularization through recruitment of endogenous stem and progenitor cells. Current advances for growing vascularized and functional cardiac constructs with human stem cells are described, bringing us a step closer to the engineering of complex cardiac tissues such as pacemaker, conducting tissue, or contractile myocardial flaps ideal for transplantation. From studies in rats successful transplantation of thin constructs to the ventricle has been reported, but there remain further issues to resolve before larger human constructs will be available to test in the clinic.

  14. Evolving concepts of heart failure: cooling furnace, malfunctioning pump, enlarging muscle--Part I.

    PubMed

    Katz, A M

    1997-12-01

    Understanding of the causes of dyspnea and anasarca, the cardinal features of heart failure, has changed dramatically since Greco-Roman times, when sputum and pleural effusions were thought to originate in the brain, and the heart was believed to heat and distribute the vital spirit. It was not until the seventeenth century, when Harvey demonstrated that the heart was a pump and autopsy descriptions revealed valve abnormalities that interfered with the circulation, that it became possible to identify the role of heart disease in causing shortness of breath and edema. Morgagni's recognition, toward the end of the eighteenth century, that overload caused the heart to enlarge was followed less than 50 years later by Corvisart's distinction between hypertrophy and dilation. Differences in the architecture of failing hearts focused attention of nineteenth-century clinical scientists on the myocardial response to overload, and by the end of this century overload-induced hypertrophy was recognized not only to have immediate adaptive effects, but also to cause progressive degeneration of the heart muscle. This focus on the failing myocardium ended in the early years of the twentieth century, when new discoveries in hemodynamic physiology shifted attention to pressure and flow abnormalities caused by the then prevalent rheumatic valvular heart disease. During the past decade, new emphasis on prognosis, along with realization that drugs intended to correct hemodynamic abnormalities often had adverse effects on survival, has led to a reexamination of the biology of the failing heart. As a result, the focus in heart failure research has returned to the myocardium. This article reviews some of the misconceptions and errors of early physicians, who, while often careful and intelligent observers, lacked the means to explain and treat heart failure. It is hoped an appreciation of the evolving concepts of heart failure will help the reader meet today's challenge of incorporating

  15. Satellite Cell Heterogeneity in Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Matthew T.; Sacco, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The cellular turnover required for skeletal muscle maintenance and repair is mediated by resident stem cells, also termed satellite cells. Satellite cells normally reside in a quiescent state, intermittently entering the cell cycle to fuse with neighboring myofibers and replenish the stem cell pool. However, the mechanisms by which satellite cells maintain the precise balance between self-renewal and differentiation necessary for long-term homeostasis remain unclear. Recent work has supported a previously unappreciated heterogeneity in the satellite cell compartment that may underlie the observed variability in cell fate and function. In this review, we examine the work supporting this notion as well as the potential governing principles, developmental origins, and principal determinants of satellite cell heterogeneity. PMID:26948993

  16. Carnosine and anserine homeostasis in skeletal muscle and heart is controlled by β-alanine transamination.

    PubMed

    Blancquaert, Laura; Baba, Shahid P; Kwiatkowski, Sebastian; Stautemas, Jan; Stegen, Sanne; Barbaresi, Silvia; Chung, Weiliang; Boakye, Adjoa A; Hoetker, J David; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Delanghe, Joris; Vanheel, Bert; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Derave, Wim; Everaert, Inge

    2016-09-01

    Using recombinant DNA technology, the present study provides the first strong and direct evidence indicating that β-alanine is an efficient substrate for the mammalian transaminating enzymes 4-aminobutyrate-2-oxoglutarate transaminase and alanine-glyoxylate transaminase. The concentration of carnosine and anserine in murine skeletal and heart muscle depends on circulating availability of β-alanine, which is in turn controlled by degradation of β-alanine in liver and kidney. Chronic oral β-alanine supplementation is a popular ergogenic strategy in sports because it can increase the intracellular carnosine concentration and subsequently improve the performance of high-intensity exercises. The present study can partly explain why the β-alanine supplementation protocol is so inefficient, by demonstrating that exogenous β-alanine can be effectively routed toward oxidation. The metabolic fate of orally ingested β-alanine is largely unknown. Chronic β-alanine supplementation is becoming increasingly popular for improving high-intensity exercise performance because it is the rate-limiting precursor of the dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-l-histidine) in muscle. However, only a small fraction (3-6%) of the ingested β-alanine is used for carnosine synthesis. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the putative contribution of two β-alanine transamination enzymes, namely 4-aminobutyrate-2-oxoglutarate transaminase (GABA-T) and alanine-glyoxylate transaminase (AGXT2), to the homeostasis of carnosine and its methylated analogue anserine. We found that, when transfected into HEK293T cells, recombinant mouse and human GABA-T and AGXT2 are able to transaminate β-alanine efficiently. The reaction catalysed by GABA-T is inhibited by vigabatrin, whereas both GABA-T and AGXT2 activity is inhibited by aminooxyacetic acid (AOA). Both GABA-T and AGXT2 are highly expressed in the mouse liver and kidney and the administration of the inhibitors effectively reduced their enzyme

  17. Association of adiponectin with peripheral muscle status in elderly patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Loncar, Goran; Bozic, Biljana; von Haehling, Stephan; Düngen, Hans-Dirk; Prodanovic, Nenad; Lainscak, Mitja; Arandjelovic, Aleksandra; Dimkovic, Sinisa; Radojicic, Zoran; Popovic, Vera

    2013-12-01

    Reduced peripheral muscle mass was demonstrated in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Adipokines may have potent metabolic effects on skeletal muscle. The associations between adipokines, peripheral muscle mass, and muscle function have been poorly investigated in patients with HF. We measured markers of fat and bone metabolism (adiponectin, leptin, 25-hydroxy vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, osteoprotegerin, RANKL), N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) in 73 non-cachectic, non-diabetic, male patients with chronic HF (age: 68 ± 7 years, New York Heart Association class II/III: 76/26%, left ventricular ejection fraction 29 ± 8%) and 20 healthy controls of similar age. Lean mass as a measure of skeletal muscle mass was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), while muscle strength was assessed by hand grip strength measured by Jamar dynamometer. Serum levels of adiponectin, parathyroid hormone, osteoprotegerin, RANKL, and NT-pro-BNP were elevated in patients with chronic HF compared to healthy controls (all p<0.0001), while no difference in serum levels of leptin, testosterone or SHBG was noted. Levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D were reduced (p=0.002) in HF group. Peripheral lean mass and hand grip strength were reduced in patients with HF compared to healthy subjects (p=0.006 and p<0.0001, respectively). Using backward selection multivariable regression, serum levels of increased adiponectin remained significantly associated with reduced arm lean mass and muscle strength. Our findings may indicate a cross-sectional metabolic association of increased serum adiponectin with reduced peripheral muscle mass and muscle strength in non-cachectic, non-diabetic, elderly HF patients. © 2013.

  18. Effect of muscle mass on muscle mechanoreflex-mediated heart rate increase at the onset of dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Lauro C; Oliveira, Ricardo B; Ramos, Plínio S; Ricardo, Djalma R; Araújo, Claudio Gil S

    2010-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether the heart rate increase at the onset of passive dynamic exercise is related to the amount of skeletal muscle mass engaged in movement. Fifteen healthy male subjects, 18-30 years old, performed, from the 4th to the 8th second of a 12-s apnea, four different 4-s bouts of passive cycling assigned in a counterbalanced order, each one different from the others by the number of limbs engaged in the movement (i.e., 1 arm, 2 arms, 2 arms + 1 leg and 2 arms + 2 legs), while respiratory movements and limb muscle electromyography were recorded. A repeated-measures ANOVA showed that the RR interval at the end of 4-s passive cycling was reduced in all the four different bouts (P < 0.05); the variations (delta values from pre-exercise to the end of 4 s of passive cycling) were directly related, in a non-linear trend, to the amount of muscle mass engaged in movement. These variations were more expressive when extremes were compared (110 +/- 16 vs. 184 +/- 24 ms, respectively, 1 limb vs. 4 limbs, P < 0.05), with differences observed from the first cardiac cycle after the onset of exercise. It was concluded that in healthy subjects, heart rate increase at the onset of passive cycling is directly related to the number of limbs and consequently the amount of muscle mass engaged, which is possibly related to a greater afferent input from stretch-sensitive muscle mechanoreceptors.

  19. Penetration of teicoplanin into heart valves and subcutaneous and muscle tissues of patients undergoing open-heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Frank, U K; Schmidt-Eisenlohr, E; Mlangeni, D; Schindler, M; Hoh, A; Beyersdorf, F; Daschner, F D

    1997-11-01

    Penetration of teicoplanin into serum, heart valves, and subcutaneous and muscle tissues was determined in 22 patients undergoing open-heart surgery. Each patient received 12 mg of teicoplanin per kg of body weight as a 30-min intravenous infusion preoperatively. Within 10 h, serum concentrations of teicoplanin declined from 43.1 to 2.8 microg/ml. Teicoplanin concentrations in subcutaneous tissues reached their peak of 9.2 microg/g after 2 to 3 h and decreased slowly to 2.3 microg/g after 9 to 10 h. Concentrations in muscle decreased from 8.7 microg/g to nondetectable levels. Teicoplanin concentrations in cardiac valvular tissue reached their peak of 6.1 microg/g and decreased thereafter to 1.7 microg/g. Teicoplanin concentrations in heart valves were high enough to inhibit methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci, which are known to cause postoperative wound infections and infective endocarditis.

  20. Penetration of teicoplanin into heart valves and subcutaneous and muscle tissues of patients undergoing open-heart surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, U K; Schmidt-Eisenlohr, E; Mlangeni, D; Schindler, M; Hoh, A; Beyersdorf, F; Daschner, F D

    1997-01-01

    Penetration of teicoplanin into serum, heart valves, and subcutaneous and muscle tissues was determined in 22 patients undergoing open-heart surgery. Each patient received 12 mg of teicoplanin per kg of body weight as a 30-min intravenous infusion preoperatively. Within 10 h, serum concentrations of teicoplanin declined from 43.1 to 2.8 microg/ml. Teicoplanin concentrations in subcutaneous tissues reached their peak of 9.2 microg/g after 2 to 3 h and decreased slowly to 2.3 microg/g after 9 to 10 h. Concentrations in muscle decreased from 8.7 microg/g to nondetectable levels. Teicoplanin concentrations in cardiac valvular tissue reached their peak of 6.1 microg/g and decreased thereafter to 1.7 microg/g. Teicoplanin concentrations in heart valves were high enough to inhibit methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci, which are known to cause postoperative wound infections and infective endocarditis. PMID:9371368

  1. Pluripotent stem cell-based heart regeneration: from the developmental and immunological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lui, Kathy O; Bu, Lei; Li, Ronald A; Chan, Camie W

    2012-03-01

    Heart diseases such as myocardial infarction cause massive loss of cardiomyocytes, but the human heart lacks the innate ability to regenerate. In the adult mammalian heart, a resident progenitor cell population, termed epicardial progenitors, has been identified and reported to stay quiescent under uninjured conditions; however, myocardial infarction induces their proliferation and de novo differentiation into cardiac cells. It is conceivable to develop novel therapeutic approaches for myocardial repair by targeting such expandable sources of cardiac progenitors, thereby giving rise to new muscle and vasculatures. Human pluripotent stem cells such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells can self-renew and differentiate into the three major cell types of the heart, namely cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of the therapeutic potential and challenges associated with the use of pluripotent stem cell and progenitor biology in cell therapy. An emphasis is placed on the contribution of paracrine factors in the growth of myocardium and neovascularization as well as the role of immunogenicity in cell survival and engraftment.

  2. Sarcopenia, cachexia, and muscle performance in heart failure: Review update 2016.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Masakazu; Ishida, Junichi; Doehner, Wolfram; von Haehling, Stephan; Anker, Markus S; Coats, Andrew J S; Anker, Stefan D; Springer, Jochen

    2017-07-01

    Cachexia in the context of heart failure (HF) has been termed cardiac cachexia, and represents a progressive involuntary weight loss. Cachexia is mainly the result of an imbalance in the homeostasis of muscle protein synthesis and degradation due to a lower activity of protein synthesis pathways and an over-activation of protein degradation. In addition, muscle wasting leads to of impaired functional capacity, even after adjusting for clinical relevant variables in patients with HF. However, there is no sufficient therapeutic strategy in muscle wasting in HF patients and very few studies in animal models. Exercise training represents a promising intervention that can prevent or even reverse the process of muscle wasting, and worsening the muscle function and performance in HF with muscle wasting and cachexia. The pathological mechanisms and effective therapeutic approach of cardiac cachexia remain uncertain, because of the difficulty to establish animal cardiac cachexia models, thus novel animal models are warranted. Furthermore, the use of improved animal models will lead to a better understanding of the pathways that modulate muscle wasting and therapeutics of muscle wasting of cardiac cachexia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. An ultrasensitive transducer for measurement of isometric contractile force from single heart cells.

    PubMed

    Tung, L

    1986-07-01

    A novel ultrasensitive force transducer suitable for measuring isometric forces generated by single spindle-shaped muscle cells is described. The transducer components are mechanically and electrically simple, consisting of a low power He-Ne laser, a pair of step index, glass optic fibers, and a photodiode detector circuit. To test the operation of the transducer, enzymatically isolated frog ventricular heart cells were used, having peak contractile forces on the order of 100 nN. The transducer presents a number of advantages over existing designs and has a resolution better than 2 nN. As such, it is suitable for excitation-contraction studies in single muscle cells.

  4. Role of satellite cells in muscle growth and maintenance of muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Pallafacchina, G; Blaauw, B; Schiaffino, S

    2013-12-01

    Changes in muscle mass may result from changes in protein turnover, reflecting the balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation, and changes in cell turnover, reflecting the balance between myonuclear accretion and myonuclear loss. Myonuclear accretion, i.e. increase in the number of myonuclei within the muscle fibers, takes place via proliferation and fusion of satellite cells, myogenic stem cells associated to skeletal muscle fibers and involved in muscle regeneration. In developing muscle, satellite cells undergo extensive proliferation and most of them fuse with myofibers, thus contributing to the increase in myonuclei during early postnatal stages. A similar process is induced in adult skeletal muscle by functional overload and exercise. In contrast, satellite cells and myonuclei may undergo apoptosis during muscle atrophy, although it is debated whether myonuclear loss occurs in atrophying muscle. An increase in myofiber size can also occur by changes in protein turnover without satellite cell activation, e.g. in late phases of postnatal development or in some models of muscle hypertrophy. The relative role of protein turnover and cell turnover in muscle adaptation and in the establishment of functional muscle hypertrophy remains to be established. The identification of the signaling pathways mediating satellite cell activation may provide therapeutic targets for combating muscle wasting in a variety of pathological conditions, including cancer cachexia, renal and cardiac failure, neuromuscular diseases, as well as aging sarcopenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) disease diagnosed on a British Columbia salmon farm through a longitudinal farm study.

    PubMed

    Di Cicco, Emiliano; Ferguson, Hugh W; Schulze, Angela D; Kaukinen, Karia H; Li, Shaorong; Vanderstichel, Raphaël; Wessel, Øystein; Rimstad, Espen; Gardner, Ian A; Hammell, K Larry; Miller, Kristina M

    2017-01-01

    Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) is an emerging disease of marine-farmed Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar), first recognized in 1999 in Norway, and later also reported in Scotland and Chile. We undertook a longitudinal study involving health evaluation over an entire marine production cycle on one salmon farm in British Columbia (Canada). In previous production cycles at this farm site and others in the vicinity, cardiac lesions not linked to a specific infectious agent or disease were identified. Histologic assessments of both live and moribund fish samples collected at the farm during the longitudinal study documented at the population level the development, peak, and recovery phases of HSMI. The fish underwent histopathological evaluation of all tissues, Twort's Gram staining, immunohistochemistry, and molecular quantification in heart tissue of 44 agents known or suspected to cause disease in salmon. Our analysis showed evidence of HSMI histopathological lesions over an 11-month timespan, with the prevalence of lesions peaking at 80-100% in sampled fish, despite mild clinical signs with no associated elevation in mortalities reported at the farm level. Diffuse mononuclear inflammation and myodegeneration, consistent with HSMI, was the predominant histologic observation in affected heart and skeletal muscle. Infective agent monitoring identified three agents at high prevalence in salmon heart tissue, including Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV), and parasites Paranucleospora theridion and Kudoa thyrsites. However, PRV alone was statistically correlated with the occurrence and severity of histopathological lesions in the heart. Immunohistochemical staining further localized PRV throughout HSMI development, with the virus found mainly within red blood cells in early cases, moving into the cardiomyocytes within or, more often, on the periphery of the inflammatory reaction during the peak disease, and reducing to low or undetectable levels later in the production

  6. Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) disease diagnosed on a British Columbia salmon farm through a longitudinal farm study

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Hugh W.; Schulze, Angela D.; Kaukinen, Karia H.; Li, Shaorong; Vanderstichel, Raphaël; Wessel, Øystein; Rimstad, Espen; Gardner, Ian A.; Hammell, K. Larry; Miller, Kristina M.

    2017-01-01

    Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) is an emerging disease of marine-farmed Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar), first recognized in 1999 in Norway, and later also reported in Scotland and Chile. We undertook a longitudinal study involving health evaluation over an entire marine production cycle on one salmon farm in British Columbia (Canada). In previous production cycles at this farm site and others in the vicinity, cardiac lesions not linked to a specific infectious agent or disease were identified. Histologic assessments of both live and moribund fish samples collected at the farm during the longitudinal study documented at the population level the development, peak, and recovery phases of HSMI. The fish underwent histopathological evaluation of all tissues, Twort’s Gram staining, immunohistochemistry, and molecular quantification in heart tissue of 44 agents known or suspected to cause disease in salmon. Our analysis showed evidence of HSMI histopathological lesions over an 11-month timespan, with the prevalence of lesions peaking at 80–100% in sampled fish, despite mild clinical signs with no associated elevation in mortalities reported at the farm level. Diffuse mononuclear inflammation and myodegeneration, consistent with HSMI, was the predominant histologic observation in affected heart and skeletal muscle. Infective agent monitoring identified three agents at high prevalence in salmon heart tissue, including Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV), and parasites Paranucleospora theridion and Kudoa thyrsites. However, PRV alone was statistically correlated with the occurrence and severity of histopathological lesions in the heart. Immunohistochemical staining further localized PRV throughout HSMI development, with the virus found mainly within red blood cells in early cases, moving into the cardiomyocytes within or, more often, on the periphery of the inflammatory reaction during the peak disease, and reducing to low or undetectable levels later in the

  7. Muscle satellite cell heterogeneity and self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Norio; Asakura, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle possesses extraordinary regeneration capacities. After muscle injury or exercise, large numbers of newly formed muscle fibers are generated within a week as a result of expansion and differentiation of a self-renewing pool of muscle stem cells termed muscle satellite cells. Normally, satellite cells are mitotically quiescent and reside beneath the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Upon regeneration, satellite cells are activated, and give rise to daughter myogenic precursor cells. After several rounds of proliferation, these myogenic precursor cells contribute to the formation of new muscle fibers. During cell division, a minor population of myogenic precursor cells returns to quiescent satellite cells as a self-renewal process. Currently, accumulating evidence has revealed the essential roles of satellite cells in muscle regeneration and the regulatory mechanisms, while it still remains to be elucidated how satellite cell self-renewal is molecularly regulated and how satellite cells are important in aging and diseased muscle. The number of satellite cells is decreased due to the changing niche during ageing, resulting in attenuation of muscle regeneration capacity. Additionally, in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, the loss of satellite cell regenerative capacity and decreased satellite cell number due to continuous needs for satellite cells lead to progressive muscle weakness with chronic degeneration. Thus, it is necessary to replenish muscle satellite cells continuously. This review outlines recent findings regarding satellite cell heterogeneity, asymmetric division and molecular mechanisms in satellite cell self-renewal which is crucial for maintenance of satellite cells as a muscle stem cell pool throughout life. In addition, we discuss roles in the stem cell niche for satellite cell maintenance, as well as related cell therapies for approaching treatment of DMD. PMID:25364710

  8. Myogenic capacity of muscle progenitor cells from head and limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers, Mette A R; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M; Torensma, Ruurd; Von den Hoff, Johannes W

    2012-02-01

    The restoration of muscles in the soft palate of patients with cleft lip and/or palate is accompanied by fibrosis, which leads to speech and feeding problems. Treatment strategies that improve muscle regeneration have only been tested in limb muscles. Therefore, in the present study the myogenic potential of muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) isolated from head muscles was compared with that of limb muscles. Muscle progenitor cells were isolated from the head muscles and limb muscles of rats and cultured. The proliferation of MPCs was analysed by DNA quantification. The differentiation capacity was analysed by quantifying the numbers of fused cells, and by measuring the mRNA levels of differentiation markers. Muscle progenitor cells were stained to quantify the expression of paired box protein Pax 7 (Pax-7), myoblast determination protein 1 (MyoD), and myogenin. Proliferation was similar in the head MPCs and the limb MPCs. Differentiating head and limb MPCs showed a comparable number of fused cells and mRNA expression levels of myosin-1 (Myh1), myosin-3 (Myh3), and myosin-4 (Myh4). During proliferation and differentiation, the number of Pax-7(+), MyoD(+), and myogenin(+) cells in head and limb MPCs was equal. It was concluded that head and limb MPCs show similar myogenic capacities in vitro. Therefore, in vivo myogenic differences between those muscles might rely on the local microenvironment. Thus, regenerative strategies for limb muscles might also be used for head muscles.

  9. Cardiac stem cell aging and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cesselli, Daniela; Aleksova, Aneta; Mazzega, Elisa; Caragnano, Angela; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo

    2017-01-19

    A side effect of the medical improvements of the last centuries is the progressive aging of the world population, which is estimated to reach the impressive number of 2 billion people with more than 65 years by 2050. As a consequence, age-related diseases, such as heart failure, will affect more and more patients in the next years. To understand the biological bases of these diseases will be a crucial task in order to find better treatments, and possibly slow age-related morbidity and mortality. Cardiac stem cells have been at the center of a heated debate and their potential involvement in cardiac homeostasis has been questioned. In this review, we summarize evidence obtained by independent groups, on different animal models and humans, that strongly support the important role played by immature, cardiac resident cells in the cardioprotection against heart failure.

  10. Regenerative function of immune system: Modulation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasdeep; McPhee, Jamie S; Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2016-05-01

    Ageing is characterised by progressive deterioration of physiological systems and the loss of skeletal muscle mass is one of the most recognisable, leading to muscle weakness and mobility impairments. This review highlights interactions between the immune system and skeletal muscle stem cells (widely termed satellite cells or myoblasts) to influence satellite cell behaviour during muscle regeneration after injury, and outlines deficits associated with ageing. Resident neutrophils and macrophages in skeletal muscle become activated when muscle fibres are damaged via stimuli (e.g. contusions, strains, avulsions, hyperextensions, ruptures) and release high concentrations of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors into the microenvironment. These localised responses serve to attract additional immune cells which can reach in excess of 1×10(5) immune cell/mm(3) of skeletal muscle in order to orchestrate the repair process. T-cells have a delayed response, reaching peak activation roughly 4 days after the initial damage. The cytokines and growth factors released by activated T-cells play a key role in muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration, although the precise mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. T-cells in older people display limited ability to activate satellite cell proliferation and migration which is likely to contribute to insufficient muscle repair and, consequently, muscle wasting and weakness. If the factors released by T-cells to activate satellite cells can be identified, it may be possible to develop therapeutic agents to enhance muscle regeneration and reduce the impact of muscle wasting during ageing and disease.

  11. Bone marrow mesenchymal cells improve muscle function in a skeletal muscle re-injury model.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Bruno M; Baldanza, Marcelo R; Ribeiro, Karla C; Porto, Anderson; Peçanha, Ramon; Fortes, Fabio S A; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antonio C; Goldenberg, Regina C S; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury is the most common problem in orthopedic and sports medicine, and severe injury leads to fibrosis and muscle dysfunction. Conventional treatment for successive muscle injury is currently controversial, although new therapies, like cell therapy, seem to be promise. We developed a model of successive injuries in rat to evaluate the therapeutic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMC) injected directly into the injured muscle. Functional and histological assays were performed 14 and 28 days after the injury protocol by isometric tension recording and picrosirius/Hematoxilin & Eosin staining, respectively. We also evaluated the presence and the fate of BMMC on treated muscles; and muscle fiber regeneration. BMMC treatment increased maximal skeletal muscle contraction 14 and 28 days after muscle injury compared to non-treated group (4.5 ± 1.7 vs 2.5 ± 0.98 N/cm2, p<0.05 and 8.4 ± 2.3 vs. 5.7 ± 1.3 N/cm2, p<0.05 respectively). Furthermore, BMMC treatment increased muscle fiber cross-sectional area and the presence of mature muscle fiber 28 days after muscle injury. However, there was no difference in collagen deposition between groups. Immunoassays for cytoskeleton markers of skeletal and smooth muscle cells revealed an apparent integration of the BMMC within the muscle. These data suggest that BMMC transplantation accelerates and improves muscle function recovery in our extensive muscle re-injury model.

  12. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Cells Improve Muscle Function in a Skeletal Muscle Re-Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Karla C.; Porto, Anderson; Peçanha, Ramon; Fortes, Fabio S. A.; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antonio C.; Goldenberg, Regina C. S.; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury is the most common problem in orthopedic and sports medicine, and severe injury leads to fibrosis and muscle dysfunction. Conventional treatment for successive muscle injury is currently controversial, although new therapies, like cell therapy, seem to be promise. We developed a model of successive injuries in rat to evaluate the therapeutic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMC) injected directly into the injured muscle. Functional and histological assays were performed 14 and 28 days after the injury protocol by isometric tension recording and picrosirius/Hematoxilin & Eosin staining, respectively. We also evaluated the presence and the fate of BMMC on treated muscles; and muscle fiber regeneration. BMMC treatment increased maximal skeletal muscle contraction 14 and 28 days after muscle injury compared to non-treated group (4.5 ± 1.7 vs 2.5 ± 0.98 N/cm2, p<0.05 and 8.4 ± 2.3 vs. 5.7 ± 1.3 N/cm2, p<0.05 respectively). Furthermore, BMMC treatment increased muscle fiber cross-sectional area and the presence of mature muscle fiber 28 days after muscle injury. However, there was no difference in collagen deposition between groups. Immunoassays for cytoskeleton markers of skeletal and smooth muscle cells revealed an apparent integration of the BMMC within the muscle. These data suggest that BMMC transplantation accelerates and improves muscle function recovery in our extensive muscle re-injury model. PMID:26039243

  13. Smooth muscle differentiation in scleroderma fibroblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sappino, A. P.; Masouyé, I.; Saurat, J. H.; Gabbiani, G.

    1990-01-01

    Using antibodies to alpha-smooth muscle actin and desmin on paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissue sections, the authors demonstrate that fibroblastic cells of localized and systemic scleroderma lesions express features of smooth muscle differentiation. Eleven of eleven skin specimens of systemic sclerosis patients and two of four skin specimens of localized scleroderma displayed the presence of fibroblasts expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin, a cell population that predominated in areas of prominent collagen deposition. A similar fibroblastic phenotype was found in the esophagus, the liver, and the lung specimens obtained from four patients who died of progressive systemic sclerosis. Immunostaining for desmin, performed on adjacent tissue sections, demonstrated that a minority of these fibroblastic cells present in skin and visceral lesions contained this protein. The authors' observations indicate that scleroderma fibroblasts are phenotypically related to the stromal cells previously identified in hypertrophic scars, fibromatoses, and desmoplasia; they might provide novel criteria for the characterization of scleroderma lesions and help to identify the factors responsible for phenotypic modulations in fibroblastic cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1698026

  14. Robust conversion of marrow cells to skeletal muscle with formation of marrow-derived muscle cell colonies: A multifactorial process

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi, Mehrdad; Greer, Deborah A.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Demers, Delia A.; Dooner, Mark S.; Harpel, Jasha A.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2004-01-10

    Murine marrow cells are capable of repopulating skeletal muscle fibers. A point of concern has been the robustness of such conversions. We have investigated the impact of type of cell delivery, muscle injury, nature of delivered cell, and stem cell mobilizations on marrow to muscle conversion. We transplanted GFP transgenic marrow into irradiated C57BL/6 mice and then injured anterior tibialis muscle by cardiotoxin. One month after injury, sections were analyzed by standard and deconvolutional microscopy for expression of muscle and hematopietic markers. Irradiation was essential to conversion although whether by injury or induction of chimerism is not clear. Cardiotoxin and to a lesser extent PBS injected muscles showed significant number of GFP+ muscle fibers while uninjected muscles showed only rare GFP+ cells. Marrow conversion to muscle was increased by two cycles of G-CSF mobilization and to a lesser extent with G-CSF and steel or GM-CSF. Transplantation of female GFP to male C57 BL/6 and GFP to Rosa26 mice showed fusion of donor cells to recipient muscle. High numbers of donor derived muscle colonies and up to12 percent GFP positive muscle cells were seen after mobilization or direct injection. These levels of donor muscle chimerism approach levels which could be clinically significant in developing strategies for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In summary, the conversion of marrow to skeletal muscle cells is based on cell fusion and is critically dependent on injury. This conversion is also numerically significant and increases with mobilization.

  15. Human satellite cells: identification on human muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Boldrin, Luisa; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells, normally quiescent underneath the myofibre basal lamina, are skeletal muscle stem cells responsible for postnatal muscle growth, repair and regeneration. Since their scarcity and small size have limited study on transverse muscle sections, techniques to isolate individual myofibres, bearing their attendant satellite cells, were developed. Studies on mouse myofibres have generated much information on satellite cells, but the limited availability and small size of human muscle biopsies have hampered equivalent studies of satellite cells on human myofibres. Here, we identified satellite cells on fragments of human and mouse myofibres, using a method applicable to small muscle biopsies. PMID:22333991

  16. Combined selenium and vitamin C deficiency causes cell death in guinea pig skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kristina E; Motley, Amy K; May, James M; Burk, Raymond F

    2009-03-01

    Combined antioxidant deficiencies of selenium and vitamin E or vitamin E and vitamin C in guinea pigs result in clinical illness. We hypothesized that combined selenium and vitamin C deficiency would have clinical consequences because in vitro interactions of these antioxidant nutrients have been reported. Because guinea pigs are dependent on dietary vitamin C, weanling male guinea pigs were fed selenium-deficient or control diet for 15 weeks before imposing vitamin C deficiency. Four dietary groups were formed and studied 3 weeks later: controls, vitamin C deficient, selenium deficient, and doubly deficient. Deficiencies were confirmed by determinations of glutathione peroxidase activity and vitamin C concentration in liver and skeletal muscle. Plasma creatine phosphokinase activity and liver, kidney, heart, and quadriceps histopathology were determined. Doubly deficient animals had moderately severe skeletal muscle cell death as judged by histopathology and plasma creatine phosphokinase activity of 6630 +/- 4400 IU/L (control, 70 + or - 5; vitamin C deficient, 95 + or - 110; selenium deficient, 280 + or - 250). Liver, kidney, and heart histology was normal in all groups. Muscle alpha-tocopherol levels were not depressed in the doubly deficient group, but muscle F2 isoprostane concentrations were elevated in them and correlated with markers of cell death. We conclude that combining selenium and vitamin C deficiencies in the guinea pig causes cell death in skeletal muscle that is more severe than the injury caused by selenium deficiency. The elevation of muscle F2 isoprostanes is compatible with the cell death being caused by oxidative stress.

  17. Combined Selenium and Vitamin C Deficiency Causes Cell Death in Guinea Pig Skeletal Muscle1

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kristina E.; Motley, Amy K.; May, James M.; Burk, Raymond F.

    2009-01-01

    Combined antioxidant deficiencies of selenium and vitamin E or vitamin E and vitamin C in guinea pigs result in clinical illness. We hypothesized that combined selenium and vitamin C deficiency would have clinical consequences because in vitro interactions of these antioxidant nutrients have been reported. Since guinea pigs are dependent on dietary vitamin C, weanling male guinea pigs were fed selenium-deficient or control diet for 15 weeks prior to imposing vitamin C deficiency. Four dietary groups were formed and studied 3 weeks later: controls, vitamin C deficient, selenium deficient, and doubly deficient. Deficiencies were confirmed by determinations of glutathione peroxidase activity and vitamin C concentration in liver and skeletal muscle. Plasma creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activity and liver, kidney, heart, and quadriceps histopathology were determined. Doubly deficient animals had moderately severe skeletal muscle cell death as judged by histopathology and plasma CPK activity of 6630 ± 4400 IU/L (control 70 ± 5; vitamin C deficient 95 ± 110; selenium deficient 280 ± 250). Liver, kidney, and heart histology was normal in all groups. Muscle α-tocopherol levels were not depressed in the doubly deficient group but muscle F2 isoprostane concentrations were elevated in them and correlated with markers of cell death. We conclude that combining selenium and vitamin C deficiencies in the guinea pig causes cell death in skeletal muscle that is more severe than the injury caused by selenium deficiency. The elevation of muscle F2 isoprostanes is compatible with the cell death being caused by oxidative stress. PMID:19358936

  18. Hypoxia Enhances Differentiation of Hair Follicle-Associated-Pluripotent (HAP) Stem Cells to Cardiac-Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kyoumi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Yamazaki, Aiko; Tohgi, Natsuko; Aki, Ryoichi; Mii, Sumiyuki; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2017-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the neural stem-cell marker nestin is expressed in hair-follicle stem cells located in the bulge area which are termed hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. HAP stem cells from mouse and human could form spheres in culture, termed hair spheres, which are keratin 15-negative and nestin-positive and could differentiate to neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. Subsequently, we demonstrated that nestin-expressing stem cells could effect nerve and spinal cord regeneration in mouse models. Recently, we demonstrated that HAP stem cells differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells. We recently observed that isoproterenol directs HAP stem cells to differentiate to cardiac-muscle cells in large numbers in culture compared to HAP stem cells not supplemented with isoproterenol. The addition of activin A, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and basic fibroblast growth factor, along with isoproternal, induced the cardiac muscle cells to form tissue sheets of beating heart muscle cells. In the present study, we report that, under hypoxic conditions, HAP stem cells differentiated to troponin-positive cardiac-muscle cells at a higher rate that under normoxic conditions. Hypoxia did not influence the differentiation to other cell types. For future use of HAP stem cells for cardiac muscle regeneration, hypoxia should enhance the rate of differentiation thereby providing patients more opportunities to use their own HAP stem cells which are easily accessible, for this purpose. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 554-558, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Satellite cell proliferation in adult skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W. (Inventor); Thomason, Donald B. (Inventor); Morrison, Paul R. (Inventor); Stancel, George M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel methods of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for the in vivo corporation and stable expression of eukaryotic or prokaryotic foreign genes in tissues of living animals is described. More specifically, methods of incorporating foreign genes into mitotically active cells are disclosed. The constitutive and stable expression of E. coli .beta.-galactosidase gene under the promoter control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat is employed as a particularly preferred embodiment, by way of example, establishes the model upon which the incorporation of a foreign gene into a mitotically-active living eukaryotic tissue is based. Use of the described methods in therapeutic treatments for genetic diseases, such as those muscular degenerative diseases, is also presented. In muscle tissue, the described processes result in genetically-altered satellite cells which proliferate daughter myoblasts which preferentially fuse to form a single undamaged muscle fiber replacing damaged muscle tissue in a treated animal. The retroviral vector, by way of example, includes a dystrophin gene construct for use in treating muscular dystrophy. The present invention also comprises an experimental model utilizable in the study of the physiological regulation of skeletal muscle gene expression in intact animals.

  20. Stem cell populations in the heart and the role of Isl1 positive cells.

    PubMed

    Di Felice, V; Zummo, G

    2013-05-09

    Cardiac progenitor cells are multipotent stem cells isolated from both embryonic and adult hearts in several species and are able to differentiate at least into smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. The embryonic origin of these cells has not yet been demonstrated, but it has been suggested that these cells may derive from the first and secondary heart fields and from the neural crest. In the last decade, two diffe-rent populations of cardiac progenitor or stem cells have been identified and isolated, i.e., the Islet1 positive (Isl1+) and c-Kit positive (c-Kit+)/Stem Cell Antigen-1 positive (Sca-1+) cells. Until 2012, these two populations have been considered two separate entities with different roles and a different origin, but new evidence now suggests a con-nection between the two populations and that the two populations may represent two subpopulations of a unique pool of cardiac stem cells, derived from a common immature primitive cell. To find a common consensus on this concept is very important in furthe-ring the application of stem cells to cardiac tissue engineering.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cardiac Strain Pattern Following Transplantation of Human Tissue Engineered Heart Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xulei; Riegler, Johannes; Tiburcy, Malte; Zhao, Xin; Chour, Tony; Ndoye, Babacar; Nguyen, Michael; Adams, Jackson; Ameen, Mohamed; Denney, Thomas S.; Yang, Phillip C.; Nguyen, Patricia; Zimmermann, Wolfram H.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of tissue engineering approaches in combination with exogenously produced cardiomyocytes offers the potential to restore contractile function after myocardial injury. However, current techniques assessing changes in global cardiac performance following such treatments are plagued by relatively low detection ability. As the treatment is locally performed, this detection could be improved by myocardial strain imaging that measures regional contractility. Methods and Results Tissue engineered heart muscles (EHMs) were generated by casting human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes with collagen in preformed molds. EHMs were transplanted (n=12) to cover infarct and border zones of recipient rat hearts one month after ischemia reperfusion injury. A control group (n=10) received only sham placement of sutures without EHMs. To assess the efficacy of EHMs, MRI and ultrasound-based strain imaging were performed prior to and four weeks after transplantation. In addition to strain imaging, global cardiac performance was estimated from cardiac MRI. Although no significant differences were found with global changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) (Control −9.6±1.3% vs. EHM −6.2±1.9%, P=0.17), regional myocardial strain from tagged MRI was able to detect preserved systolic function in EHM-treated animals compared to control (Control 4.4±1.0% vs. EHM 1.0±0.6%, P=0.04). However, ultrasound-based strain failed to detect any significant change (Control 2.1±3.0% vs. EHM 6.3±2.9%, P=0.46). Conclusions This study highlights the feasibility of using cardiac strain from tagged MRI to assess functional changes in rat models due to localized regenerative therapies, which may not be detected by conventional measures of global systolic performance. PMID:27903535

  2. Muscle Satellite Cell Protein Teneurin-4 Regulates Differentiation During Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kana; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Mabuchi, Yo; Ito, Naoki; Kikura, Naomi; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2015-10-01

    Satellite cells are maintained in an undifferentiated quiescent state, but during muscle regeneration they acquire an activated stage, and initiate to proliferate and differentiate as myoblasts. The transmembrane protein teneurin-4 (Ten-4) is specifically expressed in the quiescent satellite cells; however, its cellular and molecular functions remain unknown. We therefore aimed to elucidate the function of Ten-4 in muscle satellite cells. In the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of Ten-4-deficient mice, the number and the size of myofibers, as well as the population of satellite cells, were reduced with/without induction of muscle regeneration. Furthermore, we found an accelerated activation of satellite cells in the regenerated Ten-4-deficient TA muscle. The cell culture analysis using primary satellite cells showed that Ten-4 suppressed the progression of myogenic differentiation. Together, our findings revealed that Ten-4 functions as a crucial player in maintaining the quiescence of muscle satellite cells.

  3. Calcium versus strontium handling by the heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Hendrych, Michal; Olejnickova, Veronika; Novakova, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role in numerous processes in living systems, from both intracellular and intercellular signalling to blood clotting. Calcium can be replaced by strontium in various intracellular processes due to high level of their similarity and strontium thus may serve as a valuable tool for different experimental studies. On the other hand, strontium is also used in clinical medicine and is commonly taken to the human body with food and water. The negative cardiac side effects of strontium therapy of osteoporosis and bone metastases are well known, but still not fully explained. This fact explains enhanced interest in this element and its impact on human body. This article reviews effects of calcium and strontium on several biochemical and physiological processes, with special emphasis on cardiac muscle.

  4. Aerobic training attenuates nicotinic acethylcholine receptor changes in the diaphragm muscle during heart failure.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Paula Aiello Tomé; de Souza, Rodrigo Wagner Alves; Soares, Luana Campos; Piedade, Warlen Pereira; Campos, Dijon Henrique S; Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Okoshi, Katashi; Cicogna, Antônio Carlos; Matheus, Selma Maria Michelin; Dal-Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2015-07-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a progressive myopathy, with clinical signs of fatigue and limb weakness that can damage the nerve-muscle interaction, altering synaptic transmission and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) in neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The diaphragm is composed of a mixed proportion of muscle fibres, and during HF, this muscle becomes slower and can alter its function. As exercise training is an accepted practice to minimise abnormalities of skeletal muscle during HF, in this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that aerobic training attenuates alterations in the expression of nAChR subunits in NMJs diaphragm during heart failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution and expression of nAChR subunits in the diaphragm muscle fibres of rats subjected to an aerobic training programme during HF. Control (Sham), control training (ShamTR), aortic stenosis (AS) and aortic stenosis training (ASTR) groups were evaluated. The expression of nAChR subunits (γ, α1, ε, β1 and δ) was determined by qRT-PCR, and NMJs were analysed using confocal microscopy. We observed increased expression of the γ, α1 and β1 subunits in the AS group compared with the ASTR group. The distribution of NMJs was modulated in these groups. HF alters the mRNA expression of nAChR subunits and the structural characteristics of diaphragm NMJs. In addition, aerobic training did not alter NMJs morphology but attenuated the alterations in heart structure and function and in nAChR subunit mRNA expression. Our findings demonstrate the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise training in maintaining the integrity of the neuromuscular system in the diaphragm muscle during HF and may be critical for non-pharmacological therapy to improve the quality of life for patients with this syndrome.

  5. Direct and indirect assessment of skeletal muscle blood flow in chronic congestive heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    LeJemtel, T.H.; Scortichini, D.; Katz, S.

    1988-09-09

    In patients with chronic congestive heart failure (CHF), skeletal muscle blood flow can be measured directly by the continuous thermodilution technique and by the xenon-133 clearance method. The continuous thermodilution technique requires retrograde catheterization of the femoral vein and, thus, cannot be repeated conveniently in patients during evaluation of pharmacologic interventions. The xenon-133 clearance, which requires only an intramuscular injection, allows repeated determination of skeletal muscle blood flow. In patients with severe CHF, a fixed capacity of the skeletal muscle vasculature to dilate appears to limit maximal exercise performance. Moreover, the changes in peak skeletal muscle blood flow noted during long-term administration of captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, appears to correlate with the changes in aerobic capacity. In patients with CHF, resting supine deep femoral vein oxygen content can be used as an indirect measurement of resting skeletal muscle blood flow. The absence of a steady state complicates the determination of peak skeletal muscle blood flow reached during graded bicycle or treadmill exercise in patients with chronic CHF. Indirect assessments of skeletal muscle blood flow and metabolism during exercise performed at submaximal work loads are currently developed in patients with chronic CHF.

  6. Meat Science and Muscle Biology Symposium: stem cell niche and postnatal muscle growth.

    PubMed

    Bi, P; Kuang, S

    2012-03-01

    Stem cell niche plays a critical role in regulating the behavior and function of adult stem cells that underlie tissue growth, maintenance, and regeneration. In the skeletal muscle, stem cells, called satellite cells, contribute to postnatal muscle growth and hypertrophy, and thus, meat production in agricultural animals. Satellite cells are located adjacent to mature muscle fibers underneath a sheath of basal lamina. Microenvironmental signals from extracellular matrix mediated by the basal lamina and from the host myofiber both impinge on satellite cells to regulate their activity. Furthermore, several types of muscle interstitial cells, including intramuscular preadipocytes and connective tissue fibroblasts, have recently been shown to interact with satellite cells and actively regulate the growth and regeneration of postnatal skeletal muscles. From this regard, interstitial adipogenic cells are not only important for marbling and meat quality, but also represent an additional cellular component of the satellite cell niche. At the molecular level, these interstitial cells may interact with satellite cells through cell surface ligands, such as delta-like 1 homolog (Dlk1) protein whose overexpression is thought to be responsible for muscle hypertrophy in callipyge sheep. In fact, extracellular Dlk1 protein has been shown to promote the myogenic differentiation of satellite cells. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms within the stem cell niche that regulate satellite cell differentiation and maintain muscle homeostasis may lead to promising approaches to optimizing muscle growth and composition, thus improving meat production and quality.

  7. Catechins activate muscle stem cells by Myf5 induction and stimulate muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, A Rum; Kim, Kyung Min; Byun, Mi Ran; Hwang, Jun-Ha; Park, Jung Il; Oh, Ho Taek; Kim, Hyo Kyeong; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2017-07-22

    Muscle weakness is one of the most common symptoms in aged individuals and increases risk of mortality. Thus, maintenance of muscle mass is important for inhibiting aging. In this study, we investigated the effect of catechins, polyphenol compounds in green tea, on muscle regeneration. We found that (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) activate satellite cells by induction of Myf5 transcription factors. For satellite cell activation, Akt kinase was significantly induced after ECG treatment and ECG-induced satellite cell activation was blocked in the presence of Akt inhibitor. ECG also promotes myogenic differentiation through the induction of myogenic markers, including Myogenin and Muscle creatine kinase (MCK), in satellite and C2C12 myoblast cells. Finally, EGCG administration to mice significantly increased muscle fiber size for regeneration. Taken together, the results suggest that catechins stimulate muscle stem cell activation and differentiation for muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ionic contrast terahertz time resolved imaging of frog auricular heart muscle electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Sauviat, Martin-Pierre; Gallot, Guilhem

    2006-10-01

    The authors demonstrate the direct, noninvasive and time resolved imaging of functional frog auricular fibers by ionic contrast terahertz (ICT) near field microscopy. This technique provides quantitative, time-dependent measurement of ionic flow during auricular muscle electrical activity, and opens the way of direct noninvasive imaging of cardiac activity under stimulation. ICT microscopy technique was associated with full three-dimensional simulation enabling to measure precisely the fiber sizes. This technique coupled to waveguide technology should provide the grounds to development of advanced in vivo ion flux measurement in mammalian hearts, allowing the prediction of heart attack from change in K+ fluxes.

  9. Muscle disuse atrophy is not accompanied by changes in skeletal muscle satellite cell content.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Tim; Wall, Benjamin T; Dirks, Marlou L; Senden, Joan M G; Hartgens, Fred; Dolmans, John; Losen, Mario; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C

    2014-04-01

    Muscle disuse leads to a considerable loss in skeletal muscle mass and strength. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying disuse-induced muscle fibre atrophy remain to be elucidated. Therefore we assessed the effect of muscle disuse on the CSA (cross-sectional area), muscle fibre size, satellite cell content and associated myocellular signalling pathways of the quadriceps muscle. A total of 12 healthy young (24±1 years of age) men were subjected to 2 weeks of one-legged knee immobilization via a full-leg cast. Before and immediately after the immobilization period and after 6 weeks of natural rehabilitation, muscle strength [1RM (one-repetition maximum)], muscle CSA [single slice CT (computed tomography) scan] and muscle fibre type characteristics (muscle biopsies) were assessed. Protein and/or mRNA expression of key genes [i.e. MYOD (myogenic differentiation), MYOG (myogenin) and MSTN (myostatin)] in the satellite cell regulatory pathways were determined using Western blotting and RT-PCR (real-time PCR) analyses respectively. The present study found that quadriceps CSA declined following immobilization by 8±2% (P<0.05). In agreement, both type I and type II muscle fibre size decreased 7±3% and 13±4% respectively (P<0.05). No changes were observed in satellite cell content following immobilization in either type I or type II muscle fibres. Muscle MYOG mRNA expression doubled (P<0.05), whereas MSTN protein expression decreased 30±9% (P<0.05) following immobilization. Muscle mass and strength returned to the baseline values within 6 weeks of recovery without any specific rehabilitative programme. In conclusion, 2 weeks of muscle disuse leads to considerable loss in skeletal muscle mass and strength. The loss in muscle mass was attributed to both type I and type II muscle fibre atrophy, and was not accompanied by a decline in satellite cell content.

  10. An early post-traumatic reaction of lymph-heart striated muscle fibers in adult frog Rana temporaria during the first postoperative week: An electron microscopic and autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Krylova, Marina I; Bogolyubov, Dmitry S

    2015-12-01

    According to the current opinion, lymph-heart striated muscle represents a specialized type of skeletal muscles in frogs. Here, we studied muscle fibers in mechanically damaged lymph hearts during the first postoperative week using electron-microscopic autoradiography. We present evidence that both, the satellite cells and pre-existing muscle fibers bordering the site of injury, contribute directly to the lymph-heart muscle regeneration. Several muscle fibers located in the vicinity of the damaged area displayed features of nuclear and sarcoplasmic activation. We also observed ultrastructural changes indicating activation of a few satellite cells, namely decondensation of chromatin, enlargement of nuclei and nucleoli, appearance of free ribosomes and rough endoplasmic reticulum tubules in the cytoplasm. Electron-microscopic autoradiography showed that 4 h after single (3)H-thymidine administration on the seventh day after injury not only the activated satellite cells, but also some nuclei of myofibers bordering the injured zone are labeled. We showed that both, the myonuclei of fibers displaying the signs of degenerative/reparative processes in the sarcoplasm and the myonuclei of the fibers enriched with highly organized myofibrils, can re-enter into the S-phase. Our results indicate that the nuclei of lymph-heart myofibers can reactivate DNA synthesis during regenerative myogenesis, unlike the situation in regenerating frog skeletal muscle where myogenic cells do not synthesize DNA at the onset of myofibrillogenesis.

  11. Muscle side population cells from dystrophic or injured muscle adopt a fibro-adipogenic fate.

    PubMed

    Penton, Christopher M; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Johnson, Eric K; McAllister, Cynthia; Montanaro, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Muscle side population (SP) cells are rare multipotent stem cells that can participate in myogenesis and muscle regeneration upon transplantation. While they have been primarily studied for the development of cell-based therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, little is known regarding their non-muscle lineage choices or whether the dystrophic muscle environment affects their ability to repair muscle. Unfortunately, the study of muscle SP cells has been challenged by their low abundance and the absence of specific SP cell markers. To address these issues, we developed culture conditions for the propagation and spontaneous multi-lineage differentiation of muscle SP cells. Using this approach, we show that SP cells from wild type muscle robustly differentiate into satellite cells and form myotubes without requiring co-culture with myogenic cells. Furthermore, this myogenic activity is associated with SP cells negative for immune (CD45) and vascular (CD31) markers but positive for Pax7, Sca1, and the mesenchymal progenitor marker PDGFRα. Additionally, our studies revealed that SP cells isolated from dystrophic or cardiotoxin-injured muscle fail to undergo myogenesis. Instead, these SP cells rapidly expand giving rise to fibroblast and adipocyte progenitors (FAPs) and to their differentiated progeny, fibroblasts and adipocytes. Our findings indicate that muscle damage affects the lineage choices of muscle SP cells, promoting their differentiation along fibro-adipogenic lineages while inhibiting myogenesis. These results have implications for a possible role of muscle SP cells in fibrosis and fat deposition in muscular dystrophy. In addition, our studies provide a useful in vitro system to analyze SP cell biology in both normal and pathological conditions.

  12. [Evaluation of heart impact in the 100 m extreme intensity sport using near-infrared non-invasive muscle oxygen detecting device and sports heart rate detection technology].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Yong; Long, Fei-Xiao; Fu, Lan-Ying; Li, Yue; Ding, Hai-Shu; Qu, An-Lian; Zhou, Xiao-Ping

    2010-02-01

    Using continuous two wavelength near-infrared technology to detect the variation in the consistency of oxygen hemoglobin in the muscle and the sports heart rate wireless real time collection technology, we devised the real time muscle tissue oxygenation and instantaneous heart rate experiment scheme and implemented it for the process of the 100 m run with two parameters given simultaneously. The experiment shows that the concentration of the oxygen hemoglobin in the muscle tissue continues decreasing after the end of the 100 m run, and the time interval between the moment when the concentration of the oxygen hemoglobin attains the minimum value and the moment when the athletes finish the 100 m run is (6.65 +/- 1.10) sec; while the heart rate continues increasing after the end of the 100 m run, and the time interval between the moment when the heart rate attains the maximum value and the moment when the athletes finish the 100 m run is (8.00 +/- 1.57) sec. The results show that the two wavelength near-infrared tissue oxygenation detection technology and the sports heart rate real time collection equipment can accurately measure the sports tissue oxygenation and the heart rate in the extreme intensity sport, and reveal the process of muscle oxygen transportation and consumption and its dynamic character with the heart rate in the extreme intensity sport.

  13. [Computer simulation programs as an alternative for classical nerve, muscle and heart experiments using frog tissues].

    PubMed

    Breves, G; Schröder, B

    2000-03-01

    Courses in Physiology include different methodical approaches such as exercises with living animals, experiments using organs or tissues from killed or slaughtered animals, application of diagnostic techniques in humans and theoretical seminars. In addition to these classical approaches computer programs for multimedia simulation of nerve, muscle and heart physiology are now a regular component of courses in Physiology at the School of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover. It is the aim of the present paper to give the first experiences about these new components.

  14. The effect of the muscle environment on the regenerative capacity of human skeletal muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jinhong; Bencze, Maximilien; Asfahani, Rowan; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Muscle stem cell transplantation is a possible treatment for muscular dystrophy. In addition to the intrinsic properties of the stem cells, the local and systemic environment plays an important role in determining the fate of the grafted cells. We therefore investigated the effect of modulating the host muscle environment in different ways (irradiation or cryoinjury or a combination of irradiation and cryoinjury) in two immunodeficient mouse strains (mdx nude and recombinase-activating gene (Rag)2-/γ chain-/C5-) on the regenerative capacity of two types of human skeletal muscle-derived stem cell (pericytes and CD133+ cells). Human skeletal muscle-derived pericytes or CD133+ cells were transplanted into muscles of either mdx nude or recombinase-activating gene (Rag)2-/γ chain-/C5- host mice. Host muscles were modulated prior to donor cell transplantation by either irradiation, or cryoinjury, or a combination of irradiation and cryoinjury. Muscles were analysed four weeks after transplantation, by staining transverse cryostat sections of grafted muscles with antibodies to human lamin A/C, human spectrin, laminin and Pax 7. The number of nuclei and muscle fibres of donor origin and the number of satellite cells of both host and donor origin were quantified. Within both host strains transplanted intra-muscularly with both donor cell types, there were significantly more nuclei and muscle fibres of donor origin in host muscles that had been modulated by cryoinjury, or irradiation+cryoinjury, than by irradiation alone. Irradiation has no additive effects in further enhancing the transplantation efficiency than cryodamage. Donor pericytes did not give rise to satellite cells. However, using CD133+ cells as donor cells, there were significantly more nuclei, muscle fibres, as well as satellite cells of donor origin in Rag2-/γ chain-/C5- mice than mdx nude mice, when the muscles were injured by either cryodamage or irradiation+cryodamage. Rag2-/γ chain-/C5- mice are a

  15. Drosophila small heat shock protein CryAB ensures structural integrity of developing muscles, and proper muscle and heart performance.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Inga; Jabłońska, Jadwiga; Zmojdzian, Monika; Taghli-Lamallem, Ouarda; Renaud, Yoan; Junion, Guillaume; Daczewska, Malgorzata; Huelsmann, Sven; Jagla, Krzysztof; Jagla, Teresa

    2015-03-01

    Molecular chaperones, such as the small heat shock proteins (sHsps), maintain normal cellular function by controlling protein homeostasis in stress conditions. However, sHsps are not only activated in response to environmental insults, but also exert developmental and tissue-specific functions that are much less known. Here, we show that during normal development the Drosophila sHsp CryAB [L(2)efl] is specifically expressed in larval body wall muscles and accumulates at the level of Z-bands and around myonuclei. CryAB features a conserved actin-binding domain and, when attenuated, leads to clustering of myonuclei and an altered pattern of sarcomeric actin and the Z-band-associated actin crosslinker Cheerio (filamin). Our data suggest that CryAB and Cheerio form a complex essential for muscle integrity: CryAB colocalizes with Cheerio and, as revealed by mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation experiments, binds to Cheerio, and the muscle-specific attenuation of cheerio leads to CryAB-like sarcomeric phenotypes. Furthermore, muscle-targeted expression of CryAB(R120G), which carries a mutation associated with desmin-related myopathy (DRM), results in an altered sarcomeric actin pattern, in affected myofibrillar integrity and in Z-band breaks, leading to reduced muscle performance and to marked cardiac arrhythmia. Taken together, we demonstrate that CryAB ensures myofibrillar integrity in Drosophila muscles during development and propose that it does so by interacting with the actin crosslinker Cheerio. The evidence that a DRM-causing mutation affects CryAB muscle function and leads to DRM-like phenotypes in the fly reveals a conserved stress-independent role of CryAB in maintaining muscle cell cytoarchitecture.

  16. Transplantation of multipotent Isl1+ cardiac progenitor cells preserves infarcted heart function in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunpeng; Tian, Shuo; Lei, Ienglam; Liu, Liu; Ma, Peter; Wang, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Cell-based cardiac therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy to restore heart function after myocardial infarction (MI). However, the cell type selection and ensuing effects remain controversial. Here, we intramyocardially injected Isl1+ cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) derived from EGFP/luciferase double-tagged mouse embryonic stem (dt-mES) cells with vehicle (fibrin gel) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) into the infarcted area in nude mice to assess the contribution of CPCs to the recovery of cardiac function post-MI. Our results showed that Isl1+ CPCs differentiated normally into three cardiac lineages (cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells) both on cell culture plates and in fibrin gel. Cell retention was significantly increased when the transplanted cells were injected with vehicle. Importantly, 28 days after injection, CPCs were observed to differentiate into CMs within the infarcted area. Moreover, numerous CD31+ endothelial cells derived from endogenous revascularization and differentiation of the injected CPCs were detected. SMMHC-, Ki67- and CX-43-positive cells were identified in the injected CPC population, further demonstrating the proliferation, differentiation and integration of the transplanted CPCs in host cells. Furthermore, animal hearts injected with CPCs showed increased angiogenesis, decreased infarct size, and improved heart function. In conclusion, our studies showed that Isl1+ CPCs, when combined with a suitable vehicle, can produce notable therapeutic effects in the infarcted heart, suggesting that CPCs might be an ideal cell source for cardiac therapy.

  17. Transplantation of multipotent Isl1+ cardiac progenitor cells preserves infarcted heart function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunpeng; Tian, Shuo; Lei, Ienglam; Liu, Liu; Ma, Peter; Wang, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Cell-based cardiac therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy to restore heart function after myocardial infarction (MI). However, the cell type selection and ensuing effects remain controversial. Here, we intramyocardially injected Isl1+ cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) derived from EGFP/luciferase double-tagged mouse embryonic stem (dt-mES) cells with vehicle (fibrin gel) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) into the infarcted area in nude mice to assess the contribution of CPCs to the recovery of cardiac function post-MI. Our results showed that Isl1+ CPCs differentiated normally into three cardiac lineages (cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells) both on cell culture plates and in fibrin gel. Cell retention was significantly increased when the transplanted cells were injected with vehicle. Importantly, 28 days after injection, CPCs were observed to differentiate into CMs within the infarcted area. Moreover, numerous CD31+ endothelial cells derived from endogenous revascularization and differentiation of the injected CPCs were detected. SMMHC-, Ki67- and CX-43-positive cells were identified in the injected CPC population, further demonstrating the proliferation, differentiation and integration of the transplanted CPCs in host cells. Furthermore, animal hearts injected with CPCs showed increased angiogenesis, decreased infarct size, and improved heart function. In conclusion, our studies showed that Isl1+ CPCs, when combined with a suitable vehicle, can produce notable therapeutic effects in the infarcted heart, suggesting that CPCs might be an ideal cell source for cardiac therapy. PMID:28386378

  18. Endurance training induces fiber type-specific revascularization in hindlimb skeletal muscles of rats with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Kamal; Ardakanizade, Malihe; Nazem, Farzad

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies showed that skeletal muscle microcirculation was reduced in chronic heart failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of endurance training on capillary and arteriolar density of fast and slow twitch muscles in rats with chronic heart failure. Four weeks after surgeries (left anterior descending (LAD) artery occlusion), chronic heart failure rats were divided into 3 groups: Sham (Sham, n=10); Sedentary (Sed, n=10); Exercise training (Ex, n=10). Ex group rats were subjected to endurance training in the form of treadmill running with moderate intensity for 10 weeks. Exercise training significantly increased capillary density and capillary to fiber ratio (P<0.05) in slow twitch muscle, but didn't change fast twitch muscle capillary density and capillary to fiber ratio. Furthermore, arteriolar density in fast twitch muscle increased remarkably (P<0.05) in response to training, but slow twitch muscle arteriolar density did not change in response to exercise in chronic heart failure rats. HIF-1 increased (P<0.01) but VEGF and FGF-2 mRNA did not change in slow twitch muscle after training. In fast twitch muscle, HIF-1 mRNA increased (P<0.05), and VEGF and angiostatin decreased (P<0.01) significantly after training. Endurance training ameliorates fast and slow twitch muscle revascularization non-uniformly in chronic heart failure rats by increasing capillary density in slow twitch muscle and arteriolar density in fast twitch muscle. The difference in revascularization at slow and fast twitch muscles may be induced by the difference in angiogenic and angiostatic gene expression response to endurance training.

  19. Endurance training induces fiber type-specific revascularization in hindlimb skeletal muscles of rats with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Kamal; Ardakanizade, Malihe; Nazem, Farzad

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Previous studies showed that skeletal muscle microcirculation was reduced in chronic heart failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of endurance training on capillary and arteriolar density of fast and slow twitch muscles in rats with chronic heart failure. Materials and Methods: Four weeks after surgeries (left anterior descending (LAD) artery occlusion), chronic heart failure rats were divided into 3 groups: Sham (Sham, n=10); Sedentary (Sed, n=10); Exercise training (Ex, n=10). Ex group rats were subjected to endurance training in the form of treadmill running with moderate intensity for 10 weeks. Results: Exercise training significantly increased capillary density and capillary to fiber ratio (P<0.05) in slow twitch muscle, but didn’t change fast twitch muscle capillary density and capillary to fiber ratio. Furthermore, arteriolar density in fast twitch muscle increased remarkably (P<0.05) in response to training, but slow twitch muscle arteriolar density did not change in response to exercise in chronic heart failure rats. HIF-1 increased (P<0.01) but VEGF and FGF-2 mRNA did not change in slow twitch muscle after training. In fast twitch muscle, HIF-1 mRNA increased (P<0.05), and VEGF and angiostatin decreased (P<0.01) significantly after training. Conclusion: Endurance training ameliorates fast and slow twitch muscle revascularization non-uniformly in chronic heart failure rats by increasing capillary density in slow twitch muscle and arteriolar density in fast twitch muscle. The difference in revascularization at slow and fast twitch muscles may be induced by the difference in angiogenic and angiostatic gene expression response to endurance training. PMID:28133530

  20. Resveratrol improves exercise performance and skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sung, Miranda M; Byrne, Nikole J; Robertson, Ian M; Kim, Ty T; Samokhvalov, Victor; Levasseur, Jody; Soltys, Carrie-Lynn; Fung, David; Tyreman, Neil; Denou, Emmanuel; Jones, Kelvin E; Seubert, John M; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Dyck, Jason R B

    2017-04-01

    We investigated whether treatment of mice with established pressure overload-induced heart failure (HF) with the naturally occurring polyphenol resveratrol could improve functional symptoms of clinical HF such as fatigue and exercise intolerance. C57Bl/6N mice were subjected to either sham or transverse aortic constriction surgery to induce HF. Three weeks postsurgery, a cohort of mice with established HF (%ejection fraction <45) was administered resveratrol (~450 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or vehicle for 2 wk. Although the percent ejection fraction was similar between both groups of HF mice, those mice treated with resveratrol had increased total physical activity levels and exercise capacity. Resveratrol treatment was associated with altered gut microbiota composition, increased skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, a switch toward greater whole body glucose utilization, and increased basal metabolic rates. Although muscle mass and strength were not different between groups, mice with HF had significant declines in basal and ADP-stimulated O2 consumption in isolated skeletal muscle fibers compared with sham mice, which was completely normalized by resveratrol treatment. Overall, resveratrol treatment of mice with established HF enhances exercise performance, which is associated with alterations in whole body and skeletal muscle energy metabolism. Thus, our preclinical data suggest that resveratrol supplementation may effectively improve fatigue and exercise intolerance in HF patients.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Resveratrol treatment of mice with heart failure leads to enhanced exercise performance that is associated with altered gut microbiota composition, increased whole body glucose utilization, and enhanced skeletal muscle metabolism and function. Together, these preclinical data suggest that resveratrol supplementation may effectively improve fatigue and exercise intolerance in heart failure via these mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Fat cell invasion in long-term denervated skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    de Castro Rodrigues, Antonio; Andreo, Jesus Carlos; Rosa, Geraldo Marco; dos Santos, Nícolas Bertolaccini; Moraes, Luis Henrique Rapucci; Lauris, José Roberto P

    2007-01-01

    There are several differences between red and white muscles submitted to different experimental conditions, especially following denervation: a) denervation atrophy is more pronounced in red than white muscles; b) the size of the fibers in the red muscles does not vary between different parts of the muscle before and after denervation, when compared to white muscles; c) the regional difference in the white muscles initially more pronounced after denervation than red muscle; d) red muscle fibers and fibers of the deep white muscle present degenerative changes such as disordered myofibrils and sarcolemmal folds after long-term denervation; e) myotube-like fibers with central nuclei occur in the red muscle more rapidly than white after denervation. Denervation of skeletal muscles causes, in addition to fibers atrophy, loss of fibers with subsequent regeneration, but the extent of fat cell percentage invasion is currently unknown. The present article describes a quantitative study on fat cell invasion percentage in red m. soleus and white m. extensor digitorum longus (EDL) rat muscles at 7 weeks for up to 32 weeks postdenervation. The results indicate that the percentage of fat cells increase after denervation and it is steeper than the age-related fat invasion in normal muscles. The fat percentage invasion is more pronounced in red compared with white muscle. All experimental groups present a statistically significant difference as regard fat cell percentage invasion.

  2. Abcg2 labels multiple cell types in skeletal muscle and participates in muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Michelle J.; Zhou, Sheng; Tanaka, Kathleen Kelly; Pisconti, Addolorata; Farina, Nicholas H.; Sorrentino, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contains progenitor cells (satellite cells) that maintain and repair muscle. It also contains muscle side population (SP) cells, which express Abcg2 and may participate in muscle regeneration or may represent a source of satellite cell replenishment. In Abcg2-null mice, the SP fraction is lost in skeletal muscle, although the significance of this loss was previously unknown. We show that cells expressing Abcg2 increased upon injury and that muscle regeneration was impaired in Abcg2-null mice, resulting in fewer centrally nucleated myofibers, reduced myofiber size, and fewer satellite cells. Additionally, using genetic lineage tracing, we demonstrate that the progeny of Abcg2-expressing cells contributed to multiple cell types within the muscle interstitium, primarily endothelial cells. After injury, Abcg2 progeny made a minor contribution to regenerated myofibers. Furthermore, Abcg2-labeled cells increased significantly upon injury and appeared to traffic to muscle from peripheral blood. Together, these data suggest an important role for Abcg2 in positively regulating skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:21949413

  3. Tissue-specific changes in fatty acid oxidation in hypoxic heart and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Morash, Andrea J; Kotwica, Aleksandra O; Murray, Andrew J

    2013-09-01

    Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia is sufficient to decrease cardiac PCr/ATP and alters skeletal muscle energetics in humans. Cellular mechanisms underlying the different metabolic responses of these tissues and the time-dependent nature of these changes are currently unknown, but altered substrate utilization and mitochondrial function may be a contributory factor. We therefore sought to investigate the effects of acute (1 day) and more sustained (7 days) hypoxia (13% O₂) on the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and its targets in mouse cardiac and skeletal muscle. In the heart, PPARα expression was 40% higher than in normoxia after 1 and 7 days of hypoxia. Activities of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD) were 75% and 35% lower, respectively, after 1 day of hypoxia, returning to normoxic levels after 7 days. Oxidative phosphorylation respiration rates using palmitoyl-carnitine followed a similar pattern, while respiration using pyruvate decreased. In skeletal muscle, PPARα expression and CPT I activity were 20% and 65% lower, respectively, after 1 day of hypoxia, remaining at this level after 7 days with no change in HOAD activity. Oxidative phosphorylation respiration rates using palmitoyl-carnitine were lower in skeletal muscle throughout hypoxia, while respiration using pyruvate remained unchanged. The rate of CO₂ production from palmitate oxidation was significantly lower in both tissues throughout hypoxia. Thus cardiac muscle may remain reliant on fatty acids during sustained hypoxia, while skeletal muscle decreases fatty acid oxidation and maintains pyruvate oxidation.

  4. Tissue-specific changes in fatty acid oxidation in hypoxic heart and skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kotwica, Aleksandra O.; Murray, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia is sufficient to decrease cardiac PCr/ATP and alters skeletal muscle energetics in humans. Cellular mechanisms underlying the different metabolic responses of these tissues and the time-dependent nature of these changes are currently unknown, but altered substrate utilization and mitochondrial function may be a contributory factor. We therefore sought to investigate the effects of acute (1 day) and more sustained (7 days) hypoxia (13% O2) on the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and its targets in mouse cardiac and skeletal muscle. In the heart, PPARα expression was 40% higher than in normoxia after 1 and 7 days of hypoxia. Activities of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD) were 75% and 35% lower, respectively, after 1 day of hypoxia, returning to normoxic levels after 7 days. Oxidative phosphorylation respiration rates using palmitoyl-carnitine followed a similar pattern, while respiration using pyruvate decreased. In skeletal muscle, PPARα expression and CPT I activity were 20% and 65% lower, respectively, after 1 day of hypoxia, remaining at this level after 7 days with no change in HOAD activity. Oxidative phosphorylation respiration rates using palmitoyl-carnitine were lower in skeletal muscle throughout hypoxia, while respiration using pyruvate remained unchanged. The rate of CO2 production from palmitate oxidation was significantly lower in both tissues throughout hypoxia. Thus cardiac muscle may remain reliant on fatty acids during sustained hypoxia, while skeletal muscle decreases fatty acid oxidation and maintains pyruvate oxidation. PMID:23785078

  5. Mast Cell-Airway Smooth Muscle Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Davinder; Doe, Camille; Woodman, Lucy; Heidi Wan, Wing-Yan; Sutcliffe, Amanda; Hollins, Fay

    2012-01-01

    Background: The mast cell localization to airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundle in asthma is important in the development of disordered airway physiology. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is expressed by airway structural cells. Whether it has a role in the crosstalk between these cells is uncertain. We sought to define TSLP expression in bronchial tissue across the spectrum of asthma severity and to investigate the TSLP and TSLP receptor (TSLPR) expression and function by primary ASM and mast cells alone and in coculture. Methods: TSLP expression was assessed in bronchial tissue from 18 subjects with mild to moderate asthma, 12 with severe disease, and nine healthy control subjects. TSLP and TSLPR expression in primary mast cells and ASM was assessed by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and its function was assessed by calcium imaging. The role of TSLP in mast cell and ASM proliferation, survival, differentiation, synthetic function, and contraction was examined. Results: TSLP expression was increased in the ASM bundle in mild-moderate disease. TSLP and TSLPR were expressed by mast cells and ASM and were functional. Mast cell activation by TSLP increased the production of a broad range of chemokines and cytokines, but did not affect mast cell or ASM proliferation, survival, or contraction. Conclusions: TSLP expression by the bronchial epithelium and ASM was upregulated in asthma. TSLP promoted mast cell synthetic function, but did not contribute to other functional consequences of mast cell-ASM crosstalk. PMID:22052771

  6. Muscle metaboreflex-induced coronary vasoconstriction limits ventricular contractility during dynamic exercise in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Coutsos, Matthew; Sala-Mercado, Javier A.; Ichinose, Masashi; Li, ZhenHua; Dawe, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    Muscle metaboreflex activation (MMA) during dynamic exercise increases cardiac work and myocardial O2 demand via increases in heart rate, ventricular contractility, and afterload. This increase in cardiac work should lead to metabolic coronary vasodilation; however, no change in coronary vascular conductance occurs. This indicates that the MMA-induced increase in sympathetic activity to the heart, which raises heart rate, ventricular contractility, and cardiac output, also elicits coronary vasoconstriction. In heart failure, cardiac output does not increase with MMA presumably due to impaired ability to improve left ventricular contractility. In this setting actual coronary vasoconstriction is observed. We tested whether this coronary vasoconstriction could explain, in part, the reduced ability to increase cardiac performance during MMA. In conscious, chronically instrumented dogs before and after pacing-induced heart failure, MMA responses during mild exercise were observed before and after α1-adrenergic blockade (prazosin 20–50 μg/kg). During MMA, the increases in coronary vascular conductance, coronary blood flow, maximal rate of left ventricular pressure change, and cardiac output were significantly greater after α1-adrenergic blockade. We conclude that in subjects with heart failure, coronary vasoconstriction during MMA limits the ability to increase left ventricular contractility. PMID:23355344

  7. Muscle metaboreflex-induced coronary vasoconstriction limits ventricular contractility during dynamic exercise in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Coutsos, Matthew; Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Ichinose, Masashi; Li, Zhenhua; Dawe, Elizabeth J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2013-04-01

    Muscle metaboreflex activation (MMA) during dynamic exercise increases cardiac work and myocardial O2 demand via increases in heart rate, ventricular contractility, and afterload. This increase in cardiac work should lead to metabolic coronary vasodilation; however, no change in coronary vascular conductance occurs. This indicates that the MMA-induced increase in sympathetic activity to the heart, which raises heart rate, ventricular contractility, and cardiac output, also elicits coronary vasoconstriction. In heart failure, cardiac output does not increase with MMA presumably due to impaired ability to improve left ventricular contractility. In this setting actual coronary vasoconstriction is observed. We tested whether this coronary vasoconstriction could explain, in part, the reduced ability to increase cardiac performance during MMA. In conscious, chronically instrumented dogs before and after pacing-induced heart failure, MMA responses during mild exercise were observed before and after α1-adrenergic blockade (prazosin 20-50 μg/kg). During MMA, the increases in coronary vascular conductance, coronary blood flow, maximal rate of left ventricular pressure change, and cardiac output were significantly greater after α1-adrenergic blockade. We conclude that in subjects with heart failure, coronary vasoconstriction during MMA limits the ability to increase left ventricular contractility.

  8. The role of muscle cells in regulating cartilage matrix production

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Dana M.; Lee, Philip G.; Uchimura, Tomoya; Seufert, Christopher R.; Kwon, Heenam; Zeng, Li

    2009-01-01

    Muscle is one of the tissues located in close proximity to cartilage tissue. Although it has been suggested that muscle could influence skeletal development through generating mechanical forces by means of contraction, very little is known regarding whether muscle cells release biochemical signals to regulate cartilage gene expression. We tested the hypothesis that muscle cells directly regulate cartilage matrix production by analyzing chondrocytes co-cultured with muscle cells in 2D or 3D conditions. We found that chondrocytes cultured with C2C12 muscle cells exhibited enhanced alcian blue staining and elevated expression of collagen II and collagen IX proteins. While non-muscle cells do not promote cartilage matrix production, converting them into muscle cells enhanced their pro-chondrogenic activity. Furthermore, muscle cell-conditioned medium led to increased cartilage matrix production, suggesting that muscle cells secrete pro-chondrogenic factors. Taken together, our study suggests that muscle cells may play an important role in regulating cartilage gene expression. This result may ultimately lead to the discovery of novel factors that regulate cartilage formation and homeostasis, and provide insights into improving the strategies for regenerating cartilage. PMID:19813241

  9. Immortalization of primary human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Reyes, N; Halbert, C L; Smith, P P; Benditt, E P; McDougall, J K

    1992-01-01

    Primary human aortic and myometrial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were immortalized using an amphotropic recombinant retroviral construct containing the E6 and E7 open reading frames (ORFs) of human papillomavirus type 16. The SMCs expressing the E6/E7 ORFs have considerably elevated growth rates when compared with nonimmortalized control cells and show no signs of senescence with long-term passage. The first SMC line derived in this study has been maintained in continuous tissue culture for greater than 1 year (greater than 180 population doublings). The immortalized SMCs have decreased cell size and decreased content of muscle-specific alpha-actin filaments as determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Southern blot analysis has demonstrated the stable integration of the E6/E7 ORFs in the retrovirally infected cells, and radioimmunoprecipitation has confirmed the continued expression of the E6 and E7 genes. Cytogenetic studies of the SMC lines have revealed essentially diploid populations except for the myometrial clonal line, which became aneuploid at late passage (greater than 125 doublings). These cell lines were not tumorigenic in nude mice. Images PMID:1311088

  10. Notch Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Baeten, J T; Lilly, B

    2017-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a highly conserved pathway involved in cell fate determination in embryonic development and also functions in the regulation of physiological processes in several systems. It plays an especially important role in vascular development and physiology by influencing angiogenesis, vessel patterning, arterial/venous specification, and vascular smooth muscle biology. Aberrant or dysregulated Notch signaling is the cause of or a contributing factor to many vascular disorders, including inherited vascular diseases, such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, associated with degeneration of the smooth muscle layer in cerebral arteries. Like most signaling pathways, the Notch signaling axis is influenced by complex interactions with mediators of other signaling pathways. This complexity is also compounded by different members of the Notch family having both overlapping and unique functions. Thus, it is vital to fully understand the roles and interactions of each Notch family member in order to effectively and specifically target their exact contributions to vascular disease. In this chapter, we will review the Notch signaling pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells as it relates to vascular development and human disease.

  11. Assessment of skeletal muscle fatigue of road maintenance workers based on heart rate monitoring and myotonometry

    PubMed Central

    Roja, Zenija; Kalkis, Valdis; Vain, Arved; Kalkis, Henrijs; Eglite, Maija

    2006-01-01

    Objective This research work is dedicated to occupational health problems caused by ergonomic risks. The research object was road building industry, where workers have to work very intensively, have long work hours, are working in forced/constrained work postures and overstrain during the work specific parts of their bodies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the work heaviness degree and to estimate the muscle fatigue of workers after one week work cycle. The study group consisted of 10 road construction and maintenance workers and 10 pavers aged between 20 and 60 years. Methods Physical load were analyzed by measuring heart rate (HR), work postures (OWAS) and perceived exertion (RPE). Assessments of the muscles strain and functional state (tone) were carried out using myotonometric (MYO) measurements. The reliability of the statistical processing of heart rate monitoring and myotonometry data was determined using correlating analysis. Results This study showed that that road construction and repairing works should be considered as a hard work according to average metabolic energy consumption 8.1 ± 1.5 kcal/min; paving, in its turn, was a moderately hard work according to 7.2 ± 1.1 kcal/min. Several muscle tone levels were identified allowing subdivision of workers into three conditional categories basing on muscle tone and fatigue: I – absolute muscle relaxation and ability to relax; II – a state of equilibrium, when muscles are able to adapt to the work load and are partly able to relax; and III – muscle fatigue and increased tone. It was also found out that the increase of muscle tone and fatigue mainly depend on workers physical preparedness and length of service, and less – on their age. Conclusion We have concluded that a complex ergonomic analysis consisting of heart rate monitoring, assessment of compulsive working postures and myotonometry is appropriate to assess the work heaviness degree and can provide prognosis of occupational pathology

  12. Assessment of skeletal muscle fatigue of road maintenance workers based on heart rate monitoring and myotonometry.

    PubMed

    Roja, Zenija; Kalkis, Valdis; Vain, Arved; Kalkis, Henrijs; Eglite, Maija

    2006-07-27

    This research work is dedicated to occupational health problems caused by ergonomic risks. The research object was road building industry, where workers have to work very intensively, have long work hours, are working in forced/constrained work postures and overstrain during the work specific parts of their bodies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the work heaviness degree and to estimate the muscle fatigue of workers after one week work cycle. The study group consisted of 10 road construction and maintenance workers and 10 pavers aged between 20 and 60 years. Physical load were analyzed by measuring heart rate (HR), work postures (OWAS) and perceived exertion (RPE). Assessments of the muscles strain and functional state (tone) were carried out using myotonometric (MYO) measurements. The reliability of the statistical processing of heart rate monitoring and myotonometry data was determined using correlating analysis. This study showed that that road construction and repairing works should be considered as a hard work according to average metabolic energy consumption 8.1 +/- 1.5 kcal/min; paving, in its turn, was a moderately hard work according to 7.2 +/- 1.1 kcal/min. Several muscle tone levels were identified allowing subdivision of workers into three conditional categories basing on muscle tone and fatigue: I--absolute muscle relaxation and ability to relax; II--a state of equilibrium, when muscles are able to adapt to the work load and are partly able to relax; and III--muscle fatigue and increased tone. It was also found out that the increase of muscle tone and fatigue mainly depend on workers physical preparedness and length of service, and less on their age. We have concluded that a complex ergonomic analysis consisting of heart rate monitoring, assessment of compulsive working postures and myotonometry is appropriate to assess the work heaviness degree and can provide prognosis of occupational pathology or work-related musculoskeletal disorders for the

  13. Novel targets for treating heart and muscle disease: stabilizing ryanodine receptors and preventing intracellular calcium leak.

    PubMed

    Lehnart, Stephan E

    2007-04-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) function as intracellular Ca(2+) release channels on the endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes. In striated muscles, Ca(2+) release through RyRs controls muscle excitation-contraction coupling. RyR channel function is regulated by a cytoplasmic scaffold domain that forms a macromolecular signaling complex including calstabin (formerly known as FK506-binding protein), calmodulin, phosphodiesterase, kinase and phosphatase proteins. An increasing number of genetic and acquired diseases has been associated with intracellular Ca(2+) leak. In heart failure, for instance, the RyR complex becomes altered, resulting in chronic channel dysfunction and chronic sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) leak. Recently, the efficacy of novel Ca(2+) release channel-stabilizing drugs has been demonstrated in cardiac and skeletal muscle disease models.

  14. [Electrostimulation of skeletal muscles in combined rehabilitation of patients with chronic pulmonary heart].

    PubMed

    Sumin, A N; Snitskaia, N A; Arkhipov, O G

    2008-01-01

    101 patients with chronic respiratory pathology and emerging pulmonary heart (middle age 59 +/- 1 years), who received a medical rehabilitation, were examined with the purpose to study safety and efficiency of skeletal muscles electrostimulation. In the beginning and in the end of therapy the patients took examinations: bicycle ergometry, test with 6-minutes walking, estimation of muscular strength and tolerance with the multifunctional trainer, spirometry and echocardiography. In the main group (n=54) patients received a course of passive training with skeletal muscles electrostimulation additionally to usual rehabilitation program. In the control group (n=47) patients received only traditional program of therapy. A course of skeletal muscles electrostimulation leaded to increase of muscular strength (by 10-24%) and tolerance (by 47-67%). In the control group muscular stage did not change. Passive training also leaded to significantly greater increase of tolerance to physical exercise at bicycle ergometry (by 55%, p = 0.000001) and at the test with 6-minutes walking (by 13.9%, p = 0.000002), then in control group. Increase of vital lungs capacity at spirometry (by 4.9%, p = 0.019) and tendency to decrease of pressure in pulmonary artery according to Doppler echocardiography (p = 0.08) were registered in the main group. In the control group significant changes of respiratory function and indices of intracardicac hemodynamics were not noticed. Therefore, skeletal muscles electrostimulation deserve to be used in rehabilitation of patients with chronic pulmonary heart.

  15. Comparison of magnetic field and electric potential produced by frog heart muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstein, Deborah; Cohen, David

    1985-04-01

    A comparison is made here between the magnetic field and electric potential produced by a thin strip of frog heart muscle. An experimental test is made of the theory which states that the wave front of a single fiber (or parallel bundle of fibers as in this strip) can be represented, for both the magnetic field and electric potential, by the same single-current dipole. First, an experimental measurement is made of the ratio of magnetic field/electric potential produced by an actual current dipole in an electrolytic tank. Then the dipole is replaced by the muscle strip and a measurement is again made of the ratio; this is done for three muscle strips at eight different source-to-detector distances ranging from 1 to 5 cm. It is found, in all cases, that the muscle ratios are equal to those of the actual dipole to within the experimental uncertainty of ±10%. Therefore, to this extent the theory is verified for this case of a thin strip of frog heart tissue.

  16. Electric Pulse Stimulation of Cultured Murine Muscle Cells Reproduces Gene Expression Changes of Trained Mouse Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Nathalie; Arnold, Anne-Sophie; Item, Flurin; Summermatter, Serge; Brochmann Santana Santos, Gesa; Christe, Martine; Boutellier, Urs; Toigo, Marco; Handschin, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Adequate levels of physical activity are at the center of a healthy lifestyle. However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate the beneficial effects of exercise remain enigmatic. This gap in knowledge is caused by the lack of an amenable experimental model system. Therefore, we optimized electric pulse stimulation of muscle cells to closely recapitulate the plastic changes in gene expression observed in a trained skeletal muscle. The exact experimental conditions were established using the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) as a marker for an endurance-trained muscle fiber. We subsequently compared the changes in the relative expression of metabolic and myofibrillar genes in the muscle cell system with those observed in mouse muscle in vivo following either an acute or repeated bouts of treadmill exercise. Importantly, in electrically stimulated C2C12 mouse muscle cells, the qualitative transcriptional adaptations were almost identical to those in trained muscle, but differ from the acute effects of exercise on muscle gene expression. In addition, significant alterations in the expression of myofibrillar proteins indicate that this stimulation could be used to modulate the fiber-type of muscle cells in culture. Our data thus describe an experimental cell culture model for the study of at least some of the transcriptional aspects of skeletal muscle adaptation to physical activity. This system will be useful for the study of the molecular mechanisms that regulate exercise adaptation in muscle. PMID:20532042

  17. Effect of muscle mass and intensity of isometric contraction on heart rate.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, J M; Alonso, J P; Sangrador, L A; Navarro, G

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of muscle mass and the level of force on the contraction-induced rise in heart rate. We conducted an experimental study in a sample of 28 healthy men between 20 and 30 yr of age (power: 95%, alpha: 5%). Smokers, obese subjects, and those who performed regular physical activity over a certain amount of energetic expenditure were excluded from the study. The participants exerted two types of isometric contractions: handgrip and turning a 40-cm-diameter wheel. Both were sustained to exhaustion at 20 and 50% of maximal force. Twenty-five subjects finished the experiment. Heart rate increased a mean of 15.1 beats/min [95% confidence interval (CI): 5.5-24.6] from 20 to 50% handgrip contractions, and 20.7 beats/min (95% CI: 11.9-29.5) from 20 to 50% wheel-turn contractions. Heart rate also increased a mean of 13.3 beats/min (95% CI: 10.4-16.1) from handgrip to wheel-turn contractions at 20% maximal force, and 18.9 beats/min (95% CI: 9. 8-28.0) from handgrip to wheel-turn contractions at 50% maximal force. We conclude that the magnitude of the heart rate increase during isometric exercise is related to the intensity of the contraction and the mass of the contracted muscle.

  18. A neural link to explain the "muscle hypothesis" of exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Piepoli, M; Ponikowski, P; Clark, A L; Banasiak, W; Capucci, A; Coats, A J

    1999-06-01

    In chronic heart failure the cause of exercise limitation is still unclear: ergoreceptors, muscle afferents sensitive to exercise metabolites, are proposed as a neural link between muscular abnormalities and the limited exercise responses in this syndrome. In 92 stable patients with heart failure (34 in New York Heart Association class I, 27 in class II, and 31 in class III) and 28 age-matched normal controls, we assessed exercise tolerance (maximal upright bicycle) and ergoreflex activity (2 dynamic hand grips: one control and one followed by 3 minutes of local circulatory occlusion to isolate the ergoreflex component by metabolite trapping). Patients, with respect to the controls, showed reduced exercise tolerance (peak VO2: 20 vs 33 mL/kg/min), increased ergoreflex effects on ventilation (9 vs 4 L/min), systolic pressure (37 vs 13 mm Hg), and leg vascular resistance (45 vs 22 units) (all P <.005); with the progression of the symptoms, a progressive increase in ergoreflex contribution to the ventilatory response to exercise was observed. The indexes of exercise limitation during arm and leg exercise (ie, peak VO 2, V/VCO2 slope) correlated highly with the ergoreflex contribution to ventilatory response during handgrip test ( r heart failure, the overactivity of the ergoreflex is related to a degree of functional limitation and appears, through direct ventilatory and cardiovascular responses, to contribute to the abnormal responses to exercise, explaining the "muscle hypothesis."

  19. Prox1 maintains muscle structure and growth in the developing heart

    PubMed Central

    Risebro, Catherine A.; Searles, Richelle G.; Melville, Athalie A. D.; Ehler, Elisabeth; Jina, Nipurna; Shah, Sonia; Pallas, Jacky; Hubank, Mike; Dillard, Miriam; Harvey, Natasha L.; Schwartz, Robert J.; Chien, Kenneth R.; Oliver, Guillermo; Riley, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Impaired cardiac muscle growth and aberrant myocyte arrangement underlie congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathy. We show that cardiac-specific inactivation of the murine homeobox transcription factor Prox1 results in the disruption of expression and localisation of sarcomeric proteins, gross myofibril disarray and growth-retarded hearts. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Prox1 is required for direct transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the structural proteins α-actinin, N-RAP and zyxin, which collectively function to maintain an actin-α-actinin interaction as the fundamental association of the sarcomere. Aspects of abnormal heart development and the manifestation of a subset of muscular-based disease have previously been attributed to mutations in key structural proteins. Our study reveals an essential requirement for direct transcriptional regulation of sarcomere integrity, in the context of enabling foetal cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, maintenance of contractile function and progression towards inherited or acquired myopathic disease. PMID:19091769

  20. Prox1 maintains muscle structure and growth in the developing heart.

    PubMed

    Risebro, Catherine A; Searles, Richelle G; Melville, Athalie A D; Ehler, Elisabeth; Jina, Nipurna; Shah, Sonia; Pallas, Jacky; Hubank, Mike; Dillard, Miriam; Harvey, Natasha L; Schwartz, Robert J; Chien, Kenneth R; Oliver, Guillermo; Riley, Paul R

    2009-02-01

    Impaired cardiac muscle growth and aberrant myocyte arrangement underlie congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathy. We show that cardiac-specific inactivation of the murine homeobox transcription factor Prox1 results in the disruption of expression and localisation of sarcomeric proteins, gross myofibril disarray and growth-retarded hearts. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Prox1 is required for direct transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the structural proteins alpha-actinin, N-RAP and zyxin, which collectively function to maintain an actin-alpha-actinin interaction as the fundamental association of the sarcomere. Aspects of abnormal heart development and the manifestation of a subset of muscular-based disease have previously been attributed to mutations in key structural proteins. Our study reveals an essential requirement for direct transcriptional regulation of sarcomere integrity, in the context of enabling foetal cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, maintenance of contractile function and progression towards inherited or acquired myopathic disease.

  1. Cell accumulation in the junctional region of denervated muscle

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    If skeletal muscles are denervated, the number of mononucleated cells in the connective tissue between muscle fibers increases. Since interstitial cells might remodel extracellular matrix, and since extracellular matrix in nerve and muscle plays a direct role in reinnervation of the sites of the original neuromuscular junctions, we sought to determine whether interstitial cell accumulation differs between junctional and extrajunctional regions of denervated muscle. We found in muscles from frog and rat that the increase in interstitial cell number was severalfold (14-fold for frog, sevenfold for rat) greater in the vicinity of junctional sites than in extrajunctional regions. Characteristics of the response at the junctional sites of frog muscles are as follows. During chronic denervation, the accumulation of interstitial cells begins within 1 wk and it is maximal by 3 wk. Reinnervation 1-2 wk after nerve damage prevents the maximal accumulation. Processes of the cells form a multilayered veil around muscle fibers but make little, if any, contact with the muscle cell or its basal lamina sheath. The results of additional experiments indicate that the accumulated cells do not originate from terminal Schwann cells or from muscle satellite cells. Most likely the cells are derived from fibroblasts that normally occupy the space between muscle fibers and are known to make and degrade extracellular matrix components. PMID:3491825

  2. Excess SMAD signaling contributes to heart and muscle dysfunction in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jeffery A.; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Beiriger, Anastasia; Wren, Lisa M.; Rossi, Ann E.; Gao, Quan Q.; Gardner, Brandon B.; Earley, Judy U.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of the dystrophin complex causes muscle injury, dysfunction, cell death and fibrosis. Excess transforming growth factor (TGF) β signaling has been described in human muscular dystrophy and animal models, where it is thought to relate to the progressive fibrosis that characterizes dystrophic muscle. We now found that canonical TGFβ signaling acutely increases when dystrophic muscle is stimulated to contract. Muscle lacking the dystrophin-associated protein γ-sarcoglycan (Sgcg null) was subjected to a lengthening protocol to produce maximal muscle injury, which produced rapid accumulation of nuclear phosphorylated SMAD2/3. To test whether reducing SMAD signaling improves muscular dystrophy in mice, we introduced a heterozygous mutation of SMAD4 (S4) into Sgcg mice to reduce but not ablate SMAD4. Sgcg/S4 mice had improved body mass compared with Sgcg mice, which normally show a wasting phenotype similar to human muscular dystrophy patients. Sgcg/S4 mice had improved cardiac function as well as improved twitch and tetanic force in skeletal muscle. Functional enhancement in Sgcg/S4 muscle occurred without a reduction in fibrosis, suggesting that intracellular SMAD4 targets may be important. An assessment of genes differentially expressed in Sgcg muscle focused on those encoding calcium-handling proteins and responsive to TGFβ since this pathway is a target for mediating improvement in muscular dystrophy. These data demonstrate that excessive TGFβ signaling alters cardiac and muscle performance through the intracellular SMAD pathway. PMID:25070948

  3. Autofluorescent particles of human uterine muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gosden, R. G.; Hawkins, H. K.; Gosden, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    Smooth muscle tissue collected from the uterine fundus of 24 patients undergoing hysterectomy was examined for chromolipoid pigments by histochemical and electron microscopic techniques. Certain cytoplasmic particles were found, mainly in smooth muscle cells, which exhibited characteristic autofluorescence, sudanophilia, and acid phosphatase activity but did not correspond to any typical pigment described previously. These particles were present in all subjects and they tended to increase in number with age. Chemical tests on tissue lipid extracts failed to prove that vitamin A was responsible for the fluorescence. The ultrastructural appearance of the particles somewhat variable, but most particles were rounded and of low electron density, with a lucent central space and dense bodies, probably lysosomes, at the periphery. The whole complex was enclosed by a single trilaminar membrane. Images Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 3 Figure 8 Figure 4 PMID:645817

  4. Autonomic control of heart rate by metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents in humans.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James P; Seifert, Thomas; Hartwich, Doreen; Young, Colin N; Secher, Niels H; Fadel, Paul J

    2010-04-01

    Isolated activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex) using post-exercise ischaemia (PEI) following handgrip partially maintains exercise-induced increases in arterial blood pressure (BP) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), while heart rate (HR) declines towards resting values. Although masking of metaboreflex-mediated increases in cardiac SNA by parasympathetic reactivation during PEI has been suggested, this has not been directly tested in humans. In nine male subjects (23 +/- 5 years) the muscle metaboreflex was activated by PEI following moderate (PEI-M) and high (PEI-H) intensity isometric handgrip performed at 25% and 40% maximum voluntary contraction, under control (no drug), parasympathetic blockade (glycopyrrolate) and beta-adrenergic blockade (metoprolol or propranalol) conditions, while beat-to-beat HR and BP were continuously measured. During control PEI-M, HR was slightly elevated from rest (+3 +/- 2 beats min(-1)); however, this HR elevation was abolished with beta-adrenergic blockade (P < 0.05 vs. control) but augmented with parasympathetic blockade (+8 +/- 2 beats min(-1), P < 0.05 vs. control and beta-adrenergic blockade). The HR elevation during control PEI-H (+9 +/- 3 beats min(-1)) was greater than with PEI-M (P < 0.05), and was also attenuated with beta-adrenergic blockade (+4 +/- 2 beats min(-1), P < 0.05 vs. control), but was unchanged with parasympathetic blockade (+9 +/- 2 beats min(-1), P > 0.05 vs. control). BP was similarly increased from rest during PEI-M and further elevated during PEI-H (P < 0.05) in all conditions. Collectively, these findings suggest that the muscle metaboreflex increases cardiac SNA during PEI in humans; however, it requires a robust muscle metaboreflex activation to offset the influence of cardiac parasympathetic reactivation on heart rate.

  5. Autonomic control of heart rate by metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, James P; Seifert, Thomas; Hartwich, Doreen; Young, Colin N; Secher, Niels H; Fadel, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Isolated activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex) using post-exercise ischaemia (PEI) following handgrip partially maintains exercise-induced increases in arterial blood pressure (BP) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), while heart rate (HR) declines towards resting values. Although masking of metaboreflex-mediated increases in cardiac SNA by parasympathetic reactivation during PEI has been suggested, this has not been directly tested in humans. In nine male subjects (23 ± 5 years) the muscle metaboreflex was activated by PEI following moderate (PEI-M) and high (PEI-H) intensity isometric handgrip performed at 25% and 40% maximum voluntary contraction, under control (no drug), parasympathetic blockade (glycopyrrolate) and β-adrenergic blockade (metoprolol or propranalol) conditions, while beat-to-beat HR and BP were continuously measured. During control PEI-M, HR was slightly elevated from rest (+3 ± 2 beats min−1); however, this HR elevation was abolished with β-adrenergic blockade (P < 0.05 vs. control) but augmented with parasympathetic blockade (+8 ± 2 beats min−1, P < 0.05 vs. control and β-adrenergic blockade). The HR elevation during control PEI-H (+9 ± 3 beats min−1) was greater than with PEI-M (P < 0.05), and was also attenuated with β-adrenergic blockade (+4 ± 2 beats min−1, P < 0.05 vs. control), but was unchanged with parasympathetic blockade (+9 ± 2 beats min−1, P > 0.05 vs. control). BP was similarly increased from rest during PEI-M and further elevated during PEI-H (P < 0.05) in all conditions. Collectively, these findings suggest that the muscle metaboreflex increases cardiac SNA during PEI in humans; however, it requires a robust muscle metaboreflex activation to offset the influence of cardiac parasympathetic reactivation on heart rate. PMID:20142272

  6. The Popeye domain containing 2 (popdc2) gene in zebrafish is required for heart and skeletal muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Kirchmaier, Bettina C.; Poon, Kar Lai; Schwerte, Thorsten; Huisken, Jan; Winkler, Christoph; Jungblut, Benno; Stainier, Didier Y.; Brand, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The Popeye domain containing (Popdc) genes encode a family of transmembrane proteins with an evolutionary conserved Popeye domain. These genes are abundantly expressed in striated muscle tissue, however their function is not well understood. In this study we have investigated the role of the popdc2 gene in zebrafish. Popdc2 transcripts were detected in the embryonic myocardium and transiently in the craniofacial and tail musculature. Morpholino oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown of popdc2 resulted in aberrant development of skeletal muscle and heart. Muscle segments in the trunk were irregularly shaped and craniofacial muscles were severely reduced or even missing. In the heart, pericardial edema was prevalent in the morphants and heart chambers were elongated and looping was abnormal. These pathologies in muscle and heart were alleviated after reducing the morpholino concentration. However the heart still was abnormal displaying cardiac arrhythmia at later stages of development. Optical recordings of cardiac contractility revealed irregular ventricular contractions with a 2:1, or 3:1 atrial/ventricular conduction ratio, which caused a significant reduction in heart frequency. Recordings of calcium transients with high spatiotemporal resolution using a transgenic calcium indicator line (Tg(cmlc2:gCaMP)s878) and SPIM microscopy confirmed the presence of a severe arrhythmia phenotype. Our results identify popdc2 as a gene important for striated muscle differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. In addition it is required for the development of the cardiac conduction system. PMID:22290329

  7. Loss of niche-satellite cell interactions in syndecan-3 null mice alters muscle progenitor cell homeostasis improving muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pisconti, Addolorata; Banks, Glen B; Babaeijandaghi, Farshad; Betta, Nicole Dalla; Rossi, Fabio M V; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Olwin, Bradley B

    2016-01-01

    The skeletal muscle stem cell niche provides an environment that maintains quiescent satellite cells, required for skeletal muscle homeostasis and regeneration. Syndecan-3, a transmembrane proteoglycan expressed in satellite cells, supports communication with the niche, providing cell interactions and signals to maintain quiescent satellite cells. Syndecan-3 ablation unexpectedly improves regeneration in repeatedly injured muscle and in dystrophic mice, accompanied by the persistence of sublaminar and interstitial, proliferating myoblasts. Additionally, muscle aging is improved in syndecan-3 null mice. Since syndecan-3 null myofiber-associated satellite cells downregulate Pax7 and migrate away from the niche more readily than wild type cells, syxndecan-3 appears to regulate satellite cell homeostasis and satellite cell homing to the niche. Manipulating syndecan-3 provides a promising target for development of therapies to enhance muscle regeneration in muscular dystrophies and in aged muscle.

  8. Vitamin D, Muscle Function, and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Adolescents From the Young Hearts Study.

    PubMed

    Carson, E L; Pourshahidi, L K; Hill, T R; Cashman, K D; Strain, J J; Boreham, C A; Mulhern, M S

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is common among the adolescent population and may have implications for health outcomes in later life. Few studies have investigated the role of vitamin D status in muscle function and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) during adolescence. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between vitamin D status and fat-free mass (FFM), muscle strength, muscle power, and CRF in a representative sample of adolescents from Northern Ireland. This was a cross-sectional study involving 1015 adolescents (age 12 and 15 y), who had 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] data available as part of the Young Hearts Study 2000. The main outcome measures of this study were FFM (kg) and FFM corrected for height [fat-free mass index; FFM (kg)/height (m(2))], muscle strength (kg), peak muscle power (kW) and VO2 max (CRF; mL/kg/min). Multinomial regression analyses, controlling for environmental and lifestyle factors, demonstrated that boys age 15 years in the highest tertile of standardized serum 25(OH)D concentration (> 51 nmol/L) had significantly higher muscle strength (β = 3.90; P ≤ .001) compared with those in the lowest tertile (< 32 nmol/L). These results were not evident in any other age-sex group and vitamin D status was not significantly associated with muscle power or CRF in any of the four age-sex groups. These results support a role for vitamin D in muscle function in adolescent males and suggest the need for more research in this vulnerable age group.

  9. The role of satellite cells in muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Blaauw, Bert; Reggiani, Carlo

    2014-02-01

    The role of satellite cells in muscle hypertrophy has long been a debated issue. In the late 1980s it was shown that proteins remain close to the myonucleus responsible for its synthesis, giving rise to the idea of a nuclear domain. This, together with the observation that during various models of muscle hypertrophy there is an activation of the muscle stem cells, i.e. satellite cells, lead to the idea that satellite cell activation is required for muscle hypertrophy. Thus, satellite cells are not only responsible for muscle repair and regeneration, but also for hypertrophic growth. Further support for this line of thinking was obtained after studies showing that irradiation of skeletal muscle, and therefore elimination of all satellite cells, completely prevented overload-induced hypertrophy. Recently however, using different transgenic approaches, it has become clear that muscle hypertrophy can occur without a contribution of satellite cells, even though in most situations of muscle hypertrophy satellite cells are activated. In this review we will discuss the contribution of satellite cells, and other muscle-resident stem cells, to muscle hypertrophy both in mice as well as in humans.

  10. Functional heterogeneity of side population cells in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Ojima, Koichi; Fukada, So-ichiro; Ikemoto, Madoka; Masuda, Satoru; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi . E-mail: takeda@ncnp.go.jp

    2006-03-17

    Skeletal muscle regeneration has been exclusively attributed to myogenic precursors, satellite cells. A stem cell-rich fraction referred to as side population (SP) cells also resides in skeletal muscle, but its roles in muscle regeneration remain unclear. We found that muscle SP cells could be subdivided into three sub-fractions using CD31 and CD45 markers. The majority of SP cells in normal non-regenerating muscle expressed CD31 and had endothelial characteristics. However, CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells, which are a minor subpopulation in normal muscle, actively proliferated upon muscle injury and expressed not only several regulatory genes for muscle regeneration but also some mesenchymal lineage markers. CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells showed the greatest myogenic potential among three SP sub-fractions, but indeed revealed mesenchymal potentials in vitro. These SP cells preferentially differentiated into myofibers after intramuscular transplantation in vivo. Our results revealed the heterogeneity of muscle SP cells and suggest that CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells participate in muscle regeneration.

  11. Muscle stem cells contribute to myofibers in sedentary adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Alexandra C.; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Flygare, Steven D.; Fox, Zachary D.; Colasanto, Mary P.; Mathew, Sam J.; Yandell, Mark; Kardon, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is essential for mobility, stability, and whole body metabolism, and muscle loss, for instance during sarcopenia, has profound consequences. Satellite cells (muscle stem cells) have been hypothesized, but not yet demonstrated, to contribute to muscle homeostasis and a decline in their contribution to myofiber homeostasis to play a part in sarcopenia. To test their role in muscle maintenance, we genetically labeled and ablated satellite cells in adult sedentary mice. We demonstrate via genetic lineage experiments that even in the absence of injury, satellite cells contribute to myofibers in all adult muscles, although the extent and timing differs. However, genetic ablation experiments showed that satellite cells are not globally required to maintain myofiber cross-sectional area of uninjured adult muscle. PMID:25971691

  12. Assessment of DNA synthesis in Islet-1{sup +} cells in the adult murine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, Florian Mehrkens, Dennis Starbatty, Jutta Nicol, Philipp Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Islet-1 was expressed in the adult heart. • Islet-1-positive cells did not proliferate in the adult heart. • Sinoatrial node cells did not proliferate in the adult heart. - Abstract: Rationale: Islet-1 positive (Islet-1{sup +}) cardiac progenitor cells give rise to the right ventricle, atria and outflow tract during murine cardiac development. In the adult heart Islet-1 expression is limited to parasympathetic neurons, few cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, within the proximal aorta and pulmonary artery and sinoatrial node cells. Its role in these cells is unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that Islet-1{sup +} cells retain proliferative activity and may therefore play a role in regenerating specialized regions in the heart. Methods and results: DNA synthesis was analyzed by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine ({sup 3}H-thymidine) in Isl-1-nLacZ mice, a transgenic model with an insertion of a nuclear beta-galactosidase in the Islet-1 locus. Mice received daily injections of {sup 3}H-thymidine for 5 days. DNA synthesis was visualized throughout the heart by dipping autoradiography of cryosections. Colocalization of an nLacZ-signal and silver grains would indicate DNA synthesis in Islet-1{sup +} cells. Whereas Islet{sup −} non-myocyte nuclei were regularly marked by accumulation of silver grains, colocalization with nLacZ-signals was not detected in >25,000 cells analyzed. Conclusions: Islet-1{sup +} cells are quiescent in the adult heart, suggesting that, under normal conditions, even pacemaking cells do not proliferate at higher rates than normal cardiac myocytes.

  13. Cardiac muscle organization revealed in 3-D by imaging whole-mount mouse hearts using two-photon fluorescence and confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn; Sivaguru, Barghav S; Sivaguru, Vignesh A; Lu, Xiaochen; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Saif, M Taher A; Lin, Brian; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2015-11-01

    The ability to image the entire adult mouse heart at high resolution in 3-D would provide enormous advantages in the study of heart disease. However, a technique for imaging nuclear/cellular detail as well as the overall structure of the entire heart in 3-D with minimal effort is lacking. To solve this problem, we modified the benzyl alcohol:benzyl benzoate (BABB) clearing technique by labeling mouse hearts with periodic acid Schiff (PAS) stain. We then imaged the hearts with a combination of two-photon fluorescence microscopy and automated tile-scan imaging/stitching. Utilizing the differential spectral properties of PAS, we could identify muscle and nuclear compartments in the heart. We were also able to visualize the differences between a 3-month-old normal mouse heart and a mouse heart that had undergone heart failure due to the expression of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) gene mutation (t/t). Using 2-D and 3-D morphometric analysis, we found that the t/t heart had anomalous ventricular shape, volume, and wall thickness, as well as a disrupted sarcomere pattern. We further validated our approach using decellularized hearts that had been cultured with 3T3 fibroblasts, which were tracked using a nuclear label. We were able to detect the 3T3 cells inside the decellularized intact heart tissue, achieving nuclear/cellular resolution in 3-D. The combination of labeling, clearing, and two-photon microscopy together with tiling eliminates laborious and time-consuming physical sectioning, alignment, and 3-D reconstruction.

  14. Cardiac muscle ring finger-1 increases susceptibility to heart failure in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Monte S.; Schisler, Jonathan C.; Li, Luge; Rodríguez, Jessica E.; Hilliard, Eleanor G.; Charles, Peter C.; Patterson, Cam

    2009-01-01

    Muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) is a muscle-specific protein implicated in the regulation of cardiac myocyte size and contractility. MuRF2, a closely related family member, redundantly interacts with protein substrates, and hetero-dimerizes with MuRF1. Mice lacking either MuRF1 or MuRF2 are phenotypically normal whereas mice lacking both proteins develop a spontaneous cardiac and skeletal muscle hypertrophy indicating cooperative control of muscle mass by MuRF1 and MuRF2. In order to identify the unique role that MuRF1 plays in regulating cardiac hypertrophy in vivo, we created transgenic mice expressing increased amounts of cardiac MuRF1. Adult MuRF1 transgenic (Tg+) hearts exhibited a non-progressive thinning of the left ventricular wall and a concomitant decrease in cardiac function. Experimental induction of cardiac hypertrophy by trans-aortic constriction (TAC) induced rapid failure of MuRF1 Tg+ hearts. Microarray analysis identified that the levels of genes associated with metabolism (and in particular mitochondrial processes) were significantly altered in MuRF1 Tg+ hearts, both at baseline and during the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Surprisingly, ATP levels in MuRF1 Tg+ mice did not differ from wild type mice despite the depressed contractility following TAC. In comparing the level and activity of creatine kinase (CK) between wild type and MuRF1 Tg+ hearts we found that mCK and CK-M/B protein levels were unaffected in MuRF1 Tg+ hearts, however total CK activity was significantly inhibited. We conclude that increased expression of cardiac MuRF1 results in a broad disruption of primary metabolic functions, including alterations in CK activity that leads to increased susceptibility to heart failure following TAC. This study demonstrates for the first time a role for MuRF1 in the regulation of cardiac energetics in vivo. PMID:19498199

  15. Lkb1 deletion promotes ectopic lipid accumulation in muscle progenitor cells and mature muscles.

    PubMed

    Shan, Tizhong; Zhang, Pengpeng; Bi, Pengpeng; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-05-01

    Excessive intramyocellular triglycerides (muscle lipids) are associated with reduced contractile function, insulin resistance, and Type 2 diabetes, but what governs lipid accumulation in muscle is unclear. Here we report a role of Lkb1 in regulating lipid metabolism in muscle stem cells and their descendent mature muscles. We used Myod(Cre) and Lkb1(flox/flox) mice to specifically delete Lkb1 in myogenic cells including stem and differentiated cells, and examined the lipid accumulation and gene expression of myoblasts cultured from muscle stem cells (satellite cells). Genetic deletion of Lkb1 in myogenic progenitors led to elevated expression of lipogenic genes and ectopic lipid accumulation in proliferating myoblasts. Interestingly, the Lkb1-deficient myoblasts differentiated into adipocyte-like cells upon adipogenic induction. However, these adipocyte-like cells maintained myogenic gene expression with reduced ability to form myotubes efficiently. Activation of AMPK by AICAR prevented ectopic lipid formation in the Lkb1-null myoblasts. Notably, Lkb1-deficient muscles accumulated excessive lipids in vivo in response to high-fat diet feeding. These results demonstrate that Lkb1 acts through AMPK to limit lipid deposition in muscle stem cells and their derivative mature muscles, and point to the possibility of controlling muscle lipid content using AMPK activating drugs.

  16. Examination of mitral regurgitation with a goat heart model for the development of intelligent artificial papillary muscle.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Y; Yambe, T; Yoshizawa, M; Hashimoto, H; Yamada, A; Miura, H; Hashem, M; Kitano, T; Shiga, T; Homma, D

    2012-01-01

    Annuloplasty for functional mitral or tricuspid regurgitation has been made for surgical restoration of valvular diseases. However, these major techniques may sometimes be ineffective because of chamber dilation and valve tethering. We have been developing a sophisticated intelligent artificial papillary muscle (PM) by using an anisotropic shape memory alloy fiber for an alternative surgical reconstruction of the continuity of the mitral structural apparatus and the left ventricular myocardium. This study exhibited the mitral regurgitation with regard to the reduction in the PM tension quantitatively with an originally developed ventricular simulator using isolated goat hearts for the sophisticated artificial PM. Aortic and mitral valves with left ventricular free wall portions of isolated goat hearts (n=9) were secured on the elastic plastic membrane and statically pressurized, which led to valvular leaflet-papillary muscle positional change and central mitral regurgitation. PMs were connected to the load cell, and the relationship between the tension of regurgitation and PM tension were measured. Then we connected the left ventricular specimen model to our hydraulic ventricular simulator and achieved hemodynamic simulation with the controlled tension of PMs.

  17. Lkb1 regulation of skeletal muscle development, metabolism and muscle progenitor cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Shan, Tizhong; Xu, Ziye; Liu, Jiaqi; Wu, Weiche; Wang, Yizhen

    2017-10-01

    Liver kinase B1 (Lkb1), also named as Serine/Threonine protein kinase 11 (STK11), is a serine/threonine kinase that plays crucial roles in various cellular processes including cell survival, cell division, cellular polarity, cell growth, cell differentiation, and cell metabolism. In metabolic tissues, Lkb1 regulates glucose homeostasis and energy metabolism through phosphorylating and activating the AMPK subfamily proteins. In skeletal muscle, Lkb1 affects muscle development and postnatal growth, lipid and fatty acid oxidation, glucose metabolism, and insulin sensitivity. Recently, the regulatory roles of Lkb1 in regulating division, self-renew, proliferation, and differentiation of skeletal muscle progenitor cells have been reported. In this review, we discuss the roles of Lkb1 in regulating skeletal muscle progenitor cell homeostasis and skeletal muscle development and metabolism. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Heart- and muscle-derived signaling system dependent on MED13 and Wingless controls obesity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2014-07-01

    Obesity develops in response to an imbalance of energy homeostasis and whole-body metabolism. Muscle plays a central role in the control of energy homeostasis through consumption of energy and signaling to adipose tissue. We reported previously that MED13, a subunit of the Mediator complex, acts in the heart to control obesity in mice. To further explore the generality and mechanistic basis of this observation, we investigated the potential influence of MED13 expression in heart and muscle on the susceptibility of Drosophila to obesity. Here, we show that heart/muscle-specific knockdown of MED13 or MED12, another Mediator subunit, increases susceptibility to obesity in adult flies. To identify possible muscle-secreted obesity regulators, we performed an RNAi-based genetic screen of 150 genes that encode secreted proteins and found that Wingless inhibition also caused obesity. Consistent with these findings, muscle-specific inhibition of Armadillo, the downstream transcriptional effector of the Wingless pathway, also evoked an obese phenotype in flies. Epistasis experiments further demonstrated that Wingless functions downstream of MED13 within a muscle-regulatory pathway. Together, these findings reveal an intertissue signaling system in which Wingless acts as an effector of MED13 in heart and muscle and suggest that Wingless-mediated cross-talk between striated muscle and adipose tissue controls obesity in Drosophila. This signaling system appears to represent an ancestral mechanism for the control of systemic energy homeostasis.

  19. Alternans Arrhythmias: From Cell to Heart

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, James N.; Nivala, Michael; Garfinkel, Alan; Qu, Zhilin

    2010-01-01

    The goal of systems biology is to relate events at the molecular level to more integrated scales from organelle to cell, tissue and living organism. Here we review how normal and abnormal excitation-contraction (EC) coupling properties emerge from the protein scale, where behaviors are dominated by randomness, to the cell and tissue scales, where heart has to beat with reliable regularity for a life-time. Beginning with the fundamental unit of EC coupling, the couplon where L-type Ca channels in the sarcolemmal membrane adjoin ryanodine receptors in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane, we show how a network of couplons with three basic properties (random activation, refractoriness, and recruitment) produces the classical physiological properties of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling and, under pathophysiological conditions, leads to Ca alternans and Ca waves. Moving to the tissue scale, we discuss how cellular Ca alternans and Ca waves promote both reentrant and focal arrhythmias in the heart. Throughout, we emphasize the qualitatively novel properties which emerge at each new scale of integration. PMID:21212392

  20. Single epicardial cell transcriptome sequencing identifies Caveolin 1 as an essential factor in zebrafish heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jingli; Navis, Adam; Cox, Ben D.; Dickson, Amy L.; Gemberling, Matthew; Karra, Ravi; Bagnat, Michel; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to mammals, adult zebrafish have a high capacity to regenerate damaged or lost myocardium through proliferation of cardiomyocytes spared from damage. The epicardial sheet covering the heart is activated by injury and aids muscle regeneration through paracrine effects and as a multipotent cell source, and has received recent attention as a target in cardiac repair strategies. Although it is recognized that epicardium is required for muscle regeneration and itself has high regenerative potential, the extent of cellular heterogeneity within epicardial tissue is largely unexplored. Here, we performed transcriptome analysis on dozens of epicardial lineage cells purified from zebrafish harboring a transgenic reporter for the pan-epicardial gene tcf21. Hierarchical clustering analysis suggested the presence of at least three epicardial cell subsets defined by expression signatures. We validated many new pan-epicardial and epicardial markers by alternative expression assays. Additionally, we explored the function of the scaffolding protein and main component of caveolae, caveolin 1 (cav1), which was present in each epicardial subset. In BAC transgenic zebrafish, cav1 regulatory sequences drove strong expression in ostensibly all epicardial cells and in coronary vascular endothelial cells. Moreover, cav1 mutant zebrafish generated by genome editing showed grossly normal heart development and adult cardiac anatomy, but displayed profound defects in injury-induced cardiomyocyte proliferation and heart regeneration. Our study defines a new platform for the discovery of epicardial lineage markers, genetic tools, and mechanisms of heart regeneration. PMID:26657776

  1. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  2. Telocytes and putative stem cells in ageing human heart

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Curici, Antoanela; Wang, Enshi; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Tradition considers that mammalian heart consists of about 70% non-myocytes (interstitial cells) and 30% cardiomyocytes (CMs). Anyway, the presence of telocytes (TCs) has been overlooked, since they were described in 2010 (visit http://www.telocytes.com). Also, the number of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) has not accurately estimated in humans during ageing. We used electron microscopy to identify and estimate the number of cells in human atrial myocardium (appendages). Three age-related groups were studied: newborns (17 days–1 year), children (6–17 years) and adults (34–60 years). Morphometry was performed on low-magnification electron microscope images using computer-assisted technology. We found that interstitial area gradually increases with age from 31.3 ± 4.9% in newborns to 41 ± 5.2% in adults. Also, the number of blood capillaries (per mm2) increased with several hundreds in children and adults versus newborns. CMs are the most numerous cells, representing 76% in newborns, 88% in children and 86% in adults. Images of CMs mitoses were seen in the 17-day newborns. Interestingly, no lipofuscin granules were found in CMs of human newborns and children. The percentage of cells that occupy interstitium were (depending on age): endothelial cells 52–62%; vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes 22–28%, Schwann cells with nerve endings 6–7%, fibroblasts 3–10%, macrophages 1–8%, TCs about 1% and stem cells less than 1%. We cannot confirm the popular belief that cardiac fibroblasts are the most prevalent cell type in the heart and account for about 20% of myocardial volume. Numerically, TCs represent a small fraction of human cardiac interstitial cells, but because of their extensive telopodes, they achieve a 3D network that, for instance, supports CSCs. The myocardial (very) low capability to regenerate may be explained by the number of CSCs, which decreases fivefold by age (from 0.5% to 0.1% in newborns versus adults). PMID:25545142

  3. Changes in extracellular muscle volume affect heart rate and blood pressure responses to static exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K.; Essfeld, D.; Stegemann, J.

    To investigate the effect of μg-induced peripheral extracellular fluid reductions on heart rate and blood pressure during isometric exercise, six healthy male subjects performed three calf ergometer test with different extracellular volumes of working muscles. In all tests, body positions during exercise were identical (supine with the knee joint flexed to 900). After a pre-exercise period of 25 min, during which calf volumes were manipulated, subjects had to counteract an external force of 180 N for 5 min. During the pre-exercise period three different protocols were applied. Test A: Subjects rested in the exercise position; test B: Body position was the same as in A but calf volume was increased by venous congestion (cuffs inflated to 80 mm Hg); test C: Calf volumes were decreased by a negative hydrostatic pressure (calves about 40 cm above heart level with the subjects supine). To clamp the changed calf volumes in tests B and C, cuffs were inflated to 300 mm Hg 5 min before the onset of exercise. This occlusion was maintained until termination of exercise. Compared to tests A and B, the reduced volume of test C led to significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure during exercise. Oxygen uptake did not exceed resting levels in B and C until cuffs were deflated, indicating that exclusively calf muscles contributed to the neurogenic peripheral drive. It is concluded that changes in extracellular muscle volume have to be taken into account when comparing heart rate and blood pressure during lg- and μg- exercise.

  4. Traction in smooth muscle cells varies with cell spreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Wang, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Changes in cell shape regulate cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. It has been suggested that the regulation of cell function by the cell shape is a result of the tension in the cytoskeleton and the distortion of the cell. Here we explore the association between cell-generated mechanical forces and the cell morphology. We hypothesized that the cell contractile force is associated with the degree of cell spreading, in particular with the cell length. We measured traction fields of single human airway smooth muscle cells plated on a polyacrylamide gel, in which fluorescent microbeads were embedded to serve as markers of gel deformation. The traction exerted by the cells at the cell-substrate interface was determined from the measured deformation of the gel. The traction was measured before and after treatment with the contractile agonist histamine, or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The relative increase in traction induced by histamine was negatively correlated with the baseline traction. On the contrary, the relative decrease in traction due to isoproterenol was independent of the baseline traction, but it was associated with cell shape: traction decreased more in elongated than in round cells. Maximum cell width, mean cell width, and projected area of the cell were the parameters most tightly coupled to both baseline and histamine-induced traction in this study. Wide and well-spread cells exerted larger traction than slim cells. These results suggest that cell contractility is controlled by cell spreading.

  5. Traction in smooth muscle cells varies with cell spreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Wang, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Changes in cell shape regulate cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. It has been suggested that the regulation of cell function by the cell shape is a result of the tension in the cytoskeleton and the distortion of the cell. Here we explore the association between cell-generated mechanical forces and the cell morphology. We hypothesized that the cell contractile force is associated with the degree of cell spreading, in particular with the cell length. We measured traction fields of single human airway smooth muscle cells plated on a polyacrylamide gel, in which fluorescent microbeads were embedded to serve as markers of gel deformation. The traction exerted by the cells at the cell-substrate interface was determined from the measured deformation of the gel. The traction was measured before and after treatment with the contractile agonist histamine, or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The relative increase in traction induced by histamine was negatively correlated with the baseline traction. On the contrary, the relative decrease in traction due to isoproterenol was independent of the baseline traction, but it was associated with cell shape: traction decreased more in elongated than in round cells. Maximum cell width, mean cell width, and projected area of the cell were the parameters most tightly coupled to both baseline and histamine-induced traction in this study. Wide and well-spread cells exerted larger traction than slim cells. These results suggest that cell contractility is controlled by cell spreading.

  6. Fetal muscle-derived cells can repair dystrophic muscles in mdx mice

    SciTech Connect

    Auda-Boucher, Gwenola; Rouaud, Thierry; Lafoux, Aude; Levitsky, Dmitri; Huchet-Cadiou, Corinne; Feron, Marie; Guevel, Laetitia; Talon, Sophie; Fontaine-Perus, Josiane; Gardahaut, Marie-France . E-mail: Marie-France.Gardahaut@univ-nantes.fr

    2007-03-10

    We have previously reported that CD34{sup +} cells purified from mouse fetal muscles can differentiate into skeletal muscle in vitro and in vivo when injected into muscle tissue of dystrophic mdx mice. In this study, we investigate the ability of such donor cells to restore dystrophin expression, and to improve the functional muscle capacity of the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) of mdx mice. For this purpose green fluorescent-positive fetal GFP{sup +}/CD34{sup +} cells or desmin{sup +}/{sup -}LacZ/CD34{sup +} cells were transplanted into irradiated or non-irradiated mdx EDL muscle. Donor fetal muscle-derived cells predominantly fused with existing fibers. Indeed more than 50% of the myofibers of the host EDL contained donor nuclei delivering dystrophin along 80-90% of the length of their sarcolemma. The presence of significant amounts of dystrophin (about 60-70% of that found in a control wild-type mouse muscle) was confirmed by Western blot analyses. Dystrophin expression also outcompeted that of utrophin, as revealed by a spatial shift in the distribution of utrophin. At 1 month post-transplant, the recipient muscle appeared to have greater resistance to fatigue than control mdx EDL muscle during repeated maximal contractions.

  7. Fetal muscle-derived cells can repair dystrophic muscles in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Auda-Boucher, Gwenola; Rouaud, Thierry; Lafoux, Aude; Levitsky, Dmitri; Huchet-Cadiou, Corinne; Feron, Marie; Guevel, Laetitia; Talon, Sophie; Fontaine-Pérus, Josiane; Gardahaut, Marie-France

    2007-03-10

    We have previously reported that CD34(+) cells purified from mouse fetal muscles can differentiate into skeletal muscle in vitro and in vivo when injected into muscle tissue of dystrophic mdx mice. In this study, we investigate the ability of such donor cells to restore dystrophin expression, and to improve the functional muscle capacity of the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) of mdx mice. For this purpose green fluorescent-positive fetal GFP(+)/CD34(+) cells or desmin(+)/(-)LacZ/CD34(+) cells were transplanted into irradiated or non-irradiated mdx EDL muscle. Donor fetal muscle-derived cells predominantly fused with existing fibers. Indeed more than 50% of the myofibers of the host EDL contained donor nuclei delivering dystrophin along 80-90% of the length of their sarcolemma. The presence of significant amounts of dystrophin (about 60-70% of that found in a control wild-type mouse muscle) was confirmed by Western blot analyses. Dystrophin expression also outcompeted that of utrophin, as revealed by a spatial shift in the distribution of utrophin. At 1 month post-transplant, the recipient muscle appeared to have greater resistance to fatigue than control mdx EDL muscle during repeated maximal contractions.

  8. Identification of Targets of CUG-BP, Elav-Like Family Member 1 (CELF1) Regulation in Embryonic Heart Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Coram, Ryan J.; Ladd, Andrea N.

    2016-01-01

    CUG-BP, Elav-like family member 1 (CELF1) is a highly conserved RNA binding protein that regulates pre-mRNA alternative splicing, polyadenylation, mRNA stability, and translation. In the heart, CELF1 is expressed in the myocardium, where its levels are tightly regulated during development. CELF1 levels peak in the heart during embryogenesis, and aberrant up-regulation of CELF1 in the adult heart has been implicated in cardiac pathogenesis in myotonic dystrophy type 1, as well as in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Either inhibition of CELF activity or over-expression of CELF1 in heart muscle causes cardiomyopathy in transgenic mice. Nonetheless, many of the cardiac targets of CELF1 regulation remain unknown. In this study, to identify cardiac targets of CELF1 we performed cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP) for CELF1 from embryonic day 8 chicken hearts. We identified a previously unannotated exon in MYH7B as a novel target of CELF1-mediated regulation. We demonstrated that knockdown of CELF1 in primary chicken embryonic cardiomyocytes leads to increased inclusion of this exon and decreased MYH7B levels. We also investigated global changes in the transcriptome of primary embryonic cardiomyocytes following CELF1 knockdown in a published RNA-seq dataset. Pathway and network analyses identified strong associations between CELF1 and regulation of cell cycle and translation. Important regulatory proteins, including both RNA binding proteins and a cardiac transcription factor, were affected by loss of CELF1. Together, these data suggest that CELF1 is a key regulator of cardiomyocyte gene expression. PMID:26866591

  9. The effect of physical training on skeletal muscle in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kiilavuori, K; Näveri, H; Salmi, T; Härkönen, M

    2000-03-01

    The improvement of exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) by physical training has been connected with reversal of the abnormalities in muscle fiber distribution and with the reduced activity of the enzymes of oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. However, the change in fiber type distribution induced by training is controversial and in previous studies the activities of the rate-limiting enzymes of the metabolic pathways have not been measured. To examine the effect of dynamic training on percentage distribution of muscle fibers, on activities of the rate-limiting enzymes of the metabolic pathways and on electrophysiology in skeletal muscle. A total of 27 patients with stable CHF (NYHA class II-III) were randomized to a training (N=12) or a control (N=15) group. The training group exercised on a bicycle ergometer for 30 min three times a week for 3 months using a load corresponding to 50-60% of their peak oxygen consumption. This was followed by a 3-month training period at home according to personal instructions. The control group did not change its physical activities. We studied muscle histology and measured the activities of the rate-limiting enzymes of anaerobic glycolysis (phosphofructokinase, PFK), glycogenolysis (phosphorylase), citric acid cycle (alpha-ketoglurate dehydrogenase, KGDH) and fatty acid oxidation (carnitinepalmitoyl transferase I and II, CPT I and II) from biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscle at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Muscle strength and strength endurance with surface EMG and macro EMG of the right knee extensors were also determined. Exercise capacity, particularly submaximal, improved in the training group. The activity of PFK rose significantly but that of the other enzymes did not when compared with the change in the controls. Training had no effect on the percentage distribution of slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fibers or on capillary density around these fibers in skeletal muscle. Maximum

  10. Effects of moderate heart failure and functional overload on rat plantaris muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangenburg, Espen E.; Lees, Simon J.; Otis, Jeff S.; Musch, Timothy I.; Talmadge, Robert J.; Williams, Jay H.

    2002-01-01

    It is thought that changes in sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) of skeletal muscle contribute to alterations in skeletal muscle function during congestive heart failure (CHF). It is well established that exercise training can improve muscle function. However, it is unclear whether similar adaptations will result from exercise training in a CHF patient. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether skeletal muscle during moderate CHF adapts to increased activity, utilizing the functional overload (FO) model. Significant increases in plantaris mass of the CHF-FO and sham-FO groups compared with the CHF and control (sham) groups were observed. Ca(2+) uptake rates were significantly elevated in the CHF group compared with all other groups. No differences were detected in Ca(2+) uptake rates between the CHF-FO, sham, and sham-FO groups. Increases in Ca(2+) uptake rates in moderate-CHF rats were not due to changes in SERCA isoform proportions; however, FO may have attenuated the CHF-induced increases through alterations in SERCA isoform expression. Therefore, changes in skeletal muscle Ca(2+) handling during moderate CHF may be due to alterations in regulatory mechanisms, which exercise may override, by possibly altering SERCA isoform expression.

  11. Mechanisms of blunted muscle vasodilation during peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Nazaré Nunes Alves, Maria Janieire; Alves, M J N N; dos Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues; Nobre, Thais Simões; Martinez, Daniel Godoy; Martinez, D G; Pereira Barretto, Antonio Carlos; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Rondon, Maria Urbana P B; Middlekauff, Holly R; Negrão, Carlos Eduardo

    2012-09-01

    We described recently that systemic hypoxia provokes vasoconstriction in heart failure (HF) patients. We hypothesized that either the exaggerated muscle sympathetic nerve activity and/or endothelial dysfunction mediate the blunted vasodilatation during hypoxia in HF patients. Twenty-seven HF patients and 23 age-matched controls were studied. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was assessed by microneurography and forearm blood flow (FBF) by venous occlusion plethysmography. Peripheral chemoreflex control was evaluated through the inhaling of a hypoxic gas mixture (10% O(2) and 90% N(2)). Basal muscle sympathetic nerve activity was greater and basal FBF was lower in HF patients versus controls. During hypoxia, muscle sympathetic nerve activity responses were greater in HF patients, and forearm vasodilatation in HF was blunted versus controls. Phentolamine increased FBF responses in both groups, but the increase was lower in HF patients. Phentolamine and N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine infusion did not change FBF responses in HF but markedly blunted the vasodilatation in controls. FBF responses to hypoxia in the presence of vitamin C were unchanged and remained lower in HF patients versus controls. In conclusion, muscle vasoconstriction in response to hypoxia in HF patients is attributed to exaggerated reflex sympathetic nerve activation and blunted endothelial function (NO activity). We were unable to identify a role for oxidative stress in these studies.

  12. Analysis of Skeletal Muscle Torque Capacity and Circulating Ceramides in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Brunjes, Danielle L; Dunlop, Mark; Wu, Christina; Jones, Meaghan; Kato, Tomoko S; Kennel, Peter J; Armstrong, Hilary F; Choo, Tse-Hwei; Bartels, Matthew N; Forman, Daniel E; Mancini, Donna M; Schulze, P Christian

    2016-05-01

    Heart failure (HF)-related exercise intolerance is thought to be perpetuated by peripheral skeletal muscle functional, structural, and metabolic abnormalities. We analyzed specific dynamics of muscle contraction in patients with HF compared with healthy, sedentary controls. Isometric and isokinetic muscle parameters were measured in the dominant upper and lower limbs of 45 HF patients and 15 healthy age-matched controls. Measurements included peak torque normalized to body weight, work normalized to body weight, power, time to peak torque, and acceleration and deceleration to maximum strength times. Body morphometry (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan) and circulating fatty acids and ceramides (lipodomics) were analyzed in a subset of subjects (18 HF and 9 controls). Extension and flexion time-to-peak torque was longer in the lower limbs of HF patients. Furthermore, acceleration and deceleration times in the lower limbs were also prolonged in HF subjects. HF subjects had increased adiposity and decreased lean muscle mass compared with controls. Decreased circulating unsaturated fatty acids and increased ceramides were found in subjects with HF. Delayed torque development suggests skeletal muscle impairments that may reflect abnormal neuromuscular functional coupling. These impairments may be further compounded by increased adiposity and inflammation associated with increased ceramides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of Skeletal Muscle Torque Capacity and Circulating Ceramides in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Brunjes, Danielle L.; Dunlop, Mark; Wu, Christina; Jones, Meaghan; Kato, Tomoko S.; Kennel, Peter J.; Armstrong, Hilary F.; Choo, Tse-Hwei; Bartels, Matthew N.; Forman, Daniel E.; Mancini, Donna M.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF)-related exercise intolerance is thought to be perpetuated by peripheral skeletal muscle functional, structural, and metabolic abnormalities. We analyzed specific dynamics of muscle contraction in patients with HF compared with healthy, sedentary controls. Methods Isometric and isokinetic muscle parameters were measured in the dominant upper and lower limbs of 45 HF patients and 15 healthy age-matched controls. Measurements included peak torque normalized to body weight, work normalized to body weight, power, time to peak torque, and acceleration and deceleration to maximum strength times. Body morphometry (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan) and circulating fatty acids and ceramides (lipodomics) were analyzed in a subset of subjects (18 HF and 9 controls). Results Extension and flexion time-to-peak torque was longer in the lower limbs of HF patients. Furthermore, acceleration and deceleration times in the lower limbs were also prolonged in HF subjects. HF subjects had increased adiposity and decreased lean muscle mass compared with controls. Decreased circulating unsaturated fatty acids and increased ceramides were found in subjects with HF. Conclusions Delayed torque development suggests skeletal muscle impairments that may reflect abnormal neuromuscular functional coupling. These impairments may be further compounded by increased adiposity and inflammation associated with increased ceramides. PMID:26879888

  14. Effects of moderate heart failure and functional overload on rat plantaris muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangenburg, Espen E.; Lees, Simon J.; Otis, Jeff S.; Musch, Timothy I.; Talmadge, Robert J.; Williams, Jay H.

    2002-01-01

    It is thought that changes in sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) of skeletal muscle contribute to alterations in skeletal muscle function during congestive heart failure (CHF). It is well established that exercise training can improve muscle function. However, it is unclear whether similar adaptations will result from exercise training in a CHF patient. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether skeletal muscle during moderate CHF adapts to increased activity, utilizing the functional overload (FO) model. Significant increases in plantaris mass of the CHF-FO and sham-FO groups compared with the CHF and control (sham) groups were observed. Ca(2+) uptake rates were significantly elevated in the CHF group compared with all other groups. No differences were detected in Ca(2+) uptake rates between the CHF-FO, sham, and sham-FO groups. Increases in Ca(2+) uptake rates in moderate-CHF rats were not due to changes in SERCA isoform proportions; however, FO may have attenuated the CHF-induced increases through alterations in SERCA isoform expression. Therefore, changes in skeletal muscle Ca(2+) handling during moderate CHF may be due to alterations in regulatory mechanisms, which exercise may override, by possibly altering SERCA isoform expression.

  15. Muscle satellite cells are a functionally heterogeneous population in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Yusuke; Boldrin, Luisa; Knopp, Paul; Morgan, Jennifer E.; Zammit, Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscles of body and limb are derived from somites, but most head muscles originate from cranial mesoderm. The resident stem cells of muscle are satellite cells, which have the same embryonic origin as the muscle in which they reside. Here, we analysed satellite cells with a different ontology, comparing those of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of the limb with satellite cells from the masseter of the head. Satellite cell-derived myoblasts from MAS and EDL muscles had distinct gene expression profiles and masseter cells usually proliferated more and differentiated later than those from EDL. When transplanted, however, masseter-derived satellite cells regenerated limb muscles as efficiently as those from EDL. Clonal analysis showed that functional properties differed markedly between satellite cells: ranging from clones that proliferated extensively and gave rise to both differentiated and self-renewed progeny, to others that divided minimally before differentiating completely. Generally, masseter-derived clones were larger and took longer to differentiate than those from EDL. This distribution in cell properties was preserved in both EDL-derived and masseter-derived satellite cells from old mice, although clones were generally less proliferative. Satellite cells, therefore, are a functionally heterogeneous population, with many occupants of the niche exhibiting stem cell characteristics in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles. PMID:19835858

  16. Muscle satellite cells are a functionally heterogeneous population in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yusuke; Boldrin, Luisa; Knopp, Paul; Morgan, Jennifer E; Zammit, Peter S

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscles of body and limb are derived from somites, but most head muscles originate from cranial mesoderm. The resident stem cells of muscle are satellite cells, which have the same embryonic origin as the muscle in which they reside. Here, we analysed satellite cells with a different ontology, comparing those of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of the limb with satellite cells from the masseter of the head. Satellite cell-derived myoblasts from MAS and EDL muscles had distinct gene expression profiles and masseter cells usually proliferated more and differentiated later than those from EDL. When transplanted, however, masseter-derived satellite cells regenerated limb muscles as efficiently as those from EDL. Clonal analysis showed that functional properties differed markedly between satellite cells: ranging from clones that proliferated extensively and gave rise to both differentiated and self-renewed progeny, to others that divided minimally before differentiating completely. Generally, masseter-derived clones were larger and took longer to differentiate than those from EDL. This distribution in cell properties was preserved in both EDL-derived and masseter-derived satellite cells from old mice, although clones were generally less proliferative. Satellite cells, therefore, are a functionally heterogeneous population, with many occupants of the niche exhibiting stem cell characteristics in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles.

  17. Eosinophils induce airway smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Halwani, Rabih; Vazquez-Tello, Alejandro; Sumi, Yuki; Pureza, Mary Angeline; Bahammam, Ahmed; Al-Jahdali, Hamdan; Soussi-Gounni, Abdelillah; Mahboub, Bassam; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Hamid, Qutayba

    2013-04-01

    Asthma is characterized by eosinophilic airway inflammation and remodeling of the airway wall. Features of airway remodeling include increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. However, little is known about the interaction between inflammatory eosinophils and ASM cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of eosinophils on ASM cell proliferation. Eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood of mild asthmatics and non-asthmatic subjects and co-cultured with human primary ASM cells. ASM proliferation was estimated using Ki-67 expression assay. The expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) mRNA in ASM cells was measured using quantitative real-time PCR. The role of eosinophil derived Cysteinyl Leukotrienes (CysLTs) in enhancing ASM proliferation was estimated by measuring the release of leukotrienes from eosinophils upon their direct contact with ASM cells using ELISA. This role was confirmed either by blocking eosinophil-ASM contact or co-culturing them in the presence of leukotrienes antagonist. ASM cells co-cultured with eosinophils, isolated from asthmatics, but not non-asthmatics, had a significantly higher rate of proliferation compared to controls. This increase in ASM proliferation was independent of their release of ECM proteins but dependent upon eosinophils release of CysLTs. Eosinophil-ASM cell to cell contact was required for CysLTs release. Preventing eosinophil contact with ASM cells using anti-adhesion molecules antibodies, or blocking the activity of eosinophil derived CysLTs using montelukast inhibited ASM proliferation. Our results indicated that eosinophils contribute to airway remodeling during asthma by enhancing ASM cell proliferation and hence increasing ASM mass. Direct contact of eosinophils with ASM cells triggers their release of CysLTs which enhance ASM proliferation. Eosinophils, and their binding to ASM cells, constitute a potential therapeutic target to interfere with the series of biological events leading to airway remodeling

  18. Novel insight into stem cell trafficking in dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Farini, Andrea; Villa, Chiara; Manescu, Adrian; Fiori, Fabrizio; Giuliani, Alessandra; Razini, Paola; Sitzia, Clementina; Del Fraro, Giulia; Belicchi, Marzia; Meregalli, Mirella; Rustichelli, Franco; Torrente, Yvan

    2012-01-01

    Recently published reports have described possible cellular therapy approaches to regenerate muscle tissues using arterial route delivery. However, the kinetic of distribution of these migratory stem cells within injected animal muscular dystrophy models is unknown. Using living X-ray computed microtomography, we established that intra-arterially injected stem cells traffic to multiple muscle tissues for several hours until their migration within dystrophic muscles. Injected stem cells express multiple traffic molecules, including VLA-4, LFA-1, CD44, and the chemokine receptor CXCR4, which are likely to direct these cells into dystrophic muscles. In fact, the majority of intra-arterially injected stem cells access the muscle tissues not immediately after the injection, but after several rounds of recirculation. We set up a new, living, 3D-imaging approach, which appears to be an important way to investigate the kinetic of distribution of systemically injected stem cells within dystrophic muscle tissues, thereby providing supportive data for future clinical applications.

  19. Spontaneous baroreflex control of cardiac output during dynamic exercise, muscle metaboreflex activation, and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Masashi; Sala-Mercado, Javier A; O'Leary, Donal S; Hammond, Robert L; Coutsos, Matthew; Ichinose, Tomoko; Pallante, Marco; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2008-03-01

    We have previously shown that spontaneous baroreflex-induced changes in heart rate (HR) do not always translate into changes in cardiac output (CO) at rest. We have also shown that heart failure (HF) decreases this linkage between changes in HR and CO. Whether dynamic exercise and muscle metaboreflex activation (via imposed reductions in hindlimb blood flow) further alter this translation in normal and HF conditions is unknown. We examined these questions using conscious, chronically instrumented dogs before and after pacing-induced HF during mild and moderate dynamic exercise with and without muscle metaboreflex activation. We measured left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), CO, and HR and analyzed the spontaneous HR-LVSP and CO-LVSP relationships. In normal animals, mild exercise significantly decreased HR-LVSP (-3.08 +/- 0.5 vs. -5.14 +/- 0.6 beats.min(-1).mmHg(-1); P < 0.05) and CO-LVSP (-134.74 +/- 24.5 vs. -208.6 +/- 22.2 ml.min(-1).mmHg(-1); P < 0.05). Moderate exercise further decreased both and, in addition, significantly reduced HR-CO translation (25.9 +/- 2.8% vs. 52.3 +/- 4.2%; P < 0.05). Muscle metaboreflex activation at both workloads decreased HR-LVSP, whereas it had no significant effect on CO-LVSP and the HR-CO translation. HF significantly decreased HR-LVSP, CO-LVSP, and the HR-CO translation in all situations. We conclude that spontaneous baroreflex HR responses do not always cause changes in CO during exercise. Moreover, muscle metaboreflex activation during mild and moderate dynamic exercise reduces this coupling. In addition, in HF the HR-CO translation also significantly decreases during both workloads and decreases even further with muscle metaboreflex activation.

  20. Satellite cells from dystrophic muscle retain regenerative capacity.

    PubMed

    Boldrin, Luisa; Zammit, Peter S; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an inherited disorder that is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, with a failure of muscle maintenance/repair mediated by satellite cells (muscle stem cells). The function of skeletal muscle stem cells resident in dystrophic muscle may be perturbed by being in an increasing pathogenic environment, coupled with constant demands for repairing muscle. To investigate the contribution of satellite cell exhaustion to this process, we tested the functionality of satellite cells isolated from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We found that satellite cells derived from young mdx mice contributed efficiently to muscle regeneration within our in vivo mouse model. To then test the effects of long-term residence in a dystrophic environment, satellite cells were isolated from aged mdx muscle. Surprisingly, they were as functional as those derived from young or aged wild type donors. Removing satellite cells from a dystrophic milieu reveals that their regenerative capacity remains both intact and similar to satellite cells derived from healthy muscle, indicating that the host environment is critical for controlling satellite cell function.

  1. Influence of locomotor muscle afferent inhibition on the ventilatory response to exercise in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Olson, Thomas P; Joyner, Michael J; Eisenach, John H; Curry, Timothy B; Johnson, Bruce D

    2014-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Patients with heart failure often develop ventilatory abnormalities at rest and during exercise, but the mechanisms underlying these abnormalities remain unclear. This study investigated the influence of inhibiting afferent neural feedback from locomotor muscles on the ventilatory response during exercise in heart failure patients. What is the main finding and its importance? Our results suggest that inhibiting afferent feedback from locomotor muscle via intrathecal opioid administration significantly reduces the ventilatory response to exercise in heart failure patients. Patients with heart failure (HF) develop ventilatory abnormalities at rest and during exercise, but the mechanism(s) underlying these abnormalities remain unclear. We examined whether the inhibition of afferent neural feedback from locomotor muscles during exercise reduces exercise ventilation in HF patients. In a randomized, placebo-controlled design, nine HF patients (age, 60 ± 2 years; ejection fraction, 27 ± 2%; New York Heart Association class 2 ± 1) and nine control subjects (age, 63 ± 2 years) underwent constant-work submaximal cycling (65% peak power) with intrathecal fentanyl (impairing the cephalad projection of opioid receptor-sensitive afferents) or sham injection. The hypercapnic ventilatory response was measured to determine whether cephalad migration of fentanyl occurred. There were no differences in hypercapnic ventilatory response within or between groups in either condition. Despite a lack of change in ventilation, tidal volume or respiratory rate, HF patients had a mild increase in arterial carbon dioxide (P(aCO(2)) and a decrease in oxygen (P(aO(2)); P < 0.05 for both) at rest. The control subjects demonstrated no change in P(aCO(2)), P(aO(2)), ventilation, tidal volume or respiratory rate at rest. In response to fentanyl during exercise, HF patients had a reduction in ventilation (63 ± 6 versus 44 ± 3 l min(-1), P < 0.05) due

  2. Muscle gelsolin: isolation from heart tissue and characterization as an integral myofibrillar protein.

    PubMed

    Rouayrenc, J F; Fattoum, A; Gabrion, J; Audemard, E; Kassab, R

    1984-02-13

    A 92-kDa polypeptide present in rabbit and dog cardiac muscle was purified to homogeneity and some of its properties were investigated using biochemical and cytochemical approaches. The protein was found to be similar, if not identical to macrophage gelsolin; it cross-reacts immunologically with anti-rabbit macrophage gelsolin antibody, has a Ca2+-sensitive shortening effect on the actin filaments as judged by the high shear viscometry and sedimentation experiments, and has a similar amino acid composition. In addition, immunoblot and SDS polyacrylamide gel analysis of cardiac muscle extracts obtained at high and low ionic strength showed that this protein is tightly bound to myofibrils, both in the absence and presence of Ca2+, in ventricular as well as in atrial muscle cells. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a striated gelsolin staining pattern analogous to that previously observed for the skeletal muscle gelsolin, suggesting that in the muscle cell this protein is sharing the same localisation as actin. Because of its severing and nucleating properties the gelsolin may play a major role in the organization, assembly and turnover of the thin filaments within the muscle cells.

  3. Pathophysiology of human heart failure: importance of skeletal muscle myopathy and reflexes.

    PubMed

    Piepoli, Massimo F; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    In the last 20 years there has been mounting evidence that chronic heart failure (CHF) has a complex pathophysiology, which begins with an abnormality of the heart as a 'primum movens', but involves adaptive changes in many body parts, including the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, renal, neuroendocrine, haemostatic, immune and inflammatory systems. Alterations in skeletal muscle are also of importance in limiting functional capacity in patients with CHF, because reduced physical activity plays some part in the muscle alterations in CHF. On the whole, these abnormalities resemble those induced by physical deconditioning. Moreover, the overactivation of signals originating from skeletal muscle receptors (mechano-metaboreceptors) is an intriguing hypothesis proposed to explain the origin of symptoms and the beneficial effect of exercise training in the CHF syndrome. These reflexes may contribute to sympathetic overactivation, to exercise intolerance and to the progression of CHF syndrome. The so-called metaboreflex has been reported to be hyperactive in CHF and to be responsible for a paradoxical increase in systemic vascular resistance and decrease in cardiac output whenever activated in these patients. This report is a brief summary of the latest news in this area of research.

  4. Acute electromyostimulation decreases muscle sympathetic nerve activity in patients with advanced chronic heart failure (EMSICA Study).

    PubMed

    Labrunée, Marc; Despas, Fabien; Marque, Philippe; Guiraud, Thibaut; Galinier, Michel; Senard, Jean Michel; Pathak, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Muscle passive contraction of lower limb by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES) is frequently used in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients but no data are available concerning its action on sympathetic activity. However, Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) is able to improve baroreflex in CHF. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effect of TENS and NMES compared to Sham stimulation on sympathetic overactivity as assessed by Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity (MSNA). We performed a serie of two parallel, randomized, double blinded and sham controlled protocols in twenty-two CHF patients in New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III. Half of them performed stimulation by TENS, and the others tested NMES. Compare to Sham stimulation, both TENS and NMES are able to reduce MSNA (63.5 ± 3.5 vs 69.7 ± 3.1 bursts / min, p < 0.01 after TENS and 51.6 ± 3.3 vs 56.7 ± 3.3 bursts / min, p < 0, 01 after NMES). No variation of blood pressure, heart rate or respiratory parameters was observed after stimulation. The results suggest that sensory stimulation of lower limbs by electrical device, either TENS or NMES, could inhibit sympathetic outflow directed to legs in CHF patients. These properties could benefits CHF patients and pave the way for a new non-pharmacological approach of CHF.

  5. Physiologic force-frequency response in engineered heart muscle by electromechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Godier-Furnémont, Amandine F G; Tiburcy, Malte; Wagner, Eva; Dewenter, Matthias; Lämmle, Simon; El-Armouche, Ali; Lehnart, Stephan E; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2015-08-01

    A hallmark of mature mammalian ventricular myocardium is a positive force-frequency relationship (FFR). Despite evidence of organotypic structural and molecular maturation, a positive FFR has not been observed in mammalian tissue engineered heart muscle. We hypothesized that concurrent mechanical and electrical stimulation at frequencies matching physiological heart rate will result in functional maturation. We investigated the role of biomimetic mechanical and electrical stimulation in functional maturation in engineered heart muscle (EHM). Following tissue consolidation, EHM were subjected to electrical field stimulation at 0, 2, 4, or 6 Hz for 5 days, while strained on flexible poles to facilitate auxotonic contractions. EHM stimulated at 2 and 4 Hz displayed a similarly enhanced inotropic reserve, but a clearly diverging FFR. The positive FFR in 4 Hz stimulated EHM was associated with reduced calcium sensitivity, frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation, and enhanced post-rest potentiation. This was paralleled on the cellular level with improved calcium storage and release capacity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and enhanced T-tubulation. We conclude that electro-mechanical stimulation at a physiological frequency supports functional maturation in mammalian EHM. The observed positive FFR in EHM has important implications for the applicability of EHM in cardiovascular research. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Transcriptional networks that regulate muscle stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Punch, Vincent G; Jones, Andrew E; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Muscle stem cells comprise different populations of stem and progenitor cells found in embryonic and adult tissues. A number of signaling and transcriptional networks are responsible for specification and survival of these cell populations and regulation of their behavior during growth and regeneration. Muscle progenitor cells are mostly derived from the somites of developing embryos, while satellite cells are the progenitor cells responsible for the majority of postnatal growth and adult muscle regeneration. In resting muscle, these stem cells are quiescent, but reenter the cell cycle during their activation, whereby they undergo decisions to self-renew, proliferate, or differentiate and fuse into multinucleated myofibers to repair damaged muscle. Regulation of muscle stem cell activity is under the precise control of a number of extrinsic signaling pathways and active transcriptional networks that dictate their behavior, fate, and regenerative potential. Here, we review the networks responsible for these different aspects of muscle stem cell biology and discuss prevalent parallels between mechanisms regulating the activity of embryonic muscle progenitor cells and adult satellite cells.

  7. The nonlinear elastic and viscoelastic passive properties of left ventricular papillary muscle of a guinea pig heart.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M A; Hamdi, M; Noma, A

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of the heart muscle tissues is the central problem in finite element simulation of the heart contraction, excitation propagation and development of an artificial heart. Nonlinear elastic and viscoelastic passive material properties of the left ventricular papillary muscle of a guinea pig heart were determined based on in-vitro precise uniaxial and relaxation tests. The nonlinear elastic behavior was modeled by a hypoelastic model and different hyperelastic strain energy functions such as Ogden and Mooney-Rivlin. Nonlinear least square fitting and constrained optimization were conducted under MATLAB and MSC.MARC in order to obtain the model material parameters. The experimental tensile data was used to get the nonlinear elastic mechanical behavior of the heart muscle. However, stress relaxation data was used to determine the relaxation behavior as well as viscosity of the tissues. Viscohyperelastic behavior was constructed by a multiplicative decomposition of a standard Ogden strain energy function, W, for instantaneous deformation and a relaxation function, R(t), in a Prony series form. The study reveals that hypoelastic and hyperelastic (Ogden) models fit the tissue mechanical behaviors well and can be safely used for heart mechanics simulation. Since the characteristic relaxation time (900 s) of heart muscle tissues is very large compared with the actual time of heart beating cycle (800 ms), the effect of viscosity can be reasonably ignored. The amount and type of experimental data has a strong effect on the Ogden parameters. The in vitro passive mechanical properties are good initial values to start running the biosimulation codes for heart mechanics. However, an optimization algorithm is developed, based on clinical intact heart measurements, to estimate and re-correct the material parameters in order to get the in vivo mechanical properties, needed for very accurate bio-simulation and for the development of new materials for the

  8. Isolation and Culture of Satellite Cells from Mouse Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Musarò, Antonio; Carosio, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is characterized by a population of quiescent mononucleated myoblasts, localized between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of myofibers, known as satellite cells. Satellite cells play a pivotal role in muscle homeostasis and are the major source of myogenic precursors in mammalian muscle regeneration.This chapter describes protocols for isolation and culturing satellite cells isolated from mouse skeletal muscles. The classical procedure, which will be discussed extensively in this chapter, involves the enzymatic dissociation of skeletal muscles, while the alternative method involves isolation of satellite cells from isolated myofibers in which the satellite cells remain in their in situ position underneath the myofiber basal lamina.In particular, we discuss the technical aspect of satellite cell isolation, the methods necessary to enrich the satellite cell fraction and the culture conditions that optimize proliferation and myotube formation of mouse satellite cells.

  9. The muscle satellite cell at 50: the formative years

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In February 1961, Alexander Mauro described a cell 'wedged' between the plasma membrane of the muscle fibre and the surrounding basement membrane. He postulated that it could be a dormant myoblast, poised to repair muscle when needed. In the same month, Bernard Katz also reported a cell in a similar location on muscle spindles, suggesting that it was associated with development and growth of intrafusal muscle fibres. Both Mauro and Katz used the term 'satellite cell' in relation to their discoveries. Today, the muscle satellite cell is widely accepted as the resident stem cell of skeletal muscle, supplying myoblasts for growth, homeostasis and repair. Since 2011 marks both the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the satellite cell, and the launch of Skeletal Muscle, it seems an opportune moment to summarise the seminal events in the history of research into muscle regeneration. We start with the 19th-century pioneers who showed that muscle had a regenerative capacity, through to the descriptions from the mid-20th century of the underlying cellular mechanisms. The journey of the satellite cell from electron microscope curio, to its gradual acceptance as a bona fide myoblast precursor, is then charted: work that provided the foundations for our understanding of the role of the satellite cell. Finally, the rapid progress in the age of molecular biology is briefly discussed, and some ongoing debates on satellite cell function highlighted. PMID:21849021

  10. Amino acid pools in cultured muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Low, R B; Stirewalt, W S; Rittling, S R; Woodworth, R C

    1984-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular amino acid pools occurs in cultures of cardiac and skeletal muscle cells, but the factors involved in this are not clear. We have further defined this problem by analyzing the intracellular free leucine and the transfer-RNA-(tRNA)-bound leucine pool in cultures of skeletal and cardiac muscle incubated with 3H-leucine in the presence and absence of serum and amino acids. Withdrawal of nitrogen substrates caused substantial changes in leucine pool relationships--in particular, a change in the degree to which intracellular free leucine and tRNA-leucine were derived from the culture medium. In separate experiments, the validity of our tRNA measurements was confirmed by measurements of the specific activity of newly synthesized ferritin after iron induction. We discuss the implications of these findings with regard to factors involved in the control of amino acid flux through the cell, as well as with regard to design of experiments using isotopic amino acids to measure rates of amino acid utilization.

  11. Comparison of transcriptomic responses to pancreas disease (PD) and heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) in heart of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L).

    PubMed

    Johansen, Lill-Heidi; Thim, Hanna L; Jørgensen, Sven Martin; Afanasyev, Sergey; Strandskog, Guro; Taksdal, Torunn; Fremmerlid, Kjersti; McLoughlin, Marion; Jørgensen, Jorunn B; Krasnov, Aleksei

    2015-10-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) and heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) are viral diseases associated with SAV (salmonid alphavirus) and PRV (piscine reovirus), which induce systemic infections and pathologies in cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue of farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L), resulting in severe morbidity and mortality. While general features of the clinical symptoms and pathogenesis of salmonid viral diseases are relatively well studied, much less is known about molecular mechanisms associated with immunity and disease-specific changes. In this study, transcriptomic analyses of heart tissue from PD and HSMI challenged Atlantic salmon were done, focusing on the mature phases of both diseases at respectively 28-35 and 42-77 days post infection. A large number of immune genes was activated in both trials with prevalence of genes associated with early innate antiviral responses, their expression levels being slightly higher in PD challenged fish. Activation of the IFN axis was in parallel with inflammatory changes that involved diverse humoral and cellular factors. Adaptive immune response genes were more pronounced in fish with HSMI, as suggested by increased expression of a large number of genes associated with differentiation and maturation of B lymphocytes and cytotoxic T cells. A similar down-regulation of non-immune genes such as myofiber and mitochondrial proteins between diseases was most likely reflecting myocardial pathology. A suite of genes important for cardiac function including B-type natriuretic peptide and four neuropeptides displayed differential expression between PD and HSMI. Comparison of results revealed common and distinct features and added to the understanding of both diseases at their mature phases with typical clinical pictures. A number of genes that showed disease-specific changes can be of interest for diagnostics.

  12. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    PubMed

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Macrophage-released ADAMTS1 promotes muscle stem cell activation.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongqing; Shih, Chung-Hsuan; Wosczyna, Michael N; Mueller, Alisa A; Cho, Joonseok; Aggarwal, Abhishek; Rando, Thomas A; Feldman, Brian J

    2017-09-22

    Coordinated activation of muscle stem cells (known as satellite cells) is critical for postnatal muscle growth and regeneration. The muscle stem cell niche is central for regulating the activation state of satellite cells, but the specific extracellular signals that coordinate this regulation are poorly understood. Here we show that macrophages at sites of muscle injury induce activation of satellite cells via expression of Adamts1. Overexpression of Adamts1 in macrophages in vivo is sufficient to increase satellite cell activation and improve muscle regeneration in young mice. We demonstrate that NOTCH1 is a target of ADAMTS1 metalloproteinase activity, which reduces Notch signaling, leading to increased satellite cell activation. These results identify Adamts1 as a potent extracellular regulator of satellite cell activation and have significant implications for understanding the regulation of satellite cell activity and regeneration after muscle injury.Satellite cells are crucial for growth and regeneration of skeletal muscle. Here the authors show that in response to muscle injury, macrophages secrete Adamts1, which induces satellite cell activation by modulating Notch1 signaling.

  14. Cdc42 and formin activity control non-muscle myosin dynamics during Drosophila heart morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Georg; Liu, Jiandong; Iafe, Timothy W.; Migh, Ede; Mihály, József

    2014-01-01

    During heart formation, a network of transcription factors and signaling pathways guide cardiac cell fate and differentiation, but the genetic mechanisms orchestrating heart assembly and lumen formation remain unclear. Here, we show that the small GTPase Cdc42 is essential for Drosophila melanogaster heart morphogenesis and lumen formation. Cdc42 genetically interacts with the cardiogenic transcription factor tinman; with dDAAM which belongs to the family of actin organizing formins; and with zipper, which encodes nonmuscle myosin II. Zipper is required for heart lumen formation, and its spatiotemporal activity at the prospective luminal surface is controlled by Cdc42. Heart-specific expression of activated Cdc42, or the regulatory formins dDAAM and Diaphanous caused mislocalization of Zipper and induced ectopic heart lumina, as characterized by luminal markers such as the extracellular matrix protein Slit. Placement of Slit at the lumen surface depends on Cdc42 and formin function. Thus, Cdc42 and formins play pivotal roles in heart lumen formation through the spatiotemporal regulation of the actomyosin network. PMID:25267295

  15. Notch signal reception is required in vascular smooth muscle cells for ductus arteriosus closure

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Luke T.; Norton, Christine R.; Gridley, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Summary The ductus arteriosus is an arterial vessel that shunts blood flow away from the lungs during fetal life, but normally occludes after birth to establish the adult circulation pattern. Failure of the ductus arteriosus to close after birth is termed patent ductus arteriosus, and is one of the most common congenital heart defects. Our previous work demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cell expression of the Jag1 gene, which encodes a ligand for Notch family receptors, is essential for postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. However, it was not known what cell population was responsible for receiving the Jag1-mediated signal. Here we show, using smooth muscle cell-specific deletion of the Rbpj gene, which encodes a transcription factor that mediates all canonical Notch signaling, that Notch signal reception in the vascular smooth muscle cell compartment is required for ductus arteriosus closure. These data indicate that homotypic vascular smooth muscle cell interactions are required for proper contractile smooth muscle cell differentiation and postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. PMID:26742650

  16. Notch signal reception is required in vascular smooth muscle cells for ductus arteriosus closure.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Luke T; Norton, Christine R; Gridley, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The ductus arteriosus is an arterial vessel that shunts blood flow away from the lungs during fetal life, but normally occludes after birth to establish the adult circulation pattern. Failure of the ductus arteriosus to close after birth is termed patent ductus arteriosus, and is one of the most common congenital heart defects. Our previous work demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cell expression of the Jag1 gene, which encodes a ligand for Notch family receptors, is essential for postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. However, it was not known what cell population was responsible for receiving the Jag1-mediated signal. Here we show, using smooth muscle cell-specific deletion of the Rbpj gene, which encodes a transcription factor that mediates all canonical Notch signaling, that Notch signal reception in the vascular smooth muscle cell compartment is required for ductus arteriosus closure. These data indicate that homotypic vascular smooth muscle cell interactions are required for proper contractile smooth muscle cell differentiation and postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mapping the Pairwise Choices Leading from Pluripotency to Human Bone, Heart, and Other Mesoderm Cell Types.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kyle M; Chen, Angela; Koh, Pang Wei; Deng, Tianda Z; Sinha, Rahul; Tsai, Jonathan M; Barkal, Amira A; Shen, Kimberle Y; Jain, Rajan; Morganti, Rachel M; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Fernhoff, Nathaniel B; George, Benson M; Wernig, Gerlinde; Salomon, Rachel E A; Chen, Zhenghao; Vogel, Hannes; Epstein, Jonathan A; Kundaje, Anshul; Talbot, William S; Beachy, Philip A; Ang, Lay Teng; Weissman, Irving L

    2016-07-14

    Stem-cell differentiation to desired lineages requires navigating alternating developmental paths that often lead to unwanted cell types. Hence, comprehensive developmental roadmaps are crucial to channel stem-cell differentiation toward desired fates. To this end, here, we map bifurcating lineage choices leading from pluripotency to 12 human mesodermal lineages, including bone, muscle, and heart. We defined the extrinsic signals controlling each binary lineage decision, enabling us to logically block differentiation toward unwanted fates and rapidly steer pluripotent stem cells toward 80%-99% pure human mesodermal lineages at most branchpoints. This strategy enabled the generation of human bone and heart progenitors that could engraft in respective in vivo models. Mapping stepwise chromatin and single-cell gene expression changes in mesoderm development uncovered somite segmentation, a previously unobservable human embryonic event transiently marked by HOPX expression. Collectively, this roadmap enables navigation of mesodermal development to produce transplantable human tissue progenitors and uncover developmental processes. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  18. Deconditioning fails to explain peripheral skeletal muscle alterations in men with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Duscha, Brian D; Annex, Brian H; Green, Howard J; Pippen, Anne M; Kraus, William E

    2002-04-03

    It remains controversial whether the skeletal muscle alterations in chronic heart failure (CHF) are due to disease pathophysiology or result from chronic deconditioning. The purpose of this study was to compare the skeletal muscle of CHF patients to peak oxygen consumption (peak VO(2)) matched sedentary controls. It has been established that skeletal muscle abnormalities are related to the exercise intolerance observed in patients with CHF. We studied the skeletal muscle of sedentary controls and patients with CHF matched for age, gender and peak VO(2). Hypothesis testing for the effects of group (CHF vs. normal), gender, and the interaction group x gender were performed. For capillary density only gender (p = 0.002) and the interaction of group x gender (p = 0.007) were significantly different. For 3-hydroxyl coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase only group effect (p = 0.004) was significantly different. Mean values for capillary density were 1.46 +/- 0.28 for CHF men versus 1.87 +/- 0.32 for sedentary control men, 1.40 +/- 0.32 for CHF women versus 1.15 +/- 0.35 for sedentary control women. The activities for 3-hydroxyl CoA dehydrogenase were 3.09 +/- 0.88 for CHF men versus 4.05 +/- 0.42 for sedentary control men, 2.93 +/- 0.72 for CHF women versus 3.51 +/- 0.78 for sedentary control women. This study suggests that women and men adapt to CHF differently: men develop peripheral skeletal muscle abnormalities that are not attributable to deconditioning; women do not develop the same pathologic responses in skeletal muscle when compared with normal women matched for aerobic capacity.

  19. Mouse sectioned muscle regenerates following auto-grafting with muscle fragments: a new muscle precursor cells transfer?

    PubMed

    Biérinx, Anne-Sophie; Sebille, Alain

    2008-02-06

    It was discovered fifty years ago that a minced skeletal muscle replaced in its bed is able to regenerate. This regeneration is due to the presence of quiescent muscle precursor cells so-called satellite cells in the adult muscle which proliferate and fuse to regenerate new centronucleated fibres when the muscle is damaged. These observations open therapeutic perspectives and, in this study, we attempted to test in the mouse whether fragments of minced muscle regenerate new fibres to fill the gap resulting from the trans-section and retraction of the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL). When untreated this gap never regenerates. In agreement with Studitsky, we observed that a minced EDL replaced in its bed regenerates fibres that are spatially disorganised. Minced fragments of abdominus rectus muscle placed in the gap resulting of the trans-section of the EDL regenerate muscle fibres in the gap with a better organisation that in the whole minced muscle. These results could have putative clinical applications, for instance in the prevention of incontinence following prostatectomy which implies removal excision of a large part of the striated urethral sphincter.

  20. Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through satellite cell expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Somik; Yin, Hongshan; Nam, Deokhwa; Li, Yong; Ma, Ke

    2015-02-01

    Circadian clock is an evolutionarily conserved timing mechanism governing diverse biological processes and the skeletal muscle possesses intrinsic functional clocks. Interestingly, although the essential clock transcription activator, Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1), participates in maintenance of muscle mass, little is known regarding its role in muscle growth and repair. In this report, we investigate the in vivo function of Bmal1 in skeletal muscle regeneration using two muscle injury models. Bmal1 is highly up-regulated by cardiotoxin injury, and its genetic ablation significantly impairs regeneration with markedly suppressed new myofiber formation and attenuated myogenic induction. A similarly defective regenerative response is observed in Bmal1-null mice as compared to wild-type controls upon freeze injury. Lack of satellite cell expansion accounts for the regeneration defect, as Bmal1{sup −/−} mice display significantly lower satellite cell number with nearly abolished induction of the satellite cell marker, Pax7. Furthermore, satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts devoid of Bmal1 display reduced growth and proliferation ex vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that Bmal1 is an integral component of the pro-myogenic response that is required for muscle repair. This mechanism may underlie its role in preserving adult muscle mass and could be targeted therapeutically to prevent muscle-wasting diseases. - Highlights: • Bmal1 is highly inducible by muscle injury and myogenic stimuli. • Genetic ablation of Bmal1 significantly impairs muscle regeneration. • Bmal1 promotes satellite cell expansion during muscle regeneration. • Bmal1-deficient primary myoblasts display attenuated growth and proliferation.

  1. Maternal blood pressure and heart rate response to pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Cristine H; Naldoni, Luciane M V; Ribeiro, Juliana Dos Santos; Meirelles, Maria Cristina C C; Cavalli, Ricardo de Carvalho; Bø, Kari

    2014-07-01

    To assess whether maternal blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) change significantly in response to pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy. Longitudinal exploratory study with repeated measurements. Twenty-seven nulliparous healthy women of mean age 23.3 years (range 18-36) and mean body mass index 23.4 (range 23.1-29.5). Individual supervised pelvic floor muscle training from gestational week 20 till 36 with assessment of BP and HR at gestational weeks 20, 24, 28, 32 and 36. Systolic and diastolic BP was measured before and after each training session and HR was monitored during each session. Pelvic floor muscle training did not change BP. 77% (n = 21) of participants exceeded 70% of estimated maximum HR during at least one session. The time for exceeding 70% of estimated maximum HR was between 2.2 and 3.2 % of the total exercise session. Increases in BP and HR from gestational weeks 20 till 36 were within normal limits for pregnant women. Pelvic floor muscle training in nulliparous sedentary pregnant women does not increase BP. It significantly increases HR during the exercise sessions, but only for a limited period of time and with no negative long-term effect on BP or HR. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  2. Levosimendan improves calcium sensitivity of diaphragm muscle fibres from a rat model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    van Hees, H W H; Andrade Acuña, Gl; Linkels, M; Dekhuijzen, P N R; Heunks, L M A

    2011-02-01

    Diaphragm muscle weakness occurs in patients with heart failure (HF) and is associated with exercise intolerance and increased mortality. Reduced sensitivity of diaphragm fibres to calcium contributes to diaphragm weakness in HF. Here we have investigated the ability of the calcium sensitizer levosimendan to restore the reduced calcium sensitivity of diaphragm fibres from rats with HF. Coronary artery ligation in rats was used as an animal model for HF. Sham-operated rats served as controls. Fifteen weeks after induction of HF or sham operations animals were killed and muscle fibres were isolated from the diaphragm. Diaphragm fibres were skinned and activated with solutions containing incremental calcium concentrations and 10 µM levosimendan or vehicle (0.02% DMSO). Developed force was measured at each calcium concentration, and force-calcium concentration relationships were plotted. Calcium sensitivity of force generation was reduced in diaphragm muscle fibres from HF rats, compared with fibres from control rats (P < 0.01). Maximal force generation was ∼25% lower in HF diaphragm fibres than in control fibres (P < 0.05). Levosimendan significantly increased calcium sensitivity of force generation in diaphragm fibres from HF and control rats, without affecting maximal force generation. Levosimendan enhanced the force generating capacity of diaphragm fibres from HF rats by increasing the sensitivity of force generation to calcium concentration. These results provide strong support for testing the effect of calcium sensitizers on diaphragm muscle weakness in patients with HF. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. Aging, metabolism and stem cells: Spotlight on muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    García-Prat, Laura; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-04-15

    All tissues and organs undergo a progressive regenerative decline as they age. This decline has been mainly attributed to loss of stem cell number and/or function, and both stem cell-intrinsic changes and alterations in local niches and/or systemic environment over time are known to contribute to the stem cell aging phenotype. Advancing in the molecular understanding of the deterioration of stem cell cells with aging is key for targeting the specific causes of tissue regenerative dysfunction at advanced stages of life. Here, we revise exciting recent findings on why stem cells age and the consequences on tissue regeneration, with a special focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle. We also highlight newly identified common molecular pathways affecting diverse types of aging stem cells, such as altered proteostasis, metabolism, or senescence entry, and discuss the questions raised by these findings. Finally, we comment on emerging stem cell rejuvenation strategies, principally emanating from studies on muscle stem cells, which will surely burst tissue regeneration research for future benefit of the increasing human aging population.

  4. Cell-cell junction remodeling in the heart: possible role in cardiac conduction system function and arrhythmias?

    PubMed

    Mezzano, Valeria; Sheikh, Farah

    2012-02-27

    Anchoring cell-cell junctions (desmosomes, fascia adherens) play crucial roles in maintaining mechanical integrity of cardiac muscle cells and tissue. Genetic mutations and/or loss of critical components in these macromolecular structures are increasingly being associated with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies; however, their specific roles have been primarily attributed to effects within the working (ventricular) cardiac muscle. Growing evidence also points to a key role for anchoring cell-cell junction components in cardiac muscle cells of the cardiac conduction system. This is not only evidenced by the molecular and ultra-structural presence of anchoring cell junctions in specific compartments/structures of the cardiac conduction system (sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node, His-Purkinje system), but also because conduction system-related arrhythmias can be found in humans and mouse models of cardiomyopathies harboring defects and/or mutations in key anchoring cell-cell junction proteins. These studies emphasize the clinical need to understand the molecular and cellular role(s) for anchoring cell-cell junctions in cardiac conduction system function and arrhythmias. This review will focus on (i) experimental findings that underline an important role for anchoring cell-cell junctions in the cardiac conduction system, (ii) insights regarding involvement of these structures in age-related cardiac remodeling of the conduction system, (iii) summarizing available genetic mouse models that can target cardiac conduction system structures and (iv) implications of these findings on future therapies for arrhythmogenic heart diseases.

  5. ASIC3 Contributes to the Blunted Muscle Metaboreflex in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jihong; Lu, Jian; Li, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Introduction During exercise, the sympathetic nervous system is activated and blood pressure and heart rate increase. In heart failure (HF), the muscle metaboreceptor contribution to sympathetic outflow is attenuated and the mechanoreceptor contribution is accentuated. Previous studies suggest that lactic acid stimulates acid sensing channel subtype 3 (ASIC3), inducing a neurally mediated pressor response. Thus, we hypothesized that the pressor response to ASIC3 stimulation is smaller in HF rats due to attenuation in expression and function of ASIC3 in sensory nerves. Methods Lactic acid was injected into the arterial blood supply of the hindlimb to stimulate ASIC3 in muscle afferent nerves and evoke the muscle metaboreceptor response in control rats and HF rats. Also, western blot analysis was employed to examine expression of ASIC3 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and patch clamp to examine current response with ASIC3 activation. Results Lactic acid (4 µmol/kg) increased mean arterial pressure by 28±5 mmHg in controls (n=6) but only by 16±3 mmHg (P<0.05 vs. control) in HF (n=8). In addition, HF decreased the protein levels of ASIC3 in DRG (optical density: 1.03±0.02 in control vs. 0.79±0.03 in HF, P<0.05; n=6 in each group). The peak current amplitude of dorsal DRG neuron in response to ASIC3 stimulation is smaller in HF rats than that in control rats. Conclusions Compared with controls, cardiovascular responses to lactic acid administered into the hindlimb muscles are blunted in HF rats owing to attenuated ASIC3. This suggests that ASIC3 plays a role in engagement in the attenuated metaboreceptor component of the exercise pressor reflex in HF. PMID:24983337

  6. Advancements in stem cells treatment of skeletal muscle wasting

    PubMed Central

    Meregalli, Mirella; Farini, Andrea; Sitzia, Clementina; Torrente, Yvan

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders, in which progressive muscle wasting and weakness is often associated with exhaustion of muscle regeneration potential. Although physiological properties of skeletal muscle tissue are now well known, no treatments are effective for these diseases. Muscle regeneration was attempted by means transplantation of myogenic cells (from myoblast to embryonic stem cells) and also by interfering with the malignant processes that originate in pathological tissues, such as uncontrolled fibrosis and inflammation. Taking into account the advances in the isolation of new subpopulation of stem cells and in the creation of artificial stem cell niches, we discuss how these emerging technologies offer great promises for therapeutic approaches to muscle diseases and muscle wasting associated with aging. PMID:24575052

  7. Fibronectin is deposited by injury-activated epicardial cells and is necessary for zebrafish heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinhu; Karra, Ravi; Dickson, Amy L.; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike adult mammals, adult zebrafish vigorously regenerate lost heart muscle in response to injury. The epicardium, a mesothelial cell layer enveloping the myocardium, is activated to proliferate after cardiac injury and can contribute vascular support cells or provide mitogens to regenerating muscle. Here, we applied proteomics to identify secreted proteins that are associated with heart regeneration. We found that Fibronectin, a main component of the extracellular matrix, is induced and deposited after cardiac damage. In situ hybridization and transgenic reporter analyses indicated that expression of two fibronectin paralogues, fn1 and fn1b, are induced by injury in epicardial cells, while the itgb3 receptor is induced in cardiomyocytes near the injury site. fn1, the more dynamic of these paralogs, is induced chamber-wide within one day of injury before localizing epicardial Fn1 synthesis to the injury site. fn1 loss-of-function mutations disrupted zebrafish heart regeneration, as did induced expression of a dominant-negative Fibronectin cassette, defects that were not attributable to direct inhibition of cardiomyocyte proliferation. These findings reveal a new role for the epicardium in establishing an extracellular environment that supports heart regeneration. PMID:23988577

  8. Excess SMAD signaling contributes to heart and muscle dysfunction in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jeffery A; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Beiriger, Anastasia; Wren, Lisa M; Rossi, Ann E; Gao, Quan Q; Gardner, Brandon B; Earley, Judy U; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-12-20

    Disruption of the dystrophin complex causes muscle injury, dysfunction, cell death and fibrosis. Excess transforming growth factor (TGF) β signaling has been described in human muscular dystrophy and animal models, where it is thought to relate to the progressive fibrosis that characterizes dystrophic muscle. We now found that canonical TGFβ signaling acutely increases when dystrophic muscle is stimulated to contract. Muscle lacking the dystrophin-associated protein γ-sarcoglycan (Sgcg null) was subjected to a lengthening protocol to produce maximal muscle injury, which produced rapid accumulation of nuclear phosphorylated SMAD2/3. To test whether reducing SMAD signaling improves muscular dystrophy in mice, we introduced a heterozygous mutation of SMAD4 (S4) into Sgcg mice to reduce but not ablate SMAD4. Sgcg/S4 mice had improved body mass compared with Sgcg mice, which normally show a wasting phenotype similar to human muscular dystrophy patients. Sgcg/S4 mice had improved cardiac function as well as improved twitch and tetanic force in skeletal muscle. Functional enhancement in Sgcg/S4 muscle occurred without a reduction in fibrosis, suggesting that intracellular SMAD4 targets may be important. An assessment of genes differentially expressed in Sgcg muscle focused on those encoding calcium-handling proteins and responsive to TGFβ since this pathway is a target for mediating improvement in muscular dystrophy. These data demonstrate that excessive TGFβ signaling alters cardiac and muscle performance through the intracellular SMAD pathway. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Ca2+ flux and beating in leaky heart cells.

    PubMed

    Bloom, S

    1980-01-01

    Previous work has shown that beating heart muscle cells with leaky sarcolemmae take up Ca2+ from the medium at a rate of 5.4 nmol/min/mg of protein while beating at a rate of 44 b.p.m. In the present work, we have used fragments of myocardium (MF), composed of such cells, to measure Ca2+ effux velocity and to compare influx and efflux rates to contraction frequency. The MF were estimated to be three cells thick, five cells wide, and three cells long, on the average. With MF suspended in fresh Pi-buffered medium containing 8.7 mumol/liter total Ca2+, the initial velocity of Ca2+ uptake (Vi) was much greater than the initial velocity of efflux (Vo). Vi, but not Vo, covaried with beating as a function of temperature and also showed ATP dependence. Thus, uptake, but not efflux, is a controlled process coupled to beating under these conditions. When cells were preloaded with Ca2+ and resuspended in Ca2+-depleted medium (total Ca2+ about 1 mumol/liter), approximating the steady state condition, Vi was reduced while Vo increased proportionally. These data suggest that contraction-activating Ca2+ is derived from extracellular sources during the pre-steady state conditions used here. Derivation from intracellular sites could occur in the steady state. The pre-steady state results conflict with mechanical behavior studies by us and others and, with Ca2+ flux in isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The steady state results suggest that this conflict may be due to differences in Ca2+ loading and [Ca2+]i/[Ca2+]o.

  10. [Analogies between heart and respiratory muscle failure. Importance to clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Köhler, D

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure is an established diagnosis. Respiratory muscle or ventilatory pump failure, however, is less well known. The latter becomes obvious through hypercapnia, caused by hypoventilation. The respiratory centre tunes into hypercapnea in order to prevent the danger of respiratory muscle overload (hypercapnic ventilatory failure). Hypoventilation will consecutively cause hypoxemia but this will not be responsible for performance limitation. One therefore has to distinguish primary hypoxemia evolving from diseases in the lung parenchyma. Here hypoxemia is the key feature and compensatory hyperventilation usually decreases PaCO2 levels. The cardiac as well as the respiratory pump adapt to an inevitable burden caused by chronic disease. In either case organ muscle mass will increase. If the burden exceeds the range of possible physiological adaptation, compensatory mechanisms will set in that are similar in both instances. During periods of overload either muscle system is mainly fueled by muscular glycogen. In the recovery phase (e. g. during sleep) stores are replenished, which can be recognized by down-regulation of the blood pressure in case of the cardiac pumb or by augmentation of hypercapnia through hypoventilation in case of the respiratory pump. The main function of cardiac and respiratory pump is maintenance of oxygen transport. The human body has developed certain compensatory mechanisms to adapt to insufficient oxygen supply especially during periods of overload. These mechanisms include shift of the oxygen binding curve, expression of respiratory chain isoenzymes capable of producing ATP at lower partial pressures of oxygen and the development of polyglobulia. Medically or pharmacologically the cardiac pump can be unloaded with beta blockers, the respiratory pump by application of inspired oxygen. Newer forms of therapy augment the process of recovery. The heart can be supported through bypass surgery or intravascular pump systems, while respiratory

  11. PEDF-derived peptide promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through its mitogenic effect on muscle progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tsung-Chuan; Chiang, Yi-Pin; Chuang, Chih-Kuang; Chen, Show-Li; Hsieh, Jui-Wen; Lan, Yu-Wen; Tsao, Yeou-Ping

    2015-08-01

    In response injury, intrinsic repair mechanisms are activated in skeletal muscle to replace the damaged muscle fibers with new muscle fibers. The regeneration process starts with the proliferation of satellite cells to give rise to myoblasts, which subsequently differentiate terminally into myofibers. Here, we investigated the promotion effect of pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) on muscle regeneration. We report that PEDF and a synthetic PEDF-derived short peptide (PSP; residues Ser(93)-Leu(112)) induce satellite cell proliferation in vitro and promote muscle regeneration in vivo. Extensively, soleus muscle necrosis was induced in rats by bupivacaine, and an injectable alginate gel was used to release the PSP in the injured muscle. PSP delivery was found to stimulate satellite cell proliferation in damaged muscle and enhance the growth of regenerating myofibers, with complete regeneration of normal muscle mass by 2 wk. In cell culture, PEDF/PSP stimulated C2C12 myoblast proliferation, together with a rise in cyclin D1 expression. PEDF induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt, and STAT3 in C2C12 myoblasts. Blocking the activity of ERK, Akt, or STAT3 with pharmacological inhibitors attenuated the effects of PEDF/PSP on the induction of C2C12 cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine pulse-labeling demonstrated that PEDF/PSP stimulated primary rat satellite cell proliferation in myofibers in vitro. In summary, we report for the first time that PSP is capable of promoting the regeneration of skeletal muscle. The signaling mechanism involves the ERK, AKT, and STAT3 pathways. These results show the potential utility of this PEDF peptide for muscle regeneration.

  12. Rejuvenating stem cells to restore muscle regeneration in aging

    PubMed Central

    Bengal, Eyal; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Serrano, Antonio L.; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-01-01

    Adult muscle stem cells, originally called satellite cells, are essential for muscle repair and regeneration throughout life. Besides a gradual loss of mass and function, muscle aging is characterized by a decline in the repair capacity, which blunts muscle recovery after injury in elderly individuals. A major effort has been dedicated in recent years to deciphering the causes of satellite cell dysfunction in aging animals, with the ultimate goal of rejuvenating old satellite cells and improving muscle function in elderly people. This review focuses on the recently identified network of cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors and processes contributing to the decline of satellite cells in old animals. Some studies suggest that aging-related satellite-cell decay is mostly caused by age-associated extrinsic environmental changes that could be reversed by a “youthful environment”. Others propose a central role for cell-intrinsic mechanisms, some of which are not reversed by environmental changes. We believe that these proposals, far from being antagonistic, are complementary and that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors contribute to muscle stem cell dysfunction during aging-related regenerative decline. The low regenerative potential of old satellite cells may reflect the accumulation of deleterious changes during the life of the cell; some of these changes may be inherent (intrinsic) while others result from the systemic and local environment (extrinsic). The present challenge is to rejuvenate aged satellite cells that have undergone reversible changes to provide a possible approach to improving muscle repair in the elderly. PMID:28163911

  13. Resveratrol causes cell cycle arrest, decreased collagen synthesis, and apoptosis in rat intestinal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Patricia; Schmiedlin-Ren, Phyllissa; Mathias, Jason S.; Tang, Huaijing; Christman, Gregory M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most difficult and treatment-resistant complications of Crohn's disease is the development of fibrotic intestinal strictures due to mesenchymal cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in berries, peanuts, grapes, and red wine, has been shown to inhibit fibrosis in vasculature, heart, lung, kidney, liver, and esophagus in animal models. Resveratrol has also been shown to inhibit oxidation, inflammation, and cell proliferation and to decrease collagen synthesis in several cell types or animal models. The aim of this study was to determine whether resveratrol has antifibrotic effects on intestinal smooth muscle cells. Responses to resveratrol by cultured smooth muscle cells isolated from colons of untreated Lewis rats were examined; this rat strain is used in a model of Crohn's disease with prominent intestinal fibrosis. A relative decrease in cell numbers following treatment with 50 and 100 μM resveratrol was evident at 24 h (P ≤ 0.005). This effect was largely due to cell cycle arrest, with an increase in the percent of cells in S phase from 8 to 25–35% (P < 0.05). Cell viability was unchanged until 2–3 days of treatment when there was a 1.2- to 5.0-fold increase in the percent of apoptotic cells, depending on the assay (P < 0.05). Expression of collagen type I protein was decreased following treatment with resveratrol for 24 h (to 44 and 25% of control levels with 50 and 100 μM resveratrol, respectively; P < 0.05). Expression of procollagen types I and III mRNA was also decreased with resveratrol treatment. Resveratrol (50 μM) diminished the proliferative response to TGF-β1 (P = 0.02) as well as IGF-I-stimulated collagen production (P = 0.02). Thus resveratrol decreases intestinal smooth muscle cell numbers through its effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and also decreases collagen synthesis by the cells. These effects could be useful in preventing the smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and collagen

  14. Effects of the Kinase Inhibitor Sorafenib on Heart, Muscle, Liver, and Plasma Metabolism In Vivo using Non-Targeted Metabolomics Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brian C; Parry, Traci L; Huang, Wei; Beak, Ju Youn; Ilaiwy, Amro; Bain, James R; Newgard, Christopher B; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Patterson, Cam; Johnson, Gary L; Willis, Monte S

    2017-10-04

    The human kinome consists of roughly 500 kinases, including 150 that have been proposed as therapeutic targets. Protein kinases regulate an array of signaling pathways that control metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell death, differentiation, and survival. It is not surprising, then, that new kinase inhibitors (KIs) developed to treat cancer, including sorafenib, also exhibit cardiotoxicity. We hypothesized that sorafenib cardiotoxicity is related to its deleterious effects on specific cardiac metabolic pathways given the critical roles of protein kinases in cardiac metabolism. FVB/N mice (10 per group) were challenged with sorafenib or vehicle control daily for two weeks. Echocardiographic assessment of the heart identified systolic dysfunction consistent with cardiotoxicity in sorafenib-treated mice compared to vehicle treated controls. Heart, skeletal muscle, liver, and plasma were flash frozen and prepped for non-targeted GC-MS metabolomics analysis. Compared to vehicle treated controls, sorafenib-treated hearts exhibited significant alterations in 11 metabolites, including markedly altered taurine/hypotaurine metabolism (25-fold enrichment) by pathway enrichment analysis. These studies identify alterations in taurine/hypotaurine metabolism in the hearts and skeletal muscles of mice treated with sorafenib. Interventions to rescue or prevent sorafenib-related cardiotoxicity by targeting the induced taurine/hypotaurine deficiency identified in the current study. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  16. 3D Cell Printing of Functional Skeletal Muscle Constructs Using Skeletal Muscle-Derived Bioink.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeong-Jin; Kim, Taek Gyoung; Jeong, Jonghyeon; Yi, Hee-Gyeong; Park, Ji Won; Hwang, Woonbong; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-10-01

    Engineered skeletal muscle tissues that mimic the structure and function of native muscle have been considered as an alternative strategy for the treatment of various muscular diseases and injuries. Here, it is demonstrated that 3D cell-printing of decellularized skeletal muscle extracellular matrix (mdECM)-based bioink facilitates the fabrication of functional skeletal muscle constructs. The cellular alignment and the shape of the tissue constructs are controlled by 3D cell-printing technology. mdECM bioink provides the 3D cell-printed muscle constructs with a myogenic environment that supports high viability and contractility as well as myotube formation, differentiation, and maturation. More interestingly, the preservation of agrin is confirmed in the mdECM, and significant increases in the formation of acetylcholine receptor clusters are exhibited in the 3D cell-printed muscle constructs. In conclusion, mdECM bioink and 3D cell-printing technology facilitate the mimicking of both the structural and functional properties of native muscle and hold great promise for producing clinically relevant engineered muscle for the treatment of muscular injuries.

  17. Progressive Muscle Cell Delivery as a Solution for Volumetric Muscle Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Ko, In Kap; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing functional volumetric tissue in vivo following implantation remains a critical challenge facing cell-based approaches. Several pre-vascularization approaches have been developed to increase cell viability following implantation. Structural and functional restoration was achieved in a preclinical rodent tissue defect; however, the approach used in this model fails to repair larger (>mm) defects as observed in a clinical setting. We propose an effective cell delivery system utilizing appropriate vascularization at the site of cell implantation that results in volumetric and functional tissue reconstruction. Our method of multiple cell injections in a progressive manner yielded improved cell survival and formed volumetric muscle tissues in an ectopic muscle site. In addition, this strategy supported the reconstruction of functional skeletal muscle tissue in a rodent volumetric muscle loss injury model. Results from our study suggest that our method may be used to repair volumetric tissue defects by overcoming diffusion limitations and facilitating adequate vascularization. PMID:27924941

  18. Action of obestatin in skeletal muscle repair: stem cell expansion, muscle growth, and microenvironment remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Santos-Zas, Icía; González-Sánchez, Jessica; Beiroa, Daniel; Moresi, Viviana; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Lin, Wei; Viñuela, Juan E; Señarís, José; García-Caballero, Tomás; Casanueva, Felipe F; Nogueiras, Rubén; Gallego, Rosalía; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Adamo, Sergio; Pazos, Yolanda; Camiña, Jesús P

    2015-06-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies for skeletal muscle diseases, such as physical injuries and myopathies, depends on the knowledge of regulatory signals that control the myogenic process. The obestatin/GPR39 system operates as an autocrine signal in the regulation of skeletal myogenesis. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury and several cellular strategies, we explored the potential use of obestatin as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of trauma-induced muscle injuries. Our results evidenced that the overexpression of the preproghrelin, and thus obestatin, and GPR39 in skeletal muscle increased regeneration after muscle injury. More importantly, the intramuscular injection of obestatin significantly enhanced muscle regeneration by simulating satellite stem cell expansion as well as myofiber hypertrophy through a kinase hierarchy. Added to the myogenic action, the obestatin administration resulted in an increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and the consequent microvascularization, with no effect on collagen deposition in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the potential inhibition of myostatin during obestatin treatment might contribute to its myogenic action improving muscle growth and regeneration. Overall, our data demonstrate successful improvement of muscle regeneration, indicating obestatin is a potential therapeutic agent for skeletal muscle injury and would benefit other myopathies related to muscle regeneration.

  19. Action of Obestatin in Skeletal Muscle Repair: Stem Cell Expansion, Muscle Growth, and Microenvironment Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Santos-Zas, Icía; González-Sánchez, Jessica; Beiroa, Daniel; Moresi, Viviana; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Lin, Wei; Viñuela, Juan E; Señarís, José; García-Caballero, Tomás; Casanueva, Felipe F; Nogueiras, Rubén; Gallego, Rosalía; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Adamo, Sergio; Pazos, Yolanda; Camiña, Jesús P

    2015-01-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies for skeletal muscle diseases, such as physical injuries and myopathies, depends on the knowledge of regulatory signals that control the myogenic process. The obestatin/GPR39 system operates as an autocrine signal in the regulation of skeletal myogenesis. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury and several cellular strategies, we explored the potential use of obestatin as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of trauma-induced muscle injuries. Our results evidenced that the overexpression of the preproghrelin, and thus obestatin, and GPR39 in skeletal muscle increased regeneration after muscle injury. More importantly, the intramuscular injection of obestatin significantly enhanced muscle regeneration by simulating satellite stem cell expansion as well as myofiber hypertrophy through a kinase hierarchy. Added to the myogenic action, the obestatin administration resulted in an increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and the consequent microvascularization, with no effect on collagen deposition in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the potential inhibition of myostatin during obestatin treatment might contribute to its myogenic action improving muscle growth and regeneration. Overall, our data demonstrate successful improvement of muscle regeneration, indicating obestatin is a potential therapeutic agent for skeletal muscle injury and would benefit other myopathies related to muscle regeneration. PMID:25762009

  20. Effect of diabetes and fasting on GLUT-4 (muscle/fat) glucose-transporter expression in insulin-sensitive tissues. Heterogeneous response in heart, red and white muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Camps, M; Castelló, A; Muñoz, P; Monfar, M; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Zorzano, A

    1992-01-01

    1. GLUT-4 glucose-transporter protein and mRNA levels were assessed in heart, red muscle and white muscle, as well as in brown and white adipose tissue from 7-day streptozotocin-induced diabetic and 48 h-fasted rats. 2. In agreement with previous data, white adipose tissue showed a substantial decrease in GLUT-4 mRNA and protein levels in response to both diabetes and fasting. Similarly, GLUT-4 mRNA and protein markedly decreased in brown adipose tissue in both insulinopenic conditions. 3. Under control conditions, the level of expression of GLUT-4 protein content differed substantially in heart, red and white skeletal muscle. Thus GLUT-4 protein was maximal in heart, and red muscle had a greater GLUT-4 content compared with white muscle. In spite of the large differences in GLUT-4 protein content, GLUT-4 mRNA levels were equivalent in heart and red skeletal muscle. 4. In heart, GLUT-4 mRNA decreased to a greater extent than GLUT-4 protein in response to diabetes and fasting. In contrast, red muscle showed a greater decrease in GLUT-4 protein than in mRNA in response to diabetes or fasting, and in fact no decrease in GLUT-4 mRNA content was detectable in fasting. On the other hand, preparations of white skeletal muscle showed a substantial increase in GLUT-4 mRNA under both insulinopenic conditions, and that was concomitant to either a modest decrease in GLUT-4 protein in diabetes or to no change in fasting. 5. These results indicate that (a) the effects of diabetes and fasting are almost identical and lead to changes in GLUT-4 expression that are tissue-specific, (b) white adipose tissue, brown adipose tissue and heart respond similarly to insulin deficiency by decreasing GLUT-4 mRNA to a larger extent than GLUT-4 protein, and (c) red and white skeletal muscle respond to insulinopenic conditions in a heterogeneous manner which is characterized by enhanced GLUT-4 mRNA/protein ratios. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1554359

  1. Turning terminally differentiated skeletal muscle cells into regenerative progenitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Lööf, Sara; Borg, Paula; Nader, Gustavo A; Blau, Helen M; Simon, András

    2015-08-05

    The ability to repeatedly regenerate limbs during the entire lifespan of an animal is restricted to certain salamander species among vertebrates. This ability involves dedifferentiation of post-mitotic cells into progenitors that in turn form new structures. A long-term enigma has been how injury leads to dedifferentiation. Here we show that skeletal muscle dedifferentiation during newt limb regeneration depends on a programmed cell death response by myofibres. We find that programmed cell death-induced muscle fragmentation produces a population of 'undead' intermediate cells, which have the capacity to resume proliferation and contribute to muscle regeneration. We demonstrate the derivation of proliferating progeny from differentiated, multinucleated muscle cells by first inducing and subsequently intercepting a programmed cell death response. We conclude that cell survival may be manifested by the production of a dedifferentiated cell with broader potential and that the diversion of a programmed cell death response is an instrument to achieve dedifferentiation.

  2. Skeletal muscle alterations in chronic heart failure: differential effects on quadriceps and diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Mangner, Norman; Weikert, Bettina; Bowen, T Scott; Sandri, Marcus; Höllriegel, Robert; Erbs, Sandra; Hambrecht, Rainer; Schuler, Gerhard; Linke, Axel; Gielen, Stephan; Adams, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure (CHF) results in limb and respiratory muscle weakness, which contributes to exercise intolerance and increased morbidity and mortality, yet the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to compare parameters of antioxidative capacity, energy metabolism, and catabolic/anabolic balance in diaphragm and quadriceps muscle in an animal model of CHF. Methods Ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (n = 13) or sham operation (n = 11) was performed on Wistar Kyoto rats. After 12 weeks, echocardiography and invasive determination of maximal rates of left ventricular (LV) pressure change were performed. Antioxidative and metabolic enzyme activities and expression of catabolic/anabolic markers were assessed in quadriceps and diaphragm muscle. Results Ligated rats developed CHF (i.e. severe LV dilatation, reduced LV ejection fraction, and impaired maximal rates of LV pressure change; P < 0.001). There was a divergent response for antioxidant enzymes between the diaphragm and quadriceps in CHF rats, with glutathione peroxidase and manganese superoxide dismutase activity increased in the diaphragm but reduced in the quadriceps relative to shams (P < 0.01). Metabolic enzymes were unaltered in the diaphragm, but cytochrome c oxidase activity (P < 0.01) decreased and lactate dehydrogenase activity (P < 0.05) increased in the quadriceps of CHF animals. Protein expression of the E3 ligase muscle ring finger 1 and proteasome activity were increased (P < 0.05) in both the diaphragm and quadriceps in CHF rats compared with shams. Conclusion Chronic heart failure induced divergent antioxidative and metabolic but similar catabolic responses between the diaphragm and quadriceps. Despite the quadriceps demonstrating significant impairments in CHF, apparent beneficial adaptations of an increased antioxidative capacity were induced in the diaphragm. Nevertheless, muscle ring finger 1 and

  3. Skeletal muscle alterations in chronic heart failure: differential effects on quadriceps and diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Mangner, Norman; Weikert, Bettina; Bowen, T Scott; Sandri, Marcus; Höllriegel, Robert; Erbs, Sandra; Hambrecht, Rainer; Schuler, Gerhard; Linke, Axel; Gielen, Stephan; Adams, Volker

    2015-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) results in limb and respiratory muscle weakness, which contributes to exercise intolerance and increased morbidity and mortality, yet the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to compare parameters of antioxidative capacity, energy metabolism, and catabolic/anabolic balance in diaphragm and quadriceps muscle in an animal model of CHF. Ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (n = 13) or sham operation (n = 11) was performed on Wistar Kyoto rats. After 12 weeks, echocardiography and invasive determination of maximal rates of left ventricular (LV) pressure change were performed. Antioxidative and metabolic enzyme activities and expression of catabolic/anabolic markers were assessed in quadriceps and diaphragm muscle. Ligated rats developed CHF (i.e. severe LV dilatation, reduced LV ejection fraction, and impaired maximal rates of LV pressure change; P < 0.001). There was a divergent response for antioxidant enzymes between the diaphragm and quadriceps in CHF rats, with glutathione peroxidase and manganese superoxide dismutase activity increased in the diaphragm but reduced in the quadriceps relative to shams (P < 0.01). Metabolic enzymes were unaltered in the diaphragm, but cytochrome c oxidase activity (P < 0.01) decreased and lactate dehydrogenase activity (P < 0.05) increased in the quadriceps of CHF animals. Protein expression of the E3 ligase muscle ring finger 1 and proteasome activity were increased (P < 0.05) in both the diaphragm and quadriceps in CHF rats compared with shams. Chronic heart failure induced divergent antioxidative and metabolic but similar catabolic responses between the diaphragm and quadriceps. Despite the quadriceps demonstrating significant impairments in CHF, apparent beneficial adaptations of an increased antioxidative capacity were induced in the diaphragm. Nevertheless, muscle ring finger 1 and proteasome activity (markers of protein

  4. Ischemia/reperfusion-induced necrosis and apoptosis in the cells isolated from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei Z; Fang, Xin-Hua; Stephenson, Linda L; Khiabani, Kayvan T; Zamboni, William A

    2008-03-01

    Necrosis was considered to be the solo mechanism for ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced cell death. Recent evidence from I/R models of the heart, liver, kidney, and brain indicates that apoptosis is a major contributor to I/R-induced cell death. However, evidence of I/R-induced apoptosis in skeletal muscle is sparse and divided. The purpose for the present study was to investigate I/R-induced necrosis and apoptosis in the cells isolated from rat skeletal muscle. A rat gracilis muscle model was used. After surgical preparation, clamps were applied on the vascular pedicle to create 4 h of ischemia and released for 24 h of reperfusion (I/R, n = 10). Clamping was omitted in sham I/R rats (sham I/R, n = 10). The muscle samples were harvested after 24 h of reperfusion for the process of cell isolation. Cells were stained by Propidium Iodide (PI) or Annexin V-FITC or both. Twenty thousand cells from each muscle sample were scanned and analyzed by flow cytometry. The average percentage of live cells was 45 +/- 2% in the I/R group versus 65 +/- 3% in the sham I/R group (p < 0.01). The average percentage of necrotic cells was 18 +/- 1% in I/R versus 12 +/- 1% in sham I/R (p < 0.01). The average percentage of apoptotic cells was 40 +/- 3% in I/R versus 27 +/- 3% in sham I/R (p < 0.01). Our results clearly demonstrated that I/R not only causes necrosis, but also accelerates apoptosis in the cells isolated from rat skeletal muscle. Copyright 2007 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Muscle stem cells in developmental and regenerative myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jong-Sun; Krauss, Robert S

    2010-05-01

    Skeletal muscle development serves as a paradigm for cell lineage specification and cell differentiation. Adult skeletal muscle has high regenerative capacity, with satellite cells the primary source of this capability. The present review describes recent findings on developmental and adult myogenesis with emphasis on emerging distinctions between various muscle groups and stages of myogenesis. Muscle progenitors of the body are derived from multipotent cells of the dermomyotome and express the transcription factors Pax3 and Pax7. These cells self-renew or induce expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and differentiate. The roles of Pax3, Pax7 and specific myogenic regulatory factor progenitor populations in trunk and limb myogenesis have been identified through cell ablation in the mouse. Various head muscles and associated satellite cells have differing developmental origins, and rely on distinct combinations of transcriptional regulators, than trunk and limb muscles. Several genetic and sorting protocols demonstrate that satellite cells are heterogeneous with some possessing stem cell properties; the relative roles of lineage and niche in these properties are being explored. Although cellular mechanisms of developmental, postnatal and adult regenerative myogenesis are thought to be similar, recent studies reveal distinct genetic requirements for embryonic, fetal, postnatal and adult regenerative myogenesis. Genetic determinants of formation or repair of various muscles during different stages of myogenesis are unexpectedly diverse. Future studies should illuminate these differences, as well as mechanisms that underlie stem cell properties of satellite cells.

  6. A fetal human heart cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR) promotes the differentiation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kochegarov, Andrei; Moses-Arms, Ashley; Lemanski, Larry F

    2015-08-01

    A specific human fetal heart RNA has been discovered, which has the ability to induce myocardial cell formation from mouse embryonic and human-induced pluripotent stem cells in culture. In this study, commercially obtained RNA from human fetal heart was cloned, sequenced, and synthesized using standard laboratory approaches. Molecular analyses of the specific fetal cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR), revealed that it is a fragment of N-sulfoglucosaminesulfohydrolase and the caspase recruitment domain family member 14 precursor. Stem cells transfected with CIRs often form into spindle-shaped cells characteristic of cardiomyocytes,and express the cardiac-specific contractile protein marker, troponin-T, in addition to tropomyosin and α-actinin as detected by immunohistochemical staining. Expression of these contractile proteins showed organization into sarcomeric myofibrils characteristic of striated cardiac muscle cells. Computer analyses of the RNA secondary structures of the active CIR show significant similarities to a RNA from salamander or myofibril-inducing RNA (MIR), which also promotes non-muscle cells to differentiate into cardiac muscle. Thus, these two RNAs, salamander MIR and the newly discovered human-cloned CIR reported here, appear to have evolutionarily conserved secondary structures suggesting that both play major roles in vertebrate heart development and, particularly, in the differentiation of cardiomyocytes from non-muscle cells during development.

  7. Current Status and Perspectives in Stem Cell Therapy for Heart

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fen-Chiung; Chen, Wen-Pin; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Wen, Ming-Shien

    2014-01-01

    For most patients, the prognosis of heart failure remains poor despite therapeutic advancement in recent decades. The option of cardiac transplantation is high risk and limited by a shortage of donors. Traditionally, the heart had been considered a terminally differentiated organ incapable of regeneration. However, numerous preclinical and clinical studies have been performed since the first report of cell therapy in heart failure using skeletal myoblasts in 2001. These investigations looked at the promising potential and use of several kinds of stem cells, which could some day dramatically alter the understanding of the regenerative capacity of the heart. To date, although there is no existing cardiac cell therapy that has been conclusively reported to be effective, stem cell-related cardiomyocyte regeneration strategies have become significant areas of research in modern cardiovascular medicine. In this review, we outline a variety of common cell sources, surface biomarkers of stem cells, and provide information related to cardiac cell therapy clinical trials. PMID:27122815

  8. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart because it controls the heartbeat. Skeletal Muscle Now, let's talk about the kind of muscle ... soccer ball into the goal. These are your skeletal muscles — sometimes called striated (say: STRY-ay-tud) muscle ...

  9. Effective fiber hypertrophy in satellite cell-depleted skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John J.; Mula, Jyothi; Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Erfani, Rod; Garrison, Kelcye; Farooqui, Amreen B.; Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Lawson, Benjamin A.; Grimes, Barry; Keller, Charles; Van Zant, Gary; Campbell, Kenneth S.; Esser, Karyn A.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.; Peterson, Charlotte A.

    2011-01-01

    An important unresolved question in skeletal muscle plasticity is whether satellite cells are necessary for muscle fiber hypertrophy. To address this issue, a novel mouse strain (Pax7-DTA) was created which enabled the conditional ablation of >90% of satellite cells in mature skeletal muscle following tamoxifen administration. To test the hypothesis that satellite cells are necessary for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the plantaris muscle of adult Pax7-DTA mice was subjected to mechanical overload by surgical removal of the synergist muscle. Following two weeks of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle showed the same increases in muscle mass (approximately twofold) and fiber cross-sectional area with hypertrophy as observed in the vehicle-treated group. The typical increase in myonuclei with hypertrophy was absent in satellite cell-depleted fibers, resulting in expansion of the myonuclear domain. Consistent with lack of nuclear addition to enlarged fibers, long-term BrdU labeling showed a significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive myonuclei in satellite cell-depleted muscle compared with vehicle-treated muscle. Single fiber functional analyses showed no difference in specific force, Ca2+ sensitivity, rate of cross-bridge cycling and cooperativity between hypertrophied fibers from vehicle and tamoxifen-treated groups. Although a small component of the hypertrophic response, both fiber hyperplasia and regeneration were significantly blunted following satellite cell depletion, indicating a distinct requirement for satellite cells during these processes. These results provide convincing evidence that skeletal muscle fibers are capable of mounting a robust hypertrophic response to mechanical overload that is not dependent on satellite cells. PMID:21828094

  10. Effective fiber hypertrophy in satellite cell-depleted skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John J; Mula, Jyothi; Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Erfani, Rod; Garrison, Kelcye; Farooqui, Amreen B; Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Lawson, Benjamin A; Grimes, Barry; Keller, Charles; Van Zant, Gary; Campbell, Kenneth S; Esser, Karyn A; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2011-09-01

    An important unresolved question in skeletal muscle plasticity is whether satellite cells are necessary for muscle fiber hypertrophy. To address this issue, a novel mouse strain (Pax7-DTA) was created which enabled the conditional ablation of >90% of satellite cells in mature skeletal muscle following tamoxifen administration. To test the hypothesis that satellite cells are necessary for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the plantaris muscle of adult Pax7-DTA mice was subjected to mechanical overload by surgical removal of the synergist muscle. Following two weeks of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle showed the same increases in muscle mass (approximately twofold) and fiber cross-sectional area with hypertrophy as observed in the vehicle-treated group. The typical increase in myonuclei with hypertrophy was absent in satellite cell-depleted fibers, resulting in expansion of the myonuclear domain. Consistent with lack of nuclear addition to enlarged fibers, long-term BrdU labeling showed a significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive myonuclei in satellite cell-depleted muscle compared with vehicle-treated muscle. Single fiber functional analyses showed no difference in specific force, Ca(2+) sensitivity, rate of cross-bridge cycling and cooperativity between hypertrophied fibers from vehicle and tamoxifen-treated groups. Although a small component of the hypertrophic response, both fiber hyperplasia and regeneration were significantly blunted following satellite cell depletion, indicating a distinct requirement for satellite cells during these processes. These results provide convincing evidence that skeletal muscle fibers are capable of mounting a robust hypertrophic response to mechanical overload that is not dependent on satellite cells.

  11. A HCN4+ cardiomyogenic progenitor derived from the first heart field and human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Später, Daniela; Abramczuk, Monika K; Buac, Kristina; Zangi, Lior; Stachel, Maxine W; Clarke, Jonathan; Sahara, Makoto; Ludwig, Andreas; Chien, Kenneth R

    2013-09-01

    Most of the mammalian heart is formed from mesodermal progenitors in the first and second heart fields (FHF and SHF), whereby the FHF gives rise to the left ventricle and parts of the atria and the SHF to the right ventricle, outflow tract and parts of the atria. Whereas SHF progenitors have been characterized in detail, using specific molecular markers, comprehensive studies on the FHF have been hampered by the lack of exclusive markers. Here, we present Hcn4 (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4) as an FHF marker. Lineage-traced Hcn4+/FHF cells delineate FHF-derived structures in the heart and primarily contribute to cardiomyogenic cell lineages, thereby identifying an early cardiomyogenic progenitor pool. As a surface marker, HCN4 also allowed the isolation of cardiomyogenic Hcn4+/FHF progenitors from human embryonic stem cells. We conclude that a primary purpose of the FHF is to generate cardiac muscle and support the contractile activity of the primitive heart tube, whereas SHF-derived progenitors contribute to heart cell lineage diversification.

  12. A novel heart derived inhibitor of vascular cell proliferation. Purification and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Westernacher, D; Schaper, W

    1995-08-01

    Recently, growth factors with mitogenic properties for vascular wall cells have been isolated from adult heart tissue. Since angiogenesis in the heart typically does not occur under normal physiological conditions, despite the presence of many growth factors, we hypothesized the existence of growth inhibitors. To test this hypothesis, we subjected whole bovine heart extracts to a series of protein purification steps in search of such an inhibitor. The purification procedure consisted of ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by cation exchange chromatography, hydroxylapatite chromatography, ultrafiltration and gelfiltration. We isolated a small protein, which is an inhibitor of cell proliferation from the bovine heart. The inhibitor reversibly suppressed [3H]-thymidine incorporation into nuclei of bovine aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells. The moiety responsible for the inhibitory activity was identified biochemically (SDS Page, isoelectric focusing, HPEC) as an 11 kD protein with an isoelectric point of 7. The substance is a heat and acetic acid stable protein which does not bind to reversed phase columns because of its hydrophilic character. The inhibitor has no affinity to heparin sepharose. The inhibitory activity was destroyed by hydrolysis. No homology to any hitherto structurally investigated growth inhibitor was observed using the chemical determination of the amino acid sequence by microsequencing after previous trypsin digestion. We conclude that the described growth inhibitor may counteract the activity of mitogens that are abundantly present in normal heart. Vascular cell proliferation may be regulated by inhibition or production of the inhibitor.

  13. Laser-patterned stem-cell bridges in a cardiac muscle model for on-chip electrical conductivity analyses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhen; Liu, Qiuying; Liu, Honghai; Yang, Huaxiao; Yun, Julie X; Eisenberg, Carol; Borg, Thomas K; Xu, Meifeng; Gao, Bruce Z

    2012-02-07

    Following myocardial infarction there is an irreversible loss of cardiomyocytes that results in the alteration of electrical propagation in the heart. Restoration of functional electrical properties of the damaged heart muscle is essential to recover from the infarction. While there are a few reports that demonstrate that fibroblasts can form junctions that transmit electrical signals, a potential alternative using the injection of stem cells has emerged as a promising cellular therapy; however, stem-cell electrical conductivity within the cardiac muscle fiber is unknown. In this study, an in vitro cardiac muscle model was established on an MEA-based biochip with multiple cardiomyocytes that mimic cardiac tissue structure. Using a laser beam, stem cells were inserted adjacent to each muscle fiber (cell bridge model) and allowed to form cell-cell contact as determined by the formation of gap junctions. The electrical conductivity of stem cells was assessed and compared with the electrical conductivities of cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts. Results showed that stem cell-myocyte contacts exhibited higher and more stable conduction velocities than myocyte-fibroblast contacts, which indicated that stem cells have higher electrical compatibility with native cardiac muscle fibers than cardiac fibroblasts.

  14. Muscle Cell Fate Choice Requires the T-Box Transcription Factor Midline in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ram P.; Dobi, Krista C.; Baylies, Mary K.; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila Midline (Mid) is an ortholog of vertebrate Tbx20, which plays roles in the developing heart, migrating cranial motor neurons, and endothelial cells. Mid functions in cell-fate specification and differentiation of tissues that include the ectoderm, cardioblasts, neuroblasts, and egg chambers; however, a role in the somatic musculature has not been described. We identified mid in genetic and molecular screens for factors contributing to somatic muscle morphogenesis. Mid is expressed in founder cells (FCs) for several muscle fibers, and functions cooperatively with the T-box protein H15 in lateral oblique muscle 1 and the segment border muscle. Mid is particularly important for the specification and development of the lateral transverse (LT) muscles LT3 and LT4, which arise by asymmetric division of a single muscle progenitor. Mid is expressed in this progenitor and its two sibling FCs, but is maintained only in the LT4 FC. Both muscles were frequently missing in mid mutant embryos, and LT4-associated expression of the transcription factor Krüppel (Kr) was lost. When present, LT4 adopted an LT3-like morphology. Coordinately, mid misexpression caused LT3 to adopt an LT4-like morphology and was associated with ectopic Kr expression. From these data, we concluded that mid functions first in the progenitor to direct development of LT3 and LT4, and later in the FCs to influence whichever of these differentiation profiles is selected. Mid is the first T-box factor shown to influence LT3 and LT4 muscle identity and, along with the T-box protein Optomotor-blind-related-gene 1 (Org-1), is representative of a new class of transcription factors in muscle specification. PMID:25614583

  15. Miniaturized iPS-Cell-Derived Cardiac Muscles for Physiologically Relevant Drug Response Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Huebsch, Nathaniel; Loskill, Peter; Deveshwar, Nikhil; Spencer, C. Ian; Judge, Luke M.; Mandegar, Mohammad A.; B. Fox, Cade; Mohamed, Tamer M.A.; Ma, Zhen; Mathur, Anurag; Sheehan, Alice M.; Truong, Annie; Saxton, Mike; Yoo, Jennie; Srivastava, Deepak; Desai, Tejal A.; So, Po-Lin; Healy, Kevin E.; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering approaches have the potential to increase the physiologic relevance of human iPS-derived cells, such as cardiomyocytes (iPS-CM). However, forming Engineered Heart Muscle (EHM) typically requires >1 million cells per tissue. Existing miniaturization strategies involve complex approaches not amenable to mass production, limiting the ability to use EHM for iPS-based disease modeling and drug screening. Micro-scale cardiospheres are easily produced, but do not facilitate assembly of elongated muscle or direct force measurements. Here we describe an approach that combines features of EHM and cardiospheres: Micro-Heart Muscle (μHM) arrays, in which elongated muscle fibers are formed in an easily fabricated template, with as few as 2,000 iPS-CM per individual tissue. Within μHM, iPS-CM exhibit uniaxial contractility and alignment, robust sarcomere assembly, and reduced variability and hypersensitivity in drug responsiveness, compared to monolayers with the same cellular composition. μHM mounted onto standard force measurement apparatus exhibited a robust Frank-Starling response to external stretch, and a dose-dependent inotropic response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Based on the ease of fabrication, the potential for mass production and the small number of cells required to form μHM, this system provides a potentially powerful tool to study cardiomyocyte maturation, disease and cardiotoxicology in vitro. PMID:27095412

  16. Training differentially regulates elastin level and proteolysis in skeletal and heart muscles and aorta in healthy rats

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Anna; Wyczalkowska-Tomasik, Aleksandra; Zendzian-Piotrowska, Malgorzata; Czarkowska-Paczek, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Exercise induces changes in muscle fibers and the extracellular matrix that may depend on elastin content and the activity of proteolytic enzymes. We investigated the influence of endurance training on the gene expression and protein content and/or activity of elastin, elastase, cathepsin K, and plasmin in skeletal and heart muscles and in the aorta. Healthy rats were randomly divided into untrained (n=10) and trained (n=10; 6 weeks of endurance training with increasing load) groups. Gene expression was evaluated via qRT-PCR. Elastin content was measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzyme activity was measured fluorometrically. Elastin content was significantly higher in skeletal (P=0.0014) and heart muscle (P=0.000022) from trained rats versus untrained rats, but not in the aorta. Although mRNA levels in skeletal muscle did not differ between groups, the activities of elastase (P=0.0434), cathepsin K (P=0.0343) and plasmin (P=0.000046) were higher in trained rats. The levels of cathepsin K (P=0.0288) and plasminogen (P=0.0005) mRNA were higher in heart muscle from trained rats, but enzyme activity was not. Enzyme activity in the aorta did not differ between groups. Increased elastin content in muscles may result in better adaption to exercise, as may remodeling of the extracellular matrix in skeletal muscle. PMID:27069251

  17. Vascular smooth muscle progenitor cells: building and repairing blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Majesky, Mark W; Dong, Xiu Rong; Regan, Jenna N; Hoglund, Virginia J

    2011-02-04

    Molecular pathways that control the specification, migration, and number of available smooth muscle progenitor cells play key roles in determining blood vessel size and structure, capacity for tissue repair, and progression of age-related disorders. Defects in these pathways produce malformations of developing blood vessels, depletion of smooth muscle progenitor cell pools for vessel wall maintenance and repair, and aberrant activation of alternative differentiation pathways in vascular disease. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that uniquely specify and maintain vascular smooth muscle cell precursors is essential if we are to use advances in stem and progenitor cell biology and somatic cell reprogramming for applications directed to the vessel wall.

  18. Muscle Satellite Cell Protein Teneurin‐4 Regulates Differentiation During Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kana; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Mabuchi, Yo; Ito, Naoki; Kikura, Naomi; Fukada, So‐ichiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Satellite cells are maintained in an undifferentiated quiescent state, but during muscle regeneration they acquire an activated stage, and initiate to proliferate and differentiate as myoblasts. The transmembrane protein teneurin‐4 (Ten‐4) is specifically expressed in the quiescent satellite cells; however, its cellular and molecular functions remain unknown. We therefore aimed to elucidate the function of Ten‐4 in muscle satellite cells. In the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of Ten‐4‐deficient mice, the number and the size of myofibers, as well as the population of satellite cells, were reduced with/without induction of muscle regeneration. Furthermore, we found an accelerated activation of satellite cells in the regenerated Ten‐4‐deficient TA muscle. The cell culture analysis using primary satellite cells showed that Ten‐4 suppressed the progression of myogenic differentiation. Together, our findings revealed that Ten‐4 functions as a crucial player in maintaining the quiescence of muscle satellite cells. Stem Cells 2015;33:3017–3027 PMID:26013034

  19. The constitutive behaviour of passive heart muscle tissue: a quasi-linear viscoelastic formulation.

    PubMed

    Huyghe, J M; van Campen, D H; Arts, T; Heethaar, R M

    1991-01-01

    A quasi-linear viscoelastic law with a continuous relaxation spectrum describing triaxial constitutive behaviour of heart muscle tissue is presented. The elastic response of the viscoelastic law is anisotropic, while the relaxation behaviour is assumed isotropic. The law is designed for a biphasic description (fluid-solid) of the myocardial tissue. Biaxial and uniaxial stress-strain curves from the literature are used to evaluate the parameters of the model. The non-linear elastic response, the difference between fibre and cross-fibre stiffness, the phenomenon of stress relaxation, the stiffening of the stress-strain relationship with increasing strain rate and the weak frequency dependency of the dissipated energy during cyclic loading are fairly well described by the proposed law. However, it is found that the model produces realistic values for the dissipated energy during cyclic loading only when relaxation parameter values are chosen which result in an overestimation of the stress relaxation data by more than 100%. This finding may indicate non-quasi-linearity of viscoelasticity of passive heart muscle tissue.

  20. Haemodynamic unloading increases the survival and affects the differentiation of cardiac stem cells after implantation into an infarcted heart.

    PubMed

    Kurazumi, Hiroshi; Li, Tao-Sheng; Takemoto, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Ryo; Mikamo, Akihito; Guo, Chang-Ying; Murata, Tomoaki; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2014-06-01

    It has been anticipated that stem cell therapy is capable of repairing an injured heart but is currently limited by its marginal efficacy. We believe that mechanical stress due to haemodynamic loading may negate the therapeutic potency of stem cells and therefore investigated how haemodynamic unloading affects the survival and differentiation of stem cells after implantation into an infarcted heart. A left ventricular (LV) haemodynamic unloading model was implemented by heterotopic transplantation of an infarcted donor heart into another healthy mouse. An in situ infarcted heart with general haemodynamic loading was used as control. A total of 5 million cardiac stem cells expanded from green fluorescence protein (GFP)-transgenic mouse were intramyocardially implanted into the infarcted LVs of haemodynamically unloaded donor heart or general haemodynamic loaded heart. The survival and differentiation of the implanted cardiac stem cells were evaluated by histological analyses at 3 and 21 days after cell implantation (n = 5-6 in each time points per group). Compared with the general haemodynamic loading condition, haemodynamic unloading of the infarcted hearts significantly improved the survival, increased the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of cardiac stem cells at 21 days after cell implantation (P < 0.05). In addition, the number of GFP(+)/Sca-1(+) cells was much higher in the unloaded hearts than in the loaded hearts at 21 days after cell implantation, although the difference was not statistically significant (5.67 ± 5.10 vs 0.75 ± 0.50, P = 0.051). Among the surviving GFP(+) donor cells 21 days after implantation, the expressions of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1, smooth muscle actin and sarcomeric alpha actin were ~7, 38 and 27% in the loaded heart and ~19, 14 and 55% in the unloaded heart, respectively. Haemodynamic unloading favours the survival/engraftment of donor stem cells and affects their differentiation after implantation into

  1. Stem Cell Antigen-1 in Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Harold S.; Samad, Tahmina; Cholsiripunlert, Sompob; Khalifian, Saami; Gong, Wenhui; Ritner, Carissa; Aurigui, Julian; Ling, Vivian; Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Bennett, Stephen; Hoffman, Julien; Oishi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) is a member of the Ly-6 multigene family encoding highly homologous, glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins. Sca-1 is expressed on muscle-derived stem cells and myogenic precursors recruited to sites of muscle injury. We previously reported that inhibition of Sca-1 expression stimulated myoblast proliferation in vitro and regulated the tempo of muscle repair in vivo. Despite its function in myoblast expansion during muscle repair, a role for Sca-1 in normal, post-natal muscle has not been thoroughly investigated. We systematically compared Sca-1-/- (KO) and Sca-1+/+ (WT) mice and hindlimb muscles to elucidate the tissue, contractile, and functional effects of Sca-1 in young and aging animals. Comparison of muscle volume, fibrosis, myofiber cross-sectional area, and Pax7+ myoblast number showed little differences between ages or genotypes. Exercise protocols, however, demonstrated decreased stamina in KO versus WT mice, with young KO mice achieving results similar to aging WT animals. In addition, KO mice did not improve with practice, while WT animals demonstrated conditioning over time. Surprisingly, myomechanical analysis of isolated muscles showed that KO young muscle generated more force and experienced less fatigue. However, KO muscle also demonstrated incomplete relaxation with fatigue. These findings suggest that Sca-1 is necessary for muscle conditioning with exercise, and that deficient conditioning in Sca-1 KO animals becomes more pronounced with age. PMID:24042315

  2. Cytoglobin modulates myogenic progenitor cell viability and muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvjeet; Canseco, Diana C; Manda, Shilpa M; Shelton, John M; Chirumamilla, Rajendra R; Goetsch, Sean C; Ye, Qiu; Gerard, Robert D; Schneider, Jay W; Richardson, James A; Rothermel, Beverly A; Mammen, Pradeep P A

    2014-01-07

    Mammalian skeletal muscle can remodel, repair, and regenerate itself by mobilizing satellite cells, a resident population of myogenic progenitor cells. Muscle injury and subsequent activation of myogenic progenitor cells is associated with oxidative stress. Cytoglobin is a hemoprotein expressed in response to oxidative stress in a variety of tissues, including striated muscle. In this study, we demonstrate that cytoglobin is up-regulated in activated myogenic progenitor cells, where it localizes to the nucleus and contributes to cell viability. siRNA-mediated depletion of cytoglobin from C2C12 myoblasts increased levels of reactive oxygen species and apoptotic cell death both at baseline and in response to stress stimuli. Conversely, overexpression of cytoglobin reduced reactive oxygen species levels, caspase activity, and cell death. Mice in which cytoglobin was knocked out specifically in skeletal muscle were generated to examine the role of cytoglobin in vivo. Myogenic progenitor cells isolated from these mice were severely deficient in their ability to form myotubes as compared with myogenic progenitor cells from wild-type littermates. Consistent with this finding, the capacity for muscle regeneration was severely impaired in mice deficient for skeletal-muscle cytoglobin. Collectively, these data demonstrate that cytoglobin serves an important role in muscle repair and regeneration.

  3. Prospective isolation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitors that integrate into human fetal heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Ardehali, Reza; Ali, Shah R; Inlay, Matthew A; Abilez, Oscar J; Chen, Michael Q; Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Yazawa, Masayuki; Gong, Yongquan; Nusse, Roeland; Drukker, Micha; Weissman, Irving L

    2013-02-26

    A goal of regenerative medicine is to identify cardiovascular progenitors from human ES cells (hESCs) that can functionally integrate into the human heart. Previous studies to evaluate the developmental potential of candidate hESC-derived progenitors have delivered these cells into murine and porcine cardiac tissue, with inconclusive evidence regarding the capacity of these human cells to physiologically engraft in xenotransplantation assays. Further, the potential of hESC-derived cardiovascular lineage cells to functionally couple to human myocardium remains untested and unknown. Here, we have prospectively identified a population of hESC-derived ROR2(+)/CD13(+)/KDR(+)/PDGFRα(+) cells that give rise to cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro at a clonal level. We observed rare clusters of ROR2(+) cells and diffuse expression of KDR and PDGFRα in first-trimester human fetal hearts. We then developed an in vivo transplantation model by transplanting second-trimester human fetal heart tissues s.c. into the ear pinna of a SCID mouse. ROR2(+)/CD13(+)/KDR(+)/PDGFRα(+) cells were delivered into these functioning fetal heart tissues: in contrast to traditional murine heart models for cell transplantation, we show structural and functional integration of hESC-derived cardiovascular progenitors into human heart.

  4. Myogenic skeletal muscle satellite cells communicate by tunnelling nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tavi, Pasi; Korhonen, Topi; Hänninen, Sandra L; Bruton, Joseph D; Lööf, Sara; Simon, Andras; Westerblad, Håkan

    2010-05-01

    Quiescent satellite cells sit on the surface of the muscle fibres under the basal lamina and are activated by a variety of stimuli to disengage, divide and differentiate into myoblasts that can regenerate or repair muscle fibres. Satellite cells adopt their parent's fibre type and must have some means of communication with the parent fibre. The mechanisms behind this communication are not known. We show here that satellite cells form dynamic connections with muscle fibres and other satellite cells by F-actin based tunnelling nanotubes (TNTs). Our results show that TNTs readily develop between satellite cells and muscle fibres. Once developed, TNTs permit transport of intracellular material, and even cellular organelles such as mitochondria between the muscle fibre and satellite cells. The onset of satellite cell differentiation markers Pax-7 and MyoD expression was slower in satellite cells cultured in the absence than in the presence of muscle cells. Furthermore physical contact between myofibre and satellite cell progeny is required to maintain subtype identity. Our data establish that TNTs constitute an integral part of myogenic cell communication and that physical cellular interaction control myogenic cell fate determination.

  5. Effect of blood volume in resting muscle on heart rate upward drift during moderately prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takehide; Matsuura, Ryouta; Arimitsu, Takuma; Yunoki, Takahiro; Yano, Tokuo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the increase in blood volume in resting muscle during moderately prolonged exercise is related to heart rate (HR) upward drift. Eight healthy men completed both arm-cranking moderately prolonged exercise (APE) and leg-pedaling moderately prolonged exercise (LPE) for 30 min. Exercise intensity was 120 bpm of HR that was determined by ramp incremental exercise. During both APE and LPE, HR significantly increased from 3 to 30 min (from 108±9.3 to 119±12 bpm and from 112±8.9 to 122±11 bpm, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between HR in APE and that in LPE. Oxygen uptake was maintained throughout the two exercises. Skin blood flow, deep temperature, and total Hb (blood volume) in resting muscle continuously increased for 30 min of exercise during both APE and LPE. During both APE and LPE, there was a significant positive correlation between total Hb and deep temperature in all subjects. Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between HR and total Hb (in seven out of eight subjects) during LPE. However, during APE, there was no positive correlation between HR and total Hb (r=0.391). These findings suggest that an increase of blood pooling in resting muscle could be proposed as one of the mechanisms underlying HR upward drift during moderately prolonged exercise.

  6. Effect of thalidomide on the skeletal muscle in experimental heart failure.

    PubMed

    Vescovo, Giorgio; Ravara, Barbara; Angelini, Annalisa; Sandri, Marco; Carraro, Ugo; Ceconi, Claudio; Dalla Libera, Luciano

    2002-08-01

    Tumour Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFalpha) has been shown to contribute to heart failure (CHF) progression. We have tried to antagonise the detrimental effects of TNFalpha on skeletal muscle apoptosis, by using thalidomide, a drug that inhibits its biosynthesis. CHF was induced in 20 rats by injecting monocrotaline, which determines right ventricle (RV) failure. After 2 weeks, when CHF developed, 12 rats were treated with thalidomide 3.5.mg/kg per day for 2 weeks. Eight had saline and served as CHF controls. Thalidomide failed to decrease TNFalpha and its second messenger sphingosine (SPH), but was able to prevent the shift toward the fast myosin heavy chains. In the Tibialis Anterior muscle of the thalidomide group, the degree of atrophy, the number of apoptotic nuclei and the levels of caspases, were similar to those of the CHF controls. Thalidomide, at the doses used in this study, which are the same employed for the treatment of tubercolosis, leprosy, AIDS and cancer in humans, did not lower either TNFalpha or SPH and only marginally influenced the apoptosis-induced muscle atrophy. Since other TNFalpha blockers are under investigation for improving the clinical status of patients with CHF, the present data could be relevant in the design of randomised clinical trials in humans.

  7. Muscle sympathetic activity in resting and exercising humans with and without heart failure.

    PubMed

    Notarius, Catherine F; Millar, Philip J; Floras, John S

    2015-11-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is critical for coordinating the cardiovascular response to various types of physical exercise. In a number of disease states, including human heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), this regulation can be disturbed and adversely affect outcome. The purpose of this review is to describe sympathetic activity at rest and during exercise in both healthy humans and those with HFrEF and outline factors, which influence these responses. We focus predominately on studies that report direct measurements of efferent sympathetic nerve traffic to skeletal muscle (muscle sympathetic nerve activity; MSNA) using intraneural microneurographic recordings. Differences in MSNA discharge between subjects with and without HFrEF both at rest and during exercise and the influence of exercise training on the sympathetic response to exercise will be discussed. In contrast to healthy controls, MSNA increases during mild to moderate dynamic exercise in the presence of HFrEF. This increase may contribute to the exercise intolerance characteristic of HFrEF by limiting muscle blood flow and may be attenuated by exercise training. Future investigations are needed to clarify the neural afferent mechanisms that contribute to efferent sympathetic activation at rest and during exercise in HFrEF.

  8. Selective Expansion of Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells From Bulk Muscle Cells in Soft Three-Dimensional Fibrin Gel.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pei; Zhou, Yalu; Wu, Furen; Hong, Yuanfan; Wang, Xin; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Mosenson, Jeffrey; Wu, Wen-Shu

    2017-02-28

    Muscle stem cells (MuSCs) exhibit robust myogenic potential in vivo, thus providing a promising curative treatment for muscle disorders. Ex vivo expansion of adult MuSCs is highly desired to achieve a therapeutic cell dose because of their scarcity in limited muscle biopsies. Sorting of pure MuSCs is generally required for all the current culture systems. Here we developed a soft three-dimensional (3D) salmon fibrin gel culture system that can selectively expand mouse MuSCs from bulk skeletal muscle preparations without cell sorting and faithfully maintain their regenerative capacity in culture. Our study established a novel platform for convenient ex vivo expansion of MuSCs, thus greatly advancing stem cell-based therapies for various muscle disorders. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017.

  9. Caveolar nanospaces in smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Popescu, L M

    2006-01-01

    Caveolae, specialized membrane nanodomains, have a key role in signaling processes, including calcium handling in smooth muscle cells (SMC). We explored the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of peripheral cytoplasmic space at the nanoscale level and the close spatial relationships between caveolae, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and mitochondria, as ultrastructural basis for an excitation-contraction coupling system and, eventually, for excitation - transcription coupling. About 150 electron micrographs of SMC showed that superficial SR and peripheral mitochondria are rigorously located along the caveolar domains of plasma membrane, alternating with plasmalemmal dense plaques. Electron micrographs made on serial ultrathin sections were digitized, then computer-assisted organellar profiles were traced on images, and automatic 3D reconstruction was obtained using the ‘Reconstruct’ software. The reconstruction was made for 1 μm3 in rat stomach (muscularis mucosae) and 10 μm3 in rat urinary bladder (detrusor smooth muscle). The close appositions (about 15 nm distance) of caveolae, peripheral SR, and mitochondria create coherent cytoplasmic nanoscale subdomains. Apparently, 80% of caveolae establish close contacts with SR and about 10% establish close contacts with mitochondria in both types of SMC. Thus, our results show that caveolae and peripheral SR build Ca2+release units in which mitochondria often could play a part. The caveolae-SR couplings occupy 4.19% of the cellular volume in stomach and 3.10% in rat urinary bladder, while caveolae-mitochondria couplings occupy 3.66% and 3.17%, respectively. We conclude that there are strategic caveolae-SR or caveolae-mitochondria contacts at the nanoscale level in the cortical cytoplasm of SMC, presumably responsible for a vectorial control of free Ca2+ cytoplasmic concentrations in definite nanospaces. This may account for slective activation of specific Ca2+ signaling pathways. PMID:16796817

  10. Determination of individual long-chain fatty acyl-CoA esters in heart and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Molaparast-Saless, F; Shrago, E; Spennetta, T L; Donatello, S; Kneeland, L M; Nellis, S H; Liedtke, A J

    1988-05-01

    A method has been developed for determination of individual long-chain fatty acyl-CoA esters from heart and skeletal muscle using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The esters were extracted from freeze-clamped tissue of pig and rat hearts and rat skeletal muscle for analysis on a radially compressed C18 5mu reverse-phase column. Nine peaks in the extract with carbon chain lengths from C12 to C20 that subsequently disappeared on alkaline hydrolysis were identified. The major acyl-CoA peaks were 14:1, 18:2, 16:0 and 18:1 and additionally in rat heart 18:0. Total long-chain acyl-CoA esters obtained by summation of the individual molecular species was 11.34 +/- 1.48 nmol/g wet wt. pig heart; 14.51 +/- 2.11 nmol/g wet wt. in rat heart, and 4.35 +/- 0.71 nmol/g wet wt. in rat skeletal muscle. These values were approximately 132% of those obtained using a separate procedure that measured total CoA by HPLC after alkaline hydrolysis of the esters. The described method demonstrates the quantitation of individual acyl-CoA species in muscle tissue. Therefore, it has a number of advantages in that it permits information to be obtained on the individual molecular species under various nutritional and metabolic conditions.

  11. Still Heart Encodes a Structural HMT, SMYD1b, with Chaperone-Like Function during Fast Muscle Sarcomere Assembly.

    PubMed

    Prill, Kendal; Windsor Reid, Pamela; Wohlgemuth, Serene L; Pilgrim, David B

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate sarcomere is a complex and highly organized contractile structure whose assembly and function requires the coordination of hundreds of proteins. Proteins require proper folding and incorporation into the sarcomere by assembly factors, and they must also be maintained and replaced due to the constant physical stress of muscle contraction. Zebrafish mutants affecting muscle assembly and maintenance have proven to be an ideal tool for identification and analysis of factors necessary for these processes. The still heart mutant was identified due to motility defects and a nonfunctional heart. The cognate gene for the mutant was shown to be smyd1b and the still heart mutation results in an early nonsense codon. SMYD1 mutants show a lack of heart looping and chamber definition due to a lack of expression of heart morphogenesis factors gata4, gata5 and hand2. On a cellular level, fast muscle fibers in homozygous mutants do not form mature sarcomeres due to the lack of fast muscle myosin incorporation by SMYD1b when sarcomeres are first being assembled (19hpf), supporting SMYD1b as an assembly protein during sarcomere formation.

  12. Percutaneous Cell Delivery Into the Heart Using Hydrogels Polymerizing In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Timothy P.; Godier, Amandine F. G.; Parks, Jonathan J.; Wan, Leo Q.; Koeckert, Michael S.; Eng, George M.; Hudson, Barry I.; Sherman, Warren; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the US. Following an acute myocardial infarction, a fibrous, noncontractile scar develops, and results in congestive heart failure in more than 500,000 patients in the US each year. Muscle regeneration and the induction of new vascular growth to treat ischemic disorders of the heart can have significant therapeutic implications. Early studies in patients with chronic ischemic SLVD using skeletal myoblasts or bone marrow-derived cells report improvement in left ventricular ejection function (LVEF) and clinical status, without notable safety issues. Nonetheless, the efficacy of cell transfer for cardiovascular disease is not established, in part due to a lack of control over cell retention, survival, and function following delivery. We studied the use of biocompatible hydrogels polymerizable in situ as a cell delivery vehicle, to improve cell retention, survival, and function following delivery into the ischemic myocardium. The study was conducted using human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and fibrin glue, but the methods are applicable to any human stem cells (adult or embryonic) and a wide range of hydrogels. We first evaluated the utility of several commercially available percutaneous catheters for delivery of viscous cell/hydrogel suspensions. Next we characterized the polymerization kinetics of fibrin glue solutions to define the ranges of concentrations compatible with catheter delivery. We then demonstrate the in vivo effectiveness of this preparation and its ability to increase cell retention and survival in a nude rat model of myocardial infarction. PMID:19558778

  13. Immunopathology of experimental Chagas' disease: binding of T cells to Trypanosoma cruzi-infected heart tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Mortatti, R C; Maia, L C; de Oliveira, A V; Munk, M E

    1990-01-01

    The immunopathology of Chagas' disease was studied in the experimental model of chronic infection in C57BL/10JT or mice. Sublethal infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, Y strain, induced specific antibodies and a delayed hypersensitivity response to parasite antigens. Mice developed chronic chagasic myocarditis but not skeletal muscle myositis. Binding of T cells to infected heart tissue was investigated during short-term cocultivation of lymphocytes with heart cryostat sections. T cells from infected mice and from normal controls bound equally to myocardium and liver sections from both infected and normal mice. A search in depth was attempted with cells heavily tagged with 99mTc. Labeled T cells from chagasic mice bound to both normal and infected myocardium slices. 99mTc-labeled T cells from controls gave the same binding values. Glass-adherent spleen cells behaved identically to T cells. Prior treatment of the tissue with serum from chronically infected mice did not increase the number of binding cells. Peritoneal macrophages tagged with 99mTc-sulfur colloid also bound to infected myocardium slices. The binding of macrophages was not changed by pretreatment of infected tissue with anti-T, cruzi antibodies. In short, this work did not detect any population of T cells or macrophages which could bind specifically to infected heart tissue to initiate an autoreactive process. Images PMID:2228230

  14. Genetic mapping of human heart-skeletal muscle adenine nucleotide translocator and its relationship to the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Y.; Chung, A.B.; Torroni, A.; Stepien, G.; Shoffner, J.M.; Costigan, D.A.; Polak, M.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Altherr, M.R.; Winokur, S.T.

    1993-05-01

    The mitochondrial heart-skeletal muscle adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT1) was regionally mapped to 4q35-qter using somatic cell hybrids containing deleted chromosome 4. The regional location was further refined through family studies using ANT1 intron and promoter nucleotide polymorphisms recognized by the restriction endonucleases MboII, NdeI, and HaeIII. Two alleles were found, each at a frequency of 0.5. The ANT1 locus was found to be closely linked to D4S139, D4S171, and the dominant skeletal muscle disease locus facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). A crossover that separated D4S171 and ANT1 from D4S139 was found. Since previous studies have established the chromosome 4 map order as centromere-D4S171-D4S139-FSHD, it was concluded that ANT1 is located on the side of D4S139, that is opposite from FSHD. This conclusion was confirmed by sequencing the exons and analyzing the transcripts of ANT1 from several FSHD patients and finding no evidence of aberration. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L; Pedersen, Roger A; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-04-15

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening.

  16. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G.; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening. PMID:25813541

  17. Cl− channels in smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Bulley, Simon

    2013-01-01

    In smooth muscle cells (SMCs), the intracellular chloride ion (Cl−) concentration is high due to accumulation by Cl−/HCO3− exchange and Na+, K+, Cl− cotransportation. The equilibrium potential for Cl− (ECl) is more positive than physiological membrane potentials (Em), with Cl− efflux inducing membrane depolarization. Early studies used electrophysiology and non-specific antagonists to study the physiological relevance of Cl− channels in SMCs. More recent reports have incorporated molecular biological approaches to identify and determine the functional significance of several different Cl− channels. Both “classic” and cGMP-dependent calcium (Ca2+)-activated (ClCa) channels and volume-sensitive Cl− channels are present, with TMEM16A/ANO1, bestrophins and ClC-3, respectively, proposed as molecular candidates for these channels. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has also been described in SMCs. This review will focus on discussing recent progress made in identifying each of these Cl− channels in SMCs, their physiological functions, and contribution to diseases that modify contraction, apoptosis and cell proliferation. PMID:24077695

  18. Asymmetric division of clonal muscle stem cells coordinates muscle regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, David B; Nguyen, Phong Dang; Siegel, Ashley L; Ehrlich, Ophelia V; Sonntag, Carmen; Phan, Jennifer M N; Berger, Silke; Ratnayake, Dhanushika; Hersey, Lucy; Berger, Joachim; Verkade, Heather; Hall, Thomas E; Currie, Peter D

    2016-07-08

    Skeletal muscle is an example of a tissue that deploys a self-renewing stem cell, the satellite cell, to effect regeneration. Recent in vitro studies have highlighted a role for asymmetric divisions in renewing rare "immortal" stem cells and generating a clonal population of differentiation-competent myoblasts. However, this model currently lacks in vivo validation. We define a zebrafish muscle stem cell population analogous to the mammalian satellite cell and image the entire process of muscle regeneration from injury to fiber replacement in vivo. This analysis reveals complex interactions between satellite cells and both injured and uninjured fibers and provides in vivo evidence for the asymmetric division of satellite cells driving both self-renewal and regeneration via a clonally restricted progenitor pool.

  19. Skeletal muscle satellite cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Greg; Hartzell, Charles R.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite cells are postnatal myoblasts responsible for providing additional nuclei to growing or regenerating muscle cells. Satellite cells retain the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in vitro and therefore provide a useful model to study postnatal muscle development. Most culture systems used to study postnatal muscle development are limited by the two-dimensional (2-D) confines of the culture dish. Limiting proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in 2-D could potentially limit cell-cell contacts important for developing the level of organization in skeletal muscle obtained in vivo. Culturing satellite cells on microcarrier beads suspended in the High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) designed by NASA provides a low shear, three-dimensional (3-D) environment to study muscle development. Primary cultures established from anterior tibialis muscles of growing rats (approximately 200 gm) were used for all studies and were composed of greater than 75 % satellite cells. Different inoculation densities did not affect the proliferative potential of satellite cells in the HARV. Plating efficiency, proliferation, and glucose utilization were compared between 2-D flat culture and 3-D HARV culture. Plating efficiency (cells attached - cells plated x 100) was similar between the two culture systems. Proliferation was reduced in HARV cultures and this reduction was apparent for both satellite cells and non-satellite cells. Furthermore, reduction in proliferation within the HARV could not be attributed to reduced substrate availability since glucose levels in media from HARV and 2-D cell culture were similar. Morphologically, microcarrier beads within the HARVS were joined together by cells into three-dimensional aggregates composed of greater than 10 beads/aggregate. Aggregation of beads did not occur in the absence of cells. Myotubes were often seen on individual beads or spanning the surface of two beads. In summary, proliferation and differentiation of

  20. Lipopolysaccharide enhances oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein by copper ions, endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Maziere, C; Conte, M A; Dantin, F; Maziere, J C

    1999-03-01

    The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) on low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidative modification by copper ions, endothelial and smooth muscle cells was studied by determination of the level of lipid peroxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances or TBARS), the diene level and the electrophoretic mobility of the LDL particle. LPS 25-75 microg/ml induced a dose-dependent increase in LDL oxidation by copper ions, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. At 75 microg LPS/ml, the TBARS content was 1.9, 1.6, and 1.8-fold increased, respectively. The LDL degradation by J774 macrophage-like cells was concomitantly stimulated. Preincubation of the LDL particle with LPS induced a marked increase in the subsequent LDL oxidative modification either by copper ions or by endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In addition, pretreatment of endothelial and smooth muscle cells with LPS also induced an enhancement of LDL oxidative modification performed in the absence of LPS. This effect was accompanied by a parallel increase in superoxide anion release by the cells. These results point at one of the mechanisms involved in the described association between bacterial infection and acute myocardial infarction as well as coronary heart disease.

  1. Myosin heavy chain expression and atrophy in rat skeletal muscle during transition from cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos; Campos, Gerson Eduardo Rocha; De Assis, Jeane Marlene Fogaça; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Pai-Silva, Maeli Dal

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether changes in myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression and atrophy in rat skeletal muscle are observed during transition from cardiac hypertrophy to chronic heart failure (CHF) induced by aortic stenosis (AS). AS and control animals were studied 12 and 18 weeks after surgery and when overt CHF had developed in AS animals, 28 weeks after the surgery. The following parameters were studied in the soleus muscle: muscle atrophy index (soleus weight/body weight), muscle fibre diameter and frequency and MHC expression. AS animals presented decreases in both MHC1 and type I fibres and increases in both MHC2a and type IIa fibres during late cardiac hypertrophy and CHF. Type IIa fibre atrophy occurred during CHF. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that skeletal muscle phenotype changes occur in both late cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure; this suggests that attention should be given to the fact that skeletal muscle phenotype changes occur prior to overt heart failure symptoms.

  2. Role of muscle stem cells during skeletal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Abou-Khalil, Rana; Yang, Frank; Lieu, Shirley; Julien, Anais; Perry, Jaselle; Pereira, Catia; Relaix, Frédéric; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph; Colnot, Céline

    2015-05-01

    Although the importance of muscle in skeletal regeneration is well recognized clinically, the mechanisms by which muscle supports bone repair have remained elusive. Muscle flaps are often used to cover the damaged bone after traumatic injury yet their contribution to bone healing is not known. Here, we show that direct bone-muscle interactions are required for periosteum activation and callus formation, and that muscle grafts provide a source of stem cells for skeletal regeneration. We investigated the role of satellite cells, the muscle stem cells. Satellite cells loss in Pax7(-/-) mice and satellite cell ablation in Pax7(Cre) (ERT) (2/) (+) ;DTA(f/f) mice impaired bone regeneration. Although satellite cells did not contribute as a large source of cells endogenously, they exhibited a potential to contribute to bone repair after transplantation. The fracture healing phenotype in Pax7(Cre) (ERT) (2/) (+) ;DTA(f/f) mice was associated with decreased bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), insulin-like growth factor 1, and fibroblast growth factor 2 expression that are normally upregulated in response to fracture in satellite cells. Exogenous rhBMP2 improved bone healing in Pax7(Cre) (ERT) (2/) (+) ;DTA(f/f) mice further supporting the role of satellite cells as a source of growth factors. These results provide the first functional evidence for a direct contribution of muscle to bone regeneration with important clinical implications as it may impact the use of muscle flaps, muscle stem cells, and growth factors in orthopedic applications. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  3. Muscle-derived hematopoietic stem cells are hematopoietic in origin

    PubMed Central

    McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L.; Jackson, Kathyjo A.; Camargo, Fernando D.; Ferrari, Giuliana; Mavilio, Fulvio; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2002-01-01

    It has recently been shown that mononuclear cells from murine skeletal muscle contain the potential to repopulate all major peripheral blood lineages in lethally irradiated mice, but the origin of this activity is unknown. We have fractionated muscle cells on the basis of hematopoietic markers to show that the active population exclusively expresses the hematopoietic stem cell antigens Sca-1 and CD45. Muscle cells obtained from 6- to 8-week-old C57BL/6-CD45.1 mice and enriched for cells expressing Sca-1 and CD45 were able to generate hematopoietic but not myogenic colonies in vitro and repopulated multiple hematopoietic lineages of lethally irradiated C57BL/6-CD45.2 mice. These data show that muscle-derived hematopoietic stem cells are likely derived from the hematopoietic system and are a result not of transdifferentiation of myogenic stem cells but instead of the presence of substantial numbers of hematopoietic stem cells in the muscle. Although CD45-negative cells were highly myogenic in vitro and in vivo, CD45-positive muscle-derived cells displayed only very limited myogenic activity and only in vivo. PMID:11830662

  4. Isolation, characterization, and molecular regulation of muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukada, So-ichiro; Ma, Yuran; Ohtani, Takuji; Watanabe, Yoko; Murakami, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has great regenerative capacity which is dependent on muscle stem cells, also known as satellite cells. A loss of satellite cells and/or their function impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and leads to a loss of skeletal muscle power; therefore, the molecular mechanisms for maintaining satellite cells in a quiescent and undifferentiated state are of great interest in skeletal muscle biology. Many studies have demonstrated proteins expressed by satellite cells, including Pax7, M-cadherin, Cxcr4, syndecan3/4, and c-met. To further characterize satellite cells, we established a method to directly isolate satellite cells using a monoclonal antibody, SM/C-2.6. Using SM/C-2.6 and microarrays, we measured the genes expressed in quiescent satellite cells and demonstrated that Hesr3 may complement Hesr1 in generating quiescent satellite cells. Although Hesr1- or Hesr3-single knockout mice show a normal skeletal muscle phenotype, including satellite cells, Hesr1/Hesr3-double knockout mice show a gradual decrease in the number of satellite cells and increase in regenerative defects dependent on satellite cell numbers. We also observed that a mouse's genetic background affects the regenerative capacity of its skeletal muscle and have established a line of DBA/2-background mdx mice that has a much more severe phenotype than the frequently used C57BL/10-mdx mice. The phenotype of DBA/2-mdx mice also seems to depend on the function of satellite cells. In this review, we summarize the methodology of direct isolation, characterization, and molecular regulation of satellite cells based on our results. The relationship between the regenerative capacity of satellite cells and progression of muscular disorders is also summarized. In the last part, we discuss application of the accumulating scientific information on satellite cells to treatment of patients with muscular disorders. PMID:24273513

  5. Neurotrophin and Neurotrophin Receptors in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Michael J.; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Kraemer, Rosemary; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Tessarollo, Lino; Mahadeo, Debbie; Sharif, Setareh; Kaplan, David R.; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Parada, Luis; Toran-Allerand, C. Dominique; Hajjar, David P.; Hempstead, Barbara L.

    1995-01-01

    The neurotrophins, a family of related polypeptide growth factors including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin (NT)-3 and NT-4/5 promote the survival and differentiation of distinctive sets of embryonic neurons. Here we define a new functional role for neurotrophins, as autocrine or local paracrine mediators of vascular smooth muscle cell migration. We have identified neurotrophins, and their cognate receptors, the trk tyrosine kinases, in human and rat vascular smooth muscle cells in vivo. In vitro, cultured human smooth muscle cells express BDNF; NT-3; and trk A, B, and C Similarly, rat smooth muscle cells expressed all three trk receptors as well as all four neurotrophins. Moreover, NGF induces cultured human smooth muscle cell migration at subnanomolar concentrations. In the rat aortic balloon deendothelialization model of vascular injury, the expression of NGF, BDNF, and their receptors trk A and trk B increased dramatically in the area of injury within 3 days and persisted during the formation of the neointima. In human coronary atherosclerotic lesions, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4/5, and the trk B and trk C receptors could be demonstrated in smooth muscle cells. These findings suggest that neurotrophins play an important role in regulating the response of vascular smooth muscle cells to injury. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:7639328

  6. Skeletal Muscle Cell Behavior After Physical Agent Treatments.

    PubMed

    Battistelli, Michela; Salucci, Sara; Guescini, Michele; Curzi, Davide; Stocchi, Vilberto; Falcieri, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is essential for skeletal muscle development and homeostasis. It has been frequently involved in several muscle myopathies and sarcopenia, as well as in denervation, in disuse and acute strenuous or eccentric physical exercise. In this work skeletal muscle cell death, induced in vitro by a variety of physical triggers, has been investigated. C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes were exposed to UVB for 30 min, hyperthermia for 1 h at 43 °C, low pH for 3 h, hypothermia for 4h at 0 - 6°C, all followed by 2 - 4 h recovery. Their effects have been analysed by means of morpho- functional and molecular approaches. After UVB radiation, hyperthermia and acidosis, morphological apoptotic features and in situ DNA fragmentation appeared, more evident in myoblasts. Interestingly, apoptotic, non apoptotic and necrotic nuclei could be occasionally observed within the same myotube. Low pH induced apoptosis and necrosis, both characterized by swollen nuclei. In all these experimental conditions, the molecular investigations revealed a caspase pathway involvement in inducing cell death. Differently, hypothermia showed a scant and initial chromatin margination, in the presence of a diffused autophagic component. In this case, in situ DNA fragmentation and caspase activation have not been detected. Myoblasts and myotubes appeared sensitive to physical agents, some of which, induced apoptotic cell death. Moreover, hypothermia exposure seemed to enhance autophagic response, thus representing a way to delay trauma-correlated muscle inflammation. This study permits to highlight skeletal muscle cell behavior in response to physical agents, by adding important information to muscle cell death knowledge. UVB radiation and hyperthermia, usually used in clinical therapy, have also adverse effects on skeletal muscle such as myonuclei loss and cell death, contributing to muscle mass decrease. Acidosis occurs physiologically in muscular fatigue, reducing not only the athlete performance, but

  7. Apoptosis-Inducing Factor Regulates Skeletal Muscle Progenitor Cell Number and Muscle Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Djeghloul, Dounia; Lécolle, Sylvie; Bertrand, Anne T.; Biondi, Olivier; De Windt, Leon J.; Chanoine, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis Inducing Factor (AIF) is a highly conserved, ubiquitous flavoprotein localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. In vivo, AIF provides protection against neuronal and cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by oxidative stress. Conversely in vitro, AIF has been demonstrated to have a pro-apoptotic role upon induction of the mitochondrial death pathway, once AIF translocates to the nucleus where it facilitates chromatin condensation and large scale DNA fragmentation. Given that the aif hypomorphic harlequin (Hq) mutant mouse model displays severe sarcopenia, we examined skeletal muscle from the aif hypomorphic mice in more detail. Adult AIF-deficient skeletal myofibers display oxidative stress and a severe form of atrophy, associated with a loss of myonuclei and a fast to slow fiber type switch, both in “slow” muscles such as soleus, as well as in “fast” muscles such as extensor digitorum longus, most likely resulting from an increase of MEF2 activity. This fiber type switch was conserved in regenerated soleus and EDL muscles of Hq mice subjected to cardiotoxin injection. In addition, muscle regeneration in soleus and EDL muscles of Hq mice was severely delayed. Freshly cultured myofibers, soleus and EDL muscle sections from Hq mice displayed a decreased satellite cell pool, which could be rescued by pretreating aif hypomorphic mice with the manganese-salen free radical scavenger EUK-8. Satellite cell activation seems to be abnormally long in Hq primary culture compared to controls. However, AIF deficiency did not affect myoblast cell proliferation and differentiation. Thus, AIF protects skeletal muscles against oxidative stress-induced damage probably by protecting satellite cells against oxidative stress and maintaining skeletal muscle stem cell number and activation. PMID:22076146

  8. Effects of dichloroacetate on the metabolism of glucose, pyruvate, acetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate and palmitate in rat diaphragm and heart muscle in vitro and on extraction of glucose, lactate, pyruvate and free fatty acids by dog heart in vivo

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Anthony; Allison, S. P.; Randle, Philip J.

    1973-01-01

    1. The extractions of glucose, lactate, pyruvate and free fatty acids by dog heart in vivo were calculated from measurements of their arterial and coronary sinus blood concentration. Elevation of plasma free fatty acid concentrations by infusion of intralipid and heparin resulted in increased extraction of free fatty acids and diminished extractions of glucose, lactate and pyruvate by the heart. It is suggested that metabolism of free fatty acids by the heart in vivo, as in vitro, may impair utilization of these substrates. These effects of elevated plasma free fatty acid concentrations on extractions by the heart in vivo were reversed by injection of dichloroacetate, which also improved extraction of lactate and pyruvate by the heart in vivo in alloxan diabetes. 2. Sodium dichloroacetate increased glucose oxidation and pyruvate oxidation in hearts from fed normal or alloxan-diabetic rats perfused with glucose and insulin. Dichloroacetate inhibited oxidation of acetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate and partially reversed inhibitory effects of these substrates on the oxidation of glucose. In rat diaphragm muscle dichloroacetate inhibited oxidation of acetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate and palmitate and increased glucose oxidation and pyruvate oxidation in diaphragms from alloxan-diabetic rats. Dichloroacetate increased the rate of glycolysis in hearts perfused with glucose, insulin and acetate and evidence is given that this results from a lowering of the citrate concentration within the cell, with a consequent activation of phosphofructokinase. 3. In hearts from normal rats perfused with glucose and insulin, dichloroacetate increased cell concentrations of acetyl-CoA, acetylcarnitine and glutamate and lowered those of aspartate and malate. In perfusions with glucose, insulin and acetate, dichloroacetate lowered the cell citrate concentration without lowering the acetyl-CoA or acetylcarnitine concentrations. Measurements of specific radioactivities of acetyl-CoA, acetylcarnitine

  9. Inspiratory Muscle Function and Exercise Capacity in Patients With Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Palau, Patricia; Domínguez, Eloy; Núñez, Eduardo; Ramón, Jose María; López, Laura; Melero, Joana; Bellver, Alejandro; Chorro, Francisco J; Bodí, Vicent; Bayés-Genis, Antoni; Sanchis, Juan; Núñez, Julio

    2017-06-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a clinical syndrome characterized by impaired exercise capacity resulting from dyspnea and fatigue. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the exercise intolerance in HFpEF are not well established. We sought to evaluate the effects of inspiratory muscle function on exercise tolerance in symptomatic patients with HFpEF. A total of 74 stable symptomatic patients with HFpEF and New York Heart Association class II-III underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test between June 2012 and May 2016. Inspiratory muscle weakness was defined as maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP)  <70% of normal predicted values. Pearson correlation coefficient and multivariate linear regression analysis were used to assess the association between percent of predicted MIP (pp-MIP) and maximal exercise capacity [measured by peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2) and percent of predicted peak VO2 (pp-peak VO2)]. Thirty-one patients (42%) displayed inspiratory muscle weakness. Mean (standard deviation) age was 72.5 ± 9.1 years, 53% were women, and 35.1% displayed New York Heart Association class III. Mean peak VO2 and pp-peak VO2 were 10 ± 2.8 mL•min•kg and 57.3 ± 13.8%, respectively. The median (interquartile range) of pp-MIP was 72% (58%-90%). pp-MIP was not correlated with peak VO2 (r = -0.047, P = .689) nor pp-peak VO2 (r = -0.078, P = .509). Furthermore, in multivariable analysis, pp-MIP showed no association with peak VO2 (β coefficient = 0.01, 95% confidence interval -0.01 to 0.03, P = .241) and pp-peak VO2 (β coefficient = -0.00, 95% confidence interval -0.10 to 0.10, P = .975). In symptomatic elderly patients with HFpEF, we found that pp-MIP was not associated with either peak VO2 or pp-peak VO2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Skeletal muscle abnormalities and exercise intolerance in older patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Nicklas, Barbara; Kraus, William E.; Lyles, Mary F.; Eggebeen, Joel; Morgan, Timothy M.; Haykowsky, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is the most common form of HF in older persons. The primary chronic symptom in HFPEF is severe exercise intolerance, and its pathophysiology is poorly understood. To determine whether skeletal muscle abnormalities contribute to their severely reduced peak exercise O2 consumption (V̇o2), we examined 22 older HFPEF patients (70 ± 7 yr) compared with 43 age-matched healthy control (HC) subjects using needle biopsy of the vastus lateralis muscle and cardiopulmonary exercise testing to assess muscle fiber type distribution and capillarity and peak V̇o2. In HFPEF versus HC patients, peak V̇o2 (14.7 ± 2.1 vs. 22.9 ± 6.6 ml·kg−1·min−1, P < 0.001) and 6-min walk distance (454 ± 72 vs. 573 ± 71 m, P < 0.001) were reduced. In HFPEF versus HC patients, the percentage of type I fibers (39.0 ± 11.4% vs. 53.7 ± 12.4%, P < 0.001), type I-to-type II fiber ratio (0.72 ± 0.39 vs. 1.36 ± 0.85, P = 0.001), and capillary-to-fiber ratio (1.35 ± 0.32 vs. 2.53 ± 1.37, P = 0.006) were reduced, whereas the percentage of type II fibers was greater (61 ± 11.4% vs. 46.3 ± 12.4%, P < 0.001). In univariate analyses, the percentage of type I fibers (r = 0.39, P = 0.003), type I-to-type II fiber ratio (r = 0.33, P = 0.02), and capillary-to-fiber ratio (r = 0.59, P < 0.0001) were positively related to peak V̇o2. In multivariate analyses, type I fibers and the capillary-to-fiber ratio remained significantly related to peak V̇o2. We conclude that older HFPEF patients have significant abnormalities in skeletal muscle, characterized by a shift in muscle fiber type distribution with reduced type I oxidative muscle fibers and a reduced capillary-to-fiber ratio, and these may contribute to their severe exercise intolerance. This suggests potential new therapeutic targets in this difficult to treat disorder. PMID:24658015

  12. Skeletal muscle microvascular oxygenation dynamics in heart failure: exercise training and nitric oxide-mediated function.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Daniel M; Copp, Steven W; Holdsworth, Clark T; Ferguson, Scott K; McCullough, Danielle J; Behnke, Bradley J; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2014-03-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) impairs nitric oxide (NO)-mediated regulation of skeletal muscle O2 delivery-utilization matching such that microvascular oxygenation falls faster (i.e., speeds PO2mv kinetics) during increases in metabolic demand. Conversely, exercise training improves (slows) muscle PO2mv kinetics following contractions onset in healthy young individuals via NO-dependent mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training would improve contracting muscle microvascular oxygenation in CHF rats partly via improved NO-mediated function. CHF rats (left ventricular end-diastolic pressure = 17 ± 2 mmHg) were assigned to sedentary (n = 11) or progressive treadmill exercise training (n = 11; 5 days/wk, 6-8 wk, final workload of 60 min/day at 35 m/min; -14% grade downhill running) groups. PO2mv was measured via phosphorescence quenching in the spinotrapezius muscle at rest and during 1-Hz twitch contractions under control (Krebs-Henseleit solution), sodium nitroprusside (SNP; NO donor; 300 μM), and N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nonspecific NO synthase blockade; 1.5 mM) superfusion conditions. Exercise-trained CHF rats had greater peak oxygen uptake and spinotrapezius muscle citrate synthase activity than their sedentary counterparts (p < 0.05 for both). The overall speed of the PO2mv fall during contractions (mean response time; MRT) was slowed markedly in trained compared with sedentary CHF rats (sedentary: 20.8 ± 1.4, trained: 32.3 ± 3.0 s; p < 0.05), and the effect was not abolished by L-NAME (sedentary: 16.8 ± 1.5, trained: 31.0 ± 3.4 s; p > 0.05). Relative to control, SNP increased MRT in both groups such that trained CHF rats had slower kinetics (sedentary: 43.0 ± 6.8, trained: 55.5 ± 7.8 s; p < 0.05). Improved NO-mediated function is not obligatory for training-induced improvements in skeletal muscle microvascular oxygenation (slowed PO2mv kinetics) following contractions onset in rats with CHF.

  13. Establishment of bipotent progenitor cell clone from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yousuke; Yada, Erica; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Hosoyama, Tohru; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2011-12-01

    The present study describes the isolation, cloning and characterization of adipogenic progenitor cells from rat skeletal muscle. Among the obtained 10 clones, the most highly adipogenic progenitor, 2G11 cells, were further characterized. In addition to their adipogenicity, 2G11 cells retain myogenic potential as revealed by formation of multinucleated myotubes when co-cultured with myoblasts. 2G11 cells were resistant to an inhibitory effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on adipogenesis, while adipogenesis of widely used preadipogenic cell line, 3T3-L1 cells, was suppressed almost completely by the same treatment. In vivo transplantation experiments revealed that 2G11 cells are able to possess both adipogenicity and myogenicity in vivo. These results indicate the presence of bipotent progenitor cells in rat skeletal muscle, and suggest that such cells may contribute to ectopic fat formation in skeletal muscle. © 2011 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2011 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation improves GLUT-4 and morphological characteristics of skeletal muscle in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    de Leon, E B; Bortoluzzi, A; Rucatti, A; Nunes, R B; Saur, L; Rodrigues, M; Oliveira, U; Alves-Wagner, A B; Xavier, L L; Machado, U F; Schaan, B D; Dall'Ago, P

    2011-02-01

    Changes in skeletal muscle morphology and metabolism are associated with limited functional capacity in heart failure, which can be attenuated by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (ES). The purpose of the present study was to analyse the effects of ES upon GLUT-4 protein content, fibre structure and vessel density of the skeletal muscle in a rat model of HF subsequent to myocardial infarction. Forty-four male Wistar rats were assigned to one of four groups: sham (S), sham submitted to ES (S+ES), heart failure (HF) and heart failure submitted to ES (HF+ES). The rats in the ES groups were submitted to ES of the left leg during 20 days (2.5 kHz, once a day, 30 min, duty cycle 50%- 15 s contraction/15 s rest). After this period, the left tibialis anterior muscle was collected from all the rats for analysis. HF+ES rats showed lower values of lung congestion when compared with HF rats (P = 0.0001). Although muscle weight was lower in HF rats than in the S group, thus indicating hypotrophy, 20 days of ES led to their recovery (P < 0.0001). In both groups submitted to ES, there was an increase in muscle vessel density (P < 0.04). Additionally, heart failure determined a 49% reduction in GLUT-4 protein content (P < 0.03), which was recovered by ES (P < 0.01). In heart failure, ES improves morphological changes and raises GLUT-4 content in skeletal muscle. © 2010 The Authors. Acta Physiologica © 2010 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  15. Arid3b is essential for second heart field cell deployment and heart patterning.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Verónica; Badía-Careaga, Claudio; Casanova, Jesús C; Domínguez, Jorge N; de la Pompa, José Luis; Sanz-Ezquerro, Juan José

    2014-11-01

    Arid3b, a member of the conserved ARID family of transcription factors, is essential for mouse embryonic development but its precise roles are poorly understood. Here, we show that Arid3b is expressed in the myocardium of the tubular heart and in second heart field progenitors. Arid3b-deficient embryos show cardiac abnormalities, including a notable shortening of the poles, absence of myocardial differentiation and altered patterning of the atrioventricular canal, which also lacks epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Proliferation and death of progenitors as well as early patterning of the heart appear normal. However, DiI labelling of second heart field progenitors revealed a defect in the addition of cells to the heart. RNA microarray analysis uncovered a set of differentially expressed genes in Arid3b-deficient tissues, including Bhlhb2, a regulator of cardiomyocyte differentiation, and Lims2, a gene involved in cell migration. Arid3b is thus required for heart development by regulating the motility and differentiation of heart progenitors. These findings identify Arid3b as a candidate gene involved in the aetiology of human congenital malformations. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Loss of Smooth Muscle α-Actin Leads to NF-κB-Dependent Increased Sensitivity to Angiotensin II in Smooth Muscle Cells and Aortic Enlargement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiyuan; Peters, Andrew; Papke, Christina L; Villamizar, Carlos; Ringuette, Lea-Jeanne; Cao, Jiumei; Wang, Shanzhi; Ma, Shuangtao; Gong, Limin; Byanova, Katerina L; Xiong, Jian; Zhu, Michael X; Madonna, Rosalinda; Kee, Patrick; Geng, Yong-Jian; Brasier, Allan R; Davis, Elaine C; Prakash, Siddharth; Kwartler, Callie S; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2017-06-09

    Mutations in ACTA2, encoding the smooth muscle isoform of α-actin, cause thoracic aortic aneurysms, acute aortic dissections, and occlusive vascular diseases. We sought to identify the mechanism by which loss of smooth muscle α-actin causes aortic disease. Acta2(-/-) mice have an increased number of elastic lamellae in the ascending aorta and progressive aortic root dilation as assessed by echocardiography that can be attenuated by treatment with losartan, an angiotensin II (AngII) type 1 receptor blocker. AngII levels are not increased in Acta2(-/-) aortas or kidneys. Aortic tissue and explanted smooth muscle cells from Acta2(-/-) aortas show increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased basal nuclear factor κB signaling, leading to an increase in the expression of the AngII receptor type I a and activation of signaling at 100-fold lower levels of AngII in the mutant compared with wild-type cells. Furthermore, disruption of smooth muscle α-actin filaments in wild-type smooth muscle cells by various mechanisms activates nuclear factor κB signaling and increases expression of AngII receptor type I a. These findings reveal that disruption of smooth muscle α-actin filaments in smooth muscle cells increases reactive oxygen species levels, activates nuclear factor κB signaling, and increases AngII receptor type I a expression, thus potentiating AngII signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells without an increase in the exogenous levels of AngII. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Satellite and stem cells in muscle growth and repair.

    PubMed

    Le Grand, Fabien; Rudnicki, Michael

    2007-11-01

    The FASEB summer research conference on Skeletal Muscle Satellite and Stem Cells, organized by Thomas Rando, Giulio Cossu and Jeffrey Chamberlain, was held in Indian Wells, California, in July. An international array of researchers gathered to share numerous new insights into the cellular and molecular regulation of stem cells and satellite cells in skeletal muscle biology. The conference is unique in that it brings together investigators from diverse backgrounds, who work on the growth and repair of skeletal muscle in humans and model systems, in health and disease.

  18. PPARδ regulates satellite cell proliferation and skeletal muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are a class of nuclear receptors that play important roles in development and energy metabolism. Whereas PPARδ has been shown to regulate mitochondrial biosynthesis and slow-muscle fiber types, its function in skeletal muscle progenitors (satellite cells) is unknown. Since constitutive mutation of Pparδ leads to embryonic lethality, we sought to address this question by conditional knockout (cKO) of Pparδ using Myf5-Cre/Pparδflox/flox alleles to ablate PPARδ in myogenic progenitor cells. Although Pparδ-cKO mice were born normally and initially displayed no difference in body weight, muscle size or muscle composition, they later developed metabolic syndrome, which manifested as increased body weight and reduced response to glucose challenge at age nine months. Pparδ-cKO mice had 40% fewer satellite cells than their wild-type littermates, and these satellite cells exhibited reduced growth kinetics and proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, regeneration of Pparδ-cKO muscles was impaired after cardiotoxin-induced injury. Gene expression analysis showed reduced expression of the Forkhead box class O transcription factor 1 (FoxO1) gene in Pparδ-cKO muscles under both quiescent and regenerating conditions, suggesting that PPARδ acts through FoxO1 in regulating muscle progenitor cells. These results support a function of PPARδ in regulating skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin sensitivity, and they establish a novel role of PPARδ in muscle progenitor cells and postnatal muscle regeneration. PMID:22040534

  19. Rejuvenation of the aged muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D.; Gilbert, Penney M.; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P.; Corbel, Stephane Y.; Llewellyn, Michael E.; Delp, Scott L.; Blau, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    The aged suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging due in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of aged MuSCs are intrinsically defective relative to young MuSCs, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation due to a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and that have elevated p38α/β MAPK activity. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the aged MuSC population to transient inhibition of p38α/β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional aged MuSC population, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration, serial transplantation, and strengthening damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy in aged individuals. PMID:24531378

  20. Rejuvenation of the muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D; Gilbert, Penney M; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P; Corbel, Stephane Y; Llewellyn, Michael E; Delp, Scott L; Blau, Helen M

    2014-03-01

    The elderly often suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging owing in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of MuSCs from aged mice are intrinsically defective relative to MuSCs from young mice, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation. This deficiency is correlated with a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and is due to elevated activity of the p38α and p38β mitogen-activated kinase pathway. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the MuSC population from aged mice to transient inhibition of p38α and p38β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional MuSC population from aged mice, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration and serial transplantation as well as strengthening of damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy for the elderly.

  1. Regulation of skeletal muscle stem cells by fibroblast growth factors.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, Bradley; Vogler, Thomas Orion; Gadek, Katherine; Olwin, Bradley B

    2017-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are essential for self-renewal of skeletal muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and required for maintenance and repair of skeletal muscle. Satellite cells express high levels of FGF receptors 1 and 4, low levels of FGF receptor 3, and little or no detectable FGF receptor 2. Of the multiple FGFs that influence satellite cell function in culture, FGF2 and FGF6 are the only members that regulate satellite cell function in vivo by activating ERK MAPK, p38α/β MAPKs, PI3 kinase, PLCγ and STATs. Regulation of FGF signaling is complex in satellite cells, requiring Syndecan-4, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, as well as ß1-integrin and fibronectin. During aging, reduced responsiveness to FGF diminishes satellite cell self-renewal, leading to impaired skeletal muscle regeneration and depletion of satellite cells. Mislocalization of ß1-integrin, reductions in fibronectin, and alterations in heparan sulfate content all contribute to reduced FGF responsiveness in satellite cells. How these cell surface proteins regulate satellite cell self-renewal is incompletely understood. Here we summarize the current knowledge, highlighting the role(s) for FGF signaling in skeletal muscle regeneration, satellite cell behavior, and age-induced muscle wasting. Developmental Dynamics, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Human muscle precursor cells overexpressing PGC-1α enhance early skeletal muscle tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Haralampieva, Deana; Salemi, Souzan; Dinulovic, Ivana; Sulser, Tullio; M Ametamey, Simon; Handschin, Christoph; Eberli, Daniel

    2017-02-03

    Muscle precursor cells (MPCs) are activated satellite cells capable of muscle fiber reconstruction. Therefore, autologous MPC transplantation is envisioned for the treatment of muscle diseases. However, the density of MPCs, as well as their proliferation and differentiation potential gradually decline with age. The goal of this research was to genetically modify human MPCs (hMPCs) to overexpress the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1α), a key regulator of exercise-mediated adaptation, and thereby to enhance early skeletal muscle formation and quality. We were able to confirm the sustained myogenic phenotype of the genetically modified hMPCs. While maintaining their viability and proliferation potential, PGC-1α modified hMPCs showed an enhanced myofiber formation capacity in vitro. Engineered muscle tissues were harvested 1, 2 and 4 weeks after subcutaneous injection of cell-collagen suspensions and histological analysis confirmed the earlier myotube formation in PGC-1α modified samples, predominantly of slow twitch myofibers. Increased contractile protein levels were detected by Western Blot. In summary, by genetically modifying hMPCs to overexpress PGC-1α we were able to promote early muscle fiber formation in vitro and in vivo, with an initial switch to slow type myofibers. Therefore, overexpressing PGC-1α is novel strategy to further enhance skeletal muscle tissue engineering.

  3. Hyaluronidase 2 Deficiency Causes Increased Mesenchymal Cells, Congenital Heart Defects, and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Biswajit; Xiang, Bo; Liu, Michelle; Hemming, Richard; Dolinsky, Vernon W.

    2017-01-01

    Background— Hyaluronan (HA) is required for endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and normal heart development in the mouse. Heart abnormalities in hyaluronidase 2 (HYAL2)–deficient (Hyal2−/−) mice and humans suggested removal of HA is also important for normal heart development. We have performed longitudinal studies of heart structure and function in Hyal2−/− mice to determine when, and how, HYAL2 deficiency leads to these abnormalities. Methods and Results— Echocardiography revealed atrial enlargement, atrial tissue masses, and valvular thickening at 4 weeks of age, as well as diastolic dysfunction that progressed with age, in Hyal2−/− mice. These abnormalities were associated with increased HA, vimentin-positive cells, and fibrosis in Hyal2−/− compared with control mice. Based on the severity of heart dysfunction, acute and chronic groups of Hyal2−/− mice that died at an average of 12 and 25 weeks respectively, were defined. Increased HA levels and mesenchymal cells, but not vascular endothelial growth factor in Hyal2−/− embryonic hearts, suggest that HYAL2 is important to inhibit endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Consistent with this, in wild-type embryos, HYAL2 and HA were readily detected, and HA levels decreased with age. Conclusions— These data demonstrate that disruption of normal HA catabolism in Hyal2−/− mice causes increased HA, which may promote endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and proliferation of mesenchymal cells. Excess endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, resulting in increased mesenchymal cells, is the likely cause of morphological heart abnormalities in both humans and mice. In mice, these abnormalities result in progressive and severe diastolic dysfunction, culminating in heart failure. PMID:28196902

  4. Dystrophic muscle environment induces changes in cell plasticity.

    PubMed

    Faralli, Herve; Dilworth, F Jeffrey

    2014-04-15

    Fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) reside in the muscle, where they facilitate myofiber regeneration. Under normal conditions, FAPs lack myogenic potential and thus do not directly contribute to regenerated myofibers. Surprisingly, Saccone and colleagues (pp. 841-857) demonstrated that the dystrophic muscle environment causes FAPs to adopt a chromatin state that imparts these cells with myogenic potential. In this context, treatment of muscle with deacetylase inhibitors activates a BAF60c-myomiR transcriptional network in FAPs, blocking adipogenesis and driving muscle differentiation.

  5. Mitochondrial Fission of Smooth Muscle Cells Is Involved in Artery Constriction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Yu; Jin, Jing; Li, Shan-Liang; Yan, Jie; Zhen, Chang-Lin; Gao, Jin-Lai; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Zhang, Yan-Qiu; Shen, Xin; Zhang, Liang-Shuan; Wei, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Yu; Wang, Chen-Guang; Bai, Yun-Long; Dong, De-Li

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles and continuously undergo fission and fusion processes. Mitochondrial fission is involved in multiple physiological or pathological processes, but the role of mitochondrial fission of smooth muscle cells in artery constriction is unknown. The role of mitochondrial fission of smooth muscle cells in arterial function was investigated by measuring the tension of rat mesenteric arteries and thora