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Sample records for heat affected zone

  1. Mechanical Properties of Heat Affected Zone of High Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefcikova, K.; Brtnik, T.; Dolejs, J.; Keltamaki, K.; Topilla, R.

    2015-11-01

    High Strength Steels became more popular as a construction material during last decade because of their increased availability and affordability. On the other hand, even though general use of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) is expanding, the wide utilization is limited because of insufficient information about their behaviour in structures. The most widely used technique for joining steels is fusion welding. The welding process has an influence not only on the welded connection but on the area near this connection, the so-called heat affected zone, as well. For that reason it is very important to be able to determine the properties in the heat affected zone (HAZ). This area of investigation is being continuously developed in dependence on significant progress in material production, especially regarding new types of steels available. There are currently several types of AHSS on the world market. Two most widely used processes for AHSS production are Thermo-Mechanically Controlled Processing (TMCP) and Quenching in connection with Tempering. In the presented study, TMCP and QC steels grade S960 were investigated. The study is focused on the changes of strength, ductility, hardness and impact strength in heat affected zone based on the used amount of heat input.

  2. Characteristics of GTA fusion zones and heat affected zones in superalloy 713C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachowicz, M. B.; Dudziński, W.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, metallographic examinations, characterising microstructural changes in the 713C superalloy subjected to remelting by GTA method, are presented. In the fusion zone, precipitation of M23C6 or M6C carbides based on chromium and molybdenum was observed. Eutectic mixtures of ( γ- gg')-M x C y type with highly developed morphology were also perceived. It was found that, in the matrix areas with non-homogeneous chemical composition, the eutectic reaction γ-γ' can occur at the temperature close to that of the precipitation of the M x C y carbides. The presence of silicon in the carbide phases can be conducive to lowering their solidification point by creating low-melting compound NbSi. Both in the fusion zone (FZ) and in the heat-affected zone (HAZ), the secondary precipitates of the Ni3(AlTi)- γ' phase, varying in size from 50 to 100 nm, were found. The lattice mismatch factor of the γ and γ' particles was +0.48 % to +0.71 %, which is characteristic of the coherent precipitates of the Ni3Al phase enriched with titanium. No dislocations or stacking faults were observed in the microstructure of the FZ. In the HAZ, some primary undissolved γ' precipitates, with a part of aluminium probably replaced with niobium were observed, which raised their melting point.

  3. Microstructural response to heat affected zone cracking of prewelding heat-treated Inconel 939 superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M.A.; Garza, A.

    2011-12-15

    The microstructural response to cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a nickel-based IN 939 superalloy after prewelding heat treatments (PWHT) was investigated. The PWHT specimens showed two different microstructures: 1) spherical ordered {gamma} Prime precipitates (357-442 nm), with blocky MC and discreet M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides dispersed within the coarse dendrites and in the interdendritic regions; and 2) ordered {gamma} Prime precipitates in 'ogdoadically' diced cube shapes and coarse MC carbides within the dendrites and in the interdendritic regions. After being tungsten inert gas welded (TIG) applying low heat input, welding speed and using a more ductile filler alloy, specimens with microstructures consisting of spherical {gamma} Prime precipitate particles and dispersed discreet MC carbides along the grain boundaries, displayed a considerably improved weldability due to a strong reduction of the intergranular HAZ cracking associated with the liquation microfissuring phenomena. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homogeneous microstructures of {gamma} Prime spheroids and discreet MC carbides of Ni base superalloys through preweld heat treatments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {gamma} Prime spheroids and discreet MC carbides reduce the intergranular HAZ liquation and microfissuring of Nickel base superalloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure {gamma} Prime spheroids and discreet blocky type MC carbides, capable to relax the stress generated during weld cooling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low welding heat input welding speeds and ductile filler alloys reduce the HAZ cracking susceptibility.

  4. Effect of Preweld Heat Treatment on the Microstructure of Heat-Affected Zone (HAZ) and Weldability of Inconel 939 Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Albarrán, M. A.; Martínez, D. I.; Díaz, E.; Díaz, J. C.; Guzman, I.; Saucedo, E.; Guzman, A. Ma.

    2014-04-01

    The effect of two preweld heat treatments on the final microstructure of a heat-affected zone (HAZ) and its effect on the weldability of the superalloy Inconel 939 have been analyzed. The HAZ cracking related to the mechanical driving force criteria during the cooling cycle was directly influenced by the strain state at this zone. Heat treatments result in the formation of (1) irregular γ' precipitates (more negative misfits) which showed higher strain (high density of interfacial dislocations) and (2) spherical precipitates (near-zero misfits) which as a result of their structure improve weldability by reducing weld HAZ cracking considerably.

  5. SCC Initiation in Alloy 600 Heat Affected Zones Exposed to High Temperature Water

    SciTech Connect

    E Richey; DS Morton; RA Etien; GA Young; RB Bucinell

    2006-11-03

    Studies have shown that grain boundary chromium carbides improve the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of nickel based alloys exposed to high temperature, high purity water. However, thermal cycles from welding can significantly alter the microstructure of the base material near the fusion line. In particular, the heat of welding can solutionize grain boundary carbides and produce locally high residual stresses and strains, reducing the SCC resistance of the Alloy 600 type material in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Testing has shown that the SCC growth rate in Alloy 600 heat affected zone samples can be {approx}30x faster than observed in the Alloy 600 base material under identical testing conditions due to fewer intergranular chromium rich carbides and increased plastic strain in the HAZ [1, 2]. Stress corrosion crack initiation tests were conducted on Alloy 600 HAZ samples at 360 C in hydrogenated, deaerated water to determine if these microstructural differences significantly affect the SCC initiation resistance of Alloy 600 heat affected zones compared to the Alloy 600 base material. Alloy 600 to EN82H to Alloy 600 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) specimens where fabricated from an Alloy 600 to Alloy 600 narrow groove weld with EN82H filler metal. The approximate middle third of the specimen gauge region was EN82H such that each specimen had two HAZ regions. Tests were conducted with in-situ monitored smooth tensile specimens under a constant load, and a direct current electric potential drop was used for in-situ detection of SCC. Test results suggest that the SCC initiation resistance of Alloy 600 and its weld metal follows the following order: EN82H > Alloy 600 HAZ > Alloy 600. The high SCC initiation resistance observed to date in Alloy 600 heat affected zones compared to wrought Alloy 600 is unexpected based on the microstructure of HAZ versus wrought material and based on prior SCC growth rate studies. The observed behavior for the HAZ specimens is likely

  6. Identification and Characterization of Intercritical Heat-Affected Zone in As-Welded Grade 91 Weldment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiyu; Kannan, Rangasayee; Li, Leijun

    2016-09-01

    A metallurgical method is proposed for locating the intercritical heat-affected zone in the as-welded Grade 91 steel. New austenitic grains, preferentially formed along the original prior austenite grain boundaries, are characterized to contain finer M23C6 carbides and higher strain levels than the original prior austenite grains. Kurdjumov-Sachs Group 1 variant pairs, with a low misorientation of 7 deg within a martensitic block, are identified as the dominant variants in the new PAGs.

  7. The effect of welding line heat-affected-zone on the formability of tube hydroforming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ChiuHuang, Cheng-Kai; Hsu, Cheng-En; Lee, Ping-Kun

    2016-08-01

    Tube hydroforming has been used as a lightweight design approach to reduce CO2 emission for the automotive industry. For the high strength steel tube, the strength and quality of the welding line is very important for a successful tube hydroforming process. This paper aims to investigate the effect of the welding line's strength and the width of the heat-affected zone on the tube thinning during the hydroforming process. The simulation results show that both factors play an important role on the thickness distribution during the tube expansion.

  8. Microstructure characterization of heat affected zone after welding in Mod.9Cr–1Mo steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, K.; Hara, T.; Tabuchi, M.; Kimura, K.; Kubushiro, K.

    2015-03-15

    The microstructure of the heat affected zone after welding was investigated in Mod.9Cr–1Mo steel, using TEM and STEM-EDX. The microstructure of thin foil was observed at the fusion line, and at the positions of 0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 2.0 mm, 2.5 mm, 3.0 mm and 3.5 mm to the base metal side of the fusion line. Martensite structure with very fine lath and high dislocation density was confirmed at all positions. Twins with a twin plane of (112) were locally observed at all positions. Elemental mapping was obtained for all positions by means of STEM-EDX. Inclusions of mainly Si were formed at the fusion line but not at the other positions. No precipitates could be detected at the fusion line or at the position of 0.5 mm. On the other hand, MX particles were observed at the positions of 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 2.0 mm, 2.5 mm, 3.0 mm and 3.5 mm even after welding. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} particles were also confirmed at the positions of 2.0 mm, 2.5 mm, 3.0 mm and 3.5 mm. Very fine equiaxed grains were locally observed at the positions of 2.0 mm and 2.5 mm. The Cr content of the equiaxed grains was about 12 mass%, although the martensite area included about 8 mass% Cr. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nonequilibrium microstructure of heat affected zone was observed after welding in Mod.9Cr–1Mo steel. • Inclusions containing Si were detected at the fusion line. • Undissolved M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and MX particles were confirmed in heat affected zone. • Twins with a twin plane of (112) were locally observed at all positions. • Very fine ferrite grains with high Cr content were observed in fine grained heat affected zone.

  9. Effect of homogenization heat treatment on the microstructure and heat- affected zone microfissuring in welded cast alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao; Chaturvedi, M. C.; Richards, N. L.

    1996-03-01

    The effect of homogenization temperature on microfissuring in the heat-affected zones of electronwelded cast INCONEL 718 has been studied. The material was homogenized at various temperatures in the range of 1037 ° to 1163 ° and air-cooled. The homogenized material was then electron-beam welded by the bead-on-plate welding technique. The microstructures and microfissuring in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) were evaluated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The grain boundary segregation of various elements was evaluated by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). It was observed that the total crack length (TCL) of microfissures first decreases with homogenization temperature and then increases, with a minimum occurring in the specimen heat treated at 1163 °. This trend coincides with the variation in segregation of B at grain boundaries with homogenization temperature and has been explained by equilibrium and nonequilibrium segregation of B to grain boundaries during the homogenization heat treatment. No other element was observed to segregate at the grain boundaries. The variation in volume fraction of phases like δ-Ni3Nb, MC carbide, and Laves phases does not follow the same trend as that observed for TCL and B segregation at the grain boundaries. Therefore, microfissuring in HAZ of welded cast INCONEL 718 is attributed to the segregation of B at the grain boundaries.

  10. In-situ Phase transformation study in fine grained heat affected zone of Grade 91 steels

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Santella, Michael L; Yu, Xinghua; Komizo, Prof. Y; Terasaki, Prof. H

    2014-01-01

    Creep strength-enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steels such as the 9 Cr steel [ASTM A387 Grade 91] are widely used as tubing and piping in the new generation of fossil fired power plants. Microstructures in the fine-grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ) may significantly reduce creep strength leading Type IV failures. Current research suggest that reducing pre-weld tempering temperature from 760 C (HTT) to 650 C (LTT) has the potential to double the creep life of these welds. To understand this improvement, time-resolved X-ray diffraction (TRXRD) measurement with synchrotron radiation was used to characterize the microstructure evolution during fine grained heat-affected zone (HAZ) thermal cycling of grade 91 steel. The measurements showed both M23C6 (M=Fe, Cr) and MX (M=Nb, V; X=C,N) are present in the sample after the HTT condition. Near equilibrium fraction of M23C6 was measured in high temperature tempering condition (HTT, 760 C). However, the amount of M23C6 in LTT condition was very low since the diffraction peaks are close to the background. During simulated FGHAZ thermal cycling, the M23C6 partially dissolved in HTT sample. Interestingly, MX did not dissolve in both LTT and HTT samples. Hypothesis for correlation of M23C6 carbide distribution and pre-mature creep failure in FGHAZ will be made.

  11. Characterization of microstructure, local deformation and microchemistry in Alloy 690 heat-affected zone and stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhanpeng; Chen, Junjie; Shoji, Tetsuo; Takeda, Yoichi; Yamazaki, Seiya

    2015-10-01

    With increasing the distance from the weld fusion line in an Alloy 690 heat-affected zone, micro-hardness decreases, kernel average misorientation decreases and the fraction of Σ3 boundaries increases. Chromium depletion at grain boundaries in the Alloy 690 heat-affected zone is less significant than that in an Alloy 600 heat-affected zone. Alloy 690 heat-affected zone exhibits much higher IGSCC resistance than Alloy 600 heat-affected zone in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water. Heavily cold worked Alloy 690 exhibits localized intergranular stress corrosion cracking. The effects of metallurgical and mechanical properties on stress corrosion cracking in Alloy 690 are discussed.

  12. TEM observation of the heat-affected zone in electron beam welded superalloy Inconel 713C

    SciTech Connect

    Lachowicz, Maciej Dudzinski, Wlodzimierz; Podrez-Radziszewska, Marzena

    2008-05-15

    The paper presents results of microstructural observations and phase analysis of electron-beam-welded fusion zones in superalloy Inconel 713C using transmission electron microscopy. In the fusion zone, a 90% fraction of fine-grained {gamma}' precipitates was found, with sizes up to 30 nm. No dislocations were observed in the precipitates or at the {gamma}-{gamma}' interface. Primary, undissolved inclusions of {gamma}' were found in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). In the HAZ, a very high concentration of dislocations was found at the {gamma}-{gamma}' boundaries, as well as inside the {gamma}' particles and in the {gamma} solid solution. The increased dislocation density indicates loss of coherence of that phase and the creation of a semi-coherent boundary, and is related to dissolution of the particles and intensified diffusion through the interphase {gamma}-{gamma}' boundary. The lattice misfit coefficient {delta}a/a between the {gamma}' particles and {gamma} solution in the HAZ indicates negative values from - 0.20% to - 0.06%. The presence of semi-coherent boundaries and the negative lattice misfit coefficient leads to dislocation locking and can result in cracking in the HAZ.

  13. Effects of Notch Location on Heat-affected Zone Impact Properties of SA-516 Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jaekeun; Park, Jihong; Kang, Chungyun

    In case of welding for pressure retaining parts on nuclear components, the verifications of heat affected zone (HAZ) impact properties are required according to application codes such as ASME Sec. III, RCC-M, KEPIC (Korea Electric Power Industry Code) MN, and JEA (Japan Electric Association) Code. Especially in case of Charpy V-notch tests of HAZ, the requirements of notch location and specimen direction have greatly impact on the reliability and consistency of the test results. For the establishment of newly adequate impact test requirements, the requirements about the HAZ impact tests of ASME Section III, RCC-M, KEPIC MN and JEA code were researched in this study. And also the HAZ impact test requirements about surveillance tests in nuclear reactor vessels were compared and investigated. For the effects of the notch location and specimen direction on the impact properties, SA-516 Gr.70 materials were investigated. The specimens were fabricated with using shielded metal-arc welding, and maximum heat inputs were controlled within the range of 16˜27 kJ/cm. Especially, this research showed the lateral expansion values and absorbed energies were not compatible and the impact test results were varied depending on notch location and specimen direction. Based on this study, newly adequate impact test requirements of HAZ were proposed.

  14. Effect of welding parameters on the heat-affected zone of AISI409 ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbarnodeh, Eslam; Hanke, Stefanie; Weiss, Sabine; Fischer, Alfons

    2012-10-01

    One of the main problems during the welding of ferritic stainless steels is severe grain growth within the heat-affected zone (HAZ). In the present study, the microstructural characteristics of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded AISI409 ferritic stainless steel were investigated by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), and the effects of welding parameters on the grain size, local misorientation, and low-angle grain boundaries were studied. A 3-D finite element model (FEM) was developed to predict the effects of welding parameters on the holding time of the HAZ above the critical temperature of grain growth. It is found that the base metal is not fully recrystallized. During the welding, complete recrystallization is followed by severe grain growth. A decrease in the number of low-angle grain boundaries is observed within the HAZ. FEM results show that the final state of residual strains is caused by competition between welding plastic strains and their release by recrystallization. Still, the decisive factor for grain growth is heat input.

  15. Crack growth rates of irradiated austenitic stainless steel weld heat affected zone in BWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Gruber, E. E.; Daum, R. S.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of reactor pressure vessels because of their superior fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods can exacerbate the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these steels by affecting the material microchemistry, material microstructure, and water chemistry. Experimental data are presented on crack growth rates of the heat affected zone (HAZ) in Types 304L and 304 SS weld specimens before and after they were irradiated to a fluence of 5.0 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 0.75 dpa) at {approx}288 C. Crack growth tests were conducted under cycling loading and long hold time trapezoidal loading in simulated boiling water reactor environments on Type 304L SS HAZ of the H5 weld from the Grand Gulf reactor core shroud and on Type 304 SS HAZ of a laboratory-prepared weld. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed.

  16. Initial Evaluation of the Heat-Affected Zone, Local Embrittlement Phenomenon as it Applies to Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.E.

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this project was to determine if the local brittle zone (LBZ) problem, encountered in the testing of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) part of welds in offshore platform construction, can also be found in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) welds. Both structures have multipass welds and grain coarsening along the fusion line. Literature was obtained that described the metallurgical evidence and the type of research work performed on offshore structure welds.

  17. Evaluation of Heat-affected Zone Hydrogen-induced Cracking in High-strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xin

    Shipbuilding is heavily reliant on welding as a primary fabrication technique. Any high performance naval steel must also possess good weldability. It is therefore of great practical importance to conduct weldability testing of naval steels. Among various weldability issues of high-strength steels, hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) following welding is one of the biggest concerns. As a result, in the present work, research was conducted to study the HAZ HIC susceptibility of several naval steels. Since the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) is generally known to be the most susceptible to HIC in the HAZ region, the continuous cooling transformation (CCT) behavior of the CGHAZ of naval steels HSLA-65, HSLA-100, and HY-100 was investigated. The CGHAZ microstructure over a range of cooling rates was characterized, and corresponding CCT diagrams were constructed. It was found that depending on the cooling rate, martensite, bainite, ferrite and pearlite can form in the CGHAZ of HSLA-65. For HSLA-100 and HY-100, only martensite and bainite formed over the range of cooling rates that were simulated. The constructed CCT diagrams can be used as a reference to select welding parameters to avoid the formation of high-hardness martensite in the CGHAZ, in order to ensure resistance to hydrogen-induced cracking. Implant testing was conducted on the naval steels to evaluate their susceptibility to HAZ HIC. Stress vs. time to failure curves were plotted, and the lower critical stress (LCS), normalized critical stress ratio (NCSR) and embrittlement index (EI) for each steel were determined, which were used to quantitatively compare HIC susceptibility. The CGHAZ microstructure of the naval steels was characterized, and the HIC fracture behavior was studied. Intergranular (IG), quasi-cleavage (QC) and microvoid coalescence (MVC) fracture modes were found to occur in sequence during the crack initiation and propagation process. This was

  18. Effect of acicular ferrite formation on grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, X.L.; Wei, R.; Wu, K.M.

    2010-07-15

    The microstructure of acicular ferrite and its formation for the grain refinement of coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone of high strength low-alloy bainite steels were studied using three-dimensional reconstruction technique. Crystallographic grain size was analyzed by means of electron backscatter diffraction. It was revealed that the microstructure in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone consisted of predominantly bainite packets and a small proportion of acicular ferrite. Acicular ferrite was of lath or plate-like rather than needle or rod-like morphology. Tempering of the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone showed that the acicular ferrite was more stable than the bainite, indicating that the acicular ferrite was formed prior to bainite. The acicular ferrite laths or plates divided the prior austenite grains into smaller and separate regions, and confining the bainite transformed at lower temperatures in the smaller regions and hence leading to the grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone.

  19. An investigation of reheat cracking in the weld heat affected zone of type 347 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phung-On, Isaratat

    2007-12-01

    microvoid corresponds to the size of precipitate that forms. In addition, there was intragranular cracking in some location indicating that another failure mechanism may also be possible. It was believed that failure may occur along a precipitate free zone. However, the distinct PFZ could not be detected. A SS-DTA technique was also implemented in order to determine precipitation temperatures of the material. The results showed the possible precipitation temperatures in the range of 850°C to 650°C. However, the results were not confidently reliable due to the small amount of carbide formed that affects the sensitivity of the SS-DTA. A simple grain boundary sliding model was generated proposing that the sliding is operated by the shear stress resulting from the formation of precipitate in the grain interior. Then, the sliding results in the microvoid formation and coalescence followed by cracking. In addition, a simple finite element model was generated to provide the illustration of the shear stress built up by the formation of precipitate. The model showed that shear stress can cause the grain boundary movement/sliding. Based on the results from this study, the recommendation for the selection of post weld heat treatment schedule as well as welding procedures can be determined for the prevention of the reheat cracking. A residual stress should be kept below the critical value during welding and post weld heat treating. The testing procedures used in this study can be applied as the guidelines to conduct the reheat cracking susceptibility test for material selection.

  20. Calibrated heat flow model for the determination of different heat-affected zones in single-pass laser-cut CFRP using a cw CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, P.; Berger, P.; Weber, R.; Speker, N.; Sommer, B.; Graf, T.

    2015-03-01

    Laser machining has great potential for automated manufacturing of parts made of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) due to the nearly force and tool-wear free processing. The high vaporization temperatures and the large heat conductivity of the carbon fibers, however, lead to unintentional heat conduction into the material causing damage in zones close to the process. In this paper, the matrix damage zone (MDZ) is subdivided into a matrix sublimation zone (MSZ) where the matrix material was sublimated and a zone where the temperature temporarily exceeded a value causing structural damage in the matrix. In order to investigate the extent of these zones, a one-dimensional heat flow model was applied, which was calibrated by cutting experiments using temperature sensors embedded in the CFRP samples. The investigations showed that the extents of the MSZ and MDZ are dominated by a total interaction time, which includes the passage of the laser beam and the continued interaction of the cloud of hot ablation products with the carbon fibers at the kerf wall and that from a practical point of view, the experimentally determined effective heat conductivity is suitable for simple estimations of the heat-affected zones in CFRP.

  1. Determination of elastoplastic mechanical properties of the weld and heat affected zone metals in tailor-welded blanks by nanoindentation test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiangdong; Guan, Yingping; Yang, Liu

    2015-09-01

    The elastoplastic mechanical properties of the weld and heat affected zone metals have comparatively major impact on the forming process of tailor-welded blanks. A few scholars investigated the elastoplastic mechanical properties of the weld and heat affected zone, but they only simply assumed that it was a uniform distribution elastoplastic material different from the base materials. Four types of tailor-welded blanks which consist of ST12 and 304 stainless steel plates are selected as the research objects, the elastoplastic mechanical properties of the tailor-welded blanks weld and heat affected zone metals are obtained based on the nanoindentation tests, and the Erichsen cupping tests are conducted by combining numerical simulation with physical experiment. The nanoindentation tests results demonstrate that the elastoplastic mechanical properties of the weld and heat affected zone metals are not only different from the base materials, but also varying between the weld metals and the heat affected zone metals. Comparing the Erichsen cupping test resulted from numerical with that from experimental method, it is found that the numerical value of Erichsen cupping test which consider the elastoplastic mechanical properties of the weld and heat affected zone metals have a good agreement with the experimental result, and the relative error is only 4.8%. The proposed research provides good solutions for the inhomogeneous elastoplastic mechanical properties of the tailor-welded blanks weld and heat affected zone metals, and improves the control performance of tailor-welded blanks forming accuracy.

  2. Neural Network approach to assess the thermal affected zone around the injection well in a groundwater heat pump system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Russo, Stefano; Taddia, Glenda; Verda, Vittorio

    2014-05-01

    The common use of well doublets for groundwater-sourced heating or cooling results in a thermal plume of colder or warmer re-injected groundwater known as the Thermal Affected Zone(TAZ). The plumes may be regarded either as a potential anthropogenic geothermal resource or as pollution, depending on downstream aquifer usage. A fundamental aspect in groundwater heat pump (GWHP) plant design is the correct evaluation of the thermally affected zone that develops around the injection well. Temperature anomalies are detected through numerical methods. Crucial elements in the process of thermal impact assessment are the sizes of installations, their position, the heating/cooling load of the building, and the temperature drop/increase imposed on the re-injected water flow. For multiple-well schemes, heterogeneous aquifers, or variable heating and cooling loads, numerical models that simulate groundwater and heat transport are needed. These tools should consider numerous scenarios obtained considering different heating/cooling loads, positions, and operating modes. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models are widely used in this field because they offer the opportunity to calculate the time evolution of the thermal plume produced by a heat pump, depending on the characteristics of the subsurface and the heat pump. Nevertheless, these models require large computational efforts, and therefore their use may be limited to a reasonable number of scenarios. Neural networks could represent an alternative to CFD for assessing the TAZ under different scenarios referring to a specific site. The use of neural networks is proposed to determine the time evolution of the groundwater temperature downstream of an installation as a function of the possible utilization profiles of the heat pump. The main advantage of neural network modeling is the possibility of evaluating a large number of scenarios in a very short time, which is very useful for the preliminary analysis of future multiple

  3. Modeling phase transformation behavior during thermal cycling in the heat-affected zone of stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Iskander, Y.S.; David, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    An implicit finite-difference analysis was used to model the diffusion-controlled transformation behavior in a ternary system. The present analysis extends earlier work by examining the transformation behavior under the influence of multiple thermal cycles. The analysis was applied to the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary system to simulate the microstructural development in austenitic stainless steel welds. The ferrite-to-austenite transformation was studied in an effort to model the response of the heat-affected zone to multiple thermal cycles experienced during multipass welding. Results show that under some conditions, a transformation ``inertia`` exists that delays the system`s response when changing from cooling to heating. Conditions under which this ``inertia`` is most influential were examined. It was also found that under some conditions, the transformation behavior does not follow the equilibrium behavior as a function of temperature. Results also provide some insight into effect of composition distribution on transformation behavior.

  4. Precipitate microstructures and resulting properties of Al-Zn-Mg metal inert gas-weld heat-affected zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, M.; Deschamps, A.

    2004-05-01

    Using the combination of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the precipitate microstructure is quantitatively investigated in the heat-affected zones (HAZs) of Al-Zn-Mg metal inert gas (MIG)-welds, and the resulting mechanical properties are determined by hardness measurements. Three initial states prior to welding (T4, T6, and T7) are investigated, and the subsequent microstructure evolution during natural aging and postwelding heat treatments (PWHTs) is assessed. The critical part of the HAZ is shown to be the transition region where partial dissolution of the initially present precipitates occurs. In this transition zone, precipitate coarsening is shown to occur for the T6 and T7 initial states, contrarily to the T4 material. After PWHT, the T6 and T7 materials experience a weak region related to this coarsening behavior, whereas the T4 material HAZ is able to recover a homogeneous microstructure after a suitably chosen PWHT. Simple model ramp heat treatments are shown to describe the main phenomena involved in the HAZ. Finally, a precipitation hardening model is successfully applied to the microstructural data to describe the hardness profiles in the various HAZs.

  5. Enhancement of Heat-Affected Zone Toughness of a Low Carbon Steel by TiN Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Xiaobao; Ma, Han

    2016-08-01

    Enhancement of heat-affected zone toughness of a weight percentage of 0.014 pct Ti-bearing low carbon steel by TiN particle was investigated. An increase in nitrogen weight percentage from 0.0031 to 0.0083 pct results in increasing of number density of TiN precipitates from 4 × 103 to 3 × 105/mm2, and reduces prior austenite grain size from 850 to 350 μm with a soaking of 1673 K (1400 °C) for 2000 seconds. Effective refinement of austenite grain prohibits formation of ferrite side plate and/or upper bainite, and densely distributed TiN particles promote intra-granular ferrite formation, which is accompanied by an increase of 40 K to 60 K (40 °C to 60 °C) in austenite decomposition temperature during continuous cooling process. The changes in transformed products improved impact toughness of heat-affected zone efficiently, ex., increase absorbed energy of less than 42 J to more than 320 J with a simulated t 8/5 of 550 seconds.

  6. Corrosion behavior in high heat input welded heat-affected zone of Ni-free high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Joonoh Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2013-08-15

    The pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion behaviors in high heat input welded heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a metastable high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel were explored through electrochemical tests. The HAZs were simulated using Gleeble simulator with high heat input welding condition of 300 kJ/cm and the peak temperature of the HAZs was changed from 1200 °C to 1350 °C, aiming to examine the effect of δ-ferrite formation on corrosion behavior. The electrochemical test results show that both pitting corrosion resistance and interphase corrosion resistance were seriously deteriorated by δ-ferrite formation in the HAZ and their aspects were different with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The pitting corrosion resistance was decreased by the formation of Cr-depleted zone along δ-ferrite/austenite (γ) interphase resulting from δ-ferrite formation; however it didn't depend on δ-ferrite fraction. The interphase corrosion resistance depends on the total amount of Cr-depleted zone as well as ferrite area and thus continuously decreased with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The different effects of δ-ferrite fraction on pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion were carefully discussed in terms of alloying elements partitioning in the HAZ based on thermodynamic consideration. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior in the weld HAZ of high-nitrogen austenitic alloy was studied. • Cr{sub 2}N particle was not precipitated in high heat input welded HAZ of tested alloy. • Pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion show a different behavior. • Pitting corrosion resistance was affected by whether or not δ-ferrite forms. • Interphase corrosion resistance was affected by the total amount of δ-ferrite.

  7. Liquation Microfissuring in the Weld Heat-Affected Zone of an Overaged Precipitation-Hardened Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, O. A.; Chaturvedi, M. C.

    2007-02-01

    The effect of preweld overaging heat treatment on the microstructural response in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a precipitation-hardened nickel-base superalloy INCONEL 738LC subjected to the welding thermal cycle ( i.e., rapid) was investigated. The overaging heat treatment resulted in the formation of an interfacial microconstituent containing M23X6 particles and coarsening of primary and secondary γ' precipitates. The HAZ microstructures around welds in the overaged alloy were simulated using the Gleeble thermomechanical simulation system. Microstructural examination of simulated HAZs and those present in tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded specimens showed the occurrence of extensive grain boundary liquation involving liquation reaction of the interfacial microconstituents containing M23X6 particles and MC-type carbides. In addition, the coarsened γ' precipitate particles present in the overaged alloy persisted well above their solvus temperature to temperatures where they constitutionally liquated and contributed to considerable liquation of grain boundaries, during continuous rapid heating. Intergranular HAZ microfissuring, with resolidified product formed mostly on one side of the microfissures, was observed in welded specimens. This suggested that the HAZ microfissuring generally occurred by decohesion across one of the solid-liquid interfaces during the grain boundary liquation stage of the weld thermal cycle. Correlation of simulated HAZ microstructures with hot ductility properties of the alloy revealed that the temperature at which the alloy exhibited zero ductility during heating was within the temperature range at which grain boundary liquation was observed. The on-cooling ductility of the alloy was significantly damaged by the on-heating liquation reaction, as reflected by the considerably low ductility recovery temperature (DRT). Important characteristics of the intergranular liquid that could influence HAZ microfissuring of the alloy in overaged

  8. Cleavage initiation in the intercritically reheated coarse-grained heat affected zone. Part 2: Failure criteria and statistical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.L.; King, J.E.

    1996-10-01

    In part 1 of this article, cleavage initiation in the intercritically reheated coarse-grained heat affected zone (IC CG HAZ) of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels was determined to occur between two closely spaced blocky MA particles. Blunt notch, crack tip opening displacement (CTOD), and precracked Charpy testing were used in this investigation to determine the failure criteria required for cleavage initiation to occur by this mechanism in the IC CG HAZ. It was found that the attainment of a critical level of strain was required in addition to a critical level of stress. This does not occur in the case of high strain rate testing, for example, during precracked Charpy testing. A different cleavage initiation mechanism is then found to operate. The precise fracture criteria and microstructural requirements (described in part 1 of this article) result in competition between potential cleavage initiation mechanisms in the IC CG HAZ.

  9. A SYNCHROTRON DIFFRACTION STUDY OF TRANSFORMATION BEHAVIOUR IN 9 CR STEELS USING SIMULATED WELD HEAT-AFFECTED ZONE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Specht, Eliot D; Shingledecker, John P; Abe, Fujio

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron diffraction experiments were conducted to examine the real-time transformation behaviours of an ex-perimental 9Cr-3W-3Co-NbV steel with high B and low N (N130B), and the commercial P92 steel under simulated weld heat-affected zone thermal cycles. When heated to peak temperatures near 1100 C, both steels rapidly trans-formed from ferrite to 100% austenite. During cooling, both transformed to martensite near 400 C. Both steels also retained untransformed austenite: 1.7% in N130B, and 5.8% in P92. The N130B was also heated to about 60 C above its A3 of 847 C. About 56% of the original ferrite never transformed to austenite. During cooling an additional 21% of ferrite and 23% of martensite formed. It retained no austenite. The P92 was heated to just above its A3 of 889 C. About 15% of the original ferrite never transformed to austenite. During cooling an additional 22% of ferrite and 60% of martensite formed. This steel retained about 2.3% austenite. Metallographic examina-tions indicated that the M23C6 in N130B was much more stable than that in P92 for heating to the lower peak tem-peratures. Analysis using equilibrium thermodynamics suggested that the more stable M23C6 in N130B could raise its apparent A3 by sequestering C. This could cause the ferrite-austenite transformation to appear sluggish. Ther-modynamic analysis also indicated that the M23C6 in N130B contained about 3.9 at% B compared to about 0.08 at% B in that of P92. In contrast, the refractory metal element content of the M23C6 was predicted to be higher in P92.

  10. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part I. The model

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, O.

    1999-11-01

    The present investigation is concerned with modeling of the microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steels under thermal conditions applicable to welding. The important reactions that have been modeled are the dissolution of austenite during heating, subsequent grain growth in the delta ferrite regime, and finally, the decomposition of the delta ferrite to austenite during cooling. As a starting point, a differential formulation of the underlying diffusion problem is presented, based on the internal-state variable approach. These solutions are later manipulated and expressed in terms of the Scheil integral in the cases where the evolution equation is separable or can be made separable by a simple change of variables. The models have then been applied to describe the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution during both thick-plate and thin-plate welding of three commercial duplex stainless steel grades: 2205, 2304, and 2507. The results may conveniently be presented in the form of novel process diagrams, which display contours of constant delta ferrite grain size along with information about dissolution and reprecipitation of austenite for different combinations of weld input energy and peak temperature. These diagrams are well suited for quantitative readings and illustrate, in a condensed manner, the competition between the different variables that lead to structural changes during welding of duplex stainless steels.

  11. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part I. the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.

    1999-11-01

    The present investigation is concerned with modeling of the microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steels under thermal conditions applicable to welding. The important reactions that have been modeled are the dissolution of austenite during heating, subsequent grain growth in the delta ferrite regime, and finally, the decomposition of the delta ferrite to austenite during cooling. As a starting point, a differential formulation of the underlying diffusion problem is presented, based on the internal-state variable approach. These solutions are later manipulated and expressed in terms of the Scheil integral in the cases where the evolution equation is separable or can be made separable by a simple change of variables. The models have then been applied to describe the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution during both thick-plate and thin-plate welding of three commercial duplex stainless steel grades: 2205, 2304, and 2507. The results may conveniently be presented in the form of novel process diagrams, which display contours of constant delta ferrite grain size along with information about dissolution and reprecipitation of austenite for different combinations of weld input energy and peak temperature. These diagrams are well suited for quantitative readings and illustrate, in a condensed manner, the competition between the different variables that lead to structural changes during welding of duplex stainless steels.

  12. Characterization of Low Temperature Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Arc Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Babu, S S; Vitek, J M

    2003-08-20

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) has been used to identify a previously unobserved low temperature ferrite ({delta})/austenite({gamma}) phase transformation in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) welds. In this ''ferrite dip'' transformation, the ferrite transforms to austenite during heating to peak temperatures on the order of 750 C, and re-transforms to ferrite during cooling, resulting in a ferrite volume fraction equivalent to that in the base metal. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) and laser dilatometry measurements during Gleeble{reg_sign} thermal simulations are performed in order to verify the existence of this low temperature phase transformation. Thermodynamic and kinetic models for phase transformations, including both local-equilibrium and para-equilibrium diffusion controlled growth, show that diffusion of substitutional alloying elements does not provide a reasonable explanation for the experimental observations. On the other hand, the diffusion of interstitial alloying elements may be rapid enough to explain this behavior. Based on both the experimental and modeling results, two mechanisms for the ''ferrite dip'' transformation, including the formation and decomposition of secondary austenite and an athermal martensitic-type transformation of ferrite to austenite, are considered.

  13. Effect of boron segregation at grain boundaries on heat-affected zone cracking in wrought INCONEL 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Chaturvedi, M. C.; Richards, N. L.

    2001-04-01

    Susceptibility to heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking during electron-beam welding was studied in two INCONEL 718-based alloys doped with different levels of boron. By lowering the carbon, sulfur, and phosphorous concentrations to be “as low as possible,” the occurrence of HAZ cracking was related directly to the level of segregation of boron at grain boundaries, which occurred by nonequilibrium segregation during a preweld heat treatment. The study has demonstrated a direct correlation between the amount of boron segregated at grain boundaries and their susceptibility to HAZ cracking, in terms of the total crack length and number of cracks observed in the HAZ. The analysis of results suggests that both the melting and resolidification temperatures of the boron-segregated grain boundaries can be about 100 °C to 200 °C lower than those of the grain boundaries that were susceptible to constitutional liquation of Nb carbides on them, making boron more deleterious in causing HAZ cracking.

  14. Irradiation effects on weld heat-affected zone and plate materials (series 11)

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; McCabe, D.E.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to examine the effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness (ductile and brittle) of the HAZ of welds and of A 302 grade B (A302B) plate materials typical of those used fabricating older RPVs. The initial plate material of emphasis will be A302B steel, not the A302B modified with nickel additions. This decision was made by the NRC following a survey of the materials of construction for RPBs in operating U.S. nuclear plants. Reference 1 was used for the preliminary survey, and the information from that report was revised by NRC staff based on information contained in the licensee responses to Generic Letter (GL) 92-01, {open_quotes}Reactor Vessel Structural Integrity, 10CFR50.54(f).{close_quotes} The resulting survey showed a total of eight RPVs with A302B, ten with A302B (modified), and one with A302 grade A plate. Table 5.1 in the previous semiannual report provides a summary of that survey. For the HAZ portion of the program, the intent is to examine HAZ material in the A302B (i.e., with low nickel content) and in A302B (modified) or A533B-1 (i.e., with medium nickel content). During this reporting period, two specific plates were identified as being applicable to this task. One plate is A302B and the other is A302B (modified). The A302B plate (43 x 42 x 7 in.) will be prepared for welding, while the A302B (modified) plate already contains a commercially produced weld (heat 33A277, Linde 0091 flux). These plates were identified from a list of ten materials provided by Mr. E. Biemiller of Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC). The materials have been requested from YAEC for use in this irradiation task, and arrangements are being made with YAEC for procurement of the plates mentioned above.

  15. Low-Temperature Sensitization Behavior of Base, Heat-Affected Zone, and Weld Pool in AISI 304LN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Das, Gautam; Singh, P. K.; Chattoraj, I.

    2009-05-01

    Present investigations were focused on low-temperature sensitization (LTS) behavior of 304LN stainless steels considered from pipes of two different thicknesses. The specimens for the present study were taken from solution-annealed pipes (of varying thicknesses) and welded pipes (including the heat-affected zone (HAZ)). The specimens were subjected to thermal aging at 400 °C and 450 °C for different durations ranging from 125 to 8000 hours, to evaluate their sensitization susceptibility. The aging durations were worked out to simulate the 30-to-100-year life of the studied stainless steel at 300 °C using the Arrheneous equation and considering the activation energy of 150 kJ/mol. The thermally aged specimens were characterized for their degree of sensitization (DOS) and susceptibility to intergranular corrosion (IGC) by double-loop (DL) electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) and by methods given in the ASTM A262 practices A and E. It has been clearly shown that the weld pool is more sensitive to IGC than are the base and the HAZ at both the aging temperatures (LTS), because they showed IGC cracks during the bending subsequent to the boiling in H2SO4-CuSO4 solution. Both the base and the HAZ of the thicker pipe material showed susceptibility to sensitization, as indicated by the increasing DOS and “dual-type” microstructure during electrolytic oxalic acid (EOA) etching; however, they were found safe from IGC for the studied sensitization times. The susceptibility to sensitization and IGC in the weld pool is related to the presence of copious delta ferrite with chromium diffusivity that is accelerated compared to the austenite phase. The time-temperature-sensitization (TTS) curves were prepared accordingly, based on these results.

  16. Creep deformation and rupture behavior of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel weldments and its constituents (base metal, weld metal and simulated heat affected zones)

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Rao, K.B.S.; Mannan, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Microstructure across a weldment base metal through transformed heat-affected zone (HAZ) to cast weld metal. HAZ of 2.25Cr-1Mo weldment consists of coarse-grain bainite, fine-grain bainite and intercritical region. These HAZ microstructures were simulated by isothermal heat-treatments. Creep tests were carried out on base metal, weld metal, weldment and the simulated HAZ structures. Creep deformation and fracture behavior of 2.25Cr-1Mo weldments has been assessed based on the properties of its constituents. Coarse-grain bainite with low ductility and intercritical structure with low strength are the critical components of HAZ determining performance of the weldments.

  17. Effect of long-term aging on microstructure and local behavior in the heat-affected zone of a Ni–Cr–Mo–V steel welded joint

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Ming-Liang Wang, De-Qiang; Xuan, Fu-Zhen

    2014-01-15

    Evolution of microstructure, micro-hardness and micro-tensile strength behavior was investigated in the heat-affected zone of a Ni–Cr–Mo–V steel welded joint after the artificial aging at 350 °C for 3000 h. After detailed characterization of microstructures in optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, it is revealed that the change of martensite–bainite constituent promotes more homogeneous microstructure distribution. The aging treatment facilitates redistribution of carbon and chromium elements along the welded joint, and the micro-hardness is increased slightly through the welds due to enrichment of carbon. The types of precipitates in the weldment mainly include M{sub 3}C, MC, M{sub 2}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. The carbides in base metal, weld metal and coarse-grained heat-affected zone are prone to change from ellipsoidal to platelet form whereas more uniform spherical carbides are observed in the fine-grained zone. Precipitation and coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} near the fusion line, and formation of MC and M{sub 2}C, are responsible for the tensile strength decrease and its smooth distribution in the aged heat-affected zone. This implies that the thermal aging can relieve strength mismatch in the weldments. - Highlights: • Microstructure homogeneity improved in HAZ after long-term aging. • Tensile strength decreased in HAZ due to precipitation and coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. • Strength mismatch in NiCrMoV steel welds was relieved after aging at 350 °C × 3000 h.

  18. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part II. Application to electron beam welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.; Klokkehaug, S.

    2000-03-01

    In the present investigation, a process model for electron beam (EB) welding of different grades of duplex stainless steels (i.e. SAF 2205 and 2507) has been developed. A number of attractive features are built into the original finite element code, including (1) a separate module for prediction of the penetration depth and distribution of the heat source into the plate, (2) adaptive refinement of the three-dimensional (3-D) element mesh for quick and reliable solution of the differential heat flow equation, and (3) special subroutines for calculation of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructure evolution. The process model has been validated by comparison with experimental data obtained from in situ thermocouple measurements and optical microscope examinations. Subsequently, its aptness to alloy design and optimization of welding conditions for duplex stainless steels is illustrated in different numerical examples and case studies pertaining to EB welding of tubular joints.

  19. Evaluation of crack arrest fracture toughness of parent plate, weld metal and heat affected zone of BIS 812 EMA ship plate steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, I. A.

    1993-10-01

    The steel chosen for the pressure hull of the Collins class submarine has undergone evaluation to compare the crack arrest fracture toughness, K(Ia), of the parent plate with that of weld metal and heat affected zone. The tests were conducted over a range of subzero temperatures on specimens slightly outside the ASTM standard test method specimen configuration. Shallow face grooved specimens were used to vary the propagating crack velocity from that of non face grooved specimens and determine if K(Ia), is sensitive to changes in crack velocity. The weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ), and parent plate were assessed to determine if the welding process had a deleterious effect on the crack arrest properties of this particular steel. Tests on each of these regions revealed that, for the combination of parent plate, welding procedure and consumables, no adverse effect on crack arrest properties was encountered. Crack arrest fracture toughness of the weld metal and HAZ was superior to that of the parent plate at comparable temperatures.

  20. Inclusions and Microstructure of Ce-Added Weld Metal Coarse Grain Heat-Affected Zone in Twin-Wire Submerged-Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S. F.; Yan, N.; Chen, Y.

    2016-06-01

    In high heat-input multi-pass twin-wire submerged-arc welding, weld metal of previous pass will be affected by the heat input of subsequent one and form coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ). This study focused on the effects of welding thermal cycle on the inclusions and microstructure of Ce-alloyed weld metal CGHAZ. According to the study of inclusions and microstructure of weld metal CGHAZ, it was found that the composition and type of the inclusions did not change under the effect of welding thermal cycle. Although the inclusions were coarsened slightly, the promoting ability to acicular ferrite (AF) was not deprived after thermal cycling. There are three types of AF in weld metal CGHAZ, which include oxy-sulfides of Ce inclusions-promoted AF, home-position-precipitated AF, and sympathetic AF. Results showed more than 80% of microstructure was AF, which greatly benefited the mechanical properties of weld metal CGHAZ, even though granular bainite and M-A constituents were generated.

  1. Prediction and characterization of heat-affected zone formation in tin-bismuth alloys due to nickel-aluminum multilayer foil reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, R. J.; Davis, C. G.; Johns, P. M.; Adams, D. P.; Hirschfeld, D.; Nino, J. C.; Manuel, M. V.

    2015-06-26

    Reactive multilayer foils have the potential to be used as local high intensity heat sources for a variety of applications. In this study, most of the past research effort concerning these materials have focused on understanding the structure-property relationships of the foils that govern the energy released during a reaction. To improve the ability of researchers to more rapidly develop technologies based on reactive multilayer foils, a deeper and more predictive understanding of the relationship between the heat released from the foil and microstructural evolution in the neighboring materials is needed. This work describes the development of a numerical model for the purpose of predicting heat affected zone size in substrate materials. The model is experimentally validated using a commercially available Ni-Al multilayer foils and alloys from the Sn-Bi binary system. To accomplish this, phenomenological models for predicting the variation of physical properties (i.e., thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity) with temperature and composition in the Sn-Bi system were utilized using literature data.

  2. Prediction and characterization of heat-affected zone formation in tin-bismuth alloys due to nickel-aluminum multilayer foil reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hooper, R. J.; Davis, C. G.; Johns, P. M.; Adams, D. P.; Hirschfeld, D.; Nino, J. C.; Manuel, M. V.

    2015-06-26

    Reactive multilayer foils have the potential to be used as local high intensity heat sources for a variety of applications. In this study, most of the past research effort concerning these materials have focused on understanding the structure-property relationships of the foils that govern the energy released during a reaction. To improve the ability of researchers to more rapidly develop technologies based on reactive multilayer foils, a deeper and more predictive understanding of the relationship between the heat released from the foil and microstructural evolution in the neighboring materials is needed. This work describes the development of a numerical modelmore » for the purpose of predicting heat affected zone size in substrate materials. The model is experimentally validated using a commercially available Ni-Al multilayer foils and alloys from the Sn-Bi binary system. To accomplish this, phenomenological models for predicting the variation of physical properties (i.e., thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity) with temperature and composition in the Sn-Bi system were utilized using literature data.« less

  3. Estimation of the most influential factors on the laser cutting process heat affected zone (HAZ) by adaptive neuro-fuzzy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, Dalibor; Nikolić, Vlastimir; Milovančević, Miloš; Lazov, Lyubomir

    2016-07-01

    Heat affected zone (HAZ) of the laser cutting process may be developed on the basis on combination of different factors. In this investigation was analyzed the HAZ forecasting based on the different laser cutting parameters. The main aim in this article was to analyze the influence of three inputs on the HAZ of the laser cutting process. The method of ANFIS (adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system) was applied to the data in order to select the most influential factors for HAZ forecasting. Three inputs are considered: laser power, cutting speed and gas pressure. According the results the cutting speed has the highest influence on the HAZ forecasting (RMSE: 0.0553). Gas pressure has the smallest influence on the HAZ forecasting (RMSE: 0.0801). The results can be used in order to simplify HAZ prediction and analyzing.

  4. Effect of welding conditions on transformation and properties of heat-affected zones in LWR (light-water reactor) vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Mohammed, S. . Welding Research and Engineering)

    1990-11-01

    The continuous cooling transformation behavior (CCT) and isothermal transformation (IT) behavior were determined for SA-508 and SA-533 materials for conditions pertaining to standard heat treatment and for the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The resulting diagrams help to select welding conditions that produce the most favorable microconstituent for the development of optimum postweld heat treatment (PWHT) toughness levels. In the case of SA-508 and SA-533, martensite responds more favorably to PWHT than does bainite. Bainite is to be avoided for the optimum toughness characteristics of the HAZ. The reheat cracking tendency for both steels was evaluated by metallographic studies of simulated HAZ structures subjected to PWHT cycles and simultaneous restraint. Both SA-533, Grade B, Class 1, and SA-508, Class 2, cracked intergranularly. The stress rupture parameter (the product of the stress for a rupture life of 10 min and the corresponding reduction of area) calculated for both steels showed that SA-508, Class 2, was more susceptible to reheat cracking than SA-533, Grade B, Class 1. Cold cracking tests (Battelle Test and University of Tennessee modified hydrogen susceptibility test) indicated that a higher preheat temperature is required for SA-508, Class 2, to avoid cracking than is required for SA-533, Grade B, Class 1. Further, the Hydrogen Susceptibility Test showed that SA-508, Class 2, is more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement than is SA-533, Grade B, Class 1.

  5. Observations of Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Spot Welds Using Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T; Elmer, J; Babu, S

    2003-10-29

    Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) measurements are made in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) spot welds. Both the {gamma} {yields} {delta} and {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformations are monitored as a function of time during the rapid spot weld heating and cooling cycles. These observations are then correlated with calculated thermal cycles. Where the peak temperatures are highest ({approx}1342 C), the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to completion, leaving a ferritic microstructure at the end of heating. With lower peak temperatures, the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to only partial completion, resulting in a microstructure containing both transformed and untransformed austenite. Further analyses of the individual diffraction patterns show shifts in the peak positions and peak widths as a function of both time and temperature. In addition, these changes in the peak characteristics are correlated with measured changes in the ferrite volume fraction. Such changes in the peak positions and widths during the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation provide an indication of changes occurring in each phase. These changes in peak properties can be correlated with the diffusion of nitrogen and other substitutional alloying elements, which are recognized as the primary mechanisms for this transformation. Upon cooling, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformation is observed to proceed from both the completely and partially transformed microstructural regions in the TRXRD data. An examination of the resulting microstructures confirms the TRXRD observation as the evidence shows that austenite both nucleates and grows from the ferritic microstructure at locations closest to the fusion zone boundary and grows from untransformed austenite grains at locations further from this boundary.

  6. Prediction and characterization of heat-affected zone formation due to neighboring nickel-aluminum multilayer foil reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, David P.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Hooper, Ryan J.; Manuel, Michelle V.

    2015-09-01

    Reactive multilayer foils have the potential to be used as local high intensity heat sources for a variety of applications. Much of the past research effort concerning these materials have focused on understanding the structure-property relationships of the foils that govern the energy released during a reaction. To enhance the ability of researchers to more rapidly develop technologies based on reactive multilayer foils, a deeper and more predictive understanding of the relationship between the heat released from the foil and microstructural evolution in the neighboring materials is needed. This work describes the development of a numerical model for the purpose of evaluating new foil-substrate combinations for screening and optimization. The model is experimentally validated using a commercially available Ni-Al multilayer foils and different alloys.

  7. Zone heating for fluidized bed silane pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iya, Sridhar K. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An improved heated fluidized bed reactor and method for the production of high purity polycrystalline silicon by silane pyrolysis wherein silicon seed particles are heated in an upper heating zone of the reactor and admixed with particles in a lower reaction zone, in which zone a silane-containing gas stream, having passed through a lower cooled gas distribution zone not conducive to silane pyrolysis, contacts the heated seed particles whereon the silane is heterogeneously reduced to silicon.

  8. Effect of silicon contents on the microstructures and mechanical properties of heat affected zones for 9Cr2WVTa steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Lu, Shanping; Rong, Lijian; Li, Dianzhong

    2016-03-01

    The weldability of 9Cr2WVTa steels with silicon content varying from 0.30 wt.% to 1.36 wt.% was studied to meet the requirement of Generation-Ⅳ nuclear reactor. Samples of enlarged HAZs were fabricated by a thermal-mechanical simulator based on the simulation and measurement of non-equilibrium phase transformation. The content of δ-ferrite in the HAZs increased with the silicon content and the peak temperature of welding thermal cycle. The impact toughness in the HAZs decreased in different degrees when the δ-ferrite exhibits stripe (lower than 4.82%) or blocky types (higher than 4.82%). Post weld heat treatment (PWHT) has a significant role on improving the toughness. Adding silicon content increased the volume of δ-ferrite and therefore, decreased the tensile strength of the HAZs for 9Cr2WVTa steels. Silicon also as solid solution strengthening element increased the tensile strength. The 9Cr2WVTa steel has good weldability when the silicon content is lower than 0.60 wt.%.

  9. The use of supercomputer modelling of high-temperature failure in pipe weldments to optimize weld and heat affected zone materials property selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. P.; Hayhurst, D. R.

    1994-07-01

    The creep deformation and damage evolution in a pipe weldment has been modeled by using the finite-element continuum damage mechanics (CDM) method. The finite-element CDM computer program DAMAGE XX has been adapted to run with increased speed on a Cray XMP/416 supercomputer. Run times are sufficiently short (20 min) to permit many parametric studies to be carried out on vessel lifetimes for different weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) materials. Finite-element mesh sensitivity was studied first in order to select a mesh capable of correctly predicting experimentally observed results using at least possible computer time. A study was then made of the effect on the lifetime of a butt welded vessel of each of the commomly measured material parameters for the weld and HAZ materials. Forty different ferritic steel welded vessels were analyzed for a constant internal pressure of 45.5 MPa at a temperature of 565 C; each vessel having the same parent pipe material but different weld and HAZ materials. A lifetime improvement has been demonstrated of 30% over that obtained for the initial materials property data. A methodology for weldment design has been established which uses supercomputer-based CDM analysis techniques; it is quick to use, provides accurate results, and is a viable design tool.

  10. Laser cutting of graphite anodes for automotive lithium-ion secondary batteries: investigations in the edge geometry and heat-affected zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Benjamin

    2012-03-01

    To serve the high need of lithium-ion secondary batteries of the automobile industry in the next ten years it is necessary to establish highly reliable, fast and non abrasive machining processes. In previous works [1] it was shown that high cutting speeds with several meters per second are achievable. For this, mainly high power single mode fibre lasers with up to several kilo watts were used. Since lithium-ion batteries are very fragile electro chemical systems, the cutting speed is not the only thing important. To guarantee a high cycling stability and a long calendrical life time the edge quality and the heat affected zone (HAZ) are equally important. Therefore, this paper tries to establish an analytical model for the geometry of the cutting edge based on the ablation thresholds of the different materials. It also deals with the composition of the HAZ in dependence of the pulse length, generated by laser remote cutting with pulsed fibre laser. The characterisation of the HAZ was done by optical microscopy, SEM, EDX and Raman microscopy.

  11. Effects of Oxides on Tensile and Charpy Impact Properties and Fracture Toughness in Heat Affected Zones of Oxide-Containing API X80 Linepipe Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Sohn, Seok Su; Shin, Sang Yong; Oh, Kyung Shik; Lee, Sunghak

    2014-06-01

    This study is concerned with effects of complex oxides on acicular ferrite (AF) formation, tensile and Charpy impact properties, and fracture toughness in heat affected zones (HAZs) of oxide-containing API X80 linepipe steels. Three steels were fabricated by adding Mg and O2 to form oxides, and various HAZ microstructures were obtained by conducting HAZ simulation tests under different heat inputs. The no. of oxides increased with increasing amount of Mg and O2, while the volume fraction of AF present in the steel HAZs increased with increasing the no. of oxides. The strengths of the HAZ specimens were generally higher than those of the base metals because of the formation of hard microstructures of bainitic ferrite and granular bainite. When the total Charpy absorbed energy was divided into the fracture initiation and propagation energies, the fracture initiation energy was maintained constant at about 75 J at room temperature, irrespective of volume fraction of AF. The fracture propagation energy rapidly increased from 75 to 150 J and saturated when the volume fraction of AF exceeded 30 pct. At 253 K (-20 °C), the total absorbed energy increased with increasing volume fraction of AF, as the cleavage fracture was changed to the ductile fracture when the volume fraction of AF exceeded 45 pct. Thus, 45 vol pct of AF at least was needed to improve the Charpy impact energy, which could be achieved by forming a no. of oxides. The fracture toughness increased with increasing the no. of oxides because of the increased volume fraction of AF formed around oxides. The fracture toughness did not show a visible correlation with the Charpy absorbed energy at room temperature, because toughness properties obtained from these two toughness testing methods had different significations in view of fracture mechanics.

  12. The Stress-Relief Cracking Susceptibility of a New Ferritic Steel - Part I: Single-Pass Heat-Affected Zone Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    NAWROCKI,J.G.; DUPONT,J.N.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; MARDER,A.R.

    1999-12-15

    The stress-relief cracking susceptibility of single-pass welds in a new ferritic steel, HCM2S, has been evaluated and compared to 2.25Cr-1Mo steel using Gleeble techniques. Simulated coarse-grained heat-affected zones (CGHAZ) were produced under a range of energy inputs and tested at various post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperatures. Both alloys were tested at a stress of 325 MPa. The 2.25 Cr-1Mo steel was also tested at 270 MPa to normalize for the difference in yield strength between the two materials. Light optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the CGHAZ microstructure. The ''as-welded'' CGHAZ of each alloy consisted of lath martensite or bainite and had approximately equal prior austenite grain sizes. The as-welded hardness of the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel CGHAZ was significantly higher than that of the HCM2S alloy. Over the range studied energy input had no effect on the as-welded microstructure or hardness of either alloy. The energy input also had no effect on the stress-relief cracking susceptibility of either material. Both alloys failed intergranularly along prior austenite grain boundaries under all test conditions. The 2.25Cr-1Mo steel samples experienced significant macroductility and some microductility when tested at 325 MPa. The ductility decreased significantly when tested at 270 MPa but was still higher that than of HCM2S at each test condition. The time to failure decreased with increasing PWHT Temperature for each material. There was no significant difference in the times to failure between the two materials. Varying energy input and stress had no effect on the time-to failure. The ductility, as measured by reduction in are% increased with increasing PWHT temperature for 2.25 Cr-1Mo steel tested at both stresses. However, PWHT temperature had no effect on the ductility of HCM2S. The hardness of the CGHAZ for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel decreased significantly after PWHT, but remained constant for HCM2S. The differences in stress

  13. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-12-27

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  14. Zoned heating and air conditioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Beachboard, S.A.

    1987-06-16

    This patent describes a zoned heating and air conditioning system comprising: a central air handling system with an air heating means and an air cooling means and a blower connected to an air duct system; thermostats each have heating and cooling set points, respectively associated with and located in different zones of a building; dampers respectively associated with each building zone positioned in the air duct system. Each damper has an open position allowing air into the respective zone from the duct system and a closed position; relay means for connecting one thermostat to the air handling system upon a call for heating or cooling by one thermostat and disconnecting all other thermostats by connecting one thermostat's connections between the thermostat and air handling system. Only one thermostat is connected to the air handling system at a time and the relay means disconnects one thermostat from the air handling system after one thermostat is satisified; and damper actuating means for unlocking each damper in one building zone responsive actuated by a respective zone thermostat connected to the air handling system by the relay means. The damper actuates means including a damper solenoid for each damper located adjacent each damper and connected to a respective zone thermostat. It unlocks each damper in one building zone responsive to being actuated by the respective zone thermostat and unlocks the dampers in one building zone when one thermostat is actuated while preventing the dampers in another thermostat's building zone from unlocking.

  15. Zone heated diesel particulate filter electrical connection

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.

    2010-03-30

    An electrical connection system for a particulate filter is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) disposed within an outer shell wherein the PF is segmented into a plurality of heating zones; an outer mat disposed between the particulate filter and the outer shell; an electrical connector coupled to the outer shell of the PF; and a plurality of printed circuit connections that extend along the outer surface of the PF from the electrical connector to the plurality of heating zones.

  16. FED. Zoning for TRUMP Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Elrod, D.

    1987-10-23

    FED reduces the effort required to obtain the necessary geometric input for problems which are to be solved using the heat-transfer code, TRUMP. TRUMP calculates transient and steady-state temperature distributions in multidimensional systems. FED can properly zone any body of revolution in one, two, or three dimensions.

  17. Changes in the timing, length and heating degree days of the heating season in central heating zone of China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiangjin; Liu, Binhui

    2016-09-21

    Climate change affects the demand for energy consumption, especially for heating and cooling buildings. Using daily mean temperature (Tmean) data, this study analyzed the spatiotemporal changes of the starting date for heating (HS), ending date for heating (HE), length (HL) and heating degree day (HDD) of the heating season in central heating zone of China. Over China's central heating zone, regional average HS has become later by 0.97 day per decade and HE has become earlier by 1.49 days per decade during 1960-2011, resulting in a decline of HL (-2.47 days/decade). Regional averaged HDD decreased significantly by 63.22 °C/decade, which implies a decreasing energy demand for heating over the central heating zone of China. Spatially, there are generally larger energy-saving rate in the south, due to low average HDD during the heating season. Over China's central heating zone, Tmean had a greater effect on HL in warm localities and a greater effect on HDD in cold localities. We project that the sensitivity of HL (HDD) to temperature change will increase (decrease) in a warmer climate. These opposite sensitivities should be considered when we want to predict the effects of climate change on heating energy consumption in China in the future.

  18. Changes in the timing, length and heating degree days of the heating season in central heating zone of China

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiangjin; Liu, Binhui

    2016-01-01

    Climate change affects the demand for energy consumption, especially for heating and cooling buildings. Using daily mean temperature (Tmean) data, this study analyzed the spatiotemporal changes of the starting date for heating (HS), ending date for heating (HE), length (HL) and heating degree day (HDD) of the heating season in central heating zone of China. Over China’s central heating zone, regional average HS has become later by 0.97 day per decade and HE has become earlier by 1.49 days per decade during 1960–2011, resulting in a decline of HL (−2.47 days/decade). Regional averaged HDD decreased significantly by 63.22 °C/decade, which implies a decreasing energy demand for heating over the central heating zone of China. Spatially, there are generally larger energy-saving rate in the south, due to low average HDD during the heating season. Over China’s central heating zone, Tmean had a greater effect on HL in warm localities and a greater effect on HDD in cold localities. We project that the sensitivity of HL (HDD) to temperature change will increase (decrease) in a warmer climate. These opposite sensitivities should be considered when we want to predict the effects of climate change on heating energy consumption in China in the future. PMID:27651063

  19. Changes in the timing, length and heating degree days of the heating season in central heating zone of China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiangjin; Liu, Binhui

    2016-01-01

    Climate change affects the demand for energy consumption, especially for heating and cooling buildings. Using daily mean temperature (Tmean) data, this study analyzed the spatiotemporal changes of the starting date for heating (HS), ending date for heating (HE), length (HL) and heating degree day (HDD) of the heating season in central heating zone of China. Over China's central heating zone, regional average HS has become later by 0.97 day per decade and HE has become earlier by 1.49 days per decade during 1960-2011, resulting in a decline of HL (-2.47 days/decade). Regional averaged HDD decreased significantly by 63.22 °C/decade, which implies a decreasing energy demand for heating over the central heating zone of China. Spatially, there are generally larger energy-saving rate in the south, due to low average HDD during the heating season. Over China's central heating zone, Tmean had a greater effect on HL in warm localities and a greater effect on HDD in cold localities. We project that the sensitivity of HL (HDD) to temperature change will increase (decrease) in a warmer climate. These opposite sensitivities should be considered when we want to predict the effects of climate change on heating energy consumption in China in the future. PMID:27651063

  20. Fluidized-Bed Reactor With Zone Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iya, Sridhar K.

    1989-01-01

    Deposition of silicon on wall suppressed. In new fluidized bed, silicon seed particles heated in uppermost zone of reactor. Hot particles gradually mix with lower particles and descend through fluidized bed. Lower wall of vessel kept relatively cool. Because silane enters at bottom and circulates through reactor pyrolized to silicon at high temperatures, silicon deposited on particles in preference wall. Design of fluidized bed for production of silicon greatly reduces tendency of silicon to deposit on wall of reaction vessel.

  1. Effects of alloying elements on fracture toughness in the transition temperature region of base metals and simulated heat-affected zones of Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangho; Im, Young-Roc; Lee, Sunghak; Lee, Hu-Chul; Kim, Sung-Joon; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2004-07-01

    This study is concerned with the effects of alloying elements on fracture toughness in the transition temperature region of base metals and heat-affected zones (HAZs) of Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steels. Three kinds of steels whose compositions were varied from the composition specification of SA 508 steel (grade 3) were fabricated by vacuum-induction melting and heat treatment, and their fracture toughness was examined using an ASTM E1921 standard test method. In the steels that have decreased C and increased Mo and Ni content, the number of fine M2C carbides was greatly increased and the number of coarse M3C carbides was decreased, thereby leading to the simultaneous improvement of tensile properties and fracture toughness. Brittle martensite-austenite (M-A) constituents were also formed in these steels during cooling, but did not deteriorate fracture toughness because they were decomposed to ferrite and fine carbides after tempering. Their simulated HAZs also had sufficient impact toughness after postweld heat treatment. These findings indicated that the reduction in C content to inhibit the formation of coarse cementite and to improve toughness and the increase in Mo and Ni to prevent the reduction in hardenability and to precipitate fine M2C carbides were useful ways to improve simultaneously the tensile and fracture properties of the HAZs as well as the base metals.

  2. Convection zone origins of solar atmospheric heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.; Mayr, Hans G.

    1986-01-01

    Spicules are examined as a means for supplying the corona with mass, energy, and magnetic field. It is suggested that spicules form from the supersonic upward expansion of material on nearly evacuated network flux tubes embedded within the sun's convection zone. This allows supersonic but subescape velocities to be attained by the material as it flows outward through the photosphere. Although supersonic, the kinetic energy (subescape) of the spicule material, as observed, is insufficient for coronal heating. It is suggested that, through buoyancy changes on evacuated flux tubes, the magnetic field first 'wicks' material flow into the solar atmosphere. Subsequently, the magnetic field energizes the gaseous material to form the conventional hot, dynamically expanding, solar corona. This occurs through momentum and energy transport by Alfven waves and associated Maxwell stresses concurrently flowing upward on these 'geysers' (spicules). The vertical momentum equation governing fluid flow is examined, and a particular equipartition solution is presented for the flow velocity along a simple field geometry.

  3. Direct Observations of the (Alpha to Gamma) Transformation at Different Input Powers in the Heat Affected Zone of 1045 C-Mn Steel Arc Welds Observed by Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W

    2005-03-16

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) experiments have been performed during Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel at input powers ranging from 1000 W to 3750 W. In situ diffraction patterns taken at discreet locations across the width of the heat affected zone (HAZ) near the peak of the heating cycle in each weld show regions containing austenite ({gamma}), ferrite and austenite ({alpha}+{gamma}), and ferrite ({alpha}). Changes in input power have a demonstrated effect on the resulting sizes of these regions. The largest effect is on the {gamma} phase region, which nearly triples in width with increasing input power, while the width of the surrounding two phase {alpha}+{gamma} region remains relatively constant. An analysis of the diffraction patterns obtained across this range of locations allows the formation of austenite from the base metal microstructure to be monitored. After the completion of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation, a splitting of the austenite peaks is observed at temperatures between approximately 860 C and 1290 C. This splitting in the austenite peaks results from the dissolution of cementite laths originally present in the base metal pearlite, which remain after the completion of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation, and represents the formation of a second more highly alloyed austenite constituent. With increasing temperatures, carbon, originally present in the cementite laths, diffuses from the second newly formed austenite constituent to the original austenite constituent. Eventually, a homogeneous austenitic microstructure is produced at temperatures of approximately 1300 C and above, depending on the weld input power.

  4. Overlap zoned electrically heated particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Chapman, Mark R [Brighton, MI

    2011-07-19

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A zoned heater is arranged spaced from the upstream end and comprises N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one, and wherein the N zones and the M sub-zones are arranged in P layers, where P is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  5. Europa, tidally heated oceans, and habitable zones around giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Ray T.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Kasting, James F.

    1987-01-01

    Tidal dissipation in the satellites of a giant planet may provide sufficient heating to maintain an environment favorable to life on the satellite surface or just below a thin ice layer. Europa could have a liquid ocean which may occasionally receive sunlight through cracks in the overlying ice shell. In such a case, sufficient solar energy could reach liquid water that organisms similar to those found under Antarctic ice could grow. In other solar systems, larger satellites with more significant heat flow could represent environments that are stable over an order of eons and in which life could perhaps evolve. A zone around a giant planet is defined in which such satellites could exist as a tidally-heated habitable zone. This zone can be compared to the habitable zone which results from heating due to the radiation of a central star. In this solar system, this radiatively-heated habitable zone contains the earth.

  6. Varying heating in dawsonite zones in hydrocarbon containing formations

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Xie, Xueying; Miller, David Scott

    2009-07-07

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes assessing a dawsonite composition of one or more zones in the formation. Heat from one or more heaters is provided to the formation such that different amounts of heat are provided to zones with different dawsonite compositions. The provided heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation.

  7. Relationship between crystallographic structure of the Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MnS complex inclusion and microstructure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in steel processed by oxide metallurgy route and impact toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Zhihui; Liu, Shilong; Wang, Xuemin; Shang, Chengjia; Misra, R.D.K.

    2015-08-15

    A new method based on electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) is proposed to determine the structure of titanium oxide/MnS complex inclusion which induced the formation of intragranular acicular ferrite (IAF) in heat-affected zone (HAZ) in steel processed by oxide metallurgy route. It was found that the complex inclusion was Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MnS, the orientation relationship between Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MnS was also examined, and the crystallographic orientation relationship among IAF, Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MnS complex inclusion, austenite, bainite formed at lower temperature is researched systematically. It was observed that MnS precipitated on Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} at specific habit plane and direction and MnS had a specific orientation relationship ((0001) Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}//(111) MnS), <10–10> Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}//<110> MnS) with respect to Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Intragranular acicular ferrite (IAF) nucleated on MnS part of the Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MnS complex inclusion had no specific orientation relationship with MnS. IAF and the surrounding bainite had different Bain groups, so that there was an increase in high angle boundaries, which was beneficial for the toughness of HAZ. - Highlights: • The inclusion of TiO{sub x}/MnS that induced IAF formation is identified to be Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MnS. • The inclusion is identified based on electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). • MnS and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} had specific orientation relationship of Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MnS complex inclusion. • The IAFs formed on the same inclusion tend to be in one Bain group. • IAF and the surrounding bainite tend to be in different Bain groups.

  8. Heat transport dynamics at a sandy intertidal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kevin M.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Erler, Dirk V.; Santos, Isaac R.; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2013-06-01

    Intertidal zones are spatially complex and temporally dynamic environments. Coastal groundwater discharge, including submarine groundwater discharge, may provide stabilizing conditions for intertidal zone permeable sediments. In this study, we integrated detailed time series temperature observations, porewater pressure measurements, and two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography profiles to understand the coupled hydraulic-thermal regime of a tropical sandy intertidal zone in a fringing coral reef lagoon (Rarotonga, Cook Islands). We found three heating patterns across the 15 m study transect over tidal and diel periods: (1) a highly variable thermal regime dominated by swash infiltration and changes in saturation state in the upper foreshore with net heat import into the sediment, (2) a groundwater-supported underground stable, cool region just seaward of the intertidal slope break also importing heat into the subsurface, and (3) a zone of seawater recirculation that sustained consistently warm subsurface temperatures that exported heat across the sediment-water interface. Simple calculations suggested thermal conduction as the main heat transport mechanism for the shallow intertidal sediment, but deeper and/or multidimensional groundwater flow was required to explain temperature patterns beyond 20 cm depth. Temperature differences between the distinct hydrodynamic zones of the foreshore site resulted in significant thermal gradients that persisted beyond tidal and diel periods. The thermal buffering of intertidal zones by coastal groundwater systems, both at surface seeps and in the shallow subsurface, can be responsible for thermal refugia for some coastal organisms and hotspots for biogeochemical reactions.

  9. Root-Zone Glyphosate Exposure Adversely Affects Two Ditch Species

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Lyndsay E.; Koontz, Melissa B.; Pezeshki, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Glyphosate, one of the most applied herbicides globally, has been extensively studied for its effects on non-target organisms. In the field, following precipitation, glyphosate runs off into agricultural ditches where it infiltrates into the soil and thus may encounter the roots of vegetation. These edge-of-field ditches share many characteristics with wetlands, including the ability to reduce loads of anthropogenic chemicals through uptake, transformation, and retention. Different species within the ditches may have a differential sensitivity to exposure of the root zone to glyphosate, contributing to patterns of abundance of ruderal species. The present laboratory experiment investigated whether two species commonly found in agricultural ditches in southcentral United States were affected by root zone glyphosate in a dose-dependent manner, with the objective of identifying a sublethal concentration threshold. The root zone of individuals of Polygonum hydropiperoides and Panicum hemitomon were exposed to four concentrations of glyphosate. Leaf chlorophyll content was measured, and the ratio of aboveground biomass to belowground biomass and survival were quantified. The findings from this study showed that root zone glyphosate exposure negatively affected both species including dose-dependent reductions in chlorophyll content. P. hydropiperdoides showed the greatest negative response, with decreased belowground biomass allocation and total mortality at the highest concentrations tested. PMID:24833234

  10. Heat flow and energetics of the San Andreas fault zone.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, A.H.; Sass, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 100 heat flow measurements in the San Andreas fault zone indicate 1) there is no evidence for local frictional heating of the main fault trace at any latitude over a 1000-km length from Cape Mendocino to San Bernardino, 2) average heat flow is high (ca.2 HFU, ca.80 mW m-2) throughout the 550-km segment of the Coast Ranges that encloses the San Andreas fault zone in central California; this broad anomaly falls off rapidly toward the Great Valley to the east, and over a 200-km distance toward the Mendocino Triple Junction to the northwest. As others have pointed out, a local conductive heat flow anomaly would be detectable unless the frictional resistance allocated to heat production on the main trace were less than 100 bars. Frictional work allocated to surface energy of new fractures is probably unimportant, and hydrologic convection is not likely to invalidate the conduction assumption, since the heat discharge by thermal springs near the fault is negligible. -Authors

  11. 49 CFR 222.42 - How does this rule affect Intermediate Quiet Zones and Intermediate Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... LOCOMOTIVE HORNS AT PUBLIC HIGHWAY-RAIL GRADE CROSSINGS Exceptions to the Use of the Locomotive Horn Silenced Horns at Groups of Crossings-Quiet Zones § 222.42 How does this rule affect Intermediate Quiet Zones...

  12. 49 CFR 222.42 - How does this rule affect Intermediate Quiet Zones and Intermediate Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... LOCOMOTIVE HORNS AT PUBLIC HIGHWAY-RAIL GRADE CROSSINGS Exceptions to the Use of the Locomotive Horn Silenced Horns at Groups of Crossings-Quiet Zones § 222.42 How does this rule affect Intermediate Quiet Zones...

  13. 49 CFR 222.42 - How does this rule affect Intermediate Quiet Zones and Intermediate Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... LOCOMOTIVE HORNS AT PUBLIC HIGHWAY-RAIL GRADE CROSSINGS Exceptions to the Use of the Locomotive Horn Silenced Horns at Groups of Crossings-Quiet Zones § 222.42 How does this rule affect Intermediate Quiet Zones...

  14. 49 CFR 222.42 - How does this rule affect Intermediate Quiet Zones and Intermediate Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... LOCOMOTIVE HORNS AT PUBLIC HIGHWAY-RAIL GRADE CROSSINGS Exceptions to the Use of the Locomotive Horn Silenced Horns at Groups of Crossings-Quiet Zones § 222.42 How does this rule affect Intermediate Quiet Zones...

  15. 49 CFR 222.42 - How does this rule affect Intermediate Quiet Zones and Intermediate Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... LOCOMOTIVE HORNS AT PUBLIC HIGHWAY-RAIL GRADE CROSSINGS Exceptions to the Use of the Locomotive Horn Silenced Horns at Groups of Crossings-Quiet Zones § 222.42 How does this rule affect Intermediate Quiet Zones...

  16. Finite element analysis of heat transport in a hydrothermal zone

    SciTech Connect

    Bixler, N.E.; Carrigan, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Two-phase heat transport in the vicinity of a heated, subsurface zone is important for evaluation of nuclear waste repository design and estimation of geothermal energy recovery, as well as prediction of magma solidification rates. Finite element analyses of steady, two-phase, heat and mass transport have been performed to determine the relative importance of conduction and convection in a permeable medium adjacent to a hot, impermeable, vertical surface. The model includes the effects of liquid flow due to capillarity and buoyancy and vapor flow due to pressure gradients. Change of phase, with its associated latent heat effects, is also modeled. The mechanism of capillarity allows for the presence of two-phase zones, where both liquid and vapor can coexist, which has not been considered in previous investigations. The numerical method employs the standard Galerkin/finite element method, using eight-node, subparametric or isoparametric quadrilateral elements. In order to handle the extreme nonlinearities inherent in two-phase, nonisothermal, porous-flow problems, steady-state results are computed by integrating transients out to a long time (a method that is highly robust).

  17. Heat protection behaviors and positive affect about heat during the 2013 heat wave in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Carmen E; Bruine de Bruin, Wändi; Taylor, Andrea L; Dessai, Suraje; Kovats, Sari; Fischhoff, Baruch

    2015-03-01

    Heat waves pose serious health risks, and are expected to become more frequent, longer lasting, and more intense in the future under a changing climate. Yet, people in the UK seem to feel positive when thinking about hot weather. According to research on the affect heuristic, any positive or negative emotions evoked by potentially risky experiences may be used as cues to inform concerns about risk protection. If so, then their positive feelings toward hot weather might lead UK residents to lower intentions to adopt heat protection behaviors. Here, we examine the relationships between heat protection behaviors during the July 2013 UK heat wave and self-reports of having heard heat protection recommendations, feeling positive affect about heat, seeing heat protection measures as effective, and trusting the organizations making those recommendations. Responses to a national survey revealed that 55.1% of participants had heard heat protection recommendations during the 2013 UK heat wave. Those who reported having heard recommendations also indicated having implemented more heat protection behaviors, perceiving heat protection behaviors as more effective, feeling more positive about heat, and intending to implement more protection behaviors in future hot summers. Mediation analyses suggested that heat protection recommendations may motivate heat protection behaviors by increasing their perceived effectiveness, but undermine their implementation by evoking positive affect about hot weather. We discuss our findings in the context of the affect heuristic and its implications for heat protection communications. PMID:25635375

  18. Heliocentric zoning of the asteroid belt by aluminum-26 heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimm, R. E.; Mcsween, H. Y., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Variations in petrology among meteorites attest to a strong heating event early in solar system history, but the heat source has remained unresolved. Aluminum-26 has been considered the most likely high-energy, short-lived radionuclide (half-life 0.72 million years) since the discovery of its decay product - excess Mg-26 - in Allende CAI's. Furthermore, observation of relict Mg-26 in an achondritic clast and in feldspars within ordinary chondrites (3,4) provided strong evidence for live Al-26 in meteorite parent bodies and not just in refractory nebular condensates. The inferred amount of Al-26 is consistent with constraints on the thermal evolution of both ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent objects up to a few hundred kilometers in diameter. Meteorites can constrain the early thermal evolution of their parent body locations, provided that a link can be established between asteroid spectrophotometric signature and meteorite class. Asteroid compositions are heliocentrically distributed: objects thought to have experienced high metamorphic or even melting temperatures are located closer to the sun, whereas apparently unaltered or mildly heated asteroids are located farther away. Heliocentric zoning could be the result of Al-26 heating if the initial amount of the radionuclide incorporated into planetesimals was controlled by accretion time, which in turn varies with semimajor axis. Analytic expressions for planetary accretion may be integrated to given the time, tau, required for a planetesimal to grow to a specified radius: tau varies as a(sup n), where n = 1.5 to 3 depending on the assumptions about variations in the surface density of the planetesimal swarm. Numerical simulations of planetesimal accretion at fixed semimajor axis demonstrate that variations in accretion time among small planetesimals can be strongly nonlinear depending on the initial conditions and model assumptions. The general relationship with semimajor axis remains valid because it

  19. High exhaust temperature, zoned, electrically-heated particulate matter filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.; Bhatia, Garima

    2015-09-22

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter, an electric heater, and a control circuit. The electric heater includes multiple zones, which each correspond to longitudinal zones along a length of the PM filter. A first zone includes multiple discontinuous sub-zones. The control circuit determines whether regeneration is needed based on an estimated level of loading of the PM filter and an exhaust flow rate. In response to a determination that regeneration is needed, the control circuit: controls an operating parameter of an engine to increase an exhaust temperature to a first temperature during a first period; after the first period, activates the first zone; deactivates the first zone in response to a minimum filter face temperature being reached; subsequent to deactivating the first zone, activates a second zone; and deactivates the second zone in response to the minimum filter face temperature being reached.

  20. Fault Zone Drainage, Heating and Melting During Earthquake Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.; Rice, J. R.; Jacques, L. M.

    2003-12-01

    The expansion of pore water caused by frictional heating during large crustal events provides a powerful weakening mechanism (Sibson, 1973; Lachenbruch, 1980). It may explain the magnitude of seismically inferred fracture energy and aspects of its variation with increased slip (Abercrombie and Rice, 2003; Rice et al., 2003; Rice, this section, 2003). The weakening is mediated by the effects of fluid transport, which are sensitive to the permeability structure of the fault zone and its modification by damage induced by the passing rupture front (Poliakov et al., 2002), as well as by the increase in pore pressure itself. Higher permeabilities allow partial drainage to occur, so that enough strength remains for the heat generated to cause partial melting of the fault gouge at large enough slip. We use recent field and laboratory data for fluid transport through pressurized fault gouge (e.g. Lockner et al., 2000; Wibberley and Shimamoto, 2003) to motivate models for drainage and melting during earthquake slip. A dramatic illustration of the role of drainage is provided by an idealized model in which we assume that a freshly damaged, highly permeable region extends right up to a localized shear zone of thickness ho=5 mm, with fixed porosity n and much lower permeability k. At 7 km depth, for n=0.02 and k=10-19 m2, the slip distance required to reach the onset of melting at 750oC is approximately 0.4 m for a constant friction coefficient of f=0.6. At 14 km depth, for n=0.01 and k=10-20 m2, the same temperature is reached after only 0.1 m of slip. Yet more efficient drainage might occur due to the permeability increases that accompany reductions in the effective stress, so that even more rapid temperature increases would be predicted. For example, with ten times higher k, melting begins after 0.1 m slip at 7 km depth and just 0.05 m at 14 km. At onset of melting the high melt viscosity impedes further drainage and, with increasing melt fraction, inter-particle contact is

  1. Characteristics of grid zone heat transfer in a gas-solid fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.; Wang, R.C.; Hopper, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    The grid zone in a gas-solid fluidized bed reactor has been observed to play a critical role in governing the reactor performance, particularly in shallow and large beds with fast reactions. However, despite its importance the grid zone behavior is far from completely understood, due mainly to its complexity and the few efforts to study it. One of the important aspects on the grid zone behavior is the heat transfer between the bed and immersed horizontal tubes. Although this subject has been under intensive study in the bubbling zone and freeboard area, no systematic work has been performed in the grid zone. Others examined the phenomenon and concluded that the existing heat transfer correlations for the bubbling zone give erroneous results when applied to the grid zone, especially at high velocities. The finding is expected since the two zones are significantly different in their hydrodynamic characteristics. An example of a process involving grid zone heat transfer is the shallow fluidized bed heat exchanger. The exchanger is operated at an extremely low bed height (6-10 cm) with horizontal fin tubes in the grid region. The authors reported a higher than expected heat transfer rate (compared to the bubbling bed heat transfer rate).

  2. SiC growth by Solvent-Laser Heated Floating Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth, Andrew A.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Sayir, Ali; Spry, David J.; Trunek, Andrew J.; Powell, J. Anthony

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to grow single crystal SiC fibers for seed crystals the following two growth methods have been coupled in this work: traveling solvent and laser heated floating zone to create the solvent-laser heated floating zone (Solvent-LHFZ) crystal growth method. This paper discusses the results of these initial experiments, which includes: source material, laser heating, and analysis of the first ever Solvent-LHFZ SiC crystals (synchrotron white beam x-ray topography confirmed).

  3. The role of fault zones in affecting multiphase flow at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Y.W.; Pruess, K.; Wang, J.S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Within Yucca Mountain, the potential High Level Nuclear-Waste Repository site, there are large scale fault zones, most notably the Ghost Dance Fault. The effect of such high-permeability, large scale discontinuities on the flow and transport is a question of concern in assessing the ability of the site to isolate radio-nuclides from the biosphere. In this paper, we present a numerical study to investigate the role of the fault in affecting both the liquid and gas phase flows in the natural state at Yucca Mountain prior to waste emplacement, as well as after the waste emplacement when the fluid flow is strongly heat-driven. Our study shows that if the characteristic curves of the Ghost Dance Fault obey the same relationship between saturated permeability and capillary scaling parameter, as is observed from the measured data of Yucca Mountain welded and nonwelded tuffs. Apache Leap tuffs, and Las Cruces soil, then a large saturated permeability of the Ghost Dance Fault will play little role in channeling water into the fault, or inenhancing the flow of water down the fault. However, the Fault may greatly enhance the upward gas flow after emplacement of waste. This may have implications on the transport of gaseous radio-nuclides such as C{sup 14}. The results of this study also focus attention on the need for field measurements of fluid flow in the fault zones.

  4. Electrically heated particulate filter with zoned exhaust flow control

    SciTech Connect

    Gonze, Eugene V

    2012-06-26

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes X zones. An electrical heater includes Y heater segments that are associated with respective ones of the X zones. The electrical heater is arranged upstream from and proximate with the PM filter. A valve assembly includes Z sections that are associated with respective ones of the X zones. A control module adjusts flow through each of the Z sections during regeneration of the PM filter via control of the valve assembly. X, Y and Z are integers.

  5. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Partial Basin and Range Heat and Zones of Critical Stress Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    Interpolated maps of heat flow, temperature gradient, and quartz geothermometers are included as TIF files. Zones of critical stress map is also included as a TIF file. The zones are given a 5km diameter buffer. The study area is only a part of the Basin and Range, but it does includes the Tularosa Basin.

  6. Percolation induced heat transfer in deep unsaturated zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; LeCain, G.D.

    2003-01-01

    Subsurface temperature data from a borehole located in a desert wash were measured and used to delineate the conductive and advective heat transfer regimes, and to estimate the percolation quantity associated with the 1997-1998 El Ni??no precipitation. In an arid environment, conductive heat transfer dominates the variation of shallow subsurface temperature most of the time, except during sporadic precipitation periods. The subsurface time-varying temperature due to conductive heat transfer is highly correlated with the surface atmospheric temperature variation, whereas temperature variation due to advective heat transfer is strongly correlated with precipitation events. The advective heat transfer associated with precipitation and infiltration is the focus of this paper. Disruptions of the subsurface conductive temperature regime, associated with the 1997-1998 El Ni??no precipitation, were detected and used to quantify the percolation quantity. Modeling synthesis using a one-dimensional coupled heat and unsaturated flow model indicated that a percolation per unit area of 0.7 to 1.3 m height of water in two weeks during February 1998 was responsible for the observed temperature deviations down to a depth of 35.2 m. The reported study demonstrated quantitatively, for the first time, that the near surface temperature variation due to advective heat transfer can be significant at a depth greater than 10 m in unsaturated soils and can be used to infer the percolation amount in thick unsaturated soils.

  7. Heat Transfer at the Reattachment Zone of Separated Laminar Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Paul M.; Viegas, John R.

    1961-01-01

    The flow and heat transfer are analyzed at the reattachment zone of two-dimensional separated laminar boundary layers. The fluid is considered to be flowing normal to the wall at reattachment. An approximate expression is derived for the heat transfer in the reattachment region and a calculated value is compared with an experimental measurement.

  8. Periodic Viscous Shear Heating Instability in Fine-Grained Shear Zones: Mechanism for Intermediate Depth Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, E.; Kelemen, P.; Hirth, G.; Spiegelman, M.

    2005-12-01

    Kelemen and Hirth (Fall 2004 AGU) presented a model for periodic, viscous shear heating instabilities along pre-existing, fine grained shear zones. This provides an attractive alternative to dehydration embrittlement for explaining intermediate-depth earthquakes, especially those in a narrow thermal window within the mantle section of subducting oceanic plates (Hacker et al JGR03). Ductile shear zones with widths of cm to m are common in shallow mantle massifs and peridotite along oceanic fracture zones. Pseudotachylites in a mantle shear zone show that shear heating temperatures exceeded the mantle solidus (Obata & Karato Tectonophys95). Olivine grain growth in shear zones is pinned by closely spaced pyroxenes; thus, once formed, these features do not `heal' on geological time scales in the absence of melt or fluid (Warren & Hirth EPSL05). Grain-size sensitive creep will be localized within these shear zones, in preference to host rocks with olivine grain size from 1 to 10 mm. Inspired by the work of Whitehead & Gans (GJRAS74), we proposed that such pre-existing shear zones might undergo repeated shear heating instabilities. This is not a new concept; what is new is that viscous deformation is limited to a narrow shear zone, because grain boundary sliding, sensitive to both stress and grain size, may accommodate creep even at high stress and high temperature. These new ideas yield a new result: simple models for a periodic shear heating instability. Last year, we presented a 1D numerical model using olivine flow laws, assuming that viscous deformation remains localized in shear zones, surrounded by host rocks undergoing elastic deformation. Stress evolves due to elastic strain and drives viscous deformation in a shear zone of specified width. Shear heating and thermal diffusion control T. A maximum of 1400 C (substantial melting of peridotite ) was imposed. Grain size evolves due to recrystallization and diffusion. For strain rates of E-13 to E-14 per sec and

  9. Zone heated inlet ignited diesel particulate filter regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

    2012-06-26

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) that is disposed downstream of the engine and that filters particulates from the exhaust; and a grid that includes electrically resistive material that is segmented by non-conductive material into a plurality of zones and wherein the grid is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF.

  10. Groundwater flow and heat transport dynamics across an intertidal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, K. M.; Cardenas, M. B.; Swanson, T. E.; Erler, D. V.; Santos, I. R.; Tait, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Intertidal zones mark the interface between terrestrial and marine systems. Nearshore energy and mass fluxes can be bi-directional as tidal and wave processes compete with surface water and groundwater discharges. We installed a transect of thirteen piezometers across a shoreface on Rarotonga, Cook Islands to measure vertical and horizontal water flux and temperature time series below the sediment-water interface. An array of four thermistors within each piezometer recorded temperatures ranging from the sediment-water interface to 0.2 m depth over multiple tidal cycles. Temperature time series at 0.2 m depth strongly resemble the tidal temperature signal with a variable time lag between nearly instantaneous to 11 hrs, suggesting predominance of marine influx over fresh groundwater seepage in this area. Vertical hydraulic head gradients calculated from select, deeper piezometers show downward water fluxes at all tides with lower gradients at low tides. However, horizontal gradients between piezometers are always seaward. A parallel series of two-dimensional, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys show some resistivity values that may be due to presence of fresh water near land at depth, but most values correspond to that of seawater-saturated sediment. We interpret this intertidal zone as a venue for seawater recirculation in the subsurface with minimal diffuse terrestrial groundwater discharge. Terrestrially-derived groundwater may be discharging further out in the lagoon and mostly bypassing the intertidal zone.

  11. 49 CFR 222.41 - How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AT PUBLIC HIGHWAY-RAIL GRADE CROSSINGS Exceptions to the Use of the Locomotive Horn Silenced Horns at Groups of Crossings-Quiet Zones § 222.41 How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule... public highway-rail grade crossing within the quiet zone one or more SSMs identified in appendix A...

  12. 49 CFR 222.41 - How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AT PUBLIC HIGHWAY-RAIL GRADE CROSSINGS Exceptions to the Use of the Locomotive Horn Silenced Horns at Groups of Crossings-Quiet Zones § 222.41 How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule... public highway-rail grade crossing within the quiet zone one or more SSMs identified in appendix A...

  13. 49 CFR 222.41 - How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AT PUBLIC HIGHWAY-RAIL GRADE CROSSINGS Exceptions to the Use of the Locomotive Horn Silenced Horns at Groups of Crossings-Quiet Zones § 222.41 How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule... public highway-rail grade crossing within the quiet zone one or more SSMs identified in appendix A...

  14. 49 CFR 222.41 - How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... AT PUBLIC HIGHWAY-RAIL GRADE CROSSINGS Exceptions to the Use of the Locomotive Horn Silenced Horns at Groups of Crossings-Quiet Zones § 222.41 How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule... public highway-rail grade crossing within the quiet zone one or more SSMs identified in appendix A...

  15. 49 CFR 222.41 - How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... AT PUBLIC HIGHWAY-RAIL GRADE CROSSINGS Exceptions to the Use of the Locomotive Horn Silenced Horns at Groups of Crossings-Quiet Zones § 222.41 How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule... public highway-rail grade crossing within the quiet zone one or more SSMs identified in appendix A...

  16. Root zone calcium modulates the response of potato plants to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Kleinhenz, Matthew D; Palta, Jiwan P

    2002-05-01

    Potato plant growth and development are known to be severely impacted by heat stress. Here plants grown in a chemically inert medium of 1 : 1 quartzite : perlite (v : v) were subjected to either 35/25 degrees C (stress) or 20/15 degrees C (control) day/night air temperatures and four concentrations of root zone calcium (5, 25, 125 and 600 &mgr;M Ca) for 3 weeks. We report for the first time that potato plant growth under heat stress can persist at specific levels of Ca2+ in the root zone and that the Ca2+ level required for growth under heat stress exceeds that required for growth under normal temperatures. We also provide strong, initial evidence that the ability of high Ca2+ levels to mitigate heat stress effects results from shifts in meristematic activity. Total foliar mass and leaf area were essentially unaffected by Ca2+ level under control temperatures. Under heat stress, leaf area was reduced to about 5% of the control at 5 and 25 &mgr;M Ca but to only 70% of the control at 125 and 600 &mgr;M Ca. Likewise, total foliar mass was reduced under heat stress to about 30% of the control at 5 and 25 &mgr;M Ca but total foliar mass was greater under heat stress than control conditions at 125 and 600 &mgr;M Ca. This increase at higher Ca2+ concentrations was due primarily to axillary shoot growth. Anatomical studies of leaves grown under heat stress show that cell expansion was impaired by heat stress and this impairment was overcome by increasing root zone calcium levels. These results provide insight into the mechanism by which root zone Ca2+ may modulate plant response to heat stress. PMID:12010474

  17. Effect of Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Hot Impact Toughness of Various Zones of P91 Welded Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, C.; Mahapatra, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    The new generation super critical thermal power plants are required to operate at enhanced thermal efficiency of over 50% to reduce the fuel consumption and environmental pollution. Creep strength-enhanced ferritic steels, commonly known as Cr-Mo alloys such as P91 (X10CrMoVNb 9-1) are such material of choice for the next generation power plants. The operating requirement of these next generation power plants is that steam temperature of around 650 °C is maintained. For such high-temperature application, creep strength of material is the primary consideration together with adequate weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) toughness. Present work deals with the effect of high service temperature on impact toughness of P91 (X10CrMoVNb 9-1) base material, weld fusion zone, and HAZ. The impact toughness of HAZ for conventional weld groove design and narrow weld groove design has been evaluated experimentally in as-welded and at different post-weld heat treatment conditions. Fractography of the impact toughness specimens of base metal, weld fusion zone, and HAZ was carried out using scanning electron microscope. The effects of heat treatment schemes on the percentage of element present at the fracture surface were also studied.

  18. A New Method to Grow SiC: Solvent-Laser Heated Floating Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth, Andrew A.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Sayir, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The solvent-laser heated floating zone (solvent-LHFZ) growth method is being developed to grow long single crystal SiC fibers. The technique combines the single crystal fiber growth ability of laser heated floating zone with solvent based growth techniques (e.g. traveling solvent method) ability to grow SiC from the liquid phase. Initial investigations reported in this paper show that the solvent-LHFZ method readily grows single crystal SiC (retains polytype and orientation), but has a significant amount of inhomogeneous strain and solvent rich inclusions.

  19. Shallow thermal structure constrained by seafloor temperature and heat flow estimated from BSRs in the Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohde, A.; Otsuka, H.; Kioka, A.; Ashi, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Nankai Trough is a plate convergent boundary where earthquakes with a magnitude of 8 take place repeatedly. Thermal structure in subduction zones affects pore pressure and diagenesis such as consolidation, dewatering and cementation, and constrains physical properties of a fault-slip plane. In the Nankai subduction zone, existence of methane hydrate is confirmed from acoustic reflectors called the Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs) which parallel the seafloor on seismic reflection images with high-amplitude and reverse-polarity waveforms. As a depth of BSR is theoretically constrained by subseafloor profiles of temperature and pressure, the BSR depths effectively produce subseafloor geothermal information over a wide area without heat flow probe penetration or in-situ borehole temperature measurement that is fragmentary. In this study, we aim at calculating precise two-dimensional shallow thermal structure. First, we investigate detailed distribution of the BSRs in the Nankai area ranging from offshore Tokai to Hyuga using two-dimensional multi-channel seismic reflection data. The BSR depths are then forwarded to estimate heat flow values. Second, we use a simple two-dimensional thermal modeling of Blackwell et al. [1980] that takes into account topographical effects of the seafloor roughness. We also employ additional boundary conditions constrained by seafloor temperature and the heat flow estimated from BSR depths. In order to confirm reliability of the modeled thermal structure, we additionally estimate the base of gas hydrate stability zone which is proved to almost equal to observational BSR depths. We find in the modeled thermal structure that the convex portions that are subject to cooling by cold bottom water, while depressions are less subject to the cooling from observational BSRs and theoretical calculation. The thermal structure gained here provides essential data for seismic simulations in subduction zones and for laboratory experiments as

  20. Influence of controlling vibrations on heat transfer in floating zone crystal growth*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedyushkin, A. I.

    The crystal growth processes of monocrystals are strongly vibrational sensitive systems and in particular it concerns to a floating zone method as presence of a free surface and two fronts of crystallization and melting that aggravate it The given work is devoted to numerical investigations of the influence of controlling vibrations on heat transfer during crystal growth by floating zone technique Normal and weightless environment conditions are considered Mathematical simulation is performed on the numerical solutions of basis unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluid flows and energy equation 2D axisymmetric geometry was used in model Marangoni convection and radiation condition on the curvature free surface were taken in account The calculations of the shape of a free surface of a liquid zone and influences on it of a corner of wetting force of weight and size of factor of a superficial tension are carried out The simulations of convective heat transfer for real curvature free surface of a liquid zone with and without the taking into account of the following factors parameters of radiation rotations natural and Marangoni convection and vibrations are carried out The given calculations are carried out for semiconductors melts with Prandtl number Pr 1 and for oxides Pr 1 The influence of vibrations of a crystal on melt flow and on the wide of dynamic and thermal boundary layers at melt-crystal interface is studied The action of vibrations on an enhancement of heat fluxes at the melt crystal interface is shown

  1. High Resolution Thermal Model and Heat Flow along the Washington Margin of the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, M.; Harris, R. N.; Johnson, H. P.; Solomon, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the temperature distribution along an active subducting plate interface improves our understanding of subduction zone dynamics and seismic hazards. The temperature dependence of the locked zone is an important tool in identifying the region of stress accumulation along the subducting plate. The temperature at the up-dip limit of the seismic zone typically ranges from 100-150°C and the down-dip limit is a transition zone between 350°C and 450°C. In July 2012, Multi-Channel Seismic (MCS) data was collected using the R/V Langseth along nine profiles perpendicular to the accretionary wedge offshore Grays Harbor, Washington. The MCS lines extend from seaward of the deformation front to the continental shelf. In August 2013, we made seafloor heat flow measurements using a violin bow probe, thermal blankets and the Jason heat flow probe. These data show mean heat flow values of 110 mW/m2 over the incoming plate, 30 mW/m2 at the first deformation ridge, and mean of 100 mW/m2 over the lower accretionary wedge terrace. These measurements were co-located with two MCS profiles allowing for direct comparison with Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs) that provide heat flow along all MCS lines from the deformation front to the methane hydrate stability depth at roughly 500 m. BSR-derived heat flow decreases from 90 mW/m2 at the deformation front to 60 mW/m2 beyond 60 km landward of the deformation front lower than consistent with our heat flow measurements, implying active upward diffuse fluid flow. Seismic velocities from MCS data provide an estimate of porosity and thermal conductivity of the underlying sediments providing the thermal parameters for a 2D model. Local but substantial heat flow anomalies likely reflect advective heat transfer within the shallow portion of the accretionary wedge. Preliminary modeling results indicate an incoming oceanic plate temperature of 215°C, potentially placing the up-dip limit of the seismogenic zone at the deformation

  2. Characterizing multiple timescales of stream and storage zone interaction that affect solute fate and transport in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, J.; Harvey, J.W.; Conklin, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    The fate of contaminants in streams and rivers is affected by exchange and biogeochemical transformation in slowly moving or stagnant flow zones that interact with rapid flow in the main channel. In a typical stream, there are multiple types of slowly moving flow zones in which exchange and transformation occur, such as stagnant or recirculating surface water as well as subsurface hyporheic zones. However, most investigators use transport models with just a single storage zone in their modeling studies, which assumes that the effects of multiple storage zones can be lumped together. Our study addressed the following question: Can a single-storage zone model reliably characterize the effects of physical retention and biogeochemical reactions in multiple storage zones? We extended an existing stream transport model with a single storage zone to include a second storage zone. With the extended model we generated 500 data sets representing transport of nonreactive and reactive solutes in stream systems that have two different types of storage zones with variable hydrologic conditions. The one storage zone model was tested by optimizing the lumped storage parameters to achieve a best fit for each of the generated data sets. Multiple storage processes were categorized as possessing I, additive; II, competitive; or III, dominant storage zone characteristics. The classification was based on the goodness of fit of generated data sets, the degree of similarity in mean retention time of the two storage zones, and the relative distributions of exchange flux and storage capacity between the two storage zones. For most cases (> 90%) the one storage zone model described either the effect of the sum of multiple storage processes (category I) or the dominant storage process (category III). Failure of the one storage zone model occurred mainly for category II, that is, when one of the storage zones had a much longer mean retention time (t(s) ratio > 5.0) and when the dominance of

  3. Radioactive heat generation and its thermal effects in the Alps Apennines boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquale, V.; Verdoya, M.; Chiozzi, P.

    2001-02-01

    Radioactive heat-production data of rocks cropping out at the Alps-Apennines boundary zone (NW Italy) are presented. Samples were analysed in the laboratory by means of a gamma-ray spectrometer. They are representative of the Savona Unit and the ophiolitic sequences, with metasediments and sediments, of the Voltri Massif, the Sestri-Voltaggio Zone and the Lavagna Nappe. The heat-production rate of sedimentary rocks ranges from 1.05 (limestones) to 2.52 μW m -3 (shales). In ophiolites, it varies from 0.04 (serpentinites) to 0.24 μW m -3 (metabasalts). Orthogneisses of the Savona Unit show the highest value (2.92 μW m -3). Potassium contributes to the heat generation on average by 17%. In the metasedimentary and sedimentary rocks, thorium contribution accounts on average by 43%, except for dolomites in which 97% of the radioactive heat is produced by uranium. Calc-schists, shales, radiolarites and phyllites give a Th/U ratio ranging from 3 to 4, that is very close to that of orthogneisses. This ratio is lower in limestones, almost all ophiolites and dolomites. Most rocks show a K/Th ratio ranging between 2×10 3 and 4×10 3. These data together with available thermal conductivity information are used in a finite element simulation to analyse the effects on the heat flux and temperature distribution due to lateral variation of thermal parameters. Changes in structure and composition of the uppermost part of the crust result in small wavelength variation of surface heat flux. The low radioactive heat production of ophiolites produces a decrease of about 10 mW m -2 in the surface heat-flux on the Voltri Massif.

  4. Performance processes within affect-related performance zones: a multi-modal investigation of golf performance.

    PubMed

    van der Lei, Harry; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2012-12-01

    Individual affect-related performance zones (IAPZs) method utilizing Kamata et al. (J Sport Exerc Psychol 24:189-208, 2002) probabilistic model of determining the individual zone of optimal functioning was utilized as idiosyncratic affective patterns during golf performance. To do so, three male golfers of a varsity golf team were observed during three rounds of golf competition. The investigation implemented a multi-modal assessment approach in which the probabilistic relationship between affective states and both, performance process and performance outcome, measures were determined. More specifically, introspective (i.e., verbal reports) and objective (heart rate and respiration rate) measures of arousal were incorporated to examine the relationships between arousal states and both, process components (i.e., routine consistency, timing), and outcome scores related to golf performance. Results revealed distinguishable and idiosyncratic IAPZs associated with physiological and introspective measures for each golfer. The associations between the IAPZs and decision-making or swing/stroke execution were strong and unique for each golfer. Results are elaborated using cognitive and affect-related concepts, and applications for practitioners are provided.

  5. Oxidative Activity of Heated Coal Affected by Antypirogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torosyan, V. F.; Torosyan, E. S.; Borovikov, I. F.; Yakutova, V. A.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of antypirogens on chemical activity of heated coal is studied. It is proved that ammonium sulfate, calcium phosphate, calcium chloride, calcium nitrate and acid fluoride are the most effective antypirogens.

  6. Electron heating within interaction zones of simple high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Lemons, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    In the present paper, electron heating within the high-speed portions of three simple stream-stream interaction zones is studied to further our understanding of the physics of heat flux regulation in interplanetary space. To this end, the thermal signals present in the compressions at the leading edges of the simple high-speed streams are analyzed, showing that the data are inconsistent with the Spitzer conductivity. Instead, a polynomial law is found to apply. Its implication concerning the mechanism of interplanetary heat conduction is discussed, and the results of applying this conductivity law to high-speed flows inside of 1 AU are studied. A self-consistent model of the radial evolution of electrons in the high-speed solar wind is proposed.

  7. [Theoretical analysis of factors affecting heat exchange stability of human body with environment].

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Wang, X

    1998-06-01

    Life could not be normal without the heat produced by metabolism of human body being transmitted into environment. This paper discussed the ways of heat exchange of human body with the environment, and analyzed their effects on the stability of heat exchange theoretically. In addition, factors that affects the stability of heat exchange were studied. The results indicate that the environmental temperature is the most important factor.

  8. Factors affecting the kinematic interpretation of asymmetric boudinage in shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Arthur G.

    Based on work along a major mylonite zone in the northern Appalachians and scale model studies, a new mechanism for the origin of asymmetric boudins in shear zones is proposed. Along the Honey Hill Fault in southern Connecticut, granitic sills intruded into calc-silicate gneisses and schists were oblique to the boundaries of the mylonite zone and experienced the following sequence in the production of sigmoidal boudins: (1) as the calc-silicate schists experienced mylonitization and flow, the more competent, coarse-grained granitic sills deformed by extensional fracturing and quartz veining; (2) continued extension of granitic sills was accommodated by 'normal' shear on early-formed quartz veins; (3) continuing extension of sills and ductile modification of the corners of boudins resulted in granitic 'fish' with tails which stream from the top of the boudin in the 'down-dip' direction and from the bottom in the 'up-dip' direction. Based on a variety of kinematic indicators, the sense of asymmetry of the tails is identical to that expected for recrystallization tails on sheared augen (σ structure). Models composed of silicone putty and Plasticine were created to investigate the effect of pre-shearing geometry on boudin evolution, and were deformed in a simple shear device. The models reproduce the kinematics deduced from field relations and suggest that one of the primary factors in controlling the amount of extension is the angle which early veins make with the shear zone boundary. Varying the angular relationships in the models suggests that other pre-shearing geometric factors may affect the geometry of boudins formed in this way. Boudins formed through this mechanism appear very similar to Hanmer's type II asymmetric boudins. Because the pre-shearing geometry can exert a control on boudin asymmetry, caution should be used when attempting to deduce shear sense or shear strain values from asymmetric boudinage.

  9. Diabatic heating profiles over the continental convergence zone during the monsoon active spells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Rajib; Sur, Sharmila; Joseph, Susmitha; Sahai, A. K.

    2013-07-01

    The present paper aims to bring out the robust common aspects of spatio-temporal evolution of diabatic heating during the monsoon intraseasonal active phases over the continental tropical convergence zone (CTCZ). The robustness of spatio-temporal features is determined by comparing the two state-of-the art reanalyses: NCEP Climate Forecast System reanalysis and Modern ERA Retrospective Analysis. The inter-comparison is based on a study period of 26 years (1984-2009). The study confirms the development of deep heating over the CTCZ region during the active phase and is consistent between the two datasets. However, the detailed temporal evolution of the vertical structure (e.g., vertical tilts) of heating differs at times. The most important common feature from both the datasets is the significant vertical redistribution of heating with the development of shallow (low level) heating and circulation over the CTCZ region 3-7 days after the peak active phase. The shallow circulation is found to be associated with increased vertical shear and relative vorticity over certain regions in the subcontinent. This increased vertical shear and relative vorticity in the lower levels could be crucial in the sustenance of rainfall after the peak active phase. Model experiments with linear dynamics affirm the role of shallow convection in increasing the lower level circulation as observed.

  10. Water and Heat Balance Model for Predicting Drainage Below the Plant Root Zone

    1989-11-01

    UNSAT-H Version 2.0 is a one-dimensional model that simulates the dynamic processes of infiltration, drainage, redistribution, surface evaporation, and the uptake of water from soil by plants. The model was developed for assessing the water dynamics of arid sites used or proposed for near-surface waste disposal. In particular, the model is used for simulating the water balance of cover systems over buried waste and for estimating the recharge rate (i.e., the drainage rate beneath themore » plant root zone when a sizable vadose zone is present). The mathematical base of the model are Richards'' equation for water flow, Ficks'' law for vapor diffusion, and Fouriers law for heat flow. The simulated profile can be homogeneous or layered. The boundary conditions can be controlled as either constant (potential or temperature) or flux conditions to reflect actual conditions at a given site.« less

  11. Laser-Heated Floating Zone Production of Single-Crystal Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, Frank; Westfall, Leonard

    1996-01-01

    This report describes how a laser-heated floating zone apparatus can be used to investigate single-crystal fibers of various compositions. A feedrod with a stoichiometric composition of high-purity powders was connected to a pedestal and fed into a laser scan where it combined with a single-crystal fiber seed. A molten zone was formed at this junction. As the feedrod was continuously fed into the laser scan, a single-crystal fiber of a prescribed orientation was withdrawn from the melt. The resultant fibers, whose diameters ranged from 100 to 250 gm, could then be evaluated on the basis of their growth behavior, physical properties, mechanical properties, and fiber perfection.

  12. Does the Heat Island Effect Affect Lake Chabot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. A.; Mock, Y.; Pun, C.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Chabot is a backup water supply source and it is important to know if the water is healthy because California is experiencing a drought. To check the quality of the water we used a submersible, waterproof thermometer to measure the temperature of the water at different depths. We hypothesized that the heat-island effect would cause the runoff from the surrounding developed areas to be warmer. This is because paving roads causes areas to become impermeable and absorb heat. Water runs off these impermeable surfaces, absorbing heat from the ground and enters larger bodies of water via stream. To locate streams we used a topography map. We located close lines followed by lines that were farther apart and then once again followed by close lines. This indicates that there is a concave area between two high points, allowing water to possibly flow through. We found that areas where the water came from highly populated areas were warmer. The increase in temperature was shown throughout all depths of the water at each site that was measured. The temperature throughout the lake was in between 19°C and 25°C. This warm temperature makes it hard for gases to mix. The lower the dissolved oxygen level, the less desirable it is for a variety of organisms to survive. Higher temperatures also increase bacterial growth and can causes water to be unhealthy. This indicates that the water at Lake Chabot is not suitable for human consumption and should not be considered a suitable backup water source for our area.

  13. Historical Temperature Variability Affects Coral Response to Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Carilli, Jessica; Donner, Simon D.; Hartmann, Aaron C.

    2012-01-01

    Coral bleaching is the breakdown of symbiosis between coral animal hosts and their dinoflagellate algae symbionts in response to environmental stress. On large spatial scales, heat stress is the most common factor causing bleaching, which is predicted to increase in frequency and severity as the climate warms. There is evidence that the temperature threshold at which bleaching occurs varies with local environmental conditions and background climate conditions. We investigated the influence of past temperature variability on coral susceptibility to bleaching, using the natural gradient in peak temperature variability in the Gilbert Islands, Republic of Kiribati. The spatial pattern in skeletal growth rates and partial mortality scars found in massive Porites sp. across the central and northern islands suggests that corals subject to larger year-to-year fluctuations in maximum ocean temperature were more resistant to a 2004 warm-water event. In addition, a subsequent 2009 warm event had a disproportionately larger impact on those corals from the island with lower historical heat stress, as indicated by lower concentrations of triacylglycerol, a lipid utilized for energy, as well as thinner tissue in those corals. This study indicates that coral reefs in locations with more frequent warm events may be more resilient to future warming, and protection measures may be more effective in these regions. PMID:22479626

  14. Health in the hot zone - How could global warming affect humans?

    SciTech Connect

    Monastersky, R.

    1996-04-06

    A soon-to-be-released report from the World Health Organization examines the health effects of global warming, calling climate change one of the largest public health challenges for the upcoming century. The issue extends beyond tropical illness: deaths caused directly by heat, dwindling agricultural yields etc. could all affect human health. This article looks at the following health related effects and gives an overview of the scientific information available on each: temperature and mortality; tropical trouble, including vecorborne diseases and increase in susceptable populations; and waterborne problems such as cholera, harmful algal bloomes, food shortages.

  15. Factors affecting nitrification in situ in a heated stream.

    PubMed Central

    White, J P; Schwert, D P; Ondrako, J P; Morgan, L L

    1977-01-01

    Nitrification, previously shown to occur in the stream under study, ensued only when the stream received heated (28 degree C or above) discharges and was negligible when water temperatures were 17 degree C or lower. The most probable number os ammonium oxidizer in stream bed sediments exceeded intrite oxidizers by ratios of 43:1 to 1,113:1, and the average rate of ammonium oxidation in this stream, 0.50 mg of NH4-N/liter per h exceeded the rate of nitrite oxidation, 0.29 mg of NO2-N/liter per h, resulting in an accumulation of nitrite. Nitrification rates were influenced by the dissolved oxygen concentration, increasing during daylight hours and exhibiting maximum rates during the summer months. PMID:869538

  16. Zoning of the territory of Russia by the effectiveness of low-potential heat of the ground and atmospheric air for heating buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, G. P.; Kolesova, M. V.; Gornov, V. F.; Yurchenko, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    The article represents the results of researches to zone the territory of Russia and Europe division into districts of by efficiency of using for the heat supply of buildings of low-potential thermal energy of ground and free air and their combination. While modeling the heat regime of geothermal HPS in climatic conditions of different regions of the territory of Russia, the influence of the long-term extraction of geothermal heat energy on the ground heat regime has been taken into account as well as the influence of phase transitions of pore moisture in ground on the efficiency of operation of geothermal heat-pump heat-supply systems. Also considered were the sinking of temperatures of ground massif by long-term extraction of the heat energy from the ground as calculation parameters of the heat energy from the ground, and as calculation parameters of ground massif temperatures.

  17. Bioenhanced DNAPL Dissolution: Understanding how Microbial Competition, Biostimulation, and Bioaugmentation Affect Source Zone Longevity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. G.; Seagren, E. A.

    2006-12-01

    The presence of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) at many chlorinated ethene-contaminated sites can greatly extend the time frames needed to reduce dissolved contaminants to regulatory levels using bioremediation. However, it has been demonstrated that mass removal from chlorinated ethene DNAPLs can potentially be enhanced through dehalorespiration of dissolved contaminants near the NAPL-water interface. Although promising, the amount of "bioenhancement" that can be achieved under optimal conditions is currently not known, and the real significance and engineering potential of this phenomenon currently are not well understood, in part because it can be influenced by a complex set of factors, including DNAPL properties, hydrodynamics, substrate concentrations, and microbial competition for growth substrates. In this study it is hypothesized that: (1) different chlorinated ethene-respiring strains may dominate within different zones of a contaminant plume emanating from a DNAPL source zone due to variations in substrate availability, and microbial competition for chlorinated ethenes and/or electron donors; and (2) the outcome of competitive interactions near the DNAPL source zone will affect the longevity of DNAPL source zones by influencing the degree of dissolution bioenhancement, while the outcome of competitive interactions further downgradient will determine the extent of contaminant dechlorination. To demonstrate the validity of the proposed hypothesis, a series of simple, "proof-of-concept," mathematical simulations evaluating the effects of competitive interactions on the distribution of dehalorespirers at the DNAPL-water interface, the dissolution of tetrachloroethene (PCE), and extent of PCE detoxification were performed in a model competition scenario, in which Dehalococcoides ethenogenes and another dehalorespirer (Desulfuromonas michiganensis) compete for the electron acceptor (PCE) and/or electron donor. The model domain for this evaluation

  18. Spatial changes of Extended De Martonne climatic zones affected by climate change in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Jaber; Ebrahimpour, Meisam; Khalili, Ali

    2013-05-01

    In order to better understand the effect associated with global climate change on Iran's climate condition, it is important to quantify possible shifts in different climatic types in the future. To this end, monthly mean minimum and maximum temperature, and precipitation from 181 synoptic meteorological stations (average 1970-2005) have been collected from the meteorological organization of Iran. In this paper, to study spatial changes of Iran's climatic zones affected by climate changes, Extended De Martonne's classification (originally formulated by De Martonne and extended by Khalili (1992)) was used. Climate change scenarios were simulated in two future climates (average conditions during the 2050s and the 2080s) under each of the SRES A1B and A2, for the CSIRO-MK3, HadCM3, and CGCM3 climate models. Coarse outputs of GCMs were downscaled by delta method. We produced all maps for three time periods (one for the current and two for the future) according to Extended De Martonne's classification. Finally, for each climatic zone, changes between the current and the future were compared. As the main result, simulated changes indicate shifts to warmer and drier zones. For example, in the current, extra arid-cold ( A1.1m2) climate is covering the largest area of the country (21.4 %), whereas in both A1B and A2 scenarios in the 2050s and the 2080s, extra arid-moderate ( A1.1m3) and extra arid-warm ( A1.1m4) will be the climate and will occupy the largest area of the country, about 21 and 38 %, respectively. This analysis suggests that the global climate change will have a profound effect on the future distribution of severe aridity in Iran.

  19. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing. PMID:27563300

  20. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing.

  1. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S.; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M.; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing. PMID:27563300

  2. Zones of impact around icebreakers affecting beluga whales in the Beaufort Sea.

    PubMed

    Erbe, C; Farmer, D M

    2000-09-01

    A software model estimating zones of impact on marine mammals around man-made noise [C. Erbe and D. M. Farmer, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1327-1331 (2000)] is applied to the case of icebreakers affecting beluga whales in the Beaufort Sea. Two types of noise emitted by the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Henry Larsen are analyzed: bubbler system noise and propeller cavitation noise. Effects on beluga whales are modeled both in a deep-water environment and a near-shore environment. The model estimates that the Henry Larsen is audible to beluga whales over ranges of 35-78 km, depending on location. The zone of behavioral disturbance is only slightly smaller. Masking of beluga communication signals is predicted within 14-71-km range. Temporary hearing damage can occur if a beluga stays within 1-4 km of the Henry Larsen for at least 20 min. Bubbler noise impacts over the short ranges quoted; propeller cavitation noise accounts for all the long-range effects. Serious problems can arise in heavily industrialized areas where animals are exposed to ongoing noise and where anthropogenic noise from a variety of sources adds up.

  3. Plant hybrid zones affect biodiversity: Tools for a genetic-based understanding of community structure

    SciTech Connect

    Whitham, T.G.; Martinsen, G.D.; Keim, P.; Floate, K.D.; Dungey, H.S. |; Potts, B.M.

    1999-03-01

    Plant hybrid zones are dynamic centers of ecological and evolutionary processes for plants and their associated communities. Studies in the wild and in gardens with synthetic crosses showed that hybrid eucalypts supports the greatest species richness and abundances of insect and fungal taxa. In an updated review of 152 case studies of taxa associated with diverse hybridizing systems, there were 43 (28%) cases of hybrids being more susceptible than their parent species, 7 (5%) resistant, 35 (23%) additive, 35 (23%) dominant, and 32 (21%) showed no response to hybridization. Thus, most taxa respond to hybrids in ways that result in equal or greater abundance, and hybrids tend to accumulate the taxa of their parent species. These studies suggest that genetic-based plant traits affect the distribution of many species and that the variation in hybrids can be used as tools to examine the genetic components of community structure and biodiversity.

  4. Shock structure and shock heating in the Galactic central molecular zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Jürgen; Burton, Michael; Jones, Paul; Meier, David S.

    2014-05-01

    We present maps of a large number of dense molecular gas tracers across the central molecular zone of our Galaxy. The data were taken with the CSIRO/CASS Mopra telescope in Large Projects in the 1.3 cm, 7 mm, and 3 mm wavelength regimes. Here, we focus on the brightness of the shock tracers SiO and HNCO, molecules that are liberated from dust grains under strong (SiO) and weak (HNCO) shocks. The shocks may have occurred when the gas enters the bar regions and the shock differences could be due to differences in the moving cloud masses. Based on tracers of ionizing photons, it is unlikely that the morphological differences are due to selective photo-dissociation of the molecules. We also observe direct heating of molecular gas in strongly shocked zones, with high SiO/HNCO ratios, where temperatures are determined from the transitions of ammonia. Strong shocks appear to be the most efficient heating source of molecular gas, apart from high energy emission emitted by the central supermassive black hole Sgr A* and the processes within the extreme star formation region Sgr B2.

  5. Root-zone acidity affects relative uptake of nitrate and ammonium from mixed nitrogen sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessey, J. K.; Henry, L. T.; Chaillou, S.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Soybean plants (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Ransom) were grown for 21 days on 4 sources of N (1.0 mM NO3-, 0.67 mM NO3- plus 0.33 mM NH4+, 0.33 mM NO3- plus 0.67 mM NH4+, and 1.0 mM NH4+) in hydroponic culture with the acidity of the nutrient solution controlled at pH 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5. Dry matter and total N accumulation of the plants was not significantly affected by N-source at any of the pH levels except for decreases in these parameters in plants supplied solely with NH4+ at pH 4.5. Shoot-to-root ratios increased in plants which had an increased proportion [correction of proporiton] of NH4(+)-N in their nutrient solutions at all levels of root-zone pH. Uptake of NO3- and NH4+ was monitored daily by ion chromatography as depletion of these ions from the replenished hydroponic solutions. At all pH levels the proportion of either ion that was absorbed increased as the ratio of that ion increased in the nutrient solution. In plants which were supplied with sources of NO3- plus NH4+, NH4+ was absorbed at a ratio of 2:1 over NO3- at pH 6.0. As the pH of the root-zone declined, however, NH4+ uptake decreased and NO3- uptake increased. Thus, the NH4+ to NO3- uptake ratio declined with decreases in root-zone pH. The data indicate a negative effect of declining root-zone pH on NH4+ uptake and supports a hypothesis that the inhibition of growth of plants dependent on NH4(+)-N at low pH is due to a decline in NH4+ uptake and a consequential limitation of growth by N stress.

  6. Flavor of oranges as impacted by abscission zone formation for trees affected by huanglongbing disease and Lasiodiploida infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trees affected by Huanglongbing (HLB) exhibit excessive fruit drop, which is exacerbated by secondary infection of the abscission zone by the fungus Lasiodiplodia. ‘Hamlin’ orange trees, both healthy and affected by HLB, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas, determined by Polymerase chain reactio...

  7. Modelling of transient river - aquifer exchange using pressure head and heat measurements: the hyporheic zone's dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuetzmann, Gunnar; Christian, Levers; Jörg, Lewandowski

    2010-05-01

    Water exchange processes in the floodplain of a lowland groundwater-surface water system are studied on the basis of a study site near Freienbrink, NE Germany. The surface water boundaries of this site are formed by an oxbow and the current bed of the river Spree, section Müggelspree. Surface and ground water levels and water temperatures were collected in 12 piezometers and 2 recording stage gauges of a 300 m long transect throughout a one-year-period. Due to water level fluctuations alternation of infiltration and exfiltration occurred. However, most of the time groundwater flux is directed into the river Spree and, river water infiltration events into the aquifer are usually short and of minor importance. Due to clogging of the oxbow bed with a mud layer of different thickness the hydraulic contact between the oxbow and the adjacent aquifer is heterogeneously distributed and partially marginal. These features are modelled quantitatively using SUTRA in order to simulate coupled ground water flow and heat transport. A two-dimensional vertical modelling approach along the piezometer transect is developed to study exchange processes close to the surface water bodies more in detail in order to quantify the hyporheic fluxes of both river sections and to identify the directions and quantities of mass and heat fluxes. With the results the following questions will be answered: (1) It is possible to identify and to quantify the hydraulic processes (in- and exfiltration) between both river sections and the aquifer? (2) How fast does the exchange between the surface water and the aquifer occur? (3) Is there a hyporheic zone between the river sections and the aquifer, where groundwater and surface water are mixed, and how much water and heat will be transferred through this zones?

  8. Viscous shear heating instabilities in a 1-D viscoelastic shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homburg, J. M.; Coon, E. T.; Spiegelman, M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.

    2010-12-01

    Viscous shear instabilities may provide a possible mechanism for some intermediate depth earthquakes where high confining pressure makes it difficult to achieve frictional failure. While many studies have explored the feedback between temperature-dependent strain rate and strain-rate dependent shear heating (e.g. Braeck and Podladchikov, 2007), most have used thermal anomalies to initiate a shear instability or have imposed a low viscosity region in their model domain (John et al., 2009). By contrast, Kelemen and Hirth (2007) relied on an initial grain size contrast between a predetermined fine-grained shear zone and coarse grained host rock to initiate an instability. This choice is supported by observations of numerous fine grained ductile shear zones in shallow mantle massifs as well as the possibility that annealed fine grained fault gouge, formed at oceanic transforms, subduction related thrusts and ‘outer rise’ faults, could be carried below the brittle/ductile transition by subduction. Improving upon the work of Kelemen and Hirth (2007), we have developed a 1-D numerical model that describes the behavior of a Maxwell viscoelastic body with the rheology of dry olivine being driven at a constant velocity at its boundary. We include diffusion and dislocation creep, dislocation accommodated grain boundary sliding, and low-temperature plasticity (Peierls mechanism). Initial results suggest that including low-temperature plasticity inhibits the ability of the system to undergo an instability, similar to the results of Kameyama et al. (1999). This is due to increased deformation in the background allowing more shear heating to take place, and thus softening the system prior to reaching the peak stress. However if the applied strain rate is high enough (e.g. greater than 0.5 x 10-11 s-1 for a domain size of 2 km, an 8 m wide shear zone, a background grain size of 1 mm, a shear zone grain size of 150 μm, and an initial temperature of 650°C) dramatic

  9. Waste storage in the vadose zone affected by water vapor condensation and leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J.W.; Gee, G.W.; Whyatt, G.A.

    1990-08-01

    One of the major concerns associated with waste storage in the vadose zone is that toxic materials may somehow be leached and transported by advecting water down to the water table and reach the accessible environment through either a well or discharge to a river. Consequently, care is taken to provide barriers over and around the storage sites to reduce contact between infiltrating water and the buried waste form. In some cases, it is important to consider the intrusion of water vapor as well as water in the liquid phase. Water vapor diffuses through porous material along vapor pressure gradients. A slightly low temperature, or the presence of water-soluble components in the waste, favors water condensation resulting in leaching of the waste form and advection of water-soluble components to the water table. A simple analysis is presented that allows one to estimate the rate of vapor condensation as a function of waste composition and backfill materials. An example using a waste form surrounded by concrete and gravel layers is presented. The use of thermal gradients to offset condensation effects of water-soluble components in the waste form is discussed. Thermal gradients may be controlled by design factors that alter the atmospheric energy exchange across the soil surface or that interrupt the geothermal heat field. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Geochemical Factors Affecting the Behavior of Antimony, Cobalt, Europium, Technetium, and Uranium in Vadose Zone Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2002-12-15

    In developing the Field Investigation Report (FIR) for the Waste Management Area (WMA) S-SX at the Hanford Site, cesium-137 was the only gamma emitting radionuclide of concern (Knepp 2002). However, in WMA B-BX-BY, the spectral gamma logging data identify seven gamma emitting radionuclides, cesium-137, antimony-125, europium-152 and -154, cobalt-60, uranium-235 and -238 (DOE-GJPO 1998). The geochemical behaviors of several of these radionuclides, antimony-125 and the two europium isotopes, have not been extensively investigated at the Hanford Site. This task was initiated to assure that our understanding of the geochemical properties affecting the environmental behavior of these radionuclides reflects the current state of knowledge. A literature review was conducted to assess the important oxidation/reduction, aqueous speciation, solubility, and adsorption processes affecting the environmental behavior of antimony, cobalt, europium, technetium, and uranium in vadose zone sediments with low-organic matter content in semi-arid environments such as those at the Hanford Site. Technetium-99 was included in this task because of its importance in the long-term risk calculations. This report presents the results of this literature review.

  11. Enhancement and performance evaluation for heat transfer of air cooling zone for reduction system of sponge titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenhao; Wu, Fuzhong; Jin, Huixin

    2016-05-01

    Since the magnesiothermic reduction employed in current sponge titanium is a highly exothermic reaction, the TiCl4 feed rate is carried out slowly to keep a suitable temperature in reduction reactor, which accounts for an extremely low level of productivity and energy efficiency. In order to shorten the production cycle and improve the energy efficiency, an enhancing scheme is proposed to enhance the heat transfer of air cooling zone for reduction system. The air cooling zone and enhancing scheme are firstly introduced. And then, the heat transfer characteristics of cooling zone are obtained by theoretical analysis and experimental date without enhancing scheme. Finally, the enhancement is analyzed and evaluated. The results show that the fitting results of heat transfer coefficients can be used to evaluate the heat transfer enhancement of cooling zone. Heat sources temperatures have a limited decreasing, heat transfer rate increases obviously with the enhanced cooling, and the TiCl4 feed rate can be increased significantly by 9.61 %. And the measured and calculated results are good enough to meet the design requirements.

  12. Developmental acclimation to low or high humidity conditions affect starvation and heat resistance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-09-01

    Several Drosophila species originating from tropical humid localities are more resistant to starvation and heat stress than populations from high latitudes but mechanistic bases of such physiological changes are largely unknown. In order to test whether humidity levels affect starvation and heat resistance, we investigated developmental acclimation effects of low to high humidity conditions on the storage and utilization of energy resources, body mass, starvation survival, heat knockdown and heat survival of D. melanogaster. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity (85% RH) stored significantly higher level of lipids and showed greater starvation survival hours but smaller in body size. In contrast, lines reared at low humidity evidenced reduced levels of body lipids and starvation resistance. Starvation resistance and lipid storage level were higher in females than males. However, the rate of utilization of lipids under starvation stress was lower for lines reared under higher humidity. Adult flies of lines reared at 65% RH and acclimated under high or low humidity condition for 200 hours also showed changes in resistance to starvation and heat but such effects were significantly lower as compared with developmental acclimation. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity showed greater heat knockdown time and heat-shock survival. These laboratory observations on developmental and adult acclimation effects of low versus high humidity conditions have helped in explaining seasonal changes in resistance to starvation and heat of the wild-caught flies of D. melanogaster. Thus, we may suggest that wet versus drier conditions significantly affect starvation and heat resistance of D. melanogaster.

  13. Numerical simulations of the impact of seasonal heat storage on source zone emission in a TCE contaminated aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Steffi; Beyer, Christof; Dahmke, Andreas; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    In urban regions, with high population densities and heat demand, seasonal high temperature heat storage in the shallow subsurface represents an attractive and efficient option for a sustainable heat supply. In fact, the major fraction of energy consumed in German households is used for room heating and hot water production. Especially in urbanized areas, however, the installation of high temperature heat storage systems is currently restricted due to concerns on negative influences on groundwater quality caused e.g. by possible interactions between heat storages and subsurface contaminants, which are a common problem in the urban subsurface. Detailed studies on the overall impact of the operation of high temperature heat storages on groundwater quality are scarce. Therefore, this work investigates possible interactions between groundwater temperature changes induced by heat storage via borehole heat exchangers and subsurface contaminations by numerical scenario analysis. For the simulation of non-isothermal groundwater flow, and reactive transport processes the OpenGeoSys code is used. A 2D horizontal cross section of a shallow groundwater aquifer is assumed in the simulated scenario, consisting of a sandy sediment typical for Northern Germany. Within the aquifer a residual trichloroethene (TCE) contaminant source zone is present. Temperature changes are induced by a seasonal heat storage placed within the aquifer with scenarios of maximum temperatures of 20°C, 40°C and 60°C, respectively, during heat injection and minimum temperatures of 2°C during heat extraction. In the scenario analysis also the location of the heat storage relative to the TCE source zone and plume was modified. Simulations were performed in a homogeneous aquifer as well as in a set of heterogeneous aquifers with hydraulic conductivity as spatially correlated random fields. In both cases, results show that the temperature increase in the heat plume and the consequential reduction of water

  14. Dehydration of hydrous minerals and formation of nanocrystals by frictional heating in experimental seismic fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, S.; Chae, S.; Ree, J.; Hirose, T.; Kim, J.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies on experimental and natural carbonate faults have shown that the formation of nanocrystals produced by thermal decomposition or deformation during seismic slip can lead to significant slip weakening and large earthquakes. Natural fault rocks contain various hydrous minerals that can be easily decomposed by frictional heating and possibly form nanocrystals. However, thermal decomposition of hydrous minerals during seismic slip has not been studied much. We performed rotary-shear experiments on amphibolites and metapelites at seismic slip rates (up to 1.3 m/s) and at normal stress of 2-16 MPa to investigate thermal decomposition of hydrous minerals. The frictional property of the metapelites is characterized by two transient peak frictions followed by a final slip weakening leading to a steady-state friction, while the amphibolites exhibit three peak frictions and subsequent steady-state friction. The simulated fault zones consist of a principal slip zone (PSZ) mantled by damage zone (DZ). The PSZ is a molten layer laden with clasts of quartz (metapelites) and plagioclase (amphibolites). Hornblendes of the amphibolites and biotites of the metapelites in DZ show dark stripes along cleavage planes in plane-polarized light (PPL). These hornblende and biotite grains become totally dark in PPL immediately adjacent to PSZ. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that tiny holes (1 to 10 μm) occur in dark colored biotites of DZ. The darker stripes of hornblende appear rugged in SEM images. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) analyses reveal that the dark cleavage stripes of biotite and hornblende consist of cavity- and nanocrystal-bands. We interpret these cavity- and nanocrystal-bands of the dark cleavage stripes are products of biotite- and hornblende-dehydration preferably occurring along cleavage planes. We believe nanocrystals not only lower friction but also facilitate reaction and

  15. High Resolution Numerical Model of Optically Heated Float-Zone Crystal Growth with Applied Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yue; Houchens, Brent

    2008-11-01

    During optically heated float-zone crystal growth processing, thermocapillary forces drive a flow in the melt. This steady, axisymmetric base flow is susceptible to instabilities, resulting in defects as the final crystal is solidified from the melt. To damp these instabilities, a magnetic field is employed. The stability of this flow, neglecting buoyancy, is studied with a full-zone model. The velocity and temperature fields are calculated by a spectral collocation method using Chebyshev polynomials as basis functions. Obtaining accurate base flows is crucial to the success of the subsequent stability analysis. A 2nd order vorticity transport representation is compared with a 4th order stream function representation. At low Hartmann numbers, the results are in good agreement. However, as resolution demands increase, the 2nd order vorticity transport formulation yields a better numerical representation by avoiding large computational errors caused by 4th and 3rd derivatives of Chebyshev terms in the 4th order stream function representation. This allows the stability analysis to be carried out at larger Hartmann numbers, where the critical thermocapillary Reynolds number is much greater.

  16. The urban heat island of a city in an arid zone: the case of Eilat, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofer, M.; Potchter, O.

    2006-05-01

    This study presents the results of a preliminary research that was conducted in the city of Eilat, located in an extreme hot and arid zone on the northern coast of the Red Sea. The purpose was to analyse the characteristics of the local urban heat island (UHI). Diurnal pre-dawn and early-afternoon measurements were taken in winter and summer weather conditions on three separate occasions for two consecutive years. The results show the development of a moderate UHI located around the most intensive area of human activity; the city business centre and dense hotel belt. The UHI is more significant at midday during the summer period, while early morning inversions in winter have a weakening effect on the UHI intensity. It was found that the topography and wind regime have a dominant effect on the location and intensity of the UHI, while the sea has a very marginal effect. Due to the UHI influences on the spatial distribution of the heat stress in the city, it is suggested that further applied UHI research should be focused on the summer period.

  17. Periodic Viscous Shear Heating Instability in Fine-Grained Shear Zones: Possible Mechanism for Intermediate Depth Earthquakes and Slow Earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.

    2004-12-01

    Localized ductile shear zones with widths of cm to m are observed in exposures of Earth's shallow mantle (e.g., Kelemen & Dick JGR 95; Vissers et al. Tectonophys 95) and dredged from oceanic fracture zones (e.g., Jaroslow et al. Tectonophys 96). These are mylonitic (grain size 10 to 100 microns) and record mineral cooling temperatures from 1100 to 600 C. Pseudotachylites in a mantle shear zone show that shear heating temperatures can exceed the mantle solidus (e.g., Obata & Karato Tectonophys 95). Simple shear, recrystallization, and grain boundary sliding all decrease the spacing between pyroxenes, so olivine grain growth at lower stress is inhibited; thus, once formed, these shear zones do not "heal" on geological time scales. Reasoning that grain-size sensitive creep will be localized within these shear zones, rather than host rocks (grain size 1 to 10 mm), and inspired by the work of Whitehead & Gans (GJRAS 74), we thought these might undergo repeated shear heating instabilities. In this view, as elastic stress increases, the shear zone weakens via shear heating; rapid deformation of the weak shear zone releases most stored elastic stress; lower stress and strain rate coupled with diffusion of heat into host rocks leads to cooling and strengthening, after which the cycle repeats. We constructed a simple numerical model incorporating olivine flow laws for dislocation creep, diffusion creep, grain boundary sliding, and low T plasticity. We assumed that viscous deformation remains localized in shear zones, surrounded by host rocks undergoing elastic deformation. We fixed the velocity along one side of an elastic half space, and calculated stress due to elastic strain. This stress drives viscous deformation in a shear zone of specified width. Shear heating and thermal diffusion control temperature evolution in the shear zone and host rocks. A maximum of 1400 C (where substantial melting of peridotite would occur) is imposed. Grain size evolves during dislocation

  18. Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer, and Solute Transport at Nuclear Waste Storage Tanks in the Hanford Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Steefel, Carl I.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2002-03-01

    At the Hanford site, highly radioactive and chemically aggressive waste fluids have leaked from underground storage tanks into the vadose zone. This paper addresses hydrogeological issues at the 241-SX tank farm, especially focusing on tank SX-108 which is one of the highest heat load, supernate density and ionic strength tanks at Hanford and a known leaker. The behavior of contaminants in the unsaturated zone near SX-108 is determined by an interplay of multiphase fluid flow and heat transfer processes with reactive chemical transport in a complex geological setting. Numerical simulation studies were performed to obtain a better understanding of mass and energy transport in the unique hydrogeologic system created by the SX tank farm. Problem parameters are patterned after conditions at tank SX-108, and measured data were used whenever possible. Borrowing from techniques developed in geothermal and petroleum reservoir engineering, our simulations feature a comprehensive description of multiphase processes, including boiling and condensation phenomena, and precipitation and dissolution of solids. We find that the thermal perturbation from the tank causes large-scale redistribution of moisture and alters water seepage patterns. During periods of high heat load, fluid and heat flow near the tank is dominated by vapor-liquid counterflow (heat pipe), which provides a much more efficient mechanism than heat conduction for dissipating tank heat. The heat pipe mechanism is also very effective in concentrating dissolved solids near the heat source, where salts may precipitate even if they were only present in small concentrations in ambient fluids. Tank leaks that released aqueous fluids of high ionic strength into the vadose zone were also modeled. The heat load causes formation dryout beneath the tank, which is accompanied by precipitation of solutes.

  19. Heat focussing, granite genesis and inverted metamorphic gradients in continental collision zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, Claude; Provost, Ariel

    1985-05-01

    The thermal conductivity of sedimentary rocks is usually much lower than that of crystalline rocks, gneisses and granites. Continental collision zones are characterized by large-scale thrusts which superpose crystalline basement and sedimentary layers. This leads to heat refraction effects of significant magnitude. Sedimentary layers act as a barrier to the transport of heat. We show that the peculiar geometry of a gently sloping sedimentary layer thrust into more conductive rocks is very efficient in diverting the vertical flux of heat. Temperatures can vary by more than 50% along the horizontal and reach a marked maximum at the top of crystalline layers. These results are in general agreement with the main features of orogenic belts as exemplified by the Himalayas. They explain why the young leucogranites of the Main Central Thrust (MCT) are confined to a narrow belt at the top of the basement slab. They also account for the inverted metamorphic gradient observed there. In a crustal accretionary wedge, folding and thrusting modify the structure of the upper crust, by thickening the sedimentary cover and by introducing sedimentary rocks at depth. This leads to high temperatures at shallow depths in specific places. Les zones de collision continentale se caractérisent par de grands chevauchementsàfaible pendage qui empilent les unes sur les autres des couches de socle cristallin et des couches sédimentaires. Cette structure particulière engendre d'importants effets de réfraction thermique. En effet, leur conductibilitéthermiqueétant normalement bien plus faible que celle des roches cristallines, les formations sédimentaires font office de barrières pour le transfert thermique: le flux de chaleur se trouve fortement dévié. Dans un plan horizontal, la température peut varier de plus de 50%, les maximaétant situésàl'interface supérieur des dalles cristallines. En ces endroits précis, les isothermes profonds remontent très significativement. Ces r

  20. Factors Affecting Motivation and Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff of Universities in South-South Geopolitical Zone of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osakwe, Regina N.

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the factors affecting motivation and job satisfaction of non-management academic staff of universities in South-South geopolitical zone of Nigeria. It employed an expost-facto research design. Three research questions and two hypotheses were raised for the study. A sample of four hundred and fifty non-management academic…

  1. Factors affecting the dynamics of the honeybee (Apis mellifera) hybrid zone of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Beekman, M; Allsopp, M H; Wossler, T C; Oldroyd, B P

    2008-01-01

    Hybrid zones are found wherever two populations distinguishable on the basis of heritable characters overlap spatially and temporally and hybridization occurs. If hybrids have lower fitness than the parental types a tension zone may emerge, in which there is a barrier to gene flow between the two parental populations. Here we discuss a hybrid zone between two honeybee subspecies, Apis mellifera capensis and A. m. scutellata and argue that this zone is an example of a tension zone. This tension zone is particularly interesting because A. m. capensis can be a lethal social parasite of A. m. scutellata. However, despite its parasitic potential, A. m. capensis appears to be unable to increase its natural range unassisted. We propose three interlinked mechanisms that could maintain the South African honeybee hybrid zone: (1) low fitness of intercrossed and genetically mixed colonies arising from inadequate regulation of worker reproduction; (2) higher reproductive success of A. m. scutellata via both high dispersal rates into the hybrid zone and increased competitiveness of males, countered by (3) the parasitic nature of A. m. capensis.

  2. Regional Climate Zone Modeling of a Commercial Absorption Heat Pump Hot Water Heater Part 1: Southern and South Central Climate Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Geoghegan, Patrick J; Shen, Bo; Keinath, Christopher M.; Garrabrant, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Commercial hot water heating accounts for approximately 0.78 Quads of primary energy use with 0.44 Quads of this amount from natural gas fired heaters. An ammonia-water based commercial absorption system, if fully deployed, could achieve a high level of savings, much higher than would be possible by conversion to the high efficiency nonheat-pump gas fired alternatives. In comparison with air source electric heat pumps, the absorption system is able to maintain higher coefficients of performance in colder climates. The ammonia-water system also has the advantage of zero Ozone Depletion Potential and low Global Warming Potential. A thermodynamic model of a single effect ammonia-water absorption system for commercial space and water heating was developed, and its performance was investigated for a range of ambient and return water temperatures. This allowed for the development of a performance map which was then used in a building energy modeling software. Modeling of two commercial water heating systems was performed; one using an absorption heat pump and another using a condensing gas storage system. The energy and financial savings were investigated for a range of locations and climate zones in the southern and south central United States. A follow up paper will analyze northern and north/central regions. Results showed that the system using an absorption heat pump offers significant savings.

  3. Fault zone architecture, San Jacinto fault zone, southern California: evidence for focused fluid flow and heat transfer in the shallow crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, N.; Girty, G. H.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2011-12-01

    We report results of a new study of the San Jacinto fault zone architecture in Horse Canyon, SW of Anza, California, where stream incision has exposed a near-continuous outcrop of the fault zone at ~0.4 km depth. The fault zone at this location consists of a fault core, transition zone, damage zone, and lithologically similar wall rocks. We collected and analyzed samples for their bulk and grain density, geochemical data, clay mineralogy, and textural and modal mineralogy. Progressive deformation within the fault zone is characterized by mode I cracking, subsequent shearing of already fractured rock, and cataclastic flow. Grain comminution advances towards the strongly indurated cataclasite fault core. Damage progression towards the core is accompanied by a decrease in bulk and grain density, and an increase in porosity and dilational volumetric strain. Palygorskite and mixed-layer illite/smectite clay minerals are present in the damage and transition zones and are the result of hydrolysis reactions. The estimated percentage of illite in illite/smectite increases towards the fault core where the illite/smectite to illite conversion is complete, suggesting elevated temperatures that may have reached 150°C. Chemical alteration and elemental mass changes are observed throughout the fault zone and are most pronounced in the fault core. We conclude that the observed chemical and mineralogical changes can only be produced by the interaction of fractured wall rocks and chemically active fluids that are mobilized through the fault zone by thermo-pressurization during and after seismic events. Based on the high element mobility and absence of illite/smectite in the fault core, we expect that greatest water/rock ratios occur within the fault core. These results indicate that hot pore fluids circulate upwards through the fractured fault core and into the surrounding damage zone. Though difficult to constrain, the site studied during this investigation may represent the top

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF REPOSITORY THERMAL LOAD ON MULTIPHASE FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE OF YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Shu Wu, Sumit Mukhopadhyay, Keni Zhang, and G. S. Bodvarsson

    2006-04-16

    This paper investigates the impact of proposed repository thermal-loading on mountain-scale flow and heat transfer in the unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this context, a model has been developed to study the coupled thermal-hydrological (TH) processes at the scale of the entire Yucca Mountain. This mountain-scale TH model implements the current geological framework and hydrogeological conceptual models, and incorporates the latest rock thermal and hydrological properties. The TH model consists of a two-dimensional north-south vertical cross section across the entire unsaturated zone model domain and uses refined meshes near and around the proposed repository block, based on the current repository design, drift layout, thermal loading scenario, and estimated current and future climatic conditions. The model simulations provide insights into thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and elevated water and rock temperature, which in turn allow modelers to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts.

  5. Factors affecting gas migration and contaminant redistribution in heterogeneous porous media subject to electrical resistance heating.

    PubMed

    Munholland, Jonah L; Mumford, Kevin G; Kueper, Bernard H

    2016-01-01

    A series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments were completed in a two-dimensional flow cell to investigate gas production and migration during the application of electrical resistance heating (ERH) for the removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Experiments consisted of heating water in homogeneous silica sand and heating 270 mL of trichloroethene (TCE) and chloroform (CF) DNAPL pools in heterogeneous silica sands, both under flowing groundwater conditions. Spatial and temporal distributions of temperature were measured using thermocouples and observations of gas production and migration were collected using front-face image capture throughout the experiments. Post-treatment soil samples were collected and analyzed to assess DNAPL removal. Results of experiments performed in homogeneous sand subject to different groundwater flow rates showed that high groundwater velocities can limit subsurface heating rates. In the DNAPL pool experiments, temperatures increased to achieve DNAPL-water co-boiling, creating estimated gas volumes of 131 and 114 L that originated from the TCE and CF pools, respectively. Produced gas migrated vertically, entered a coarse sand lens and subsequently migrated laterally beneath an overlying capillary barrier to outside the heated treatment zone where 31-56% of the original DNAPL condensed back into a DNAPL phase. These findings demonstrate that layered heterogeneity can potentially facilitate the transport of contaminants outside the treatment zone by mobilization and condensation of gas phases during ERH applications. This underscores the need for vapor phase recovery and/or control mechanisms below the water table during application of ERH in heterogeneous porous media during the co-boiling stage, which occurs prior to reaching the boiling point of water.

  6. Factors affecting gas migration and contaminant redistribution in heterogeneous porous media subject to electrical resistance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munholland, Jonah L.; Mumford, Kevin G.; Kueper, Bernard H.

    2016-01-01

    A series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments were completed in a two-dimensional flow cell to investigate gas production and migration during the application of electrical resistance heating (ERH) for the removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Experiments consisted of heating water in homogeneous silica sand and heating 270 mL of trichloroethene (TCE) and chloroform (CF) DNAPL pools in heterogeneous silica sands, both under flowing groundwater conditions. Spatial and temporal distributions of temperature were measured using thermocouples and observations of gas production and migration were collected using front-face image capture throughout the experiments. Post-treatment soil samples were collected and analyzed to assess DNAPL removal. Results of experiments performed in homogeneous sand subject to different groundwater flow rates showed that high groundwater velocities can limit subsurface heating rates. In the DNAPL pool experiments, temperatures increased to achieve DNAPL-water co-boiling, creating estimated gas volumes of 131 and 114 L that originated from the TCE and CF pools, respectively. Produced gas migrated vertically, entered a coarse sand lens and subsequently migrated laterally beneath an overlying capillary barrier to outside the heated treatment zone where 31-56% of the original DNAPL condensed back into a DNAPL phase. These findings demonstrate that layered heterogeneity can potentially facilitate the transport of contaminants outside the treatment zone by mobilization and condensation of gas phases during ERH applications. This underscores the need for vapor phase recovery and/or control mechanisms below the water table during application of ERH in heterogeneous porous media during the co-boiling stage, which occurs prior to reaching the boiling point of water.

  7. Factors affecting gas migration and contaminant redistribution in heterogeneous porous media subject to electrical resistance heating.

    PubMed

    Munholland, Jonah L; Mumford, Kevin G; Kueper, Bernard H

    2016-01-01

    A series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments were completed in a two-dimensional flow cell to investigate gas production and migration during the application of electrical resistance heating (ERH) for the removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Experiments consisted of heating water in homogeneous silica sand and heating 270 mL of trichloroethene (TCE) and chloroform (CF) DNAPL pools in heterogeneous silica sands, both under flowing groundwater conditions. Spatial and temporal distributions of temperature were measured using thermocouples and observations of gas production and migration were collected using front-face image capture throughout the experiments. Post-treatment soil samples were collected and analyzed to assess DNAPL removal. Results of experiments performed in homogeneous sand subject to different groundwater flow rates showed that high groundwater velocities can limit subsurface heating rates. In the DNAPL pool experiments, temperatures increased to achieve DNAPL-water co-boiling, creating estimated gas volumes of 131 and 114 L that originated from the TCE and CF pools, respectively. Produced gas migrated vertically, entered a coarse sand lens and subsequently migrated laterally beneath an overlying capillary barrier to outside the heated treatment zone where 31-56% of the original DNAPL condensed back into a DNAPL phase. These findings demonstrate that layered heterogeneity can potentially facilitate the transport of contaminants outside the treatment zone by mobilization and condensation of gas phases during ERH applications. This underscores the need for vapor phase recovery and/or control mechanisms below the water table during application of ERH in heterogeneous porous media during the co-boiling stage, which occurs prior to reaching the boiling point of water. PMID:26638038

  8. Factors affecting carbon-14 activity of unsaturated zone CO2 and implications for groundwater dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Cameron; Cook, Peter G.; Harrington, Glenn A.; Meredith, Karina; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-11-01

    Unsaturated zone processes may influence the carbon-14 (14C) activity of infiltrating groundwater and thus introduce error in derived groundwater residence times. However unsaturated zone 14C activities are rarely measured and there is little understanding of how they may vary spatially in a groundwater basin. In this study we measured 14C activity in unsaturated zone gas at five sites with different watertable depths (8.2-31.5 m) in the arid Ti Tree Basin, central Australia. We observed a relatively uniform decrease in 14C activity of unsaturated zone gas with depth at most sites, with variation in unsaturated zone depths leading to variation in 14C activities directly above the watertable at each site (ranging from 54 to 106 percent Modern Carbon (pMC)). Through modelling we show that the profiles are influenced by CO2 production at different depths from sources with different isotopic ratios, including production of ‘modern' CO2 in the root zone and production of ‘old' CO2 above the watertable. Scenario modelling showed that these processes are independent of recharge when recharge is low (0-10 mm y-1) but that higher recharge rates (>100 mm y-1) result in more advective transport of atmospheric CO2 to the watertable. The variation in 14C above the watertable was more sensitive to watertable depth and shallow and deep CO2 production rates. These findings offer insight into how unsaturated zone 14C activities may vary spatially and provide guidance as to when 14C depletion in unsaturated zone CO2 may become important for groundwater dating, particularly in arid settings.

  9. Thermal diffusivity of spinels at elevated temperature: implications for heat transfer in the transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A. M.

    2006-12-01

    The dependence of the vibrational component of thermal diffusivity (D) of spinel-family minerals on chemical composition, disorder, and temperature (T) is discerned using laser-flash measurements of single-crystals up to 1850 K, and used along with data on garnets and radiative transfer calculations to constrain heat transport in Earth's transition zone (TZ). Laser-flash analysis lacks the systematic errors associated with conventional methods, namely, corruption with radiative transfer, and thermal contact losses. Chemical compositions are synthetic disordered spinel, 4 natural samples near MgAl2O4; 4 natural hercynites (Mg,Fe,Al)3O4], nearly ZnAl2O4, and 2 magnetites [Fe3O4]. The magnetic transition is manifest as a lambda curve in 1/D, but otherwise, 1/D is described by low-order polynomial fits with temperature. Ordered, MgAl2O4 has D(298K) = 7.78 mm2/s, which should approximate that of γ-Mg2SiO4. At 298 K, D decreases strongly as cation substitution or Mg-Al disorder increases: D(298K) for ringwoodite is estimated as 5.8 mm2/s. However, above 1400 K, D becomes constant: this limit (Dsat=0.70-1.07 mm2/s) weakly depends on composition and disorder and is analogous to the Dulong-Petit limit in heat capacity (Cp). Mantle garnets have Dsat=0.65 mm2/s (Hofmeister 2006 Phys Chem Min.). To obtain TZ values, we use d(lnD)/dP= (4γth 2/3)KT, literature data on bulk modulus and thermal Gruneisen parameter, density from PREM, and Cp=1.3 J/g-K, which depends weakly on composition, T, and P. Average thermal conductivity (k)in the TZ is 5-6 W/m-K, depending on garnet proportion, and increase with P. Radiative transfer provides ca 1 W/m-K, depending on Fe content and grain-size (Hofmeister 2005 J. Geodyn.). Our estimate of large k = 6-7 W/m-K is twice recent estimates, and is a consequence of phonon saturation revealed by laser-flash measurements. Efficient vibrational transport of heat in the TZ and deeper stabilizes against convection, as does the positive temperature

  10. Cause-Specific Human Mortality by Building Climate Zone during the Great California Heat Wave of July 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnly, M. E.; Joe, L.; Smorodinsky, S.; Hoshiko, S.; Smith, D.

    2011-12-01

    California has suffered a number of heat waves (HWs) which have resulted in considerable human mortality. With climate change, HWs are predicted to increase, particularly in areas where HWs have historically occurred. The "Great" California HW of July 2006 was unprecedented in duration and occurred statewide, lasting ten days in much of the state and longer in some areas. Previous analysis has shown that an excess of all-cause human mortality occurred statewide and that the excess was higher in the Northern part of the state. We calculated the ratio of deaths during the heat wave period (July 15 - Aug 1, 2006) to deaths in reference days from the non-heat wave period in the same summer by cause of death. We have further calculated these cause-specific ratios by California's sixteen building climate zones. These zones were outlined in 1982 based on climate, geophysical features, and estimated energy consumption. We will discuss whether differences in mortality ratios by these climate zones may be related to zonal differences in HW intensity or duration, air conditioning use, building insulation requirements, or other factors. Identifying resilient (low health impact) and vulnerable zones (high health impacts) and factors that may mitigate the health impact will ultimately inform climate change mitigation and adaptation policies.

  11. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  12. Localized heating of electrons in ionization zones: Going beyond the Penning-Thornton paradigm in magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2014-12-07

    The fundamental question of how energy is supplied to a magnetron discharge is commonly answered by the Penning-Thornton paradigm invoking secondary electrons. Huo et al. (Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 22, 045005, (2013)) used a global discharge model to show that electron heating in the electric field of the magnetic presheath is dominant. In this contribution, this concept is applied locally taking into account the electric potential structure of ionization zones. Images of ionization zones can and should be interpreted as diagrams of the localization of electric potential and related electron energy, where certain collisions promote or dampen their formation.

  13. Dense gas in the Galactic central molecular zone is warm and heated by turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsburg, Adam; Henkel, Christian; Ao, Yiping; Riquelme, Denise; Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Requena-Torres, Miguel A.; Immer, Katharina; Testi, Leonardo; Ott, Juergen; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Darling, Jeremy; Aalto, Susanne; Stanke, Thomas; Kendrew, Sarah; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Longmore, Steven; Dale, James; Guesten, Rolf; Menten, Karl M.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The Galactic center is the closest region where we can study star formation under extreme physical conditions like those in high-redshift galaxies. Aims: We measure the temperature of the dense gas in the central molecular zone (CMZ) and examine what drives it. Methods: We mapped the inner 300 pc of the CMZ in the temperature-sensitive J = 3-2 para-formaldehyde (p - H2CO) transitions. We used the 32,1-22,0/ 30,3-20,2 line ratio to determine the gas temperature in n ~ 104-105 cm-3 gas. We have produced temperature maps and cubes with 30'' and 1 km s-1 resolution and published all data in FITS form. Results: Dense gas temperatures in the Galactic center range from ~60 K to >100 K in selected regions. The highest gas temperatures TG> 100 K are observed around the Sgr B2 cores, in the extended Sgr B2 cloud, the 20 km s-1 and 50 km s-1 clouds, and in "The Brick" (G0.253+0.016). We infer an upper limit on the cosmic ray ionization rate ζCR< 10-14s-1. Conclusions: The dense molecular gas temperature of the region around our Galactic center is similar to values found in the central regions of other galaxies, in particular starburst systems. The gas temperature is uniformly higher than the dust temperature, confirming that dust is a coolant in the dense gas. Turbulent heating can readily explain the observed temperatures given the observed line widths. Cosmic rays cannot explain the observed variation in gas temperatures, so CMZ dense gas temperatures are not dominated by cosmic ray heating. The gas temperatures previously observed to be high in the inner ~75 pc are confirmed to be high in the entire CMZ. The data can be accessed from doi:10.7910/DVN/27601 and are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/586/A50

  14. Mechanisms affecting the infiltration and distribution of ethanol-blended gasoline in the vadose zone.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Cory J; Powers, Susan E

    2003-05-01

    One- and two-dimensional experiments were conducted to examine differences in the behavior of gasoline and gasohol (10% ethanol by volume) as they infiltrate through the unsaturated zone and spread at the capillary fringe. Ethanol in the spilled gasohol quickly partitions into the residual water in the vadose zone and is retained there as the gasoline continues to infiltrate. Under the conditions tested, over 99% of the ethanol was initially retained in the vadose zone. Depending on the volume of gasoline spilled and the depth to the water table, this causes an increase in the aqueous-phase saturation and relative permeability, thus allowing the ethanol-laden water to drain into the gasoline pool. Under the conditions tested, the presence of ethanol does not have a significant impact on the overall size or shape of the resulting gasoline pool at the capillary fringe. Residual gasoline saturations in the vadose zone were significantly reduced however because of reduced surface and interfacial tensions associated with high ethanol concentrations. The flux of ethanol in the effluent of the column ranged from 1.4 x 10(-4) to 4.5 x 10(-7) g/(cm2 min) with the LNAPL and from 6 x 10(-3) to 3.0 x 10(-4) g/(cm2 min) after water was introduced to simulate rain infiltration. The experimental results presented here illustrate that the dynamic effects of ethanol partitioning into the aqueous phase in the vadose zone create an initial condition that is significantly different than previously understood.

  15. Fluid infiltration, heat transport, and healing of microcracks in the damage zone of magmatic veins: Numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engvik, Lars; StöCkhert, Bernhard; Engvik, Ane K.

    2009-05-01

    Alteration halos with sharp boundaries are flanking pegmatitic veins in high-grade metamorphic and magmatic rocks of Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. These halos are interpreted to represent the damage zone, formed as the wake of the process zone at the tip of the propagating magma-filled fracture and infiltrated by the fluid phase liberated from the crystallizing hydrous melt. On the basis of a set of assumptions, our numerical model explores the time scales of the infiltration processes, taking into account the combined effects of fluid flow, heat transfer, and temperature-dependent decay of interconnected porosity due to microcrack healing. Assuming an initial magma temperature of 700°C, a far field temperature in the host rock of 300°C, an initial porosity range of 0.5-2% in the damage zone, a permeability of 10-16 m2, and a pressure difference of 300 MPa, we find that the fluid infiltration into the damage zone proceeds within seconds to minutes and that the fluid flow contributes significantly to the heat transfer into the host rock. Assuming an initial microcrack aperture of 1 μm, the model predicts that the crack healing time scale is significantly longer than that of fluid infiltration in the case of thin veins with narrow damage zones; in this case, crack healing does not hinder fluid infiltration. Only for thick veins with high heat content and prolonged crystallization history does permeability become reduced by crack healing during progressive fluid infiltration. The results indicate that the formation of the alteration halos flanking pegmatitic veins may be a quasi-instantaneous process on geological time scales.

  16. Influence of the heating rate on the critical Marangoni number of oscillatory thermocapillary convection in the floating half zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Tang, ZeMei; Hu, WenRui

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, numerical simulations were conducted on thermocapillary convection in floating half zones of 5 cSt silicone oil of different scales in comparison with the experimental studies in the microgravity conditions. The effect of heating rate on the marginal instability boundaries is indicated as a possible explanation for the significant quantitative discrepancies between the experimental results in the terrestrial conditions and in the microgravity conditions.

  17. Variable power distribution for zoned regeneration of an electrically heated particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Bhatia, Garima [Bangalore, IN; Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2012-04-03

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with multiple zones, an electric heater and a control module. The electrical heater includes heater segments, which each correspond with a respective one of the zones. The electrical heater is arranged upstream from and is proximate with the PM filter. The control module selectively applies a first energy level to a first one of the zones via a first one of the heater segments to initiate regeneration in the first zone. The control module also selectively applies a second energy level that is less than the first energy level to a second one of the zones via a second one of the heater segments to initiate regeneration in the second zone.

  18. The problems of weld metal or heat affected zone toughness in offshore structural steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, P.; Spurrier, J.; Chubb, J.P.

    1996-12-01

    An extensive set of fracture toughness results for welded offshore structural steels, gathered from nine separate sponsoring companies, has been entered into a specially constructed database. With over eleven thousand Charpy results and over two thousand CTOD results available, it has been possible to analyze the occurrence of low toughness results with respect to variables such as thickness, PWHT, steel production route etc., even though the individual test programs were not specifically structured to do this. This paper concentrates on the toughness of the weld metal. The data demonstrates that the likelihood of a low toughness result from a CTOD test in weld metal at {minus}10 C is comparable with that from the HAZ region for welded offshore structural steels, and PWHT of the joint is beneficial in reducing the occurrence of low toughness values in the weld metal. It is therefore important that when the HAZ performance is assessed, either through weld procedure tests or plate prequalification procedures, adequate attention is also paid to the weld metal toughness.

  19. Superconducting accelerator cavity with a heat affected zone having a higher RRR

    DOEpatents

    Brawley, John; Phillips, H. Lawrence

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for welding accelerator cavities without the need for time consuming and expensive faying surface treatments comprising electron beam welding such cavities in a vacuum welding chamber within a vacuum envelope and using the following welding parameters: a beam voltage of between about 45 KV and 55 KV; a beam current between about 38 ma and 47 ma; a weld speed of about 15 cm/min; and a sharp focus and a rhombic raster of between about 9 KHz and 10 Khz. A welded cavity made according to the method of the present invention is also described.

  20. Capture zone delineation methodology based on the maximum concentration: Preventative groundwater well protection areas for heat exchange fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okkonen, Jarkko; Neupauer, Roseanna M.

    2016-05-01

    Capture zones of water supply wells are most often delineated based on travel times of water or solute to the well, with the assumption that if the travel time is sufficiently large, the concentration of chemical at the well will not exceed the drinking water standards. In many situations, the likely source concentrations or release masses of contamination from the potential sources are unknown; therefore, the exact concentration at the well cannot be determined. In situations in which the source mass can be estimated with some accuracy, the delineation of the capture zone should be based on the maximum chemical concentration that can be expected at the well, rather than on an arbitrary travel time. We present a new capture zone delineation methodology that is based on this maximum chemical concentration. The method delineates capture zones by solving the adjoint of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation and relating the adjoint state and the known release mass to the expected chemical concentration at the well. We demonstrate the use of this method through a case study in which soil heat exchange systems are potential sources of contamination. The heat exchange fluid mixtures contain known fluid volumes and chemical concentrations; thus, in the event of a release, the release mass of the chemical is known. We also demonstrate the use of a concentration basis in quantifying other measures of well vulnerability including exposure time and time to exceed a predefined threshold concentration at the well.

  1. Visualization of microcrack anisotropy in granite affected by afault zone, using confocal laser scanning microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Celia T.; Shimizu, Ichiko

    2004-01-02

    Brittle deformation in granite can generate a fracture system with different patterns. Detailed fracture analyses at both macroscopic and microscopic scales, together with physical property data from a drill-core, are used to classify the effects of reverse fault deformation in four domains: (1) undeformed granite, (2) fractured granite with cataclastic seams, (3) fractured granite from the damage zone, and (4) foliated cataclasite from the core of the fault. Intact samples from two orthogonal directions, horizontal (H) and vertical (V), from the four domains indicate a developing fracture anisotropy toward the fault, which is highly developed in the damage zone. As a specific illustration of this phenomenon, resin impregnation, using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) technique is applied to visualize the fracture anisotropy developed in the Toki Granite, Japan. As a result, microcrack networks have been observed to develop in H sections and elongate open cracks in V sections, suggesting that flow pathways can be determined by deformation.

  2. Studies on wake-affected heat transfer around the circular leading edge of blunt body

    SciTech Connect

    Funazaki, K.

    1996-07-01

    Detailed measurements are performed about time-averaged heat transfer distributions around the leading edge of a blunt body, which is affected by incoming periodic wakes from the upstream moving bars. The blunt body is a test model of a front portion of a turbine blade in gas turbines and consists of a semicircular cylindrical leading edge and a flat plate afterbody. A wide range of the steady and unsteady flow conditions are adopted as for the Reynolds number based on the diameter of the leading edge and the bar-passing Strouhal number. The measured heat transfer distributions indicate that the wakes passing over the leading edge cause a significant increase in heat transfer before the separation and the higher Strouhal number results in higher heat transfer. From this experiment, a correlation for the heat transfer enhancement around the leading edge due to the periodic wakes is deduced as a function of the Stanton number and it is reviewed by comparison with the other experimental works.

  3. HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER IN THE VADOSE ZONE WITH PLANT ROOTS. (R825414)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The vadose zone is the intermediate medium between the atmosphere and groundwater. The modeling of the processes taking place in the vadose zone needs different approaches to those needed for groundwater transport problems because of the marked changes in envi...

  4. Surface heat flow and CO2 emissions within the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rissmann, C.; Christenson, B.; Werner, C.; Leybourne, M.; Cole, J.; Gravley, D.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide emissions and heat flow have been determined from the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand following 20a of production (116MW e). Soil CO2 degassing was quantified with 2663 CO2 flux measurements using the accumulation chamber method, and 2563 soil temperatures were measured and converted to equivalent heat flow (Wm -2) using published soil temperature heat flow functions. Both CO2 flux and heat flow were analysed statistically and then modelled using 500 sequential Gaussian simulations. Forty subsoil CO 2 gas samples were also analysed for stable C isotopes. Following 20a of production, current CO2 emissions equated to 111??6.7T/d. Observed heat flow was 70??6.4MW, compared with a pre-production value of 122MW. This 52MW reduction in surface heat flow is due to production-induced drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows (61.5MW) and steam-heated pools (8.6MW) within the Ohaaki West thermal area (OHW). The drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows at Ohaaki means that the soil zone is now the major natural pathway of heat release from the high-temperature reservoir. On the other hand, a net gain in thermal ground heat flow of 18MW (from 25MW to 43.3??5MW) at OHW is associated with permeability increases resulting from surface unit fracturing by production-induced ground subsidence. The Ohaaki East (OHE) thermal area showed no change in distribution of shallow and deep soil temperature contours despite 20a of production, with an observed heat flow of 26.7??3MW and a CO 2 emission rate of 39??3T/d. The negligible change in the thermal status of the OHE thermal area is attributed to the low permeability of the reservoir beneath this area, which has limited production (mass extraction) and sheltered the area from the pressure decline within the main reservoir. Chemistry suggests that although alkali-Cl outflows once contributed significantly to the natural surface heat flow (~50%) they contributed little (<1%) to pre-production CO 2

  5. Urban Heat Island Variation across a Dramatic Coastal to Desert Climate Zone: An Application to Los Angeles, CA Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayyebi, A.; Jenerette, D.

    2015-12-01

    Urbanization is occurring at an unprecedented rate across the globe. The resulting urban heat island (UHI), which is a well-known phenomenon in urban areas due to the increasing number and density of buildings, leads to higher temperature in urban areas than surrounding sub-urban or rural areas. Understanding the effects of landscape pattern on UHI is crucial for improving the sustainability of cities and reducing heat vulnerability. Although a variety of studies have quantified UHI, there are a lack of studies to 1) understand UHI variation at the micro-scale (e.g., neighborhood effect) for large urban areas and 2) identify variation in the sensitivity of the UHI to environmental drivers across a megacity with a pronounced climate zone (i.e. coastal to desert climates) using advanced analytical tools. In this study, we identified the interacting relationship among various environmental and socio-economic factors to better identify UHI over the Los Angeles, CA metropolitan area. We used structural equation modeling (SEM) to quantify the interacting relationships among land surface temperature (LST), land cover (NDVI), distance to ocean, elevation, and socio-economic status (neighborhood income). LST-NDVI slopes were negative across the climate zones and became progressively stronger with increasing distance from the coast. Results also showed that slopes between NDVI and neighborhood income were positive throughout the climate zone with a maximum in the relationship occurring near 25km from the coast. Because of these income-NDVI and NDVI-LST relationships we also found that slopes between LST and neighborhood income were negative throughout the climate zones and peaked at about 30km from the coast. These findings suggest assessments of urban heat vulnerability need to consider not only variation in the indicators but also variation in how the indicators influence vulnerability.

  6. Exertional heat illness: a review of the syndrome affecting racing Thoroughbreds in hot and humid climates.

    PubMed

    Brownlow, M A; Dart, A J; Jeffcott, L B

    2016-07-01

    Metabolic heat produced by Thoroughbred racehorses during racing can rapidly elevate core body temperature (1°C/min). When environmental conditions are hot and humid, the normal physiological cooling mechanisms become ineffective. The heat accumulated may exceed a critical thermal maximum (estimated to be 42°C), which may trigger a complex pathophysiological cascade with potentially lethal consequences. This syndrome has been labelled exertional heat illness (EHI). EHI is described in humans, but has not been well documented in Thoroughbred racehorses. The clinical signs described in racehorses would suggest that the pathophysiological events affecting the central nervous (CNS) and gastrointestinal systems are similar to those described in humans. Clinical signs are progressive and include signs of endotoxaemia and increasing levels of CNS dysfunction. Initially, horses that may be mildly irritable (agitated, randomly kicking out) may progress to unmanageable (disorientation, severe ataxia, falling) and ultimately convulsions, coma and death. Currently, the approach to treatment is largely empirical and involves rapid and effective cooling, administration of drugs to provide sedation, administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to ameliorate the effects of endotoxaemia and glucocorticoids to stabilise cell membranes and reduce the effects of inflammation on the CNS. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge about EHI in Thoroughbred racehorses, suggests a likely pathophysiology of the syndrome in horses based on the current literature on heat illness in humans and horses, and outlines current treatment strategies being used to treat racehorses with clinical signs of EHI. PMID:27349884

  7. Seismic heating signatures in the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone: evidence from a preliminary rock magnetic `geothermometer'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Dekkers, Mark J.; Zhang, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Frictional heating during earthquake rupture reveals important information on earthquake mechanisms and energy dissipation. The amount of annealing varies widely and is, as yet, poorly constrained. Here we use magnetic susceptibility versus temperature measurements during cycling to increasingly elevated temperatures to constrain the maximum temperature a slip zone has experienced. The case study comprises sheared clay cored from the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone (décollement), which accommodated the large slip of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The décollement was cored during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 343, the Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST). Heating signatures with estimated maximum temperatures ranging from ˜300 to over 500 °C are determined close to the multiple slip surfaces within the décollement. Since it is impossible to tie a specific slip surface to a certain earthquake, thermal evidence for the cumulative effect of several earthquakes is unveiled. This as yet preliminary rock magnetic `geothermometer' would be a useful tool to detect seismic heating along faults that experienced medium temperature rise, a range which is difficult to assess with other approaches.

  8. Heat-induced aggregation of thylakoid membranes affect their interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Östbring, Karolina; Rayner, Marilyn; Albertsson, Per-Åke; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2015-04-01

    Many of our most popular lipid containing foods are in emulsion form. These foods are often highly palatable with high caloric density, that subsequently increases the risk of overconsumption and possibly lead to obesity. Regulating the lipid bioavailability of high-fat foods is one approach to prevent overconsumption. Thylakoids, the chloroplast membrane, creates a barrier around lipid droplets, which prolong lipolysis and increase satiety as demonstrated both in animal and human studies. However, a reduced lipase inhibiting capacity has been reported after heat treatment but the mechanism has not yet been fully established. The aim of this study was to investigate thylakoids' emulsifying properties post heat-treatment and possible links to alterations in lipase inhibiting capacity and chlorophyll degradation. Heat-treatment of thylakoids at either 60 °C, 75 °C or 90 °C for time interval ranging from 15 s to 4 min reduced ability to stabilise emulsions, having increased lipid droplets sizes, reduced emulsification capacity, and elevated surface load as consequence. Emulsifying properties were also found to display a linear relationship to both chlorophyll and lipase inhibiting capacity. The correlations support the hypothesis that heat-treatment induce chlorophyll degradation which promote aggregation within proteins inside the thylakoid membrane known to play a decisive role in interfacial processes. Therefore, heat-treatment of thylakoids affects both chlorophyll content, lipase inhibiting capacity and ability to stabilise the oil-water interface. Since the thylakoid's appetite reducing properties are a surface-related phenomenon, the results are useful to optimize the effect of thylakoids as an appetite reducing agent.

  9. Denaturation and Oxidative Stability of Hemp Seed (Cannabis sativa L.) Protein Isolate as Affected by Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Raikos, Vassilios; Duthie, Garry; Ranawana, Viren

    2015-09-01

    The present study investigated the impact of heat treatments on the denaturation and oxidative stability of hemp seed protein during simulated gastrointestinal digestion (GID). Heat-denatured hemp protein isolate (HPI) solutions were prepared by heating HPI (2 mg/ml, pH 6.8) to 40, 60, 80 and 100 °C for 10 min. Heat-induced denaturation of the protein isolates was monitored by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heating HPI at temperatures above 80 °C significantly reduced solubility and led to the formation of large protein aggregates. The isolates were then subjected to in vitro GID and the oxidative stability of the generated peptides was investigated. Heating did not significantly affect the formation of oxidation products during GID. The results suggest that heat treatments should ideally remain below 80 °C if heat stability and solubility of HPI are to be preserved. PMID:26142888

  10. Denaturation and Oxidative Stability of Hemp Seed (Cannabis sativa L.) Protein Isolate as Affected by Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Raikos, Vassilios; Duthie, Garry; Ranawana, Viren

    2015-09-01

    The present study investigated the impact of heat treatments on the denaturation and oxidative stability of hemp seed protein during simulated gastrointestinal digestion (GID). Heat-denatured hemp protein isolate (HPI) solutions were prepared by heating HPI (2 mg/ml, pH 6.8) to 40, 60, 80 and 100 °C for 10 min. Heat-induced denaturation of the protein isolates was monitored by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heating HPI at temperatures above 80 °C significantly reduced solubility and led to the formation of large protein aggregates. The isolates were then subjected to in vitro GID and the oxidative stability of the generated peptides was investigated. Heating did not significantly affect the formation of oxidation products during GID. The results suggest that heat treatments should ideally remain below 80 °C if heat stability and solubility of HPI are to be preserved.

  11. Factors Affecting the Latitudinal Location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone in a GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston C.; Chen, Baode

    2002-01-01

    The dominant role of the latitudinal peak of the sea surface temperature (SST) in determining the latitudinal location of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) is well-known. However, the roles of the other factors are less well-known and are the topic of this study. These other factors include the inertial stability, the interaction between convection and surface fluxes and the interaction between convection and radiation. Since these interactions involve convection, in a model they involve the cumulus parameterization scheme. These factors are studied with a general circulation model with uniform SST and solar angle. Under the aforementioned model settings, the latitudinal location of the ITCZ is the latitude where the balance of two types of attraction on the ITCZ, both due to earth's rotation, exists. Directly related to the Coriolis parameter, the first type pulls the ITCZ toward the equator and is not sensitive to model design changes. Related to the convective circulation, the second type pulls the ITCZ poleward and is sensitive to model design changes. Due to the shape and the magnitude of the attractors, the balance of the two types of attractions is reached either at the equator or more than 10 degrees away from the equator. The former case results in a single ITCZ over the equator and the latter case a double ITCZ straddling the equator.

  12. Statistical analysis of factors affecting landslide distribution in the new Madrid seismic zone, Tennessee and Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jibson, R.W.; Keefer, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    More than 220 large landslides along the bluffs bordering the Mississippi alluvial plain between Cairo, Ill., and Memphis, Tenn., are analyzed by discriminant analysis and multiple linear regression to determine the relative effects of slope height and steepness, stratigraphic variation, slope aspect, and proximity to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 New Madrid, Mo., earthquakes on the distribution of these landslides. Three types of landslides are analyzed: (1) old, coherent slumps and block slides, which have eroded and revegetated features and no active analogs in the area; (2) old earth flows, which are also eroded and revegetated; and (3) young rotational slumps, which are present only along near-river bluffs, and which are the only young, active landslides in the area. Discriminant analysis shows that only one characteristic differs significantly between bluffs with and without young rotational slumps: failed bluffs tend to have sand and clay at their base, which may render them more susceptible to fluvial erosion. Bluffs having old coherent slides are significantly higher, steeper, and closer to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 earthquakes than bluffs without these slides. Bluffs having old earth flows are likewise higher and closer to the earthquake hypocenters. Multiple regression analysis indicates that the distribution of young rotational slumps is affected most strongly by slope steepness: about one-third of the variation in the distribution is explained by variations in slope steepness. The distribution of old coherent slides and earth flows is affected most strongly by slope height, but the proximity to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 earthquakes also significantly affects the distribution. The results of the statistical analyses indicate that the only recently active landsliding in the area is along actively eroding river banks, where rotational slumps formed as bluffs are undercut by the river. The analyses further indicate that the old coherent slides

  13. Remote sensing for assessing the zone of benefit where deep drains improve productivity of land affected by shallow saline groundwater.

    PubMed

    Kobryn, H T; Lantzke, R; Bell, R; Admiraal, R

    2015-03-01

    The installation of deep drains is an engineering approach to remediate land salinised by the influence of shallow groundwater. It is a costly treatment and its economic viability is, in part, dependent on the lateral extent to which the drain increases biological productivity by lowering water tables and soil salinity (referred to as the drains' zone of benefit). Such zones may be determined by assessing the biological productivity response of adjacent vegetation over time. We tested a multi-temporal satellite remote sensing method to analyse temporal and spatial changes in vegetation condition surrounding deep drainage sites at five locations in the Western Australian wheatbelt affected by dryland salinity-Morawa, Pithara, Beacon, Narembeen and Dumbleyung. Vegetation condition as a surrogate for biological productivity was assessed by Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) during the peak growing season. Analysis was at the site scale within a 1000 m buffer zone from the drains. There was clear evidence of NDVI increasing with elevation, slope and distance from the drain. After accounting for elevation, slope and distance from the drain, there was a significant increase in NDVI across the five locations after installation of deep drains. Changes in NDVI after drainage were broadly consistent with measured changes at each site in groundwater levels after installation of the deep drains. However, this study assessed the lateral extent of benefit for biological productivity and gave a measure of the area of benefit along the entire length of the drain. The method demonstrated the utility of spring NDVI images for rapid and relatively simple assessment of the change in site condition after implementation of drainage, but approaches for further improvement of the procedure were identified.

  14. Linking river, floodplain, and vadose zone hydrology to improve restoration of a coastal river affected by saltwater intrusion.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D; Muñoz-Carpena, R; Wan, Y; Hedgepeth, M; Zheng, F; Roberts, R; Rossmanith, R

    2010-01-01

    Floodplain forests provide unique ecological structure and function, which are often degraded or lost when watershed hydrology is modified. Restoration of damaged ecosystems requires an understanding of surface water, groundwater, and vadose (unsaturated) zone hydrology in the floodplain. Soil moisture and porewater salinity are of particular importance for seed germination and seedling survival in systems affected by saltwater intrusion but are difficult to monitor and often overlooked. This study contributes to the understanding of floodplain hydrology in one of the last bald cypress [Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.] floodplain swamps in southeast Florida. We investigated soil moisture and porewater salinity dynamics in the floodplain of the Loxahatchee River, where reduced freshwater flow has led to saltwater intrusion and a transition to salt-tolerant, mangrove-dominated communities. Twenty-four dielectric probes measuring soil moisture and porewater salinity every 30 min were installed along two transects-one in an upstream, freshwater location and one in a downstream tidal area. Complemented by surface water, groundwater, and meteorological data, these unique 4-yr datasets quantified the spatial variability and temporal dynamics of vadose zone hydrology. Results showed that soil moisture can be closely predicted based on river stage and topographic elevation (overall Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency = 0.83). Porewater salinity rarely exceeded tolerance thresholds (0.3125 S m(-1)) for bald cypress upstream but did so in some downstream areas. This provided an explanation for observed vegetation changes that both surface water and groundwater salinity failed to explain. The results offer a methodological and analytical framework for floodplain monitoring in locations where restoration success depends on vadose zone hydrology and provide relationships for evaluating proposed restoration and management scenarios for the Loxahatchee River.

  15. Estimating the effect of shallow groundwater on diurnal heat transport in a vadose zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jianmei; Zhao, Lin; Zhai, Zhe

    2016-09-01

    The influence of shallow groundwater on the diurnal heat transport of the soil profile was analyzed using a soil sensor automatic monitoring system that continuously measures temperature and water content of soil profiles to simulate heat transport based on the Philip and de Vries (PDV) model. Three experiments were conducted to measure soil properties at depths of 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm, and 30 cm when groundwater tables reached 10 cm, 30 cm, and 60 cm (Experiments I, II, and III). Results show that both the soil temperature near shallow groundwater and the soil water content were effectively simulated by the PDV model. The root mean square errors of the temperature at depths of 5 cm, 10 cm, and 20 cm were 1.018°C, 0.909°C, and 0.255°C, respectively. The total heat flux generated the convergent and divergent planes in space-time fields with valley values of-161.5W•m-2 at 7:30 and-234.6W•m-2 at 11:10 in Experiments II and III, respectively. The diurnal heat transport of the saturated soil occurred in five stages, while that of saturated-unsaturated and unsaturated soil profiles occurred in four stages because high moisture content led to high thermal conductivity, which hastened the heat transport.

  16. Adaptation to heat and water shortage in large, arid-zone mammals.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Andrea; Hetem, Robyn S; Maloney, Shane K; Mitchell, Duncan

    2014-05-01

    Although laboratory studies of large mammals have revealed valuable information on thermoregulation, such studies cannot predict accurately how animals respond in their natural habitats. Through insights obtained on thermoregulatory behavior, body temperature variability, and selective brain cooling in free-living mammals, we show here how we can better understand the physiological capacity of large mammals to cope with hotter and drier arid-zone habitats likely with climate change.

  17. Adaptation to heat and water shortage in large, arid-zone mammals.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Andrea; Hetem, Robyn S; Maloney, Shane K; Mitchell, Duncan

    2014-05-01

    Although laboratory studies of large mammals have revealed valuable information on thermoregulation, such studies cannot predict accurately how animals respond in their natural habitats. Through insights obtained on thermoregulatory behavior, body temperature variability, and selective brain cooling in free-living mammals, we show here how we can better understand the physiological capacity of large mammals to cope with hotter and drier arid-zone habitats likely with climate change. PMID:24789980

  18. Factors affecting the quality of fish caught by Native Americans in the Zone 6 fishery 1991 through 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Abernethy, C.S.

    1994-09-01

    A program to monitor the salmon and steelhead (Oncorhynchus spp.) fishery in the lower Columbia River (Zone 6 fishery) was initiated in 1991 to respond to questions and comments frequently made by Native Americans at public meetings. Native Americans were concerned that the quality of the Columbia River had deteriorated and that the poor environmental conditions had affected the health and quality of fish they relied on for subsistence, ceremonial, religious, and commercial purposes. They also feared that eating contaminated fish might endanger the health of their children and future generations. Operations at the Hanford Site were listed as one of many causes of the deteriorating environment. Fisheries pathologists concluded that most of the external symptoms on fish were related to bacterial infection of gill net abrasions and pre-spawning trauma, and were not caused by pollution or contamination of the Columbia River. The pathologists also stated that consumption of the fish posed no threat to human consumers.

  19. GaAs wafer overlay performance affected by annealing heat treatment: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Black, Iain

    2002-07-01

    Further analysis on how wafer distortion affecting the overlay performance during annealing treatment in GaAs wafer fabrication was conducted quantitatively using MONO-LITH software. The experimental results were decomposed as wafer translation, scaling at X and Y direction, rotation and orthogonality. The grid residual was used to describe non- correctable distortion of the wafers, which fits the equations given below: Residual equals Measured - Modeled, which is not a modeled component. The Vector Map displays distribution of error vectors over the wafer or field for various components or overall effect. Based on the component analysis that the misalignment caused by translation and scaling can be compensated by heat treatment if the wafer is placed at a favorable orientation. This can help mitigate the effects of substrate quality in manufactory.

  20. Dissolved barium behavior in Louisiana Shelf waters affected by the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River mixing zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, DongJoo; Shiller, Alan M.

    2014-09-01

    a proxy for paleo-salinity changes. Barium input to bottom waters and the extent to which this is natural or anthropogenically-affected is a particular source of uncertainty. Thus, as is the case with nearly all paleoceanographic proxies, the planktonic foraminiferal Ba/Ca ratio should be used in conjunction with other constraining proxies.

  1. Water color affects the stratification, surface temperature, heat content, and mean epilimnetic irradiance of small lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of water color on lake stratification, mean epilimnetic irradiance, and lake temperature dynamics were examined in small, north-temperate lakes that differed widely in water color (1.5-19.8 m -1). Among these lakes, colored lakes differed from clear lakes in the following ways: (i) the epilimnia were shallower and colder, and mean epilimnetic irradiance was reduced; (ii) the diel temperature cycles were more pronounced; (iii) whole-lake heat accumulation during stratification was reduced. The depth of the epilimnion ranged from 2.5 m in the clearest lake to 0.75 m in the most colored lake, and 91% of the variation in epilimnetic depth was explained by water color. Summer mean morning epilimnetic temperature was ???2??C cooler in the most colored lake compared with the clearest lake. In clear lakes, the diel temperature range (1.4 ?? 0.7??C) was significantly (p = 0.01) less than that in the most colored lake (2.1 ?? 1.0??C). Change in whole-lake heat content was negatively correlated with water color. Increasing water color decreased light penetration more than thermocline depth, leading to reduced mean epilimnetic irradiance in the colored lakes. Thus, in these small lakes, water color significantly affected temperature, thermocline depth, and light climate. ?? 2006 NRC.

  2. Ground-water heat pumps: an examination of hydrogeologic, environmental, legal, and economic factors affecting their use

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, D M; Bacon, D J; Massey-Norton, J T; Miller, J D

    1980-11-12

    Groundwater is attractive as a potential low-temperature energy source in residential space-conditioning applications. When used in conjuncton with a heat pump, ground water can serve as both a heat source (for heating) and a heat sink (for cooling). Major hydrogeologic aspects that affect system use include groundwater temperature and availability at shallow depths as these factors influence operational efficiency. Ground-water quality is considered as it affects the performance and life-expectancy of the water-side heat exchanger. Environmental impacts related to groundwater heat pump system use are most influenced by water use and disposal methods. In general, recharge to the subsurface (usually via injection wells) is recommended. Legal restrictions on system use are often stricter at the municipal and county levels than at state and Federal levels. Although Federal regulations currently exist, the agencies are not equipped to regulate individual, domestic installations. Computer smulations indicate that under a variety of climatologic conditions, groundwater heat pumps use less energy than conventional heating and cooling equipment. Life-cycle cost comparisons with conventional equipment depend on alternative system choices and well cost options included in the groundwater heat pump system.

  3. How do changes in the Diurnal Cycle affect Bi-stability and Climate Sensitivity in the Habitable Zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, R.; Valerio, L.

    2013-09-01

    In this study we deal with the effect of varying the length of the diurnal cycle on its bi-stability properties. By using a general circulation model, PlaSim, we consider several values for the diurnal cycle, from tidally locked, to that of 1 Earth day. For each value of the diurnal cycle, we slowly modulate the solar constant between 1510 and 1000 Wm-2 and perform a hysteresis experiment. It is found that the width of the bi-stable region, i.e. the range of climate states - determined here by changes in S* - which support two climatic attractors, reduces when the diurnal cycle is increased in length and disappears - signifying the merging of both attractors - for climates with a diurnal cycle greater than 180 days. Crucial to the loss of bi-stability is the longitudinally asymmetric distribution of solar radiation, incident on the planet's surface, leading to the development of equatorial sea-ice. For diurnal cycles where bi-stability is found, the longitudinally asymmetric heating is sufficiently compensated for by the strength of the zonal winds and the rate of solar distribution, which redistribute heat and maintain the meridional temperature gradient across all longitudes. Conversely, for mono-stable regimes, the energy transport associated with zonal winds becomes insufficient to compensate for the increase in the length of the diurnal cycle, resulting in large zonal temperature gradients along the equatorial band. Furthermore, the results found here confirm and reenforce the robustness of those found in Boschi et al (2013), showing that, for climates which support bistability, it may be possible to parameterise variables such as the material entropy production and the meridional heat transport in terms of the surface and emission temperatures, within reasonably well defined upper and lower bounds, even when considering a wide range of planetary rotation speeds and changes to the infrared opacity. This paves the way for the possibility of practically deducing

  4. Geothermal Frontier: Penetrate a boundary between hydrothermal convection and heat conduction zones to create 'Beyond Brittle Geothermal Reservoir'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, N.; Asanuma, H.; Sakaguchi, K.; Okamoto, A.; Hirano, N.; Watanabe, N.; Kizaki, A.

    2013-12-01

    EGS has been highlightened as a most promising method of geothermal development recently because of applicability to sites which have been considered to be unsuitable for geothermal development. Meanwhile, some critical problems have been experimentally identified, such as low recovery of injected water, difficulties to establish universal design/development methodology, and occurrence of large induced seismicity. Future geothermal target is supercritical and superheated geothermal fluids in and around ductile rock bodies under high temperatures. Ductile regime which is estimated beyond brittle zone is target region for future geothermal development due to high enthalpy fluids and relatively weak water-rock interaction. It is very difficult to determine exact depth of Brittle-Ductile boundary due to strong dependence of temperature (geotherm) and strain rate, however, ductile zone is considered to be developed above 400C and below 3 km in geothermal fields in Tohoku District. Hydrothermal experiments associated with additional advanced technology will be conducting to understand ';Beyond brittle World' and to develop deeper and hotter geothermal reservoir. We propose a new concept of the engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile basement, expecting the following advantages: (a)simpler design and control the reservoir, (b)nearly full recovery of injected water, (c)sustainable production, (d)cost reduction by development of relatively shallower ductile zone in compression tectonic zones, (e)large quantity of energy extraction from widely distributed ductile zones, (f)establishment of universal and conceptual design/development methodology, and (g) suppression of felt earthquakes from/around the reservoirs. In ductile regime, Mesh-like fracture cloud has great potential for heat extraction between injection and production wells in spite of single and simple mega-fracture. Based on field observation and high performance hydrothermal

  5. Behavioural Responses to Thermal Conditions Affect Seasonal Mass Change in a Heat-Sensitive Northern Ungulate

    PubMed Central

    van Beest, Floris M.; Milner, Jos M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Empirical tests that link temperature-mediated changes in behaviour (activity and resource selection) to individual fitness or condition are currently lacking for endotherms yet may be critical to understanding the effect of climate change on population dynamics. Moose (Alces alces) are thought to suffer from heat stress in all seasons so provide a good biological model to test whether exposure to non-optimal ambient temperatures influence seasonal changes in body mass. Seasonal mass change is an important fitness correlate of large herbivores and affects reproductive success of female moose. Methodology/Principal Findings Using GPS-collared adult female moose from two populations in southern Norway we quantified individual differences in seasonal activity budget and resource selection patterns as a function of seasonal temperatures thought to induce heat stress in moose. Individual body mass was recorded in early and late winter, and autumn to calculate seasonal mass changes (n = 52 over winter, n = 47 over summer). We found large individual differences in temperature-dependent resource selection patterns as well as within and between season variability in thermoregulatory strategies. As expected, individuals using an optimal strategy, selecting young successional forest (foraging habitat) at low ambient temperatures and mature coniferous forest (thermal shelter) during thermally stressful conditions, lost less mass in winter and gained more mass in summer. Conclusions/Significance This study provides evidence that behavioural responses to temperature have important consequences for seasonal mass change in moose living in the south of their distribution in Norway, and may be a contributing factor to recently observed declines in moose demographic performance. Although the mechanisms that underlie the observed temperature mediated habitat-fitness relationship remain to be tested, physiological state and individual variation in thermal tolerance

  6. The Influence of Static and Rotating Magnetic Fields on Heat and Mass Transfer in Silicon Floating Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, Arne; Dold, P.; Kaiser, Th.; Szofran, Frank; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Hear and mass transfer in float-zone processing are strongly influenced by convective flows in the zone. They are caused by buoyancy convection, thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection, or artificial sources such as rotation and radio frequency heating. Flows in conducting melts can be controlled by the use of magnetic fields, either by damping fluid motion with static fields or by generating a def@ned flow with rotating fields. The possibilities of using static and rotating magnetic fields in silicon floating-zone growth have been investigated by experiments in axial static fields up to ST and in transverse rotating magnetic fields up to 7.S mT. Static fields of a few 100 MT already suppress most striations but are detrimental to the radial segregation by introducing a coring effect. A complete suppression of dopant striations caused by time-dependent thermocapillary convection and a reduction of the coring to insignificant values, combined with a shift of the axial segregation profile towards a more diffusion-limited case, is possible with static fields ? 1T. However, under certain conditions the use of high axial magnetic fields can lead to the appearance of a new type of pronounced dopant striations, caused by thermoelec:romagnetic convection. The use of a transverse rotating magnetic field influences the microscopic segregation at quite low inductions, of the order of a few mT. The field shifts time-dependent flows and the resulting striation patterns from a broad range of low frequencies at high amplitudes to a few high frequencies at low amplitudes

  7. Enhanced heat conductivity in stochastic magnetic field of tokomak affected by the ratio of the parallel to the perpendicular heat diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H.

    2012-11-01

    Electron heat transport across stochastic magnetic fields is studied numerically in order to find out how the ratio of the parallel to the perpendicular heat diffusivity affects the enhanced heat conductivity and its radial profile in tokomak plasma physics. To find out the details of profile, non-local stochastic magnetic fields, in which the perturbed magnetic islands are separated with each other but very close to in the minor radius of tokomak, are chosen as research objects in our simulation work. Our numerical results indicate that the ratio of the parallel to the perpendicular heat diffusivity is a very important effective factor, which dominate how far the enhanced conductivity contributed by a perturbed magnetic field approach to zero from the rational surface in minor radius. Besides that, a theoretical analysis was provided and compared with the numerical results in this article.

  8. Study on Electron Heat Diffusion Across Stochastic Magnetic Field Affected by Magnitude of Perturbed Magnetic Field in Tokomak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hong

    2013-04-01

    Electron heat diffusion across stochastic magnetic fields is studied numerically in order to find out how the magnitude of perturbed magnetic field affect the enhanced heat conductivity and its radial profile in tokomak plasma physics. For these purposes, non-local stochastic magnetic fields are chosen as research objects in our simulation work. From our numerical results, we can find that the effects of the perturbed magnetic field magnitude are dominated parameter on the enhance electron heat transport conductivity wherever the magnetic field is single island or full stochastic field. Also, a theoretical analysis is provided and compared with numerical results.

  9. Multi-zone furnace system

    SciTech Connect

    Orbeck, G.A.

    1986-05-06

    A multi-zone furnace is described which consists of: a furnace chamber having at least one heat zone and at least one zone adjacent to the heat zone and disposed along the length of the furnace chamber; the heat zone having a hearth at a level different from the hearth level of the adjacent zone; a walking beam conveyor disposed in the furnace chamber and operative in a short stroke mode to convey a product along the hearth of the heat zone, and in a long stroke mode to convey a product from the heat zone to the adjacent zone.

  10. Analysis of factors influencing moxibustion efficacy by affecting heat-activated transient receptor potential vanilloid channels.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinfeng; Wang, Xinjun; Wu, Xiaojing; Yu, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Moxibustion is an important component part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Among differ- ent kinds of moxibustion methods, thermal stimulation seems to be a pivotal impact factor to the theraputic efficacy. Based on its thermal characteristic and treated area-skin, we hypothesize that the thermosensitive TRPV channels may involve in the mechanism of moxibustion. This study, by referring to various experimental and clinical data, analyzes the properties and features of transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) subfamily 1-4 and the impact of moxibustion on these channels. The factors impacting the efficacy of moxibustion treatment were analyzed on three levels: the independent basic factors of moxibustion (temperature, space and time); moxibustion intensity (a compound factor achieved through comprehensive control of the three individual basic factors mentioned above); and moxibustion quantity (the amount of temperature stimulation applied within a certain unit of time, including the total amount of moxibustion treatment). The results from present study show that the effect of moxibustion therapy appears to be determined by the activation of TRPV1-4, mainly TRPV1 and TRPV2. Temperature (the degree of heat stimulation), time and area (how long the treatment lasts and how many TRPV1-4 channels are activated) affect the intensity of moxibustion treatment to form effective moxibustion quantity; this should be considered in clinical moxibustion application.

  11. Analysis of factors influencing moxibustion efficacy by affecting heat-activated transient receptor potential vanilloid channels.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinfeng; Wang, Xinjun; Wu, Xiaojing; Yu, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Moxibustion is an important component part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Among differ- ent kinds of moxibustion methods, thermal stimulation seems to be a pivotal impact factor to the theraputic efficacy. Based on its thermal characteristic and treated area-skin, we hypothesize that the thermosensitive TRPV channels may involve in the mechanism of moxibustion. This study, by referring to various experimental and clinical data, analyzes the properties and features of transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) subfamily 1-4 and the impact of moxibustion on these channels. The factors impacting the efficacy of moxibustion treatment were analyzed on three levels: the independent basic factors of moxibustion (temperature, space and time); moxibustion intensity (a compound factor achieved through comprehensive control of the three individual basic factors mentioned above); and moxibustion quantity (the amount of temperature stimulation applied within a certain unit of time, including the total amount of moxibustion treatment). The results from present study show that the effect of moxibustion therapy appears to be determined by the activation of TRPV1-4, mainly TRPV1 and TRPV2. Temperature (the degree of heat stimulation), time and area (how long the treatment lasts and how many TRPV1-4 channels are activated) affect the intensity of moxibustion treatment to form effective moxibustion quantity; this should be considered in clinical moxibustion application. PMID:27400483

  12. Affect of Air Leakage into a Thermal-Vacuum Chamber on Helium Refrigeration Heat Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Sam; Meagher, Daniel; Linza, Robert; Saheli, Fariborz; Vargas, Gerardo; Lauterbach, John; Reis, Carl; Ganni, Venkatarao (Rao); Homan, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    NASA s Johnson Space Center (JSC) Building 32 houses two large thermal-vacuum chambers (Chamber A and Chamber B). Within these chambers are liquid nitrogen shrouds to provide a thermal environment and helium panels which operate at 20K to provide cryopumping. Some amount of air leakage into the chambers during tests is inevitable. This causes "air fouling" of the helium panel surfaces due to the components of the air that adhere to the panels. The air fouling causes the emittance of the helium panels to increase during tests. The increase in helium panel emittance increases the heat load on the helium refrigerator that supplies the 20K helium for those panels. Planning for thermal-vacuum tests should account for this increase to make sure that the helium refrigerator capacity will not be exceeded over the duration of a test. During a recent test conducted in Chamber B a known-size air leak was introduced to the chamber. Emittance change of the helium panels and the affect on the helium refrigerator was characterized. A description of the test and the results will be presented.

  13. Green reconstruction of the tsunami-affected areas in India using the integrated coastal zone management concept.

    PubMed

    Sonak, Sangeeta; Pangam, Prajwala; Giriyan, Asha

    2008-10-01

    A tsunami, triggered by a massive undersea earthquake off Sumatra in Indonesia, greatly devastated the lives, property and infrastructure of coastal communities in the coastal states of India, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Malaysia and Thailand. This event attracted the attention of environmental managers at all levels, local, national, regional and global. It also shifted the focus from the impact of human activities on the environment to the impacts of natural hazards. Recovery/reconstruction of these areas is highly challenging. A clear understanding of the complex dynamics of the coast and the types of challenges faced by the several stakeholders of the coast is required. Issues such as sustainability, equity and community participation assume importance. The concept of ICZM (integrated coastal zone management) has been effectively used in most parts of the world. This concept emphasizes the holistic assessment of the coast and a multidisciplinary analysis using participatory processes. It integrates anthropocentric and eco-centric approaches. This paper documents several issues involved in the recovery of tsunami-affected areas and recommends the application of the ICZM concept to the reconstruction efforts. PMID:17544565

  14. Green reconstruction of the tsunami-affected areas in India using the integrated coastal zone management concept.

    PubMed

    Sonak, Sangeeta; Pangam, Prajwala; Giriyan, Asha

    2008-10-01

    A tsunami, triggered by a massive undersea earthquake off Sumatra in Indonesia, greatly devastated the lives, property and infrastructure of coastal communities in the coastal states of India, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Malaysia and Thailand. This event attracted the attention of environmental managers at all levels, local, national, regional and global. It also shifted the focus from the impact of human activities on the environment to the impacts of natural hazards. Recovery/reconstruction of these areas is highly challenging. A clear understanding of the complex dynamics of the coast and the types of challenges faced by the several stakeholders of the coast is required. Issues such as sustainability, equity and community participation assume importance. The concept of ICZM (integrated coastal zone management) has been effectively used in most parts of the world. This concept emphasizes the holistic assessment of the coast and a multidisciplinary analysis using participatory processes. It integrates anthropocentric and eco-centric approaches. This paper documents several issues involved in the recovery of tsunami-affected areas and recommends the application of the ICZM concept to the reconstruction efforts.

  15. Recovery approach affects soil quality in the water level fluctuation zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China: implications for revegetation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chen; Cheng, Xiaoli; Zhang, Quanfa

    2014-02-01

    Plants in the water level fluctuation zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region disappeared due to winter-flooding and prolonged inundation. Revegetation (plantation and natural recovery) have been promoted to restore and protect the riparian ecosystem in recent years. Revegetation may affect soil qualities and have broad important implications both for ecological services and soil recovery. In this study, we investigated soil properties including soil pH values, bulk density, soil organic matter (SOM), soil nutrients and heavy metals, soil microbial community structure, microbial biomass, and soil quality index under plantation and natural recovery in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region. Most soil properties showed significant temporal and spatial variations in both the plantation and natural recovery areas. Higher contents of SOM and NO3-N were found in plantation area, while higher contents of soil pH values, bulk density, and total potassium were observed in the natural recovery area. However, there were no significant differences in plant richness and diversity and soil microbial community structure between the two restoration approaches. A soil quality index derived from SOM, bulk density, Zn, Cd, and Hg indicated that natural recovery areas with larger herbaceous coverage had more effective capacity for soil restoration. PMID:24019143

  16. Recovery approach affects soil quality in the water level fluctuation zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China: implications for revegetation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chen; Cheng, Xiaoli; Zhang, Quanfa

    2014-02-01

    Plants in the water level fluctuation zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region disappeared due to winter-flooding and prolonged inundation. Revegetation (plantation and natural recovery) have been promoted to restore and protect the riparian ecosystem in recent years. Revegetation may affect soil qualities and have broad important implications both for ecological services and soil recovery. In this study, we investigated soil properties including soil pH values, bulk density, soil organic matter (SOM), soil nutrients and heavy metals, soil microbial community structure, microbial biomass, and soil quality index under plantation and natural recovery in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region. Most soil properties showed significant temporal and spatial variations in both the plantation and natural recovery areas. Higher contents of SOM and NO3-N were found in plantation area, while higher contents of soil pH values, bulk density, and total potassium were observed in the natural recovery area. However, there were no significant differences in plant richness and diversity and soil microbial community structure between the two restoration approaches. A soil quality index derived from SOM, bulk density, Zn, Cd, and Hg indicated that natural recovery areas with larger herbaceous coverage had more effective capacity for soil restoration.

  17. Expression of Selenoprotein Genes Is Affected by Heat Stress in IPEC-J2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Tang, Jiayong; Li, Qiang; Xu, Jingyang; Jia, Gang; Liu, Guangmang; Chen, Xiaoling; Shang, Haiying; Cai, Jingyi; Zhao, Hua

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impacts of heat stress (HS) on expressions of selenoprotein genes in IPEC-J2 cells. Cells were cultured with 5 % CO2-humidified chamber at 37 °C until the cells grew to complete confluence and then exposed to a mild hyperthermia at 41.5 °C (HS) or 37 °C (control) for another 24 h, finally harvested for total RNA or protein extraction. Real-time quantitative PCRs (qPCRs) were performed to compare gene expression of 25 selenoprotein genes, 3 tight junction-related genes, and 10 inflammation-related genes. Protein expressions of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and selenoprotein X and P (SelX and SelP) were also investigated by Western blot. The results showed that HS up-regulated (P < 0.05) Hsp70 and one tight junction-related gene [zonula occludens-1 (Zo-1)] in IPEC-J2 cells. At the same time, HS up-regulated (P < 0.05) 4 selenoprotein genes (Gpx3, Dio2, Selk, Sels) and three inflammation-related genes (Il-6, Icam-1, Tgf-β) and down-regulated (P < 0.05 or as indicated) six selenoprotein genes (Gpx2, Gpx6, Txnrd1, Selh, Selm, Selx) and three inflammation-related genes (Ifn-β, Mcp-1, Tnf-α) in the cells. HS also exhibited impacts on protein expressions, which up-regulated Hsp70, down-regulated SelX, and showed no effect on SelP in IPEC-J2 cells. Our results showed that HS affected the expression of inflammation-related genes and up-regulated gene and protein expressions of Hsp70. The changes of so many selenoprotein genes expression implied a potential link between selenoprotein genes and HS. Moreover, the results provided by this IPEC-J2 model may be used to further study the interactive mechanisms between selenoprotein function and potential intestinal damage induced by HS.

  18. Coloration affects heating and cooling in three color morphs of the Australian bluetongue lizard, Tiliqua scincoides.

    PubMed

    Geen, Michael R S; Johnston, Gregory R

    2014-07-01

    The color-mediated thermoregulation hypothesis predicts that dark body color (low reflectance) allows organisms to gain heat more efficiently than does pale coloration (high reflectance). This prediction is intuitive and widely assumed to be true, but has poor empirical support. We used rare, captive-bred, mutant melanistic, albino and wild-type Australian bluetongue lizards, Tiliqua scincoides to measure the effects of skin reflectance on the heating and cooling rates. We measured heating under an artificial radiant heat source and cooling rates in an ice-cooled box using live lizards in a room with still air. The effect of skin reflectance on heat transfer was clear, despite the substantial influence of body size. Melanistic T. scincoides showed low reflectance and gained heat faster than highly reflective albinos. Melanistic lizards also lost heat faster than albinos. Wild-type lizards were intermediate in reflectance, gained heat at rates indistinguishable from melanistic lizards, and lost heat at rates indistinguishable from albino lizards. This study system allowed us to control for variables that were confounded in other studies and may explain the inconsistent support for the color-mediated thermoregulation hypothesis. Our results provide clear evidence that skin reflectance influences the rate of heating and cooling in ectotherms.

  19. Coloration affects heating and cooling in three color morphs of the Australian bluetongue lizard, Tiliqua scincoides.

    PubMed

    Geen, Michael R S; Johnston, Gregory R

    2014-07-01

    The color-mediated thermoregulation hypothesis predicts that dark body color (low reflectance) allows organisms to gain heat more efficiently than does pale coloration (high reflectance). This prediction is intuitive and widely assumed to be true, but has poor empirical support. We used rare, captive-bred, mutant melanistic, albino and wild-type Australian bluetongue lizards, Tiliqua scincoides to measure the effects of skin reflectance on the heating and cooling rates. We measured heating under an artificial radiant heat source and cooling rates in an ice-cooled box using live lizards in a room with still air. The effect of skin reflectance on heat transfer was clear, despite the substantial influence of body size. Melanistic T. scincoides showed low reflectance and gained heat faster than highly reflective albinos. Melanistic lizards also lost heat faster than albinos. Wild-type lizards were intermediate in reflectance, gained heat at rates indistinguishable from melanistic lizards, and lost heat at rates indistinguishable from albino lizards. This study system allowed us to control for variables that were confounded in other studies and may explain the inconsistent support for the color-mediated thermoregulation hypothesis. Our results provide clear evidence that skin reflectance influences the rate of heating and cooling in ectotherms. PMID:24956958

  20. Effects of Heat Stress on the Well-Being, Fertility, and Hatchability of Chickens in the Northern Guinea Savannah Zone of Nigeria: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ayo, J. O.; Obidi, J. A.; Rekwot, P. I.

    2011-01-01

    The paper examines heat stress and its adverse effects as a hindrance to profitable poultry production in the tropics, with emphasis on the Northern Guinea Savannah zone of Nigeria. It elucidates the general negative effects of heat stress on physiological parameters of domestic chickens, and the specific impact of the stress on reproduction in the tropics. The deleterious effects are expressed in poor poultry well-being and reproductive performance. It is concluded that measures aimed at alleviating heat stress in domestic chickens must be adopted in order to enhance reproductive and, consequently, efficiency of modern poultry production in the tropics. PMID:23738109

  1. Factors affecting the optimization of the Stirling cycle for use as a heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Scaringe, R.P.

    1983-11-01

    This report discusses the effects of variations of the phase-angle, cylinder volumes, dead space, cylinder heat transfer, working fluid, and temperature on capacity and performance of a Stirling cycle heat pump through the use of a relatively simple computer model. Shortcomings in predicting the coefficient of performance for heating (COP /SUB H/ ) via ideal analysis are identified. A comparison of the simulated COP /SUB H/ with experimental data is presented for one particular nonoptimum machine.

  2. Recovery of Heat Treated Bacillus cereus Spores Is Affected by Matrix Composition and Factors with Putative Functions in Damage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Warda, Alicja K.; Tempelaars, Marcel H.; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja N.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of spores to recover and grow out after food processing is affected by cellular factors and by the outgrowth conditions. In the current communication we studied the recovery and outgrowth of individually sorted spores in BHI and rice broth media and on agar plates using flow cytometry. We show that recovery of wet heat treated Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores is affected by matrix composition with highest recovery in BHI broth or on rice agar plates, compared to BHI agar plates and rice broth. Data show that not only media composition but also its liquid or solid state affect the recovery of heat treated spores. To determine the impact of factors with putative roles in recovery of heat treated spores, specific genes previously shown to be highly expressed in outgrowing heat-treated spores were selected for mutant construction. Spores of nine B. cereus ATCC 14579 deletion mutants were obtained and their recovery from wet heat treatment was evaluated using BHI and rice broth and agar plates. Deletion mutant spores showed different capacity to recover from heat treatment compared to wild type with the most pronounced effect for a mutant lacking BC5242, a gene encoding a membrane protein with C2C2 zinc finger which resulted in over 95% reduction in recovery compared to the wild type in BHI broth. Notably, similar relative performance of wild type and mutants was observed using the other recovery conditions. We obtained insights on the impact of matrix composition and state on recovery of individually sorted heat treated spores and identified cellular factors with putative roles in this process. These results may provide leads for future developments in design of more efficient combined preservation treatments. PMID:27486443

  3. Recovery of Heat Treated Bacillus cereus Spores Is Affected by Matrix Composition and Factors with Putative Functions in Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Warda, Alicja K; Tempelaars, Marcel H; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja N

    2016-01-01

    The ability of spores to recover and grow out after food processing is affected by cellular factors and by the outgrowth conditions. In the current communication we studied the recovery and outgrowth of individually sorted spores in BHI and rice broth media and on agar plates using flow cytometry. We show that recovery of wet heat treated Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores is affected by matrix composition with highest recovery in BHI broth or on rice agar plates, compared to BHI agar plates and rice broth. Data show that not only media composition but also its liquid or solid state affect the recovery of heat treated spores. To determine the impact of factors with putative roles in recovery of heat treated spores, specific genes previously shown to be highly expressed in outgrowing heat-treated spores were selected for mutant construction. Spores of nine B. cereus ATCC 14579 deletion mutants were obtained and their recovery from wet heat treatment was evaluated using BHI and rice broth and agar plates. Deletion mutant spores showed different capacity to recover from heat treatment compared to wild type with the most pronounced effect for a mutant lacking BC5242, a gene encoding a membrane protein with C2C2 zinc finger which resulted in over 95% reduction in recovery compared to the wild type in BHI broth. Notably, similar relative performance of wild type and mutants was observed using the other recovery conditions. We obtained insights on the impact of matrix composition and state on recovery of individually sorted heat treated spores and identified cellular factors with putative roles in this process. These results may provide leads for future developments in design of more efficient combined preservation treatments.

  4. Recovery of Heat Treated Bacillus cereus Spores Is Affected by Matrix Composition and Factors with Putative Functions in Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Warda, Alicja K; Tempelaars, Marcel H; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja N

    2016-01-01

    The ability of spores to recover and grow out after food processing is affected by cellular factors and by the outgrowth conditions. In the current communication we studied the recovery and outgrowth of individually sorted spores in BHI and rice broth media and on agar plates using flow cytometry. We show that recovery of wet heat treated Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores is affected by matrix composition with highest recovery in BHI broth or on rice agar plates, compared to BHI agar plates and rice broth. Data show that not only media composition but also its liquid or solid state affect the recovery of heat treated spores. To determine the impact of factors with putative roles in recovery of heat treated spores, specific genes previously shown to be highly expressed in outgrowing heat-treated spores were selected for mutant construction. Spores of nine B. cereus ATCC 14579 deletion mutants were obtained and their recovery from wet heat treatment was evaluated using BHI and rice broth and agar plates. Deletion mutant spores showed different capacity to recover from heat treatment compared to wild type with the most pronounced effect for a mutant lacking BC5242, a gene encoding a membrane protein with C2C2 zinc finger which resulted in over 95% reduction in recovery compared to the wild type in BHI broth. Notably, similar relative performance of wild type and mutants was observed using the other recovery conditions. We obtained insights on the impact of matrix composition and state on recovery of individually sorted heat treated spores and identified cellular factors with putative roles in this process. These results may provide leads for future developments in design of more efficient combined preservation treatments. PMID:27486443

  5. Reproductive period affects water intake in heat-stressed dehydrated goats.

    PubMed

    Olsson, K; Josäter-Hermelin, M; Hossaini-Hilali, J; Cvek, K; Hydbring, E; Dahlborn, K

    1996-04-01

    Water intake following dehydration was studied in pregnant (N = 5), lactating (N = 4) and nonpregnant, nonlactating (N = 5) Swedish domestic goats (Capra hircus) to investigate if reproductive period affected drinking. Plasma cortisol concentration and the hematocrit value were measured to evaluate stress. The goats were water deprived from 9.00 h until 15.05 h the next day. They were fed at 7.00 and 15.20 h. On the second day, ambient temperature was increased from 20 degrees C to 38-39.5 degrees C for 5.15 h to accelerate water losses. Water temperature during rehydration was 35 +/- 1 degree C. Plasma Na concentration and osmolality increased most in dehydrated and heat-stressed pregnant and lactating goats. Pregnant goats lost 2.2 kg of their body weight. They drank 3.5 l immediately, followed by 2.5 l during afternoon eating. Lactating goats lost 4.9 kg and drank 6.3 l at once, and 3.9 l during feeding. Nonpregnant, nonlactating goats lost 1.7 kg and drank 2.6 l followed by 0.6 l. The large water consumption in pregnant and lactating goats caused hyponatremia and hemodilution, but they continued to drink during the night (0.5 +/- 0.2 l and 0.8 +/- 0.5 l, respectively). Renal free water clearance increased in all periods, with a long-lasting water diuresis during pregnancy. Plasma cortisol concentrations and the hematocrit values rose in connection with water intake. These results imply that the thirst center became less sensitive to inhibitory signals from the oropharyngeal tract and the diluted blood plasma during pregnancy and lactation. Catching sight of water was the most exciting procedure during these experiments.

  6. Pre-natal heat load affects bacterial levels and innate immunity in neonatal calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress suppresses immunity, making animals more susceptible to bacterial infections. Additionally, field observations suggest that calves have greater morbidity and mortality when they are born after a heat event. However, scientific evidence is still lacking, limiting the development of target...

  7. Influence of gravitational and vibrational convection on the heat- and mass transfer in the melt during crystal growing by Bridgman and floating zone methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Oleg

    2016-07-01

    Space materials science is one of the priorities of different national and international space programs. The physical processes of heat and mass transfer in microgravity (including effect of g-jitter) is far from complete clarity, especially for important practical technology for producing crystals from the melt. The idea of the impact on crystallizing melt by low frequency vibration includes not only the possibility to suppress unwanted microaccelerations, but also to actively influence the structure of the crystallization front. This approach is one of the most effective ways to influence the quality of materials produced in flight conditions. The subject of this work is the effect of vibrations on the thermal and hydrodynamic processes during crystal growth using Bridgman and floating zone techniques, which have the greatest prospect of practical application in space. In the present approach we consider the gravitational convection, Marangoni convection, as well as the effect of vibration on the melt for some special cases. The results of simulation were compared with some experimental data obtained by the authors using a transparent model substance - succinonitrile (Bridgman method), and silicon (floating zone method). Substances used, process parameters and characteristics of the experimental units correspond the equipment developed for onboard research and serve as a basis for selecting optimum conditions vibration exposure as a factor affecting the solidification pattern. The direction of imposing vibrations coincides with the axis of the crystal, the frequency is presented by the harmonic law, and the force of gravity was varied by changing its absolute value. Mathematical model considered axisymmetric approximation of joint convective-conductive energy transfer in the system crystal - melt. Upon application of low-frequency oscillations of small amplitude along the axis of growing it was found the suppression of the secondary vortex flows near the

  8. Utility of Bromide and Heat Tracers for Aquifer Characterization Affected by Highly Transient Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Zachara, John M.; Tonkin, Matthew J.

    2012-08-29

    A tracer test using both bromide and heat tracers conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Hanford 300 Area (300A), Washington, provided an instrument for evaluating the utility of bromide and heat tracers for aquifer characterization. The bromide tracer data were critical to improving the calibration of the flow model complicated by the highly dynamic nature of the flow field. However, most bromide concentrations were obtained from fully screened observation wells, lacking depth-specific resolution for vertical characterization. On the other hand, depth-specific temperature data were relatively simple and inexpensive to acquire. However, temperature-driven fluid density effects influenced heat plume movement. Moreover, the temperature data contained “noise” caused by heating during fluid injection and sampling events. Using the hydraulic conductivity distribution obtained from the calibration of the bromide transport model, the temperature depth profiles and arrival times of temperature peaks simulated by the heat transport model were in reasonable agreement with observations. This suggested that heat can be used as a cost-effective proxy for solute tracers for calibration of the hydraulic conductivity distribution, especially in the vertical direction. However, a heat tracer test must be carefully designed and executed to minimize fluid density effects and sources of noise in temperature data. A sensitivity analysis also revealed that heat transport was most sensitive to hydraulic conductivity and porosity, less sensitive to thermal distribution factor, and least sensitive to thermal dispersion and heat conduction. This indicated that the hydraulic conductivity remains the primary calibration parameter for heat transport.

  9. Three-dimensional simulation and analysis of heat transfer and flow field in micro-floating zone of LHPG with asymmetrical perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng-Yi; Huang, En-Ping; Lo, Chia-Yao

    2012-12-01

    Under symmetrical conditions, the micro-floating zone of a laser-heated pedestal growth (LHPG) system displays a symmetrical double eddy flow field distribution. However, as the perturbation increases, the double eddy flow field distribution changes from symmetry to tilt, resulting in unstable flow field vibration. This study investigated the influence of the molten zone on the shape (at vapor-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces) and flow field distribution resulting from tilting the CO2 laser heating ring and the gravity field. This tilt is caused by spatial perturbations resulting from mounting the source rod and seed on pedestals with an alignment that slightly deviates from the growth axis of the LHPG system. The feasibility of growing crystal fibers using the micro-floating zone of the LHPG in the horizontal plane was further investigated. After selecting YAG as the growth material, we evaluated various reduction ratios, source rod scales, surface tensions, and thermocapillary coefficients for the two types of perturbation. Deviation in the laser heating ring significantly influenced the solid-liquid interface and the symmetry of the flow field in the molten zone. However, as long as the laser heating ring remained close to symmetrical, the influence on the molten zone of the larger deviation in the gravity field was limited. Therefore, growing crystal fibers using the micro-floating zone of the LHPG system in the horizontal plane is possible for materials that possess the correct physical properties at appropriate source rod scales. The three-dimensional simulation of this asymmetry includes the effects of the diameter reduction ratio and laser heating, and also modifies Lan's thermocapillary floating numerical model. The modified model calculates the physical grid through a non-orthogonal body-fitting grid transformation using the control-volume finite-difference method. To enhance the simulation and represent the physical system more accurately, we compared

  10. Contents and toxicity of heavy metals in soils of the zone affected by aerial emissions from the Severonikel Enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evdokimova, G. A.; Kalabin, G. V.; Mozgova, N. P.

    2011-02-01

    In 2009, the zoning of the terrestrial ecosystems in the area exposed to aerial emissions from the Severonikel Enterprise (Murmansk oblast) was performed on the basis of the parameters characterizing the state of the soils, including the contents of the main heavy metal pollutants and exchangeable calcium and magnesium, the soils' pH, the ratio of the organic to mineral soil components, and the state of the soils' microbiota. Three zones differing in the degree of the soil pollution were delimited. These were the zones of heavy, moderate, and weak pollution, which extended for up to 3, 25, and 50 km from the emission source in the prevailing wind direction. The data on the amount of bacterial and fungal biomass provided evidence of the profound degradation of the soils in the heavily polluted zone. In particular, the biomass of the soil microbiota, including its prokaryotic and eukaryotic components, was two to six times lower in this zone than in the background (control) area. The soils of the heavily polluted zone can be classified as strongly toxic for plants, and most of the soils of the moderately polluted zone also fall into the same category.

  11. Oligonol supplementation affects leukocyte and immune cell counts after heat loading in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Beom; Shin, Young Oh

    2014-06-24

    Oligonol is a low-molecular-weight form of polyphenol and has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, making it a potential promoter of immunity. This study investigates the effects of oligonol supplementation on leukocyte and immune cell counts after heat loading in 19 healthy male volunteers. The participants took a daily dose of 200 mg oligonol or a placebo for 1 week. After a 2-week washout period, the subjects were switched to the other study arm. After each supplement, half-body immersion into hot water was made, and blood was collected. Then, complete and differential blood counts were performed. Flow cytometry was used to enumerate and phenotype lymphocyte subsets. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in blood samples were analyzed. Lymphocyte subpopulation variables included counts of total T cells, B cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. Oligonol intake attenuated elevations in IL-1β (an 11.1-fold change vs. a 13.9-fold change immediately after heating; a 12.0-fold change vs. a 12.6-fold change 1h after heating) and IL-6 (an 8.6-fold change vs. a 9.9-fold change immediately after heating; a 9.1-fold change vs. a 10.5-fold change 1h after heating) immediately and 1 h after heating in comparison to those in the placebo group. Oligonol supplementation led to significantly higher numbers of leukocytes (a 30.0% change vs. a 21.5% change immediately after heating; a 13.5% change vs. a 3.5% change 1h after heating) and lymphocytes (a 47.3% change vs. a 39.3% change immediately after heating; a 19.08% change vs. a 2.1% change 1h after heating) relative to those in the placebo group. Oligonol intake led to larger increases in T cells, B cells, and NK cells at rest (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, and p < 0.001, respectively) and immediately after heating (p < 0.001) in comparison to those in the placebo group. In addition, levels of T cells (p < 0.001) and B cells (p < 0.001) were significantly higher 1 h after heating in comparison to those in the

  12. Characterization of 4H <000-1> Silicon Carbide Films Grown by Solvent-Laser Heated Floating Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth, Andrew, A; Sayir, Ali; Neudeck, Philip, G; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Commercially available bulk silicon carbide (SiC) has a high number (>2000/sq cm) of screw dislocations (SD) that have been linked to degradation of high-field power device electrical performance properties. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have proposed a method to mass-produce significantly higher quality bulk SiC. In order for this bulk growth method to become reality, growth of long single crystal SiC fibers must first be achieved. Therefore, a new growth method, Solvent-Laser Heated Floating Zone (Solvent-LHFZ), has been implemented. While some of the initial Solvent-LHFZ results have recently been reported, this paper focuses on further characterization of grown crystals and their growth fronts. To this end, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profiles, cross section analysis by focused ion beam (FIB) milling and mechanical polishing, and orientation and structural characterization by x-ray transmission Laue diffraction patterns and x-ray topography were used. Results paint a picture of a chaotic growth front, with Fe incorporation dependant on C concentration.

  13. Crustal structure, heat flux and mass transfer within a continental back-arc basin: Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, T. A.; Benson, A.; Greve, A.

    2012-12-01

    New seismic crustal structure data combined with gravity analysis provide constraints on mass and heat transfer processes in a continental back-arc basin. A recent high resolution seismic refraction, wide-angle experiment across the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand, shows the lower crust is dominated by a ~ 10 km thick, lozenge-shaped body with seismic P-wave velocities of 6.8-7.1 km/s. Seismic reflections define the top and bottom surface of the body at depths of ~ 15 and 25 km, respectively. This "rift-pillow" we interpret as a mafic under-plate that will be in various stages of cooling. Heat fluxes from the TVZ at a rate of about 4GW, and the area is extending at a rate of 10-16 mm/y. To sustain 4GW in steady state for this extension rate requires the continuous intrusion, then cooling, of a molten -layer about 10-15 km thick. Thus the rift pillow is likely to be the main source of heat and rhyolite volcanism that dominates the surface processes within the TVZ. On the southeastern margin of the TVZ lies the active volcanic arc of andesite and dacitic volcanoes. Directly beneath the arc at a depth of ~ 32 km we detect a bright seismic reflection of limited lateral extent (~ 18 km wide). The relative amplitude and negative phase of this reflection suggests a melt body of unknown thickness. We relate this melt body to corner of an upwelling of the mantle asthenosphere, which feeds the primary melts into the active volcanic arc, and also may supply melt to rift pillow structure in the central TVZ. Gravity anomalies across the central North Island are dominated by a long wavelength signal related to subduction. We remove this regional effect with 2-way, third-order polynomial to leave a residual that is largely due to the rifting process in the back arc basin. The residual signal has a classical rift signature of a central low of -55 mgals and gravity highs of about +10 mgals over the flanks of the TVZ. Using the detailed seismic data as a constraint we account

  14. BAG3 affects the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HSF1 upon heat stress

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Young-Hee; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Kim, Soo-A.

    2015-08-21

    Bcl2-associated athoanogene (BAG) 3 is a member of the co-chaperone BAG family. It is induced by stressful stimuli such as heat shock and heavy metals, and it regulates cellular adaptive responses against stressful conditions. In this study, we identified a novel role for BAG3 in regulating the nuclear shuttling of HSF1 during heat stress. The expression level of BAG3 was induced by heat stress in HeLa cells. Interestingly, BAG3 rapidly translocalized to the nucleus upon heat stress. Immunoprecipitation assay showed that BAG3 interacts with HSF1 under normal and stressed conditions and co-translocalizes to the nucleus upon heat stress. We also demonstrated that BAG3 interacts with HSF1 via its BAG domain. Over-expression of BAG3 down-regulates the level of nuclear HSF1 by exporting it to the cytoplasm during the recovery period. Depletion of BAG3 using siRNA results in reduced nuclear HSF1 and decreased Hsp70 promoter activity. BAG3 in MEF(hsf1{sup −/−}) cells actively translocalizes to the nucleus upon heat stress suggesting that BAG3 plays a key role in the processing of the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HSF1 upon heat stress. - Highlights: • The expression level of BAG3 is induced by heat stress. • BAG3 translocates to the nucleus upon heat stress. • BAG3 interacts with HSF1 and co-localizes to the nucleus. • BAG3 is a key regulator for HSF1 nuclear shuttling.

  15. Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting surimi as affected by nano-scaled fish bone and heating rates.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; Park, Jae W

    2015-08-01

    Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting (PW) surimi were investigated at various heating rates with the use of nano-scaled fish bone (NFB) and calcium chloride. Addition of NFB and slow heating improved gel strength significantly. Activity of endogenous transglutaminase (ETGase) from PW surimi was markedly induced by both NFB calcium and calcium chloride, showing an optimal temperature at 30°C. Initial storage modulus increased as NFB calcium concentration increased and the same trend was maintained throughout the temperature sweep. Rheograms with temperature sweep at slow heating rate (1°C/min) exhibited two peaks at ∼ 35°C and ∼ 70°C. However, no peak was observed during temperature sweep from 20 to 90°C at fast heating rate (20°C/min). Protein patterns of surimi gels were affected by both heating rate and NFB calcium concentration. Under slow heating, myosin heavy chain intensity decreased with NFB calcium concentration, indicating formation of ε-(γ-glutamyl) lysine cross-links by ETGase and NFB calcium ion.

  16. Exploring systems affected by the heat shock response in Plasmodium falciparum via protein association networks

    PubMed Central

    Lilburn, Timothy G.; Cai, Hong; Gu, Jianying; Zhou, Zhan; Wang, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    The heat shock response is a general mechanism by which organisms deal with physical insults such as sudden changes in temperature, osmotic and oxidative stresses, and exposure to toxic substances. Plasmodium falciparum is exposed to drastic temperature changes as a part of its life cycle and maintains an extensive repertoire of heat shock response-related proteins. As these proteins serve to maintain the parasite in the face of anti-malarial drugs as well, better understanding of the heat shock-related systems in the malaria parasite will lead to therapeutic approaches that frustrate these systems, leading to more effective use of anti-malarials. Here we use protein association networks to broaden our understanding of the systems impacted by and/or implicated in the heat shock response. PMID:25539848

  17. Rapid heating of Alaska pollock and chicken breast myofibrillar proteins as affecting gel rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjie; Stevenson, Clint D; Lanier, Tyre C

    2013-07-01

    Surimi seafoods (fish/poikilotherm protein) in the U.S.A. are typically cooked rapidly to 90+°C, while comminuted products made from land animals (meat/homeotherm protein) are purposely cooked much more slowly, and to lower endpoint temperatures (near 70 °C). We studied heating rate (0.5, 25, or 90 °C/min) and endpoint temperature (45 to 90 °C) effects on rheological properties (fracture, small strain) of washed myofibril gels derived from fish (Alaska pollock) compared with chicken breast at a common pH (6.75). This was contrasted with published data on gelation kinetics of chicken myosin over the same temperature range. Heating rate had no effect on fracture properties of fish gels but slow heating did yield somewhat stronger, but not more deformable, chicken gels. Maximum gel strength by rapid heating could be achieved within 5 min holding after less than 1 min heating time. Dynamic testing by small strain revealed poor correspondence of the present data to that published for gelling response of chicken breast myosin in the same temperature range. The common practice of reporting small-strain rheological parameters measured at the endpoint temperature was also shown to be misleading, since upon cooling, there was much less difference in rigidity between rapidly and slowly heated gels for either species.

  18. Rapid heating of Alaska pollock and chicken breast myofibrillar proteins as affecting gel rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjie; Stevenson, Clint D; Lanier, Tyre C

    2013-07-01

    Surimi seafoods (fish/poikilotherm protein) in the U.S.A. are typically cooked rapidly to 90+°C, while comminuted products made from land animals (meat/homeotherm protein) are purposely cooked much more slowly, and to lower endpoint temperatures (near 70 °C). We studied heating rate (0.5, 25, or 90 °C/min) and endpoint temperature (45 to 90 °C) effects on rheological properties (fracture, small strain) of washed myofibril gels derived from fish (Alaska pollock) compared with chicken breast at a common pH (6.75). This was contrasted with published data on gelation kinetics of chicken myosin over the same temperature range. Heating rate had no effect on fracture properties of fish gels but slow heating did yield somewhat stronger, but not more deformable, chicken gels. Maximum gel strength by rapid heating could be achieved within 5 min holding after less than 1 min heating time. Dynamic testing by small strain revealed poor correspondence of the present data to that published for gelling response of chicken breast myosin in the same temperature range. The common practice of reporting small-strain rheological parameters measured at the endpoint temperature was also shown to be misleading, since upon cooling, there was much less difference in rigidity between rapidly and slowly heated gels for either species. PMID:23646872

  19. Mortality during a Large-Scale Heat Wave by Place, Demographic Group, Internal and External Causes of Death, and Building Climate Zone

    PubMed Central

    Joe, Lauren; Hoshiko, Sumi; Dobraca, Dina; Jackson, Rebecca; Smorodinsky, Svetlana; Smith, Daniel; Harnly, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Mortality increases during periods of elevated heat. Identification of vulnerable subgroups by demographics, causes of death, and geographic regions, including deaths occurring at home, is needed to inform public health prevention efforts. We calculated mortality relative risks (RRs) and excess deaths associated with a large-scale California heat wave in 2006, comparing deaths during the heat wave with reference days. For total (all-place) and at-home mortality, we examined risks by demographic factors, internal and external causes of death, and building climate zones. During the heat wave, 582 excess deaths occurred, a 5% increase over expected (RR = 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03–1.08). Sixty-six percent of excess deaths were at home (RR = 1.12, CI 1.07–1.16). Total mortality risk was higher among those aged 35–44 years than ≥65, and among Hispanics than whites. Deaths from external causes increased more sharply (RR = 1.18, CI 1.10–1.27) than from internal causes (RR = 1.04, CI 1.02–1.07). Geographically, risk varied by building climate zone; the highest risks of at-home death occurred in the northernmost coastal zone (RR = 1.58, CI 1.01–2.48) and the southernmost zone of California’s Central Valley (RR = 1.43, CI 1.21–1.68). Heat wave mortality risk varied across subpopulations, and some patterns of vulnerability differed from those previously identified. Public health efforts should also address at-home mortality, non-elderly adults, external causes, and at-risk geographic regions. PMID:27005646

  20. Mortality during a Large-Scale Heat Wave by Place, Demographic Group, Internal and External Causes of Death, and Building Climate Zone.

    PubMed

    Joe, Lauren; Hoshiko, Sumi; Dobraca, Dina; Jackson, Rebecca; Smorodinsky, Svetlana; Smith, Daniel; Harnly, Martha

    2016-03-09

    Mortality increases during periods of elevated heat. Identification of vulnerable subgroups by demographics, causes of death, and geographic regions, including deaths occurring at home, is needed to inform public health prevention efforts. We calculated mortality relative risks (RRs) and excess deaths associated with a large-scale California heat wave in 2006, comparing deaths during the heat wave with reference days. For total (all-place) and at-home mortality, we examined risks by demographic factors, internal and external causes of death, and building climate zones. During the heat wave, 582 excess deaths occurred, a 5% increase over expected (RR = 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.08). Sixty-six percent of excess deaths were at home (RR = 1.12, CI 1.07-1.16). Total mortality risk was higher among those aged 35-44 years than ≥ 65, and among Hispanics than whites. Deaths from external causes increased more sharply (RR = 1.18, CI 1.10-1.27) than from internal causes (RR = 1.04, CI 1.02-1.07). Geographically, risk varied by building climate zone; the highest risks of at-home death occurred in the northernmost coastal zone (RR = 1.58, CI 1.01-2.48) and the southernmost zone of California's Central Valley (RR = 1.43, CI 1.21-1.68). Heat wave mortality risk varied across subpopulations, and some patterns of vulnerability differed from those previously identified. Public health efforts should also address at-home mortality, non-elderly adults, external causes, and at-risk geographic regions.

  1. Promoting protection against a threat that evokes positive affect: The case of heat waves in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Bruine de Bruin, Wändi; Lefevre, Carmen E; Taylor, Andrea L; Dessai, Suraje; Fischhoff, Baruch; Kovats, Sari

    2016-09-01

    Heat waves can cause death, illness, and discomfort, and are expected to become more frequent as a result of climate change. Yet, United Kingdom residents have positive feelings about hot summers that may undermine their willingness to protect themselves against heat. We randomly assigned United Kingdom participants to 1 of 3 intervention strategies intended to promote heat protection, or to a control group. The first strategy aimed to build on the availability heuristic by asking participants to remember high summer temperatures, but it elicited thoughts of pleasantly hot summer weather. The second strategy aimed to build on the affect heuristic by evoking negative affect about summer temperatures, but it evoked thoughts of unpleasantly cold summer weather. The third strategy combined these 2 approaches and succeeded in evoking thoughts of unpleasantly hot summer weather. Across 2 experiments, the third (combined) strategy increased participants' expressed intentions to protect against heat compared with the control group, while performing at least as well as the 2 component strategies. We discuss implications for developing interventions about other "pleasant hazards." (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Promoting Protection Against a Threat That Evokes Positive Affect: The Case of Heat Waves in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heat waves can cause death, illness, and discomfort, and are expected to become more frequent as a result of climate change. Yet, United Kingdom residents have positive feelings about hot summers that may undermine their willingness to protect themselves against heat. We randomly assigned United Kingdom participants to 1 of 3 intervention strategies intended to promote heat protection, or to a control group. The first strategy aimed to build on the availability heuristic by asking participants to remember high summer temperatures, but it elicited thoughts of pleasantly hot summer weather. The second strategy aimed to build on the affect heuristic by evoking negative affect about summer temperatures, but it evoked thoughts of unpleasantly cold summer weather. The third strategy combined these 2 approaches and succeeded in evoking thoughts of unpleasantly hot summer weather. Across 2 experiments, the third (combined) strategy increased participants’ expressed intentions to protect against heat compared with the control group, while performing at least as well as the 2 component strategies. We discuss implications for developing interventions about other “pleasant hazards.” PMID:27268282

  3. Promoting protection against a threat that evokes positive affect: The case of heat waves in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Bruine de Bruin, Wändi; Lefevre, Carmen E; Taylor, Andrea L; Dessai, Suraje; Fischhoff, Baruch; Kovats, Sari

    2016-09-01

    Heat waves can cause death, illness, and discomfort, and are expected to become more frequent as a result of climate change. Yet, United Kingdom residents have positive feelings about hot summers that may undermine their willingness to protect themselves against heat. We randomly assigned United Kingdom participants to 1 of 3 intervention strategies intended to promote heat protection, or to a control group. The first strategy aimed to build on the availability heuristic by asking participants to remember high summer temperatures, but it elicited thoughts of pleasantly hot summer weather. The second strategy aimed to build on the affect heuristic by evoking negative affect about summer temperatures, but it evoked thoughts of unpleasantly cold summer weather. The third strategy combined these 2 approaches and succeeded in evoking thoughts of unpleasantly hot summer weather. Across 2 experiments, the third (combined) strategy increased participants' expressed intentions to protect against heat compared with the control group, while performing at least as well as the 2 component strategies. We discuss implications for developing interventions about other "pleasant hazards." (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27268282

  4. Probability of US Heat Waves Affected by a Subseasonal Planetary Wave Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Haiyan; Branstator, Grant; Wang, Hailan; Meehl, Gerald A.; Washington, Warren M.

    2013-01-01

    Heat waves are thought to result from subseasonal atmospheric variability. Atmospheric phenomena driven by tropical convection, such as the Asian monsoon, have been considered potential sources of predictability on subseasonal timescales. Mid-latitude atmospheric dynamics have been considered too chaotic to allow significant prediction skill of lead times beyond the typical 10-day range of weather forecasts. Here we use a 12,000-year integration of an atmospheric general circulation model to identify a pattern of subseasonal atmospheric variability that can help improve forecast skill for heat waves in the United States. We find that heat waves tend to be preceded by 15-20 days by a pattern of anomalous atmospheric planetary waves with a wavenumber of 5. This circulation pattern can arise as a result of internal atmospheric dynamics and is not necessarily linked to tropical heating.We conclude that some mid-latitude circulation anomalies that increase the probability of heat waves are predictable beyond the typical weather forecast range.

  5. Simulated heat waves affected alpine grassland only in combination with drought.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Hans J; Bassin, Seraina; Verlinden, Maya; Zeiter, Michaela; Hiltbrunner, Erika

    2016-01-01

    The Alpine region is warming fast, and concurrently, the frequency and intensity of climate extremes are increasing. It is currently unclear whether alpine ecosystems are sensitive or resistant to such extremes. We subjected Swiss alpine grassland communities to heat waves with varying intensity by transplanting monoliths to four different elevations (2440-660 m above sea level) for 17 d. Half of these were regularly irrigated while the other half were deprived of irrigation to additionally induce a drought at each site. Heat waves had no significant impacts on fluorescence (Fv /Fm , a stress indicator), senescence and aboveground productivity if irrigation was provided. However, when heat waves coincided with drought, the plants showed clear signs of stress, resulting in vegetation browning and reduced phytomass production. This likely resulted from direct drought effects, but also, as measurements of stomatal conductance and canopy temperatures suggest, from increased high-temperature stress as water scarcity decreased heat mitigation through transpiration. The immediate responses to heat waves (with or without droughts) recorded in these alpine grasslands were similar to those observed in the more extensively studied grasslands from temperate climates. Responses following climate extremes may differ in alpine environments, however, because the short growing season likely constrains recovery.

  6. Simulated heat waves affected alpine grassland only in combination with drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Boeck, Hans J.; Bassin, Seraina; Verlinden, Maya; Zeiter, Michaela; Hiltbrunner, Erika

    2016-04-01

    The Alpine region is warming fast, leading to an increase in the frequency and intensity of climate extremes. Currently, it is unclear whether alpine ecosystems are sensitive or resistant to such extremes. In an experiment carried out in the Swiss Alps, we subjected Swiss alpine grassland communities to heat waves with varying intensity (5-10 °C warming) by transplanting monoliths to four different elevations (2440-660 m a.s.l.) for 17 days. Half of the monoliths were regularly irrigated while the other half were deprived of irrigation to additionally induce a drought at each site. We found that heat waves had no significant short-term impacts on fluorescence (Fv/Fm, a stress indicator), senescence and aboveground productivity if irrigation was provided. However, when heat waves coincided with drought, plants showed clear signs of stress, resulting in vegetation browning and reduced phytomass production. This likely resulted from direct drought effects, but also, as measurements of stomatal conductance and canopy temperatures suggest, from increased high-temperature stress as water scarcity decreased heat mitigation through transpiration. The immediate responses to heat waves (with or without droughts) recorded in these alpine grasslands were similar to those observed in the more extensively studied grasslands from temperate climates. Climate extreme impacts may differ in the longer run, however, because the short growing season in alpine environments likely constrains recovery.

  7. Fault zone architecture of the San Jacinto fault zone in Horse Canyon, southern California: A model for focused post-seismic fluid flow and heat transfer in the shallow crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Nissa; Girty, Gary H.; Rockwell, Thomas K.

    2012-05-01

    We report results of a new study of the architecture of the San Jacinto fault zone in Horse Canyon, California, where stream incision has exposed a nearly continuous outcrop of the fault zone at ~ 0.4 km depth. The fault zone at this location consists of a fault core, transition zone, damage zone, and tonalitic wall rocks. We collected and analyzed samples for their bulk and grain density, geochemical data, clay mineralogy, and textural and modal mineralogy. Progressive deformation within the fault zone is characterized by mode I cracking, subsequent shearing of already fractured rock, and cataclastic flow. Grain comminution advances towards the strongly indurated cataclasite fault core. Damage progression towards the core is accompanied by a decrease in bulk and grain density, and an increase in porosity and dilational volumetric strain. Palygorskite and mixed-layer illite/smectite clay minerals are present in the damage and transition zones and are the result of hydrolysis reactions. The estimated percentage of illite in illite/smectite increases towards the fault core where the illite/smectite to illite conversion is complete, suggesting elevated temperatures that may have reached 150 °C. Chemical alteration and elemental mass changes are observed throughout the fault zone and are most pronounced in the fault core. We conclude that the observed chemical and mineralogical changes can only be produced by the interaction of fractured wall rocks and chemically active fluids that are mobilized through the fault zone by thermo-pressurization during and after seismic events. Based on the high element mobility and absence of illite/smectite in the fault core, we expect that the greatest water/rock ratios occur within the fault core. These results indicate that hot pore fluids circulate upwards through the fractured fault core and into the surrounding damage zone. Though difficult to constrain, we speculate that the site studied during this investigation may represent

  8. Aggregate-cement paste transition zone properties affecting the salt-frost damage of high-performance concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Cwirzen, Andrzej; Penttala, Vesa

    2005-04-01

    The influence of the cement paste-aggregate interfacial transition zone (ITZ) on the frost durability of high-performance silica fume concrete (HPSFC) has been studied. Investigation was carried out on eight non-air-entrained concretes having water-to-binder (W/B) ratios of 0.3, 0.35 and 0.42 and different additions of condensed silica fume. Studies on the microstructure and composition of the cement paste have been made by means of environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM)-BSE, ESEM-EDX and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) analysis. The results showed that the transition zone initiates and accelerates damaging mechanisms by enhancing movement of the pore solution within the concrete during freezing and thawing cycles. Cracks filled with ettringite were primarily formed in the ITZ. The test concretes having good frost-deicing salt durability featured a narrow transition zone and a decreased Ca/Si atomic ratio in the transition zone compared to the bulk cement paste. Moderate additions of silica fume seemed to densify the microstructure of the ITZ.

  9. The pentosidine concentration in human blood specimens is affected by heating.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masako; Kubota, Midori; Owada, Shigeru; Nagai, Ryoji

    2013-06-01

    Pentosidine is an advanced glycation end product, formed by oxidation and glycation that accumulates markedly during end-stage renal failure. Measurement of the pentosidine level in physiological samples is applied as a sensitive marker for the early diagnosis of renal failure. In the quantitative measurements of pentosidine reported to date, a rapid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been widely used to estimate the plasma/serum pentosidine levels in a number of clinical samples, because high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods require multiple preparation steps before the analysis. However, the currently used clinical analysis of the plasma/serum pentosidine level by ELISA requires incubation of the plasma/serum at 100°C for 15 min to inactivate the protease, which is required before the anti-pentosidine antibody can bind to the pentosidine. In the present study, we examined whether pentosidine could be generated artificially through the heating of serum. The pentosidine content, measured by HPLC, in the serum increased by heating in a temperature- and time-dependent manner. The pentosidine content was increased 1.1- to 4.2-fold by the heating process compared to unheated samples, and the increased rate was not identical for each sample. After removing low-molecular weight (<10,000) serum components, the heat-induced pentosidine formation was decreased. Furthermore, the increase in pentosidine formation was significantly inhibited by acidic conditions more than by the addition of diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid, a metal chelator. This indicates that the level of serum pentosidine will be measured more accurately by ELISA if hydrochloric acid is added during the heating process.

  10. Heat exposure of Cannabis sativa extracts affects the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Martin; Spinedi, Luca; Unfer-Grauwiler, Sandra; Bodmer, Michael; Surber, Christian; Luedi, Markus; Drewe, Juergen

    2012-05-01

    The most important psychoactive constituent of CANNABIS SATIVA L. is Δ (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabidiol (CBD), another important constituent, is able to modulate the distinct unwanted psychotropic effect of THC. In natural plant extracts of C. SATIVA, large amounts of THC and CBD appear in the form of THCA-A (THC-acid-A) and CBDA (cannabidiolic acid), which can be transformed to THC and CBD by heating. Previous reports of medicinal use of cannabis or cannabis preparations with higher CBD/THC ratios and use in its natural, unheated form have demonstrated that pharmacological effects were often accompanied with a lower rate of adverse effects. Therefore, in the present study, the pharmacokinetics and metabolic profiles of two different C. SATIVA extracts (heated and unheated) with a CBD/THC ratio > 1 were compared to synthetic THC (dronabinol) in a double-blind, randomized, single center, three-period cross-over study involving 9 healthy male volunteers. The pharmacokinetics of the cannabinoids was highly variable. The metabolic pattern was significantly different after administration of the different forms: the heated extract showed a lower median THC plasma AUC (24 h) than the unheated extract of 2.84 vs. 6.59 pmol h/mL, respectively. The later was slightly higher than that of dronabinol (4.58 pmol h/mL). On the other hand, the median sum of the metabolites (THC, 11-OH-THC, THC-COOH, CBN) plasma AUC (24 h) was higher for the heated than for the unheated extract. The median CBD plasma AUC (24 h) was almost 2-fold higher for the unheated than for the heated extract. These results indicate that use of unheated extracts may lead to a beneficial change in metabolic pattern and possibly better tolerability.

  11. Dietary fat affects heat production and other variables of equine performance, under hot and humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Kronfeld, D S

    1996-07-01

    Does dietary fat supplementation during conditioning improve athletic performance, especially in the heat? Fat adaptation has been used to increase energy density, decrease bowel bulk and faecal output and reduce health risks associated with hydrolysable carbohydrate overload. It may also reduce spontaneous activity and reactivity (excitability), increase fatty acid oxidation, reduce CO2 production and associated acidosis, enhance metabolic regulation of glycolysis, improve both aerobic and anaerobic performance and substantially reduce heat production. A thermochemical analysis of ATP generation showed the least heat release during the direct oxidation of long chain fatty acids, which have a 3% advantage over glucose and 20 to 30% over short chain fatty acids and amino acids. Indirect oxidation via storage as triglyceride increased heat loss during ATP generation by 3% for stearic acid, 65% for glucose and 174% for acetic acid. Meal feeding and nutrient storage, therefore, accentuates the advantage of dietary fat. A calorimetric model was based on initial estimates of net energy for competitive work (10.76 MJ for the Endurance Test of an Olympic level 3-day-event), other work (14.4 MJ/day) and maintenance (36 MJ), then applied estimates of efficiencies to derive associated heat productions for the utilisation of 3 diets, Diet A: hay (100), Diet B: hay and oats (50:50) and Diet C: hay, oats and vegetable oil (45:45:10), the difference between the last 2 diets representing fat adaptation. During a 90.5 min speed and stamina test, heat production was estimated as 37, 35.4 and 34.6 MJ for the 3 diets, respectively, an advantage 0.8 MJ less heat load for the fat adapted horse, which would reduce water needed for evaporation by 0.33 kg and reduce body temperature increase by about 0.07 degree C. Total estimated daily heat production was 105, 93 and 88 MJ for the 3 diets, respectively, suggesting a 5 MJ advantage for the fat adapted horse (Diet C vs. Diet B). Estimated

  12. Are heat and cold resistance of arctic species affected by successive extreme temperature events?

    PubMed

    Marchand, F L; Kockelbergh, Fred; van de Vijver, Bart; Beyens, Louis; Nijs, I

    2006-01-01

    Extreme temperature events are projected to increase in frequency in a future climate. As successive extremes could occur more frequently, patches of vulnerable tundra vegetation were exposed to two consecutive heat waves (HWs) of 10 d each, with a 5-d recovery period in between. Surface temperatures during the HWs were increased approximately 6 degrees C using infrared irradiation sources. In three of the four target species (Pyrola grandiflora, Polygonum viviparum and Carex bigelowii), plant conditions improved upon the first exposure. Depending on species, leaf relative growth, leaf chlorophyll content or maximal photochemical efficiency was increased. In P. grandiflora the positive effects of the heat on the photosynthetic apparatus led to augmented net photosynthesis. By contrast, Salix arctica responded mainly negatively, indicating species-specific responses. During the second HW, leaf mortality suddenly increased, indicating that the heat stress induced by the extreme events lasted too long and negatively influenced the species resistance to high temperature. After the HWs, when plants were exposed to (low) ambient temperatures again, plant performance deteriorated further, indicating possible loss of cold resistance.

  13. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Marika M.; Landrum, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state. PMID:26032318

  14. Ground-water heat pumps: an examination of hydrogeologic, environmental, legal, and economic factors affecting their use

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, D M; Bacon, D J; Massey-Norton, J T; Miller, J M

    1980-11-12

    Factors affecting the use of ground water (well) are presented. First is the well cost and the availability of an adequate supply of suitable quality of well water. Second, the removal of significant quantities of well water without suitable recharge may deplete the underground aquifer. Plans to reinject or return the water underground may be precluded by legal restrictions. It could entail additional costs for the disposal well. Special provisions to prevent thermal alterations of the underground source may be required. These issues are addressed in the study and other questions are answered relating to ground-water quality and availability, potential environmental effects, legal restrictions, and energy use and economics of ground-water heat pump use. The main elements of the study and conclusions are summarized. Other topics briefly discussed are: ground-water resources in the US; water-source heat pump equipment; and energy use comparisons. Some data on heat pump use in Atlanta, Birmingham, Cleveland, Columbus, Concord, Houston, Philadelphia, Seattle, and Tulsa are tabulated and graphically presented. Data of ground water heat pump water use and effluent disposal regulations by states are summarized.

  15. Tomato growth as affected by root-zone temperature and the addition of gibberellic acid and kinetin to nutrient solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.; White, J. W.; Salisbury, F. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    The effect of root-zone temperature on young tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Heinz 1350) was evaluated in controlled environments using a recirculating solution culture system. Growth rates were measured at root-zone temperatures of 15 degrees, 20 degrees, 25 degrees, and 30 degrees C in a near optimum foliar environment. Optimum growth occurred at 25 degrees to 30 degrees during the first 4 weeks of growth and 20 degrees to 25 degrees during the 5th and 6th weeks. Growth was severely restricted at 15 degrees. Four concentrations of gibberellic acid (GA3) and kinetin were added to the nutrient solution in a separate trial; root-zone temperature was maintained at 15 degrees and 25 degrees. Addition of 15 micromoles GA3 to solutions increased specific leaf area, total leaf area, and dry weight production of plants in both temperature treatments. GA3-induced growth stimulation was greater at 15 degrees than at 25 degrees. GA3 may promote growth by increasing leaf area, enhancing photosynthesis per unit leaf area, or both. Kinetic was not useful in promoting growth at either temperature.

  16. Colloid formation and metal transport through two mixing zones affected by acid mine drainage near Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, L.E.; Kimball, B.A.; Bencala, K.E.

    2000-01-01

    Stream discharges and concentrations of dissolved and colloidal metals (Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Pb, and Zn), SO4, and dissolved silica were measured to identify chemical transformations and determine mass transports through two mixing zones in the Animas River that receive the inflows from Cement and Mineral Creeks. The creeks were the dominant sources of Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb, whereas the upstream Animas River supplied about half of the Zn. With the exception of Fe, which was present in dissolved and colloidal forms, the metals were dissolved in the acidic, high-SO4 waters of Cement Creek (pH 3.8). Mixing of Cement Creek with the Animas River increased pH to near-neutral values and transformed Al and some additional Fe into colloids which also contained Cu and Pb. Aluminium and Fe colloids had already formed in the mildly acidic conditions in Mineral Creek (pH 6.6) upstream of the confluence with the Animas River. Colloidal Fe continued to form downstream of both mixing zones. The Fe- and Al-rich colloids were important for transport of Cu, Pb, and Zn, which appeared to have sorbed to them. Partitioning of Zn between dissolved and colloidal phases was dependent on pH and colloid concentration. Mass balances showed conservative transports for Ca, Mg, Mn, SO4, and dissolved silica through the two mixing zones and small losses (< 10%) of colloidal Al, Fe and Zn from the water column.

  17. High hydrogen peroxide concentration in the feed-zone affects bioreactor cell productivity with liquid phase oxygen supply strategy.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Pritish; Ghosh, Kaushik; Suraishkumar, G K

    2008-06-01

    Liquid phase oxygen supply strategy (LPOS), in which hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is used to supply oxygen to the bioreactor, leads to low cell productivity despite high specific productivities of relevant metabolites. We hypothesized that high H(2)O(2) concentrations in the feed-zone led to local cell death, which in turn, lead to lower cell productivity. To test the hypothesis, a mathematical model was developed. Bacillus subtilis 168 was used as the model system in this study. The model simulations of cell concentrations in the bioreactor-zone were verified with the experimental results. The feed-zone H(2)O(2) concentrations remained 12-14 times higher than bulk bioreactor concentrations. The high local concentrations are expected to cause local cell killing, which explains the decrease in overall cell production by 50% at 300 rpm compared to conventional cultivation. Further, among the four different feed strategies studied using the model, dissolved oxygen (DO) controlled H(2)O(2) feed strategy caused least local cell killing and improved overall cell production by 34%.

  18. Integrating distributed temperature sensing and geological characterization to quantify spatiotemporal variability in subsurface heat transport within the Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. F. F.; Stumpf, A.; Luo, Y.; Kumar, P.

    2015-12-01

    This study is designed to investigate how the ambient ground temperature fluctuates with diurnal and seasonal changes under various hydrogeological system variations as part of the Intensively Managed Landscapes-Critical Zone Observatory. A fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) system is used to measure thermal profiles in two adjacent boreholes situated in a complex glaciated landscape. The test site is located in east-central Illinois on a terminal moraine of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. The moraine crosses a buried preglacial bedrock valley that is 50 m deep. The valley fill contains alternating deposits of clayey glacial till and gravelly sand that have varying physical and hydrological properties. In the 100-m-deep borehole, a fiber-optic cable was installed without casing, sealed against the sidewall with grout. This borehole was drilled to the top of bedrock and penetrated a sequence of glacial sediments containing at least two aquifer units. Thick, Early Pleistocene glacial sand and gravel that penetrated near the bedrock forms an aquifer that is part of a regional groundwater system, the Mahomet Aquifer System. The aquifer system is primarily recharged by slow infiltration of surface waters and has been designated by the USEPA as a "Sole Source" of drinking water. At the same location, a second 40-m-deep borehole was drilled through Middle-Late Pleistocene till and fluvioglacial sediment, and a groundwater monitoring well was installed. Fiber-optic cable was attached along the outside of the casing, and the well was screened in a shallower, localized aquifer. At a broad scale, thermal variations in the subsurface appear to be correlated with sediment type. The basal sand and gravel aquifer exhibits a unique thermal profile deviating from patterns at shallower depths. Temperature measurements with 1-m and 0.1°C resolutions have being collected at various temporal scales, ranging from 30-minute to 2-week intervals, since June 2015. The initial

  19. Temperature change affected groundwater quality in a confined marine aquifer during long-term heating and cooling.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takeshi; Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Ueki, Takashi; Ohkubo, Satoshi; Moldrup, Per; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2016-05-01

    Global warming and urbanization together with development of subsurface infrastructures (e.g. subways, shopping complexes, sewage systems, and Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) systems) will likely cause a rapid increase in the temperature of relatively shallow groundwater reservoirs (subsurface thermal pollution). However, potential effects of a subsurface temperature change on groundwater quality due to changed physical, chemical, and microbial processes have received little attention. We therefore investigated changes in 34 groundwater quality parameters during a 13-month enhanced-heating period, followed by 14 months of natural or enhanced cooling in a confined marine aquifer at around 17 m depth on the Saitama University campus, Japan. A full-scale GSHP test facility consisting of a 50 m deep U-tube for circulating the heat-carrying fluid and four monitoring wells at 1, 2, 5, and 10 m from the U-tube were installed, and groundwater quality was monitored every 1-2 weeks. Rapid changes in the groundwater level in the area, especially during the summer, prevented accurate analyses of temperature effects using a single-well time series. Instead, Dual-Well Analysis (DWA) was applied, comparing variations in subsurface temperature and groundwater chemical concentrations between the thermally-disturbed well and a non-affected reference well. Using the 1 m distant well (temperature increase up to 7 °C) and the 10 m distant well (non-temperature-affected), the DWA showed an approximately linear relationships for eight components (B, Si, Li, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Mg(2+), NH4(+), Na(+), and K(+)) during the combined 27 months of heating and cooling, suggesting changes in concentration between 4% and 31% for a temperature change of 7 °C. PMID:26938497

  20. Temperature change affected groundwater quality in a confined marine aquifer during long-term heating and cooling.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takeshi; Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Ueki, Takashi; Ohkubo, Satoshi; Moldrup, Per; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2016-05-01

    Global warming and urbanization together with development of subsurface infrastructures (e.g. subways, shopping complexes, sewage systems, and Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) systems) will likely cause a rapid increase in the temperature of relatively shallow groundwater reservoirs (subsurface thermal pollution). However, potential effects of a subsurface temperature change on groundwater quality due to changed physical, chemical, and microbial processes have received little attention. We therefore investigated changes in 34 groundwater quality parameters during a 13-month enhanced-heating period, followed by 14 months of natural or enhanced cooling in a confined marine aquifer at around 17 m depth on the Saitama University campus, Japan. A full-scale GSHP test facility consisting of a 50 m deep U-tube for circulating the heat-carrying fluid and four monitoring wells at 1, 2, 5, and 10 m from the U-tube were installed, and groundwater quality was monitored every 1-2 weeks. Rapid changes in the groundwater level in the area, especially during the summer, prevented accurate analyses of temperature effects using a single-well time series. Instead, Dual-Well Analysis (DWA) was applied, comparing variations in subsurface temperature and groundwater chemical concentrations between the thermally-disturbed well and a non-affected reference well. Using the 1 m distant well (temperature increase up to 7 °C) and the 10 m distant well (non-temperature-affected), the DWA showed an approximately linear relationships for eight components (B, Si, Li, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Mg(2+), NH4(+), Na(+), and K(+)) during the combined 27 months of heating and cooling, suggesting changes in concentration between 4% and 31% for a temperature change of 7 °C.

  1. Microstructure characterization and weldability evaluation of the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) in 310HCbN tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.

    1995-08-01

    Metallographic evaluation on the Gleeble simulated HAZ samples of 310HCbN tubing material was performed in order to reveal potential degradation in mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. The carbide evolutionary process in the HAZ samples was studied. It is indicated that 310HCbN material showed a weld HAZ sensitization tendency that is associated with the formation of Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6}.

  2. Thermal syneresis affected by heating schedule and moisture level in surimi gels.

    PubMed

    Park, Y D; Yoon, K S; Lee, C M

    2008-03-01

    The extent of thermal syneresis in protein gelation is indicative of thermal and freeze-thaw stability as well as the network integrity of a protein gel. Thermal syneresis in Alaska pollock surimi gels was examined under different heating schedules (40 degrees C/20 min to 90 degrees C/30 min, 60 degrees C/20 min to 90 degrees C/30 min, and 90 degrees C/20 min to 90 degrees C/20 min) at varying moisture levels (80%, 82%, and 84%). The extent of syneresis and gel firming was monitored by centrifugation expressible moisture and penetration force, respectively. The occurrence of 2 distinct peaks as a function of time for both thermal syneresis and gel firming suggests that a multistage aggregation is involved in the formation of gel network. All syneresis preceded gel firming upon protein aggregation. Increasing the moisture content in the gel delayed the 2nd stage of protein aggregation. The 60 degrees C/20 min preheating followed by 90 degrees C/30 min postheating resulted in significantly greater thermal syneresis and gel weakening compared to 40 and 90 degrees C preheating. Changes of gel structure clearly reflected thermal syneresis when the size of water pores became smaller with initiation of network formation and progressively larger upon further heating. Thermal syneresis history during protein gelation can be used to predict thermal and freeze-thaw stability.

  3. Rheological and biochemical characterization of salmon myosin as affected by constant heating rate.

    PubMed

    Reed, Zachary H; Park, Jae W

    2011-03-01

    Purified Chinook salmon myosin was studied using sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacryamide gel electrophoresis and densitometric analysis to determine its purity (approximately 94%). Myosin subjected to a constant heating rate began to form aggregates at >24 °C as measured by turbidity at 320 nm. Conformational changes, as measured by surface hydrophobicity (S(o)), began at 18.5 °C and continued to increase up to 75 °C after which it decreased slightly. Total sulfhydryl (TSH) content remained steady from 18.5 to 50 °C after which point the TSH began to drop. Surface reactive sulfhydryl groups gradually increased as the temperature increased from 18.5 to 55 °C and then followed a similar trend as TSH decreased. Presumably disulfide bond started to be formed at around 50 to 55 °C. Differential scanning calorimetry showed 4 peaks, 3 endothermic (27.9, 36.0, 45.5 °C), and 1 exothermic (49.0 °C). Dynamic rheological measurements provided information concerning the gelation point of salmon myosin that was 31.1 °C as samples were heated at a rate of 2 °C/min.

  4. Augmenting performance feedback does not affect 4 km cycling time-trials in the heat.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Mark; Villerius, Vincent; Murphy, Aron

    2015-01-01

    We compared the effects of (1) accurate and (2) surreptitiously augmented performance feedback on power output and physiological responses to a 4000 m time-trial in the heat. Nine cyclists completed a baseline (BaseL) 4000 m time-trial in ambient temperatures of 30°C, followed by two further 4000 m time-trials at the same temperature, randomly assigning the participants to an accurate (ACC; accurate feedback of baseline) or deceived (DEC; 2% increase above baseline) feedback group. The total power output (PO) and aerobic (Paer) and anaerobic (Pan) contributions were determined at 0.4 km stages during the time-trials, alongside measurements of rectal (Trec) and skin (Tskin) temperatures. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in any of the variables between BaseL, ACC and DEC, despite increases (P < 0.05) in Trec and Tskin. Typical pacing profiles were demonstrated; however, there was no interaction (P > 0.05) between feedback condition and time-trial stage. Providing surreptitiously augmented performance feedback to well-trained cyclists did not alter their performance or physiological responses to a 4000 m time-trial in a hot environment. The assumed influence of augmented performance feedback was nullified in the heat, perhaps reflecting a central down-regulation of exercise intensity in response to an increased body temperature.

  5. Loop heating by D.C. electric current and electromagnetic wave emissions simulated by 3-D EM particle zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakai, J. I.; Zhao, J.; Nishikawa, K.-I.

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that a current-carrying plasma loop can be heated by magnetic pinch driven by the pressure imbalance between inside and outside the loop, using a 3-dimensional electromagnetic (EM) particle code. Both electrons and ions in the loop can be heated in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, therefore the perpendicular temperature can be increased about 10 times compared with the parallel temperature. This temperature anisotropy produced by the magnetic pinch heating can induce a plasma instability, by which high-frequency electromagnetic waves can be excited. The plasma current which is enhanced by the magnetic pinch can also excite a kinetic kink instability, which can heat ions perpendicular to the magnetic field. The heating mechanism of ions as well as the electromagnetic emission could be important for an understanding of the coronal loop heating and the electromagnetic wave emissions from active coronal regions.

  6. Absence of functional active zone protein Bassoon affects assembly and transport of ribbon precursors during early steps of photoreceptor synaptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Regus-Leidig, Hanna; tom Dieck, Susanne; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut

    2010-06-01

    The retinal photoreceptor ribbon synapse is a structurally and functionally unique type of chemical synapse, specialized for tonic release of neurotransmitter in the dark. It is characterized by the presynaptic ribbon, an electron-dense organelle at the active zone, which is covered by hundreds of synaptic vesicles. Recently we showed that photoreceptor ribbon complexes are assembled from non-membranous, spherical densities--the precursor spheres--during the first two postnatal weeks of photoreceptor synaptogenesis. A core component of the precursor spheres and a key player in attaching the ribbon to the active zone is the presynaptic cytomatrix protein Bassoon. In this study, we examined in a comprehensive light and electron microscopic analysis whether Bassoon plays a role in the formation of the precursor spheres using Bassoon mutant mice lacking functional Bassoon. We report that developing Bassoon mutant photoreceptors contain fewer and smaller precursor spheres and that transport of precursor spheres to nascent synapses is delayed compared to wild-type controls. Moreover, western blot analyses of homogenates from postnatal day 0 (P0) to P14 Bassoon mutant retinae exhibit lower RIBEYE and Piccolo protein levels compared to the wild type, indicating elevated protein degradation in the absence of Bassoon. Our findings reveal a novel function of Bassoon in the early formation and delivery of precursor spheres to nascent ribbon synaptic sites in addition to its known role in ribbon anchoring during later stages of photoreceptor ribbon synaptogenesis.

  7. Heat Stress Affects Pi-related Genes Expression and Inorganic Phosphate Deposition/Accumulation in Barley.

    PubMed

    Pacak, Andrzej; Barciszewska-Pacak, Maria; Swida-Barteczka, Aleksandra; Kruszka, Katarzyna; Sega, Pawel; Milanowska, Kaja; Jakobsen, Iver; Jarmolowski, Artur; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in plants is taken from soil as an inorganic phosphate (Pi) and is one of the most important macroelements in growth and development. Plants actively react to Pi starvation by the induced expression of Pi transporters, MIR399, MIR827, and miR399 molecular sponge - IPS1 genes and by the decreased expression of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 (PHOSPHATE2 - PHO2) and Pi sensing and transport SPX-MFS genes. The PHO2 protein is involved in the degradation of Pi transporters PHT1;1 (from soil to roots) and PHO1 (from roots to shoots). The decreased expression of PHO2 leads to Pi accumulation in shoots. In contrast, the pho1 mutant shows a decreased level of Pi concentration in shoots. Finally, Pi starvation leads to decreased Pi concentration in all plant tissues. Little is known about plant Pi homeostasis in other abiotic stress conditions. We found that, during the first hour of heat stress, Pi accumulated in barley shoots but not in the roots, and transcriptomic data analysis as well as RT-qPCR led us to propose an explanation for this phenomenon. Pi transport inhibition from soil to roots is balanced by lower Pi efflux from roots to shoots directed by the PHO1 transporter. In shoots, the PHO2 mRNA level is decreased, leading to an increased Pi level. We concluded that Pi homeostasis in barley during heat stress is maintained by dynamic changes in Pi-related genes expression. PMID:27446155

  8. Heat Stress Affects Pi-related Genes Expression and Inorganic Phosphate Deposition/Accumulation in Barley.

    PubMed

    Pacak, Andrzej; Barciszewska-Pacak, Maria; Swida-Barteczka, Aleksandra; Kruszka, Katarzyna; Sega, Pawel; Milanowska, Kaja; Jakobsen, Iver; Jarmolowski, Artur; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in plants is taken from soil as an inorganic phosphate (Pi) and is one of the most important macroelements in growth and development. Plants actively react to Pi starvation by the induced expression of Pi transporters, MIR399, MIR827, and miR399 molecular sponge - IPS1 genes and by the decreased expression of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 (PHOSPHATE2 - PHO2) and Pi sensing and transport SPX-MFS genes. The PHO2 protein is involved in the degradation of Pi transporters PHT1;1 (from soil to roots) and PHO1 (from roots to shoots). The decreased expression of PHO2 leads to Pi accumulation in shoots. In contrast, the pho1 mutant shows a decreased level of Pi concentration in shoots. Finally, Pi starvation leads to decreased Pi concentration in all plant tissues. Little is known about plant Pi homeostasis in other abiotic stress conditions. We found that, during the first hour of heat stress, Pi accumulated in barley shoots but not in the roots, and transcriptomic data analysis as well as RT-qPCR led us to propose an explanation for this phenomenon. Pi transport inhibition from soil to roots is balanced by lower Pi efflux from roots to shoots directed by the PHO1 transporter. In shoots, the PHO2 mRNA level is decreased, leading to an increased Pi level. We concluded that Pi homeostasis in barley during heat stress is maintained by dynamic changes in Pi-related genes expression.

  9. Heat Stress Affects Pi-related Genes Expression and Inorganic Phosphate Deposition/Accumulation in Barley

    PubMed Central

    Pacak, Andrzej; Barciszewska-Pacak, Maria; Swida-Barteczka, Aleksandra; Kruszka, Katarzyna; Sega, Pawel; Milanowska, Kaja; Jakobsen, Iver; Jarmolowski, Artur; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in plants is taken from soil as an inorganic phosphate (Pi) and is one of the most important macroelements in growth and development. Plants actively react to Pi starvation by the induced expression of Pi transporters, MIR399, MIR827, and miR399 molecular sponge – IPS1 genes and by the decreased expression of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 (PHOSPHATE2 – PHO2) and Pi sensing and transport SPX-MFS genes. The PHO2 protein is involved in the degradation of Pi transporters PHT1;1 (from soil to roots) and PHO1 (from roots to shoots). The decreased expression of PHO2 leads to Pi accumulation in shoots. In contrast, the pho1 mutant shows a decreased level of Pi concentration in shoots. Finally, Pi starvation leads to decreased Pi concentration in all plant tissues. Little is known about plant Pi homeostasis in other abiotic stress conditions. We found that, during the first hour of heat stress, Pi accumulated in barley shoots but not in the roots, and transcriptomic data analysis as well as RT-qPCR led us to propose an explanation for this phenomenon. Pi transport inhibition from soil to roots is balanced by lower Pi efflux from roots to shoots directed by the PHO1 transporter. In shoots, the PHO2 mRNA level is decreased, leading to an increased Pi level. We concluded that Pi homeostasis in barley during heat stress is maintained by dynamic changes in Pi-related genes expression. PMID:27446155

  10. The impact of fault zones on the 3D coupled fluid and heat transport for the area of Brandenburg (NE German Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvonne, Cherubini; Mauro, Cacace; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2013-04-01

    Faults can provide permeable pathways for fluids at a variety of scales, from great depth in the crust to flow through fractured aquifers, geothermal fields, and hydrocarbon reservoirs (Barton et al. 1995). In terms of geothermal energy exploration, it is essential to understand the role of faults and their impact on the thermal field and fluid system. 3D numerical simulations provide a useful tool for investigating the active physical processes in the subsurface. To assess the influence of major fault zones on the thermal field and fluid system, 3D coupled fluid and heat transport simulations are carried out. The study is based on a recently published structural model of the Brandenburg area, which is located in the south-eastern part of the Northeast German Basin (NEGB) (Noack et al. 2010). Two major fault zones of the Elbe Fault System (Gardelegen and Lausitz Escarpments) vertically offset the pre-Permian basement against the Permian to Cenozoic basin fill at the southern margin by several km (Scheck et al. 2002). Within the numerical models, these two major fault zones are represented as equivalent porous media and vertical discrete elements. The coupled system of equations describing fluid flow and heat transport in saturated porous media are numerically solved by the Finite Element software FEFLOW® (Diersch, 2002). Different possible geological scenarios are modelled and compared to a simulation in which no faults are considered. In one scenario the fault zones are set as impermeable. In this case, the thermal field is similar to the no fault model. Fluid flow is redirected because the fault zones act as hydraulic barriers that prevent a lateral fluid advection into the fault zones. By contrast, modelled permeable fault zones induce a pronounced thermal signature with distinctly cooler temperatures than in the no fault model. Fluid motion within the fault is initially triggered by advection due to hydraulic head gradients, but may be even enhanced by

  11. Oral administration of γ-aminobutyric acid affects heat production in a hot environment in resting humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Central administration of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) induces lower body temperature in animals in hot ambient air. However, it is still unknown whether oral GABA administration affects temperature regulation at rest in a hot environment in humans. Therefore, in the present study, we specifically hypothesized that systemic administration of GABA in humans would induce hypothermia in a hot environment and that this response would be observed in association with decreased heat production. Methods Eight male participants drank a 200-ml sports drink with 1 g of GABA (trial G) or without GABA (trial C), then rested for 30 minutes in a sitting position in a hot environment (ambient air temperature 33°C, relative humidity 50%). Results We found that changes in esophageal temperature from before drinking the sports drink were lower in trial G than in trial C (-0.046 ± 0.079°C vs 0.001 ± 0.063°C; P < 0.05), with lower heat production calculated by oxygen consumption (41 ± 5 W/m2 vs 47 ± 8 W/m2; P < 0.05). Conclusions In this study, we have demonstrated that a single oral administration of GABA induced a larger decrease in body core temperature compared to a control condition during rest in a hot environment and that this response was concomitant with a decrease in total heat production. PMID:22738209

  12. Study of Reservoir Heterogencities and Structural Features Affecting Production in the Shallow Oil Zone, Eastern Elk Hills Area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Janice Gillespie

    2004-11-01

    Late Neogene (Plio-Pleistocene) shallow marine strata of the western Bakersfield Arch and Elk Hills produce hydrocarbons from several different reservoirs. This project focuses on the shallow marine deposits of the Gusher and Calitroleum reservoirs in the Lower Shallow Oil Zone (LSOZ). In the eastern part of the study area on the Bakersfield Arch at North and South Coles Levee field and in two wells in easternmost Elk Hills, the LSOZ reservoirs produce dry (predominantly methane) gas. In structurally higher locations in western Elk Hills, the LSOZ produces oil and associated gas. Gas analyses show that gas from the eastern LSOZ is bacterial and formed in place in the reservoirs, whereas gas associated with oil in the western part of the study area is thermogenic and migrated into the sands from deeper in the basin. Regional mapping shows that the gas-bearing LSOZ sands in the Coles Levee and easternmost Elk Hills area are sourced from the Sierra Nevada to the east whereas the oil-bearing sands in western Elk Hills appear to be sourced from the west. The eastern Elk Hills area occupied the basin depocenter, farthest from either source area. As a result, it collected mainly low-permeability offshore shale deposits. This sand-poor depocenter provides an effective barrier to the updip migration of gases from east to west. The role of small, listric normal faults as migration barriers is more ambiguous. Because our gas analyses show that the gas in the eastern LSOZ reservoirs is bacterial, it likely formed in-place near the reservoirs and did not have to migrate far. Therefore, the gas could have been generated after faulting and accumulated within the fault blocks as localized pools. However, bacterial gas is present in both the eastern AND western parts of Elk Hills in the Dry Gas Zone (DGZ) near the top of the stratigraphic section even though the measured fault displacement is greatest in this zone. Bacterial gas is not present in the west in the deeper LSOZ which

  13. How radiation affects superbubbles : Through momentum injection in early phase and photo-heating thereafter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Siddhartha; Nath, Biman B.; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    Energetic winds and radiation from massive star clusters push the surrounding gas and blow superbubbles in the interstellar medium (ISM). Using 1-D hydrodynamic simulations, we study the role of radiation in the dynamics of superbubbles driven by a young star cluster of mass 106 M⊙. We have considered a realistic time evolution of the mechanical power as well as radiation power of the star cluster, and detailed heating and cooling processes. We find that the ratio of the radiation pressure on the shell (shocked ISM) to the thermal pressure (˜107 K) of the shocked wind region is almost independent of the ambient density, and it is greater than unity before ≲ 1 Myr. We explore the parameter space of density and dust opacity of the ambient medium, and find that the size of the hot gas (˜ 107 K) cavity is insensitive to the dust opacity (σd ≈ (0.1 - 1.5) × 10-21 cm2), but the structure of the photoionized (˜104 K) gas depends on it. Most of the radiative losses occur at ˜104 K, with sub-dominant losses at ≲ 103 K and ˜106 - 108 K. The superbubbles can retain as high as ˜10% of its input energy, for an ambient density of 103 mH cm-3. We discuss the role of ionization parameter and recombination-averaged density in understanding the dominant feedback mechanism. Finally, we compare our results with the observations of 30 Doradus.

  14. Creep properties of PWC-11 base metal and weldments as affected by heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Titran, R.H.; Moore, T.J.; Grobstein, T.L.

    1994-09-01

    In a preliminary study using single specimens for each condition, PWC-11 (a niobium-base alloy with a nominal composition of Nb-1%Zr-0.1%C) was creep tested at 1350 K and 40 MPa. Base metal specimens and specimens with transverse electrode beam welds were tested with and without a 1000 hr, 1350 K aging treatment prior to testing. In the annealed condition (1 hr at 1755 K + 2 hr at 1475 K), the base metal exhibited superior creep strength compared to the aged condition, reaching 1 percent strain in 3480 hr. A 1000 hr, 1350 K aging treatment prior to creep testing had a severe detrimental effect on creep strength of the base metal and transverse electron beam weldments, reducing the time to attain 1 percent strain by an order of magnitude. Extrapolated temperature compensated creep rates indicate that the present heat of PWC-11 may be four times as creep resistance as similarly tested Nb-1%Zr. The extrapolated stress to achieve 1 percent creep strain in 7 yr at 1350 K is 0.6 MPa for annealed Nb-1%Zr and 2.8 MPa for annealed and aged PWC-11 base metal with and without a transverse electron beam weld.

  15. Physcomitrella patens mutants affected on heat dissipation clarify the evolution of photoprotection mechanisms upon land colonization.

    PubMed

    Alboresi, Alessandro; Gerotto, Caterina; Giacometti, Giorgio M; Bassi, Roberto; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2010-06-15

    Light is the source of energy for photosynthetic organisms; when in excess, however, it also drives the formation of reactive oxygen species and, consequently, photoinhibition. Plants and algae have evolved mechanisms to regulate light harvesting efficiency in response to variable light intensity so as to avoid oxidative damage. Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) consists of the rapid dissipation of excess excitation energy as heat. Although widespread among oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, NPQ shows important differences in its machinery. In land plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, NPQ depends on the presence of PSBS, whereas in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it requires a different protein called LHCSR. In this work, we show that both proteins are present in the moss Physcomitrella patens. By generating KO mutants lacking PSBS and/or LHCSR, we also demonstrate that both gene products are active in NPQ. Plants lacking both proteins are more susceptible to high light stress than WT, implying that they are active in photoprotection. These results suggest that NPQ is a fundamental mechanism for survival in excess light and that upon land colonization, photosynthetic organisms evolved a unique mechanism for excess energy dissipation before losing the ancestral one found in algae.

  16. Creep properties of PWC-11 base metal and weldments as affected by heat treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Moore, T. J.; Grobstein, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    In a preliminary study using single specimens for each condition, PWC-11 (a niobium-base alloy with a nominal composition of Nb-1%Zr-0.1%C) was creep tested at 1350 K and 40 MPa. Base metal specimens and specimens with transverse electron beam welds were tested with and without a 1000 hr, 1350 K aging treatment prior to testing. In the annealed condition (1 hr at 1755 K + 2 hr at 1475 K), the base metal exhibited superior creep strength compared to the nonaged condition, reaching 1 percent strain in 3480 hr. A 1000 hr, 1350 K aging treatment prior to creep testing had a severe detrimental effect on creep strength of the base metal and transverse electron beam weldments, reducing the time to attain 1 percent strain by an order of magnitude. Extrapolated temperature compensated creep rates indicate that the present heat of PWC-11 may be four times as creep resistant as similarly tested Nb-1%Zr. The extrapolated stress to achieve 1 percent creep strain in 7 yr at 1350 K is 2.7 MPa for annealed Nb-1%Zr and 12 MPa for annealed and aged PWC-11 base metal with and without a transverse electron beam weld.

  17. Distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls in an urban riparian zone affected by wastewater treatment plant effluent and the transfer to terrestrial compartment by invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junchao; Wang, Thanh; Han, Shanlong; Wang, Pu; Zhang, Qinghua; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in a riparian zone affected by the effluent from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). River water, sediment, aquatic invertebrates and samples from the surrounding terrestrial compartment such as soil, reed plants and several land based invertebrates were collected. A relatively narrow range of δ(13)C values was found among most invertebrates (except butterflies, grasshoppers), indicating a similar energy source. The highest concentration of total PCBs was observed in zooplankton (151.1 ng/g lipid weight), and soil dwelling invertebrates showed higher concentrations than phytophagous insects at the riparian zone. The endobenthic oligochaete Tubifex tubifex (54.28 ng/g lw) might be a useful bioindicator of WWTP derived PCBs contamination. High bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were observed in collected aquatic invertebrates, although the biota-sediment/soil accumulation factors (BSAF) remained relatively low. Emerging aquatic insects such as chironomids could carry waterborne PCBs to the terrestrial compartment via their lifecycles. The estimated annual flux of PCBs for chironomids ranged from 0.66 to 265 ng⋅m(-2)⋅y(-1). Although a high prevalence of PCB-11 and PCB-28 was found for most aquatic based samples in this riparian zone, the mid-chlorinated congeners (e.g. PCB-153 and PCB-138) became predominant among chironomids and dragonflies as well as soil dwelling invertebrates, which might suggest a selective biodriven transfer of different PCB congeners.

  18. Mineralogical constraint for metamorphic conditions in a shear zone affecting the Archean Ngoulemakong tonalite, Congo craton (Southern Cameroon) and retentivity of U-Pb SHRIMP zircon dates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchameni, R.; Lerouge, C.; Penaye, J.; Cocherie, A.; Milesi, J. P.; Toteu, S. F.; Nsifa, N. E.

    2010-08-01

    In the Ngoulemakong region of the Ntem unit (South Cameroon), tonalite crops out as intrusions of various sizes cross-cutting the charnockite suite. Both of these granitoids are affected by NE-SW and WNW-ESE sinistral and dextral shear zones. Tonalite in the WNW-ESE shear zone are deformed and shows metamorphic assemblages represented by quartz-microcline-biotite-garnet-plagioclase-scapolite-fluoro-apatite and chlorite-sulfides-epidote-muscovite-quartz-calcite not recorded by the undeformed rocks outside it. These mineralogical assemblages provide evidence of decreasing pressure-temperature conditions from granulite-amphibolite-facies in the moderate deformed part to greenschist-facies in the central part of the shear plane. The higher fluid (H 2O, CO 2, S, F, Cl, K, and Na) activities and high-grade recrystallizations recorded in the shear zone favour a Pb loss hypothesis in the zircons. U-Pb SHRIMP zircon dating yield an emplacement age of 2865 ± 4 Ma for the tonalite but does not permit the determination of the age of the high-grade event responsible for the Pb loss. These results provide evidence of the retentivity of U-Pb zircon dates under high grade conditions.

  19. Dynamics and controls of urban heat sink and island phenomena in a desert city: Development of a local climate zone scheme using remotely-sensed inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Ahmed K.; Blackburn, G. Alan; Whyatt, J. Duncan

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to determine the dynamics and controls of Surface Urban Heat Sinks (SUHS) and Surface Urban Heat Islands (SUHI) in desert cities, using Dubai as a case study. A Local Climate Zone (LCZ) schema was developed to subdivide the city into different zones based on similarities in land cover and urban geometry. Proximity to the Gulf Coast was also determined for each LCZ. The LCZs were then used to sample seasonal and daily imagery from the MODIS thermal sensor to determine Land Surface Temperature (LST) variations relative to desert sand. Canonical correlation techniques were then applied to determine which factors explained the variability between urban and desert LST. Our results indicate that the daytime SUHS effect is greatest during the summer months (typically ∼3.0 °C) with the strongest cooling effects in open high-rise zones of the city. In contrast, the night-time SUHI effect is greatest during the winter months (typically ∼3.5 °C) with the strongest warming effects in compact mid-rise zones of the city. Proximity to the Arabian Gulf had the largest influence on both SUHS and SUHI phenomena, promoting daytime cooling in the summer months and night-time warming in the winter months. However, other parameters associated with the urban environment such as building height had an influence on daytime cooling, with larger buildings promoting shade and variations in airflow. Likewise, other parameters such as sky view factor contributed to night-time warming, with higher temperatures associated with limited views of the sky.

  20. Avian thermoregulation in the heat: scaling of heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity in three southern African arid-zone passerines.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Maxine C; Smit, Ben; McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O

    2015-06-01

    Many birds can defend body temperature (Tb) far below air temperature (Ta) during acute heat exposure, but relatively little is known about how avian heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity varies with body mass (Mb), phylogeny or ecological factors. We determined maximum rates of evaporative heat dissipation and thermal end points (Tb and Ta associated with thermoregulatory failure) in three southern African ploceid passerines, the scaly-feathered weaver (Sporopipes squamifrons, Mb≈10 g), sociable weaver (Philetairus socius, Mb≈25 g) and white-browed sparrow-weaver (Plocepasser mahali, Mb≈40 g). Birds were exposed to a ramped profile of progressively increasing Ta, with continuous monitoring of behaviour and Tb used to identify the onset of severe hyperthermia. The maximum Ta birds tolerated ranged from 48°C to 54°C, and was positively related to Mb. Values of Tb associated with severe heat stress were in the range of 44 to 45°C. Rates of evaporative water loss (EWL) increased rapidly when Ta exceeded Tb, and maximum evaporative heat dissipation was equivalent to 141-222% of metabolic heat production. Fractional increases in EWL between Ta<40°C and the highest Ta reached by each species were 10.8 (S. squamifrons), 18.4 (P. socius) and 16.0 (P. mahali). Resting metabolic rates increased more gradually with Ta than expected, probably reflecting the very low chamber humidity values we maintained. Our data suggest that, within a taxon, larger species can tolerate higher Ta during acute heat stress.

  1. How radiation affects superbubbles: through momentum injection in early phase and photo-heating thereafter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Siddhartha; Nath, Biman B.; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-11-01

    Energetic winds and radiation from massive star clusters push the surrounding gas and blow superbubbles in the interstellar medium (ISM). Using 1D hydrodynamic simulations, we study the role of radiation in the dynamics of superbubbles driven by a young star cluster of mass 106 M⊙. We have considered a realistic time evolution of the mechanical power as well as radiation power of the star cluster, and detailed heating and cooling processes. We find that the ratio of the radiation pressure on the shell (shocked ISM) to the thermal pressure (˜107 K) of the shocked-wind region is almost independent of the ambient density, and it is greater than unity before ≲1 Myr. We explore the parameter space of density and dust opacity of the ambient medium, and find that the size of the hot gas (˜107 K) cavity is insensitive to the dust opacity [σd ≈ (0.1-1.5) × 10-21 cm2], but the structure of the photoionized (˜104 K) gas depends on it. Most of the radiative losses occur at ˜104 K, with sub-dominant losses at ≲103 K and ˜106-108 K. The superbubbles can retain as high as ˜10 per cent of its input energy, for an ambient density of 103 mH cm-3. We discuss the role of ionization parameter and recombination-averaged density in understanding the dominant feedback mechanism. Finally, we compare our results with the observations of 30 Doradus.

  2. Morphological and mechanical characterization of the acid-base resistant zone at the adhesive-dentin interface of intact and caries-affected dentin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Go; Tsuchiya, Satoko; Nikaido, Toru; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the ultrastructure of both intact and caries affected dentin-adhesive interface after artificial secondary caries formation, using scanning electron microscopy and nanoindentation testing. Half of the prepared specimens were bonded with Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Medical, Japan) and a resin composite (Metafil Flo, Sun Medical, Japan) for the nanoindentation test. The other specimens were stored in a buffered demineralizing solution for 90 minutes, then observed using SEM. An acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) was observed beneath the hybrid layer, distinguished by argon-ion etching. The ABRZ of caries-affected dentin was thicker than that of normal dentin, while its nanohardess was lower than normal dentin (p<0.05). It is suggested that the monomer of Clearfil SE Bond penetrated deeper than previously reported, creating a so-called "hybrid layer." However, its physical properties depended on the condition of the dentin.

  3. Living in the heart of a volcanic hazard zone and the issues that affect community vulnerability and resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Deanne; Gísladóttir, Guőrún; Dominey-Howes, Dale

    2010-05-01

    Volcanic risk mitigation strategies were revised for residents living in the eastern jökulhlaup hazard zone of Mýrdalsjökull, southern Iceland. These plans were trialled during a full-scale evacuation exercise on 25 March 2006. In order to assess residents' perception of and response to the exercise and proposed mitigation strategies a mixed methods survey was applied. This investigation consisted of field observations during the exercise and semi-structured interviews with emergency management officials and residents of a small rural community after the exercise. This community was the focus of this survey because these residents did not consider the previous plan appropriate to their beliefs and needs. The results of the survey revealed that residents are reluctant to evacuate and do not agree with the proposed strategies. Residents believe that the newly devised plans do not address the contextual issues of their community. Factors influencing the residents' perception are inherited knowledge, attachment to place and livelihood connections (i.e. concern for livestock). Residents' requests for alternative plans, in case adverse environmental conditions prevent evacuation, were ignored. Consequently, emergency managers failed to resolve residents' risk mitigation concerns prior to the evacuation exercise. We recommend that emergency managers should incorporate local knowledge and perceptions to ensure reduced vulnerability and enhanced community resilience.

  4. Surface Features Analysis in Salt-Affected Area Using Hyperspectral Data: A Case Study in the Zone of Chotts, Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaziz, Moncef; Liesenberg, Veraldo; Bouaziz, Samir; Gloaguen, Richard

    2010-12-01

    Arid and semi-arid regions are most affected by Salinity. Chotts regions in southern Tunisia are such an area, where the excessive content of salt in the soil is a hard faced problem. Soil salinity in this area enforces several environmental problems such as limiting plant growth, reducing crop productivity, degrading soil quality and leads to accelerated rates rill and gully erosion . Remote sensing analysis by the mean of spectral analysis, geomorphologic aspect from digital elevation models and distribution of rainfall intensity from satellite data are used in this study to discern features and patterns of areas affected by salt. Correlation between these remote sensing indicators is made in order to assess the contribution of each indicator to identify the salt-affected area. The approach followed in this study was applied on Hyperspectral data from EO-1 Mission. Hyperion data are promoted due to their very high spectral resolution and wide enhanced spatial information. The present study highlighted the high correlation between the flat surfaces and the high content of salt in the soil (from soil salinity indices) on one hand and a low correlation between the high intensity of rainfall distribution and indicators of low salt content in the soil on the other hand.

  5. [Heat exchange of the rat in thermoneutral zone temperature and comparison with heat exchange in ambient temperature over and under it].

    PubMed

    Rumiantsev, G V

    2011-08-01

    With the help of thermonetry and general calorimetry body temperature and heat production in ambient temperatures 20 degrees C, 28 degrees C, 33 degrees C were recorded. The experiments showed, that at the temperature 20 degrees C the rectal temperature was changing very little. But in ambient temperature 33 degrees C the rectal temperature was 40.5 +/- 0.1 degrees C.

  6. Differences in Water Vapor Radiative Transfer among 1D Models Can Significantly Affect the Inner Edge of the Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Leconte, Jérémy; Wolf, Eric T.; Goldblatt, Colin; Feldl, Nicole; Merlis, Timothy; Wang, Yuwei; Koll, Daniel D. B.; Ding, Feng; Forget, François; Abbot, Dorian S.

    2016-08-01

    An accurate estimate of the inner edge of the habitable zone is critical for determining which exoplanets are potentially habitable and for designing future telescopes to observe them. Here, we explore differences in estimating the inner edge among seven one-dimensional radiative transfer models: two line-by-line codes (SMART and LBLRTM) as well as five band codes (CAM3, CAM4_Wolf, LMDG, SBDART, and AM2) that are currently being used in global climate models. We compare radiative fluxes and spectra in clear-sky conditions around G and M stars, with fixed moist adiabatic profiles for surface temperatures from 250 to 360 K. We find that divergences among the models arise mainly from large uncertainties in water vapor absorption in the window region (10 μm) and in the region between 0.2 and 1.5 μm. Differences in outgoing longwave radiation increase with surface temperature and reach 10-20 W m-2 differences in shortwave reach up to 60 W m-2, especially at the surface and in the troposphere, and are larger for an M-dwarf spectrum than a solar spectrum. Differences between the two line-by-line models are significant, although smaller than among the band models. Our results imply that the uncertainty in estimating the insolation threshold of the inner edge (the runaway greenhouse limit) due only to clear-sky radiative transfer is ≈10% of modern Earth’s solar constant (i.e., ≈34 W m-2 in global mean) among band models and ≈3% between the two line-by-line models. These comparisons show that future work is needed that focuses on improving water vapor absorption coefficients in both shortwave and longwave, as well as on increasing the resolution of stellar spectra in broadband models.

  7. Differences in Water Vapor Radiative Transfer among 1D Models Can Significantly Affect the Inner Edge of the Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Leconte, Jérémy; Wolf, Eric T.; Goldblatt, Colin; Feldl, Nicole; Merlis, Timothy; Wang, Yuwei; Koll, Daniel D. B.; Ding, Feng; Forget, François; Abbot, Dorian S.

    2016-08-01

    An accurate estimate of the inner edge of the habitable zone is critical for determining which exoplanets are potentially habitable and for designing future telescopes to observe them. Here, we explore differences in estimating the inner edge among seven one-dimensional radiative transfer models: two line-by-line codes (SMART and LBLRTM) as well as five band codes (CAM3, CAM4_Wolf, LMDG, SBDART, and AM2) that are currently being used in global climate models. We compare radiative fluxes and spectra in clear-sky conditions around G and M stars, with fixed moist adiabatic profiles for surface temperatures from 250 to 360 K. We find that divergences among the models arise mainly from large uncertainties in water vapor absorption in the window region (10 μm) and in the region between 0.2 and 1.5 μm. Differences in outgoing longwave radiation increase with surface temperature and reach 10–20 W m‑2 differences in shortwave reach up to 60 W m‑2, especially at the surface and in the troposphere, and are larger for an M-dwarf spectrum than a solar spectrum. Differences between the two line-by-line models are significant, although smaller than among the band models. Our results imply that the uncertainty in estimating the insolation threshold of the inner edge (the runaway greenhouse limit) due only to clear-sky radiative transfer is ≈10% of modern Earth’s solar constant (i.e., ≈34 W m‑2 in global mean) among band models and ≈3% between the two line-by-line models. These comparisons show that future work is needed that focuses on improving water vapor absorption coefficients in both shortwave and longwave, as well as on increasing the resolution of stellar spectra in broadband models.

  8. Why person affected by leprosy did not look after their plantar ulcer? Experience from Pakokku zone, Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Win, Le Le; Shwe, San; Maw, Win; Ishida, Yutaka; Myint, Kyaw; Mar, Kyi Kyi; Min, Thandar; Oo, Phyo Min; Khine, Aye Win

    2010-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to identify methods of caring plantar ulcers in leprosy patients and the underlying causes of poor plantar ulcer care during January and February 2008. This was conducted in Pakokku zone as it was one of the "9 selected townships of the Disabilities survey, i.e., Basic Health Staff project 2003/4", which was funded by Japan International Cooperation Agency. After getting consent, all available leprosy cases, i.e., 101 cases with foot disability grade 2 were interviewed with the pre-tested questionnaire. Among 101 cases, 13 cases who took care of their ulcer poorly and 20 who did none of the recommended measures were recruited for in-depth interview (IDI). The subjects were largely old people, males and people with no marriage partner. The majority had earned money by doing sedentary job. Prolongation of ulcers was observed in 78 cases. Most had been suffering from ulcers for years. When asking face-to-face interview, all the recommended care measures were not reported. Among these recommended measures, a large number of respondents reported about soaking measure. However, these reported measures were contradicted to the preventive methods which they disclosed in IDI. Plantar ulcer care seemed to be an individualised practice. The individual ways of performing were related to their view of ulcer, the environment, and occupation, and custom, communication with family and health staff. The findings identified the actual practice of plantar ulcer care in study areas. It is suggested that the current performance of planar ulcer care is inadequate and more attention should be given to achieve the target set by the programme as a recommendation. PMID:20857653

  9. Natural Radiation for Identification and Evaluation of Risk Zones for Affectation of Activated Faults in Aquifer Overexploited.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Leal, J.; Lopez-Loera, H.; Carbajal-Perez, N.

    2007-05-01

    In basins as Mexico, Michoacán, Guanajuato, Queretaro, Aguascalientes and San Luis Potosi, the existence of faults and fractures have affected the urban infrastructure, lines of conduction of drinkable water, pipelines, etc., that when not being identified and considered, they don't reflect the real impact that these cause also to the aquifer system, modifying the permeability of the means and in occasions they work as preferential conduits that communicate hydraulically potentially to the aquifer with substances pollutants (metals, fertilizers, hydrocarbons, waste waters, etc.) located in the surface. In the Valley of San Luis Potosi, Villa of Reyes, Arista, Ahualulco and recently The Huizache-Matehuala is being strongly affected by faulting and supposedly due cracking to subsidence, however, the regional tectonic could also be the origin of this phenomenon. To know the origin of the faults and affectation to the vulnerability of the aquifer few works they have been carried out in the area. A preliminary analysis indicates that it is possible that a tectonic component is affecting the area and that the vulnerability of the aquifer in that area you this increasing. Before such a situation, it is necessary to carry out the isotopic study of the same one, for this way to know among other things, isotopic characterization, recharge places and addresses of flow of the groundwater; quality of waters and the behavior hydrochemistry with relationship to the faults. High radon values were measured in San Luis Potosi Valley, the natural source of radon could be the riolites and however, these are located to almost a once thousand meters deep for what the migration of the gas is not very probable. The anomalies radiometrics was not correlation with the faults in this case. In some areas like the Valley of Celaya, the origin of the structures and the tectonic activity in the area was confirmed, identifying the structural arrangement of the faulting, the space relationships

  10. Melt front propagation in dielectrics upon femtosecond laser irradiation: Formation dynamics of a heat-affected layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Solis, Javier; Siegel, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Several studies in dielectrics have reported the presence of a thin heat-affected layer underneath the ablation crater produced by femtosecond laser irradiation. In this work, we present a time-resolved microscopy technique that is capable of monitoring the formation dynamics of this layer and apply it to the study of a phosphate glass exposed to single pulses below the ablation threshold. A few nanoseconds after laser excitation, a melt front interface can be detected, which propagates into the bulk, gradually slowing down its speed. By means of image analysis combined with optical modeling, we are able to determine the temporal evolution of the layer thickness and its refractive index. Initially, a strong transient decrease in the refractive index is observed, which partially recovers afterwards. The layer resolidifies after approximately 1 μs after excitation, featuring a maximum thickness of several hundreds of nanometers.

  11. Heating up Climate Literacy Education: Understanding Teachers' and Students' Motivational and Affective Response to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinatra, G. M.

    2011-12-01

    Changing students' ideas about controversial scientific issues, such as human-induced climate change, presents unique challenges for educators (Lombardi & Sinatra, 2010; Sinatra & Mason, 2008). First, climate science is complex and requires "systems thinking," or the ability to think and reason abstractly about emergent systems (Goldstone & Sakamoto, 2003). Appreciating the intricacies of complex systems and emergent processes has proven challenging for students (Chi, 2005). In addition to these challenges, there are specific misconceptions that may lead thinking astray on the issue of global climate change, such as the distinction between weather and climate (Lombardi & Sinatra, 2010). As an example, when students are asked about their views on climate change, they often recall individual storm events or very cold periods and use their personal experiences and recollections of short-term temperature fluctuations to assess whether the planet is warming. Beyond the conceptual difficulties, controversial topics offer another layer of challenge. Such topics are often embedded in complex socio-cultural and political contexts, have a high degree of uncertainty, and may be perceived by individuals as in conflict with their personal or religious beliefs (Levinson, 2006, Sinatra, Kardash, Taasoobshirazi, & Lombardi, 2011). Individuals are often committed to their own views on socio-scientific issues and this commitment may serve as a motivation to actively resist new ideas (Dole & Sinatra, 1998). Individuals may also have strong emotions associated with their misconceptions (Broughton, Pekrun, & Sinatra, 2011). Negative emotions, misconceptions, and resistance do not make a productive combination for learning. Further, teachers who find human-induced climate change implausible have been shown to hold negative emotions about having to teach about climate change (Lombardi & Sinatra, in preparation), which could affect how they present the topic to students. In this

  12. Design requirements for ERD in diffusion-dominated media: how do injection interval, bioactive zones and reaction kinetics affect remediation performance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambon, J.; Lemming, G.; Manoli, G.; Broholm, M. M.; Bjerg, P.; Binning, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination (ERD) has been successfully used in high permeability media, such as sand aquifers, and is considered to be a promising technology for low permeability settings. Pilot and full-scale applications of ERD at several sites in Denmark have shown that the main challenge is to get contact between the injected bacteria and electron donor and the contaminants trapped in the low-permeability matrix. Sampling of intact cores from the low-permeability matrix has shown that the bioactive zones (where degradation occurs) are limited in the matrix, due to the slow diffusion transport processes, and this affects the timeframes for the remediation. Due to the limited ERD applications and the complex transport and reactive processes occurring in low-permeability media, design guidelines are currently not available for ERD in such settings, and remediation performance assessments are limited. The objective of this study is to combine existing knowledge from several sites with numerical modeling to assess the effect of the injection interval, development of bioactive zones and reaction kinetics on the remediation efficiency for ERD in diffusion-dominated media. A numerical model is developed to simulate ERD at a contaminated site, where the source area (mainly TCE) is located in a clayey till with fractures and interbedded sand lenses. Such contaminated sites are common in North America and Europe. Hydro-geological characterization provided information on geological heterogeneities and hydraulic parameters, which are relevant for clay till sites in general. The numerical model couples flow and transport in the fracture network and low-permeability matrix. Sequential degradation of TCE to ethene is modeled using Monod kinetics, and the kinetic parameters are obtained from laboratory experiments. The influence of the reaction kinetics on remediation efficiency is assessed by varying the biomass concentration of the specific degraders. The injected

  13. Actively heated high-resolution fiber-optic-distributed temperature sensing to quantify streambed flow dynamics in zones of strong groundwater upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Martin A.; Buckley, Sean F.; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios C.; Werkema, Dale D.; Lane, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Zones of strong groundwater upwelling to streams enhance thermal stability and moderate thermal extremes, which is particularly important to aquatic ecosystems in a warming climate. Passive thermal tracer methods used to quantify vertical upwelling rates rely on downward conduction of surface temperature signals. However, moderate to high groundwater flux rates (>-1.5 m d-1) restrict downward propagation of diurnal temperature signals, and therefore the applicability of several passive thermal methods. Active streambed heating from within high-resolution fiber-optic temperature sensors (A-HRTS) has the potential to define multidimensional fluid-flux patterns below the extinction depth of surface thermal signals, allowing better quantification and separation of local and regional groundwater discharge. To demonstrate this concept, nine A-HRTS were emplaced vertically into the streambed in a grid with ˜0.40 m lateral spacing at a stream with strong upward vertical flux in Mashpee, Massachusetts, USA. Long-term (8-9 h) heating events were performed to confirm the dominance of vertical flow to the 0.6 m depth, well below the extinction of ambient diurnal signals. To quantify vertical flux, short-term heating events (28 min) were performed at each A-HRTS, and heat-pulse decay over vertical profiles was numerically modeled in radial two dimension (2-D) using SUTRA. Modeled flux values are similar to those obtained with seepage meters, Darcy methods, and analytical modeling of shallow diurnal signals. We also observed repeatable differential heating patterns along the length of vertically oriented sensors that may indicate sediment layering and hyporheic exchange superimposed on regional groundwater discharge.

  14. Hydrogeologic factors that affect the flowpath of water in selected zones of the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groschen, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio region supplies drinking water for more than 1 million people. Proper development and protection of the aquifer is a high priority for local and State authorities. To better understand the flow of water in two major flowpaths in the Edwards aquifer, stratigraphic, structural, hydrologic, and geochemical data were analyzed. The western Medina flowpath is in parts of Uvalde, Medina, and Bexar Counties, and the eastern flowpath is in northern Bexar and central Comal Counties. A major hydrogeologic factor that affects the pattern of flow in the Edwards aquifer is the spatial and temporal distribution of recharge. Other hydrogeologic factors that affect flowpaths include internal boundaries and the location and rate of spring discharge. The relative displacement of faults and the high permeability layers have substantial control on the discharge at springs and on the flowpaths in the Edwards aquifer. Analysis of the estimated recharge to the Edwards aquifer during 1982 89 indicated that during years of substantial precipitation, a large part of the net recharge probably is diffuse infiltration of precipitation over large parts of the recharge area. During years with below-normal precipitation, most recharge is leakage from rivers and streams that drain the catchment subbasins. In the western Medina flowpath, concentrations of major ions indicate saturation of calcite and undersaturation of dolomite the two minerals that constitute most of the Edwards aquifer matrix. Concentrations of dissolved calcium, alkalinity, and dissolved chloride in the eastern flowpath are greater than those in the western Medina flowpath. These upward trends in concentrations might result in part from: (1) increased development in the recharge area, (2) mineralized effluent from developed areas, or (3) increased dissolution of aquifer material. Tritium data from wells sampled in and near the western Medina flowpath indicate no vertical stratification of

  15. Factors Affecting Utilization of Maternal Health Care Services in Kombolcha District, Eastern Hararghe Zone, Oromia Regional State, Eastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Zelalem Ayele, Desalew; Belayihun, Bekele; Teji, Kedir; Admassu Ayana, Desalegn

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. World health organization estimates that more than half a million women lose their lives in the process of reproduction worldwide every year and most of these mortalities are avoidable if mothers have access to maternal health care services. Objectives. This study was conducted with objectives of determining the prevalence of utilization of maternal health care services and identifying factors affecting it. Methodology. A community based cross-sectional survey was conducted in six kebeles of Kombolcha district. A total of 495 women of reproductive age participated in the study and their selection was made using simple random sampling technique and data was collected using an interviewer-administered structured questionnaire. The data was analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results. A total of 495 women were included in this study and from these women about 86.1% had at least one ANC visit during their last pregnancy. About 61.7% of mothers had less than four visits which is less than the recommended and 46.2% started it in the second trimester. Only 25.3% of respondents gave birth in health institutions and rural women were less likely to use institutional delivery 20.9% compared to urban women 35.9%. Recommendations. More efforts should be given to educate society in general and mothers in particular, to strengthen community participation and to increase the accessibility of maternal health care services. Moreover, providing accurate information about the services provided in the health institutions is required from the concerned governmental and nongovernmental organizations.

  16. M3B2 and M5B3 Formation in Diffusion-Affected Zone During Transient Liquid Phase Bonding Single-Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Naicheng; Hu, Xiaobing; Liu, Jide; Jin, Tao; Sun, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhuangqi

    2015-04-01

    Precipitates in the diffusion-affected zone (DAZ) during transient liquid phase bonding (TLP) single-crystal superalloys were observed and investigated. Small size and dendritic-shaped precipitates were identified to be M3B2 borides and intergrowth of M3B2/M5B3 borides. The orientation relationships among M3B2, M5B3, and matrix were determined using transmission electron microscope (TEM). Composition characteristics of these borides were also analyzed by TEM energy-dispersive spectrometer. Because this precipitating phenomenon deviates from the traditional parabolic transient liquid phase bonding model which assumed a precipitates free DAZ during TLP bonding, some correlations between the deviation of the isothermal solidification kinetics and these newly observed precipitating behaviors were discussed and rationalized when bonding the interlayer containing the high diffusivity melting point depressant elements and substrates of low solubility.

  17. Depth-dependent permeability of hydrothermal discharge zones: measurements through tidal modulation and implications for mid-ocean ridge heat budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreyre, T.; Crone, T. J.; Olive, J. A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The efficiency of hydrothermal circulation as a heat and mass exchanger is strongly modulated by the permeability structure of newly formed oceanic crust, which is known to vary spatially and temporally. Here we use the modulation of discharge temperatures by oscillatory tidal loading to estimate permeability vs. depth profiles beneath hydrothermal discharge zones at three basalt-hosted hydrothermal fields. Phase lags between fluctuations in discharge temperature and seafloor tidal loading have previously been inverted for the permeability of the underlying discharge zone using the poroelastic modulation model of Jupp and Schulz [2004]. This has yielded a wide range of permeability estimates ranging from 10-13­-10-9 m2. Here we extend the model to a stratified medium comprising a top layer (2A) of permeability k2A overlying a bottom layer (2B) of permeability k2B. We apply it to three basalt-hosted hydrothermal fields on a slow- (Lucky Strike), intermediate- (Main Endeavour Field), and fast-spreading (East Pacific Rise, EPR-9ºN) ridge, where stratification is well known from seismic studies. We estimate a layer 2A permeability of ~10-10 m2 at Lucky Strike, in sharp contrast with EPR-9ºN, where k2A ~ 10-13 m2. At the Main Endeavour field, two different sites located above different distinct discharge zones (as indicated by magnetic studies) yield a high and a low permeability. The permeability of layer 2B is not as well constrained as that of layer 2A, with possible values ranging from 10-14-10-12 m2. We note, however, that the variability in measured phase lags across hydrothermal fields is compatible with a uniform layer 2B permeability of ~10-13 m2. Using theoretical scalings for high-Rayleigh porous convection, we demonstrate that the permeability of layer 2B sets the "effective permeability" of the entire convective system, and therefore the efficiency of heat extraction through young oceanic crust. A uniform layer 2B permeability would thus reconcile the

  18. The dynamical oscillation and propulsion of magnetic fields in the convective zone of a star. II - Thermal shadows. III - Accumulation of heat and the onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of thermal shadows which develop in the convective zone of a star around an insulating obstacle such as a horizontal band in intense magnetic field are studied. The depth of the shadow on the cool side of the obstacle is found to depend largely on the width of the obstacle multiplied by the temperature gradient. Thermal shadows pressing fields up to 10,000 G downward against the bottom of the convective zone are produced by the broad bands of the azimuthal field in the sun's convective zone. In the third part, the time-dependent accumulation of heat beneath a thermal barrier simulating such a band in the lower convective zone of the sun is considered. The resulting Rayleigh-Taylor instability is shown to cause tongues of heated gas to penetrate upward through the field, providing the emerging magnetic fields that give rise to the activity of the sun.

  19. Formation of the seed layers for layer-transfer process silicon solar cells by zone-heating recrystallization of porous silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukianov, A.; Murakami, K.; Takazawa, C.; Ihara, M.

    2016-05-01

    Thin-film crystalline silicon is promising for photovoltaic application to reduce the cost of photovoltaic energy. Porous silicon structures have been intensively studied as a seed layer for epitaxial growth of thin Si film and layer-transfer process (LTP). In this article, another approach for LTP has been proposed. The seed layers for epitaxial silicon growth have been formed by zone-heating recrystallization of double-layer por-Si structures. The influence of annealing parameters on porous silicon structures was studied. The transformation of por-Si layer to crystalline Si was observed with the formation of smooth continuous surface with the roughness 0.3 nm, peak-to-valley distance around 3.5 nm, and reduced density of pores. The mechanism of the transformation of por-Si surface due to the action of hydrogen in the passivated pores with preventing surface oxidation was proposed.

  20. Single-dose oral quercetin improves redox status but does not affect heat shock response in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifan; Islam, Aminul; Abraham, Preetha; Deuster, Patricia

    2014-07-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are considered as likely contributors to heat injury. However, their roles in regulating the heat shock response in vivo remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that acute quercetin treatment would improve redox status and reduce heat shock responses in mice. Mice underwent two heat tests before and after single oral administration of either quercetin (15 mg/kg) or vehicle. We measured physiologic and biochemical responses in mice during and 18 to 22 hours after heat tests, respectively. There were no significant differences in core temperature, heart rate, or blood pressure between quercetin and vehicle groups during heat exposure. Mice with relatively severe hyperthermia during the pretreatment heat test showed a significant trend toward a lower peak core temperature during the heat test after quercetin treatment. Compared with mice not exposed to heat, quercetin-treated mice had significantly lower interleukin 6 (P < .01) and higher superoxide dismutase levels (P < .01), whereas vehicle-treated mice had significantly lower total glutathione and higher 8-isoprostane levels in the circulation after heat exposure. Heat exposure significantly elevated heat shock proteins (HSPs) 72 and 90 and heat shock factor 1 levels in mouse liver, heart, and skeletal muscles, but no significant differences in tissue HSPs and heat shock factor 1 were found between quercetin- and vehicle-treated mice. These results suggest that a single moderate dose of quercetin is sufficient to alter redox status but not heat stress response in mice. Acute adaptations of peripheral tissues to heat stress may not be mediated by systemic inflammatory and redox state in vivo.

  1. An Evaluation of Coupled Water and Heat Transport Models in the Vadose Zone with Different Assumptions and Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Mohanty, B.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and simulating coupled water and heat transfer appropriately in the shallow subsurface is of vital significance for accurate prediction of soil evaporation that would improve the coupling between land surface and atmosphere, which consequently could enhance the reliability of weather and climate forecast. The theory of Philip and de Vries (1957), accounting for coupling between liquid water flow, vapor diffusion and heat transport, was considered physically incomplete and consequently extended by several researchers via taking into account more processes such as vapor convection, dispersion, air flow and dynamic phase change between liquid and vapor. Furthermore, the film flow process induced by adsorptive forces, which was also ignored in Philip and de Vries model for characterizing soil hydraulic parameters, was shown to be non-negligible for soil moisture and evaporation flux calculation in dry soils based on a recent synthetic analysis (Mohanty and Yang, 2013). In fact, the importance of these additional processes in arid and semiarid regions should be critically evaluated. Therefore, a general nonisothermal two-phase flow numerical model is developed to investigate the different conceptual model concepts, assumptions and processes regarding coupled water and heat transport in soils using two field data sets including Riverside, California and Audubon, Arizona. It is found that for the Riverside, California data sets, where the soil is relatively moist, the film flow effect is not very significant. However, for drier soils at the Audubon site in Arizona, the liquid film flow effect was significantly important. The airflow effect is important in both the Riverside site, California and Audubon, Arizona site data set and needs to be accounted for. In addition, the model taking into account non-equilibrium phase change effect is most complicated, however most accurate for both the sites in the study

  2. Effect of heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas arc butt-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy plates

    SciTech Connect

    Min Dong; Shen Jun; Lai Shiqiang; Chen Jie

    2009-12-15

    In this paper, the effects of heat input on the microstructures and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas arc butt-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy plates were investigated by microstructural observations, microhardness tests and tensile tests. The results show that with an increase of the heat input, the grains both in the fusion zone and the heat-affected zone coarsen and the width of the heat-affected zone increased. Moreover, an increase of the heat input resulted in a decrease of the continuous {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase and an increase of the granular {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase in both the fusion zone and the heat-affected zone. The ultimate tensile strength of the welded joint increased with an increase of the heat input, while, too high a heat input resulted in a decrease of the ultimate tensile strength of the welded joint. In addition, the average microhardness of the heat-affected zone and fusion zone decreased sharply with an increase of the heat input and then decreased slowly at a relatively high heat input.

  3. Twin Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's QuikSCAT satellite has confirmed a 30-year old largely unproven theory that there are two areas near the equator where the winds converge year after year and drive ocean circulation south of the equator. By analyzing winds, QuikSCAT has found a year-round southern and northern Intertropical Convergence Zone. This find is important to climate modelers and weather forecasters because it provides more detail on how the oceans and atmosphere interact near the equator. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the region that circles the Earth near the equator, where the trade winds of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. North of the equator, strong sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, drawing air in from north and south and causing the air to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Satellite data, however, has confirmed that there is an ITCZ north of the equator and a parallel ITCZ south of the equator. Variation in the location of the ITCZ is important to people around the world because it affects the north-south atmospheric circulation, which redistributes energy. It drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. 'The double ITCZ is usually only identified in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on a limited and seasonal basis,' said Timothy Liu, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., and lead researcher on the project. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, the southern ITCZ is usually seen springtime. In the western Atlantic Ocean, the southern ITCZ was recently clearly identified only in the summertime. However, QuikSCAT's wind data has seen the southern ITCZ in all seasons across the

  4. Contrast Ultrasound Imaging Does Not Affect Heat Shock Protein 70 Expression in Cholesterol-Fed Rabbit Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brendon W.; Simpson, Douglas G.; Miller, Rita J.; Erdman, John W.; O’Brien, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Diagnostic ultrasound imaging is enhanced by the use of circulating microbubble contrast agents (UCAs), but the interactions between ultrasound, UCAs, and vascular tissue are not fully understood. We hypothesized that ultrasound with a UCA would stress the vascular tissue and increase levels of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), a cellular stress protein. Methods Male New Zealand White rabbits (n = 32) were fed a standard chow diet (n = 4) or a 1% cholesterol, 10% fat, and 0.11% magnesium diet (n = 28). At 21 days, 24 rabbits on the cholesterol diet were either exposed to ultrasound (3.2-MHz f/3 transducer; 2.1 MPa; mechanical index, 1.17; 10 Hz pulse repetition frequency; 1.6 micro -seconds pulse duration; 2 minutes exposure duration at 4 sites along the aorta) with the UCA Definity (1× concentration, 1 mL/min; Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA) or sham exposed with a saline vehicle injection (n = 12 per group). Four rabbits on the cholesterol diet and 4 on the chow diet served as cage controls and were not exposed to ultrasound or restrained for blood sample collection. Animals were euthanized 24 hours after exposure, and aortas were quickly isolated and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Aorta lysates from the area of ultrasound exposure were analyzed for Hsp70 level by Western blot. Blood plasma was analyzed for cholesterol, Hsp70, and von Willebrand factor, a marker of endothelial function. Results Plasma total cholesterol levels increased to an average of 705 mg/dL. Ultrasound did not affect plasma von Willebrand factor, plasma Hsp70, or aorta Hsp70. Restraint increased Hsp70 (P < .001, analysis of variance). Conclusions Restraint, but not ultrasound with the UCA or cholesterol feeding, significantly increased Hsp70. PMID:26112623

  5. Evidence of multi-stage faulting by clay mineral analysis: Example in a normal fault zone affecting arkosic sandstones (Annot sandstones)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buatier, Martine D.; Cavailhes, Thibault; Charpentier, Delphine; Lerat, Jérémy; Sizun, Jean Pierre; Labaume, Pierre; Gout, Claude

    2015-06-01

    Fault affecting silicoclastic sediments are commonly enriched in clay minerals. Clays are sensitive to fluid-rock interactions and deformation mechanisms; in this paper, they are used as proxy for fault activity and behavior. The present study focuses on clay mineral assemblages from the Point Vert normal fault zone located in the Annot sandstones, a Priabonian-Rupelian turbidite succession of the Alpine foredeep in SE France. In this area, the Annot sandstones were buried around 6-8 km below the front of Alpine nappes soon after their deposition and exhumed during the middle-late Miocene. The fault affects arkosic sandstone beds alternating with pelitic layers, and displays throw of about thirty meters. The fault core zone comprises intensely foliated sandstones bounding a corridor of gouge about 20 cm thick. The foliated sandstones display clay concentration along S-C structures characterized by dissolution of K-feldspar and their replacement by mica, associated with quartz pressure solution, intense microfracturation and quartz vein precipitation. The gouge is formed by a clayey matrix containing fragments of foliated sandstones and pelites. However, a detailed petrographical investigation suggests complex polyphase deformation processes. Optical and SEM observations show that the clay minerals fraction of all studied rocks (pelites and sandstones from the damage and core zones of the fault) is dominated by white micas and chlorite. These minerals have two different origins: detrital and newly-formed. Detrital micas are identified by their larger shape and their chemical composition with a lower Fe-Mg content than the newly-formed white micas. In the foliated sandstones, newly-formed white micas are concentrated along S-C structures or replace K-feldspar. Both types of newly formed micas display the same chemical composition confirmed microstructural observations suggesting that they formed in the same conditions. They have the following structural formulas: Na0

  6. Will changes in root-zone temperature in boreal spring affect recovery of photosynthesis in Picea mariana and Populus tremuloides in a future climate?

    PubMed

    Fréchette, Emmanuelle; Ensminger, Ingo; Bergeron, Yves; Gessler, Arthur; Berninger, Frank

    2011-11-01

    Future climate will alter the soil cover of mosses and snow depths in the boreal forests of eastern Canada. In field manipulation experiments, we assessed the effects of varying moss and snow depths on the physiology of black spruce (Picea -mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) and trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) in the boreal black spruce forest of western Québec. For 1 year, naturally regenerated 10-year-old spruce and aspen were grown with one of the following treatments: additional N fertilization, addition of sphagnum moss cover, removal of mosses, delayed soil thawing through snow and hay addition, or accelerated soil thawing through springtime snow removal. Treatments that involved the addition of insulating moss or snow in the spring caused lower soil temperature, while removing moss and snow in the spring caused elevated soil temperature and thus had a warming effect. Soil warming treatments were associated with greater temperature variability. Additional soil cover, whether moss or snow, increased the rate of photosynthetic recovery in the spring. Moss and snow removal, on the other hand, had the opposite effect and lowered photosynthetic activity, especially in spruce. Maximal electron transport rate (ETR(max)) was, for spruce, 39.5% lower after moss removal than with moss addition, and 16.3% lower with accelerated thawing than with delayed thawing. Impaired photosynthetic recovery in the absence of insulating moss or snow covers was associated with lower foliar N concentrations. Both species were affected in that way, but trembling aspen generally reacted less strongly to all treatments. Our results indicate that a clear negative response of black spruce to changes in root-zone temperature should be anticipated in a future climate. Reduced moss cover and snow depth could adversely affect the photosynthetic capacities of black spruce, while having only minor effects on trembling aspen. PMID:22021010

  7. Will changes in root-zone temperature in boreal spring affect recovery of photosynthesis in Picea mariana and Populus tremuloides in a future climate?

    PubMed

    Fréchette, Emmanuelle; Ensminger, Ingo; Bergeron, Yves; Gessler, Arthur; Berninger, Frank

    2011-11-01

    Future climate will alter the soil cover of mosses and snow depths in the boreal forests of eastern Canada. In field manipulation experiments, we assessed the effects of varying moss and snow depths on the physiology of black spruce (Picea -mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) and trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) in the boreal black spruce forest of western Québec. For 1 year, naturally regenerated 10-year-old spruce and aspen were grown with one of the following treatments: additional N fertilization, addition of sphagnum moss cover, removal of mosses, delayed soil thawing through snow and hay addition, or accelerated soil thawing through springtime snow removal. Treatments that involved the addition of insulating moss or snow in the spring caused lower soil temperature, while removing moss and snow in the spring caused elevated soil temperature and thus had a warming effect. Soil warming treatments were associated with greater temperature variability. Additional soil cover, whether moss or snow, increased the rate of photosynthetic recovery in the spring. Moss and snow removal, on the other hand, had the opposite effect and lowered photosynthetic activity, especially in spruce. Maximal electron transport rate (ETR(max)) was, for spruce, 39.5% lower after moss removal than with moss addition, and 16.3% lower with accelerated thawing than with delayed thawing. Impaired photosynthetic recovery in the absence of insulating moss or snow covers was associated with lower foliar N concentrations. Both species were affected in that way, but trembling aspen generally reacted less strongly to all treatments. Our results indicate that a clear negative response of black spruce to changes in root-zone temperature should be anticipated in a future climate. Reduced moss cover and snow depth could adversely affect the photosynthetic capacities of black spruce, while having only minor effects on trembling aspen.

  8. A laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator: formulas for simulating the dynamics of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves during the device operation in the self-heating regime

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, E A

    2014-04-28

    For a laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator we have developed a mathematical model, which allows one to simulate the temporal behaviour of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves in a situation when the device operates in the self-heating regime and is switched-on at different initial temperatures. (laser gyroscopes)

  9. Proteins associated with heat-induced leaf senescence in creeping bentgrass as affected by foliar application of nitrogen, cytokinins, and an ethylene inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, David; Huang, Bingru

    2015-02-01

    Heat stress causes premature leaf senescence in cool-season grass species. The objective of this study was to identify proteins regulated by nitrogen, cytokinins, and ethylene inhibitor in relation to heat-induced leaf senescence in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera). Plants (cv. Penncross) were foliar sprayed with 18 mM carbonyldiamide (N source), 25 μM aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG, ethylene inhibitor), 25 μM zeatin riboside (ZR, cytokinin), or a water control, and then exposed to 20/15°C (day/night) or 35/30°C (heat stress) in growth chambers. All treatments suppressed heat-induced leaf senescence, as shown by higher turf quality and chlorophyll content, and lower electrolyte leakage in treated plants compared to the untreated control. A total of 49 proteins were responsive to N, AVG, or ZR under heat stress. The abundance of proteins in photosynthesis increased, with ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase affected by all three treatments, chlorophyll a/b-binding protein by AVG and N or Rubisco activase by AVG. Proteins for amino acid metabolism were upregulated, including alanine aminotransferase by three treatments and ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase by AVG and N. Upregulated proteins also included catalase by AVG and N and heat shock protein by ZR. Exogenous applications of AVG, ZR, or N downregulated proteins in respiration (enolase, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehygrogenase) under heat stress. Alleviation of heat-induced senescence by N, AVG, or ZR was associated with enhanced protein abundance in photosynthesis and amino acid metabolism and stress defense systems (heat shock protection and antioxidants), as well as suppression of those imparting respiration metabolism.

  10. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A resistance heated zoner, suitable for early zoning experiments with silicon, was designed and put into operation. The initial power usage and size was designed for an shown to be compatible with payload carriers contemplated for the Shuttle. This equipment will be used in the definition and development of flight experiments and apparatus for float zoning silicon and other materials in microgravity.

  11. Short communication: radio frequency dielectric heating of nonfat dry milk affects solubility and whey protein nitrogen index.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Michael, M; Phebus, R K; Thippareddi, H; Subbiah, J; Birla, S L; Schmidt, K A

    2013-03-01

    The US infant formula market is estimated at over $3.5 billion, of which 75% are dairy-based formulas. Dried dairy powders pose a significant food safety risk, with Cronobacter sakazakii and Salmonella spp. being pathogens of particular concern. Radio frequency dielectric heating (RFDH) can provide rapid, uniform heat treatment of dry powders; thus, it potentially may be used as a postprocess lethality treatment for nonfat dry milk (NDM) or powdered infant formula. Because RFDH is a heat treatment, the functionality of the NDM may be altered and should be evaluated. High heat- and low heat-NDM were RFDH processed at temperatures ranging from 75 to 90°C for 5 to 125 min. Products were then assessed for whey protein nitrogen index (WPNI), solubility, and color. In low heat-NDM, RFDH decreased WPNI and solubility if the process was done at ≥ 80°C; however, in high heat-NDM, RFDH had a greater effect on solubility than WPNI and some color properties were altered. Further investigation of RFDH is merited to validate its application as a pathogen control process for NDM across processing parameters that result in acceptable functional properties for infant formula and other food products containing NDM.

  12. Oxidative stress in deep scattering layers: Heat shock response and antioxidant enzymes activities of myctophid fishes thriving in oxygen minimum zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Ana Rita; Trübenbach, Katja; Teixeira, Tatiana; Lopes, Vanessa M.; Pires, Vanessa; Baptista, Miguel; Repolho, Tiago; Calado, Ricardo; Diniz, Mário; Rosa, Rui

    2013-12-01

    Diel vertical migrators, such as myctophid fishes, are known to encounter oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) during daytime in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and, therefore, have to cope with temperature and oxidative stress that arise while ascending to warmer, normoxic surface waters at night-time. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant defense strategies and heat shock response (HSR) in two myctophid species, namely Triphoturus mexicanus and Benthosema panamense, at shallow and warm surface waters (21 kPa, 20-25 °C) and at hypoxic, cold (≤1 kPa, 10 °C) mesopelagic depths. More specifically, we quantified (i) heat shock protein concentrations (HSP70/HSC70) (ii) antioxidant enzyme activities [including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)], and (iii) lipid peroxidation [malondialdehyde (MDA) levels]. HSP70/HSC70 levels increased in both myctophid species at warmer, well-oxygenated surface waters probably to prevent cellular damage (oxidative stress) due to increased oxygen demand under elevated temperatures and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. On the other hand, CAT and GST activities were augmented under hypoxic conditions, probably as preparatory response to a burst of oxyradicals during the reoxygenation phase (while ascending). SOD activity decreased under hypoxia in B. panamense, but was kept unchanged in T. mexicanus. MDA levels in B. panamense did not change between the surface and deep-sea conditions, whereas T. mexicanus showed elevated MDA and HSP70/HSC70 concentrations at warmer surface waters. This indicated that T. mexicanus seems to be not so well tuned to temperature and oxidative stress associated to diel vertical migrations. The understanding of such physiological strategies that are linked to oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation phases may provide valuable information about how different species might respond to the impacts of environmental stressors (e.g. expanding mesopelagic hypoxia

  13. Growth of high T{sub c} superconducting fibers using a minaturized laser-heated float zone process. Annual progress report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Feigelson, R.S.

    1993-12-01

    This report covers the research done on {open_quotes}Growth of High Tc Superconducting Fibers using a Miniaturized Laser-Heated Float Zone Process{close_quotes} during the 12 months from Jan. 1, 1993 until Dec. 31, 1993. The effort during this period were directed into two areas; the influence of growth conditions on the properties of the superconducting fibers and the construction of the advanced fiber growth station. In the first area of emphasis, studies were done on constitutional super cooling effect, the influence of processing parameters on Tc, the correlation between Tc and growth parameters and the mechanical properties of 2212 fibers. These studies showed that there are two types of interfacial breakdowns; one type that involves low temperature inclusions caused by excessive solute buildup and another involving high temperature inclusions which require two conditions to be met. These condition are: (1) significant compositional gradients in the melt and (2) an interface melt temperature near the peritectic decomposition temperature. Analysis of the experimental data lead to the hypothesis that fibers with the highest crystallinity are grown from SrO-rich 2212 melts. Evaluation of the constitutional supercooling responsible for the high temperature inclusions suggested that growth under these conditions was most vulnerable to disruption by HT inclusions. Tc increased with growth temperature for as-grown fibers. The concentration of SrO in the fibers had a parabolic relationship with temperature. The same parabolic relationship was observed between composition and Tc. The thermal history of 2212 crystals has been shown to influence their oxygen content which played a significant role in determining their Tc`s. Fiber heat treatment and the ambient gaseous atmosphere were found to dominate the Tc variations measured in this study.

  14. An attempt to minimize the temperature gradient along a plug-flow methane/steam reforming reactor by adopting locally controlled heating zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozdzierz, M.; Brus, G.; Sciazko, A.; Komatsu, Y.; Kimijima, S.; Szmyd, J. S.

    2014-08-01

    Plug flow reactors are very common in the chemical process industry, including methane/steam reforming applications. Their operation presents many challenges, such as a strong dependence of temperature and composition distribution on the inlet conditions. The strongly endothermic methane/steam reforming reaction might result in a temperature drop at the inlet of the reactor and consequently the occurrence of large temperature gradients. The strongly non-uniform temperature distribution due to endothermic chemical reaction can have tremendous consequences on the operation of the reactor, such as catalyst degradation, undesired side reactions and thermal stresses. To avoid such unfavorable conditions, thermal management of the reactor becomes an important issue. To carry out thermal management properly, detailed modeling and corresponding numerical analyses of the phenomena occurring inside the reforming system is required. This paper presents experimental and numerical studies on the methane/steam reforming process inside a plug-flow reactor. To optimize the reforming reactors, detailed data about the entire reforming process is required. In this study the kinetics of methane/steam reforming on the Ni/YSZ catalyst was experimentally investigated. Measurements including different thermal boundary conditions, the fuel flow rate and the steam- to-methane ratios were performed. The reforming rate equation derived from experimental data was used in the numerical model to predict gas composition and temperature distribution along the steam-reforming reactor. Finally, an attempt was made to control the temperature distribution by adopting locally controlled heating zones.

  15. Exposure of Lactating Dairy Cows to Acute Pre-Ovulatory Heat Stress Affects Granulosa Cell-Specific Gene Expression Profiles in Dominant Follicles.

    PubMed

    Vanselow, Jens; Vernunft, Andreas; Koczan, Dirk; Spitschak, Marion; Kuhla, Björn

    2016-01-01

    High environmental temperatures induce detrimental effects on various reproductive processes in cattle. According to the predicted global warming the number of days with unfavorable ambient temperatures will further increase. The objective of this study was to investigate effects of acute heat stress during the late pre-ovulatory phase on morphological, physiological and molecular parameters of dominant follicles in cycling cows during lactation. Eight German Holstein cows in established lactation were exposed to heat stress (28°C) or thermoneutral conditions (15°C) with pair-feeding for four days. After hormonal heat induction growth of the respective dominant follicles was monitored by ultrasonography for two days, then an ovulatory GnRH dose was given and follicular steroid hormones and granulosa cell-specific gene expression profiles were determined 23 hrs thereafter. The data showed that the pre-ovulatory growth of dominant follicles and the estradiol, but not the progesterone concentrations tended to be slightly affected. mRNA microarray and hierarchical cluster analysis revealed distinct expression profiles in granulosa cells derived from heat stressed compared to pair-fed animals. Among the 255 affected genes heatstress-, stress- or apoptosis associated genes were not present. But instead, we found up-regulation of genes essentially involved in G-protein coupled signaling pathways, extracellular matrix composition, and several members of the solute carrier family as well as up-regulation of FST encoding follistatin. In summary, the data of the present study show that acute pre-ovulatory heat stress can specifically alter gene expression profiles in granulosa cells, however without inducing stress related genes and pathways and suggestively can impair follicular growth due to affecting the activin-inhibin-follistatin system. PMID:27532452

  16. Exposure of Lactating Dairy Cows to Acute Pre-Ovulatory Heat Stress Affects Granulosa Cell-Specific Gene Expression Profiles in Dominant Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Vanselow, Jens; Vernunft, Andreas; Koczan, Dirk; Spitschak, Marion; Kuhla, Björn

    2016-01-01

    High environmental temperatures induce detrimental effects on various reproductive processes in cattle. According to the predicted global warming the number of days with unfavorable ambient temperatures will further increase. The objective of this study was to investigate effects of acute heat stress during the late pre-ovulatory phase on morphological, physiological and molecular parameters of dominant follicles in cycling cows during lactation. Eight German Holstein cows in established lactation were exposed to heat stress (28°C) or thermoneutral conditions (15°C) with pair-feeding for four days. After hormonal heat induction growth of the respective dominant follicles was monitored by ultrasonography for two days, then an ovulatory GnRH dose was given and follicular steroid hormones and granulosa cell-specific gene expression profiles were determined 23 hrs thereafter. The data showed that the pre-ovulatory growth of dominant follicles and the estradiol, but not the progesterone concentrations tended to be slightly affected. mRNA microarray and hierarchical cluster analysis revealed distinct expression profiles in granulosa cells derived from heat stressed compared to pair-fed animals. Among the 255 affected genes heatstress-, stress- or apoptosis associated genes were not present. But instead, we found up-regulation of genes essentially involved in G-protein coupled signaling pathways, extracellular matrix composition, and several members of the solute carrier family as well as up-regulation of FST encoding follistatin. In summary, the data of the present study show that acute pre-ovulatory heat stress can specifically alter gene expression profiles in granulosa cells, however without inducing stress related genes and pathways and suggestively can impair follicular growth due to affecting the activin-inhibin-follistatin system. PMID:27532452

  17. The historical trend in float zone crystal diameters and power requirements for float zoned silicon crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    The power needed to zone silicon crystals by radio frequency heating was analyzed. The heat loss mechanisms are examined. Curves are presented for power as a function of crystal diameter for commercial silicon zoning.

  18. HEAT GENERATION

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1963-12-01

    Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

  19. Temperature trends in desert cities: how vegetation and urbanization affect the urban heat island dynamics in hyper-arid climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marpu, P. R.; Lazzarini, M.; Molini, A.; Ghedira, H.

    2013-12-01

    Urban areas represent a unique micro-climatic system, mainly characterized by scarcity of vegetation and ground moisture, an albedo strictly dependent on building materials and urban forms, high heat capacity, elevated pollutants emissions, anthropogenic heat production, and a characteristic boundary layer dynamics. For obvious historical reasons, the first to be addressed in the literature were the effects of urbanization on the local microclimate of temperate regions, where most of the urban development took place in the last centuries. Here micro-climatic characteristics all contribute to the warming of urban areas, also known as 'urban heat island' effect, and are expected to crucially impact future energy and water consumption, air quality, and human health. However, rapidly increasing urbanization rates in arid and hyper-arid developing countries could soon require more attention towards studying the effects of urban development on arid climates, which remained mainly unexplored till now. In this talk we investigate the climatology of urban heat islands in seven highly urbanized desert cities based on day and night temporal trends of land surface temperature (LST) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) acquired using MODIS satellite during 2000-2012. Urban and rural areas are distinguished by analyzing the high-resolution temporal variability and averaged monthly values of LST, NDVI and Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI) for all the seven cities and adjacent sub-urban areas. Different thermal behaviors were observed at the selected sites, also including temperature mitigation and inverse urban heat island, and are here discussed together with detailed analysis of the corresponding trends.

  20. Application of heat- and steam-generating sheets to the lumbar or abdominal region affects autonomic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Yoshinao; Oda, Hideshi; Igaki, Michihito; Suzuki, Megumi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Yada, Yukihiro; Tsuchiya, Shuichi; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Ohishi, Sachiko

    2006-06-30

    Effects of applying a heat- and steam-generating (HSG) sheet on peripheral hemodynamics and autonomic nerve activity were examined. An HSG sheet was applied to the lumbar or abdominal region. Measurements included skin temperature at the lumbar and abdominal regions and the fingertip, total hemoglobin, tissue oxygen saturation ratio (StO2), pupillary light reflex, changes in ECG R-R interval blood pressure and percutaneous electrogastrography (EGG). A heat-generating sheet without steam was used as the control. Based on the present findings, application of the HSG sheet to the lumbar or abdominal region may improve peripheral hemodynamics and inhibit sympathetic nerve activity, resulting in parasympathetic nerve activity dominance.

  1. Growth performance and reproductive traits at first parity of New Zealand white female rabbits as affected by heat stress and its alleviation under Egyptian conditions.

    PubMed

    Marai, I F; Ayyat, M S; Abd el-Monem, U M

    2001-12-01

    Exposing growing and adult New Zealand White (NZW) female rabbits to severe heat stress (temperature-humidity index = 28.9) during summer adversely affected their growth and reproductive traits. The traits that declined significantly (p < 0.01) were the live body weight, daily weight gain and feed intake of growing rabbits, and the litter size and litter weight at weaning (p < 0.05) and the pre-weaning weight gain of pups (p < 0.01) for adult females. The conception rate declined considerably with heat stress. The declines in the values of the digestibility coefficients due to heat stress were 7.9% (p < 0.05) for dry matter (DM), 8.1% (p < 0.05) for crude protein (CP) and 1.0% for crude fibre (CF). The traits that increased significantly (p < 0.01) due to heat stress were water intake, water/feed ratio and rectal temperature in growing rabbits and pre-weaning mortality for adult females. Alleviation of heat stress in the growing and adult female NZW rabbits was more efficient with drinking cool water (10-15 degrees C; between 10:00 and 17:00) than with supplementation with palm oil (as a source of energy) or natural clay (as a natural enhancer to growth and milk production). Supplying the animals with cool drinking water gave the highest body weight and weight gain, conception rate, litter size and weight and digestibility coefficients for DM and CP and the lowest rectal temperature, respiration rate and pre-weaning mortality. The loss in rabbit production pertaining to heat stress estimated from the percentages of decline in conception rate x pre-weaning mortality x litter weight at weaning was 73.0%. The provision of cool water restored 11/12 of heat loss. PMID:11770200

  2. Absence of heat treatment of serum for culture medium supplementation does not adversely affect the outcome of in-vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Imoedemhe, D A; Sigue, A B; Pacpaco, E L; Olazo, A B; Luciano, E C

    1994-09-01

    This study was carried out to determine if not heat-treating serum prior to use for medium supplementation adversely affected in-vitro fertilization (IVF) of human oocytes. Morphologically mature human oocytes derived from 135 patients undergoing IVF treatment were studied. A total of 504 oocytes were incubated, inseminated and the resulting pronuclear oocytes cultured further in Earle's balanced salt solution (EBSS) supplemented with 10% non-heat-treated serum. Comparisons of fertilization rate and embryonic development were made between these and 687 control oocytes derived from the same patients but incubated, inseminated and resulting pronuclear oocytes cultured further in EBSS supplemented with 10% heat-treated serum. The fertilization rate of 74.4% (375/504) of oocytes handled in serum-supplemented medium that had not been heat-treated was significantly better than the rate of 67.7% (465/687) for controls (P < 0.0125). The proportion of pronucleate oocytes that cleaved was also significantly better in the non-heat-treated serum group: 270/300 (90%) versus 307/375 (81.8%) (P < 0.0025). There was no significant difference in the proportion of embryos with four or more cells at the time of embryo transfer. The results show that the absence of heat treatment of serum used to supplement culture medium has no adverse effect on the fertilization rate and short-term embryo development in vitro; hence we suggest that serum heat treatment is an unnecessary procedure and could be abandoned. PMID:7836531

  3. Heat shock and cold shock treatments affect the survival of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium exposed to disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Hsuan; Chiang, Ming-Lun; Pan, Chorng-Liang; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2012-04-01

    The foodborne pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium were subjected to heat shock at 48°C for 10 and 30 min, respectively, and then cold shocked at 15°C for 3 h. The effect of these shocks on the viability of test organisms exposed to chlorine dioxide and quaternary ammonium compounds was then determined. After exposure to the disinfectants, the viable population of each test organism, regardless of heat shock or cold shock treatment, decreased as the exposure period was extended. Both heat shock and cold shock treatments reduced the susceptibility of L. monocytogenes to both disinfectants at 25°C. However, for Salmonella Typhimurium, exposure to the chlorine dioxide disinfectant or quaternary ammonium compounds at 25°C significantly reduced (P < 0.05) survival of heat-shocked cells but significantly increased (P < 0.05) survival of cold-shocked cells compared with control cells. Survival of both L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium generally was reduced after exposure to disinfectants at 40°C compared with 25°C.

  4. Heat-denaturation and aggregation of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) globulins as affected by the pH value.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Outi E; Zannini, Emanuele; Koehler, Peter; Arendt, Elke K

    2016-04-01

    The influence of heating (100 °C; 0-15 min) on the relative molecular mass, protein unfolding and secondary structure of quinoa globulins was studied at pH 6.5 (low solubility), 8.5 and 10.5 (high solubility). The patterns of denaturation and aggregation varied with pH. Heating triggered the disruption of the disulfide bonds connecting the acidic and basic chains of the chenopodin subunits at pH 8.5 and 10.5, but not at pH 6.5. Large aggregates unable to enter a 4% SDS-PAGE gel were formed at pH 6.5 and 8.5, which became soluble under reducing conditions. Heating at pH 10.5 lead to a rapid dissociation of the native chenopodin and to the disruption of the subunits, but no SDS-insoluble aggregates were formed. No major changes in secondary structure occurred during a 15 min heating, but an increase in hydrophobicity indicated unfolding of the tertiary structure in all samples.

  5. Heat treatment of Huanglongbing–affected citrus trees in field for reduction of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus”

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease) is a devastating citrus disease worldwide. Research conducted by Lin Kung-Hisang et al. in 1960s China suggested that heat treatments were effective at eliminating the pathogen that causes HLB from scions. We tested the effects of high temperature on the red...

  6. Heat-denaturation and aggregation of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) globulins as affected by the pH value.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Outi E; Zannini, Emanuele; Koehler, Peter; Arendt, Elke K

    2016-04-01

    The influence of heating (100 °C; 0-15 min) on the relative molecular mass, protein unfolding and secondary structure of quinoa globulins was studied at pH 6.5 (low solubility), 8.5 and 10.5 (high solubility). The patterns of denaturation and aggregation varied with pH. Heating triggered the disruption of the disulfide bonds connecting the acidic and basic chains of the chenopodin subunits at pH 8.5 and 10.5, but not at pH 6.5. Large aggregates unable to enter a 4% SDS-PAGE gel were formed at pH 6.5 and 8.5, which became soluble under reducing conditions. Heating at pH 10.5 lead to a rapid dissociation of the native chenopodin and to the disruption of the subunits, but no SDS-insoluble aggregates were formed. No major changes in secondary structure occurred during a 15 min heating, but an increase in hydrophobicity indicated unfolding of the tertiary structure in all samples. PMID:26593460

  7. Antinutritional factors and functionality of protein-rich fractions of industrial guar meal as affected by heat processing.

    PubMed

    Nidhina, N; Muthukumar, S P

    2015-04-15

    Proximate composition analysis and antinutritional factor composition of different fractions of industrial guar meal: raw churi (IRC), heated churi (IHC), final churi (IFC) and guar korma (IGK) were studied and compared. Protein content was found to be very high in IGK (52.7%) when compared to the churi fractions (32-33%) and the trypsin inhibitor activities were found to be negligible in all the fractions (0.58-1.8 mg/g). Single fraction (IGK) was selected for further studies, based on the protein content. The antinutritional factors of selected fractions were significantly reduced by different heat treatments. Heat treatments significantly increased the water absorbing capacity of IGK, but reduced the nitrogen solubility, emulsifying and foaming capacity. Highest L(∗) value was observed for boiled IGK, highest a(∗) and b(∗) values for roasted IGK, during colour measurement. FTIR spectral analysis revealed the presence several aromatic groups in IGK and slight modifications in the molecular structure during heat treatments.

  8. Fluid processes in subduction zones.

    PubMed

    Peacock, S A

    1990-04-20

    Fluids play a critical role in subduction zones and arc magmatism. At shallow levels in subduction zones (<40 kilometers depth), expulsion of large volumes of pore waters and CH(4)-H(2)O fluids produced by diagenetic and low-grade metamorphic reactions affect the thermal and rheological evolution of the accretionary prism and provide nutrients for deep-sea biological communities. At greater depths, H(2)O and CO(2) released by metamorphic reactions in the subducting oceanic crust may alter the bulk composition in the overlying mantle wedge and trigger partial melting reactions. The location and conse-quences of fluid production in subduction zones can be constrained by consideration of phase diagrams for relevant bulk compositions in conjunction with fluid and rock pressure-temperature-time paths predicted by numerical heat-transfer models. Partial melting of subducting, amphibole-bearing oceanic crust is predicted only within several tens of million years of the initiation of subduction in young oceanic lithosphere. In cooler subduction zones, partial melting appears to occur primarily in the overlying mantle wedge as a result of fluid infiltration. PMID:17784486

  9. Fluid processes in subduction zones.

    PubMed

    Peacock, S A

    1990-04-20

    Fluids play a critical role in subduction zones and arc magmatism. At shallow levels in subduction zones (<40 kilometers depth), expulsion of large volumes of pore waters and CH(4)-H(2)O fluids produced by diagenetic and low-grade metamorphic reactions affect the thermal and rheological evolution of the accretionary prism and provide nutrients for deep-sea biological communities. At greater depths, H(2)O and CO(2) released by metamorphic reactions in the subducting oceanic crust may alter the bulk composition in the overlying mantle wedge and trigger partial melting reactions. The location and conse-quences of fluid production in subduction zones can be constrained by consideration of phase diagrams for relevant bulk compositions in conjunction with fluid and rock pressure-temperature-time paths predicted by numerical heat-transfer models. Partial melting of subducting, amphibole-bearing oceanic crust is predicted only within several tens of million years of the initiation of subduction in young oceanic lithosphere. In cooler subduction zones, partial melting appears to occur primarily in the overlying mantle wedge as a result of fluid infiltration.

  10. Growth of high {Tc} superconducting fibers using a miniaturized laser-heated float zone process. Progress report, November 6, 1990--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Feigelson, R.S.; Route, R.K.; DeMattei, R.C.

    1991-12-31

    This report summarizes the progress made on the project ``Growth of High {Tc} Superconducting Fibers Using a Miniaturized Laser-Heated Float Zone Process`` during the 14 month period from Nov. 6, 1990 to Dec. 31, 1991. The studies during this period focused primarily on phase diagram studies, phase relations in the calcium aluminate system and on Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (BSCCO). Some work was also done on the Advanced Fiber Growing Station. Because of the complicated phase relationships found in the incongruently melting BSCCO system, the incongruently melting CA{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} phase of the calcium oxide-aluminum oxide system was studied as a model material. The data obtained was in agreement with well known solidification theory. Fibers grown from calcium oxide rich sources contained calcium oxide nodules which transported from the melting source interface to the growth interface, while those grown from aluminum oxide rich sources contained continuous inclusions of a divorced eutectic. The melt compositions were also found to follow theoretical predictions. The agreement of this data with the phase diagram and solidification theory demonstrates that phase equilibrium information can be extracted from fiber growth experiments. BSCCO feed rods were made from 12 different compositions. Fibers were grown from these rods and the melts were abruptly quenched which preserves the as-grown 2212 fiber, a glassy frozen melt and the source. A future study of these sections will reveal the phase relationships that exist in the BSCCO system. Melt temperature gradients of 500--1,000 C/cm were measured near the interface in these experiments. During this reporting period, work continued on the mechanical components of the Advanced Fiber Growth Station.

  11. Predicted optimum ambient temperatures for broiler chickens to dissipate metabolic heat do not affect performance or improve breast muscle quality

    PubMed Central

    Zahoor, I.; Mitchell, M.A.; Hall, S.; Beard, P.M.; Gous, R.M.; De Koning, D.J.; Hocking, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that muscle damage in fast-growing broiler chickens is associated with an ambient temperature that does not permit the birds to lose metabolic heat resulting in physiological heat stress and a reduction in meat quality.The experiment was performed in 4 climate chambers and was repeated in 2 trials using a total of 200 male broiler chickens. Two treatments compared the recommended temperature profile and a cool regimen. The cool regimen was defined by a theoretical model that determined the environmental temperature that would enable heat generated by the bird to be lost to the environment.There were no differences in growth rate or feed intake between the two treatments. Breast muscles from birds on the recommended temperature regimen were lighter, less red and more yellow than those from the cool temperature regimen. There were no differences in moisture loss or shear strength but stiffness was greater in breast muscle from birds housed in the cool compared to the recommended regimen.Histopathological changes in the breast muscle were similar in both treatments and were characterised by mild to severe myofibre degeneration and necrosis with regeneration, fibrosis and adipocyte infiltration. There was no difference in plasma creatine kinase activity, a measure of muscle cell damage, between the two treatments consistent with the absence of differences in muscle pathology.It was concluded that breast muscle damage in fast-growing broiler chickens was not the result of an inability to lose metabolic heat at recommended ambient temperatures. The results suggest that muscle cell damage and breast meat quality concerns in modern broiler chickens are related to genetic selection for muscle yields and that genetic selection to address breast muscle integrity in a balanced breeding programme is imperative. PMID:26670305

  12. Magnetic characterization of radio frequency heat affected micron size Fe3O4 powders: a bio-application perspective.

    PubMed

    Roul, B K; Mishra, D K; Ray, M; Sahu, D R; Mishra, P K; Srinivasu, V V; Pradhan, A K

    2009-05-01

    Micron size Fe3O4 powders were chemically prepared and processed by radio frequency (13.56 MHz) oxygen plasma irradiation technique at different elevated temperatures using low radio frequency (RF) power level. Low magnetic field RF superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetization studies were performed up to a maximum magnetic field of 100 Oe, which was well below the magnetic field tolerance factor of human beings and at different temperatures (down to 5 K). Heat-treated powders in RF oxygen plasma showed significant changes in blocking temperature, magnetization and susceptibility, which are important parameters for bio-applications. It is observed that blocking temperature is decreased under identical RF heat treatment in oxygen plasma and noted to be dependent on average particle size. Microscopic rise in electron temperature during RF heating may likely to enhance the electron-hopping rate between Fe(+2) and Fe(+3) in the octahedral site of Fe3O4 molecular crystal structure, which in turn exhibit changes in blocking temperature including low field magnetization and susceptibility. These properties of Fe3O4 fine powder are likely to play important role in generating and processing biocompatible Ferro-fluid down to nanoscopic size for biomaterials applications. PMID:19452992

  13. Chlorophylls and carotenoids of kiwifruit puree are affected similarly or less by microwave than by conventional heat processing and storage.

    PubMed

    Benlloch-Tinoco, María; Kaulmann, Anouk; Corte-Real, Joana; Rodrigo, Dolores; Martínez-Navarrete, Nuria; Bohn, Torsten

    2015-11-15

    The impact of microwave (1000 W - 340 s) and conventional heat (97 °C - 30s) pasteurisation and storage (4, 10, 22 °C for up to 63 d) on total and individual carotenoids and chlorophylls in kiwifruit puree was evaluated. Bioaccessibility of carotenoids, before and after pasteurisation and storage, was also studied. Microwaves and conventional heating led to marked changes in the chlorophyll (42-100% losses) and carotenoid (62-91% losses) content. First- and second-order kinetics appropriately explained the degradation of total carotenoids and chlorophylls over time, respectively. Pasteurised samples showed significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced stability of these pigments, with microwaves (k = 0.007-0.031100 g mg(-1) day(-1) at 4-22 °C) promoting chlorophyll stability to a greater extent than conventional heating (k = 0.0015-0.034100 g mg(-1) day(-1) at 4-22 °C). Bioaccessibility of carotenoids remained (p < 0.05) unaffected by processing and storage. These results highlighted that the pigment composition of microwaved kiwifruit was more similar to that of the fresh fruit and better preserved during storage.

  14. Estrogen deprivation does not affect vascular heat shock response in female rats: a comparison with oxidative stress markers.

    PubMed

    Miragem, Antônio Azambuja; Ludwig, Mirna Stela; Heck, Thiago Gomes; Baldissera, Fernanda Giesel; dos Santos, Analu Bender; Frizzo, Matias Nunes; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo

    2015-09-01

    Hot flashes, which involve a tiny rise in core temperature, are the most common complaint of peri- and post-menopausal women, being tightly related to decrease in estrogen levels. On the other hand, estradiol (E2) induces the expression of HSP72, a member of the 70 kDa family of heat shock proteins (HSP70), which are cytoprotective, cardioprotective, and heat inducible. Since HSP70 expression is compromised in age-related inflammatory diseases, we argued whether the capacity of triggering a robust heat shock (HS) response would be still present after E2 withdrawal. Hence, we studied the effects of HS treatment (hot tub) in female Wistar rats subjected to bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) after a 7-day washout period. Twelve h after HS, the animals were killed and aortic arches were surgically excised for molecular analyses. The results were compared with oxidative stress markers in the plasma (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and lipoperoxidation) because HSP70 expression is also sensitive to redox regulation. Extracellular (plasma) to intracellular HSP70 ratio, an index of systemic inflammatory status, was also investigated. The results showed that HS response was preserved in OVX animals, as inferred from HSP70 expression (up to 40% rise, p < 0.01) in the aortas, which was accompanied by no further alterations in oxidative stress, hematological parameters, and glycemic control either. This suggests that the lack of estrogen per se could not be solely ascribed as the unique source of low HSP70 expression as observed in long-term post-menopausal individuals. As a consequence, periodic evaluation of HSP70 status (iHSP70 vs. eHSP70) may be of clinical relevance because decreased HS response capacity is at the center of the onset of menopause-related dysfunctions.

  15. Neonatal capsaicin treatment in rats affects TRPV1-related noxious heat sensation and circadian body temperature rhythm.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Seong, Jinsil

    2014-06-15

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a cation channel that serves as a polymodal detector of noxious stimuli such as capsaicin. Therefore, capsaicin treatment has been used to investigate the physiological function of TRPV1. Here, we report physiological changes induced by treating neonatal rats with capsaicin. Capsaicin (50mg/kg) (cap-treated) or vehicle (vehicle-treated) was systemically administered to newborn SD rat pups within 48 h after birth. TRPV1 expression, intake volume of capsaicin water, and noxious heat sensation were measured 6 weeks after capsaicin treatment. Circadian body temperature and locomotion were recorded by biotelemetry. Expression of Per1, Per2, Bmal1 and Hsf1 (clock genes) was also investigated. Neonatal capsaicin treatment not only decreased TRPV1 expression but also induced desensitization to noxious heat stimuli. Circadian body temperature of cap-treated rats increased significantly compared with that of vehicle-treated rats. Additionally, the amplitude of the circadian body temperature was reversed in cap-treated rats. Expression of the hypothalamic Hsf1 and liver Per2 clock genes followed a similar trend. Therefore, we suggest that these findings will be useful in studying various physiological mechanisms related to TRPV1.

  16. Digestibility and antigenicity of β-lactoglobulin as affected by heat, pH and applied shear.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Toheder; Vasiljevic, Todor; Ramchandran, Lata

    2017-02-15

    Processing induced conformational changes can modulate digestibility of food allergens and thereby their antigenicity. Effect of different pH (3, 5, 7), temperature (room temperature, 120°C) and shear (0s(-1), 1000s(-1)) on simulated gastrointestinal digestibility of β-lg and post digestion antigenic characteristics have been studied. At all pH levels unheated β-lg showed resistance to peptic digestion with high antigenic value while it was fairly susceptible to pancreatin with moderate reduction in antigenicity. Heating at 120°C significantly improved both peptic and pancreatic digestion attributed to structural alterations that resulted in much lower antigenicity; the level of reduction being pH dependant. The lowest antigenicity was recorded at pH 5. Shearing (1000s(-1)) had a minor impact reducing digestibility and thereby enhancing antigenicity of unheated β-lg at pH 5 and 7 slightly; however in conjunction with heating (120°C) it reduced antigenicity further irrespective of the pH. Overall, treatment at pH 5, 120°C and 1000s(-1) could potentially reduce post digestion antigenicity of β-lg. PMID:27664667

  17. Digestibility and antigenicity of β-lactoglobulin as affected by heat, pH and applied shear.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Toheder; Vasiljevic, Todor; Ramchandran, Lata

    2017-02-15

    Processing induced conformational changes can modulate digestibility of food allergens and thereby their antigenicity. Effect of different pH (3, 5, 7), temperature (room temperature, 120°C) and shear (0s(-1), 1000s(-1)) on simulated gastrointestinal digestibility of β-lg and post digestion antigenic characteristics have been studied. At all pH levels unheated β-lg showed resistance to peptic digestion with high antigenic value while it was fairly susceptible to pancreatin with moderate reduction in antigenicity. Heating at 120°C significantly improved both peptic and pancreatic digestion attributed to structural alterations that resulted in much lower antigenicity; the level of reduction being pH dependant. The lowest antigenicity was recorded at pH 5. Shearing (1000s(-1)) had a minor impact reducing digestibility and thereby enhancing antigenicity of unheated β-lg at pH 5 and 7 slightly; however in conjunction with heating (120°C) it reduced antigenicity further irrespective of the pH. Overall, treatment at pH 5, 120°C and 1000s(-1) could potentially reduce post digestion antigenicity of β-lg.

  18. The thermal consequences of river-level variations in an urban groundwater body highly affected by groundwater heat pumps.

    PubMed

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñe, Enric; Schneider, Eduardo Garrido; Sánchez-Navarro, José Ángel; Mateo-Lázaro, Jesús

    2014-07-01

    The extensive implementation of ground source heat pumps in urban aquifers is an important issue related to groundwater quality and the future economic feasibility of existent geothermal installations. Although many cities are in the immediate vicinity of large rivers, little is known about the thermal river-groundwater interaction at a kilometric-scale. The aim of this work is to evaluate the thermal impact of river water recharges induced by flood events into an urban alluvial aquifer anthropogenically influenced by geothermal exploitations. The present thermal state of an urban aquifer at a regional scale, including 27 groundwater heat pump installations, has been evaluated. The thermal impacts of these installations in the aquifer together with the thermal impacts from "cold" winter floods have also been spatially and temporally evaluated to ensure better geothermal management of the aquifer. The results showed a variable direct thermal impact from 0 to 6 °C depending on the groundwater-surface water interaction along the river trajectory. The thermal plumes far away from the riverbed also present minor indirect thermal impacts due to hydraulic gradient variations.

  19. Impact of western Siberia heat wave 2012 on greenhouse gases and trace metal concentration in thaw lakes of discontinuous permafrost zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, O. S.; Shirokova, L. S.; Kirpotin, S. N.; Kulizhsky, S. P.; Vorobiev, S. N.

    2013-08-01

    During the anomalously hot summer in 2012, surface air temperatures in Western Siberia were 5 to 15 °C higher than those observed during the previous period of > 30 yr. This unusual climate phenomenon provided an opportunity to examine the effects of short-term natural heating of water in thermokarst ponds and lakes in discontinuous permafrost zones and compare these observations to previous field results obtained when the temperature was normal during the summer of 2010 in the same region. In 2012, thermokarst bodies of water shrank significantly, water levels dropped approximately 50 cm in large lakes and small (< 10-100 m2) ponds, and shallow soil depressions disappeared. Based on samples from ~ 40 bodies of water collected previously and in 2012, first-order features of changes in chemical composition in response to increased water temperatures (from 14.1 ± 2.2 to 23.8 ± 2.3 °C in 2010 and 2012, respectively) were established. In these thermokarst bodies of water that covered a full range of surface areas, the average conductivity and pH were almost unchanged, whereas dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Cl- and SO42- concentrations were higher by a factor of ~ 2 during summer 2012 compared to periods with normal temperatures. Similarly, most divalent metals and insoluble trivalent and tetravalent elements were more concentrated by a factor of 1.7-2.4 in the summer of 2012 than normal periods. The average concentrations of dissolved CO2 and CH4 during the hot summer of 2012 increased by factors of 1.4 and 4.9, respectively. For most of the trace elements bound to colloids, the degree of colloidal binding decreased by a factor of 1.44 ± 0.33 (for an average of 40 elements) during the hot summer of 2012 compared to normal periods. Increases in CO2 and CH4 concentrations with the decreasing size of the body of water were well-pronounced during the hot summer of 2012. The concentrations of CO2 and CH4 rose by factors of 5 and 150, respectively, in small (≤ 102 m2

  20. The Small Heat Shock Protein Hsp27 Affects Assembly Dynamics and Structure of Keratin Intermediate Filament Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Jona; Haslbeck, Martin; Dempfle, Lisa; Krause, Maike; Grashoff, Carsten; Buchner, Johannes; Herrmann, Harald; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of living cells are essential for many processes. They are defined by the cytoskeleton, a composite network of protein fibers. Thus, the precise control of its architecture is of paramount importance. Our knowledge about the molecular and physical mechanisms defining the network structure remains scarce, especially for the intermediate filament cytoskeleton. Here, we investigate the effect of small heat shock proteins on the keratin 8/18 intermediate filament cytoskeleton using a well-controlled model system of reconstituted keratin networks. We demonstrate that Hsp27 severely alters the structure of such networks by changing their assembly dynamics. Furthermore, the C-terminal tail domain of keratin 8 is shown to be essential for this effect. Combining results from fluorescence and electron microscopy with data from analytical ultracentrifugation reveals the crucial role of kinetic trapping in keratin network formation. PMID:24138853

  1. Chemical forces and water holding capacity study of heat-induced myofibrillar protein gel as affected by high pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziye; Yang, Yuling; Tang, Xiaozhi; Chen, Yinji; You, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The effects of high pressure (100-500 MPa) on chemical forces and water holding capacity of heat-induced myofibrillar protein (MP) gel were investigated. As pressure increased, total sulfhydryl (SH) group content decreased and absolute value of zeta potential increased, which suggested the formation of disulfide bonds and increased the strength of electrostatic repulsion. Surface hydrophobicity and normalized intensity of the 760 cm(-1) band showed a maximum value at 200 MPa, indicating that 200 MPa was the optimum pressure for hydrophobic interactions. Hydrogen bonding of MP gel was strengthened at pressures of 300 MPa and above. Bound water (T2b) had lower water mobility and was more closely associated with proteins. Free water (T22) had higher water mobility. More free water was attracted by proteins or trapped in gel structure, and transferred to bound or immobilized water as pressure increased. A value of 200 MPa was the optimum pressure for the water holding capacity of MP gel.

  2. Off-flavor related volatiles in soymilk as affected by soybean variety, grinding, and heat-processing methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Guo, Shuntang; Liu, Zhisheng; Chang, Sam K C

    2012-08-01

    Off-flavor of soymilk is a barrier to the acceptance of consumers. The objectionable soy odor can be reduced through inhibition of their formation or through removal after being formed. In this study, soymilk was prepared by three grinding methods (ambient, cold, and hot grinding) from two varieties (yellow Prosoy and a black soybean) before undergoing three heating processes: stove cooking, one-phase UHT (ultrahigh temperature), and two-phase UHT process using a Microthermics direct injection processor, which was equipped with a vacuuming step to remove injected water and volatiles. Eight typical soy odor compounds, generated from lipid oxidation, were extracted by a solid-phase microextraction method and analyzed by gas chromatography. The results showed that hot grinding and cold grinding significantly reduced off-flavor as compared with ambient grinding, and hot grinding achieved the best result. The UHT methods, especially the two-phase UHT method, were effective to reduce soy odor. Different odor compounds showed distinct concentration patterns because of different formation mechanisms. The two varieties behaved differently in odor formation during the soymilk-making process. Most odor compounds could be reduced to below the detection limit through a combination of hot grinding and two-phase UHT processing. However, hot grinding gave lower solid and protein recoveries in soymilk.

  3. Decontamination method using heat and relative humidity for radish seeds achieves a 7-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 without affecting product quality.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y B; Kim, H W; Song, M K; Rhee, M S

    2015-05-18

    We developed a novel decontamination method to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 on radish seeds without adversely affecting seed germination or product quality. The use of heat (55, 60, and 65 °C) combined with relative humidity (RH; 25, 45, 65, 85, and 100%) for 24h was evaluated for effective microbial reduction and preservation of seed germination rates. A significant two-way interaction of heat and RH was observed for both microbial reduction and germination rate (P<0.0001). Increases in heat and RH were associated with corresponding reductions in E. coli O157:H7 and in germination rate (P<0.05). The order of lethality for the different treatments was generally as follows: no treatment <55 °C/25-65% RH ≒60 °C/25-45% RH ≒65 °C/25% RH <55 °C/85% RH =60 °C/65% RH <55 °C/100% RH =60 °C/85-100% RH =65 °C/45-100% RH. The most effective condition, 65 °C/45% RH, completely inactivated E. coli O157:H7 on the seeds (7.0 log CFU/g reduction) and had no significant effect on the germination rate (85.4%; P>0.05) or product quality. The method uses only heat and relative humidity without chemicals, and is thus applicable as a general decontamination procedure in spout producing plants where the use of growth chambers is the norm. PMID:25732001

  4. Decontamination method using heat and relative humidity for radish seeds achieves a 7-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 without affecting product quality.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y B; Kim, H W; Song, M K; Rhee, M S

    2015-05-18

    We developed a novel decontamination method to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 on radish seeds without adversely affecting seed germination or product quality. The use of heat (55, 60, and 65 °C) combined with relative humidity (RH; 25, 45, 65, 85, and 100%) for 24h was evaluated for effective microbial reduction and preservation of seed germination rates. A significant two-way interaction of heat and RH was observed for both microbial reduction and germination rate (P<0.0001). Increases in heat and RH were associated with corresponding reductions in E. coli O157:H7 and in germination rate (P<0.05). The order of lethality for the different treatments was generally as follows: no treatment <55 °C/25-65% RH ≒60 °C/25-45% RH ≒65 °C/25% RH <55 °C/85% RH =60 °C/65% RH <55 °C/100% RH =60 °C/85-100% RH =65 °C/45-100% RH. The most effective condition, 65 °C/45% RH, completely inactivated E. coli O157:H7 on the seeds (7.0 log CFU/g reduction) and had no significant effect on the germination rate (85.4%; P>0.05) or product quality. The method uses only heat and relative humidity without chemicals, and is thus applicable as a general decontamination procedure in spout producing plants where the use of growth chambers is the norm.

  5. Pioneering Heat Pump Project

    SciTech Connect

    Aschliman, Dave; Lubbehusen, Mike

    2015-06-30

    This project was initiated at a time when ground coupled heat pump systems in this region were limited in size and quantity. There were economic pressures with costs for natural gas and electric utilities that had many organizations considering ground coupled heat pumps; The research has added to the understanding of how ground temperatures fluctuate seasonally and how this affects the performance and operation of the heat pumps. This was done by using a series of temperature sensors buried within the middle of one of the vertical bore fields with sensors located at various depths below grade. Trending of the data showed that there is a lag in ground temperature with respect to air temperatures in the shoulder months, however as full cooling and heating season arrives, the heat rejection and heat extraction from the ground has a significant effect on the ground temps; Additionally it is better understood that while a large community geothermal bore field serving multiple buildings does provide a convenient central plant to use, it introduces complexity of not being able to easily model and predict how each building will contribute to the loads in real time. Additional controllers and programming were added to provide more insight into this real time load profile and allow for intelligent shedding of load via a dry cooler during cool nights in lieu of rejecting to the ground loop. This serves as a means to ‘condition’ the ground loop and mitigate thermal creep of the field, as is typically observed; and It has been observed when compared to traditional heating and cooling equipment, there is still a cost premium to use ground source heat pumps that is driven mostly by the cost for vertical bore holes. Horizontal loop systems are less costly to install, but do not perform as well in this climate zone for heating mode

  6. A reduced core to skin temperature gradient, not a critical core temperature, affects aerobic capacity in the heat.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, John S; Hailes, Walter S; Ruby, Brent C

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the core to skin temperature gradient during incremental running to volitional fatigue across varying environmental conditions. A secondary aim was to determine if a "critical" core temperature would dictate volitional fatigue during running in the heat. 60 participants (n=49 male, n=11 female; 24±5 yrs, 177±11 cm, 75±13 kg) completed the study. Participants were uniformly stratified into a specific exercise temperature group (18 °C, 26 °C, 34 °C, or 42 °C) based on a 3-mile run performance. Participants were equipped with core and chest skin temperature sensors and a heart rate monitor, entered an environmental chamber (18 °C, 26 °C, 34 °C, or 42 °C), and rested in the seated position for 10 min before performing a walk/run to volitional exhaustion. Initial treadmill speed was 3.2 km h(-1) with a 0% grade. Every 3 min, starting with speed, speed and grade increased in an alternating pattern (speed increased by 0.805 km h(-1), grade increased by 0.5%). Time to volitional fatigue was longer for the 18 °C and 26 °C group compared to the 42 °C group, (58.1±9.3 and 62.6±6.5 min vs. 51.3±8.3 min, respectively, p<0.05). At the half-way point and finish, the core to skin gradient for the 18 °C and 26 °C groups was larger compared to 42 °C group (halfway: 2.6±0.7 and 2.0±0.6 vs. 1.3±0.5 for the 18 °C, 26 °C and 42 °C groups, respectively; finish: 3.3±0.7 and 3.5±1.1 vs. 2.1±0.9 for the 26 °C, 34 °C, and 42 °C groups, respectively, p<0.05). Sweat rate was lower in the 18 °C group compared to the 26 °C, 34 °C, and 42 °C groups, 3.6±1.3 vs. 7.2±3.0, 7.1±2.0, and 7.6±1.7 g m(-2) min(-1), respectively, p<0.05. There were no group differences in core temperature and heart rate response during the exercise trials. The current data demonstrate a 13% and 22% longer run time to exhaustion for the 18 °C and 26 °C group, respectively, compared to the 42 °C group despite no differences

  7. A reduced core to skin temperature gradient, not a critical core temperature, affects aerobic capacity in the heat.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, John S; Hailes, Walter S; Ruby, Brent C

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the core to skin temperature gradient during incremental running to volitional fatigue across varying environmental conditions. A secondary aim was to determine if a "critical" core temperature would dictate volitional fatigue during running in the heat. 60 participants (n=49 male, n=11 female; 24±5 yrs, 177±11 cm, 75±13 kg) completed the study. Participants were uniformly stratified into a specific exercise temperature group (18 °C, 26 °C, 34 °C, or 42 °C) based on a 3-mile run performance. Participants were equipped with core and chest skin temperature sensors and a heart rate monitor, entered an environmental chamber (18 °C, 26 °C, 34 °C, or 42 °C), and rested in the seated position for 10 min before performing a walk/run to volitional exhaustion. Initial treadmill speed was 3.2 km h(-1) with a 0% grade. Every 3 min, starting with speed, speed and grade increased in an alternating pattern (speed increased by 0.805 km h(-1), grade increased by 0.5%). Time to volitional fatigue was longer for the 18 °C and 26 °C group compared to the 42 °C group, (58.1±9.3 and 62.6±6.5 min vs. 51.3±8.3 min, respectively, p<0.05). At the half-way point and finish, the core to skin gradient for the 18 °C and 26 °C groups was larger compared to 42 °C group (halfway: 2.6±0.7 and 2.0±0.6 vs. 1.3±0.5 for the 18 °C, 26 °C and 42 °C groups, respectively; finish: 3.3±0.7 and 3.5±1.1 vs. 2.1±0.9 for the 26 °C, 34 °C, and 42 °C groups, respectively, p<0.05). Sweat rate was lower in the 18 °C group compared to the 26 °C, 34 °C, and 42 °C groups, 3.6±1.3 vs. 7.2±3.0, 7.1±2.0, and 7.6±1.7 g m(-2) min(-1), respectively, p<0.05. There were no group differences in core temperature and heart rate response during the exercise trials. The current data demonstrate a 13% and 22% longer run time to exhaustion for the 18 °C and 26 °C group, respectively, compared to the 42 °C group despite no differences

  8. Investigation of factors affecting hypothermic pelvic tissue cooling using bio-heat simulation based on MRI-segmented anatomic models.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuting; Lin, Wei-Ching; Fwu, Peter T; Shih, Tzu-Ching; Yeh, Lee-Ren; Su, Min-Ying; Chen, Jeon-Hor

    2015-10-01

    This study applied a simulation method to map the temperature distribution based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of individual patients, and investigated the influence of different pelvic tissue types as well as the choice of thermal property parameters on the efficiency of endorectal cooling balloon (ECB). MR images of four subjects with different prostate sizes and pelvic tissue compositions, including fatty tissue and venous plexus, were analyzed. The MR images acquired using endorectal coil provided a realistic geometry of deformed prostate that resembled the anatomy in the presence of ECB. A single slice with the largest two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional area of the prostate gland was selected for analysis. The rectal wall, prostate gland, peri-rectal fatty tissue, peri-prostatic fatty tissue, peri-prostatic venous plexus, and urinary bladder were manually segmented. Pennes' bioheat thermal model was used to simulate the temperature distribution dynamics, by using an in-house finite element mesh based solver written in MATLAB. The results showed that prostate size and periprostatic venous plexus were two major factors affecting ECB cooling efficiency. For cases with negligible amount of venous plexus and small prostate, the average temperature in the prostate and neurovascular bundles could be cooled down to 25 °C within 30 min. For cases with abundant venous plexus and large prostate, the temperature could not reach 25 °C at the end of 3 h cooling. Large prostate made the cooling difficult to propagate through. The impact of fatty tissue on cooling effect was small. The filling of bladder with warm urine during the ECB cooling procedure did not affect the temperature in the prostate or NVB. In addition to the 2D simulation, in one case a 3D pelvic model was constructed for volumetric simulation. It was found that the 2D slice with the largest cross-sectional area of prostate had the most abundant venous plexus, and was the most difficult slice to

  9. In situ viability detection assays induce heat-shock protein 70 expression in spermatozoa without affecting the chromatin integrity.

    PubMed

    Asokan, Y; Honguntikar, S D; Uppangala, S; Salian, S R; Kumar, D; Kalthur, G; Adiga, S K

    2015-10-01

    To differentiate dead spermatozoa from viable but immotile spermatozoa, several techniques are being used during ICSI. As processed spermatozoa from poor-quality ejaculate are confronted with a higher risk of experiencing stress on exposure to altered osmotic conditions or chemicals, this study was undertaken to determine the expression of stress response gene Hsp70 and chromatin integrity in spermatozoa subjected to in situ viability assays such as hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) test, modified hypo-osmotic swelling (M-HOS) test and pentoxifylline in 25 fresh and frozen-thawed asthenozoospermic ejaculates. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence detection of Hsp70 were performed to elucidate the expression and localisation of Hsp70 in spermatozoa, whereas DNA fragmentation analysis was performed by sperm chromatin dispersion assay. Exposure of fresh and frozen-thawed asthenozoospermic spermatozoa to M-HOS and pentoxifylline significantly increased Hsp70 expression as evidenced by increased RNA expression and immunolocalisation of Hsp70 protein in sperm head (P < 0.05-0.001). However, chromatin integrity was not significantly affected in any groups until 6 h of post-exposure time period. Our results suggest that conventional HOS may be preferred for the in situ detection of the viability as there was no immediate stress response and chromatin instability in the exposed spermatozoa.

  10. Megacities in the Coastal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Glasow, R.; Jickells, T.; Baklanov, A.; Carmichael, G. R.; Church, T. M.; Gallardo, L.; Hughes, C.; Kanakidou, M.; Liss, P. S.; Mee, L.; Raine, R.; Ramachandran, P.; Ramesh, R.; Sundseth, K.; Tsunogai, U.; Uematsu, M.; Zhu, T.

    2012-04-01

    Megacities have long been recognised as important drivers for socioeconomic development but also as sources of environmental challenges. A large number of megacities are located in the coastal zone where land, atmosphere and ocean meet, posing additional challenges for our understanding of the interactions. The atmospheric flow is complicated not only by urban heat island effects but also topographic flows and sea breezes which also lead to profound changes in clouds and precipitation. Inflow of oceanic air (rich in sea salt) into the polluted city's atmosphere and outflow of polluted air onto a much cleaner ocean lead to very specific interactions, the net effects of which are not well understood. The addition of contaminants to the coastal waters both by atmospheric deposition and fluvial inputs can affect the coastal ecosystems dramatically, limiting their ability to function and provide ecosystem services, e.g. fisheries and aquaculture. Changes to coastal ecosystems also affect fluxes of gases and particles to the atmosphere and can lead to harmful algal blooms. The scale of influence of megacities in the coastal zone is at least hundreds if not thousands of kilometres in the atmosphere and tens to hundreds of kilometres in the ocean, the latter strongly dependent on the hydrographic setting. Coastal megacities are at risk by sea level rise, floods and storms; they are at the forefront of change and scientifically well informed planning can improve livelihoods and ecosystem health but only if we take a holistic approach to study and monitor these regions.

  11. Zones of Peace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Judith L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Children affected by armed violence face a specific set of stressors and challenges which calls for appropriate programming. This Coordinator's Notebook focuses on how to work with children affected by organized violence in order to provide them the best possible early childhood experiences. It is divided into five sections. "Children as Zones of…

  12. Electron Heating in Magnetorotational Instability: Implications for Turbulence Strength in the Outer Regions of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shoji; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives vigorous turbulence in a region of protoplanetary disks where the ionization fraction is sufficiently high. It has recently been shown that the electric field induced by the MRI can heat up electrons and thereby affect the ionization balance in the gas. In particular, in a disk where abundant dust grains are present, the electron heating causes a reduction of the electron abundance, thereby preventing further growth of the MRI. By using the nonlinear Ohm's law that takes into account electron heating, we investigate where in protoplanetary disks this negative feedback between the MRI and ionization chemistry becomes important. We find that the “e-heating zone,” the region where the electron heating limits the saturation of the MRI, extends out up to 80 AU in the minimum-mass solar nebula with abundant submicron-sized grains. This region is considerably larger than the conventional dead zone whose radial extent is ∼20 AU in the same disk model. Scaling arguments show that the MRI turbulence in the e-heating zone should have a significantly lower saturation level. Submicron-sized grains in the e-heating zone are so negatively charged that their collisional growth is unlikely to occur. Our present model neglects ambipolar and Hall diffusion, but our estimate shows that ambipolar diffusion would also affect the MRI in the e-heating zone.

  13. Physicochemical characteristics of the hyporheic zone affect redd site selection of chum salmon and fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R. ); Hanrahan, Timothy P. ); Arntzen, Evan V. ); McMichael, Geoffrey A. ); Murray, Christopher J. ); Chien, Yi-Ju )

    2002-11-01

    Chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta and fall chinook salmon O. tshawytscha spawned at different locations in the vicinity of Ives Island, Washington, a side channel to the Columbia River downstream of Bonneville Dam. We hypothesized that measurements of water depth, substrate size, and water velocity alone would not explain the separation in spawning areas and began a 2-year investigation of physicochemical characteristics of the hyporheic zone. We found that chum salmon spawned in upwelling water that was significantly warmer than the surrounding river water. In contrast, fall chinook salmon constructed redds at downwelling sites where there was no difference in temperature between the river and its bed. Understanding the specific features that are important for chum salmon and fall chinook salmon redd site selection at Ives Island will be useful to resource managers attempting to maximize available spawning habitat for these species within the constraints imposed by other water resource needs.

  14. Beyond the classic thermoneutral zone

    PubMed Central

    Kingma, Boris RM; Frijns, Arjan JH; Schellen, Lisje; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2014-01-01

    The thermoneutral zone is defined as the range of ambient temperatures where the body can maintain its core temperature solely through regulating dry heat loss, i.e., skin blood flow. A living body can only maintain its core temperature when heat production and heat loss are balanced. That means that heat transport from body core to skin must equal heat transport from skin to the environment. This study focuses on what combinations of core and skin temperature satisfy the biophysical requirements of being in the thermoneutral zone for humans. Moreover, consequences are considered of changes in insulation and adding restrictions such as thermal comfort (i.e. driver for thermal behavior). A biophysical model was developed that calculates heat transport within a body, taking into account metabolic heat production, tissue insulation, and heat distribution by blood flow and equates that to heat loss to the environment, considering skin temperature, ambient temperature and other physical parameters. The biophysical analysis shows that the steady-state ambient temperature range associated with the thermoneutral zone does not guarantee that the body is in thermal balance at basal metabolic rate per se. Instead, depending on the combination of core temperature, mean skin temperature and ambient temperature, the body may require significant increases in heat production or heat loss to maintain stable core temperature. Therefore, the definition of the thermoneutral zone might need to be reformulated. Furthermore, after adding restrictions on skin temperature for thermal comfort, the ambient temperature range associated with thermal comfort is smaller than the thermoneutral zone. This, assuming animals seek thermal comfort, suggests that thermal behavior may be initiated already before the boundaries of the thermoneutral zone are reached. PMID:27583296

  15. Beyond the classic thermoneutral zone

    PubMed Central

    Kingma, Boris RM; Frijns, Arjan JH; Schellen, Lisje; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2014-01-01

    The thermoneutral zone is defined as the range of ambient temperatures where the body can maintain its core temperature solely through regulating dry heat loss, i.e., skin blood flow. A living body can only maintain its core temperature when heat production and heat loss are balanced. That means that heat transport from body core to skin must equal heat transport from skin to the environment. This study focuses on what combinations of core and skin temperature satisfy the biophysical requirements of being in the thermoneutral zone for humans. Moreover, consequences are considered of changes in insulation and adding restrictions such as thermal comfort (i.e. driver for thermal behavior). A biophysical model was developed that calculates heat transport within a body, taking into account metabolic heat production, tissue insulation, and heat distribution by blood flow and equates that to heat loss to the environment, considering skin temperature, ambient temperature and other physical parameters. The biophysical analysis shows that the steady-state ambient temperature range associated with the thermoneutral zone does not guarantee that the body is in thermal balance at basal metabolic rate per se. Instead, depending on the combination of core temperature, mean skin temperature and ambient temperature, the body may require significant increases in heat production or heat loss to maintain stable core temperature. Therefore, the definition of the thermoneutral zone might need to be reformulated. Furthermore, after adding restrictions on skin temperature for thermal comfort, the ambient temperature range associated with thermal comfort is smaller than the thermoneutral zone. This, assuming animals seek thermal comfort, suggests that thermal behavior may be initiated already before the boundaries of the thermoneutral zone are reached.

  16. Tensile properties of vanadium-base alloys with a tungsten/inert-gas weld zone

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, B.A.; Konicek, C.F.; Nowicki, L.J.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    The tensile properties of V-(0-20)Ti and V-(O-15)Cr-5Ti alloys after butt-joining by tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding were determined from tests at 25{degrees}C. Tensile tests were conducted on both annealed and cold-worked materials with a TIG weld zone. The tensile properties of these materials were strongly influenced by the microstructure in the heat-affected zone adjacent to the weld zone and by the intrinsic fracture toughness of the alloys. TIG weld zones in these vanadium-base alloys had tensile properties comparable to those of recrystallized alloys without a weld zone. Least affected by the TIG welding were tensile properties of the V-5Ti and V-5Cr-5Ti alloys. Although the tensile properties of the V-5Ti and V- 5Cr-5Ti alloys with a TIG weld zone were acceptable for structural material, these properties would be improved by optimization of the welding parameters for minimum grain size in the heat-affected zone.

  17. How selection for reproduction or foundation for longevity could have affected blood lymphocyte populations of rabbit does under conventional and heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Ferrian, Selena; Guerrero, Irene; Blas, Enrique; García-Diego, Fernando J; Viana, David; Pascual, Juan J; Corpa, Juan M

    2012-11-15

    The present work characterises how selection for reproduction (by comparing two generations - 16th and 36th - of the V line selected for litter size at weaning) or foundation for reproductive longevity (the LP line) can affect the blood lymphocytes populations of reproductive rabbit does under normal [conventional housing, average daily minimum and maximum temperatures of 14°C and 20°C, respectively] and heat stress conditions [climatic chamber, 25°C and 36°C] from the first to the second parturition. Housing under heat stress conditions significantly reduced the B lymphocytes counts in female rabbits (-34 × 10(6)/L; P<0.05). The highest lymphocytes population value in blood (total, T CD5(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+)) was noted at the first parturition, while the B lymphocytes count was significantly lower at the second parturition (-61 × 10(6)/L; P<0.05). Selection for litter size at weaning (V females) reduced the average counts of total and B lymphocytes in blood (-502 and -60 × 10(6)/L, respectively; P<0.01), mainly because these populations in V36 females continuously lowered from the first to the second parturition under normal housing conditions. Thus, more selected females (V36) at the second parturition showed significantly lower counts in blood for total, T CD5(+) and CD25(+) lymphocytes (-1303, -446 and -33 × 10(6)/L, respectively; P<0.05). The main differences in blood counts between V36 and V16 females disappeared when housed under heat stress conditions, except for T CD5(+) and CD25(+), which significantly increased (T CD5(+): +428 × 10(6)/L; CD25(+): +41 × 10(6)/L; P<0.01) in the V16 vs. V36 females on day 10 post-partum. Under normal conditions, no differences between LP and V36 females were found for most lymphocyte populations; only higher counts were noted in CD25(+) (+20 × 10(6)/L; P<0.05) for LP females. However, the lymphocytes counts [especially total (+1327 × 10(6)/L; P<0.01) and T CD5(+) (+376 × 10(6)/L; P<0.10)] of LP females

  18. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In fusion welding, parts are joined together by melting and subsequent solidification. Although this principle is simple, complex transport phenomena take place during fusion welding, and they determine the final weld quality and performance. The heat and mass transfer in the weld pool directly affect the size and shape of the pool, the solidification microstructure, the formation of weld defects such as porosity and humping, and the temperature distribution in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ). Furthermore, the temperature evolution affects the kinetics and extent of various solid-state phase transformations, which in turn determine the final weld microstructure and mechanical properties. The formation of residual stresses and distortion originates from the thermal expansion and contraction during welding heating and cooling, respectively.

  19. Geochemical distribution of arsenic, cadmium, lead and zinc in river sediments affected by tailings in Zimapán, a historical polymetalic mining zone of México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, Erik; Armienta, María Aurora; Cruz, Olivia; Aguayo, Alejandra; Ceniceros, Nora

    2009-10-01

    In the historical mining zone of Zimapán, México, unprotected tailings deposits are supplying contaminants to the local fluvial system. This research was conducted to assess the environmental hazard of these wastes and river sediments by determining the input, transport and seasonal variability of arsenic, cadmium, lead and zinc, and their speciation by an operationally defined scheme of decreasing lability: F1, fraction soluble in deionized water; F2, associated to carbonates; F3, oxides and hydroxides of iron; F4, sulfides and organic matter; F5, residual. Higher total concentrations of Cd, Pb and Zn were present in sediments in the dry season regarding the rainy season. In the dry season, As and Pb were principally associated with the more stable F3 and F5 fractions, whereas Cd was in F2 and F5, and Zn in F3, F2 and F5. In the rainy season the association was mainly F3 for As, while F2 and F3 contained most Cd, Pb and Zn. This fractionation indicates that the environmental hazard of Cd, Pb and Zn enhances upon a pH decrease due to their proportion in the carbonatic fraction, and shows a mobility increase during the rainy season.

  20. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Creep Rupture Properties of Grade 91 Steel Heavy Section Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Leijun

    2012-11-02

    This project will conduct a systematic metallurgical study on the effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the creep rupture properties of P91 heavy section welds. The objective is to develop a technical guide for selecting PWHT parameters, and to predict expected creep-rupture life based on the selection of heat treatment parameters. The project consists of four interdependent tasks: Experimentally and numerically characterize the temperature fields of typical post-weld heat treatment procedures for various weld and joint configurations to be used in Gen IV systems. Characterize the microstructure of various regions, including the weld fusion zone, coarse-grain heat-affected zone, and fine-grain heat affected zone, in the welds that underwent the various welding and PWHT thermal histories. Conduct creep and creep-rupture testing of coupons extracted from actual and physically simulated welds. Establish the relationship among PWHT parameters, thermal histories, microstructure, creep, and creep-rupture properties.

  1. Bioturbation, geochemistry and geotechnics of sediments affected by the oxygen minimum zone on the Oman continental slope and abyssal plain, Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, Azra; Meadows, Peter S.; West, Fraser J. C.; Murray, John M. H.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the way the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) alters interactions between bioturbation and sediment geochemistry, and geotechnical properties. Sediments are compared within and below the OMZ on the Oman continental slope and adjacent abyssal plain during the post monsoonal autumn season. Quantitative measurements were made of Eh and pH, of total organic matter (TOM) and carbonate, of water content and shear strength, and of bioturbation structures in vertical profiles of subcores taken from spade-box core samples. The OMZ stations had distinctively low redox conditions and high carbonate content, and different geotechnical properties and different bioturbation structures than stations below the OMZ on the abyssal plain. These differences are related to the degree of anoxia and to water depth. Within the OMZ, Eh, pH and carbonate increased with water depth, and TOM and water content decreased. We also noted the presence of subsurface sediment heterogeneity on the continental slope within the OMZ. In the OMZ, Eh, water content and bioturbation decreased with increasing sediment depth. There was a slight decrease in pH in the top 5 cm at all stations. Shear strength nearly always increased with increasing sediment depth. At each water depth correlations show down-core trends in these parameters, while across all water depths correlations were significant at deeper sediment depths (20-30 cm). An Eh-pH diagram identified two water-depth groupings: 391-1008 and 1265-3396 m. Cluster analysis showed the upper and lower sediment depths form separate clusters, the break occurring at 4-7.5 cm; while there are also distinct clusters related to water depth. We relate our results to bottom-water oxygen concentrations reported by other investigators, and to regional-scale geochemical processes.

  2. Multi-zone cooling/warming garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koscheyev, Victor S. (Inventor); Leon, Gloria R. (Inventor); Dancisak, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A thermodynamically efficient garment for cooling and/or heating a human body. The thermodynamic efficiency is provided in part by targeting the heat exchange capabilities of the garment to specific areas and/or structures of the human body. The heat exchange garment includes heat exchange zones and one or more non-heat exchange zones, where the heat exchange zones are configured to correspond to one or more high density tissue areas of the human body when the garment is worn. A system including the garment can be used to exchange heat with the adjacent HD tissue areas under the control of a feedback control system. Sensed physiological parameters received by the feedback control system can be used to adjust the characteristics of heat exchange fluid moving within the heat exchange garment.

  3. Modelling vegetation water-use and groundwater recharge as affected by climate variability in an arid-zone Acacia savanna woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Eamus, Derek; Cleverly, James; Boulain, Nicolas; Cook, Peter; Zhang, Lu; Cheng, Lei; Yu, Qiang

    2014-11-01

    For efficient and sustainable utilisation of limited groundwater resources, improved understanding of how vegetation water-use responds to climate variation and the corresponding controls on recharge is essential. This study investigated these responses using a modelling approach. The biophysically based model WAVES was calibrated and validated with more than two years of field experimental data conducted in Mulga (Acacia aneura) in arid central Australia. The validated model was then applied to simulate vegetation growth (as changes in overstory and understory leaf area index; LAI), vegetation water-use and groundwater recharge using observed climate data for the period 1981-2012. Due to large inter-annual climatic variability, especially precipitation, simulated annual mean LAI ranged from 0.12 to 0.35 for the overstory and 0.07 to 0.21 for the understory. These variations in simulated LAI resulted in vegetation water-use varying greatly from year-to-year, from 64 to 601 mm pa. Simulated vegetation water-use also showed distinct seasonal patterns. Vegetation dynamics affected by climate variability exerted significant controls on simulated annual recharge, which was greatly reduced to 0-48 mm compared to that (58-672 mm) only affected by climate. Understanding how climate variability and land use/land cover change interactively impact on groundwater recharge significantly improves groundwater resources management in arid and semi-arid regions.

  4. Factors affecting women’s intention to use long acting and permanent contraceptive methods in Wolaita Zone, Southern Ethiopia: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of long acting and permanent contraceptive methods (LAPMs) has not kept step with that of short-acting methods such as oral pills and injectable in Africa. This study explores the association between women’s awareness, attitude and barriers with their intention to use LAPMs among users of short term methods, in Southern Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study design of mixed methods was conducted in the public health facilities of Wolaita zone, Southern Ethiopia, in January 2013. Women who were using short term contraceptive methods were the study population (n = 416). Moreover, 12 in-depth interviews were conducted among family planning providers and women who have been using short term methods. Data were entered into EPI Info version 3.5.3 and exported to SPSS version 16.0 for analysis. The odds ratios in the binary logistic regression model along with 95% confidence interval were used. Results One hundred fifty six (38%) of women had the intention to use LAPMs while nearly half of them (n = 216) had a negative attitude to use such methods. Moreover, two-third of study participants (n = 276) held myths and misconceptions about such methods. The women who had a positive attitude were found to be 2.5 times more intention to use LAPMs compared to women who had a negative attitude (AOR =2. 47; 95% CI: 1.48- 4.11). Women who had no myths and misconceptions on LAPMs were found to be 1.7 times more intention to use LAPMs compared to women who had myths and misconceptions (AOR = 1.71; 95% CI: 1.08- 2.72). Likewise, women who attained secondary and higher level of education were found to be 2 and 2.8 times more intention to use LAPMs compared to women with no education, respectively (AOR = 2. 10; 95% CI: 1.11- 3.98) and AOR = 2. 80; 95% CI: 1.15- 6.77). Conclusions Intention to use LAPMs was low and nearly half of women had a negative attitude to use such methods. Positive attitude, absence of myths and misconceptions on

  5. Recent (2008-10) water quality in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer and its contributing zone, central Texas, with emphasis on factors affecting nutrients and bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, Barbara J.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Sample, Thomas L.; Wong, Corinne I.

    2011-01-01

    The Barton Springs zone, which comprises the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer and the watersheds to the west that contribute to its recharge, is in south-central Texas, an area with rapid growth in population and increasing amounts of land area affected by development. During November 2008-March 2010, an investigation of factors affecting the fate and transport of nutrients and bacteria in the Barton Springs zone was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The primary objectives of the study were to characterize occurrence of nutrients and bacteria in the Barton Springs zone under a range of flow conditions; to improve understanding of the interaction between surface-water quality and groundwater quality; and to evaluate how factors such as streamflow variability and dilution affect the fate and transport of nutrients and bacteria in the Barton Springs zone. The USGS collected and analyzed water samples from five streams (Barton, Williamson, Slaughter, Bear, and Onion Creeks), two groundwater wells (Marbridge and Buda), and the main orifice of Barton Springs in Austin, Texas. During the period of the study, during which the hydrologic conditions transitioned from exceptional drought to wetter than normal, water samples were collected routinely (every 3 to 4 weeks) from the streams, wells, and spring and, in response to storms, from the streams and spring. All samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, the bacterium Escherichia coli, and suspended sediment. During the dry period, the geochemistry of groundwater at the two wells and at Barton Springs was dominated by flow from the aquifer matrix and was relatively similar and unchanging at the three sites. At the onset of the wet period, when the streams began to flow, the geochemistry of groundwater samples from the Marbridge well and Barton Springs changed rapidly, and concentrations of most major ions and nutrients and

  6. Cereal type and heat processing of the cereal affect nutrient digestibility and dynamics of serum insulin and ghrelin in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Menoyo, D; Serrano, M P; Barrios, V; Valencia, D G; Lázaro, R; Argente, J; Mateos, G G

    2011-09-01

    The effects of feeding corn or rice, either raw or heat processed (HP), on apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) and apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of nutrients and on insulin and ghrelin concentrations in the serum were studied in young pigs. Pigs were weaned at approximately 23 ± 3 d of age and weighed 7.4 ± 1.2 kg. Each of the 4 treatments was replicated 9 times, and the experimental unit was a pig individually housed. Pigs (5 males and 4 females/treatment) were fed their respective diets ad libitum from 23 to 47 d of age. At 37 d of age, the effects of dietary treatments on the fasting and postprandial concentrations of insulin and total and acylated ghrelin were studied. The ATTD of OM, GE, and ether extract were, respectively, 4.3, 5.4, and 3.6% greater (P < 0.05) for the rice than for the corn diets, but CP digestibility was not affected. Similar results were observed for AID. Heat processing of the cereal increased (P < 0.05) the ATTD by 2.1% for OM, 3.2% for GE, 7.1% for ether extract, and 2.2% for CP and tended to increase the AID of CP (P = 0.06) and starch (P = 0.09). The postprandial serum insulin response was greater and was more prolonged in pigs fed raw rice than in pigs fed raw corn (P < 0.05). In addition, the effects of HP on serum insulin response were more pronounced with corn than with rice (cereal × HP, P < 0.05). Total ghrelin concentration was not affected by treatment, but acylated ghrelin was greater (P < 0.05) at 6 h postprandially in pigs fed rice than in pigs fed raw corn. Feeding rice and HP corn increased nutrient digestibility and insulin response in the early postprandial period and increased the acylated ghrelin response in the late postprandial period compared with feeding raw corn.

  7. Using heat as a tracer to estimate spatially distributed mean residence times in the hyporheic zone of a riffle-pool sequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naranjo, Ramon C.

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical reactions that occur in the hyporheic zone are highly dependent on the time solutes that are in contact with sediments of the riverbed. In this investigation, we developed a 2-D longitudinal flow and solute-transport model to estimate the spatial distribution of mean residence time in the hyporheic zone. The flow model was calibrated using observations of temperature and pressure, and the mean residence times were simulated using the age-mass approach for steady-state flow conditions. The approach used in this investigation includes the mixing of different ages and flow paths of water through advection and dispersion. Uncertainty of flow and transport parameters was evaluated using standard Monte Carlo and the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation method. Results of parameter estimation support the presence of a low-permeable zone in the riffle area that induced horizontal flow at a shallow depth within the riffle area. This establishes shallow and localized flow paths and limits deep vertical exchange. For the optimal model, mean residence times were found to be relatively long (9–40.0 days). The uncertainty of hydraulic conductivity resulted in a mean interquartile range (IQR) of 13 days across all piezometers and was reduced by 24% with the inclusion of temperature and pressure observations. To a lesser extent, uncertainty in streambed porosity and dispersivity resulted in a mean IQR of 2.2 and 4.7 days, respectively. Alternative conceptual models demonstrate the importance of accounting for the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity in simulating mean residence times in a riffle-pool sequence.

  8. The dead zone size limits in a proto-stellar accretion disc model heated by the damping of Alfvén waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatenco-Pereira, V.

    2015-05-01

    Heating of proto-stellar accretion discs has been studied by several authors. Jatenco-Pereira (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 431:3150, 2013) proposed a disc model with two heating mechanisms: the "anomalous" viscosity considered in terms of the α-prescription and the damping of Alfvén waves. As the discs are composed of dust, it was considered that when charged dust particles acquire the same (cyclotron) frequency as the waves, a resonance occurs that leads to the damping of the waves. Here we show that the increase in the temperature of the disc midplane implies in the reduction of the size of the quiescent region in proto-stellar discs and compare it with the actual position of the solar system planets.

  9. Hydrogeology, Water Chemistry, and Factors Affecting the Transport of Contaminants in the Zone of Contribution of a Public-Supply Well in Modesto, Eastern San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; Burow, Karen R.; Dalgish, Barbara A.; Shelton, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water chemistry in the zone of contribution of a public-supply well in Modesto, California, was studied by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program's topical team for Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants (TANC) to supply wells. Twenty-three monitoring wells were installed in Modesto to record baseline hydraulic information and to collect water-quality samples. The monitoring wells were divided into four categories that represent the chemistry of different depths and volumes of the aquifer: (1) water-table wells were screened between 8.5 and 11.7 m (meter) (28 and 38.5 ft [foot]) below land surface (bls) and were within 5 m (16 ft) of the water table; (2) shallow wells were screened between 29 and 35 m (95 and 115 ft) bls; (3) intermediate wells were screened between 50.6 and 65.5 m (166 and 215 ft) bls; and (4) deep wells are screened between 100 to 106 m (328 and 348 ft) bls. Inorganic, organic, isotope, and age-dating tracers were used to characterize the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and understand the mechanisms of mobilization and movement of selected constituents from source areas to a public-supply well. The ground-water system within the study area has been significantly altered by human activities. Water levels in monitoring wells indicated that horizontal movement of ground water was generally from the agricultural areas in the northeast towards a regional water-level depression within the city in the southwest. However, intensive pumping and irrigation recharge in the study area has caused large quantities of ground water to move vertically downward within the regional and local flow systems. Analysis of age tracers indicated that ground-water age varied from recent recharge at the water table to more than 1,000 years in the deep part of the aquifer. The mean age of shallow ground water was determined to be between 30 and 40 years. Intermediate ground water was determined to be a mixture

  10. etude experimentale de la propagation de fissures de fatigue dans la zone affectee thermiquement de joints soudes de roues de turbines hydrauliques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudel, Alexandre

    This thesis presents the results of a comprehensive experimental study on the fatigue crack propagation behavior in aqueous environment of the heat affected zone of CA6NM stainless steel hydraulic turbine runner welds. The initial objective of this project was to determine the fatigue crack growth properties of the heat affected zone. To achieve this, standardized fatigue crack growth tests in aqueous environment were performed to determine the crack growth threshold DeltaKth, and the Paris relationship constants C and m of the heat affected zone. Given potential experimental uncertainties arising from the growth of a crack confined to the heat affected zone, fatigue crack growth tests in an aqueous environment at constant stress intensity factor range (DeltaK) were performed so that the crack would propagate across the heat affected zone. These tests allowed to better appreciate the fatigue crack growth resistance variation between the three zones of the weld, i.e., the filler metal, the heat affected zone and the base metal. Various experimental objectives were supplemented to these two primary objectives. A CA6NM plate was welded to generate a layer of filler metal over its entire surface. The welded plate was cut in two equal pieces, one of which was post-weld heat treated in order to study the effect of this treatment on the fatigue crack growth behavior. Compact tension type fatigue specimens were machined from the welded plates. Rectangular samples were also collected to allow the characterization of the weld. Metallographic observations and X-ray diffraction measurements of the three zones of the weld (filler metal, heat affected zone and base metal) were conducted in order to characterize the microstructure. This microstructural characterization combined with metallographic observations of the crack path profiles were useful in assessing the microstructural effects acting on the fatigue crack growth behavior of the weld. Microhardness measurements were

  11. Archaeal dominated ammonia-oxidizing communities in Icelandic grassland soils are moderately affected by long-term N fertilization and geothermal heating

    PubMed Central

    Daebeler, Anne; Abell, Guy C. J.; Bodelier, Paul L. E.; Bodrossy, Levente; Frampton, Dion M. F.; Hefting, Mariet M.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB and AOA, respectively) to the net oxidation of ammonia varies greatly between terrestrial environments. To better understand, predict and possibly manage terrestrial nitrogen turnover, we need to develop a conceptual understanding of ammonia oxidation as a function of environmental conditions including the ecophysiology of associated organisms. We examined the discrete and combined effects of mineral nitrogen deposition and geothermal heating on ammonia-oxidizing communities by sampling soils from a long-term fertilization site along a temperature gradient in Icelandic grasslands. Microarray, clone library and quantitative PCR analyses of the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene accompanied by physico-chemical measurements of the soil properties were conducted. In contrast to most other terrestrial environments, the ammonia-oxidizing communities consisted almost exclusively of archaea. Their bacterial counterparts proved to be undetectable by quantitative polymerase chain reaction suggesting AOB are only of minor relevance for ammonia oxidation in these soils. Our results show that fertilization and local, geothermal warming affected detectable ammonia-oxidizing communities, but not soil chemistry: only a subset of the detected AOA phylotypes was present in higher temperature soils and AOA abundance was increased in the fertilized soils, while soil physio-chemical properties remained unchanged. Differences in distribution and structure of AOA communities were best explained by soil pH and clay content irrespective of temperature or fertilizer treatment in these grassland soils, suggesting that these factors have a greater potential for ecological niche-differentiation of AOA in soil than temperature and N fertilization. PMID:23060870

  12. The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on MultiphaseFlow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2006-02-28

    This paper investigates the impact of proposed repositorythermal-loading on mountain-scale flow and heat transfer in theunsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this context, amodel has been developed to study the coupled thermal-hydrological (TH)processes at the scale of the entire Yucca Mountain. This mountain-scaleTH model implements the current geological framework and hydrogeologicalconceptual models, and incorporates the latest rock thermal andhydrological properties. The TH model consists of a two-dimensionalnorth-south vertical cross section across the entire unsaturated zonemodel domain and uses refined meshes near and around the proposedrepository block, based on the current repository design, drift layout,thermal loading scenario, and estimated current and future climaticconditions. The model simulations provide insights into thermallyaffected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and elevatedwater and rock temperature, which in turn allow modelers to predict thechanges in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, anddrainage between drifts.

  13. Disruption of the three cytoskeletal networks in mammalian cells does not affect transcription, translation, or protein translocation changes induced by heat shock.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, W J; Feramisco, J R

    1985-01-01

    Mammalian cells show a complex series of transcriptional and translational switching events in response to heat shock treatment which ultimately lead to the production and accumulation of a small number of proteins, the so-called heat shock (or stress) proteins. We investigated the heat shock response in both qualitative and quantitative ways in cells that were pretreated with drugs that specifically disrupt one or more of the three major cytoskeletal networks. (These drugs alone, cytochalasin E and colcemid, do not result in induction of the heat shock response.) Our results indicated that disruption of the actin microfilaments, the vimentin-containing intermediate filaments, or the microtubules in living cells does not hinder the ability of the cell to undergo an apparently normal heat shock response. Even when all three networks were simultaneously disrupted (resulting in a loose, baglike appearance of the cells), the cells still underwent a complete heat shock response as assayed by the appearance of the heat shock proteins. In addition, the major induced 72-kilodalton heat shock protein was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm into its proper location in the nucleus and nucleolus irrespective of the condition of the three cytoskeletal elements. Images PMID:4040602

  14. Floating zone melting of cadmium telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Wen-Ming; Regel, L. L.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    To produce superior crystals of cadmium telluride, floating zone melting in space has been proposed. Techniques required for floating zone melting of cadmium telluride are being developed. We have successfully float-zoned cadmium telluride on earth using square rods. A resistance heater was constructed for forming the molten zone. Evaporation of the molten zone was controlled by adding excess cadmium to the growth ampoule combined with heating of the entire ampoule. An effective method to hold the feed rod was developed. Slow rotation of the growth ampoule was proven experimentally to be necessary to achieve a complete symmetric molten zone. Most of the resultant cylindrical rods were single crystals with twins. Still needed is a suitable automatic method to control the zone length. We tried a fiber optical technique to control the zone length, but experiments showed that application of this technique to automate zone length control is unlikely to be successful.

  15. Heat-Related Illnesses

    MedlinePlus

    ... that involves extreme heat. Young children and the elderly are most at risk, but anyone can be affected. Here you will find information about heat cramps and heat stroke and exhaustion. Heat Cramps Symptoms include muscle spasms, usually in the legs and stomach area. To ...

  16. Growth of high T{sub c} superconducting fibers using a miniaturized laser-heated float zone process. Final technical report, January 15, 1989--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Feigelson, R.S.; Route, R.K.; DeMattei, R.C.

    1995-04-01

    This report summarizes a four year program on the use of the laser-heated pedestral growth (LHPG) process for the preparation of long, flexible fibers of the high T{sub c} copper-oxide ceramic superconductors having wire-like morphology. The major question addressed was whether the LHPG method could produce high T{sub c} fibers of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (2212) in lengths long enough for use as superconducting wires. Cold-pressing and sintering methods were developed to prepare uniform, single phase ceramic feedstock. Phase equilibrium studies revealed the relationship between thermal gradients, interface shape and phases produced by the LHPG process during incongruent solidification. The highest critical current densities over measured in bulk samples of Bi-2212 material, 60,000 A/cm{sup 2} at 68K, were achieved in single crystal and/or highly grain-oriented fibers. The first ever flexible, multi-cm fibers ({le}100 {mu}m in diameter) were prepared. Fibers diameters were ultimately reduced to 25 {mu}m (1 cm in length), and we were able to grow them up to 14 cm in length (100 {mu}m diameter). These fibers could be bent in radii less than 5 cm, but max. growth rates of {approximately}10 mm/hr did not permit them to be grown long enough for prototype motor windings. Superconducting Bi-2212 grain-aligned ribbons were grown for the first time by the LHPG method using platinum guide wires.

  17. Contents of Highly Labile Trace Elements in H4-6 Chondrite Falls Are Not Affected by Post-Accretionary Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S. F.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1999-03-01

    Contents of volatile trace elements in H4-6 chondrites were established during nebular condensation and accretion and the most thermally labile of these were unaffected by metamorphism of their parent bodies, shock heating or close solar approach.

  18. Factors affecting thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis ODA 99-30581-13 in shell egg contents and use of heat-ozone combinations for egg pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jennifer J; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2013-02-01

    Infection of laying hens with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis leads to deposition of the pathogen into the albumen or yolk of forming eggs. Heat treatment can inactivate internalized Salmonella Enteritidis in shell eggs, but factors such as the nature and location of contamination may influence the efficacy of thermal treatments. In the current research, natural contamination was mimicked by introducing small inocula of Salmonella Enteritidis into different locations of shell eggs and incubating inoculated eggs. These pathogen-containing eggs were heated at 57°C for 40 min, and temperature within eggs was monitored at the locations of inocula. Comparison of inactivation at equivalent internal temperatures revealed similar levels of lethality regardless of inoculum location. Refrigeration between incubation and heat treatment did not increase thermal resistance of cells in albumen but decreased cell inactivation in yolk. Sequential application of heat and gaseous ozone allows for the development of a process capable of decontaminating shell eggs with minimal thermal treatment and impact on egg quality. Inoculated eggs were subjected to (i) an immersion heating process similar to that used in commercial pasteurization or (ii) immersion heating, at reduced duration, followed by vacuum (50.8 kPa) and treatment with ozone gas (maximum 160 g/m(3)) under pressure (∼187.5 kPa). All treatments tested produced greater than 5-log inactivation, which is required for "pasteurization" processes. Differences were observed in the visual quality of eggs depending on treatment parameters. Application of ozone subsequent to heating allows for a significant reduction in heating time without decreasing process lethality.

  19. Short-Term Heat Shock Affects Host–Virus Interaction in Mice Infected with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus H5N1

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jia; Fan, Xiaoxu; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Shouping; Xiao, Jin; Hu, Yanxin; Wang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 is a highly contagious virus that can cause acute respiratory infections and high human fatality ratio due to excessive inflammatory response. Short-term heat shock, as a stressful condition, could induce the expression of heat shock proteins that function as molecular chaperones to protect cells against multiple stresses. However, the protective effect of short-term heat shock in influenza infection is far from being understood. In this study, mice were treated at 39°C for 4 h before being infected with HPAIV H5N1. Interestingly, short-term heat shock significantly increased the levels of HSP70 and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-β, and IFN-γ in the lung tissues of mice. Following HPAIV H5N1 infection, short-term heat shock alleviated immunopathology and viral replication in lung tissue and repressed the weight loss and increased the survival rate of H5N1-infected mice. Our data reported that short-term heat shock provided beneficial anti-HPAIV H5N1 properties in mice model, which offers an alternative strategy for non-drug prevention for influenza infection. PMID:27379054

  20. Microstructural studies and crystallographic orientation of different zones and δ-hydrides in resistance welded Zircaloy-4 sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiran Kumar, N. A. P.; Szpunar, Jerzy. A.; He, Zhang

    2011-07-01

    The cold worked stress relieved (CWSR) Zircaloy-4 sheet used as endplate in nuclear fuel bundle is resistance welded with an endcap in argon environment. Later the welded sample is hydrided in a gaseous atmosphere at 400 °C. Optical microscopy (OM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to examine the morphology and crystal orientation of the hydrides. The microstructural changes in different areas of the weld zone, heat affected zone (HAZ) and the as-received zone were analyzed using EBSD technique. Optical examination showed complete random morphological orientation of hydrides and predominantly basket-weave structure in the weld zone, with very few colonies of parallel plate structures. Variant selection for α-phase formation inside prior β-grains was identified at the weld centre. As we move from the weld centre to the as-received zone, the variant selection is found to be less probable. The δ-hydride platelets at the weld zone were always found to be growing perpendicular to the α-colonies having angular difference of 60-63° and follow (0 0 0 1) α-Zr//{1 1 1}δ-ZrH 1.5 orientation relationship with the zirconium matrix. Proposed description of complex distribution of hydrides and alloy microstructure at the weld and heat affected zone will contribute to a better understanding of mechanisms of failure of fuel cladding in various types of nuclear reactors.

  1. Microwave Heating Inactivates Shiga Toxin (Stx2) in Reconstituted Fat-Free Milk and Adversely Affects the Nutritional Value of Cell Culture Medium.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; Hernlem, Bradley; He, Xiaohua; Friedman, Mendel

    2014-03-26

    Microwave exposure is a convenient and widely used method for defrosting, heating, and cooking numerous foods. Microwave cooking is also reported to kill pathogenic microorganisms that often contaminate food. In this study, we tested whether microwaves would inactivate the toxicity of Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2) added to 5% reconstituted fat-free milk administered to monkey kidney Vero cells. Heating of milk spiked with Stx2 in a microwave oven using a 10% duty cycle (cycle period of 30 s) for a total of 165 kJ energy or thermal heating (pasteurization), widely used to kill pathogenic bacteria, did not destroy the biological effect of the toxin in the Vero cells. However, conventional heating of milk to 95 °C for 5 min or at an increased microwave energy of 198 kJ reduced the Stx2 activity. Gel electrophoresis showed that exposure of the protein toxin to high-energy microwaves resulted in the degradation of its original structure. In addition, two independent assays showed that exposure of the cell culture medium to microwave energy of 198 kJ completely destroyed the nutritional value of the culture medium used to grow the Vero cells, possibly by damaging susceptible essential nutrients present in the medium. These observations suggest that microwave heating has the potential to destroy the Shiga toxin in liquid food.

  2. Thermal Anomalies and Fluid Geochemistry Framework In Occurrence of The 2000-2001 Nizza Monferrato Seismic Sequence (northern Italy): Episodic Changes In The Fault Zone Heat Flow Or Chemical Mixing Phenomena ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrocchi, F.; Favara, R.; Capasso, G.; Pizzino, L.; Bencini, R.; Cinti, D.

    Soon after and soon before the August 21, 2000 earthquake (Ml = 5.2), occurred at 7:14 pm, in the Nizza Monferrato area (Piemonte, Northern Italy) several episodes of heating up (reaching 30 C from a normal regional background around 10oC) affecting groundwater from wells and springs were recorded. The area affected by the temperature uprising in the shallow aquifers is around 20 Km x 30 Km wide, elongated in a N-S direction (the same evidenced by the strike-slip left -lateral focal mechanism), from Incisa Scapaccino to Nizza Monferrato towns. Water temperatures of some wells remained anomalous, lasting for 3-4 months, returning to normal values very slowly. Also in concomitance with the Ml = 4.0 event, occurred on August 2001 in the same area, similar phenomena were observed. We performed geochemical and hydrogeological surveys (around 40 sites as a whole were selected for chemical and isotopic analyses and the hottest wells several times, in a yearly period) to understand the causes of this temperature uprising also in relation to the presence of the Acqui Terme thermal spring (70 C) located at 30 Km o Southward. On field we measured temperature, pH, Eh, electrical conductivity, and 222Rn. Moreover major elements (Ca, Mg, Na, K, Cl, SO4), minor elements (NH4 e NO3, PO4, Li, B, SiO2, F, Br, Sr), and trace elements (Fe, Mn, As, Sb, Hg, U) as well as H, O, C isotopic ratios were analyzed in laboratory. Dissolved gases water analyzed selecting 9 sites. The collected data showed that, apart from the noteworthy changes in the well temperatures, no peculiar variations in fluid geochemistry occurred in time. On the basis of the experimental geochemical evidences, the work focuses on the geochemical and physico-chemical trends, the isotopic analyses and the anomalous- episodic change of the heat flow in an "activated" fault zoneas the Bacino Terziario Piemontese one. The "frictional heating" process, the "stress-driven phase transitions" and episodic variations in the

  3. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  4. Microwave heating inactivates Shiga Toxin (Stx2) in reconstituted fat-free Milk and adversely affects the nutritional value of cell culture medium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microwave exposure is a convenient and widely used method for defrosting, heating, and cooking numerous foods. Microwave cooking is also reported to kill pathogenic microorganisms that often contaminate food. Microwaves act by causing polar molecules in food, such as water, to rapidly rotate, thus...

  5. Spin transition zone in Earth's lower mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.-F.; Vanko, G.; Jacobsen, S.D.; Iota, V.; Struzhkin, V.V.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Kuznetsov, A.; Yoo, C.-S.

    2008-06-16

    Mineral properties in Earth's lower mantle are affected by iron electronic states, but representative pressures and temperatures have not yet been probed. Spin states of iron in lower-mantle ferropericlase have been measured up to 95 gigapascals and 2000 kelvin with x-ray emission in a laser-heated diamond cell. A gradual spin transition of iron occurs over a pressure-temperature range extending from about 1000 kilometers in depth and 1900 kelvin to 2200 kilometers and 2300 kelvin in the lower mantle. Because low-spin ferropericlase exhibits higher density and faster sound velocities relative to the high-spin ferropericlase, the observed increase in low-spin (Mg,Fe)O at mid-lower mantle conditions would manifest seismically as a lower-mantle spin transition zone characterized by a steeper-than-normal density gradient.

  6. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  7. Three-zonal engineering method of heat calculation for fluidized bed furnaces based on data on commercial investigations of heat generation distribution during biomass combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litun, D. S.; Ryabov, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    A three-zonal method of heat calculation of furnaces for combustion of biomass and low-caloric fuel in the fluidized bed is described. The method is based on equations of thermal and material balances that account for heat generation by fuel in the zone, heat-and-mass transfer heat exchange between the furnace media and surfaces that bound the zone, and heat-and-mass transfer between furnace zones. The calculation procedure for heat generation by fuel in the fluidized bed (FB) using the heat generation portion by the fuel is proposed. Based on commercial investigations, the main factors that affect the average temperature in the FB and the portion of fuel heat that is released in the FB are determined. Results of commercial investigations showed that the airflow coefficient in the FB should be recognized as the main operation parameter that affects the average temperature in the FB and, consequently, heat generation in the FB. The gas flow rate in the FB can be marked out as the second factor that affects the consumption degree of oxidizer supplied in the FB. Commercial investigations revealed that mixing is affected by the gas flow rate in the FB and the bed material particle size, which may be changed during the boiler operation because of the agglomeration of particles of sand and ash. The calculation processing of commercial investigations on a KM-75-40M boiler of a CHP-3 of an Arkhangelsk Pulp and Paper Mill (APPM), which was carried out using the inverse problem procedure by means of a developed computer program, determined the range of the fuel heat release share in the FB, which was 0.26-0.45 at an excess air factor of 0.59-0.93 in the bed, and the heat release share in the maximum temperature zone in the total heat release in the superbed space. The heat release share in the bed is determined as an approximating function of the excess air factor in the bed and the fluidization number. The research results can be used during designing boilers with the

  8. Moving-Gradient Furnace With Constant-Temperature Cold Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J.; Shaubach, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Outer heat pipe helps in controlling temperature of cold zone of furnace. Part of heat-pipe furnace that includes cold zone surrounded by another heat pipe equipped with heater at one end and water cooling coil at other end. Temperature of heat pipe maintained at desired constant value by controlling water cooling. Serves as constant-temperature heat source or heat sink, as needed, for gradient of temperature as gradient region moved along furnace. Proposed moving-gradient heat-pipe furnace used in terrestrial or spaceborne experiments on directional solidification in growth of crystals.

  9. Heat transfer in rotating coolant channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoguan; Zheng, Jirui; Ding, Xiaojiang

    The effect of cooling channels' rotation on the local and mean heat transfer is investigated using an experimental simulation of three types of flow in rotating circular tubes: (1) flow parallel to the rotating axis, (2) radially outward flow perpendicular to the rotating axis, and (3) radially inward flow perpendicular to the rotating axis. Theoretical analysis uses the boundary layer model method, in which the flow in a tube is divided into the core and boundary layer zones with different assumptions for each zone, and the equations are solved using the momentum integration method. Experimental results were obtained using a specially designed facility incorporating all three modes of flow. The results confirm that rotation of the flow in a tube can enhance the heat transfer processes whether the flow is parallel or perpendicular to the rotating axis. The incremental increase in heat transfer rate due to rotation was found to be more pronounced at low rotational speeds than at high speeds. The variation of local heat transfer coefficients along axial direction is affected by the inlet and outlet sections and by the ratio of length to diameter.

  10. Transparent multi-zone crystal growth furnace and method for controlling the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter (Inventor); Batur, Celal (Inventor); Bennett, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A crystal growth system, comprising: a furnace; a plurality of heating elements coupled to said furnace, each said plurality of heating elements defining a heat zone, each said heating element set to a desired temperature value; a plurality of thermocouples associated with respective heat zones to detect a temperature value; a translation system for passing an ampoule containing crystal growth material through said furnace into said heat zones and providing a positional location of said ampoule and; a multi-variable self-tuning temperature controller connected to said plurality of heating elements, said plurality of thermocouples and said translation system, said controller monitoring each said zone temperature value and upon considering the thermal interaction of heating zones and the moving thermal inertia of the ampoule, adjusting voltage input to said heat zones to obtain optimal crystal growth within said ampoule.

  11. Transparent multi-zone crystal growth furnace and method for controlling the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter (Inventor); Batur, Celal (Inventor); Bennett, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A crystal growth system, comprising: a furnace; a plurality of heating elements coupled to said furnace, each said plurality of heating elements defining a heat zone, each said heating element set to a desired temperature value; a plurality of thermocouples associated with respective heat zones to detect a temperature value; a translation system for passing an ampoule containing crystal growth material through said furnace into said heat zones and providing a positional location of said ampoule and; a multi-variable self-tuning temperature controller connected to said plurality of heating elements, said plurality of thermocouples and said translation system, said controller monitoring each said zone temperature value and upon considering the thermal interaction of heating zones and the moving thermal inertia of the ampoule, adjusting voltage input to said heat zones to obtain optimal crystal growth within said ampoule.

  12. 24 CFR 3285.103 - Site suitability with design zone maps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 3285.315 for Special Snow Load Conditions. (c) Thermal zone. Manufactured homes must not be installed in a thermal zone that exceeds the thermal zone for which the home has been designed, as evidenced by the thermal zone indicated on the heating/cooling certificate and insulation zone map and as...

  13. 24 CFR 3285.103 - Site suitability with design zone maps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 3285.315 for Special Snow Load Conditions. (c) Thermal zone. Manufactured homes must not be installed in a thermal zone that exceeds the thermal zone for which the home has been designed, as evidenced by the thermal zone indicated on the heating/cooling certificate and insulation zone map and as...

  14. 24 CFR 3285.103 - Site suitability with design zone maps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 3285.315 for Special Snow Load Conditions. (c) Thermal zone. Manufactured homes must not be installed in a thermal zone that exceeds the thermal zone for which the home has been designed, as evidenced by the thermal zone indicated on the heating/cooling certificate and insulation zone map and as...

  15. 24 CFR 3285.103 - Site suitability with design zone maps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 3285.315 for Special Snow Load Conditions. (c) Thermal zone. Manufactured homes must not be installed in a thermal zone that exceeds the thermal zone for which the home has been designed, as evidenced by the thermal zone indicated on the heating/cooling certificate and insulation zone map and as...

  16. Laying performance, digestibility and plasma hormones in laying hens exposed to chronic heat stress as affected by betaine, vitamin C, and/or vitamin E supplementation.

    PubMed

    Attia, Youssef A; Abd El-Hamid, Abd El-Hamid E; Abedalla, Ahmed A; Berika, Marfat A; Al-Harthi, Mohammed A; Kucuk, Osman; Sahin, Kazim; Abou-Shehema, Baha M

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress had a negative effect on laying hens' performance, thus this research was to study the influences of betaine (Bet, 1000 mg/kg betaine), vitamin C (VC, 200 mg/kg ascorbic acid), and vitamin E (VE, 150 mg/kg α-Tocopherol acetate) and their possible combinations on egg production, digestibility of nutrients, plasma hormones and reproductive organs of dual-purpose hens exposed to chronic heat stress. Two hundred and eighty eight hens and thirty-six cocks from 32 to 48 weeks of age were divided into nine treatment groups of four replicates, each containing eight hens and one cock. One group was kept under thermo-natural condition and the eight others were kept under chronic heat stress (CHS). One of these eight was used as a negative control, while the others were supplemented with VC, VE and/or betaine and their possible combinations. Body weights, laying rate, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio in hens reared under CHS rooster without any supplementation during 32 to 48 weeks of impairment (P = 0.0052) were recorded. Hens reared under heat stress and fed a diet supplemented with either Bet, VC, VE or combination of the supplements increased production traits. However, hens supplemented with VC showed the greatest production traits. Plasma glucose, estradiol-17 (E2), progesterone (P4), tri-iodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) decreased in hens reared under CHS and fed a diet with no supplementation compared to the other treatments (P = 0.001). Liver weights, spleen weights, thyroid gland weights, ovary weights, oviduct weights and oviduct lengths were lowest in hens reared under CHS and fed a diet with no supplementation (P = 0.0480). In conclusion, dual purpose hens reared under CHS and supplemented with VC at 200 mg/kg diet and Bet at 1000 mg/kg enhanced the laying performance and combated CHS. PMID:27652192

  17. 49 CFR 1105.9 - Coastal Zone Management Act requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coastal Zone Management Act requirements. 1105.9... ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS § 1105.9 Coastal Zone Management Act requirements. (a) If the proposed action affects land or water uses within a State coastal zone designated pursuant to the Coastal Zone Management Act (16...

  18. 32 CFR 643.33 - Policy-Coastal zone management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Policy-Coastal zone management. 643.33 Section... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Policy § 643.33 Policy—Coastal zone management. (a) The Coastal Zone Management Act of... affecting the coastal zone of a state, to conduct or support those activities in a manner which is, to...

  19. Connection Between Internal Structural Stresses of the Ist and the IInd kind and Operational Reliability of the Boiler Heating Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, Lyudmila; Tabakaev, Roman; Tashlykov, Alexander; Zavorin, Alexander; Zyubanov, Vadim

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents new approaches to solving problems of forecasting the life of heating surface of boilers, based on an analysis of internal structural stresses of the first and second kind that could affect the intragranular and intergranular strength and reliability of the pipeline in continuous operation by making it work without damage by preventing the disclosure of zone cracks.

  20. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  1. Heat-labile IgG2a antibodies affect cure of Trypanosoma musculi infection in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Wechsler, D S; Kongshavn, P A

    1986-11-01

    Immune plasma (IP) obtained from mice cured of Trypanosoma musculi infection is able to mediate trypanosome clearance both in vivo and in vitro. A protein A-derived immunoglobulin fraction of IP containing primarily IgG2a and IgG3 shares this curative activity. Additional purification of IP with the use of anti-IgG2a and anti-IgG3 coupled to Sepharose beads demonstrates that the curative activity of IP resides solely in the IgG2a fraction; IP depleted of IgG2a is no longer able to effect T. musculi removal. Furthermore, this curative IgG2a is labile to heat treatment for 30 min at 56 degrees C. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays show that trypanosome-specific IgG2a builds up gradually over the course of infection, and temporarily drops slightly at the time of parasite clearance.

  2. Two years of combined high-intensity physical training and heat acclimatization affect lymphocyte and serum HSP70 in purebred military working dogs.

    PubMed

    Bruchim, Yaron; Aroch, Itamar; Eliav, Ady; Abbas, Atallah; Frank, Ilan; Kelmer, Efrat; Codner, Carolina; Segev, Gilad; Epstein, Yoram; Horowitz, Michal

    2014-07-15

    Military working dogs in hot countries undergo exercise training at high ambient temperatures for at least 9 mo annually. Physiological adaptations to these harsh conditions have been extensively studied; however, studies focusing on the underlying molecular adaptations are limited. In the current study, military working dogs were chosen as a model to examine the effects of superimposing endurance exercise on seasonal acclimatization to environmental heat stress. The lymphocyte HSP70 profile and extracellular HSP70 were studied in tandem with physiological performance in the dogs from their recruitment for the following 2 yr. Aerobic power and heat shock proteins were measured at the end of each summer, with physical performance tests (PPTs) in an acclimatized room (22°C). The study shows that together with a profound enhancement of aerobic power and physical performance, hsp72 mRNA induction immediately post-PPT and 45 min later, progressively increased throughout the study period (relative change in median lymphocyte hsp72 mRNA first PPT, 4.22 and 12.82; second PPT, 17.19 and 109.05, respectively), whereas induction of HSP72 protein was stable. These responses suggest that cellular/molecular adaptive tools for maintaining HSP72 homeostasis exist. There was also a significant rise in basal and peak median optical density extracellular HSP at the end of each exercise test (first PPT, 0.13 and 0.15; second PPT, 1.04 and 1.52, respectively). The relationship between these enhancements and improved aerobic power capacity is not yet fully understood.

  3. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  4. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  5. Heating with waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Beabout, R.W.

    1986-09-02

    Most of the power consumed in the gaseous diffusion process is converted into heat of compression, which is removed from the process gas and rejected into the atmosphere by recirculating cooling water over cooling towers. The water being handled through the X-333 and X-330 Process Buildings can be heated to 140 to 150/sup 0/F for heating use. The Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant is provided with a recirculating heating water (RHW) system which uses X-330 water and wasted heat. The RHW flow is diagrammed. (DLC)

  6. The pH sensitivity of murine heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) binding to collagen is affected by mutations in the breach histidine cluster.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Wahab, Mohd Firdaus; Homma, Takayuki; Wright, Michael; Olerenshaw, Dee; Dafforn, Timothy R; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Miller, Andrew D

    2013-02-01

    Heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) is a single-substrate molecular chaperone crucial for collagen biosynthesis. Although its function is well established, the molecular mechanisms that govern binding to procollagen peptides and triple helices in the endoplasmic reticulum (followed by controlled release in the Golgi) are unclear. HSP47 binds procollagen at a neutral pH but releases at a pH similar to the pK(a) of the imidazole side chain of histidine residues. It thus seems likely that these residues are involved in this pH-dependent mechanism. Murine HSP47 has 14 histidine residues grouped into three clusters, known as the breach, gate, and shutter. Here, we report the use of histidine mutagenesis to demonstrate the relative contribution of these three clusters to HSP47 structure and the "pH switch." Many of the tested mutants are silent; however, breach mutants H197A and H198A show binding but no apparent pH switch and are unable to control release. Another breach mutant, H191A, shows perturbed collagen release characteristics, consistent with observed perturbations in pH-driven trans-conformational changes. Thus, His-198, His-197 and His-191 are important (if not central) to HSP47 mechanism of binding/release to collagen. This is consistent with the breach cluster residues being well conserved across the HSP47 family.

  7. 36 CFR 13.430 - Determination of resident zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... public hearing in the affected local vicinity, a community or area near a national park or monument may be— (1) Added to a resident zone; or (2) Deleted from a resident zone, when such community or...

  8. Numerical modeling of thermal conductive heating in fractured bedrock.

    PubMed

    Baston, Daniel P; Falta, Ronald W; Kueper, Bernard H

    2010-01-01

    Numerical modeling was employed to study the performance of thermal conductive heating (TCH) in fractured shale under a variety of hydrogeological conditions. Model results show that groundwater flow in fractures does not significantly affect the minimum treatment zone temperature, except near the beginning of heating or when groundwater influx is high. However, fracture and rock matrix properties can significantly influence the time necessary to remove all liquid water (i.e., reach superheated steam conditions) in the treatment area. Low matrix permeability, high matrix porosity, and wide fracture spacing can contribute to boiling point elevation in the rock matrix. Consequently, knowledge of these properties is important for the estimation of treatment times. Because of the variability in boiling point throughout a fractured rock treatment zone and the absence of a well-defined constant temperature boiling plateau in the rock matrix, it may be difficult to monitor the progress of thermal treatment using temperature measurements alone.

  9. Endogenous enzymes, heat, and pH affect flavone profiles in parsley (Petroselinum crispum var. neapolitanum) and celery (Apium graveolens) during juice processing.

    PubMed

    Hostetler, Gregory L; Riedl, Ken M; Schwartz, Steven J

    2012-01-11

    Flavones are abundant in parsley and celery and possess unique anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in animal models. However, their bioavailability and bioactivity depend in part on the conjugation of sugars and other functional groups to the flavone core. The effects of juice extraction, acidification, thermal processing, and endogenous enzymes on flavone glycoside profile and concentration in both parsley and celery were investigated. Parsley yielded 72% juice with 64% of the total flavones extracted, whereas celery yielded 79% juice with 56% of flavones extracted. Fresh parsley juice averaged 281 mg flavones/100 g and fresh celery juice, 28.5 mg/100 g. Flavones in steamed parsley and celery were predominantly malonyl apiosylglucoside conjugates, whereas those in fresh samples were primarily apiosylglucoside conjugates; this was apparently the result of endogenous malonyl esterases. Acidification and thermal processing of celery converted flavone apiosylglucosides to flavone glucosides, which may affect the intestinal absorption and metabolism of these compounds.

  10. BAY 81-8973, a full-length recombinant factor VIII: Human heat shock protein 70 improves the manufacturing process without affecting clinical safety.

    PubMed

    Maas Enriquez, Monika; Thrift, John; Garger, Stephen; Katterle, Yvonne

    2016-11-01

    BAY 81-8973 is a full-length, unmodified recombinant human factor VIII (FVIII) approved for the treatment of hemophilia A. BAY 81-8973 has the same amino acid sequence as the currently marketed sucrose-formulated recombinant FVIII (rFVIII-FS) product and is produced using additional advanced manufacturing technologies. One of the key manufacturing advances for BAY 81-8973 is introduction of the gene for human heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) into the rFVIII-FS cell line. HSP70 facilitates proper folding of proteins, enhances cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis, and potentially impacts rFVIII glycosylation. HSP70 expression in the BAY 81-8973 cell line along with other manufacturing advances resulted in a higher-producing cell line and improvements in the pharmacokinetics of the final product as determined in clinical studies. HSP70 protein is not detected in the harvest or in the final BAY 81-8973 product. However, because this is a new process, clinical trial safety assessments included monitoring for anti-HSP70 antibodies. Most patients, across all age groups, had low levels of anti-HSP70 antibodies before exposure to the investigational product. During BAY 81-8973 treatment, 5% of patients had sporadic increases in anti-HSP70 antibody levels above a predefined threshold (cutoff value, 239 ng/mL). No clinical symptoms related to anti-HSP70 antibody development occurred. In conclusion, addition of HSP70 to the BAY 81-8973 cell line is an innovative technology for manufacturing rFVIII aimed at improving protein folding and expression. Improved pharmacokinetics and no effect on safety of BAY 81-8973 were observed in clinical trials in patients with hemophilia A.

  11. BAY 81-8973, a full-length recombinant factor VIII: Human heat shock protein 70 improves the manufacturing process without affecting clinical safety.

    PubMed

    Maas Enriquez, Monika; Thrift, John; Garger, Stephen; Katterle, Yvonne

    2016-11-01

    BAY 81-8973 is a full-length, unmodified recombinant human factor VIII (FVIII) approved for the treatment of hemophilia A. BAY 81-8973 has the same amino acid sequence as the currently marketed sucrose-formulated recombinant FVIII (rFVIII-FS) product and is produced using additional advanced manufacturing technologies. One of the key manufacturing advances for BAY 81-8973 is introduction of the gene for human heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) into the rFVIII-FS cell line. HSP70 facilitates proper folding of proteins, enhances cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis, and potentially impacts rFVIII glycosylation. HSP70 expression in the BAY 81-8973 cell line along with other manufacturing advances resulted in a higher-producing cell line and improvements in the pharmacokinetics of the final product as determined in clinical studies. HSP70 protein is not detected in the harvest or in the final BAY 81-8973 product. However, because this is a new process, clinical trial safety assessments included monitoring for anti-HSP70 antibodies. Most patients, across all age groups, had low levels of anti-HSP70 antibodies before exposure to the investigational product. During BAY 81-8973 treatment, 5% of patients had sporadic increases in anti-HSP70 antibody levels above a predefined threshold (cutoff value, 239 ng/mL). No clinical symptoms related to anti-HSP70 antibody development occurred. In conclusion, addition of HSP70 to the BAY 81-8973 cell line is an innovative technology for manufacturing rFVIII aimed at improving protein folding and expression. Improved pharmacokinetics and no effect on safety of BAY 81-8973 were observed in clinical trials in patients with hemophilia A. PMID:27436242

  12. Heat accumulation during pulsed laser materials processing.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Berger, Peter; Onuseit, Volkher; Wiedenmann, Margit; Freitag, Christian; Feuer, Anne

    2014-05-01

    Laser materials processing with ultra-short pulses allows very precise and high quality results with a minimum extent of the thermally affected zone. However, with increasing average laser power and repetition rates the so-called heat accumulation effect becomes a considerable issue. The following discussion presents a comprehensive analytical treatment of multi-pulse processing and reveals the basic mechanisms of heat accumulation and its consequence for the resulting processing quality. The theoretical findings can explain the experimental results achieved when drilling microholes in CrNi-steel and for cutting of CFRP. As a consequence of the presented considerations, an estimate for the maximum applicable average power for ultra-shorts pulsed laser materials processing for a given pulse repetition rate is derived.

  13. IEA BESTEST Multi-Zone Non-Airflow In-Depth Diagnostic Cases: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Alexander, D.; Felsmann, C.; Strachan, P.; Wijsman, A.

    2011-11-01

    This paper documents a set of in-depth diagnostic test cases for multi-zone heat transfer models that do not include the heat and mass transfer effects of airflow between zones. The multi-zone non-airflow test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST (Judkoff and Neymark 1995a).

  14. Climate change and dead zones.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Andrew H; Gedan, Keryn B

    2015-04-01

    Estuaries and coastal seas provide valuable ecosystem services but are particularly vulnerable to the co-occurring threats of climate change and oxygen-depleted dead zones. We analyzed the severity of climate change predicted for existing dead zones, and found that 94% of dead zones are in regions that will experience at least a 2 °C temperature increase by the end of the century. We then reviewed how climate change will exacerbate hypoxic conditions through oceanographic, ecological, and physiological processes. We found evidence that suggests numerous climate variables including temperature, ocean acidification, sea-level rise, precipitation, wind, and storm patterns will affect dead zones, and that each of those factors has the potential to act through multiple pathways on both oxygen availability and ecological responses to hypoxia. Given the variety and strength of the mechanisms by which climate change exacerbates hypoxia, and the rates at which climate is changing, we posit that climate change variables are contributing to the dead zone epidemic by acting synergistically with one another and with recognized anthropogenic triggers of hypoxia including eutrophication. This suggests that a multidisciplinary, integrated approach that considers the full range of climate variables is needed to track and potentially reverse the spread of dead zones.

  15. Climate change and dead zones.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Andrew H; Gedan, Keryn B

    2015-04-01

    Estuaries and coastal seas provide valuable ecosystem services but are particularly vulnerable to the co-occurring threats of climate change and oxygen-depleted dead zones. We analyzed the severity of climate change predicted for existing dead zones, and found that 94% of dead zones are in regions that will experience at least a 2 °C temperature increase by the end of the century. We then reviewed how climate change will exacerbate hypoxic conditions through oceanographic, ecological, and physiological processes. We found evidence that suggests numerous climate variables including temperature, ocean acidification, sea-level rise, precipitation, wind, and storm patterns will affect dead zones, and that each of those factors has the potential to act through multiple pathways on both oxygen availability and ecological responses to hypoxia. Given the variety and strength of the mechanisms by which climate change exacerbates hypoxia, and the rates at which climate is changing, we posit that climate change variables are contributing to the dead zone epidemic by acting synergistically with one another and with recognized anthropogenic triggers of hypoxia including eutrophication. This suggests that a multidisciplinary, integrated approach that considers the full range of climate variables is needed to track and potentially reverse the spread of dead zones. PMID:25385668

  16. Root apex transition zone as oscillatory zone.

    PubMed

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen, and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command center. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwin, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone.

  17. Root Apex Transition Zone As Oscillatory Zone

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen, and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command center. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwin, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone. PMID:24106493

  18. Solar heated fluidized bed gasification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qader, S. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A solar-powered fluidized bed gasification system for gasifying carbonaceous material is presented. The system includes a solar gasifier which is heated by fluidizing gas and steam. Energy to heat the gas and steam is supplied by a high heat capacity refractory honeycomb which surrounds the fluid bed reactor zone. The high heat capacity refractory honeycomb is heated by solar energy focused on the honeycomb by solar concentrator through solar window. The fluid bed reaction zone is also heated directly and uniformly by thermal contact of the high heat capacity ceramic honeycomb with the walls of the fluidized bed reactor. Provisions are also made for recovering and recycling catalysts used in the gasification process. Back-up furnace is provided for start-up procedures and for supplying heat to the fluid bed reaction zone when adequate supplies of solar energy are not available.

  19. Duration of a large Mafic intrusion and heat transfer in the lower crust: A SHRIMP U-Pb zircon Study in the Ivrea-Verbano Zone (Western Alps, Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peressini, G.; Quick, J.E.; Sinigoi, S.; Hofmann, A.W.; Fanning, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Ivrea-Verbano Zone in the western Italian Alps contains one of the world's classic examples of ponding of mantle-derived, mafic magma in the deep crust. Within it, a voluminous, composite mafic pluton, the Mafic Complex, intruded lower-crustal, high-grade paragneiss of the Kinzigite Formation during Permian-Carboniferous time, and is now exposed in cross-section as a result of Alpine uplift. The age of the intrusion is still debated because the results of geochronological studies in the last three decades on different rock types and with various dating techniques range from 250 to about 300 Ma. Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb zircon age determinations on 12 samples from several locations within the Mafic Complex were performed to better constrain the age of the igneous event. The results indicate a long history of magma emplacement and cooling, which reconciles the spread in previously published ages. The main intrusive phase took place at 288 ?? 4 Ma, causing a perturbation of the deep-crustal geotherm, which relaxed to the Sm-Nd closure temperature in garnet-free mafic rocks after about 15-20 Myr of sub-solidus cooling at c. 270 Ma. These results suggest that large, deep crustal plutons, such as those identified geophysically at depths of 10-20 km within extended continental crust (e.g. Yellowstone, Rio Grande Rift, Basin and Range) may have formed rapidly but induced a prolonged thermal perturbation. In addition, the data indicate that a significant thermal event affected the country rock of the Mafic Complex at about 310 Ma. The occurrence of an upper amphibolite- to granulite-facies thermal event in the Kinzigite Formation prior to the main intrusive phase of the Mafic Complex has been postulated by several workers, and is corroborated by other geochronological investigations. However, it remains uncertain whether this event (1) was part of a prolonged perturbation of the deep-crustal geotherm, which started long before the onset of

  20. Natural analogs for enhanced heat recovery from geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    High-temperature hydrothermal systems are physically and chemically zoned with depth. The energy input is from a magmatic zone, intruded by igneous bodies, that may also contribute variable amounts of magmatic fluid to the system. The heat source is directly overlain by a section of rocks, that due to their elevated temperature, respond to stress in a ductile fashion. The ductile zone is, in turn, overlain by a section of rocks that respond to stress in a brittle fashion, where water is able to circulate through fractures (the geothermal reservoir) and will be termed the hydrothermal circulation zone. Ancient and modern high-temperature geothermal systems show a predictable sequence of evolutionary events affecting these stratified zones. Metamorphic core complexes are uplifts, formed in highly extended terrains, that expose fossil brittle-ductile transition zones. Formerly ductile rocks have had brittle fractures superimposed on them, and meteoric hydrothermal systems are associated with the brittle fracturing. Porphyry copper deposits typically evolve from magmatic to meteoric hydrothermal systems. At the Larderello geothermal system, the brittle-ductile transition has been mapped using reflection seismology, and the zone has been penetrated by the San Pompeo 2 well where temperatures >420{degrees}C were encountered. Although neo-granitic dikes have been penetrated by drilling in the Larderello area, the brittle-ductile transition is largely above the inferred plutonic heat source. In the Geysers system, in contrast, the present steam system has been superimposed on young plutonic rocks and the inferred brittle-ductile transition is present at a depth of about 4.7 km within the plutonic rocks. As hydrothermal reservoirs are depleted, or surface facilities are restricted by environmental considerations, interest will turn to the deeper portions of known systems. Japan already has an aggressive program to develop Deep-Seated and Magma-Ambient resources.

  1. Effects of heat input on mechanical properties of metal inert gas welded 1.6 mm thick galvanized steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiqul, M. I.; Ishak, M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    It is usually a lot easier and less expensive to galvanize steel before it is welded into useful products. Galvanizing afterwards is almost impossible. In this research work, Galvanized Steel was welded by using the ER 308L stainless steel filler material. This work was done to find out an alternative way of welding and investigate the effects of heat input on the mechanical properties of butt welded joints of Galvanized Steel. A 13.7 kW maximum capacity MIG welding machine was used to join 1.6 mm thick sheet of galvanized steel with V groove and no gap between mm. Heat inputs was gradually increased from 21.06 to 25.07 joules/mm in this study. The result shows almost macro defects free welding and with increasing heat input the ultimate tensile strength and welding efficiency decrease. The Vickers hardness also decreases at HAZ with increasing heat input and for each individual specimen; hardness was lowest in heat affected zone (HAZ), intermediate in base metal and maximum in welded zone. The fracture for all specimens was in the heat affected zone while testing in the universal testing machine.

  2. Effect of heat input on the microstructure, residual stresses and corrosion resistance of 304L austenitic stainless steel weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul; Idury, K.S.N. Satish; Ismail, T.P.; Bhadauria, Alok; Shekhawat, S.K.; Khatirkar, Rajesh K.; Sapate, Sanjay G.

    2014-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high performance pressure vessels, nuclear, chemical, process and medical industry due to their very good corrosion resistance and superior mechanical properties. However, austenitic stainless steels are prone to sensitization when subjected to higher temperatures (673 K to 1173 K) during the manufacturing process (e.g. welding) and/or certain applications (e.g. pressure vessels). During sensitization, chromium in the matrix precipitates out as carbides and intermetallic compounds (sigma, chi and Laves phases) decreasing the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the present investigation, 304L austenitic stainless steel was subjected to different heat inputs by shielded metal arc welding process using a standard 308L electrode. The microstructural developments were characterized by using optical microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction, while the residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction using the sin{sup 2}ψ method. It was observed that even at the highest heat input, shielded metal arc welding process does not result in significant precipitation of carbides or intermetallic phases. The ferrite content and grain size increased with increase in heat input. The grain size variation in the fusion zone/heat affected zone was not effectively captured by optical microscopy. This study shows that electron backscattered diffraction is necessary to bring out changes in the grain size quantitatively in the fusion zone/heat affected zone as it can consider twin boundaries as a part of grain in the calculation of grain size. The residual stresses were compressive in nature for the lowest heat input, while they were tensile at the highest heat input near the weld bead. The significant feature of the welded region and the base metal was the presence of a very strong texture. The texture in the heat affected zone was almost random. - Highlights: • Effect of heat input on microstructure, residual

  3. Effects of aging treatment and heat input on the microstructures and mechanical properties of TIG-welded 6061-T6 alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong; Shen, Jun; Tang, Qin; Wu, Cui-ping; Zhou, Yan-bing

    2013-03-01

    Aging treatment and various heat input conditions were adopted to investigate the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of TIG welded 6061-T6 alloy joints by microstructural observations, microhardness tests, and tensile tests. With an increase in heat input, the width of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) increases and grains in the fusion zone (FZ) coarsen. Moreover, the hardness of the HAZ decreases, whereas that of the FZ decreases initially and then increases with an increase in heat input. Low heat input results in the low ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints due to the presence of partial penetrations and pores in the welded joints. After a simple artificial aging treatment at 175°C for 8 h, the microstructure of the welded joints changes slightly. The mechanical properties of the welded joints enhance significantly after the aging process as few precipitates distribute in the welded seam.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Poshusta, Joseph C; Booten, Charles W; Martin, Jerry L

    2013-12-24

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  5. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

    2012-11-06

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  6. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOEpatents

    Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

    2016-05-17

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  7. Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation

    DOEpatents

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-02-26

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

  8. Tectonics and the photosynthetic habitable zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, N. H.

    2009-12-01

    The traditional habitable zone lies between an inner stellar radius where the surface of the planet becomes too hot for liquid water carbon-based life and on outer radius, where the surface freezes. It is effectively the zone where photosynthesis is feasible. The concept extends to putative life on objects with liquid methane at the surface, like Titan. As a practical matter, photosynthesis leaves detectable biosignatures in the geological record; black shale on the Earth indicates that sulfide and probably FeO based photosynthesis existed by 3.8 Ga. The hard crustal rocks and the mantle sequester numerous photosynthetic biosignatures. Photosynthesis can produce detectable free oxygen with ozone in the atmosphere of extrasolar planets. In contrast, there is no outer limit for subsurface life in large silicate objects. Pre-photosynthetic niches are dependable but meager and not very detectable at great antiquity or great distance, with global productivity less than 1e-3 of the photosynthetic ones. Photosynthetic organisms have bountiful energy that modifies their surface environment and even tectonics. For example, metamorphic rocks formed at the expense of thick black shale are highly radioactive and hence self-fluxing. Active tectonics with volcanism and metamorphism prevents volatiles from being sequestered in the subsurface as on Mars. A heat-pipe object, like a larger Io, differs from the Earth in that the volatiles return to the deep interior distributed within massive volcanic deposits rather than concentrated in the shallow oceanic crust. One the Earth, the return of water to the surface by arc volcanoes controls its mantle abundance at the transition between behaving as a trace element and behaving as a major element that affects melting. The ocean accumulates the water that the mantle and crust do not take. The Earth has the “right” amount of water that erosion/deposition and tectonics both tend to maintain near sea level surfaces. The mantle contains

  9. Inductively heated particulate matter filter regeneration control system

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore Jr., Michael J; Kirby, Kevin W; Phelps, Amanda; Gregoire, Daniel J

    2012-10-23

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and zones. The system also includes a heating element. A control module selectively activates the heating element to inductively heat one of the zones.

  10. Vadose zone microbiology

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results in the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.

  11. Deciphering a multistage history affecting U-Cu(-Fe) mineralization in the Singhbhum Shear Zone, eastern India, using pyrite textures and compositions in the Turamdih U-Cu(-Fe) deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Dipak C.; Barton, Mark D.; Sarangi, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    The ˜200-km-long intensely deformed Singhbhum Shear Zone (SSZ) in eastern India hosts India’s largest U and Cu deposits and related Fe mineralization. The SSZ separates an Archaean cratonic nucleus to the south from a Mesoproterozoic fold belt in the North and has a complex geologic history that obscures the origin of the contained iron-oxide-rich mineral deposits. This study investigates aspects of the history of mineralization in the SSZ by utilizing new petrographic and electron microprobe observations of pyrite textures and zoning in the Turamdih U-Cu(-Fe) deposit. Mineralization at Turamdih is hosted in intensively deformed quartz-chlorite schist. Sulfides and oxides include, in inferred order of development: (a) magmatic Fe(-Ti-Cr) oxide and Fe-Cu(-Ni) sulfide minerals inferred to be magmatic (?) in origin; followed by (b) uranium, Fe-oxide, and Fe-Cu(-Co) sulfide minerals that predate most or all ductile deformation, and are inferred to be of hydrothermal origin; and (c) Fe-Cu sulfides that were generated during and postdating ductile deformation. These features are associated with the formation of three compositionally and texturally distinct pyrites. Pyrite (type-A), typically in globular-semiglobular composite inclusions of pyrite plus chalcopyrite in magnetite, is characterized by very high Ni content (up to 30,700 ppm) and low Co to Ni ratios (0.01-0.61). The textural and compositional characteristics of associated chalcopyrite and rare pyrrhotite suggest that this pyrite could be linked to the magmatic event via selective replacement of magmatic pyrrhotite. Alternatively, this pyrite and associated sulfide inclusions might be cogenetic with hydrothermal Fe-oxide. Type-B pyrite that forms elongate grains and irregular relics and cores of pyrite with high Co contents (up to 23,630 ppm) and high Co to Ni ratios (7.2-140.9) are interpreted to be related to hydrothermal mineralization predating ductile deformation. A third generation of pyrite (type C

  12. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate zone refining techniques for the purification of plutonium metal. The redistribution of 10 impurity elements from zone melting was examined. Four tantalum boats were loaded with plutonium impurity alloy, placed in a vacuum furnace, heated to 700{degrees}C, and held at temperature for one hour. Ten passes were made with each boat. Metallographic and chemical analyses performed on the plutonium rods showed that, after 10 passes, moderate movement of certain elements were achieved. Molten zone speeds of 1 or 2 inches per hour had no effect on impurity element movement. Likewise, the application of constant or variable power had no effect on impurity movement. The study implies that development of a zone refining process to purify plutonium is feasible. Development of a process will be hampered by two factors: (1) the effect on impurity element redistribution of the oxide layer formed on the exposed surface of the material is not understood, and (2) the tantalum container material is not inert in the presence of plutonium. Cold boat studies are planned, with higher temperature and vacuum levels, to determine the effect on these factors. 5 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  13. Heat accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, A.

    1981-09-29

    A heat accumulator comprises a thermally-insulated reservoir full of paraffin wax mixture or other flowable or meltable heat storage mass, heat-exchangers immersed in the mass, a heat-trap connected to one of the heat-exchangers, and a heat user connected to the other heat-exchanger. Pumps circulate fluids through the heat-trap and the heat-using means and the respective heat-exchangers, and a stirrer agitates and circulates the mass, and the pumps and the stirrer and electric motors driving these devices are all immersed in the mass.

  14. Browns Ferry waste heat greenhouse environmental control system design

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, M.; Stovall, T.K.; Hicks, N.G.; Pile, R.S.; Burns, E.R.; Waddell, E.L. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee Valley Authority and the Environmental Research Laboratory at the University of Arizona cooperated on the design of an experimental greenhouse located at TVA's Browns Ferry Nuclear Generating Station. Two greenhouse zones are heated by waste heat from the plant's condenser effluent. For comparison, a third greenhouse zone is heated conventionally (fossil-fueled burners) as a control. Design specifics for each of the three zones and a qualitative operating evaluation are presented.

  15. Capillary zone electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, J.W.; Lukacs, K.D.

    1983-10-21

    Zone electrophoresis in capillaries is a technique complementary to electrophoresis in supporting media, and each approach has its own particular advantages. Efficient heat transfer from small-diameter capillaries permits use of unusually high voltages, resulting in both high resolution and rapid analysis. Capillaries also seem well suited for automation. Our present electromigration injection technique is relatively straightforward and should be simple to automate. Capillaries are reusable, which is an advantage over gels. On-line electronic detection permits good quantification, further enhancing possibilities for fully automatic operation. The greatest obstacle to further development and utilization of capillaries is the requirement of extremely sensitive detectors, and more types of detectors with higher sensitivity are greatly needed. A better understanding of capillary surface modification will also be important, both for improved capillary surface deactivation and for better control over electroosmotic flow. Capillaries should provide an ideal system in which to explore nonaqueous separation media. The prospects for nonaqueous media in electrophoresis are similar to those in electrochemistry, and capillaries should prove an excellent system in which to begin their study. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: Micro iron-oxide zones generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Morales, M.; Frausto-Reyes, C.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Acosta-Ortiz, S. E.; Gonzalez-Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2014-07-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas.

  17. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: micro iron-oxide zones generation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Frausto-Reyes, C; Soto-Bernal, J J; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2014-07-15

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas.

  18. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: micro iron-oxide zones generation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Frausto-Reyes, C; Soto-Bernal, J J; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2014-07-15

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas. PMID:24699286

  19. Natural analogs for enhanced heat recovery from geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Dennis L.

    1996-01-24

    High-temperature hydrothermal systems are physically and chemically zoned with depth. The energy input is from a magmatic zone, intruded by igneous bodies, that may also contribute variable amounts of magmatic fluid to the system. The heat source is directly overlain by a section of rocks, that due to their elevated temperature, respond to stress in a ductile fashion. The ductile zone is, in turn, overlain by a section of rocks that respond to stress in a brittle fashion, where water is able to circulate through fractures (the geothermal reservoir) and will be termed the hydrothermal circulation zone. Ancient and modern high-temperature geothermal systems show a predictable sequence of evolutionary events affecting these stratified zones. Metamorphic core complexes are uplifts, formed in highly extended terrains, that expose fossil brittle-ductile transition zones. Formerly ductile rocks have had brittle fractures superimposed on them, and meteoric hydrothermal systems are associated with the brittle fracturing. Porphyry copper deposits typically evolve from magmatic to meteoric hydrothermal systems. At the Larderello geothermal system, the brittle- ductile transition has been mapped using reflection seismology, and the zone has been penetrated by the San Pompeo 2 well where temperatures >420°C were encountered. Although neo-granitic dikes have been penetrated by drilling in the Larderello area, the brittle- ductile transition is largely above the inferred plutonic heat source. In the Geysers system, in contrast, the present steam system has been superimposed on young plutonic rocks and the inferred brittle-ductile transition is present at a depth of about 4.7 km within the plutonic rocks. As hydrothermal reservoirs are depleted, or surface facilities are restricted by environmental considerations, interest will turn to the deeper portions of known systems. Japan already has an aggressive program to develop Deep-seated and Magma-Ambient resources. This program, as

  20. Heat Without Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubkin, Elihu

    1997-04-01

    Logic of the Second Law of Thermodynamics demands acquisition of naked entropy. Accordingly, the leanest liaison between systems is not a diathermic membrane, it is a purely informational tickler, leaking no appreciable energy. The subsystem here is a thermodynamic universe, which gets `heated' entropically, yet without gaining calories. Quantum Mechanics graciously supports that(Lubkin, E. and Lubkin, T., International Journal of Theoretical Physics,32), 933-943 (1993) (at a cost of about 1 bit) through entanglement---across this least permeable of membranes---with what is beyond that universe. Heat without heat(Also v. forthcoming Proceedings of the 4th Drexel University Conference of September 1994) is the aspirin for Boltzmann's headache, conserving entropy in mechanical isolation, even while increasing entropy in thermodynamic isolation.

  1. Beyond the classic thermoneutral zone: Including thermal comfort.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Boris Rm; Frijns, Arjan Jh; Schellen, Lisje; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2014-01-01

    The thermoneutral zone is defined as the range of ambient temperatures where the body can maintain its core temperature solely through regulating dry heat loss, i.e., skin blood flow. A living body can only maintain its core temperature when heat production and heat loss are balanced. That means that heat transport from body core to skin must equal heat transport from skin to the environment. This study focuses on what combinations of core and skin temperature satisfy the biophysical requirements of being in the thermoneutral zone for humans. Moreover, consequences are considered of changes in insulation and adding restrictions such as thermal comfort (i.e. driver for thermal behavior). A biophysical model was developed that calculates heat transport within a body, taking into account metabolic heat production, tissue insulation, and heat distribution by blood flow and equates that to heat loss to the environment, considering skin temperature, ambient temperature and other physical parameters. The biophysical analysis shows that the steady-state ambient temperature range associated with the thermoneutral zone does not guarantee that the body is in thermal balance at basal metabolic rate per se. Instead, depending on the combination of core temperature, mean skin temperature and ambient temperature, the body may require significant increases in heat production or heat loss to maintain stable core temperature. Therefore, the definition of the thermoneutral zone might need to be reformulated. Furthermore, after adding restrictions on skin temperature for thermal comfort, the ambient temperature range associated with thermal comfort is smaller than the thermoneutral zone. This, assuming animals seek thermal comfort, suggests that thermal behavior may be initiated already before the boundaries of the thermoneutral zone are reached. PMID:27583296

  2. Beyond the classic thermoneutral zone: Including thermal comfort.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Boris Rm; Frijns, Arjan Jh; Schellen, Lisje; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2014-01-01

    The thermoneutral zone is defined as the range of ambient temperatures where the body can maintain its core temperature solely through regulating dry heat loss, i.e., skin blood flow. A living body can only maintain its core temperature when heat production and heat loss are balanced. That means that heat transport from body core to skin must equal heat transport from skin to the environment. This study focuses on what combinations of core and skin temperature satisfy the biophysical requirements of being in the thermoneutral zone for humans. Moreover, consequences are considered of changes in insulation and adding restrictions such as thermal comfort (i.e. driver for thermal behavior). A biophysical model was developed that calculates heat transport within a body, taking into account metabolic heat production, tissue insulation, and heat distribution by blood flow and equates that to heat loss to the environment, considering skin temperature, ambient temperature and other physical parameters. The biophysical analysis shows that the steady-state ambient temperature range associated with the thermoneutral zone does not guarantee that the body is in thermal balance at basal metabolic rate per se. Instead, depending on the combination of core temperature, mean skin temperature and ambient temperature, the body may require significant increases in heat production or heat loss to maintain stable core temperature. Therefore, the definition of the thermoneutral zone might need to be reformulated. Furthermore, after adding restrictions on skin temperature for thermal comfort, the ambient temperature range associated with thermal comfort is smaller than the thermoneutral zone. This, assuming animals seek thermal comfort, suggests that thermal behavior may be initiated already before the boundaries of the thermoneutral zone are reached.

  3. [Dynamics of Radioecological State of the Fresh-Water Ecosystems Affected by a Long-Term Impact from Nuclear Power Plant in the Frontiers of the Zone under Observation].

    PubMed

    Trapeznikov, A V; Trapeznikova, V N; Korjavin, A V

    2015-01-01

    The results of radioecological studies of six small rivers situated in the surveillance zone of the Beloyarskaya NPP (BNPP) and around the cooling pond of the power plant are presented. 21 radionuclides and the total α- and β-activity were studied in the main components of the aquatic ecosystems. It is shown that after the 1st and 2nd BN PP blocks decommissioning the content of 60Co and 137Cs in the Beloyarskoye storage pond water, sediments, fish fauna and macrophytes dropped tens and hundreds of times. The fundamental importance of this fact is that in a large range of time the aquatic ecosystem mechanism of self-purification from radionuclides is working due to radioactive substances decay as well as redistribution of radionuclides from water to other components, primarily to the sediments. Of 6 small rivers the maximum levels of radioactive substances is found in the river Olkhovka, which for several years has been subjected to the low-level radioactive water discharges from Beloyarskaya NPP. The radionuclide content in the main components of the aquatic ecosystems of the other five rivers studied after BNPP 47-year operation period corresponds to the regional background. PMID:26310022

  4. Zone Refining by Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    System developed for studying use of laser beam for zone-refining semiconductors and metals. Specimen scanned with focused CO2 laser beam in such way that thin zone of molten material moves along specimen sweeps impurities with it. Zone-melting system comprises microcomputer, laser, electromechanical and optical components for beam control, vacuum chamber that holds specimen, and sensor for determining specimen temperature.

  5. The effects of plate-bending-related aquifer thickening on temperatures in the Japan Trench subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate subduction zone thermal models are necessary to understand a wide range of geophysical and geochemical processes, including: metamorphic reaction progress, mantle wedge hydration, and melt generation. For decades, plate convergence rate and subducting plate age and dip have been recognized as basic factors affecting subduction zone temperatures. Recent discoveries highlight the important effects of fluid circulation in oceanic lithosphere on subduction zone temperatures. However, there are contrasting hypotheses for the distribution of the regions within the oceanic lithosphere that host vigorous fluid circulation: one with a constant thickness aquifer extending both seaward and landward of the trench, one with an aquifer that thickens as it approaches the trench (due to bend-related faulting) but assumes vigorous fluid circulation only occurs prior to subduction, and a hybrid that considers both aquifer thickening seaward of the trench and continued circulation in the subducting plate. I examine the effects of bend-related aquifer thickening on temperatures within the Japan Trench subduction zone with a suite of thermal models. Kawada et al. [2014] hypothesize that plate-bending faults offshore northern Japan increase the thickness of the oceanic crustal aquifer, and therefore influence heat redistribution in the system. Existing models explore the effects of aquifer thickening on heat flux seaward of the trench, but they do not examine the effects of this process on temperatures within the subduction zone; additionally, they treat the aquifer seaward of the trench as completely isolated from the aquifer in the subducted plate. Here, I exploit the fact that aquifer thickening from the outer rise to the trench and continued fluid circulation in subducting crust are expected to produce distinct surface heat flux anomalies, in order to constrain the thermal effects of each process. I find the combinations of the amount of aquifer thickening and the degree of

  6. Conservation of the Red Kite Milvus milvus (Aves: Accipitriformes) Is Not Affected by the Establishment of a Broad Hybrid Zone with the Black Kite Milvus migrans migrans in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Matušík, Hynek; Pfeiffer, Thomas; Nachtigall, Winfried; Bizos, Jiří; Šimčíková, Daniela; Literák, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Among Accipitriformes sensu stricto, only a few species have been reported to form hybrid zones; these include the red kite Milvus milvus and black kite Milvus migrans migrans. M. milvus is endemic to the western Palearctic and has an estimated total population of 20–24,000 breeding pairs. The species was in decline until the 1970s due to persecution and has declined again since the 1990s due to ingestion of rodenticide-treated baits, illegal poisoning and changes in agricultural practices, particularly in its core range. Whereas F1 M. milvus × M. migr. migrans hybrid offspring have been found, F2 and F3 hybrids have only rarely been reported, with low nesting success rates of F1 hybrids and partial hybrid sterility likely playing a role. Here, we analyzed the mitochondrial (CO1 and CytB) and nuclear (Myc) DNA loci of 184 M. milvus, 124 M. migr. migrans and 3 F1 hybrid individuals collected across central Europe. In agreement with previous studies, we found low heterozygosity in M. milvus regardless of locus. We found that populations of both examined species were characterized by a high gene flow within populations, with all of the major haplotypes distributed across the entire examined area. Few haplotypes displayed statistically significant aggregation in one region over another. We did not find mitochondrial DNA of one species in individuals with the plumage of the other species, except in F1 hybrids, which agrees with Haldane´s Rule. It remains to be investigated by genomic methods whether occasional gene flow occurs through the paternal line, as the examined Myc gene displayed only marginal divergence between M. milvus and M. migr. migrans. The central European population of M. milvus is clearly subject to free intraspecific gene flow, which has direct implications when considering the origin of individuals in M. milvus re-introduction programs. PMID:27463515

  7. Conservation of the Red Kite Milvus milvus (Aves: Accipitriformes) Is Not Affected by the Establishment of a Broad Hybrid Zone with the Black Kite Milvus migrans migrans in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Heneberg, Petr; Dolinay, Matej; Matušík, Hynek; Pfeiffer, Thomas; Nachtigall, Winfried; Bizos, Jiří; Šimčíková, Daniela; Literák, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Among Accipitriformes sensu stricto, only a few species have been reported to form hybrid zones; these include the red kite Milvus milvus and black kite Milvus migrans migrans. M. milvus is endemic to the western Palearctic and has an estimated total population of 20-24,000 breeding pairs. The species was in decline until the 1970s due to persecution and has declined again since the 1990s due to ingestion of rodenticide-treated baits, illegal poisoning and changes in agricultural practices, particularly in its core range. Whereas F1 M. milvus × M. migr. migrans hybrid offspring have been found, F2 and F3 hybrids have only rarely been reported, with low nesting success rates of F1 hybrids and partial hybrid sterility likely playing a role. Here, we analyzed the mitochondrial (CO1 and CytB) and nuclear (Myc) DNA loci of 184 M. milvus, 124 M. migr. migrans and 3 F1 hybrid individuals collected across central Europe. In agreement with previous studies, we found low heterozygosity in M. milvus regardless of locus. We found that populations of both examined species were characterized by a high gene flow within populations, with all of the major haplotypes distributed across the entire examined area. Few haplotypes displayed statistically significant aggregation in one region over another. We did not find mitochondrial DNA of one species in individuals with the plumage of the other species, except in F1 hybrids, which agrees with Haldane´s Rule. It remains to be investigated by genomic methods whether occasional gene flow occurs through the paternal line, as the examined Myc gene displayed only marginal divergence between M. milvus and M. migr. migrans. The central European population of M. milvus is clearly subject to free intraspecific gene flow, which has direct implications when considering the origin of individuals in M. milvus re-introduction programs. PMID:27463515

  8. Conservation of the Red Kite Milvus milvus (Aves: Accipitriformes) Is Not Affected by the Establishment of a Broad Hybrid Zone with the Black Kite Milvus migrans migrans in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Heneberg, Petr; Dolinay, Matej; Matušík, Hynek; Pfeiffer, Thomas; Nachtigall, Winfried; Bizos, Jiří; Šimčíková, Daniela; Literák, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Among Accipitriformes sensu stricto, only a few species have been reported to form hybrid zones; these include the red kite Milvus milvus and black kite Milvus migrans migrans. M. milvus is endemic to the western Palearctic and has an estimated total population of 20-24,000 breeding pairs. The species was in decline until the 1970s due to persecution and has declined again since the 1990s due to ingestion of rodenticide-treated baits, illegal poisoning and changes in agricultural practices, particularly in its core range. Whereas F1 M. milvus × M. migr. migrans hybrid offspring have been found, F2 and F3 hybrids have only rarely been reported, with low nesting success rates of F1 hybrids and partial hybrid sterility likely playing a role. Here, we analyzed the mitochondrial (CO1 and CytB) and nuclear (Myc) DNA loci of 184 M. milvus, 124 M. migr. migrans and 3 F1 hybrid individuals collected across central Europe. In agreement with previous studies, we found low heterozygosity in M. milvus regardless of locus. We found that populations of both examined species were characterized by a high gene flow within populations, with all of the major haplotypes distributed across the entire examined area. Few haplotypes displayed statistically significant aggregation in one region over another. We did not find mitochondrial DNA of one species in individuals with the plumage of the other species, except in F1 hybrids, which agrees with Haldane´s Rule. It remains to be investigated by genomic methods whether occasional gene flow occurs through the paternal line, as the examined Myc gene displayed only marginal divergence between M. milvus and M. migr. migrans. The central European population of M. milvus is clearly subject to free intraspecific gene flow, which has direct implications when considering the origin of individuals in M. milvus re-introduction programs.

  9. Heat Capacity Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    A. Findikakis

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide heat capacity values for the host and surrounding rock layers for the waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The heat capacity representations provided by this analysis are used in unsaturated zone (UZ) flow, transport, and coupled processes numerical modeling activities, and in thermal analyses as part of the design of the repository to support the license application. Among the reports that use the heat capacity values estimated in this report are the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' report, the ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' report, the ''Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, the Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms'' report, the ''Dike/Drift Interactions report, the Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' report, and the ''In-Drift Natural Convection and Condensation'' report. The specific objective of this study is to determine the rock-grain and rock-mass heat capacities for the geologic stratigraphy identified in the ''Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170031], Table 1-1). This report provides estimates of the heat capacity for all stratigraphic layers except the Paleozoic, for which the mineralogic abundance data required to estimate the heat capacity are not available. The temperature range of interest in this analysis is 25 C to 325 C. This interval is broken into three separate temperature sub-intervals: 25 C to 95 C, 95 C to 114 C, and 114 C to 325 C, which correspond to the preboiling, trans-boiling, and postboiling regimes. Heat capacity is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of material by one degree (Nimick and Connolly 1991 [DIRS 100690], p. 5). The rock-grain heat capacity is defined as the heat capacity of the rock solids (minerals), and does not include the effect of water that exists in the rock pores. By comparison, the rock-mass heat capacity considers the heat capacity of both solids and pore

  10. Factors Affecting Internal Blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granholm, R. H.; Sandusky, H. W.; Felts, J. E.

    2007-12-01

    Internal blast refers to explosion effects in confined spaces, which are dominated by the heat output of the explosive. Theoretical temperatures and pressures may not be reached due to heat losses and incomplete gas mixing. Gas mixing can have the largest effect, potentially reducing peak quasi-static pressure by a factor of two due to lack of thermal equilibrium between products and atmosphere in the space, separate from the effect of incomplete combustion of excess fuel when that atmosphere is air. Chamber and test geometry affect gas mixing, which has been inferred through temperature and pressure measurements and compared to calculations. Late-time combustion is observed for TNT compared to HMX.

  11. Influence of mushy zone constant on the solid-liquid phase change process modeled by enthalpy-porosity technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiari, Saeed; Mahdavi, Mahboobe; Qiu, Songgang

    2015-11-01

    In the present work, the effects of mushy zone constant on the melting and solidification processes simulation with enthalpy-porosity technique are investigated. The isothermal melting and solidification of gallium enclosed by a rectangular container is studied using a transient two-dimensional finite volume based model. A wide range of mushy zone constants are considered in the study of the thermal and fluid flow characteristics of the system. The results indicate that increasing the mushy zone constant value up to a limit leads to the acceleration of the solidification process, while it decreases the melting rate. However, the further increase of the constant does not affect the phase change process in melting and solidification. It is found that the mushy zone constant has a significant influence on the temperature distribution adjacent to the melt front as well as the morphology of the solid-liquid interface. This is due to the effect of mushy zone constant on the flow in the mushy region and liquid layers nearby. The results also reveal that the increase of mushy zone constant results in the decrease of average wall heat flux in both melting and solidification processes.

  12. Crash Performance Evaluation of Hydro-formed DP-steel Tubes Considering Welding Heat Effects, Formability and Spring-back

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Junehyung; Lee, Wonoh; Chung, Kwansoo; Lim, Ji-Ho; Kim, Chongmin; Wenner, Michael. L.

    2007-04-07

    In order to numerically evaluate hydro-formed DP-steel tubes on crash performance considering welding heat effects, finite element simulations of crash behavior were performed for hydro-formed tubes with and without heat treatment effects. Also, finite element simulations were performed for the sequential procedures of bending and hydro-forming of tubes in order to design process parameters, particularly for the boost condition and axial feeding, considering formability and spring-back. Effects of the material property including strain-rate sensitivity on formability as well as spring-back were also considered. The mechanical properties of the metal active gas (MAG) weld zone and the heat affected zone (HAZ) were obtained utilizing the continuous indentation method in this work.

  13. On post-weld heat treatment cracking in tig welded superalloy ATI 718Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asala, G.; Ojo, O. A.

    The susceptibility of heat affected zone (HAZ) to cracking in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welded Allvac 718Plus superalloy during post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) was studied. Contrary to the previously reported case of low heat input electron beam welded Allvac 718Plus, where HAZ cracking occurred during PWHT, the TIG welded alloy is crack-free after PWHT, notwithstanding the presence of similar micro-constituents that caused cracking in the low input weld. Accordingly, the formation of brittle HAZ intergranular micro-constituents may not be a sufficient factor to determine cracking propensity, the extent of heat input during welding may be another major factor that influences HAZ cracking during PWHT of the aerospace superalloy Allvac 718Plus.

  14. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  15. Method for heating nongaseous carbonaceous material

    DOEpatents

    Lumpkin, Jr., Robert E.

    1978-01-01

    Nongaseous carbonaceous material is heated by a method comprising introducing tangentially a first stream containing a nongaseous carbonaceous material and carbon monoxide into a reaction zone; simultaneously and separately introducing a second stream containing oxygen into the reaction zone such that the oxygen enters the reaction zone away from the wall thereof and reacts with the first stream thereby producing a gaseous product and heating the nongaseous carbonaceous material; forming an outer spiralling vortex within the reaction zone to cause substantial separation of gases, including the gaseous product, from the nongaseous carbonaceous material; removing a third stream from the reaction zone containing the gaseous product which is substantially free of the nongaseous carbonaceous material before a major portion of the gaseous product can react with the nongaseous carbonaceous material; and removing a fourth stream containing the nongaseous carbonaceous material from the reaction zone.

  16. Sodium L-lactate differently affects brain-derived neurothrophic factor, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and heat shock protein 70 kDa production in human astrocytes and SH-SY5Y cultures.

    PubMed

    Coco, Marinella; Caggia, Silvia; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Perciavalle, Vincenzo; Graziano, Adriana C E; Pannuzzo, Giovanna; Cardile, Venera

    2013-02-01

    The present study analyzed the in vitro effects induced by sodium L-lactate on human astrocytes and the SH-SY5Y cell line, when added at concentrations of 5, 10, and 25 mmol/liter. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and heat shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70) was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Cell viability with MTT, release of nitric oxide (NO) through the Griess reaction, and production of BDNF by enzyme-linked immunoassay was determined. Data indicate that, in SH-SY5Y as well as in cortical astrocytes, after 4 hr sodium L-lactate increases the expression and release of BDNF, iNOS, and NO; after 24 hr, it turns is ineffective for the production of the neurotrophin in SH-SY5Y and not in astrocytes, but the expression of iNOS and release of NO appear to be further increased compared with those after 4 hr. Sodium L-lactate influences differently the expression of HSP70 in SH-SY5Y compared with astrocytes. We propose, based on these findings, that sodium L-lactate affects the expression of BDNF in SH-SY5Y and astrocytes in a different manner: high levels of iNOS and NO expressed in SH-SY5Y have a profound inhibitory effect on the release of BDNF related to a more limited production of HSP70 by SH-SY5Y. In conclusion, the results demonstrate differences in the responses of SH-SY5Y and astrocytes to stimulation by high levels of sodium L-lactate. Sodium L-lactate differently and dose and time dependently influences the expression and release of BDNF, iNOS, NO, and HSP70 depending on the cell type.

  17. Friction Stir Welding of Steel: Heat Input, Microstructure, and Mechanical Property Co-relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Md. M.; Sarkar, R.; Pal, T. K.; Prabhu, N.; Ghosh, M.

    2015-09-01

    Friction stir welding was performed to join carbon steel plates at tool rotational rate of 800-1400 rpm. Microstructure and microhardness of welded specimens were evaluated across weld centerline. Torque base index, peak temperature, cooling rate, strain, strain rate, volumetric material flow rate, and width of extruded zone at weld nugget were calculated. Peak temperature at weld nugget was ~1300-1360 K. At this temperature, ferrite transformed to austenite during welding. Austenite was decomposed in to ferrite and bainite at cooling rate of ~4-7.5 K/s. The presence of bainite was endorsed by increment in microhardness with respect to base material. Ferrite grain size at weld nugget was finer in comparison to as-received alloy. With the increment in tool rotational rate strain, strain rate, total heat input, and peak temperature at weld nugget were increased. High temperature at weld nugget promoted increment in ferrite grain size and reduction in area fraction of bainite. Heat-affected zone also experienced phase transformation and exhibited enhancement in ferrite grain size in comparison to base alloy at all welding parameters with marginal drop in microhardness. Maximum joint strength was obtained at the tool rotational rate of 1000 rpm. Increment in tool rational rate reduced the joint efficiency owing to increment in ferrite grain size and reduction in pearlite area fraction at heat-affected zone.

  18. Residential Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps Sized to Heating Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, Jeffrey D.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Odukomaiya, Adewale; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    Variable capacity heat pumps are an emerging technology offering significant energy savings potential and improved efficiency. With conventional single-speed systems, it is important to appropriately size heat pumps for the cooling load as over-sizing would result in cycling and insufficient latent capacity required for humidity control. These appropriately sized systems are often under-sized for the heating load and require inefficient supplemental electric resistance heat to meet the heating demand. Variable capacity heat pumps address these shortcomings by providing an opportunity to intentionally size systems for the dominant heating season load without adverse effects of cycling or insufficient dehumidification in the cooling season. This intentionally-sized system could result in significant energy savings in the heating season, as the need for inefficient supplemental electric resistance heat is drastically reduced. This is a continuation of a study evaluating the energy consumption of variable capacity heat pumps installed in two unoccupied research homes in Farragut, a suburb of Knoxville, Tennessee. In this particular study, space conditioning systems are intentionally sized for the heating season loads to provide an opportunity to understand and evaluate the impact this would have on electric resistance heat use and dehumidification. The results and conclusions drawn through this research are valid and specific for portions of the Southeastern and Midwestern United States falling in the mixed-humid climate zone. While other regions in the U.S. do not experience this type of climate, this work provides a basis for, and can help understand the implications of other climate zones on residential space conditioning energy consumption. The data presented here will provide a framework for fine tuning residential building EnergyPlus models that are being developed.

  19. Two-Zone Bridgman Furnace With Sharp Thermal Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borshchevsky, Alex; Caillat, Thierry; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    1994-01-01

    Two-zone vertical directional-solidification furnace designed and built to grow crystals from stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric melts and from solutions. Includes conventional wire heater in lower zone, tubular silicon carbide heating element in upper zone, and thermal baffle between zones. Temperature gradients up to 125 degrees centigrade per centimeter achieved in the crystal-growth region. Sharper gradient enables both faster growth and better separation between solid and liquid. Furnace used in laboratory or industrial setting for growth of crystals from congruently melting materials as well as for growth of compounds formed by peritectic reactions.

  20. Heat flow in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranganu, Constantin

    Twenty new heat flow values are incorporated, along with 40 previously published data, into a heat flow map of Oklahoma. The new heat flow data were estimated using previous temperature measurements in boreholes made by American Petroleum Institute researchers and 1,498 thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings. The mean of 20 average thermal gradients is 30.50sp°C/km. In general, thermal gradients increase from SW (14.11sp°C/km) to NE (42.24sp°C/km). The range of 1,498 in situ thermal conductivity measurements (after corrections for anisotropy, in situ temperature, and porosity) is 0.90-6.1 W/m-K; the average is 1.68 W/m-K. Estimated near-surface heat flow (±20%) at 20 new sites in Oklahoma varies between 22 ± 4 mW/msp2 and 86 ± 17 mW/msp2; the average is 50 mW/msp2. Twenty-seven new heat-generation estimates, along with 22 previously published data, are used to create a heat generation map of Oklahoma. The range of heat production estimates is 1.1-3.5 muW/msp3, with an average of 2.5 muW/msp3. The heat flow regime in Oklahoma is primarily conductive in nature, except for a zone in northeast. Transient effects due to sedimentary processes and metamorphic/igneous activity, as well as past climatic changes, do not significantly influence the thermal state of the Oklahoma crust. Heat flow near the margins of the Arkoma and Anadarko Basins may be depressed or elevated by 5-13 mW/msp2 by refraction of heat from sedimentary rocks of relatively low thermal conductivity (1-2 W/m-K) into crystalline basement rocks of relatively high thermal conductivity (˜3-4 W/m-K). The heat generation-heat flow relationship shows a modest correlation. The relatively high heat flow (˜70-80 mW/msp2) in part of northeastern Oklahoma suggests that the thermal regime there may be perturbed by regional groundwater flow originating in the fractured outcrops of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the Arbuckle Mountains.

  1. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  2. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  3. Coastal zone management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, E. L., III

    1975-01-01

    A panel of federal and state representatives concerned with coastal zone affairs discussed their problems in this area. In addition, several demonstrations of the application of remote sensing technology to coastal zone management were described. These demonstrations were performed by several agencies in a variety of geographical areas.

  4. Subduction of fracture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi; Leeman, William

    2013-04-01

    Since Wilson proposed in 1965 the existence of a new class of faults on the ocean floor, namely transform faults, the geodynamic effects and importance of fracture zone subduction is still little studied. It is known that oceanic plates are characterized by numerous fracture zones, and some of them have the potential to transport into subduction zones large volumes of water-rich serpentinite, providing a fertile water source for magma generated in subduction-related arc volcanoes. In most previous geodynamic studies, subducting plates are considered to be homogeneous, and there is no clear indication how the subduction of a fracture zone influences the melting pattern in the mantle wedge and the slab-derived fluids distribution in the subarc mantle. Here we show that subduction of serpentinized fracture zones plays a significant role in distribution of melt and fluids in the mantle wedge above the slab. Using high-resolution tree-dimensional coupled petrological-termomechanical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, vary dramatically in the region where a serpentinized fracture zone enters into subduction. Our models show that substantial hydration and partial melting tend to concentrate where fracture zones are being subducted, creating favorable conditions for partially molten hydrous plumes to develop. These results are consistent with the along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes in several regions, as the Aleutian Arc, the Cascades, the Southern Mexican Volcanic Arc, and the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone.

  5. Fault zone hydrogeologic properties and processes revealed by borehole temperature monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, P. M.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution borehole temperature monitoring can provide valuable insight into the hydrogeologic structure of fault zones and transient processes that affect fault zone stability. Here we report on results from a subseafloor temperature observatory within the Japan Trench plate boundary fault. In our efforts to interpret this unusual dataset, we have developed several new methods for probing hydrogeologic properties and processes. We illustrate how spatial variations in the thermal recovery of the borehole after drilling and other spectral characteristics provide a measure of the subsurface permeability architecture. More permeable zones allow for greater infiltration of cool drilling fluids, are more greatly thermally disturbed, and take longer to recover. The results from the JFAST (Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project) observatory are consistent with geophysical logs, core data, and other hydrologic observations and suggest a permeable damage zone consisting of steeply dipping faults and fractures overlays a low-permeability clay-rich plate boundary fault. Using high-resolution time series data, we have also developed methods to map out when and where fluid advection occurs in the subsurface over time. In the JFAST data, these techniques reveal dozens of transient earthquake-driven fluid pulses that are spatially correlated and consistently located around inferred permeable areas of the fault damage zone. These observations are suspected to reflect transient fluid flow driven by pore pressure changes in response to dynamic and/or static stresses associated with nearby earthquakes. This newly recognized hydrologic phenomenon has implications for understanding subduction zone heat and chemical transport as well as the redistribution of pore fluid pressure which influences fault stability and can trigger other earthquakes.

  6. Slip on 'Weak' Faults by the Rotation of Regional Stress in the Fracture Damage Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, D. R.; Mitchell, T. M.; Healy, D.; Heap, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    The concept of stress rotation within fault zones is important in order to understand the strength of fault zones that are unfavourably oriented with respect to the remotely-applied driving stress. The San Andreas 'stress-heat flow paradox' and slip on low-angle normal faults imply that fault zone weakening must occur. Possible explanations for this weakening include weak fault materials, dynamic slip weakening and elevated pore fluid pressures. Stress rotation within the fault zone must accompany high pore fluid pressures, or effective σ3 will be pushed well into the tensile field, resulting in hydrofracture, pore fluid pressure loss and fault strengthening. Here we show from field observations of a major tectonic fault, laboratory experiments and numerical modelling, that stress rotation is significant within the fractured damage zone surrounding a fault. We characterize the microfracture damage surrounding a major strike-slip fault within the Atacama fault system in northern Chile, which shows an exponential decrease with distance from the fault core. We then relate the microfracture damage to changes in elastic properties as measured in laboratory experiments. The field and laboratory data are then used in a two-dimensional plane strain model to show how the remotely applied stress field is affected as the fault core is approached. We show that greatest principal stress orientations of 80° with respect to the fault plane can be rotated to less than 45° within the damage zone. The damage-induced change in elastic properties provide the necessary stress rotation to allow high pore pressure faulting, without resulting in hydrofracture.

  7. A multi-zone muffle furnace design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, Neil D.; Kisel, Martin

    1993-01-01

    A Multi-Zone Muffle-Tube Furnace was designed, built, and tested for the purpose of providing an in-house experience base with tubular furnaces for materials processing in microgravity. As such, it must not only provide the desired temperatures and controlled thermal gradients at several discrete zones along its length but must also be capable of sustaining the rigors of a Space Shuttle launch. The furnace is insulated to minimize radial and axial heat losses. It is contained in a water-cooled enclosure for purposes of dissipating un-wanted residual heat, keeping the outer surfaces of the furnace at a 'touch-safe' temperature, and providing a rugged housing. This report describes the salient features of the furnace, testing procedures and results, and concluding remarks evaluating the overall design.

  8. Heat Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... breathing and a fast, weak pulse Heat cramps - muscle pains or spasms that happen during heavy exercise Heat rash - skin irritation from excessive sweating Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  9. Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stress Learn some tips to protect workers including: acclimatization, rest breaks, and fluid recommendations. NIOSH Workplace Solution: ... Blog: Adjusting to Work in the Heat: Why Acclimatization Matters The natural adaptation to the heat takes ...

  10. Heat Shield in Pieces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the remains of the rover's heat shield, broken into two key pieces, the main piece on the left side and a broken-off flank piece near the middle of the image. The heat shield impact site is identified by the circle of red dust on the right side of the picture. In this view, Opportunity is approximately 20 meters (66 feet) away from the heat shield, which protected it while hurtling through the martian atmosphere.

    In the far left of the image, a meteorite called 'Heat Shield Rock,' sits nearby, The Sun is reflecting off the silver-colored underside of the internal thermal blankets of the heat shield.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact.

    This is an approximately true-color rendering of the scene acquired around 1:22 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity sol 324 (Dec. 21, 2004) in an image mosaic using panoramic filters at wavelengths of 750, 530, and 430 nanometers.

  11. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  12. Liquid encapsulated float zone process and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J. (Inventor); Frazier, Donald O. (Inventor); Lehoczky, Sandor L. (Inventor); Vlasse, Marcus (Inventor); Facemire, Barbara R. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The process and apparatus for growing crystals using float zone techniques are described. A rod of crystalline materials is disposed in a cylindrical container, leaving a space between the rod and container walls. This space is filled with an encapsulant, selected to have a slightly lower melting point than the crystalline material. The rod is secured to a container end cap at one end and to a shaft at its other end. A piston slides over the rod and provides pressure to prevent loss of volatile components upon melting of the rod. Prior to melting the rod the container is first heated to melt the encapsulant, with any off-gas from this step being vented to a cavity behind the piston. The piston moves slightly forward owing to volume change upon melting of the encapsulant, and the vent passageway is closed. The container is then moved longitudinally through a heated zone to progressively melt sections of the rod as in conventional float zone processes. The float zone technique may be used in the microgravity environment of space.

  13. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laser Beam Welded TiAl-based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Ventzke, Volker; Staron, Peter; Schell, Norbert; Kashaev, Nikolai; Huber, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Post-weld heat treatment is carried out on the laser beam welded γ-TiAl-based alloy Ti-48Al-1Cr-1.5Nb-1Mn-0.2Si-0.5B (at. pct). The macro/microstructure and mechanical properties of both as-welded and heat-treated specimens are investigated by radiography, SEM, and tensile tests. Moreover, high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction is performed to measure the residual stresses and evaluate the microstructure evolution. It is found that the residual stresses are distributed in a three-peak shape in the region of the weld zone and heat-affected zone of the as-welded specimen due to the microstructural transformation and heat softening. The residual stresses are largely relieved after the heat treatment. The heat-treated specimens have a near fully lamellar microstructure and show balanced mechanical properties of strength and ductility. The diffraction shows that the phase transformation from α 2 to γ takes place under tensile load at 1023 K (750 °C), and the grain size and lamellar spacing are refined in the weld zone. Finally, the fracture mechanisms are found to be controlled by the local stress concentration-induced strain misfit between α 2 and γ phases in the near γ grains and delamination and debonding in the lamellae. Boride ribbons of 5 μm in the near fully lamellar microstructure are found not to be detrimental to the tensile properties.

  14. Euphotic Zone Study moves forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denman, Kenneth

    The Global Ocean Euphotic Zone Study (GOEZS), a potential core program of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) being planned jointly with the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR), was recently given the go-ahead by IGBP's Scientific Committee to move on to the next level of developing its scientific program.The GOEZS program will focus on the coupled physical, biological, and chemical processes operating in the euphotic zone, which is the ocean surface layer where sufficient light penetrates for photosynthesis by phytoplankton to exceed their metabolic energy losses. The upper ocean is extremely important to understanding the atmosphereocean system because it mediates exchanges of heat, momentum, carbon dioxide, sulphur, and nitrogen between the atmosphere and the ocean interior. For the major greenhouse gas carbon dioxide for example, there is more carbon in the upper ocean than in the whole atmosphere. Essentially all carbon dioxide from the atmosphere that passes from the upper ocean to the ocean interior has been transformed chemically or biologically in the upper ocean. Moreover, the upper ocean is the site of all marine shipping and most recreation and industrial activity and contains the planktonic food chain and most fish stocks.

  15. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  16. Shear heating and clumped isotope reordering in carbonate faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siman-Tov, Shalev; Affek, Hagit P.; Matthews, Alan; Aharonov, Einat; Reches, Ze'ev

    2016-07-01

    Natural faults are expected to heat rapidly during seismic slip and to cool quite quickly after the slip event. Here we examine clumped isotope thermometry for its ability to identify such short duration elevated temperature events along frictionally heated carbonate faults. Our approach is based on measured Δ47 values that reflect the distribution of oxygen and carbon isotopes in the calcite lattice, measuring the abundance of 13Csbnd 18O bonds, which is affected by temperature. We examine three types of calcite rock samples: (1) crushed limestone grains that were rapidly heated and then cooled in static laboratory experiments, simulating the temperature cycle experienced by fault rock during an earthquake slip; (2) limestone samples that were experimentally sheared to simulate earthquake slip events; and (3) samples from Fault Mirrors (FMs) collected from principle slip surfaces of three natural carbonate faults. Extensive FM surfaces are believed to form during earthquake slip. Our experimental results show that Δ47 values decrease rapidly (in the course of seconds) with increasing temperature and shear velocity. On the other hand, carbonate shear zones from natural faults do not show such Δ47 decrease. We suggest that the Δ47 response may be controlled by nano-size grains, the high abundance of defects, and highly stressed/strained grain boundaries within the carbonate fault zone that can reduce the activation energy for diffusion, and thus lead to an increased rate of isotopic disordering during shear experiments. In our laboratory experiments the high stress and strain on grain contacts and the presence of nanograins thus allows for rapid disordering so that a change in Δ47 occurs in a very short and relatively low intensity heating events. In natural faults it may also lead to isotopic ordering after the cessation of frictional heating thus erasing the high temperature signature of Δ47.

  17. Fluidized bed heating process and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McHale, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Capacitive electrical heating of a fluidized bed enables the individual solid particles within the bed to constitute the hottest portion thereof. This effect is achieved by applying an A. C. voltage potential between dielectric coated electrodes, one of which is advantageously the wall of the fluidized bed rejection zone, sufficient to create electrical currents in said particles so as to dissipate heat therein. In the decomposition of silane or halosilanes in a fluidized bed reaction zone, such heating enhances the desired deposition of silicon product on the surface of the seed particles within the fluidized bed and minimizes undesired coating of silicon on the wall of the reaction zone and the homogeneous formation of fine silicon powder within said zone.

  18. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Phoenix Refrigeration Systems, Inc.'s heat pipe addition to the Phoenix 2000, a supermarket rooftop refrigeration/air conditioning system, resulted from the company's participation in a field test of heat pipes. Originally developed by NASA to control temperatures in space electronic systems, the heat pipe is a simple, effective, heat transfer system. It has been used successfully in candy storage facilities where it has provided significant energy savings. Additional data is expected to fully quantify the impact of the heat pipes on supermarket air conditioning systems.

  19. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Heat Pipes were originally developed by NASA and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory during the 1960s to dissipate excessive heat build- up in critical areas of spacecraft and maintain even temperatures of satellites. Heat pipes are tubular devices where a working fluid alternately evaporates and condenses, transferring heat from one region of the tube to another. KONA Corporation refined and applied the same technology to solve complex heating requirements of hot runner systems in injection molds. KONA Hot Runner Systems are used throughout the plastics industry for products ranging in size from tiny medical devices to large single cavity automobile bumpers and instrument panels.

  20. Growth recovery zones.

    PubMed

    Siffert, R S; Katz, J F

    1983-05-01

    Growth arrest lines and zones have been reinvestigated. Sequential studies after dietary deprivation reveal transformations of the physis with diminution in formation of the zone of cell columns, resorption of previously formed bone, and cessation of new bone formation. At 6 weeks post diet restriction, the physis is prominently narrowed with transversely oriented, thin bone plaque sealing it from the subjacent marrow. Initially, restoration of stock diet thickens the bony plaque, creating a growth arrest line. Later the zone of osteogenesis adds new bone as a dense metaphyseal band.

  1. Solar heated vacuum flask

    SciTech Connect

    Posnansky, M.

    1980-04-08

    The wall of a protective jacket of a vacuum flask, containing a double-walled vessel whose walls are permeable to solar radiation , includes parts capable of being swung open. These parts and a wall part situated between them each have a reflective coating. The reflective surfaces of these coatings, viewed in crosssection, extend along a parabola when the movable wall parts are opened out, so that incident solar radiation is collected in the core zone of the vessel. A solar-radiation absorbing member may be disposed in this core zone, E.G., a metal tube having a black outer surface. Liquid contents of such a vacuum flask can be heated by means of solar energy.

  2. Effect of Heat Input on Microstructural Changes and Corrosion Behavior of Commercially Pure Titanium Welds in Nitric Acid Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Balusamy, V.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2009-11-01

    Commercially pure titanium (Ti) has been selected for the fabrication of dissolver for the proposed fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant at Kalpakkam, India. In the present investigation, microstructural changes and corrosion behavior of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds of Ti grade-1 and grade-2 with different heat inputs were carried out. A wider heat affected zone was observed with higher heat inputs and coarse grains were observed from base metal toward the weld zone with increasing heat input. Fine and more equiaxed prior β grains were observed at lower heat input and the grain size increased toward fusion zone. The results indicated that Ti grade-1 and grade-2 with different heat inputs and different microstructures were insensitive to corrosion in liquid, vapor, and condensate phases of 11.5 M nitric acid tested up to 240 h. The corrosion rate in boiling liquid phase (0.60-0.76 mm/year) was higher than that in vapor (0.012-0.039 mm/year) and condensate phases (0.04-0.12 mm/year) of nitric acid for Ti grade-1 and grade-2, as well as for base metal for all heat inputs. Potentiodynamic polarization experiment carried out at room temperature indicated higher current densities and better passivation in 11.5 M nitric acid. SEM examination of Ti grade-1 welds for all heat inputs exposed to liquid phase after 240 h showed corrosion attack on the surface, exposing Widmanstatten microstructure containing acicular alpha. The continuous dissolution of the liquid-exposed samples was attributed to the heterogeneous microstructure and non-protective passive film formation.

  3. Affective Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles T.

    This paper addresses itself to the question, "What does feeling have to do with knowing?" Two movements in affective education are discussed which have come into focus in recent years and which attempt to define the relationship between knowing and feeling. The first, a conscious application of the role of arousal in learning, emphasizes arousal…

  4. The gray zone.

    PubMed

    Kisner, H J

    1998-01-01

    Think for a minute about the terms equivocal and indeterminate. Equivocal is defined as "of uncertain significance", and indeterminate is defined as "indefinite, uncertain". Now think of the context in which laboratory results are reported: either by using the exact words equivocal or indeterminate or cloaked in technical jargon (e.g., cytologic diagnoses "ASCUS" or "AGUS"). Clinicians expect (or at least want) laboratory results to be black or white (i.e., bimodally distributed), whereas laboratorians strive for the perfect shade of gray because of data that often are bimodal but overlapping. A consequence of this color war is "the gray zone" (often confused with the "twilight zone"), a noncommittal zone that leaves laboratorians and clinicians alike plenty of wiggle room, allowing us to interpret results on either side of the fence. This article examines the root causes of the gray zone, with several clinical examples of how it permeates laboratory interpretation.

  5. Evolution of a Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Van Hoolst, Tim; Dehant, Veronique

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand how Earth's surface might have evolved with time and to examine in a more general way the initiation and continuance of subduction zones and the possible formation of continents on an Earth-like planet. Plate tectonics and continents seem to influence the likelihood of a planet to harbour life, and both are strongly influenced by the planetary interior (e.g. mantle temperature and rheology) and surface conditions (e.g. stabilizing effect of continents, atmospheric temperature), but may also depend on the biosphere. Employing the Fortran convection code CHIC (developed at the Royal Observatory of Belgium), we simulate a subduction zone with a pre-defined weak zone (between oceanic and continental crust) and a fixed plate velocity for the subducting oceanic plate (Quinquis et al. in preparation). In our study we first investigate the main factors that influence the subduction process. We simulate the subduction of an oceanic plate beneath a continental plate (Noack et al., 2013). The crust is separated into an upper crust and a lower crust. We apply mixed Newtonian/non-Newtonian rheology and vary the parameters that are most likely to influence the subduction of the ocanic plate, as for example density of the crust/mantle, surface temperature, plate velocity and subduction angle. The second part of our study concentrates on the long-term evolution of a subduction zone. Even though we model only the upper mantle (until a depth of 670km), the subducted crust is allowed to flow into the lower mantle, where it is no longer subject to our investigation. This way we can model the subduction zone over long time spans, for which we assume a continuous inflow of the oceanic plate into the investigated domain. We include variations in mantle temperatures (via secular cooling and decay of radioactive heat sources) and dehydration of silicates (leading to stiffening of the material). We investigate how the mantle environment influences

  6. Advanced heat-pipe heat exchanger and microprocessor-based modulating burner controls development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenstein, A.; Cohen, B.; Feldman, S.; Spatz, M.; Smith, E.

    1986-03-01

    The development of a novel condensing heat exchanger, a modulating gas burner, and a zone-controlled residential warm-air heating system is described. The condensing heat exchanger uses ten thermosyphons which are manifolded at both the condenser and evaporator ends to achieve a compact low-cost design. Initial tests have demonstrated a + 92 percent steady-state efficiency for a conventional clamshell furnace operating with the thermosyphon heat exchanger located outside the furnace cabinet. A 100,000 -Btu/hr modulating burner has also been developed. Comprehensive study of the burner's operating characteristics has produced guidelines for the design and application of the device. Finally, the modulating burner has been incorporated into a zone-controlled heating system. In parallel with the development of the preceding heating system components, the performance of thermosyphons over a wide range of operating conditions is being explored with the objective of improving design procedures for incorporating these devices into heat exchangers.

  7. The Ethical Tipping Points of Evaluators in Conflict Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggan, Colleen; Bush, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    What is different about the conduct of evaluations in conflict zones compared to nonconflict zones--and how do these differences affect (if at all) the ethical calculations and behavior of evaluators? When are ethical issues too risky, or too uncertain, for evaluators to accept--or to continue--an evaluation? These are the core questions guiding…

  8. Cascadia Subduction Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry and recurrence times of large earthquakes associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) were discussed and debated at a March 28-29, 2006 Pacific Northwest workshop for the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps. The CSZ is modeled from Cape Mendocino in California to Vancouver Island in British Columbia. We include the same geometry and weighting scheme as was used in the 2002 model (Frankel and others, 2002) based on thermal constraints (Fig. 1; Fluck and others, 1997 and a reexamination by Wang et al., 2003, Fig. 11, eastern edge of intermediate shading). This scheme includes four possibilities for the lower (eastern) limit of seismic rupture: the base of elastic zone (weight 0.1), the base of transition zone (weight 0.2), the midpoint of the transition zone (weight 0.2), and a model with a long north-south segment at 123.8? W in the southern and central portions of the CSZ, with a dogleg to the northwest in the northern portion of the zone (weight 0.5). The latter model was derived from the approximate average longitude of the contour of the 30 km depth of the CSZ as modeled by Fluck et al. (1997). A global study of the maximum depth of thrust earthquakes on subduction zones by Tichelaar and Ruff (1993) indicated maximum depths of about 40 km for most of the subduction zones studied, although the Mexican subduction zone had a maximum depth of about 25 km (R. LaForge, pers. comm., 2006). The recent inversion of GPS data by McCaffrey et al. (2007) shows a significant amount of coupling (a coupling factor of 0.2-0.3) as far east as 123.8? West in some portions of the CSZ. Both of these lines of evidence lend support to the model with a north-south segment at 123.8? W.

  9. Opportunity's Heat Shield Scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity reveals the scene of the rover's heat shield impact. In this view, Opportunity is approximately 130 meters (427 feet) away from the device that protected it while hurtling through the martian atmosphere.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact.

    This is the panoramic camera team's best current attempt at generating a true-color view of what this scene would look like if viewed by a human on Mars. It was generated from a mathematical combination of six calibrated, left-eye panoramic camera images acquired around 1:50 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 322 (Dec. 19, 2004) using filters ranging in wavelengths from 430 to 750 nanometers.

  10. Dentin Caries Zones

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, M.K.; Strother, J.; Darling, C.L.; Fried, D.; Gansky, S.A.; Marshall, S.J.; Marshall, G.W.

    2009-01-01

    Caries Detector staining reveals 4 zones in dentin containing caries lesions, but characteristics of each zone are not well-defined. We therefore investigated the physical and microstructural properties of carious dentin in the 4 different zones to determine important differences revealed by Caries Detector staining. Six arrested dentin caries lesions and 2 normal controls were Caries-Detector-stained, each zone (pink, light pink, transparent, apparently normal) being analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging for microstructure, by AFM nano-indentation for mechanical properties, and by transverse digital microradiography (TMR) for mineral content. Microstructure changes, and nanomechanical properties and mineral content significantly decreased across zones. Hydrated elastic modulus and mineral content from normal dentin to pink Caries-Detector-stained dentin ranged from 19.5 [10.6-25.3] GPa to 1.6 [0.0-5.0] GPa and from 42.9 [39.8-44.6] vol% to 12.4 [9.1-14.2] vol%, respectively. Even the most demineralized pink zone contained considerable residual mineral. PMID:19131321

  11. In situ study of the effect of ground source heat pump on shallow ground-water quality in the late Pleistocene terrace area of Tokyo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, T.; Uemura, K.; Akiba, Y.; Ota, M.

    2015-12-01

    The implementation of ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems has rapidly increased around the world, since they reduce carbon dioxide emissions and save electric energy. The GSHP system transfer heat into the geosphere zone when air conditioners are used to cool rooms or buildings. However, the effects of temperature increase on the quality of underground water has yet to be fully investigated. In order to reduce the risks of ground-water pollution by the installed GSHPs, it is important to evaluate the effect of temperature change on the ground-water quality. In this study, we installed a closed loop GSHP system on a heat exchange well along with a monitoring well drilled to measure ground-water quality and temperature. The monitoring well was drilled at 0.1cm away from the heat exchange well. We observed that changes of temperature in the heat exchange well affected the water quality, especially turbidity, in gravelly layer.

  12. A consistent model for fluid distribution, viscosity distribution, and flow-thermal structure in subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shun-suke; Iwamori, Hikaru

    2016-05-01

    Water plays crucial roles in the subduction zone dynamics affecting the thermal-flow structure through the fluid processes. We aim to understand what controls the dynamics and construct a model to solve consistently fluid generation, fluid transport, its reaction with the solid and resultant viscosity, and thermal-flow structure. We highlight the effect of mechanical weakening of rocks associated with hydration. The viscosity of serpentinite (ηserp) in subduction zones critically controls the flow-thermal structure via extent of mechanical coupling between the subducting slab and overlying mantle wedge. When ηserp is greater than 1021 Pa s, the thermal-flow structure reaches a steady state beneath the volcanic zone, and the melting region expands until Cin (initial water content in the subducting oceanic crust) reaches 3 wt %, and it does not expand from 3 wt %. On the other hand, when ηserp is less than 1019 Pa s, the greater water dependence of viscosity (expressed by a larger fv) confines a hot material to a narrower channel intruding into the wedge corner from a deeper part of the back-arc region. Consequently, the overall heat flux becomes less for a larger fv. When ageba (age of back-arc basin as a rifted lithosphere) = 7.5 Ma, the increase in fv weakens but shifts the melting region toward the trench side because of the narrow channel flow intruding into the wedge corner, where as it shuts down melting when ageba=20 Ma. Several model cases (particularly those with ηserp=1020 to 1021 Pa s and a relatively large fv for Cin=2 to 3 wt %) broadly account for the observations in the Northeast Japan arc (i.e., location and width of volcanic chain, extent of serpentinite, surface heat flow, and seismic tomography), although the large variability of surface heat flow and seismic tomographic images does not allow us to constrain the parameter range tightly.

  13. Comparison of the heat stress induced variations in DNA methylation between heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive rapeseed seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guizhen; Li, Jun; Li, Hao; Li, Feng; Xu, Kun; Yan, Guixin; Chen, Biyun; Qiao, Jiangwei; Wu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is responsive to various biotic and abiotic stresses. Heat stress is a serious threat to crop growth and development worldwide. Heat stress results in an array of morphological, physiological and biochemical changes in plants. The relationship between DNA methylation and heat stress in crops is relatively unknown. We investigated the differences in methylation levels and changes in the cytosine methylation patterns in seedlings of two rapeseed genotypes (heat-sensitive and heat-tolerant) under heat stress. Our results revealed that the methylation levels were different between a heat-tolerant genotype and a heat-sensitive one under control conditions. Under heat treatment, methylation increased more in the heat-sensitive genotype than in the heat-tolerant genotype. More DNA demethylation events occurred in the heat-tolerant genotype, while more DNA methylation occurred in the heat-sensitive genotype. A large and diverse set of genes were affected by heat stress via cytosine methylation changes, suggesting that these genes likely play important roles in the response and adaption to heat stress in Brassica napus L. This study indicated that the changes in DNA methylation differed between heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive genotypes of B. napus in response to heat stress, which further illuminates the molecular mechanisms of the adaption to heat stress in B. napus. PMID:24987298

  14. Quantitative evaluation on internal seeing induced by heat-stop of solar telescope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyi; Gu, Naiting; Rao, Changhui

    2015-07-27

    heat-stop is one of the essential thermal control devices of solar telescope. The internal seeing induced by its temperature rise will degrade the imaging quality significantly. For quantitative evaluation on internal seeing, an integrated analysis method based on computational fluid dynamics and geometric optics is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the temperature field of the heat-affected zone induced by heat-stop temperature rise is obtained by the method of computational fluid dynamics calculation. Secondly, the temperature field is transformed to refractive index field by corresponding equations. Thirdly, the wavefront aberration induced by internal seeing is calculated by geometric optics based on optical integration in the refractive index field. This integrated method is applied in the heat-stop of the Chinese Large Solar Telescope to quantitatively evaluate its internal seeing. The analytical results show that the maximum acceptable temperature rise of heat-stop is up to 5 Kelvins above the ambient air at any telescope pointing directions under the condition that the root-mean-square of wavefront aberration induced by internal seeing is less than 25nm. Furthermore, it is found that the magnitude of wavefront aberration gradually increases with the increase of heat-stop temperature rise for a certain telescope pointing direction. Meanwhile, with the variation of telescope pointing varying from the horizontal to the vertical direction, the magnitude of wavefront aberration decreases at first and then increases for the same heat-stop temperature rise.

  15. Sea surface temperature of the coastal zones of France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deschamps, P. Y.; Crepon, M.; Monget, J. M.; Verger, F. (Principal Investigator); Frouin, R.; Cassanet, J.; Wald, L.

    1980-01-01

    The various thermal gradients in the coastal zones of France were mapped with regard to natural phenomena and man made thermal effluents. The mesoscale thermal features of the English Channel, the Bay of Biscay, and the northwestern Mediterranean Sea were also studied. The evolution of the thermal gradients generated by the main estuaries of the French coastal zones was investigated along with the modeling of diurnal heating of the sea surface and its influence on the oceanic surface layers.

  16. Dead zones and extrasolar planetary properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Soko; Pudritz, Ralph E.

    2006-01-01

    Most low-mass protostellar discs evolve in clustered environments where they are affected by external radiation fields, while others evolve in more isolated star-forming regions. Assuming that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is the main source of viscosity, we calculate the size of a poorly ionized, MRI inactive and hence low viscosity region - the `dead zone'- in these protostellar discs. We include disc ionization by X-rays, cosmic rays, radioactive elements and thermal collisions, recombination by molecules, metals and grains, as well as the effect of turbulence stimulation in the dead zone by the active layers lying above it. We also calculate the gap-opening masses of planets, which are determined by a disc's viscosity and a disc aspect ratio, for discs in these environments and compare them with each other. We find that the dead zone is a robust feature of the protostellar discs that is largely independent of their environment, typically stretching out to ~15 au. We analyse the possible effects of dead zones on planet formation, migration and eccentricity evolution. We show that the gap-opening mass inside the dead zone is expected to be of the order of terrestrial and ice giant mass planets while that outside the dead zone is Jovian or super-Jovian mass planets, largely independent of the star-forming environment. We show that dead zones can significantly slow down both type I and type II planetary migration due to their lower viscosity. We also find that the growth of eccentricity of massive extrasolar planets is particularly favourable through the planet-disc interaction inside the dead zones due to the large gaps expected to be opened by planets.

  17. Flow, affect and visual creativity.

    PubMed

    Cseh, Genevieve M; Phillips, Louise H; Pearson, David G

    2015-01-01

    Flow (being in the zone) is purported to have positive consequences in terms of affect and performance; however, there is no empirical evidence about these links in visual creativity. Positive affect often--but inconsistently--facilitates creativity, and both may be linked to experiencing flow. This study aimed to determine relationships between these variables within visual creativity. Participants performed the creative mental synthesis task to simulate the creative process. Affect change (pre- vs. post-task) and flow were measured via questionnaires. The creativity of synthesis drawings was rated objectively and subjectively by judges. Findings empirically demonstrate that flow is related to affect improvement during visual creativity. Affect change was linked to productivity and self-rated creativity, but no other objective or subjective performance measures. Flow was unrelated to all external performance measures but was highly correlated with self-rated creativity; flow may therefore motivate perseverance towards eventual excellence rather than provide direct cognitive enhancement.

  18. Heat Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Heat problems and heat cramps related to jogging can be caused by fluid imbalances, medications, dietary insufficiency, vomiting or diarrhea, among other factors. If the condition keeps reoccurring, the advice of a physician should be sought. Some preventive measures that can be taken include: (1) running during the cooler hours of the day; (2)…

  19. Semiautomatic fracture zone tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Paul; Matthews, Kara J.; Müller, R. Dietmar; Mazzoni, Aline; Whittaker, Joanne M.; Myhill, Robert; Chandler, Michael T.

    2015-07-01

    Oceanic fracture zone traces are widely used in studies of seafloor morphology and plate kinematics. Satellite altimetry missions have resulted in high-resolution gravity maps in which all major fracture zones and other tectonic fabric can be identified, and numerous scientists have digitized such lineaments. We have initiated a community effort to maintain low-cost infrastructure that allows seafloor fabric lineaments to be stored, accessed, and updated. A key improvement over past efforts is our processing software (released as a GMT5 supplement) that allows for semiautomatic corrections to previously digitized fracture zone traces given improved gridded data sets. Here we report on our seafloor fabric processing tools, which complement our database of seafloor fabric lineations, magnetic anomaly identifications, and plate kinematic models.

  20. Multi-zone modelling of partially premixed low-temperature combustion in pilot-ignited natural-gas engines

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, S. R.; inivasan, K. K.

    2010-09-14

    Detailed results from a multi-zone phenomenological simulation of partially premixed advanced-injection low-pilot-ignited natural-gas low-temperature combustion are presented with a focus on early injection timings (the beginning of (pilot) injection (BOI)) and very small diesel quantities (2-3 per cent of total fuel energy). Combining several aspects of diesel and spark ignition engine combustion models, the closed-cycle simulation accounted for diesel autoignition, diesel spray combustion, and natural-gas combustion by premixed turbulent flame propagation. The cylinder contents were divided into an unburned zone, several pilot fuel zones (or 'packets') that modelled diesel evaporation and ignition, a flame zone for natural-gas combustion, and a burned zone. The simulation predicted the onset of ignition, cylinder pressures, and heat release rate profiles satisfactorily over a wide range of BOIs (20-60° before top dead centre (before TDC)) but especially well at early BOIs. Strong coupling was observed between pilot spray combustion in the packets and premixed turbulent combustion in the flame zone and, therefore, the number of ignition centres (packets) profoundly affected flame combustion. The highest local peak temperatures (greater than 2000 K) were observed in the packets, while the flame zone was much cooler (about 1650 K), indicating that pilot diesel spray combustion is probably the dominant source of engine-out emissions of nitrogen oxide (NOx). Further, the 60° before TDC BOI yielded the lowest average peak packet temperatures (about 1720 K) compared with the 20° before TDC BOI (about 2480 K) and 40° before TDC BOI (about 2700 K). These trends support experimental NOx trends, which showed the lowest NOx emissions for the 60°, 20°, and 40° before TDC BOIs in that order. Parametric studies showed that increasing the intake charge temperature, pilot quantity, and natural-gas equivalence ratio all led to higher peak

  1. Nuclear free zone

    SciTech Connect

    Christoffel, T.

    1987-07-01

    Health professionals have played a leading role in alerting and educating the public regarding the danger of nuclear war which has been described as the last epidemic our civilization will know. Having convinced most people that the use of nuclear weapons would mean intolerable consequences, groups such as Physicians for Social Responsibility have focused on the second critical question how likely is it that these weapons will be used. The oultlook is grim. This article describes the nuclear free zone movement, explores relevant legal questions, and shows how the political potential of nuclear free zones threatens to open a deep rift in the American constitutional system.

  2. Factors Affecting the Sensitivity of Permafrost to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, T.; Romanovsky, V.; Harden, J.; Shur, Y.; Hinzman, L.; Marchenko, S.; Bolton, R.; O'Donnell, J.

    2009-05-01

    Permafrost aggradation and degradation are affected by numerous geomorphological and ecological properties of the landscape that confound our ability to accurately predict the response of permafrost to climate change. Permafrost can persist at mean annual air temperatures (MAAT) of +2 °C and can degrade at MAAT of -15 °C with the help of surface water. Permafrost is decoupled from the atmosphere by the active layer, thus, its thermal regime is mediated by numerous factors such as topography, soil texture, organic-matter accumulation, vegetation, snow, surface water, groundwater movement, and disturbance. Topography affects the amount of solar radiation to the soil surface, causing permafrost in the discontinuous zone to occur generally on north-facing slopes that receive less direct radiation and on flat, low- lying areas where vegetation and organic soils have a greater insulating effect and where air temperatures tend to be colder during winter inversions. Soil texture affects soil moisture and thermal properties. For instance, gravelly soils tend to be well-drained with little difference between thermal conductivities when frozen or thawed. In contrast, surface organic soils, as well as clayey and silty soils, in lowland areas tend to be poorly drained and have much higher thermal conductivities when frozen in winter than unfrozen in summer. In well- drained upland sites, however, organic soils typically are well below saturation. Differences in frozen and unfrozen thermal conductivities lead to more rapid heat loss in winter, depending on snow, and slower heat penetration in summer. Vegetation has important effects through interception of solar radiation, growth of mosses, accumulation of organic matter, and interception of snow by trees and shrubs. Snow protects soil from cooling in winter. Thus, the seasonality (e.g., timing of snowfall in early winter) and depth of snow are very important. Surface water provides an important positive feedback that enhances

  3. Temperature and acidification variability reduce physiological performance in the intertidal zone porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes.

    PubMed

    Paganini, Adam W; Miller, Nathan A; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2014-11-15

    We show here that increased variability of temperature and pH synergistically negatively affects the energetics of intertidal zone crabs. Under future climate scenarios, coastal ecosystems are projected to have increased extremes of low tide-associated thermal stress and ocean acidification-associated low pH, the individual or interactive effects of which have yet to be determined. To characterize energetic consequences of exposure to increased variability of pH and temperature, we exposed porcelain crabs, Petrolisthes cinctipes, to conditions that simulated current and future intertidal zone thermal and pH environments. During the daily low tide, specimens were exposed to no, moderate or extreme heating, and during the daily high tide experienced no, moderate or extreme acidification. Respiration rate and cardiac thermal limits were assessed following 2.5 weeks of acclimation. Thermal variation had a larger overall effect than pH variation, though there was an interactive effect between the two environmental drivers. Under the most extreme temperature and pH combination, respiration rate decreased while heat tolerance increased, indicating a smaller overall aerobic energy budget (i.e. a reduced O2 consumption rate) of which a larger portion is devoted to basal maintenance (i.e. greater thermal tolerance indicating induction of the cellular stress response). These results suggest the potential for negative long-term ecological consequences for intertidal ectotherms exposed to increased extremes in pH and temperature due to reduced energy for behavior and reproduction.

  4. Temperature and acidification variability reduce physiological performance in the intertidal zone porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes.

    PubMed

    Paganini, Adam W; Miller, Nathan A; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2014-11-15

    We show here that increased variability of temperature and pH synergistically negatively affects the energetics of intertidal zone crabs. Under future climate scenarios, coastal ecosystems are projected to have increased extremes of low tide-associated thermal stress and ocean acidification-associated low pH, the individual or interactive effects of which have yet to be determined. To characterize energetic consequences of exposure to increased variability of pH and temperature, we exposed porcelain crabs, Petrolisthes cinctipes, to conditions that simulated current and future intertidal zone thermal and pH environments. During the daily low tide, specimens were exposed to no, moderate or extreme heating, and during the daily high tide experienced no, moderate or extreme acidification. Respiration rate and cardiac thermal limits were assessed following 2.5 weeks of acclimation. Thermal variation had a larger overall effect than pH variation, though there was an interactive effect between the two environmental drivers. Under the most extreme temperature and pH combination, respiration rate decreased while heat tolerance increased, indicating a smaller overall aerobic energy budget (i.e. a reduced O2 consumption rate) of which a larger portion is devoted to basal maintenance (i.e. greater thermal tolerance indicating induction of the cellular stress response). These results suggest the potential for negative long-term ecological consequences for intertidal ectotherms exposed to increased extremes in pH and temperature due to reduced energy for behavior and reproduction. PMID:25392458

  5. Heating device for semiconductor wafers

    DOEpatents

    Vosen, S.R.

    1999-07-27

    An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernible pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light. 4 figs.

  6. Heating device for semiconductor wafers

    DOEpatents

    Vosen, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernable pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light.

  7. [Affective dependency].

    PubMed

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  8. [Affective dependency].

    PubMed

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy. PMID:23888587

  9. Groundwater-Stream Interactions in a Seasonal Flooded Riparian Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, J. K.; Engesgaard, P. K.; Nilsson, B.

    2011-12-01

    by solution to heat transport) and to monitor infiltration of river water through the soil to the water table (continuous). Finally, seepage meter measurements have been performed to directly estimate flux of groundwater to the stream and double-ring infiltrometer test to estimate capacity of the soils to infiltrate river water during flooding. Hydraulic head and discharge data suggest a very dynamic and heterogeneous system. The riparian area is flooded regularly in response to heavy rainfall affecting infiltration and groundwater flow. Residence times in the riparian zone vary over the current measurement period between 200 to 1100 days. Discharge to the stream is very heterogeneous, ranging from 0 to 20 cm/day as obtained from fitting a solution to 38 temperature profiles recorded during base flow in the river, while seepage meter discharge measurements range from 0 to 12 cm/day. The data suggest that groundwater is preferentially discharged to the stream in a narrow 10 m section where discharge is up to 4 times higher. A 2D numerical cross-sectional model using FEFLOW is being developed to understand the temporal changes in the hydraulics of this new riparian area and evaluate the efficiency of the zone to deplete agricultural pollutants.

  10. Effect of Pre- and Post-weld Heat Treatments on Linear Friction Welded Ti-5553

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanjara, Priti; Dalgaard, Elvi; Gholipour, Javad; Cao, Xinjin; Cuddy, Jonathan; Jonas, John J.

    2014-10-01

    Linear friction welding allows solid-state joining of near-beta ( β) titanium alloy Ti-5553 (Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr). In the as-welded condition, the weld zone (WZ) exhibits β grain refinement and marked softening as compared with Ti-5553 in the solution heat treated and aged condition. The softening of the weldment is attributed to the depletion of the strengthening alpha ( α) phase in the WZ and the adjacent thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ). Specifically, in near- β titanium alloys, the strength of the material mainly depends on the shape, size, distribution, and fraction of the primary α and other decomposition products of the β phase. Hence, a combination of pre- and post-weld heat treatments were applied to determine the conditions that allow mitigating the α phase depletion in the WZ and TMAZ of the welds. The mechanical response of the welded samples to the heat treatments was determined by performing microhardness measurements and tensile testing at room temperature with an automated 3D deformation measurement system. It was found that though the joint efficiency in the as-welded condition was high (96 pct), strain localization and failure occurred in the TMAZ. The application of post-weld solution heat treatment with aging was effective in restoring α, increasing the joint efficiency (97 to 99 pct) and inducing strain localization and failure in the parent material region.

  11. Fast aurora zone analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, Mattie

    1992-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), of the Goddard Space Flight Center provides acquisition data to tracking stations and orbit and attitude services to scientists and mission support personnel. The following paper explains how a method was determined that found spacecraft entry and exit times of the aurora zone.

  12. Heat collector

    DOEpatents

    Merrigan, Michael A.

    1984-01-01

    A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

  13. Heat collector

    DOEpatents

    Merrigan, M.A.

    1981-06-29

    A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

  14. ON HYDRODYNAMIC MOTIONS IN DEAD ZONES

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark E-mail: mordecai@amnh.or

    2009-10-20

    We investigate fluid motions near the midplane of vertically stratified accretion disks with highly resistive midplanes. In such disks, the magnetorotational instability drives turbulence in thin layers surrounding a resistive, stable dead zone. The turbulent layers in turn drive motions in the dead zone. We examine the properties of these motions using three-dimensional, stratified, local, shearing-box, non-ideal, magnetohydrodynamical simulations. Although the turbulence in the active zones provides a source of vorticity to the midplane, no evidence for coherent vortices is found in our simulations. It appears that this is because of strong vertical oscillations in the dead zone. By analyzing time series of azimuthally averaged flow quantities, we identify an axisymmetric wave mode particular to models with dead zones. This mode is reduced in amplitude, but not suppressed entirely, by changing the equation of state from isothermal to ideal. These waves are too low frequency to affect sedimentation of dust to the midplane, but may have significance for the gravitational stability of the resulting midplane dust layers.

  15. The human thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones: Thermal comfort in your own skin blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Schlader, Zachary J

    2014-01-01

    Human thermoregulation is achieved via autonomic and behavioral responses. Autonomic responses involve 2 synchronous ‘components’. One counteracts large thermal perturbations, eliciting robust heat loss or gain (i.e., sweating or shivering). The other fends off smaller insults, relying solely on changes in sensible heat exchange (i.e., skin blood flow). This sensible component occurs within the thermoneutral zone [i.e., the ambient temperature range in which temperature regulation is achieved only by sensible heat transfer, without regulatory increases in metabolic heat production (e.g., shivering) or evaporative heat loss (e.g., sweating)].1 The combination of behavior and sensible heat exchange permits a range of conditions that are deemed thermally comfortable, which is defined as the thermal comfort zone.1 Notably, we spend the majority of our lives within the thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones. It is only when we are unable to stay within these zones that deleterious health and safety outcomes can occur (i.e., hypo- or hyperthermia). Oddly, although the thermoneutral zone and thermal preference (a concept similar to the thermal comfort zone) has been extensively studied in non-human animals, our understanding of human thermoregulation within the thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones remains rather crude. PMID:27226992

  16. The human thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones: Thermal comfort in your own skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J

    2015-01-01

    Human thermoregulation is achieved via autonomic and behavioral responses. Autonomic responses involve 2 synchronous 'components'. One counteracts large thermal perturbations, eliciting robust heat loss or gain (i.e., sweating or shivering). The other fends off smaller insults, relying solely on changes in sensible heat exchange (i.e., skin blood flow). This sensible component occurs within the thermoneutral zone [i.e., the ambient temperature range in which temperature regulation is achieved only by sensible heat transfer, without regulatory increases in metabolic heat production (e.g., shivering) or evaporative heat loss (e.g., sweating)].(1) The combination of behavior and sensible heat exchange permits a range of conditions that are deemed thermally comfortable, which is defined as the thermal comfort zone.(1) Notably, we spend the majority of our lives within the thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones. It is only when we are unable to stay within these zones that deleterious health and safety outcomes can occur (i.e., hypo- or hyperthermia). Oddly, although the thermoneutral zone and thermal preference (a concept similar to the thermal comfort zone) has been extensively studied in non-human animals, our understanding of human thermoregulation within the thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones remains rather crude.

  17. The human thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones: Thermal comfort in your own skin blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Schlader, Zachary J

    2015-01-01

    Human thermoregulation is achieved via autonomic and behavioral responses. Autonomic responses involve 2 synchronous ‘components’. One counteracts large thermal perturbations, eliciting robust heat loss or gain (i.e., sweating or shivering). The other fends off smaller insults, relying solely on changes in sensible heat exchange (i.e., skin blood flow). This sensible component occurs within the thermoneutral zone [i.e., the ambient temperature range in which temperature regulation is achieved only by sensible heat transfer, without regulatory increases in metabolic heat production (e.g., shivering) or evaporative heat loss (e.g., sweating)].1 The combination of behavior and sensible heat exchange permits a range of conditions that are deemed thermally comfortable, which is defined as the thermal comfort zone.1 Notably, we spend the majority of our lives within the thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones. It is only when we are unable to stay within these zones that deleterious health and safety outcomes can occur (i.e., hypo- or hyperthermia). Oddly, although the thermoneutral zone and thermal preference (a concept similar to the thermal comfort zone) has been extensively studied in non-human animals, our understanding of human thermoregulation within the thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones remains rather crude. PMID:27226