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Sample records for heat denatured p53

  1. Heat stress induces apoptosis through transcription-independent p53-mediated mitochondrial pathways in human umbilical vein endothelial cell.

    PubMed

    Gu, Z T; Wang, H; Li, L; Liu, Y S; Deng, X B; Huo, S F; Yuan, F F; Liu, Z F; Tong, H S; Su, L

    2014-03-26

    Cells apoptosis induced by intense heat stress is the prominent feature of heat-related illness. However, little is known about the biological effects of heat stress on cells apoptosis. Herein, we presented evidence that intense heat stress could induce early apoptosis of HUVEC cells through activating mitochondrial pathway with changes in mitochondrial membrane potential(ΔΨm), release of cytochrome c, and activation of caspase-9 and -3. We further revealed that p53 played a crucial role in heat stress-induced early apoptosis, with p53 protein rapidly translocated into mitochondria. Using pifithrin-α(PFT), a p53's mitochondrial translocation inhibitor, we found that pretreated with PFT, heat stress induced mitochondrial p53 translocation was significantly suppressed, accompanied by a significant alleviation in the loss of ΔΨm, cytochrome c release and caspase-9 activation. Furthermore, we also found that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was a critical mediator in heat stress-induced apoptosis. In addition, the antioxidant MnTMPyP significantly decreased the heat stress-induced p53's mitochondrial translocation, followed by the loss of ΔΨm, cytochrome c release, caspase-9 activation and heat stress-mediated apoptosis. Conclusively, these findings indicate the contribution of the transcription-independent mitochondrial p53 pathway to early apoptosis in HUVEC cells induced by oxidative stress in response to intense heat stress.

  2. Heat shock factor 1 deficiency via its downstream target gene αB-crystallin (Hspb5) impairs p53 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiongjie; Moskophidis, Demetrius; Hu, Yanzhong; Phillips, Andrew; Mivechi, Nahid F.

    2009-01-01

    Heat shock factor Hsf1 regulates the stress-inducibility of heat shock proteins (Hsps) or molecular chaperones. One of the functions attributed to Hsps is their participation in folding and degradation of proteins. We recently showed that hsf1−/− cells accumulate ubiquitinated proteins. However, a direct role for Hsf1 in stability of specific proteins such as p53 has not been elucidated. We present evidence that cells deficient in hsf1 accumulate wild type p53 protein. We further show that hsf1−/− cells express lower levels of αB-crystallin and cells deficient in αB-crystallin also accumulate p53 protein. Reports indicate that αB-crystallin binds to Fbx4 ubiquitin ligase, and they target cyclin D1 for degradation through a pathway involving the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box) complex. Towards determining a mechanism for p53 degradation involving αB-crystallin and Hsf1, we have found that ectopic expression of Fbx4 in wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) expressing mutant p53 (p53R175H) leads to increase in its degradation, while MEFs deficient in hsf1 or αBcry are defective in degradation of this p53 protein. In addition, immunoprecipitated p53R175H from wild type MEFs is able to pull-down both αB-crystallin and Fbx4. Finally, immunoprecipitated wild type p53 from doxorubicin treated U2OS cells can pull-down endogenous αB-crystallin and Fbx4. These results indicate that hsf1- and αBcry- deficient cells accumulate p53 due to reduced levels of αB-crystallin in these cells. Elevated levels of p53 in hsf1- and αBcry- deficient cells lead to their increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. These data reveal a novel mechanism for protein degradation through Hsf1 and αB-crystallin. PMID:19343786

  3. Role of wild-type p53 in apoptotic and non-apoptotic cell death induced by X-irradiation and heat treatment in p53-mutated mouse M10 cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Atsushi; Nakano, Hisako; Shinohara, Kunio

    2010-01-01

    The sensitizing effects of wild-type p53 on X-ray-induced cell death and on heat-induced apoptosis in M10, a radiosensitive and Trp53 (mouse p53 gene)-mutated lymphoma cell line which dies through necrosis by X-irradiation, were investigated using three M10 derived transfectants with wild-type TP53 (human p53 gene). Cell death was determined by colony formation and/or dye exclusion test, and apoptosis was detected as the changes in nuclear morphology by Giemsa staining. Expression of wild-type p53 protein increased radiosensitivity of cell death as determined by both clonogenic and dye exclusion assays. This increase in radiosensitivity was attributable largely to apoptosis induction in addition to a small enhancement of necrosis. Interestingly neither pathway to cell death was accompanied by caspase-3 activation. On the other hand, heat-induced caspase-3 dependent apoptotic cell death without transfection was further increased by the transfection of wild-type p53. In conclusion, the introduction of wild-type p53 enhanced apoptotic cell death by X-rays or heat via different mechanisms that do or do not activate caspase-3, respectively. In addition, p53 also enhanced the X-ray-induced necrosis in M10 cells.

  4. Plasma protein denaturation with graded heat exposure.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, R; Larson, D F

    2013-11-01

    During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), perfusion at tepid temperatures (33-35 °C) is recommended to avoid high temperature cerebral hyperthermia during and after the operation. However, the ideal temperature for uncomplicated adult cardiac surgery is an unsettled question. Typically, the heat exchanger maximum temperature is monitored between 40-42 °C to prevent denaturation of plasma proteins, but studies have not been performed to make these conclusions. Therefore, our hypothesis was to determine the temperature in which blood plasma protein degradation occurs after 2 hours of heat exposure. As a result, blood plasma proteins were exposed to heat in the 37-50 °C range for 2 hours. Plasma protein samples were loaded onto an 8-12% gradient gel for SDS-PAGE and low molecular weight plasma protein degradation was detected with graded heat exposure. Protein degradation was first detected between 43-45 °C of heat exposure. This study supports the practice of monitoring the heat exchanger between 40-42 °C to prevent denaturation of plasma proteins.

  5. [Expression of HSP70 and P53 in malignant tumor tissues and its relationship to heat syndrome of TCM].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-qi; Zhang, Zheng; Zhao, Yan-ping; Li, Jianguo; Chen, Kai

    2004-10-01

    To investigate the expression of HSP70 and P53 in malignant tumor tissues of patients with TCM Heat-Syndrome (HS) or with non-Heat-Syndrome (NHS). S-P immunohistochemical method was used to detect the gene expression, and ELISA and RT-PCR were adopted to determine the content of HSP70 and P53 mRNA expression in different malignant tumor tissues. (1) Positive ratio of HSP70 and P53 in the colorectal cancer of HS was significantly higher than that in colorectal cancer of NHS respectively, and the total positive ratio of the two genes in all tumors of HS was higher than those of NHS (P<0.05); (2) HSP70 expression content in colorectal, nasopharyngeal and lung cancers of HS was higher than in those of NHS respectively, and the total HSP70 expression content in tumors of HS was higher than in those of NHS (P<0.01); (3) HSP70 mRNA expression content in colorectal and lung cancers of HS was higher than in those of NHS respectively, and the total HSP70 mRNA expression content in tumors of HS was higher than in those of NHS (P<0.01). HSP70 and P53 positive ratio and HSP70 expression content in patients of malignant tumor with HS was higher than in those with NHS.

  6. Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gestl, Erin E.; Anne Boettger, S.

    2012-06-29

    gene expression levels compared to cell lines without p53 sequestration. Our data reveal the characteristic cytoplasmic sequestration of p53 by the heat shock protein mortalin in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines, as is the case for other cancers, such as glioblastomas and hepatocellular carcinomas.

  7. Effect of C-terminal deletion of P53 on heat induced CD95 expression and apoptosis in a rat histiocytoma.

    PubMed

    Sreedhar, Amere S; Pardhasaradhi, Bobbili V V; Khar, Ashok; Srinivas, Usha K

    2002-06-06

    Tumor suppressor gene product p53 in its wild-type conformation, is an effector of apoptosis. A rat histiocytic tumor, AK-5 which has a rearranged and mutated p53 gene undergoes apoptosis upon heat shock through surface expression of CD95 receptor. DNA sequence analysis of p53 gene from tumor cells revealed a deletion of 'C' at nucleotide position 942 and an addition of 'A' at position 1055. Deletion of one nucleotide caused premature termination of p53 protein which resulted in shorter p53 protein with an altered sequence from amino acids 315 to 341. Altered p53 was unable to protect BC-8, a single cell clone of AK-5 cells from apoptosis upon heat shock. BC-8 cells transfected with a wild-type p53gene (3B4 cells) were resistant to heat induced apoptosis and did not show the expression CD95 death receptor. Inhibition of p53 expression by using antisense oligo induced apoptosis upon heat shock in 3B4 cells. Similarly, inhibition of CD95 expression by antisense oligo inhibited heat induced apoptosis in BC-8 cells. In addition, cell cycle regulatory molecules, cdc2 and cdk2 are differentially regulated in a non-cell cycle dependent manner in these tumor cells. These results, in view of lack of heat shock response in BC-8 cells suggest a complex interaction between p53, CD95 and hsp70 which determines the fate of the cell. In the absence of functional p53, CD95 appears to be an effector of apoptosis in BC-8 cells.

  8. Heat shock proteins and p53 play a critical role in K+ channel-mediated tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaobing; Wang, Fang; Yao, Weixing; Xing, Hui; Weng, Danhui; Song, Xiaohong; Chen, Gang; Xi, Ling; Zhu, Tao; Zhou, Jianfeng; Xu, Gang; Wang, Shixuan; Meng, Li; Iadecola, Costantino; Wang, Gang; Ma, Ding

    2007-10-01

    Plasma membrane potassium (K+) channels are required for tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. However, the signal transduction mechanisms underlying K+ channel-dependent tumor cell proliferation or apoptosis remains elusive. Using HeLa and A2780 cells as study models, we tested the hypothesis that apoptotic proteins are linked with K+ channel-dependent tumor cell cycle and apoptosis. The patch-clamping study using the whole-cell mode revealed two components of voltage-gated outward K+ currents: one is sensitive to either tetraethylammonium (TEA) or tetrandrine (Tet), a maxi-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel blocker, and the other is sensitive to 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a delayed rectifier K+ channel blocker. MTT and flow cytometry assays showed that TEA, Tet, or iberiotoxin (Ibtx), a selective BK channel blocker, inhibited HeLa and A2780 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner with G1 phase arrest. Pretreatment with TEA or Tet also induced apoptosis in HeLa and A2780 cells. However, glibenclamide (Gli), an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker, did not influence K+ currents, proliferation or apoptosis. Western blot analyses showed that while pretreatment of TEA and Tet produced an increase in expressions of p53, p21, and Bax, pretreatment of these two agents led to a decrease in expressions of heat shock protein (hsp)90alpha, hsp90beta, and hsp70. Our results indicate that the blockade of BK channels results in tumor cell apoptosis and cycle arrest at G1 phase, and the transduction pathway underlying the anti-proliferative effects is linked to the increased expression of apoptotic protein p53 and the decreased expression of its chaperone proteins hsp.

  9. A low dose pre-irradiation induces radio- and heat-resistance via HDM2 and NO radicals, and is associated with p53 functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, T.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this work was to clarify the effect of low dose pre-irradiation on radio- and heat-sensitivity. Wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cells derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line were used. The parental H1299 cell line is p53-null. Cellular sensitivities were determined with a colony-forming assay. When wtp53 cells were exposed to a low dose X-irradiation, induction of radio- and heat-resistance was observed only in the absence of RITA (an inhibitor of p53-HDM2 interactions), aminoguanidine (an iNOS inhibitor) and c-PTIO (an NO radical scavenger). In contrast, the induced radio- and heat-resistance was not observed under similar conditions in mp53 cells. Moreover, heat-resistance as well as radio-resistance developed when wtp53 cells were treated with ISDN (an NO generating agent) alone. These findings suggest that NO radicals are an initiator of radio- and heat-resistance, and function through the activation of HDM2 and the depression of p53 accumulation.

  10. Caspase-3 activation downstream from reactive oxygen species in heat-induced apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cells carrying a mutant p53 gene.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, D; Sasaki, M; Watanabe, N

    2001-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the intracellular signaling pathway leading to p53-independent activation of caspase-3 during heat-induced apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cells. Induction of mutant p53 protein, but not p21/WAF-1, was observed after heat treatment of both heat-resistant (PANC-1) and heat-sensitive (MIAPaCa-2) cells. A specific inhibitor of caspase-3 (Ac-DMQD-CHO) caused 84% and 92% inhibition of apoptosis in MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, respectively. Caspase-3 mRNA expression was increased in both cell lines after heat treatment. Further, heat-induced caspase-3 activity detected by fluorogenic assay in MIAPaCa-2 cells was almost completely inhibited by addition of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. In contrast, Ac-DMQD-CHO had no inhibitory effect on amounts of reactive oxygen species in heat-treated MIAPaCa-2 cells. These results suggest a possible pathway by which reactive oxygen species lead to caspase-3 activation to cause heat-induced death of pancreatic carcinoma cells carrying mutant p53.

  11. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation.

  12. Geranylgeranylacetone attenuates cisplatin-induced reductions in cell viability by suppressing the elevation of intracellular p53 content without heat shock protein induction.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Motofusa; Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi

    2012-02-01

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) was originally used as an anti-ulcer drug to protect gastric mucosa from various stresses, and it is also known to induce heat shock proteins (HSPs), especially HSP70. However, it remains unclear how GGA affects cellular functions in the presence of anti-cancer drugs. We investigated the effects of GGA on cellular viability, caspase-3 activation, HSP induction and p53 content in the presence of cisplatin (CDDP). Rat intestinal epithelium-derived IEC-18 cells and human colon cancer-derived CW-2 cells were incubated with GGA in the presence of CDDP, and we observed that GGA attenuated CDDP-induced viability reductions. GGA also suppressed CDDP-induced caspase-3 activation. However, GGA induced neither HSP70 nor GRP78 expression in the presence of CDDP. We found that GGA suppressed the CDDP-induced elevation of intracellular p53 content. In conclusion, GGA attenuates viability reductions and caspase-3 activation in CDDP-treated cells by suppressing the elevation of intracellular p53 content without HSP induction.

  13. GERANYLGERANYLACETONE ATTENUATES CISPLATIN-INDUCED REDUCTIONS IN CELL VIABILITY BY SUPPRESSING THE ELEVATION OF INTRACELLULAR P53 CONTENT WITHOUT HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN INDUCTION

    PubMed Central

    HASEGAWA, MOTOFUSA; ISHIGURO, KAZUHIRO; ANDO, TAKAFUMI; GOTO, HIDEMI

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) was originally used as an anti-ulcer drug to protect gastric mucosa from various stresses, and it is also known to induce heat shock proteins (HSPs), especially HSP70. However, it remains unclear how GGA affects cellular functions in the presence of anti-cancer drugs. We investigated the effects of GGA on cellular viability, caspase-3 activation, HSP induction and p53 content in the presence of cisplatin (CDDP). Rat intestinal epithelium-derived IEC-18 cells and human colon cancer-derived CW-2 cells were incubated with GGA in the presence of CDDP, and we observed that GGA attenuated CDDP-induced viability reductions. GGA also suppressed CDDP-induced caspase-3 activation. However, GGA induced neither HSP70 nor GRP78 expression in the presence of CDDP. We found that GGA suppressed the CDDP-induced elevation of intracellular p53 content. In conclusion, GGA attenuates viability reductions and caspase-3 activation in CDDP-treated cells by suppressing the elevation of intracellular p53 content without HSP induction. PMID:22515118

  14. CPUY201112, a novel synthetic small-molecule compound and inhibitor of heat shock protein Hsp90, induces p53-mediated apoptosis in MCF-7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Li; Bao, Qi-chao; Jia, Jian-Min; Liu, Fang; Guo, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Ming-ye; Wei, Jin-lian; Lu, Meng-chen; Xu, Li-li; Zhang, Xiao-Jin; You, Qi-Dong; Sun, Hao-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is highly expressed in many tumor cells and is associated with the maintenance of malignant phenotypes. Targeting Hsp90 has had therapeutic success in both solid and hematological malignancies, which has inspired more studies to identify new Hsp90 inhibitors with improved clinical efficacy. Using a fragment-based approach and subsequent structural optimization guided by medicinal chemistry principles, we identified the novel compound CPUY201112 as a potent Hsp90 inhibitor. It binds to the ATP-binding pocket of Hsp90 with a kinetic dissociation (Kd) constant of 27 ± 2.3 nM. It also exhibits potent in vitro antiproliferative effects in a range of solid tumor cells. In MCF-7 cells with high Hsp90 expression, CPUY201112 induces the degradation of Hsp90 client proteins including HER-2, Akt, and c-RAF. We prove that treating MCF-7 cells with CPUY201112 results in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through the wild-type (wt) p53 pathway. CPUY201112 also synergizes with Nutlin-3a to induce cancer cell apoptosis. CPUY201112 significantly inhibited the growth of MCF-7 xenografts in nude mice without apparent body weight loss. These results demonstrate that CPUY201112 is a novel Hsp90 inhibitor with potential use in treating wild-type p53 related cancers. PMID:26743233

  15. CPUY201112, a novel synthetic small-molecule compound and inhibitor of heat shock protein Hsp90, induces p53-mediated apoptosis in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Li; Bao, Qi-chao; Jia, Jian-Min; Liu, Fang; Guo, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Ming-ye; Wei, Jin-lian; Lu, Meng-chen; Xu, Li-li; Zhang, Xiao-Jin; You, Qi-Dong; Sun, Hao-Peng

    2016-01-08

    Heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is highly expressed in many tumor cells and is associated with the maintenance of malignant phenotypes. Targeting Hsp90 has had therapeutic success in both solid and hematological malignancies, which has inspired more studies to identify new Hsp90 inhibitors with improved clinical efficacy. Using a fragment-based approach and subsequent structural optimization guided by medicinal chemistry principles, we identified the novel compound CPUY201112 as a potent Hsp90 inhibitor. It binds to the ATP-binding pocket of Hsp90 with a kinetic dissociation (Kd) constant of 27 ± 2.3 nM. It also exhibits potent in vitro antiproliferative effects in a range of solid tumor cells. In MCF-7 cells with high Hsp90 expression, CPUY201112 induces the degradation of Hsp90 client proteins including HER-2, Akt, and c-RAF. We prove that treating MCF-7 cells with CPUY201112 results in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through the wild-type (wt) p53 pathway. CPUY201112 also synergizes with Nutlin-3a to induce cancer cell apoptosis. CPUY201112 significantly inhibited the growth of MCF-7 xenografts in nude mice without apparent body weight loss. These results demonstrate that CPUY201112 is a novel Hsp90 inhibitor with potential use in treating wild-type p53 related cancers.

  16. Expression of p53, MDM2, p21, heat shock protein 70, and HPV 16/18 E6 proteins in oral verrucous carcinoma and oral verrucous hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Pin; Wang, Yi-Ping; Chiang, Chun-Pin

    2011-03-01

    Oral verrucous hyperplasia is a precancerous lesion of oral verrucous carcinoma. This study used immunohistochemistry to examine the expression of p53, murine double minute 2 (MDM2), p21, heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70), and human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 E6 proteins in 48 oral verrucous carcinoma and 30 oral verrucous hyperplasia samples. The mean labeling indices of p53, MDM2, p21, HSP 70, and HPV 16/18 E6 proteins in oral verrucous carcinoma samples were 21%, 31%, 7%, 17%, and 0.5%, respectively, and those in oral verrucous hyperplasia samples were 19%, 35%, 11%, 14%, and 0.3%, respectively. Immunohistochemistry with the above-cited 5 biomarkers could not help differentiate oral verrucous hyperplasia from oral verrucous carcinoma. The low expression of p21 may partially explain abnormal epithelial overgrowth in both verrucous lesions. The pathogenesis of both verrucous lesions may be at least partially attributed to the overexpression of MDM2 protein and moderate expression of HSP 70 protein in both lesions. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The Enigma of p53.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Guillermina

    2016-12-08

    This perspective will focus on the physiological impact of wild-type and mutant p53 activities. In particular, the tissue-specific nature of activation of p53 targets and their subsequent effects on cell behavior will be discussed. Because mutations in p53 are common in human cancers, the regulation and physiological consequences of mutant p53 proteins will also be discussed.

  18. Cooperative Unfolding of Residual Structure in Heat Denatured Proteins by Urea and Guanidinium Chloride.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ritu; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan

    2015-01-01

    The denatured states of proteins have always attracted our attention due to the fact that the denatured state is the only experimentally achievable state of a protein, which can be taken as initial reference state for considering the in vitro folding and defining the native protein stability. It is known that heat and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) give structurally different states of RNase-A, lysozyme, α-chymotrypsinogen A and α-lactalbumin. On the contrary, differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetric measurements, reported in the literature, led to the conclusion that heat denatured and GdmCl denatured states are thermodynamically and structurally identical. In order to resolve this controversy, we have measured changes in the far-UV CD (circular dichroism) of these heat-denatured proteins on the addition of different concentrations of GdmCl. The observed sigmoidal curve of each protein was analyzed for Gibbs free energy change in the absence of the denaturant (ΔG0X→D) associated with the process heat denatured (X) state ↔ GdmCl denatured (D) state. To confirm that this thermodynamic property represents the property of the protein alone and is not a manifestation of salvation effect, we measured urea-induced denaturation curves of these heat denatured proteins under the same experimental condition in which GdmCl-induced denaturation was carried out. In this paper we report that (a) heat denatured proteins contain secondary structure, and GdmCl (or urea) induces a cooperative transition between X and D states, (b) for each protein at a given pH and temperature, thermodynamic cycle connects quantities, ΔG0N→X (native (N) state ↔ X state), ΔG0X→D and ΔG0N→D (N state ↔ D state), and

  19. What's new in p53

    PubMed Central

    Maritsi, D; Stagikas, D; Charalabopoulos, K; Batistatou, A

    2006-01-01

    p53 is the main intrinsic factor inducing apoptosis by recognizing the external stimuli and activating the p53 responsive genes to an irreversible series of events. P53 activates the transcription of specific proapoptotic genes called p53 target genes. A growing number of p53 responsive genes have been identified and numerous studies have demonstrated that p53 proapoptotic factors such as Noxa, Puma and Perp play cell type specific roles in p53's mediated response to certain stimuli. Perp (p53 apoptosis effector related to PMP-22) is a direct proapoptotic target gene encoding a tetraspan protein. Perp is highly expressed in cells undergoing apoptosis compared to cells under G1 arrest and its overexpression is sufficient to cause cell death in fibroblasts. Noxa is another member of the preapoptotic p53 genes family. When expressed Noxa acts in a BH3 motif-dependent localization to mitochondria, causing structural changes, activation of caspase 9 and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol. Puma (p53 mutant of apoptosis) is another critical mediator of p53-dependent apoptosis. P53 binds to Puma-promoter gene sites, leading to puma production. The mtCLIC, a member of intracellular chloride channels, is a cytoplasmic and mitochondrial protein positively regulated by p53. Caspase 10 is induced in p53-dependent manner leading to cellular apoptosis. Other newly announced factors are also involved in p53-regulated apoptosis such as brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor - 1 (BSAI1), MSOD and GPX genes. A global discussion on this topic is attempted in the present review article. PMID:20351806

  20. What's new in p53?

    PubMed

    Maritsi, D; Stagikas, D; Charalabopoulos, K; Batistatou, A

    2006-07-01

    p53 is the main intrinsic factor inducing apoptosis by recognizing the external stimuli and activating the p53 responsive genes to an irreversible series of events. P53 activates the transcription of specific proapoptotic genes called p53 target genes. A growing number of p53 responsive genes have been identified and numerous studies have demonstrated that p53 proapoptotic factors such as Noxa, Puma and Perp play cell type specific roles in p53's mediated response to certain stimuli. Perp (p53 apoptosis effector related to PMP-22) is a direct proapoptotic target gene encoding a tetraspan protein. Perp is highly expressed in cells undergoing apoptosis compared to cells under G1 arrest and its overexpression is sufficient to cause cell death in fibroblasts. Noxa is another member of the preapoptotic p53 genes family. When expressed Noxa acts in a BH3 motif-dependent localization to mitochondria, causing structural changes, activation of caspase 9 and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol. Puma (p53 mutant of apoptosis) is another critical mediator of p53-dependent apoptosis. P53 binds to Puma-promoter gene sites, leading to puma production. The mtCLIC, a member of intracellular chloride channels, is a cytoplasmic and mitochondrial protein positively regulated by p53. Caspase 10 is induced in p53-dependent manner leading to cellular apoptosis. Other newly announced factors are also involved in p53-regulated apoptosis such as brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor-1 (BSAI1), MSOD and GPX genes. A global discussion on this topic is attempted in the present review article.

  1. Thermal denaturation of egg protein under nanosecond pulsed laser heating of gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Meshalkin, Yu P; Lapin, I N; Svetlichnyi, Valery A

    2011-08-31

    Thermal denaturation of egg protein in the presence of gold nanoparticles via their heating at the plasmon resonance wavelength by the pulsed radiation of the second harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) is investigated. The experimental dependence of the protein denaturation time on the mean laser power is obtained. The heating temperature of the medium with gold nanoparticles is calculated. The numerical estimates of the temperature of the heated medium containing protein and gold nanoparticles (45.3 deg. C at the moment of protein denaturation) are in good agreement with the literature data on its thermal denaturation and with the data of pyrometric measurements (42.0 {+-} 1.5 deg. C). The egg protein may be successfully used to investigate the specific features of laser heating of proteins in the presence of metal nanoparticles under their excitation at the plasmon resonance wavelength. (laser methods in biology)

  2. Experimental and Modelling Study of the Denaturation of Milk Protein by Heat Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Fang; Sun, Jiayue; Cao, Di; Tuo, Yanfeng; Jiang, Shujuan; Mu, Guangqing

    2017-01-01

    Heat treatment of milk aims to inhibit the growth of microbes, extend the shelf-life of products and improve the quality of the products. Heat treatment also leads to denaturation of whey protein and the formation of whey protein-casein polymer, which has negative effects on milk product. Hence the milk heat treatment conditions should be controlled in milk processing. In this study, the denaturation degree of whey protein and the combination degree of whey protein and casein when undergoing heat treatment were also determined by using the Native-PAGE and SDS-PAGE analysis. The results showed that the denaturation degree of whey protein and the combination degree of whey protein with casein extended with the increase of the heat-treated temperature and time. The effects of the heat-treated temperature and heat-treated time on the denaturation degree of whey protein and on the combination degree of whey protein and casein were well described using the quadratic regression equation. The analysis strategy used in this study reveals an intuitive and effective measure of the denaturation degree of whey protein, and the changes of milk protein under different heat treatment conditions efficiently and accurately in the dairy industry. It can be of great significance for dairy product proteins following processing treatments applied for dairy product manufacturing. PMID:28316470

  3. Experimental and Modelling Study of the Denaturation of Milk Protein by Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Qian, Fang; Sun, Jiayue; Cao, Di; Tuo, Yanfeng; Jiang, Shujuan; Mu, Guangqing

    2017-01-01

    Heat treatment of milk aims to inhibit the growth of microbes, extend the shelf-life of products and improve the quality of the products. Heat treatment also leads to denaturation of whey protein and the formation of whey protein-casein polymer, which has negative effects on milk product. Hence the milk heat treatment conditions should be controlled in milk processing. In this study, the denaturation degree of whey protein and the combination degree of whey protein and casein when undergoing heat treatment were also determined by using the Native-PAGE and SDS-PAGE analysis. The results showed that the denaturation degree of whey protein and the combination degree of whey protein with casein extended with the increase of the heat-treated temperature and time. The effects of the heat-treated temperature and heat-treated time on the denaturation degree of whey protein and on the combination degree of whey protein and casein were well described using the quadratic regression equation. The analysis strategy used in this study reveals an intuitive and effective measure of the denaturation degree of whey protein, and the changes of milk protein under different heat treatment conditions efficiently and accurately in the dairy industry. It can be of great significance for dairy product proteins following processing treatments applied for dairy product manufacturing.

  4. The p53 circuit board

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelly D.; Gallant-Behm, Corrie L.; Henry, Ryan E.; Fraikin, Jean-Luc; Espinosa, Joaquín M.

    2012-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is embedded in a large gene network controlling diverse cellular and organismal phenotypes. Multiple signaling pathways converge onto p53 activation, mostly by relieving the inhibitory effects of its repressors, MDM2 and MDM4. In turn, signals originating from increased p53 activity diverge into distinct effector pathways to deliver a specific cellular response to the activating stimuli. Much attention has been devoted to dissecting how the various input pathways trigger p53 activation and how the activity of the p53 protein itself can be modulated by a plethora of co-factors and post-translational modifications. In this review we will focus instead on the multiple configurations of the effector pathways. We will discuss how p53-generated signals are transmitted, amplified, resisted and eventually integrated by downstream gene circuits operating at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational level. We will also discuss how context-dependent variations in these gene circuits define the cellular response to p53 activation and how they may impact the clinical efficacy of p53-based targeted therapies. PMID:22333261

  5. Nuclear inclusion bodies of mutant and wild-type p53 in cancer: a hallmark of p53 inactivation and proteostasis remodelling by p53 aggregation.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Frederik; Saiz Rubio, Mirian; Hompes, Daphne; Naus, Evelyne; De Baets, Greet; Langenberg, Tobias; Hipp, Mark S; Houben, Bert; Claes, Filip; Charbonneau, Sarah; Delgado Blanco, Javier; Plaisance, Stephane; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Ramkissoon, Lori; Simons, Colinda; van den Brandt, Piet; Weijenberg, Matty; Van England, Manon; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Amant, Frederic; D'Hoore, André; Ligon, Keith L; Sagaert, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2016-12-30

    Although p53 protein aggregates have been observed in cancer cell lines and tumour tissue, their impact in cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we extensively screened for p53 aggregation phenotypes in tumour biopsies, and identified nuclear inclusion bodies (nIBs) of transcriptionally inactive mutant or wild-type p53 as the most frequent aggregation-like phenotype across six different cancer types. p53-positive nIBs co-stained with nuclear aggregation markers, and shared molecular hallmarks of nIBs commonly found in neurodegenerative disorders. In cell culture, tumour-associated stress was a strong inducer of p53 aggregation and nIB formation. This was most prominent for mutant p53, but could also be observed in wild-type p53 cell lines, for which nIB formation correlated with the loss of p53's transcriptional activity. Importantly, protein aggregation also fuelled the dysregulation of the proteostasis network in the tumour cell by inducing a hyperactivated, oncogenic heat-shock response, to which tumours are commonly addicted, and by overloading the proteasomal degradation system, an observation that was most pronounced for structurally destabilized mutant p53. Patients showing tumours with p53-positive nIBs suffered from a poor clinical outcome, similar to those with loss of p53 expression, and tumour biopsies showed a differential proteostatic expression profile associated with p53-positive nIBs. p53-positive nIBs therefore highlight a malignant state of the tumour that results from the interplay between (1) the functional inactivation of p53 through mutation and/or aggregation, and (2) microenvironmental stress, a combination that catalyses proteostatic dysregulation. This study highlights several unexpected clinical, biological and therapeutically unexplored parallels between cancer and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Combined NMR-observation of cold denaturation in supercooled water and heat denaturation enables accurate measurement of deltaC(p) of protein unfolding.

    PubMed

    Szyperski, Thomas; Mills, Jeffrey L; Perl, Dieter; Balbach, Jochen

    2006-04-01

    Cold and heat denaturation of the double mutant Arg 3-->Glu/Leu 66-->Glu of cold shock protein Csp of Bacillus caldolyticus was monitored using 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy in the temperature range from -12 degrees C in supercooled water up to +70 degrees C. The fraction of unfolded protein, f (u), was determined as a function of the temperature. The data characterizing the unfolding transitions could be consistently interpreted in the framework of two-state models: cold and heat denaturation temperatures were determined to be -11 degrees C and 39 degrees C, respectively. A joint fit to both cold and heat transition data enabled the accurate spectroscopic determination of the heat capacity difference between native and denatured state, DeltaC(p) of unfolding. The approach described in this letter, or a variant thereof, is generally applicable and promises to be of value for routine studies of protein folding.

  7. Antimicrobial and inhibition on heat-induced protein denaturation of constituents isolated from Polygonatum verticillatum rhizomes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Haroon; Saeed, Muhammad; Rauf, Abdur; Khan, Muhammad Atif; Muhammad, Naveed

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the susceptibility of various microorganisms and inhibition on heat-induced protein denaturation against diosgenin and santonin, isolated from Polygonatum verticillatum rhizomes. Both diosgenin and santonin showed significant zone of inhibition when studied against various Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi). In antifungal assay, only santonin exhibited profound sensitivity against various fungi (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma harzianum and Fusarium oxysporum) used in the test. Both diosgenin and santonin also exhibited marked attenuation on heat-induced protein denaturation in a concentration-dependent manner with EC50 values of 375 and 310 μg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, both the isolated compounds have antimicrobial potential supported by strong inhibition on protein denaturation and thus support the antimicrobial uses of plant in traditional system of treatment.

  8. Dielectric study of heat-denatured ovalbumin in aqueous solution by time domain reflectometry method.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanxia; Ishida, Tomoyuki; Hayakawa, Shigeru

    2004-04-21

    The dielectric behavior of native and heat-denatured ovalbumins (OVAs) from three avian species in aqueous solution was examined over a frequency range of 100 kHz to 20 GHz, using the time domain reflectometry (TDR) method. For the native OVA solutions, three kinds of relaxation processes were observed at around 10 MHz, 100 MHz, and 20 GHz, respectively; these could be assigned to the overall rotation of protein molecules, the reorientations of the bound water, and the free water molecules, respectively. For the heat-denatured samples, three relaxation processes were also observed. However, the relaxation process at approximately 100 MHz originated via a different mechanism other than the reorientation of bound water, namely, the micro-Brownian motion of peptide chains of heat-denatured protein. From the observed relaxation process at approximately 100 MHz, the relaxation strength of heat-denatured OVA solution for duck was higher than that of OVA solutions for hen and guinea fowl and showed the pH dependency from pH 7.0 to 8.0 for OVAs obtained from all three species. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that the relaxation strength was closely related to surface hydrophobicity of protein molecules and gel rheological properties. It was suggested that the difference in the surface hydrophobicity of protein influenced the dielectric behavior of water around denatured protein, whereas the dielectric behavior of denatured protein could be an indication of the gel rheological properties. Such studies can aid in the understanding of the different network structures of OVA gels from three avian species.

  9. p53: out of Africa.

    PubMed

    Lane, David

    2016-04-15

    Somatic mutations in the tumor suppressor gene p53 occur in more than half of all human cancers. Rare germline mutations result in the Li-Fraumeni cancer family syndrome. In this issue ofGenes&Development, Jennis and colleagues (pp. 918-930) use an elegant mouse model to examine the affect of a polymorphism, P47S (rs1800371), in the N terminus of p53 that is found in Africans as well as more than a million African Americans. Remarkably, the single nucleotide change causes the mice to be substantially tumor-prone compared with littermates, suggesting that this allele causes an increased risk of developing cancer. The defect in p53 function is traced to a restriction in downstream gene regulation that reduces cell death in response to stress.

  10. Development of novel short-term heating angioplasty: thermal denaturation dynamics of collagen in artery wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, N.; Tokunaga, H.; Katou, Y.; Hayashi, T.; Arai, T.

    2009-02-01

    We have studied to develop the new thermal angioplasty methodology, photo-thermo dynamic balloon angioplasty (PTDBA), which provides artery dilatation with short-term (<15s) and uniform heating through the balloon by the combination of the efficient laser driven heat generation and fluid perfusion. Thermal denaturation degree of the collagen in artery media may be the important factor to attain sufficient artery dilatation for the PTDBA. In order to predict the optimum heating condition i.e. the balloon temperature and heating duration, we investigated the thermal denaturation dynamics of artery collagen in ex vivo. The extracted fresh porcine carotid artery was used. The temperature-dependent light scattering property and mechanical property of the artery specimen were simultaneously measured during artery temperature rising by specially made setup to assess the denaturation of arterial collagen. The change rate of the backscattered light intensity from the artery specimen; I(T)/I0 with 633nm was measured to evaluate the artery scattering property change with the thermal denaturation. The artery specimen was heated from 25°C to 80°C with constant temperature rising rate of 3°C/min. The measured I(T)/I0 was suddenly increased over 48°C. This boundary temperature might be the initiation temperature of the arterial collagen denaturation. We defined the variation of the I(T)/I0 as the collagen denaturation ratio, and calculated the reactive enthalpy by the chemical equilibrium theory. Since the calculated enthalpy was similar to the enthalpy in literature report, the variety of I(T)/I0 during the temperature rising might be attributed to the collagen conformational change due to the denaturation. In terms of the artery internal force measurement, the artery force was decreased with increasing of the artery temperature up to 65°C (i.e. softening), and increased over 65°C (i.e. shrinkage). We confirmed that the changes of the backscattered light (at 633nm in

  11. Temperature effects on the hydrodynamic radius of the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region of the p53 protein.

    PubMed

    Langridge, Timothy D; Tarver, Micheal J; Whitten, Steven T

    2014-04-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are often characterized in terms of the hydrodynamic radius, Rh . The Rh of IDPs are known to depend on fractional proline content and net charge, where increased numbers of proline residues and increased net charge cause larger Rh . Though sequence and charge effects on the Rh of IDPs have been studied, the temperature sensitivity has been noted only briefly. Reported here are Rh measurements in the temperature range of 5-75°C for the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region of the p53 protein, p53(1-93). Of note, the Rh of this protein fragment was highly sensitive to temperature, decreasing from 35 Å at 5°C to 26 Å at 75°C. Computer generated simulations of conformationally dynamic and disordered polypeptide chains were performed to provide a hypothesis for the heat-induced compaction of p53(1-93) structure, which was opposite to the heat-induced increase in Rh observed for a model folded protein. The simulations demonstrated that heat caused Rh to trend toward statistical coil values for both proteins, indicating that the effects of heat on p53(1-93) structure could be interpreted as thermal denaturation. The simulation data also predicted that proline content contributed minimally to the native Rh of p53(1-93), which was confirmed by measuring Rh for a substitution variant that had all 22 proline residues changed for glycine.

  12. Joule Heating and Thermal Denaturation of Proteins in Nano-ESI Theta Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Feifei; Matt, Sarah M.; Bu, Jiexun; Rehrauer, Owen G.; Ben-Amotz, Dor; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-07-01

    Electro-osmotically induced Joule heating in theta tips and its effect on protein denaturation were investigated. Myoglobin, equine cytochrome c, bovine cytochrome c, and carbonic anhydrase II solutions were subjected to electro-osmosis in a theta tip and all of the proteins were denatured during the process. The extent of protein denaturation was found to increase with the applied square wave voltage and electrolyte concentration. The solution temperature at the end of a theta tip was measured directly by Raman spectroscopy and shown to increase with the square wave voltage, thereby demonstrating the effect of Joule heating through an independent method. The electro-osmosis of a solution comprised of myoglobin, bovine cytochrome c, and ubiquitin demonstrated that the magnitude of Joule heating that causes protein denaturation is positively correlated with protein melting temperature. This allows for a quick determination of a protein's relative thermal stability. This work establishes a fast, novel method for protein conformation manipulation prior to MS analysis and provides a temperature-controllable platform for the study of processes that take place in solution with direct coupling to mass spectrometry.

  13. Joule Heating and Thermal Denaturation of Proteins in Nano-ESI Theta Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Feifei; Matt, Sarah M.; Bu, Jiexun; Rehrauer, Owen G.; Ben-Amotz, Dor; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-10-01

    Electro-osmotically induced Joule heating in theta tips and its effect on protein denaturation were investigated. Myoglobin, equine cytochrome c, bovine cytochrome c, and carbonic anhydrase II solutions were subjected to electro-osmosis in a theta tip and all of the proteins were denatured during the process. The extent of protein denaturation was found to increase with the applied square wave voltage and electrolyte concentration. The solution temperature at the end of a theta tip was measured directly by Raman spectroscopy and shown to increase with the square wave voltage, thereby demonstrating the effect of Joule heating through an independent method. The electro-osmosis of a solution comprised of myoglobin, bovine cytochrome c, and ubiquitin demonstrated that the magnitude of Joule heating that causes protein denaturation is positively correlated with protein melting temperature. This allows for a quick determination of a protein's relative thermal stability. This work establishes a fast, novel method for protein conformation manipulation prior to MS analysis and provides a temperature-controllable platform for the study of processes that take place in solution with direct coupling to mass spectrometry. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. [Association and interaction of heat shock proteins B1 gene and tumor-suppressor protein p53 gene with chromosome damage levels among coke oven workers].

    PubMed

    Li, X L; Deng, Q F; Zhang, X; Wang, T; Chen, Z W; Bai, Y S; Wang, S H; Wu, T C; Guo, H

    2016-10-06

    Objective: To investigate the association and interaction of heat shock proteins B1(HSPB1)gene rs2868371 and tumor-suppressor protein p53(TP53)gene rs1042522 polymorphisms with chromosome damage levels among coke oven workers. Methods: We recruited 1 333 male workers from a state-run coke oven plant in Wuhan in September-October 2010. Among them, 949 who had worked in coke oven workplaces, including auxiliary facilities and bottom, side, and top ovens, were nominated as coke oven workers(i.e., exposed), and 384 administrative or medical staff whose workplaces were offices were used as controls. General characteristics and 5 ml of venous blood were collected from each participant. The plasma concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene-diolepoxide(BPDE)-albumin adducts and the lymphocytic micronucleus(MN)frequencies for each individual were detected by ELISA and cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay, respectively. Gene polymorphisms were genotyped using TaqMan assays via quantitative PCR(ABI Prism 7900HT), and the corresponding frequency ratios(FR)with 95% confidence intervals(CI)were computed for all assays. Results: In the exposed group, the MN frequencies were higher in HSPB1 rs2868371 GC, CC, and GC+ CC genotype carriers((3.88 ± 2.88)‰,(4.00 ± 2.66)‰, and(3.91 ± 2.83)‰, respectively)than in rs2868371 GG genotype carriers((3.52±2.67)‰; FR=1.10, 1.13, and 1.11; 95% CI: 1.02-1.19, 1.02-1.25, and 1.03-1.19, respectively), and the HSPB1 rs2868371C allele was associated with increased MN frequency(Ptrend=0.006). Further, in the exposed group, the MN frequencies were lower in TP53 rs1042522 CG and CG+GG genotype carriers((3.63±2.61)‰ and(3.66±2.61)‰, respectively)than in TP53 rs1042522 CC genotype carriers(3.95±3.06)‰(FR=0.87 and 0.90; 95% CI: 0.83-0.96 and 0.84-0.97, respectively). The effect of gene-gene interaction between HSPB1, rs2868371, and TP53 rs1042522 on MN frequency was significant among coke oven workers(P=0.001). Further stratified analyses showed

  15. [Some properties of complexes formed by small heat shock proteins with denatured actin].

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, A V; Chebotareva, N A; Guseev, N B; Levitskiĭ, D I

    2008-01-01

    We applied different methods to analyze the effects of the recombinant wild-type small heat shock protein with an apparent molecular mass of 27 kD (Hsp27-wt) and its S15,78,82D mutant (Hsp27-3D), which mimics the naturally occurring phosphorylation of this protein, on the thermal denaturation and aggregation of F-actin. It has been shown that, at the weight ratio of Hsp27/actin equal to 1/4, both Hsp27-wt and Hsp27-3D do not affect the thermal unfolding of F-actin but effectively prevent the aggregation of F-actin by forming soluble complexes with denatured actin. The formation of these complexes occurs upon heating and accompanies the F-actin thermal denaturation. It is known that Hsp27-wt forms high-molecular-mass oligomers, whereas Hsp27-3D forms small dimers or tetramers. However, the complexes formed by Hsp27-wt and Hsp27-3D with denatured actin did not differ in their size, as measured by dynamic light scattering, and demonstrated the same hydrodynamic radius of 17-18 nm. On the other hand, the sedimentation coefficients of these complexes were distributed within the range 10-45 S in the case of Hsp27-3D and 18-60 S in the case of Hsp27-wt. Thus, the ability of Hsp27 to form soluble complexes with denatured actin does not significantly depend on the initial oligomeric state of Hsp27.

  16. Heat-Denatured Lysozyme Inactivates Murine Norovirus as a Surrogate Human Norovirus.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hajime; Nakazawa, Moemi; Ohshima, Chihiro; Sato, Miki; Tsuchiya, Tomoki; Takeuchi, Akira; Kunou, Masaaki; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2015-07-02

    Human norovirus infects humans through the consumption of contaminated food, contact with the excrement or vomit of an infected person, and through airborne droplets that scatter the virus through the air. Being highly infectious and highly viable in the environment, inactivation of the norovirus requires a highly effective inactivating agent. In this study, we have discovered the thermal denaturing capacity of a lysozyme with known antimicrobial activity against gram-positive bacteria, as well as its inactivating effect on murine norovirus. This study is the first report on the norovirus-inactivating effects of a thermally denatured lysozyme. We observed that lysozymes heat-treated for 40 min at 100 °C caused a 4.5 log reduction in infectivity of norovirus. Transmission electron microscope analysis showed that virus particles exposed to thermally denatured lysozymes were expanded, compared to the virus before exposure. The amino acid sequence of the lysozyme was divided into three sections and the peptides of each artificially synthesised, in order to determine the region responsible for the inactivating effect. These results suggest that thermal denaturation of the lysozyme changes the protein structure, activating the region responsible for imparting an inactivating effect against the virus.

  17. Heat-induced Irreversible Denaturation of the Camelid Single Domain VHH Antibody Is Governed by Chemical Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Takashima, Mizuki; Lee, Young-Ho; Ikegami, Takahisa; Goto, Yuji; Uegaki, Koichi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    The variable domain of camelid heavy chain antibody (VHH) is highly heat-resistant and is therefore ideal for many applications. Although understanding the process of heat-induced irreversible denaturation is essential to improve the efficacy of VHH, its inactivation mechanism remains unclear. Here, we showed that chemical modifications predominantly governed the irreversible denaturation of VHH at high temperatures. After heat treatment, the activity of VHH was dependent only on the incubation time at 90 °C and was insensitive to the number of heating (90 °C)-cooling (20 °C) cycles, indicating a negligible role for folding/unfolding intermediates on permanent denaturation. The residual activity was independent of concentration; therefore, VHH lost its activity in a unimolecular manner, not by aggregation. A VHH mutant lacking Asn, which is susceptible to chemical modifications, had significantly higher heat resistance than did the wild-type protein, indicating the importance of chemical modifications to VHH denaturation. PMID:24739391

  18. Effect of heating strategies on whey protein denaturation--Revisited by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akkerman, M; Rauh, V M; Christensen, M; Johansen, L B; Hammershøj, M; Larsen, L B

    2016-01-01

    Previous standards in the area of effect of heat treatment processes on milk protein denaturation were based primarily on laboratory-scale analysis and determination of denaturation degrees by, for example, electrophoresis. In this study, whey protein denaturation was revisited by pilot-scale heating strategies and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LC/MC Q-TOF) analysis. Skim milk was heat treated by the use of 3 heating strategies, namely plate heat exchanger (PHE), tubular heat exchanger (THE), and direct steam injection (DSI), under various heating temperatures (T) and holding times. The effect of heating strategy on the degree of denaturation of β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin was determined using LC/MC Q-TOF of pH 4.5-soluble whey proteins. Furthermore, effect of heating strategy on the rennet-induced coagulation properties was studied by oscillatory rheometry. In addition, rennet-induced coagulation of heat-treated micellar casein concentrate subjected to PHE was studied. For skim milk, the whey protein denaturation increased significantly as T and holding time increased, regardless of heating method. High denaturation degrees were obtained for T >100°C using PHE and THE, whereas DSI resulted in significantly lower denaturation degrees, compared with PHE and THE. Rennet coagulation properties were impaired by increased T and holding time regardless of heating method, although DSI resulted in less impairment compared with PHE and THE. No significant difference was found between THE and PHE for effect on rennet coagulation time, whereas the curd firming rate was significantly larger for THE compared with PHE. Micellar casein concentrate possessed improved rennet coagulation properties compared with skim milk receiving equal heat treatment.

  19. Denaturation and Oxidative Stability of Hemp Seed (Cannabis sativa L.) Protein Isolate as Affected by Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Raikos, Vassilios; Duthie, Garry; Ranawana, Viren

    2015-09-01

    The present study investigated the impact of heat treatments on the denaturation and oxidative stability of hemp seed protein during simulated gastrointestinal digestion (GID). Heat-denatured hemp protein isolate (HPI) solutions were prepared by heating HPI (2 mg/ml, pH 6.8) to 40, 60, 80 and 100 °C for 10 min. Heat-induced denaturation of the protein isolates was monitored by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heating HPI at temperatures above 80 °C significantly reduced solubility and led to the formation of large protein aggregates. The isolates were then subjected to in vitro GID and the oxidative stability of the generated peptides was investigated. Heating did not significantly affect the formation of oxidation products during GID. The results suggest that heat treatments should ideally remain below 80 °C if heat stability and solubility of HPI are to be preserved.

  20. Viability of murine norovirus in salads and dressings and its inactivation using heat-denatured lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hajime; Tsuchiya, Tomoki; Takahashi, Michiko; Nakazawa, Moemi; Watanabe, Tomoka; Takeuchi, Akira; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2016-09-16

    In recent years, a number of food poisoning outbreaks due to the contamination of norovirus in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods such as salads have been reported, and this issue is regarded as a global problem. The risk of contamination of fresh vegetables with norovirus has been previously reported, but the survivability of norovirus that contaminates salads remains unknown. In addition, there have been limited reports on the control of norovirus in food products by using inactivating agents. In this study, the viability of norovirus in various types of salads and dressings was examined using murine norovirus strain 1 (MNV-1) as a surrogate for the closely related human norovirus. In addition, the inactivation of MNV-1 in salads was examined using heat-denatured lysozyme, which had been reported to inactivate norovirus. MNV-1 was inoculated in 4 types of salads (coleslaw, thousand island salad, vinaigrette salad, egg salad) and 3 types of dressings (mayonnaise, thousand island dressing, vinaigrette dressing), stored at 4°C for 5days. The results revealed that in the vinaigrette dressing, the infectivity of MNV-1 decreased by 2.6logPFU/mL in 5days, whereas in the other dressings and salads, the infectivity of MNV-1 did not show any significant decrease. Next, 1% heat-denatured lysozyme was added to the 4 types of salads, and subsequently it was found that in 2 types of salads (thousand island salad, vinaigrette salad), the infectivity of MNV-1 decreased by >4.0logPFU/g, whereas in coleslaw salad, a decrease of 3.0logPFU/g was shown. However, in egg salads, the infectivity of MNV-1 did not show such decrease. These results suggest that norovirus can survive for 5days in contaminated salads. Further, these findings also indicated that heat-denatured lysozyme had an inactivating effect on norovirus, even in salads. In the future, heat-denatured lysozyme can be used as a novel norovirus-inactivating agent, although it is essential to investigate the mechanism of inactivating

  1. Influenza A Viruses Control Expression of Proviral Human p53 Isoforms p53β and Δ133p53α

    PubMed Central

    Marcel, Virginie; Cartet, Gaëlle; Lane, David P.; Lina, Bruno; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have described the role of p53 isoforms, including p53β and Δ133p53α, in the modulation of the activity of full-length p53, which regulates cell fate. In the context of influenza virus infection, an interplay between influenza viruses and p53 has been described, with p53 being involved in the antiviral response. However, the role of physiological p53 isoforms has never been explored in this context. Here, we demonstrate that p53 isoforms play a role in influenza A virus infection by using silencing and transient expression strategies in human lung epithelial cells. In addition, with the help of a panel of different influenza viruses from different subtypes, we also show that infection differentially regulates the expressions of p53β and Δ133p53α. Altogether, our results highlight the role of p53 isoforms in the viral cycle of influenza A viruses, with p53β and Δ133p53α acting as regulators of viral production in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:22647703

  2. p53 isoform Δ113p53/Δ133p53 promotes DNA double-strand break repair to protect cell from death and senescence in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lu; Gong, Hongjian; Pan, Xiao; Chang, Changqing; Ou, Zhao; Ye, Shengfan; Yin, Le; Yang, Lina; Tao, Ting; Zhang, Zhenhai; Liu, Cong; Lane, David P; Peng, Jinrong; Chen, Jun

    2015-03-01

    The inhibitory role of p53 in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair seems contradictory to its tumor-suppressing property. The p53 isoform Δ113p53/Δ133p53 is a p53 target gene that antagonizes p53 apoptotic activity. However, information on its functions in DNA damage repair is lacking. Here we report that Δ113p53 expression is strongly induced by γ-irradiation, but not by UV-irradiation or heat shock treatment. Strikingly, Δ113p53 promotes DNA DSB repair pathways, including homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining and single-strand annealing. To study the biological significance of Δ113p53 in promoting DNA DSB repair, we generated a zebrafish Δ113p53(M/M) mutant via the transcription activator-like effector nuclease technique and found that the mutant is more sensitive to γ-irradiation. The human ortholog, Δ133p53, is also only induced by γ-irradiation and functions to promote DNA DSB repair. Δ133p53-knockdown cells were arrested at the G2 phase at the later stage in response to γ-irradiation due to a high level of unrepaired DNA DSBs, which finally led to cell senescence. Furthermore, Δ113p53/Δ133p53 promotes DNA DSB repair via upregulating the transcription of repair genes rad51, lig4 and rad52 by binding to a novel type of p53-responsive element in their promoters. Our results demonstrate that Δ113p53/Δ133p53 is an evolutionally conserved pro-survival factor for DNA damage stress by preventing apoptosis and promoting DNA DSB repair to inhibit cell senescence. Our data also suggest that the induction of Δ133p53 expression in normal cells or tissues provides an important tolerance marker for cancer patients to radiotherapy.

  3. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Sara M.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites) as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis) to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer. PMID:25545885

  4. Nanometer-Scale Dissection of Chromosomes by Atomic Force Microscopy Combined with Heat-Denaturing Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Kazumi; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shichiri, Motoharu; Yoshino, Tomoyuki; Ohtani, Toshio; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a method for dissecting chromosome fragments with a size of a few hundred nanometers by atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using this method, we demonstrated reproducible dissections of silkworm chromosomes in the pachytene phase. The dissected fragments were successfully recovered on the cantilever tips, as confirmed by fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent stained chromosomes. To recover dissected chromosome fragments from a larger chromosome, such as the human metaphase chromosome of a somatic cell, heat denaturation was found to be effective. Further improvements in this method may lead to a novel tool for isolating valuable genes and/or investigating local genome structures in the near future.

  5. Prospective therapeutic applications of p53 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gudkov, Andrei V. . E-mail: gudkov@ccf.org; Komarova, Elena A.

    2005-06-10

    p53, in addition to being a key cancer preventive factor, is also a determinant of cancer treatment side effects causing excessive apoptotic death in several normal tissues during cancer therapy. p53 inhibitory strategy has been suggested to protect normal tissues from chemo- and radiotherapy, and to treat other pathologies associated with stress-mediated activation of p53. This strategy was validated by isolation and testing of small molecule p53 inhibitor pifithrin-{alpha} that demonstrated broad tissue protecting capacity. However, in some normal tissues and tumors p53 plays protective role by inducing growth arrest and preventing cells from premature entrance into mitosis and death from mitotic catastrophe. Inhibition of this function of p53 can sensitize tumor cells to chemo- and radiotherapy, thus opening new potential application of p53 inhibitors and justifying the need in pharmacological agents targeting specifically either pro-apoptotic or growth arrest functions of p53.

  6. Air leak seal for lung dissection plane with diode laser irradiation: monitoring heat-denature with auto-fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Maya; Arai, Tsunenori

    2008-02-01

    We studied the monitoring of heat-denature by autofluorescence spectrum from lung dissection plane during laser air leak sealing procedure. In order to seal the air leakage from lung in thoracotomy, we proposed novel laser sealing method with the combination of the diode laser (810nm wavelength) irradiation and indocyanine green staining (peak absorption wavelength: 805 nm). This sealing method is expected to preserve the postoperative ventilatory capacity and achieve minimally invasive surgery. We previously reported that this laser sealing only requires thin sealing margin (less than 300 μm in thickness) compared with that of the suturing or stapling. The most serious issue on the laser air leak sealing might be re-air-leakage due to rigid surface layer caused by excessive heat-denature, such as carbonization. We should achieve laser air leak sealing minimizing the degree of heat denature. Dissection planes of isolated porcine lung with /without the diode laser irradiation were prepared as samples. We measured the auto-fluorescence from these samples using a spectrometer. When the diode laser was irradiated with 400J/cm2, the surface of diode laser irradiated lung was fully carbonized. The ration of auto-fluorescence emission of 450nm / 500 nm, with 280 nm excitation wavelength was decreased less tha 50 % of initial value. That of 600 nm / 500 nm was increased over 700 % of initial value. The decreasing of the 450 nm auto-fluorescence intensity might be attributed to the heat-denaturing of the interstitial collagen in lung. However, increasing of the 600 nm didn't specify the origins, we suppose it might be originated from heat-denature substance, like carbonization. We could establish the useful monitoring for lung heat-denaturing with simple methodology. We think the auto-fluorescence measurement can be helpful not only for understanding the sealing mechanism, but also for controlling the degree of heat-denaturing during the procedure.

  7. p53 mutations promote proteasomal activity.

    PubMed

    Oren, Moshe; Kotler, Eran

    2016-07-27

    p53 mutations occur very frequently in human cancer. Besides abrogating the tumour suppressive functions of wild-type p53, many of those mutations also acquire oncogenic gain-of-function activities. Augmentation of proteasome activity is now reported as a common gain-of-function mechanism shared by different p53 mutants, which promotes cancer resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

  8. Mouse models of p53 functions.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Guillermina

    2010-04-01

    Studies in mice have yielded invaluable insight into our understanding of the p53 pathway. Mouse models with activated p53, no p53, and mutant p53 have queried the role of p53 in development and tumorigenesis. In these models, p53 is activated and stabilized via redundant posttranslational modifications. On activation, p53 initiates two major responses: inhibition of proliferation (via cell-cycle arrest, quiescence, senescence, and differentiation) and induction of apoptosis. Importantly, these responses are cell-type and tumor-type-specific. The analysis of mutant p53 alleles has established a gain-of-function role for p53 mutants in metastasis. The development of additional models that can precisely time the oncogenic events in single cells will provide further insight into the evolution of tumors, the importance of the stroma, and the cooperating events that lead to disruption of the p53 pathway. Ultimately, these models should serve to study the effects of novel drugs on tumor response as well as normal homeostasis.

  9. Regulation of autophagy by cytoplasmic p53.

    PubMed

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; D'Amelio, Marcello; Criollo, Alfredo; Morselli, Eugenia; Zhu, Changlian; Harper, Francis; Nannmark, Ulf; Samara, Chrysanthi; Pinton, Paolo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Carnuccio, Rosa; Moll, Ute M; Madeo, Frank; Paterlini-Brechot, Patrizia; Rizzuto, Rosario; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Pierron, Gérard; Blomgren, Klas; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Codogno, Patrice; Cecconi, Francesco; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-06-01

    Multiple cellular stressors, including activation of the tumour suppressor p53, can stimulate autophagy. Here we show that deletion, depletion or inhibition of p53 can induce autophagy in human, mouse and nematode cells subjected to knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53. Enhanced autophagy improved the survival of p53-deficient cancer cells under conditions of hypoxia and nutrient depletion, allowing them to maintain high ATP levels. Inhibition of p53 led to autophagy in enucleated cells, and cytoplasmic, not nuclear, p53 was able to repress the enhanced autophagy of p53(-/-) cells. Many different inducers of autophagy (for example, starvation, rapamycin and toxins affecting the endoplasmic reticulum) stimulated proteasome-mediated degradation of p53 through a pathway relying on the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2. Inhibition of p53 degradation prevented the activation of autophagy in several cell lines, in response to several distinct stimuli. These results provide evidence of a key signalling pathway that links autophagy to the cancer-associated dysregulation of p53.

  10. Reciprocal repression between P53 and TCTP.

    PubMed

    Amson, Robert; Pece, Salvatore; Lespagnol, Alexandra; Vyas, Rajesh; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Tosoni, Daniela; Colaluca, Ivan; Viale, Giuseppe; Rodrigues-Ferreira, Sylvie; Wynendaele, Jessika; Chaloin, Olivier; Hoebeke, Johan; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Telerman, Adam

    2011-12-11

    Screening for genes that reprogram cancer cells for the tumor reversion switch identified TCTP (encoding translationally controlled tumor protein) as a crucial regulator of apoptosis. Here we report a negative feedback loop between P53 and TCTP. TCTP promotes P53 degradation by competing with NUMB for binding to P53-MDM2-containing complexes. TCTP inhibits MDM2 auto-ubiquitination and promotes MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of P53. Notably, Tctp haploinsufficient mice are sensitized to P53-dependent apoptosis. In addition, P53 directly represses TCTP transcription. In 508 breast cancers, high-TCTP status associates with poorly differentiated, aggressive G3-grade tumors, predicting poor prognosis (P < 0.0005). Tctp knockdown in primary mammary tumor cells from ErbB2 transgenic mice results in increased P53 expression and a decreased number of stem-like cancer cells. The pharmacological compounds sertraline and thioridazine increase the amount of P53 by neutralizing TCTP's action on the MDM2-P53 axis. This study links TCTP and P53 in a previously unidentified regulatory circuitry that may underlie the relevance of TCTP in cancer.

  11. Identification of p53 in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Vaseva, Angelina V; Moll, Ute M

    2013-01-01

    p53 is a master regulator of cell death pathways and has transcription-dependent and transcription-independent modes of action. Mitochondria are major signal transducers in apoptosis and are critical for p53-dependent cell death. Our lab and others have discovered that a fraction of stress-induced wild-type p53 protein rapidly translocates to mitochondria upon various stress stimuli and exerts p53-dependent apoptosis. Suborganellar localization by various methods shows that p53 localizes to the surface of mitochondria. Direct targeting of p53 to mitochondria is sufficient to induce apoptosis in p53-null cells, without requiring further DNA damage. Recently, p53 has been also shown to localize to other mitochondrial compartments such as the mitochondrial matrix where it plays a role in maintaining mitochondrial genome integrity. Here, we describe subcellular fractionation as a classic technique for detecting mitochondrial p53 in cell extracts. It consists of cell homogenization by hypo-osmotic swelling, removal of nuclear components by low-speed centrifugation, and mitochondrial isolation by a discontinuous sucrose density gradient. Additionally, we describe a method for submitochondrial fractionation, performed by phosphate buffer mediated swelling/shrinking. p53 and other mitochondrial proteins can then be detected by standard immunoblotting procedures. The quality of mitochondrial isolates/subfractions can be verified for purity and intactness.

  12. p53 regulates the cardiac transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tak W.; Hauck, Ludger; Grothe, Daniela; Billia, Filio

    2017-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Trp53 (p53) inhibits cell growth after acute stress by regulating gene transcription. The mammalian genome contains hundreds of p53-binding sites. However, whether p53 participates in the regulation of cardiac tissue homeostasis under normal conditions is not known. To examine the physiologic role of p53 in adult cardiomyocytes in vivo, Cre-loxP–mediated conditional gene targeting in adult mice was used. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses of conditional heart-specific p53 knockout mice were performed. Genome-wide annotation and pathway analyses of >5,000 differentially expressed transcripts identified many p53-regulated gene clusters. Correlative analyses identified >20 gene sets containing more than 1,000 genes relevant to cardiac architecture and function. These transcriptomic changes orchestrate cardiac architecture, excitation-contraction coupling, mitochondrial biogenesis, and oxidative phosphorylation capacity. Interestingly, the gene expression signature in p53-deficient hearts confers resistance to acute biomechanical stress. The data presented here demonstrate a role for p53, a previously unrecognized master regulator of the cardiac transcriptome. The complex contributions of p53 define a biological paradigm for the p53 regulator network in the heart under physiological conditions. PMID:28193895

  13. Radionuclide imaging of the spleen with heat denatured technetium-99m RBC when the splenic reticuloendothelial system seems impaired

    SciTech Connect

    Owunwanne, A.; Halkar, R.; Al-Rasheed, A.; Abubacker, K.C.; Abdel-Dayem, H.

    1988-03-01

    Imaging of the spleen of 10 patients who had been hematologically diagnosed with sickle-cell anemia (SCA) was studied with (/sup 99m/Tc)tin colloid and heat denatured (/sup 99m/Tc)RBCs. In all ten patients, there was faint or nonvisualization of the spleen with (/sup 99m/Tc)tin colloid. However, with heat denatured (/sup 99m/Tc)RBCs, nine spleens were well visualized, and the uptake was homogenous. One spleen had two patchy areas of uptake. The results indicate that when splenic phagocytic function is impaired as reflected by nonvisualization of the spleen with (/sup 99m/Tc)tin colloid, it is still possible to image such a spleen with heat denatured (/sup 99m/Tc)RBCs

  14. Comparative study of denaturation of whey protein isolate (WPI) in convective air drying and isothermal heat treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Haque, M Amdadul; Aldred, Peter; Chen, Jie; Barrow, Colin J; Adhikari, Benu

    2013-11-15

    The extent and nature of denaturation of whey protein isolate (WPI) in convective air drying environments was measured and analysed using single droplet drying. A custom-built, single droplet drying instrument was used for this purpose. Single droplets having 5±0.1μl volume (initial droplet diameter 1.5±0.1mm) containing 10% (w/v) WPI were dried at air temperatures of 45, 65 and 80°C for 600s at constant air velocity of 0.5m/s. The extent and nature of denaturation of WPI in isothermal heat treatment processes was measured at 65 and 80°C for 600s and compared with those obtained from convective air drying. The extent of denaturation of WPI in a high hydrostatic pressure environment (600MPa for 600s) was also determined. The results showed that at the end of 600s of convective drying at 65°C the denaturation of WPI was 68.3%, while it was only 10.8% during isothermal heat treatment at the same medium temperature. When the medium temperature was maintained at 80°C, the denaturation loss of WPI was 90.0% and 68.7% during isothermal heat treatment and convective drying, respectively. The bovine serum albumin (BSA) fraction of WPI was found to be more stable in the convective drying conditions than β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin, especially at longer drying times. The extent of denaturation of WPI in convective air drying (65 and 80°C) and isotheral heat treatment (80°C) for 600s was found to be higher than its denaturation in a high hydrostatic pressure environment at ambient temperature (600MPa for 600s). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Heat capacity changes in RNA folding: application of perturbation theory to hammerhead ribozyme cold denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Mikulecky, Peter J.; Feig, Andrew L.

    2004-01-01

    In proteins, empirical correlations have shown that changes in heat capacity (ΔCP) scale linearly with the hydrophobic surface area buried upon folding. The influence of ΔCP on RNA folding has been widely overlooked and is poorly understood. In addition to considerations of solvent reorganization, electrostatic effects might contribute to ΔCPs of folding in polyanionic species such as RNAs. Here, we employ a perturbation method based on electrostatic theory to probe the hot and cold denaturation behavior of the hammerhead ribozyme. This treatment avoids much of the error associated with imposing two-state folding models on non-two-state systems. Ribozyme stability is perturbed across a matrix of solvent conditions by varying the concentration of NaCl and methanol co-solvent. Temperature-dependent unfolding is then monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The resulting array of unfolding transitions can be used to calculate a ΔCP of folding that accurately predicts the observed cold denaturation temperature. We confirm the accuracy of the calculated ΔCP by using isothermal titration calorimetry, and also demonstrate a methanol-dependence of the ΔCP. We weigh the strengths and limitations of this method for determining ΔCP values. Finally, we discuss the data in light of the physical origins of the ΔCPs for RNA folding and consider their impact on biological function. PMID:15282329

  16. The expanding universe of p53 targets.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Daniel; Inga, Alberto; Resnick, Michael A

    2009-10-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor is modified through mutation or changes in expression in most cancers, leading to the altered regulation of hundreds of genes that are directly influenced by this sequence-specific transcription factor. Central to the p53 master regulatory network are the target response element (RE) sequences. The extent of p53 transactivation and transcriptional repression is influenced by many factors, including p53 levels, cofactors and the specific RE sequences, all of which contribute to the role that p53 has in the aetiology of cancer. This Review describes the identification and functionality of REs and highlights the inclusion of non-canonical REs that expand the universe of genes and regulation mechanisms in the p53 tumour suppressor network.

  17. p53 mutation heterogeneity in cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soussi, T. . E-mail: thierry.soussi@free.fr; Lozano, G.

    2005-06-10

    The p53 gene is inactivated in about 50% of human cancers and the p53 protein is an essential component of the cell response induced by genotoxic stresses such as those generated by radiotherapy or chemotherapy. It is therefore highly likely that these alterations are an important component in tumor resistance to therapy. The particular characteristics of these alterations, 80% of which are missense mutations leading to functionally heterogeneous proteins, make p53 a unique gene in the class of tumor suppressor genes. A considerable number of mutant p53 proteins probably have an oncogenic activity per se and therefore actively participate in cell transformation. The fact that the apoptotic and antiproliferative functions of p53 can be dissociated in certain mutants also suggests another level of complexity in the relationships between p53 inactivation and neoplasia.

  18. p53: good cop/bad cop.

    PubMed

    Sharpless, Norman E; DePinho, Ronald A

    2002-07-12

    Activation of the p53 transcription factor in response to a variety of cellular stresses, including DNA damage and oncogene activation, initiates a program of gene expression that blocks the proliferative expansion of damaged cells. While the beneficial impact of the anticancer function of p53 is well established, several recent papers suggest that p53 activation may in some circumstances act in a manner detrimental to the long-term homeostasis of the organism. Here, we discuss the significant participation of p53 in three non-mutually exclusive theories of human aging involving DNA damage, telomere shortening, and oxidative stress. These "good cop/bad cop" functions of p53 appear to place it at the nexus of two opposing forces, cancer and aging. By extension, this relationship implies that therapies aimed to reduce cancer and postpone aging, and thereby increase longevity, will necessarily work either upstream or downstream, but not on the level of, p53.

  19. The role of intra-domain disulfide bonds in heat-induced irreversible denaturation of camelid single domain VHH antibodies.

    PubMed

    Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Uegaki, Koichi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Camelid-derived single domain VHH antibodies are highly heat resistant, and the mechanism of heat-induced VHH denaturation predominantly relies on the chemical modification of amino acids. Although chemical modification of disulfide bonds has been recognized as a cause for heat-induced denaturation of many proteins, there have been no mutagenesis studies, in which the number of disulfide bonds was controlled. In this article, we examined a series of mutants of two different VHHs with single, double or no disulfide bonds, and scrutinized the effects of these disulfide bond modifications on VHH denaturation. With the exception of one mutant, the heat resistance of VHHs decreased when the number of disulfide bonds increased. The effect of disulfide bonds on heat denaturation was more striking if the VHH had a second disulfide bond, suggesting that the contribution of disulfide shuffling is significant in proteins with multiple disulfide bonds. Furthermore, our results directly indicate that removal of a disulfide bond can indeed increase the heat resistance of a protein, irrespective of the negative impact on equilibrium thermodynamic stability.

  20. The role of intra-domain disulfide bonds in heat-induced irreversible denaturation of camelid single domain VHH antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Uegaki, Koichi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Camelid-derived single domain VHH antibodies are highly heat resistant, and the mechanism of heat-induced VHH denaturation predominantly relies on the chemical modification of amino acids. Although chemical modification of disulfide bonds has been recognized as a cause for heat-induced denaturation of many proteins, there have been no mutagenesis studies, in which the number of disulfide bonds was controlled. In this article, we examined a series of mutants of two different VHHs with single, double or no disulfide bonds, and scrutinized the effects of these disulfide bond modifications on VHH denaturation. With the exception of one mutant, the heat resistance of VHHs decreased when the number of disulfide bonds increased. The effect of disulfide bonds on heat denaturation was more striking if the VHH had a second disulfide bond, suggesting that the contribution of disulfide shuffling is significant in proteins with multiple disulfide bonds. Furthermore, our results directly indicate that removal of a disulfide bond can indeed increase the heat resistance of a protein, irrespective of the negative impact on equilibrium thermodynamic stability. PMID:26289739

  1. Constant rate of p53 tetramerization in response to DNA damage controls the p53 response

    PubMed Central

    Gaglia, Giorgio; Lahav, Galit

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of the tumor suppressor protein p53 have been previously investigated in single cells using fluorescently tagged p53. Such approach reports on the total abundance of p53 but does not provide a measure for functional p53. We used fluorescent protein-fragment complementation assay (PCA) to quantify in single cells the dynamics of p53 tetramers, the functional units of p53. We found that while total p53 increases proportionally to the input strength, p53 tetramers are formed in cells at a constant rate. This breaks the linear input–output relation and dampens the p53 response. Disruption of the p53-binding protein ARC led to a dose-dependent rate of tetramers formation, resulting in enhanced tetramerization and induction of p53 target genes. Our work suggests that constraining the p53 response in face of variable inputs may protect cells from committing to terminal outcomes and highlights the importance of quantifying the active form of signaling molecules in single cells. Quantification of the dynamics of p53 tetramers in single cells using a fluorescent protein-fragment complementation assay reveals that, while total p53 increases proportionally to the DNA damage strength, p53 tetramers are formed at a constant rate. PMID:25344068

  2. Regulation of autophagy by cytoplasmic p53

    PubMed Central

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M. Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; D'Amelio, Marcello; Criollo, Alfredo; Morselli, Eugenia; Zhu, Changlian; Harper, Francis; Nannmark, Ulf; Samara, Chrysanthi; Pinton, Paolo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Carnuccio, Rosa; Moll, Ute M.; Madeo, Frank; Paterlini-Brechot, Patrizia; Rizzuto, Rosario; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Pierron, Gérard; Blomgren, Klas; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Codogno, Patrice; Cecconi, Francesco; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Multiple cellular stressors, including activation of the tumour suppressor p53, can stimulate autophagy. Here we show that knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53 can induce autophagy in human, mouse and nematode cells. Enhanced autophagy improved the survival of p53-deficient cancer cells under conditions of hypoxia and nutrient depletion, allowing them to maintain high ATP levels. Inhibition of p53 led to autophagy in enucleated cells, and cytoplasmic, not nuclear, p53 was able to repress the enhanced autophagy of p53-/- cells. Many different inducers of autophagy (for example, starvation, rapamycin and toxins affecting the endoplasmic reticulum) stimulated proteasome-mediated degradation of p53 through a pathway relying on the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2. Inhibition of p53 degradation prevented the activation of autophagy in several cell lines, in response to several distinct stimuli. These results provide evidence of a key signalling pathway that links autophagy to the cancer-associated dysregulation of p53. PMID:18454141

  3. Detection of mitochondrial localization of p53.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Motohiro; Moll, Ute M

    2003-01-01

    p53 is a master regulator of cell death pathways and has transcription-dependent and transcription- independent modes of action. Mitochondria are major signal transducers in apoptosis and are critical for p53-dependent cell death. Recently, we discovered that a fraction of stress-induced wild-type p53 protein rapidly translocates to mitochondria during p53-dependent apoptosis. Suborganellar localization by various methods shows that p53 predominantly localizes to the surface of mitochondria. Moreover, bypassing the nucleus by targeting p53 to mitochondria is sufficient to induce apoptosis in p53-null cells, without requiring further DNA damage. Here, we describe subcellular fractionation as a classic technique for detecting mitochondrial p53 in cell extracts. It consists of cell homogenization by hypo-osmotic swelling, removal of nuclear components by low-speed centrifugation, and mitochondrial isolation by a discontinuous sucrose density gradient. p53 and other mitochondrial proteins can then be detected by standard immunoblotting procedures. The quality of mitochondrial isolates can be verified for purity and intactness.

  4. Determination of the heat treatment undergone by milk by following the denaturation of alpha-lactalbumin with a biosensor.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Didier; Rolet-Repecaud, Odile; Muller-Renaud, Stéphanie

    2004-02-25

    Dairy industries are interested in knowing the heat treatment undergone by milk so as to control the quality of drinking milks or to control their heating systems. Among the different techniques available to characterize the heat treatment of milk, estimation of the denaturation of proteins has been widely used. However, because the concentration of the proteins in raw milk can fluctuate significantly, determining only the concentration of a native protein without knowing its concentration in the raw milk before undergoing heat treatment can lead to significant imprecision. The objective of this study was to develop, on Biacore 3000, a biosensor assay for determining the denaturation index of alpha-lactalbumin by quantifying separately the native and "heat-denatured" forms of alpha-lactalbumin with specific monoclonal antibodies. alpha-Lactalbumin denaturation index is independent of the concentration of alpha-lactalbumin in the original raw milk. The technique developed is discriminating, fast, repeatable, fully automated, and requires no pretreatment of the milk sample.

  5. Aggregation tendencies in the p53 family are modulated by backbone hydrogen bonds

    PubMed Central

    Cino, Elio A.; Soares, Iaci N.; Pedrote, Murilo M.; de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2016-01-01

    The p53 family of proteins is comprised of p53, p63 and p73. Because the p53 DNA binding domain (DBD) is naturally unstable and possesses an amyloidogenic sequence, it is prone to form amyloid fibrils, causing loss of functions. To develop p53 therapies, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of p53 instability and aggregation. Light scattering, thioflavin T (ThT) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) assays showed that p53 DBD aggregates faster and to a greater extent than p63 and p73 DBDs, and was more susceptible to denaturation. The aggregation tendencies of p53, p63, and p73 DBDs were strongly correlated with their thermal stabilities. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations indicated specific regions of structural heterogeneity unique to p53, which may be promoted by elevated incidence of exposed backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs). The results indicate regions of structural vulnerability in the p53 DBD, suggesting new targetable sites for modulating p53 stability and aggregation, a potential approach to cancer therapy. PMID:27600721

  6. Mitochondrial death functions of p53

    PubMed Central

    Marchenko, N D; Moll, U M

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor network plays a fundamental surveillance role in both homeostatic and adaptive cell biology. p53 is one of the most important barriers against malignant derailment of normal cells, orchestrating growth arrest, senescence, or cell death by linking many different pathways in response to genotoxic and non-genotoxic insults. p53 is the key broadband sensor for numerous cellular stresses such as DNA damage, hypoxia, oxidative stress, oncogenic signaling, and nucleolar stress. The crucial tumor suppressive and tissue homeostasis activity of p53 is its ability to activate cell death via multiple different pathways. A well-characterized biochemical function of p53 in the regulation of apoptosis is its role as a potent transcriptional regulator. p53 activates a panel of proapoptotic genes from the mitochondrial apoptotic and death receptor programs while repressing antiapoptotic Bcl2 family genes. In addition, over the last 10 y a growing body of evidence has also defined direct extranuclear non-transcriptional p53 activities within mitochondria-mediated cell death pathways that are based on p53 protein accumulation in cytosolic and mitochondrial compartments and protein-protein interactions. To date, transcription-independent p53-mediated cell death regulation has been described for apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy. Because mitochondrial dysregulation is central to the development of a number of pathologic processes such as cancer and neurodegenerative and age-related diseases, understanding the direct roles of p53 protein in mitochondria has high translational impact and could facilitate the development of novel drug targets to combat these diseases. In this review we will mainly focus on mechanisms of p53-mediated transcription-independent cell death pathways at mitochondria. PMID:27308326

  7. The p53-dependent radioadaptive response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    We already reported that conditioning exposures at low doses, or at low dose-rates, lowered radiation-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in cultured cells in vitro and in the spleens of mice in vivo. In this study, the aim was to characterize the p53-dependent radioadaptive response at the molecular level. We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 containing cells derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53-null. Cellular radiation sensitivities were determined with a colony-forming assay. The accumulation of p53, Hdm2, and iNOS was analyzed with Western blotting. The quantification of chromosomal aberrations was estimated by scoring dicentrics per cell. In wtp53 cells, it was demonstrated that the lack of p53 accumulation was coupled with the activation of Hdm2 after low dose irradiation (0.02 Gy). Although NO radicals were only minimally induced in wtp53 cells irradiated with a challenging irradiation (6 Gy) alone, NO radicals were seen to increase about 2-4 fold after challenging irradiation following a priming irradiation (0.02 Gy). Under similar irradiation conditions with a priming and challenging irradiation in wtp53 cells, induction of radioresistance and a depression of chromosomal aberrations were observed only in the absence of Pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor), RITA or Nutlin-3 (p53-Hdm2 interaction inhibitors), aminoguanidine (an iNOS inhibitor) and c-PTIO (an NO radical scavenger). On the other hand, in p53 dysfunctional cells, a radioadaptive response was not observed in the presence or absence of those inhibitors. Moreover, radioresistance developed when wtp53 cells were treated with ISDN (an NO generating agent) alone. These findings suggest that NO radicals are an initiator of the radioadaptive response acting through the activation of Hdm2 and the depression of p53 accumulations.

  8. Denaturant m values and heat capacity changes: relation to changes in accessible surface areas of protein unfolding.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, J. K.; Pace, C. N.; Scholtz, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Denaturant m values, the dependence of the free energy of unfolding on denaturant concentration, have been collected for a large set of proteins. The m value correlates very strongly with the amount of protein surface exposed to solvent upon unfolding, with linear correlation coefficients of R = 0.84 for urea and R = 0.87 for guanidine hydrochloride. These correlations improve to R = 0.90 when the effect of disulfide bonds on the accessible area of the unfolded protein is included. A similar dependence on accessible surface area has been found previously for the heat capacity change (delta Cp), which is confirmed here for our set of proteins. Denaturant m values and heat capacity changes also correlate well with each other. For proteins that undergo a simple two-state unfolding mechanism, the amount of surface exposed to solvent upon unfolding is a main structural determinant for both m values and delta Cp. PMID:8535251

  9. Heat shock protein coinducers with no effect on protein denaturation specifically modulate the membrane lipid phase

    PubMed Central

    Török, Zsolt; Tsvetkova, Nelly M.; Balogh, Gábor; Horváth, Ibolya; Nagy, Enikő; Pénzes, Zoltán; Hargitai, Judit; Bensaude, Olivier; Csermely, Péter; Crowe, John H.; Maresca, Bruno; Vígh, László

    2003-01-01

    The hydroxylamine derivative bimoclomol (BM) has been shown to activate natural cytoprotective homeostatic responses by enhancing the capability of cells to cope with various pathophysiological conditions. It exerts its effect in synergy with low levels of stress to induce the synthesis of members of major stress protein families. We show here that the presence of BM does not influence protein denaturation in the cells. BM and its derivatives selectively interact with acidic lipids and modulate their thermal and dynamic properties. BM acts as a membrane fluidizer at normal temperature, but it is a highly efficient membrane stabilizer, inhibiting the bilayer–nonbilayer phase transitions during severe heat shock. We suggest that BM and the related compounds modify those domains of membrane lipids where the thermally or chemically induced perturbation of lipid phase is sensed and transduced into a cellular signal, leading to enhanced activation of heat shock genes. BM may be a prototype for clinically safe membrane-interacting drug candidates that rebalance the level and composition of heat shock proteins. PMID:12615993

  10. p53 responsive elements in human retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Harris, CR; DeWan, A; Zupnick, A; Normart, R; Gabriel, A; Prives, C; Levine, AJ; Hoh, J

    2011-01-01

    Long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (L1s) are highly repetitive DNA elements that are capable of altering the human genome through retrotransposition. To protect against L1 retroposition, the cell downregulates the expression of L1 proteins by various mechanisms, including high-density cytosine methylation of L1 promoters and DICER-dependent destruction of L1 mRNAs. In this report, a large number of p53 responsive elements, or p53 DNA binding sites, were detected in L1 elements within the human genome. At least some of these p53 responsive elements are functional and can act to increase the levels of L1 mRNA expression. The p53 protein can directly bind to a short 15-nucleotide sequence within the L1 promoter. This p53 responsive element within L1 is a recent addition to evolution, appearing ~20 million years ago. This suggests an interplay between L1 elements, which have a rich history of causing changes in the genome, and the p53 protein, the function of which is to protect against genomic changes. To understand these observations, a model is proposed in which the increased expression of L1 mRNAs by p53 actually increases, rather than decreases, the genomic stability through amplification of p53-dependent processes for genomic protection. PMID:19718052

  11. p53 responsive elements in human retrotransposons.

    PubMed

    Harris, C R; Dewan, A; Zupnick, A; Normart, R; Gabriel, A; Prives, C; Levine, A J; Hoh, J

    2009-11-05

    Long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (L1s) are highly repetitive DNA elements that are capable of altering the human genome through retrotransposition. To protect against L1 retroposition, the cell downregulates the expression of L1 proteins by various mechanisms, including high-density cytosine methylation of L1 promoters and DICER-dependent destruction of L1 mRNAs. In this report, a large number of p53 responsive elements, or p53 DNA binding sites, were detected in L1 elements within the human genome. At least some of these p53 responsive elements are functional and can act to increase the levels of L1 mRNA expression. The p53 protein can directly bind to a short 15-nucleotide sequence within the L1 promoter. This p53 responsive element within L1 is a recent addition to evolution, appearing approximately 20 million years ago. This suggests an interplay between L1 elements, which have a rich history of causing changes in the genome, and the p53 protein, the function of which is to protect against genomic changes. To understand these observations, a model is proposed in which the increased expression of L1 mRNAs by p53 actually increases, rather than decreases, the genomic stability through amplification of p53-dependent processes for genomic protection.

  12. SUMOylation of p53 mediates interferon activities

    PubMed Central

    Marcos-Villar, Laura; Pérez-Girón, José V; Vilas, Jéssica M; Soto, Atenea; de la Cruz-Hererra, Carlos F; Lang, Valerie; Collado, Manuel; Vidal, Anxo; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Rivas, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that many host proteins involved in innate and intrinsic immunity are regulated by SUMOylation, and that SUMO contributes to the regulatory process that governs the initiation of the type I interferon (IFN) response. The tumor suppressor p53 is a modulator of the IFN response that plays a role in virus-induced apoptosis and in IFN-induced senescence. Here we demonstrate that IFN treatment increases the levels of SUMOylated p53 and induces cellular senescence through a process that is partially dependent upon SUMOylation of p53. Similarly, we show that vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection induces p53 SUMOylation, and that this modification favors the control of VSV replication. Thus, our study provides evidence that IFN signaling induces p53 SUMOylation, which results in the activation of a cellular senescence program and contributes to the antiviral functions of interferon. PMID:23966171

  13. Study of dynamical process of heat denaturation in optically trapped single microorganisms by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changan; Li, Yong-qing; Tang, Wei; Newton, Ronald J.

    2003-11-01

    The development of laser traps has made it possible to investigate single cells and record real-time Raman spectra during a heat-denaturation process when the temperature of the surrounding medium is increased. Large changes in the phenylalanine band (1004 cm-1) of near-infrared spectra between living and heat-treated cells were observed in yeast and Escerichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes bacteria. This change appears to reflect the change in environment of phenylalanine as proteins within the cells unfold as a result of increasing temperatures. As a comparison, we measured Raman spectra of native and heat-denatured solutions of bovine serum albumin proteins, and a similar change in the phenylalanine band of spectra was observed. In addition, we measured Raman spectra of native and heat-treated solutions of pure phenylalanine molecules; no observable difference in vibrational spectra was observed. These findings may make it possible to study conformational changes in proteins within single cells.

  14. p53 isoforms - a conspiracy to kidnap p53 tumor suppressor activity?

    PubMed

    Marcel, V; Hainaut, P

    2009-02-01

    For 25 years, the p53 tumor suppressor protein was considered the only protein expressed by the (TP53) gene. However, in several studies the existence of p53 alternative transcripts in mouse and human cells has been documented, while their expression patterns and functions remained a mystery. Since 2002, several groups have identified and described the existence of up to 10 p53 isoforms and have demonstrated their roles in modulation of p53 suppressive activity. It is now clear that the patterns of p53 expression are much more complex than previously recognized and that these isoforms have the potential to act either synergistically or antagonistically, depending on their structure and mechanism of production. This review focuses on the different ways to produce p53 isoforms, on their specific properties, on their effect on p53 suppressive activity as well as on their implication in a new potential mechanism involved in p53 deregulation in cancer.

  15. Dial 9-1-1 for p53: Mechanisms of p53 Activation by Cellular Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ljungman, Mats

    2000-01-01

    Abstract The tumor suppressor protein, p53, is part of the cell's emergency team that is called upon following cellular insult. How do cells sense DNA damage and other cellular stresses and what signal transduction pathways are used to alert p53? How is the resulting nuclear accumulation of p53 accomplished and what determines the outcome of p53 induction? Many posttranslational modifications of p53, such as phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, acetylation and ribosylation, have been shown to occur following cellular stress. Some of these modifications may activate the p53 protein, interfere with MDM2 binding and/or dictate cellular localization of p53. This review will focus on recent findings about how the p53 response may be activated following cellular stress. PMID:10935507

  16. p53, Oxidative Stress, and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongping

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian aging is associated with elevated levels of oxidative damage of DNA, proteins, and lipids as a result of unbalanced prooxidant and antioxidant activities. Accumulating evidence indicates that oxidative stress is a major physiological inducer of aging. p53, the guardian of the genome that is important for cellular responses to oxidative stresses, might be a key coordinator of oxidative stress and aging. In response to low levels of oxidative stresses, p53 exhibits antioxidant activities to eliminate oxidative stress and ensure cell survival; in response to high levels of oxidative stresses, p53 exhibits prooxidative activities that further increase the levels of stresses, leading to cell death. p53 accomplishes these context-dependent roles by regulating the expression of a panel of genes involved in cellular responses to oxidative stresses and by modulating other pathways important for oxidative stress responses. The mechanism that switches p53 function from antioxidant to prooxidant remains unclear, but could account for the findings that increased p53 activities have been linked to both accelerated aging and increased life span in mice. Therefore, a balance of p53 antioxidant and prooxidant activities in response to oxidative stresses could be important for longevity by suppressing the accumulation of oxidative stresses and DNA damage. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1669–1678. PMID:21050134

  17. p53 in the game of transposons.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Annika; Jones, Amanda E; Abrams, John M

    2016-11-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, p53 genes function to restrain mobile elements and recent observations indicate that transposons become derepressed in human cancers. Together, these emerging lines of evidence suggest that cancers driven by p53 mutations could represent "transpospoathies," i.e. disease states linked to eruptions of mobile elements. The transposopathy hypothesis predicts that p53 acts through conserved mechanisms to contain transposon movement, and in this way, prevents tumor formation. How transposon eruptions provoke neoplasias is not well understood but, from a broader perspective, this hypothesis also provides an attractive framework to explore unrestrained mobile elements as inciters of late-onset idiopathic disease. Also see the video abstract here.

  18. Interaction of a small heat shock protein of the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, with a denatured protein at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Maya; Tohda, Hideki; Giga-Hama, Yuko; Tsushima, Reiko; Zako, Tamotsu; Iizuka, Ryo; Pack, Changi; Kinjo, Masataka; Ishii, Noriyuki; Yohda, Masafumi

    2005-09-23

    We have expressed, purified, and characterized one small heat shock protein of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, SpHsp16.0. SpHsp16.0 was able to protect citrate synthase from thermal aggregation at 45 degrees C with high efficiency. It existed as a hexadecameric globular oligomer near the physiological growth temperature. At elevated temperatures, the oligomer dissociated into small species, probably dimers. The dissociation was completely reversible, and the original oligomer reformed immediately after the temperature dropped. Large complexes of SpHsp16.0 and denatured citrate synthase were observed by size exclusion chromatography and electron microscopy following incubation at 45 degrees C and then cooling. However, such large complexes did not elute from the size exclusion column incubated at 45 degrees C. The denatured citrate synthase protected from aggregation was trapped by a GroEL trap mutant at 45 degrees C. These results suggest that the complex of SpHsp16.0 and denatured citrate synthase at elevated temperatures is in the transient state and has a hydrophobic nature. Analyses of the interaction between SpHsp16.0 and denatured citrate synthase by fluorescence cross-correlation spectrometry have also shown that the characteristics of SpHsp16.0-denatured citrate synthase complex at the elevated temperature are different from those of the large complex obtained after the shift to lowered temperatures.

  19. Heat-induced denaturation and aggregation of ovalbumin at neutral pH described by irreversible first-order kinetics.

    PubMed

    Weijers, Mireille; Barneveld, Peter A; Cohen Stuart, Martien A; Visschers, Ronald W

    2003-12-01

    The heat-induced denaturation kinetics of two different sources of ovalbumin at pH 7 was studied by chromatography and differential scanning calorimetry. The kinetics was found to be independent of protein concentration and salt concentration, but was strongly dependent on temperature. For highly pure ovalbumin, the decrease in nondenatured native protein showed first-order dependence. The activation energy obtained with different techniques varied between 430 and 490 kJ*mole(-1). First-order behavior was studied in detail using differential scanning calorimetry. The calorimetric traces were irreversible and highly scan rate-dependent. The shape of the thermograms as well as the scan rate dependence can be explained by assuming that the thermal denaturation takes place according to a simplified kinetic process where N is the native state, D is denatured (or another final state) and k a first-order kinetic constant that changes with temperature, according to the Arrhenius equation. A kinetic model for the temperature-induced denaturation and aggregation of ovalbumin is presented. Commercially obtained ovalbumin was found to contain an intermediate-stable fraction (IS) of about 20% that was unable to form aggregates. The denaturation of this fraction did not satisfy first-order kinetics.

  20. Small heat shock protein Hsp27 prevents heat-induced aggregation of F-actin by forming soluble complexes with denatured actin.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Anastasia V; Chebotareva, Natalia A; Chernik, Ivan S; Gusev, Nikolai B; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2007-11-01

    Previously, we have shown that the small heat shock protein with apparent molecular mass 27 kDa (Hsp27) does not affect the thermal unfolding of F-actin, but effectively prevents aggregation of thermally denatured F-actin [Pivovarova AV, Mikhailova VV, Chernik IS, Chebotareva NA, Levitsky DI & Gusev NB (2005) Biochem Biophys Res Commun331, 1548-1553], and supposed that Hsp27 prevents heat-induced aggregation of F-actin by forming soluble complexes with denatured actin. In the present work, we applied dynamic light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation and size exclusion chromatography to examine the properties of complexes formed by denatured actin with a recombinant human Hsp27 mutant (Hsp27-3D) mimicking the naturally occurring phosphorylation of this protein at Ser15, Ser78, and Ser82. Our results show that formation of these complexes occurs upon heating and accompanies the F-actin thermal denaturation. All the methods show that the size of actin-Hsp27-3D complexes decreases with increasing Hsp27-3D concentration in the incubation mixture and that saturation occurs at approximately equimolar concentrations of Hsp27-3D and actin. Under these conditions, the complexes exhibit a hydrodynamic radius of approximately 16 nm, a sedimentation coefficient of 17-20 S, and a molecular mass of about 2 MDa. It is supposed that Hsp27-3D binds to denatured actin monomers or short oligomers dissociated from actin filaments upon heating and protects them from aggregation by forming relatively small and highly soluble complexes. This mechanism might explain how small heat shock proteins prevent aggregation of denatured actin and by this means protect the cytoskeleton and the whole cell from damage caused by accumulation of large insoluble aggregates under heat shock conditions.

  1. Promotion of CHIP-mediated p53 degradation protects the heart from ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Naito, Atsuhiko T; Okada, Sho; Minamino, Tohru; Iwanaga, Koji; Liu, Mei-Lan; Sumida, Tomokazu; Nomura, Seitaro; Sahara, Naruhiko; Mizoroki, Tatsuya; Takashima, Akihiko; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Nagai, Toshio; Shiojima, Ichiro; Komuro, Issei

    2010-06-11

    The number of patients with coronary heart disease, including myocardial infarction, is increasing and novel therapeutic strategy is awaited. Tumor suppressor protein p53 accumulates in the myocardium after myocardial infarction, causes apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, and plays an important role in the progression into heart failure. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of p53 accumulation in the heart after myocardial infarction and tested whether anti-p53 approach would be effective against myocardial infarction. Through expression screening, we found that CHIP (carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein) is an endogenous p53 antagonist in the heart. CHIP suppressed p53 level by ubiquitinating and inducing proteasomal degradation. CHIP transcription was downregulated after hypoxic stress and restoration of CHIP protein level prevented p53 accumulation after hypoxic stress. CHIP overexpression in vivo prevented p53 accumulation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis after myocardial infarction. Promotion of CHIP function by heat shock protein (Hsp)90 inhibitor, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxy geldanamycin (17-AAG), also prevented p53 accumulation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. CHIP-mediated p53 degradation was at least one of the cardioprotective effects of 17-AAG. We found that downregulation of CHIP level by hypoxia was responsible for p53 accumulation in the heart after myocardial infarction. Decreasing the amount of p53 prevented myocardial apoptosis and ameliorated ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction. We conclude that anti-p53 approach would be effective to treat myocardial infarction.

  2. Targeting the p53 signaling pathway in cancer therapy - The promises, challenges, and perils

    PubMed Central

    Stegh, Alexander H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Research over the past three decades has identified p53 as a multifunctional transcription factor, which regulates the expression of >2,500 target genes. p53 impacts myriad, highly diverse cellular processes, including the maintenance of genomic stability and fidelity, metabolism, longevity, and represents one of the most important and extensively studied tumor suppressors. Activated by various stresses, foremost genotoxic damage, hypoxia, heat shock and oncogenic assault, p53 blocks cancer progression by provoking transient or permanent growth arrest, by enabling DNA repair or by advancing cellular death programs. This potent and versatile anti-cancer activity profile, together with genomic and mutational analyses documenting inactivation of p53 in more than 50% of human cancers, motivated drug development efforts to (re-) activate p53 in established tumors. Areas covered In this review the complexities of p53 signaling in cancer are summarized. Current strategies and challenges to restore p53’s tumor suppressive function in established tumors, i.e. adenoviral gene transfer and small molecules to activate p53, to inactivate p53 inhibitors and to restore wild type function of p53 mutant proteins are discussed. Expert opinion It is indubitable that p53 represents an attractive target for the development of anti-cancer therapies. Whether p53 is ‘druggable’, however, remains an area of active research and discussion, as p53 has pro-survival functions and chronic p53 activation accelerates aging, which may compromise the long-term homeostasis of an organism. Thus, the complex biology and dual functions of p53 in cancer prevention and age-related cellular responses pose significant challenges on the development of p53-targeting cancer therapies. PMID:22239435

  3. p53 regulates thymic Notch1 activation.

    PubMed

    Laws, Amy M; Osborne, Barbara A

    2004-03-01

    Notch is crucial for multiple stages of T cell development, including the CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP)/CD8+ single positive (SP) transition, but regulation of Notchactivation is not well understood. p53 regulates Presenilin1 (PS1) expression, and PS1 cleaves Notch, releasing its intracellular domain (NIC), leading to the expression of downstream targets, e.g. the HES1 gene. We hypothesize that p53 regulates Notch activity during T cell development. We found that Notch1 expression and activation were negatively regulated by p53in several thymoma lines. Additionally, NIC was elevated in Trp53(-/-) thymocytes as compared to Trp53(+/+) thymocytes. To determine if elevated Notch1 activation in Trp53(-/-) thymocytes had an effect on T cell development, CD4 and CD8 expression were analyzed. The CD4+ SP/CD8+ SP T cell ratio was decreased in Trp53(-/-) splenocytes and thymocytes. This alteration in T cell development correlated with the increased Notch1 activation observed in the absence of p53. These data indicate that p53 negatively regulates Notch1 activation during T cell development. Skewing of T cell development toward CD8+SP T cells in Trp53(-/-) mice is reminiscent of the phenotype of NIC-overexpressing mice. Thus, we suggest that p53 plays a role in T cell development, in part by regulating Notch1 activation.

  4. Nucleolar stress with and without p53

    PubMed Central

    James, Allison; Wang, Yubo; Raje, Himanshu; Rosby, Raphyel; DiMario, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    A veritable explosion of primary research papers within the past 10 years focuses on nucleolar and ribosomal stress, and for good reason: with ribosome biosynthesis consuming ~80% of a cell’s energy, nearly all metabolic and signaling pathways lead ultimately to or from the nucleolus. We begin by describing p53 activation upon nucleolar stress resulting in cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. The significance of this mechanism cannot be understated, as oncologists are now inducing nucleolar stress strategically in cancer cells as a potential anti-cancer therapy. We also summarize the human ribosomopathies, syndromes in which ribosome biogenesis or function are impaired leading to birth defects or bone narrow failures; the perplexing problem in the ribosomopathies is why only certain cells are affected despite the fact that the causative mutation is systemic. We then describe p53-independent nucleolar stress, first in yeast which lacks p53, and then in other model metazoans that lack MDM2, the critical E3 ubiquitin ligase that normally inactivates p53. Do these presumably ancient p53-independent nucleolar stress pathways remain latent in human cells? If they still exist, can we use them to target >50% of known human cancers that lack functional p53? PMID:25482194

  5. Nucleolar stress with and without p53.

    PubMed

    James, Allison; Wang, Yubo; Raje, Himanshu; Rosby, Raphyel; DiMario, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    A veritable explosion of primary research papers within the past 10 years focuses on nucleolar and ribosomal stress, and for good reason: with ribosome biosynthesis consuming ~80% of a cell's energy, nearly all metabolic and signaling pathways lead ultimately to or from the nucleolus. We begin by describing p53 activation upon nucleolar stress resulting in cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. The significance of this mechanism cannot be understated, as oncologists are now inducing nucleolar stress strategically in cancer cells as a potential anti-cancer therapy. We also summarize the human ribosomopathies, syndromes in which ribosome biogenesis or function are impaired leading to birth defects or bone narrow failures; the perplexing problem in the ribosomopathies is why only certain cells are affected despite the fact that the causative mutation is systemic. We then describe p53-independent nucleolar stress, first in yeast which lacks p53, and then in other model metazoans that lack MDM2, the critical E3 ubiquitin ligase that normally inactivates p53. Do these presumably ancient p53-independent nucleolar stress pathways remain latent in human cells? If they still exist, can we use them to target >50% of known human cancers that lack functional p53?

  6. Smoking, p53 mutation, and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Don L; Byers, Lauren A; Kurie, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    This issue marks the 50th anniversary of the release of the U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health. Perhaps no other singular event has done more to highlight the effects of smoking on the development of cancer. Tobacco exposure is the leading cause of cancers involving the oral cavity, conductive airways, and the lung. Owing to the many carcinogens in tobacco smoke, smoking-related malignancies have a high genome-wide burden of mutations, including in the gene encoding for p53. The p53 protein is the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor in cancer, responsible for a range of critical cellular functions that are compromised by the presence of a mutation. Herein, we review the epidemiologic connection between tobacco exposure and cancer, the molecular basis of p53 mutation in lung cancer, and the normal molecular and cellular roles of p53 that are abrogated during lung tumor development and progression as defined by in vitro and in vivo studies. We also consider the therapeutic potential of targeting mutant p53 in a clinical setting based upon the cellular role of mutant p53 and data from genetic murine models.

  7. Effects of chronic deoxynivalenol exposure on p53 heterozygous and p53 homozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Bondy, G S; Coady, L; Curran, I; Caldwell, D; Armstrong, C; Aziz, S A; Nunnikhoven, A; Gannon, A M; Liston, V; Shenton, J; Mehta, R

    2016-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a secondary metabolite associated with Fusarium species pathogenic to important food crops. A two-year feeding study reported that DON was non-carcinogenic in B6C3F1 mice. The present study was conducted to further characterize the chronic effects of DON by exposing cancer-prone transgenic p53 heterozygous (p53+/-) male mice and p53 homozygous (p53+/+) male mice to 0, 1, 5, or 10 mg DON/kg in diet for 26 weeks. Gross and microscopic organ-specific neoplastic and non-neoplastic changes and expression profiles of key hepatic and renal genes were assessed. Few toxicologic differences between p53+/+ and p53+/- mice were observed, and no tumours were observed due to DON. The results indicated that DON was non-carcinogenic and that reduced expression of the p53 gene did not play a key role in responses to DON toxicity. The lack of inflammatory and proliferative lesions in mice may be attributed to the anorectic effects of DON, which resulted in dose-dependent reductions in body weight in p53+/+ and p53+/- mice. Hepatic and renal gene expression analyses confirmed that chronic exposure to DON was noninflammatory. The effects of 26-week DON exposure on p53+/+ and p53+/-mice were consistent with those previously seen in B6C3F1 mice exposed to DON for two years.

  8. Protein denaturation of whey protein isolates (WPIs) induced by high intensity ultrasound during heat gelation.

    PubMed

    Frydenberg, Rikke P; Hammershøj, Marianne; Andersen, Ulf; Greve, Marie T; Wiking, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the impact of high intensity ultrasound (HIU) on proteins in whey protein isolates was examined. Effects on thermal behavior, secondary structure and nature of intra- and intermolecular bonds during heat-induced gelling were investigated. Ultrasonication (24 kHz, 300 W/cm(2), 2078 J/mL) significantly reduced denaturation enthalpies, whereas no change in secondary structure was detected by circular dichroism. The thiol-blocking agent N-ethylmaleimide was applied in order to inhibit formation of disulfide bonds during gel formation. Results showed that increased contents of α-lactalbumin (α-La) were associated with increased sensitivity to ultrasonication. The α-La:β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) ratio greatly affected the nature of the interactions formed during gelation, where higher amounts of α-La lead to a gel more dependent on disulfide bonds. These results contribute to clarifying the mechanisms mediating the effects of HIU on whey proteins on the molecular level, thus moving further toward implementing HIU in the processing chain in the food industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Supercoiling and denaturation in Gal repressor/heat unstable nucleoid protein (HU)-mediated DNA looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lia, Giuseppe; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent; Allemand, Jean-Francois; Dunlap, David; Lewis, Dale E. A.; Adhya, Sankar; Finzi, Laura

    2003-09-01

    The overall topology of DNA profoundly influences the regulation of transcription and is determined by DNA flexibility as well as the binding of proteins that induce DNA torsion, distortion, and/or looping. Gal repressor (GalR) is thought to repress transcription from the two promoters of the gal operon of Escherichia coli by forming a DNA loop of 40 nm of DNA that encompasses the promoters. Associated evidence of a topological regulatory mechanism of the transcription repression is the requirement for a supercoiled DNA template and the histone-like heat unstable nucleoid protein (HU). By using single-molecule manipulations to generate and finely tune tension in DNA molecules, we directly detected GalR/HU-mediated DNA looping and characterized its kinetics, thermodynamics, and supercoiling dependence. The factors required for gal DNA looping in single-molecule experiments (HU, GalR and DNA supercoiling) correspond exactly to those necessary for gal repression observed both in vitro and in vivo. Our single-molecule experiments revealed that negatively supercoiled DNA, under slight tension, denatured to facilitate GalR/HU-mediated DNA loop formation. Such topological intermediates may operate similarly in other multiprotein complexes of transcription, replication, and recombination.

  10. Hemoglobin stability: observations on the denaturation of normal and abnormal hemoglobins by oxidant dyes, heat, and alkali

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Ronald F.

    1970-01-01

    Several unstable mutant hemoglobins have alterations which affect areas of the molecule involved in the attachment of heme to globin. Loss of heme from globin has been demonstrated during the denaturation of some of these unstable mutants. The importance of heme ligands for the stability of hemoglobin was illustrated in the present experiments on the denaturation of several hemoglobins and hemoglobin derivatives by heat, oxidative dyes, and alkali. Heating of normal hemolysates diluted to 4 g of hemoglobin per 100 ml at 50°C for 20 hr in 0.05 M sodium phosphate, pH 7.4, caused precipitation of 23-54% of the hemoglobin. Dialysis against water or dilution of the sample decreased denaturation to 12-20%. Precipitation was decreased to less than 3.5% by the presence of 0.015 M potassium cyanide. Increasing the ionic strength of the medium increased precipitation. Cyanide prevented the formation of inclusion bodies when red cells containing unstable hemoglobin Philly, β35 tyr → phe, were incubated with the redox dye new methylene blue. Conversion to methemoglobin increased the rate of alkali denaturation of hemoglobin but the presence of potassium cyanide returned the denaturation rate to that of ferrohemoglobin. The ability of cyanide to decrease heat precipitation of hemoglobin may depend on a dimeric or tetrameric state of the hemoglobin molecule. Purified β-chains, which exist as tetramers, were stabilized but purified monomeric α-chains were not rendered more heat resistant by the ligand. Stabilization of hemoglobin by cyanide required binding of the ligand to only one heme of an αβ-dimer. Hemoglobin Gun Hill, an unstable molecule with heme groups present only on the α-chains was quite heat stable in the presence of cyanide. The binding of cyanide to the iron atom in methemoglobin is thought to be associated with increased planarity of the heme group and increased stability of the heme-globin complex. The stabilizing effect of cyanide in the above

  11. The role of p53 in ribosomopathies.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Thomas, George

    2011-04-01

    Impaired ribosome biogenesis is the underlying cause of the pathological conditions collectively known as ribosomopathies. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain the mechanisms by which deficiencies in ribosome biogenesis interfere with developmental processes leading eventually to the emergence of these diseases. In recent years it has become clear that perturbation of this process triggers a cell-cycle checkpoint that, through activation of the tumor-suppressor p53, leads to cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Indeed, evidence is accumulating from studies in animal models that the unscheduled activation of p53 is responsible for perturbations in tissue homeostasis that cause the development of ribosomopathies such as Treacher-Collins syndrome (TCS) and 5q(-) syndrome. These findings imply that inhibition of p53, or better, of mechanisms that specifically lead to p53 activation in response to inhibition of ribosome biogenesis, could be targeted in the treatment of ribosomopathies where activation of p53 is shown to play a pathogenic role. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Patterns and Biologic Features of p53 Mutation Types in Korean Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Won; Lee, Hak Min; Hwang, Seung Hyun; Ahn, Sung Gwe; Lee, Kyung-A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The p53 gene is one of the most frequently mutated genes in breast cancer. We investigated the patterns and biologic features of p53 gene mutation and evaluated their clinical significance in Korean breast cancer patients. Methods Patients who underwent p53 gene sequencing were included. Mutational analysis of exon 5 to exon 9 of the p53 gene was carried out using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing high performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. Results A total of 497 patients were eligible for the present study and p53 gene mutations were detected in 71 cases (14.3%). Mutation of p53 was significantly associated with histologic grading (p<0.001), estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status (p<0.001), HER2 status (p<0.001), Ki-67 (p=0.028), and tumor size (p=0.004). The most frequent location of p53 mutations was exon 7 and missense mutation was the most common type of mutation. Compared with patients without mutation, there was a statistically significant difference in relapse-free survival of patients with p53 gene mutation and missense mutation (p=0.020, p=0.006, respectively). Only p53 missense mutation was an independent prognostic factor for relapse-free survival in multivariate analysis, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.29 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-4.89, p=0.031). Conclusion Mutation of the p53 gene was associated with more aggressive clinicopathologic characteristics and p53 missense mutation was an independent negative prognostic factor in Korean breast cancer patients. PMID:24744791

  13. p53 Suppresses Tetraploid Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Horii, Takuro; Yamamoto, Masamichi; Morita, Sumiyo; Kimura, Mika; Nagao, Yasumitsu; Hatada, Izuho

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian tetraploid embryos die in early development because of defects in the epiblast. Experiments with diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice, obtained via the aggregation of embryonic stem cells, clarified that while tetraploid cells are excluded from epiblast derivatives, diploid embryos with tetraploid extraembryonic tissues can develop to term. Today, this method, known as tetraploid complementation, is usually used for rescuing extraembryonic defects or for obtaining completely embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived pups. However, it is still unknown why defects occur in the epiblast during mammalian development. Here, we demonstrated that downregulation of p53, a tumour suppressor protein, rescued tetraploid development in the mammalian epiblast. Tetraploidy in differentiating epiblast cells triggered p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting the activation of a tetraploidy checkpoint during early development. Finally, we found that p53 downregulation rescued tetraploid embryos later in gestation. PMID:25752699

  14. p53 suppresses tetraploid development in mice.

    PubMed

    Horii, Takuro; Yamamoto, Masamichi; Morita, Sumiyo; Kimura, Mika; Nagao, Yasumitsu; Hatada, Izuho

    2015-03-10

    Mammalian tetraploid embryos die in early development because of defects in the epiblast. Experiments with diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice, obtained via the aggregation of embryonic stem cells, clarified that while tetraploid cells are excluded from epiblast derivatives, diploid embryos with tetraploid extraembryonic tissues can develop to term. Today, this method, known as tetraploid complementation, is usually used for rescuing extraembryonic defects or for obtaining completely embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived pups. However, it is still unknown why defects occur in the epiblast during mammalian development. Here, we demonstrated that downregulation of p53, a tumour suppressor protein, rescued tetraploid development in the mammalian epiblast. Tetraploidy in differentiating epiblast cells triggered p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting the activation of a tetraploidy checkpoint during early development. Finally, we found that p53 downregulation rescued tetraploid embryos later in gestation.

  15. p53 and rapamycin are additive

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Judith; Huang, Jing; Jones, Diane; Dodds, Sherry G.; Williams, Charnae; Hubbard, Gene; Livi, Carolina B.; Gao, Xiaoli; Weintraub, Susan; Curiel, Tyler; Sharp, Z. Dave; Hasty, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a kinase found in a complex (mTORC1) that enables macromolecular synthesis and cell growth and is implicated in cancer etiology. The rapamycin-FK506 binding protein 12 (FKBP12) complex allosterically inhibits mTORC1. In response to stress, p53 inhibits mTORC1 through a separate pathway involving cell signaling and amino acid sensing. Thus, these different mechanisms could be additive. Here we show that p53 improved the ability of rapamycin to: 1) extend mouse life span, 2) suppress ionizing radiation (IR)-induced senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) and 3) increase the levels of amino acids and citric acid in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. This additive effect could have implications for cancer treatment since rapamycin and p53 are anti-oncogenic. PMID:26158292

  16. Interferons alpha and gamma induce p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis, respectively.

    PubMed

    Porta, Chiara; Hadj-Slimane, Reda; Nejmeddine, Mohamed; Pampin, Mathieu; Tovey, Michael G; Espert, Lucile; Alvarez, Sandra; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K

    2005-01-20

    Type I interferon (IFN) enhances the transcription of the tumor suppressor gene p53. To elucidate the molecular mechanism mediating IFN-induced apoptosis, we analysed programmed cell death in response to type I (IFNalpha) or type II (IFNgamma) treatment in relation to p53 status. In two cell lines (MCF-7, SKNSH), IFNalpha, but not IFNgamma, enhanced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, only IFNalpha upregulated p53 as well as p53 target genes (Noxa, Mdm2 and CD95). The apoptotic response to IFNalpha decreased in the presence of ZB4, an anti-CD95 antibody, suggesting that CD95 is involved in this process. When p53 was inactivated by the E6 viral protein or the expression of a p53 mutant, IFNalpha-induced apoptosis and p53 target genes upregulation were abrogated. Altogether these results demonstrate that p53 plays a pivotal role in the IFNalpha-induced apoptotic response. IFNalpha-induced PML was unable to recruit p53 into nuclear bodies and its downregulation by siRNA did not alter CD95 expression. In contrast, IFNgamma-induced apoptosis is p53-independent. CD95 and IFN-regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) are directly upregulated by this cytokine. Apoptotic response to IFNgamma is decreased in the presence of ZB4 and strongly diminished by IRF1 siRNA, implicating both CD95 and IRF1 in IFNgamma-induced apoptotic response. Taken together, these results show that in two different cell lines, IFNalpha and IFNgamma, induce p53-dependent -independent apoptosis, respectively.

  17. DJ-1 restores p53 transcription activity inhibited by Topors/p53BP3.

    PubMed

    Shinbo, Yumi; Taira, Takahiro; Niki, Takeshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2005-03-01

    DJ-1 is a multi-functional protein that plays roles in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidative stress, and loss of its function is thought to result in onset of Parkinson's disease. Here, we report that DJ-1 bound to Topors/p53BP3, a ring finger protein binding to both topoisomerase I and p53, in vitro and in vivo and that both proteins were colocalized in cells. DJ-1 and p53 were then found to be sumoylated by Topors in cells. It was also found that DJ-1 bound to p53 in vitro and in vivo and that colocalization with and its binding to p53 were stimulated by UV irradiation of cells. Transcription activity of p53 was found to be abrogated by Topors concomitant with sumoylation of p53 in a dose-dependent manner, and DJ-1 restored its repressed activity by releasing the sumoylated form of p53. These findings suggest that DJ-1 positively regulates p53 through Topors-mediated sumoylation.

  18. P53 Gene Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    suppressor gene in sporadic breast tumours . 1991. Loss of chromosome 17 pl3 sequences and mutation of p53 Oncogene 5 :1573-1579. in human breast...COVERED March 2005 Final (I Aug 2000 - 1 Feb 2004) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS p53 Gene Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer DAMD17-00-1-0204 6. AUTHOR...The central hypothesis of this proposal is that variability in the patterns of p 5 3 mutagenesis in breast cancer reflects differences in exposures to

  19. Dipeptide analysis of p53 mutations and evolution of p53 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiang; Yu, Long; Levine, Arnold J; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2014-01-01

    p53 gain-of-function mutations are similar to driver mutations in cancer genes, with both promoting tumorigenesis. Most previous studies focused on residues lost by mutations, providing information related to a dominantly-negative effect. However, to understand gain-of-function mutations, it is also important to investigate what are the distributions of residues gained by mutations. We compile available p53/p63/p73 protein sequences and construct a non-redundant dataset. We analyze the amino acid and dipeptide composition of p53/p63/p73 proteins across evolution and compare them with the gain/loss of amino acids and dipeptides in human p53 following cancer-related somatic mutations. We find that the ratios of amino acids gained via somatic mutations during evolution to those lost through p53 cancer mutations correlate with the ratios found in single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human proteome. The dipeptide mutational gain/loss ratios are inversely correlated with those observed over p53 evolution but tend to follow the increasing p63/p73-like dipeptide propensities. We successfully simulated the p53 cancer mutation spectrum using the dipeptide composition across the p53 family accounting for the likelihood of mutations in p53 codons. The results revealed that the p53 mutation spectrum is dominated not only by p53 evolution but also by reversal of evolution to a certain degree. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics, Systems Biology & Clinical Implications. Guest Editor: Yudong Cai.

  20. Heat-induced denaturation and aggregation of ovalbumin at neutral pH described by irreversible first-order kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Weijers, Mireille; Barneveld, Peter A.; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Visschers, Ronald W.

    2003-01-01

    The heat-induced denaturation kinetics of two different sources of ovalbumin at pH 7 was studied by chromatography and differential scanning calorimetry. The kinetics was found to be independent of protein concentration and salt concentration, but was strongly dependent on temperature. For highly pure ovalbumin, the decrease in nondenatured native protein showed first-order dependence. The activation energy obtained with different techniques varied between 430 and 490 kJ•mole−1. First-order behavior was studied in detail using differential scanning calorimetry. The calorimetric traces were irreversible and highly scan rate-dependent. The shape of the thermograms as well as the scan rate dependence can be explained by assuming that the thermal denaturation takes place according to a simplified kinetic process \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}N\\;{ \\,\\substack{ ^{{\\mathit{k}}} \\\\ {\\rightarrow} \\\\ }\\, }\\;D\\end{equation*}\\end{document} where N is the native state, D is denatured (or another final state) and k a first-order kinetic constant that changes with temperature, according to the Arrhenius equation. A kinetic model for the temperature-induced denaturation and aggregation of ovalbumin is presented. Commercially obtained ovalbumin was found to contain an intermediate-stable fraction (IS) of about 20% that was unable to form aggregates. The denaturation of this fraction did not satisfy first-order kinetics. PMID:14627731

  1. Autoantibody recognition mechanisms of p53 epitopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need for economical blood based, noninvasive molecular biomarkers to assist in the detection and diagnosis of cancers in a cost-effective manner at an early stage, when curative interventions are still possible. Serum autoantibodies are attractive biomarkers for early cancer detection, but their development has been hindered by the punctuated genetic nature of the ten million known cancer mutations. A landmark study of 50,000 patients (Pedersen et al., 2013) showed that a few p53 15-mer epitopes are much more sensitive colon cancer biomarkers than p53, which in turn is a more sensitive cancer biomarker than any other protein. The function of p53 as a nearly universal "tumor suppressor" is well established, because of its strong immunogenicity in terms of not only antibody recruitment, but also stimulation of autoantibodies. Here we examine dimensionally compressed bioinformatic fractal scaling analysis for identifying the few sensitive epitopes from the p53 amino acid sequence, and show how it could be used for early cancer detection (ECD). We trim 15-mers to 7-mers, and identify specific 7-mers from other species that could be more sensitive to aggressive human cancers, such as liver cancer. Our results could provide a roadmap for ECD.

  2. Mechanisms of p53-Mediated Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    exclusion assay and under control of the IGFBP3 promoter and 1 pig of empty pcDNA3 or pcDNA3 vector expressing p53 and various mutants. (A) The BD found that...C. C. Harris, and P. p73-deficient mice have neurological, pheromonal and inflammatory defects Hainaut. 2002. The IARC TP53 database: new online

  3. Regulation of p53 tetramerization and nuclear export by ARC

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Roger S.-Y.; Nam, Young-Jae; Ostreicher, Marc Jason; Metzl, Mark D.; Whelan, Russell S.; Peng, Chang-Fu; Ashton, Anthony W.; Fu, Weimin; Mani, Kartik; Chin, Suet-Feung; Provenzano, Elena; Ellis, Ian; Figg, Nichola; Pinder, Sarah; Bennett, Martin R.; Caldas, Carlos; Kitsis, Richard N.

    2007-01-01

    Inactivation of the transcription factor p53 is central to carcinogenesis. Yet only approximately one-half of cancers have p53 loss-of-function mutations. Here, we demonstrate a mechanism for p53 inactivation by apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), a protein induced in multiple cancer cells. The direct binding in the nucleus of ARC to the p53 tetramerization domain inhibits p53 tetramerization. This exposes a nuclear export signal in p53, triggering Crm1-dependent relocation of p53 to the cytoplasm. Knockdown of endogenous ARC in breast cancer cells results in spontaneous tetramerization of endogenous p53, accumulation of p53 in the nucleus, and activation of endogenous p53 target genes. In primary human breast cancers with nuclear ARC, p53 is almost always WT. Conversely, nearly all breast cancers with mutant p53 lack nuclear ARC. We conclude that nuclear ARC is induced in cancer cells and negatively regulates p53. PMID:18087040

  4. Heat-denatured lysozyme aggregation and gelation as revealed by combined dielectric relaxation spectroscopy and light scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Giugliarelli, A; Sassi, P; Paolantoni, M; Onori, G; Cametti, C

    2012-09-06

    The dielectric behavior of native and heat-denatured lysozyme in ethanol-water solutions was examined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 2 GHz, using frequency-domain dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. Because of the conformational changes on unfolding, dielectric methods provide information on the denaturation process of the protein and, at protein concentration high enough, on the subsequent aggregation and gelation. Moreover, the time evolution of the protein aggregation and gelation was monitored measuring, by means of dynamic light scattering methods, the diffusion coefficient of micro-sized polystyrene particles, deliberately added to the protein solution, which act as a probe of the viscosity of the microenvironment close to the particle surface. All together, our measurements indicate that heat-induced denaturation favors, at high concentrations, a protein aggregation process which evolves up to the full gelation of the system. These findings have a direct support from IR measurements of the absorbance of the amide I band that, because of the unfolding, indicate that proteins entangle each other, producing a network structure which evolves, in long time limit, in the gel.

  5. Combination of p53-DC vaccine and rAd-p53 gene therapy induced CTLs cytotoxic against p53-deleted human prostate cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Kitagawa, K; Yoneda, T; Fukui, Y; Fujsawa, M; Bautista, D; Shirakawa, T

    2017-07-01

    Recently, the US FDA approved sipuleucel-T, which is composed of autologous DCs stimulated with a recombinant fusion protein of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), as the first immunotherapeutic agent for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). However, sipuleucel-T demonstrated only modest efficacy in mCPRC patients. Researchers are now investigating the potential of p53 protein as a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) loaded in DC-based cancer vaccine. Approximately half of all tumors overexpress p53, and up to 20% of prostate cancer cells overexpresses p53. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of combining p53-DC vaccine and rAd-p53 gene therapy, using the p53-overexpressing and non-expressing prostate cancer cells in vitro. We successfully generated the p53-DC vaccine by culturing autologous DCs infected with rAd-p53. This p53-DC vaccine can differentiate CTLs specifically cytotoxic to p53-overexpressing prostate cancer cells. In addition, rAd-p53 infection can induce overexpression of p53 and thus the cytotoxicity of CTLs differentiated by the p53-DC vaccine in p53 non-expressing prostate cancer cells. These findings suggest that this combination therapy using p53-DC vaccine and rAd-p53 gene therapy together may represent a new paradigm for the treatment of mCRPC.

  6. S100A4 interacts with p53 in the nucleus and promotes p53 degradation.

    PubMed

    Orre, L M; Panizza, E; Kaminskyy, V O; Vernet, E; Gräslund, T; Zhivotovsky, B; Lehtiö, J

    2013-12-05

    S100A4 is a small calcium-binding protein that is commonly overexpressed in a range of different tumor types, and it is widely accepted that S100A4 has an important role in the process of cancer metastasis. In vitro binding assays has shown that S100A4 interacts with the tumor suppressor protein p53, indicating that S100A4 may have additional roles in tumor development. In the present study, we show that endogenous S100A4 and p53 interact in complex samples, and that the interaction increases after inhibition of MDM2-dependent p53 degradation using Nutlin-3A. Further, using proximity ligation assay, we show that the interaction takes place in the cell nucleus. S100A4 knockdown experiments in two p53 wild-type cell lines, A549 and HeLa, resulted in stabilization of p53 protein, indicating that S100A4 is promoting p53 degradation. Finally, we demonstrate that S100A4 knockdown leads to p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Thus, our data add a new layer to the oncogenic properties of S100A4 through its inhibition of p53-dependent processes.

  7. Rap2b, a novel p53 target, regulates p53-mediated pro-survival function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyue; He, Yunlong; Lee, Kyoung-Hwa; Dubois, Wendy; Li, Ziqing; Wu, Xiaolin; Kovalchuk, Alexander; Zhang, Weimin; Huang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a critical regulator of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest/pro-survival. Upon DNA damage, p53 evokes both cell cycle arrest/pro-survival and apoptosis transcriptional programs. The ultimate cellular outcome depends on the balance of these two programs. However, the p53 downstream targets that mediate this cell fate decision remain to be identified. Using an integrative genomic approach, we identify Rap2b as a conserved p53-activated gene that counters p53-mediated apoptosis after DNA damage. Upon DNA damage, p53 directly binds to the promoter of Rap2b and activates its transcription. The reduction of Rap2b levels by small interference RNA sensitizes cells to DNA damage-induced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-survival function, analysis of cancer genomic data reveals that Rap2b is overexpressed in many types of tumors. Anchorage-independent growth assays show that Rap2b has only weak transformation activity, suggesting that it is not an oncogene by itself. Together, our results identify Rap2b as a new player in the pro-survival program conducted by p53 and raise the possibility that targeting Rap2b could sensitize tumor cells to apoptosis in response to DNA damage. PMID:23535297

  8. Liposomes as chaperone mimics with controllable affinity toward heat-denatured formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Kozono, Ryohei; Tsubomura, Naoki

    2015-01-20

    Chaperone machinery in living systems can catch denatured enzymes and induce their reactivation. Chaperone mimics are beneficial for applying enzymatic reactions in vitro. In this work, the affinity between liposomes and thermally denatured enzymes was controlled to stabilize the enzyme activity. The model enzyme is formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) which is a homodimer and negatively charged in the phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.2) used. The activity of free CbFDH readily decreased at 58 °C following the first-order kinetics with the half-life t1/2 of 27 min. The turbidity measurements showed that the denatured enzyme molecules formed aggregates. The liposomes composed of zwitterionic phosphatidylcholines (PCs) stabilized the CbFDH activity at 58 °C, as revealed with six different PCs. The PC liposomes were indicated to bind to the aggregate-prone enzyme molecules, allowing reactivation at 25 °C. The cofactor β-reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) also stabilized the enzyme activity. The affinity between liposomes and denatured CbFDH could be modulated by incorporating cationic 1,2-dioleoyloxy-3-trimethylammonium propane chloride (DOTAP) in PC membranes. The t1/2 values significantly increased in the presence of liposomes ([lipid] = 1.5 mM) composed of PC and DOTAP at the mole fraction f(D) of 0.1. On the other hand, the DOTAP-rich liposomes (f(D) ≥ 0.7) showed strong affinity toward denatured CbFDH, accelerating its deactivation. The liposomes with low charge density function as chaperone mimics that can efficiently catch the denatured enzymes without interfering with their intramolecular interaction for reactivation.

  9. INGN 201: Ad-p53, Ad5CMV-p53, Adenoviral p53, INGN 101, p53 gene therapy--Introgen, RPR/INGN 201.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Introgen's adenoviral p53 gene therapy [INGN 201, ADVEXIN] is in clinical development for the treatment of various cancers. The p53 tumour suppressor gene is deleted or mutated in many tumour cells and is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human tumours. INGN 201 has been shown to kill cancer cells directly. In August 2002, Introgen announced plans to file an application for INGN 201 with the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) for the treatment of head and neck cancer; the European filing will be submitted simultaneously with the previously scheduled (planned for 2004) submission of a Biologics License Application (BLA) for ADVEXIN to the US FDA. On 20 February 2003, INGN 201 received orphan drug designation from the US FDA for head and neck cancer. INGN 201 is available for licensing although Introgen favours retaining partial or full rights to the therapy in the US. Introgen Therapeutics and its collaborative partner for the p53 programme, Aventis Gencell, have been developing p53 gene therapy products. The agreement was originally signed by Rhône-Poulenc Rorer's Gencell division, which became Aventis Gencell after Rhône-Poulenc Rorer merged with Hoechst Marion Roussel to form Aventis Pharma. According to the original agreement, Introgen was responsible for phase I and preclinical development in North America, while Aventis Gencell was responsible for clinical trials conducted in Europe and for clinical trials in North America beyond phase I. In April 2001, Aventis Gencell and Introgen restructured their existing collaboration agreement for p53 gene therapy products. Aventis Gencell indicated that p53 research had suffered from internal competition for resources and was pulling back from its development agreement with Introgen for p53 gene therapy products. Introgen will assume responsibility for worldwide development of all p53 programmes and will obtain exclusive worldwide commercial rights to p53-based gene therapy

  10. Characterization of a murine p53ser246 mutant equivalent to the human p53ser249 associated with hepatocellular carcinoma and aflatoxin exposure.

    PubMed

    Ghebranious, N; Knoll, B J; Wu, H; Lozano, G; Sell, S

    1995-06-01

    A mutation in the tumor suppressor p53 gene resulting in an Arg-->Ser substitution in position 249 is found frequently in human hepatocellular carcinomas associated with hepatitis B infection and with aflatoxin exposure. To determine the significance of this mutation in an in vivo experimental model using transgenic mice, we introduced a two-nucleotide change in the mouse p53 gene at amino-acid position 246, which is equivalent to position 249 in human p53, by the recombinant polymerase chain reaction mismatched primer method. This p53 mutation resulted in the same change, an Arg-->Ser substitution, as in the human p53 gene at position 249. We now report that the protein product of this mutant mouse p53ser246 had properties similar to those of the wild-type protein when tested by binding to (i) monoclonal antibodies PAb246 and PAb240, ii) simian virus 40 large T antigen, and (iii) heat-shock protein. However, it had mutant-type transforming properties when tested for colony formation with an osteosarcoma cell line. It was not active, as is wild-type p53, in transcription activation of the muscle creatine kinase promoter. These properties are the same as those found in the p53trp248 product of the p53 mutation associated with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Although less is known about the human p53ser249 product associated with hepatocellular carcinoma, the mutant murine p53ser246 protein shares the known properties of the human gene product.

  11. Emerging Non-Canonical Functions and Regulation by p53: p53 and Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Olivos, David J.; Mayo, Lindsey D.

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery nearly 40 years ago, p53 has ascended to the forefront of investigated genes and proteins across diverse research disciplines and is recognized most exclusively for its role in cancer as a tumor suppressor. Levine and Oren (2009) reviewed the evolution of p53 detailing the significant discoveries of each decade since its first report in 1979. In this review, we will highlight the emerging non-canonical functions and regulation of p53 in stem cells. We will focus on general themes shared among p53’s functions in non-malignant stem cells and cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and the influence of p53 on the microenvironment and CSC niche. We will also examine p53 gain of function (GOF) roles in stemness. Mutant p53 (mutp53) GOFs that lead to survival, drug resistance and colonization are reviewed in the context of the acquisition of advantageous transformation processes, such as differentiation and dedifferentiation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem cell senescence and quiescence. Finally, we will conclude with therapeutic strategies that restore wild-type p53 (wtp53) function in cancer and CSCs, including RING finger E3 ligases and CSC maintenance. The mechanisms by which wtp53 and mutp53 influence stemness in non-malignant stem cells and CSCs or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are poorly understood thus far. Further elucidation of p53’s effects on stemness could lead to novel therapeutic strategies in cancer research. PMID:27898034

  12. Mechanisms of p53-Mediated Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    BD) within residues 364 to 393. AD1 is important for transactivation; this domain contains residues that contact the basal transcriptional machinery...256 IGFBP3, a genomic fragment of the IGFBP3 promoter spanning nucleo - tides (nt) 256 to 72, with 1 being the transcriptional start site, was...BD) bind to the IGFBP3 promoter, but full-length p53 cannot recruit the basal transcriptional machinery due to its association with HDAC activity (Fig

  13. The C-terminal region of alpha-crystallin: involvement in protection against heat-induced denaturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L.; Emmons, T.; Horwitz, J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the alpha-crystallins can protect other proteins against heat-induced denaturation and aggregation. To determine the possible involvement of the C-terminal region in this activity, the alpha-crystallins were subjected to limited tryptic digestion, and the amount of cleavage from the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the alpha-A and alpha-B crystallin chains was assessed using antisera specific for these regions. Limited tryptic digestion resulted in cleavage only from the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin. This trypsin-treated alpha-A crystallin preparation showed a decreased ability to protect proteins from heat-induced aggregation using an in vitro assay. Together, these results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin is important for its ability to protect against heat-induced aggregation, which is consistent with the hypothesis that post-translational changes that are known to occur at the C-terminal region may have significant effects on the ability of alpha-A crystallin to protect against protein denaturation in vivo.

  14. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed.

  15. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed. PMID:26618142

  16. Necdin, a p53-Target Gene, Is an Inhibitor of p53-Mediated Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lafontaine, Julie; Rodier, Francis; Ouellet, Véronique; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    In vitro, cellular immortalization and transformation define a model for multistep carcinogenesis and current ongoing challenges include the identification of specific molecular events associated with steps along this oncogenic pathway. Here, using NIH3T3 cells, we identified transcriptionally related events associated with the expression of Polyomavirus Large-T antigen (PyLT), a potent viral oncogene. We propose that a subset of these alterations in gene expression may be related to the early events that contribute to carcinogenesis. The proposed tumor suppressor Necdin, known to be regulated by p53, was within a group of genes that was consistently upregulated in the presence of PyLT. While Necdin is induced following p53 activation with different genotoxic stresses, Necdin induction by PyLT did not involve p53 activation or the Rb-binding site of PyLT. Necdin depletion by shRNA conferred a proliferative advantage to NIH3T3 and PyLT-expressing NIH3T3 (NIHLT) cells. In contrast, our results demonstrate that although overexpression of Necdin induced a growth arrest in NIH3T3 and NIHLT cells, a growing population rapidly emerged from these arrested cells. This population no longer showed significant proliferation defects despite high Necdin expression. Moreover, we established that Necdin is a negative regulator of p53-mediated growth arrest induced by nutlin-3, suggesting that Necdin upregulation could contribute to the bypass of a p53-response in p53 wild type tumors. To support this, we characterized Necdin expression in low malignant potential ovarian cancer (LMP) where p53 mutations rarely occur. Elevated levels of Necdin expression were observed in LMP when compared to aggressive serous ovarian cancers. We propose that in some contexts, the constitutive expression of Necdin could contribute to cancer promotion by delaying appropriate p53 responses and potentially promote genomic instability. PMID:22355404

  17. SCH529074, a small molecule activator of mutant p53, which binds p53 DNA binding domain (DBD), restores growth-suppressive function to mutant p53 and interrupts HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of wild type p53.

    PubMed

    Demma, Mark; Maxwell, Eugene; Ramos, Robert; Liang, Lianzhu; Li, Cheng; Hesk, David; Rossman, Randall; Mallams, Alan; Doll, Ronald; Liu, Ming; Seidel-Dugan, Cynthia; Bishop, W Robert; Dasmahapatra, Bimalendu

    2010-04-02

    Abrogation of p53 function occurs in almost all human cancers, with more than 50% of cancers harboring inactivating mutations in p53 itself. Mutation of p53 is indicative of highly aggressive cancers and poor prognosis. The vast majority of mutations in p53 occur in its core DNA binding domain (DBD) and result in inactivation of p53 by reducing its thermodynamic stability at physiological temperature. Here, we report a small molecule, SCH529074, that binds specifically to the p53 DBD in a saturable manner with an affinity of 1-2 microm. Binding restores wild type function to many oncogenic mutant forms of p53. This small molecule reactivates mutant p53 by acting as a chaperone, in a manner similar to that previously reported for the peptide CDB3. Binding of SCH529074 to the p53 DBD is specifically displaced by an oligonucleotide with a sequence derived from the p53-response element. In addition to reactivating mutant p53, SCH529074 binding inhibits ubiquitination of p53 by HDM2. We have also developed a novel variant of p53 by changing a single amino acid in the core domain of p53 (N268R), which abolishes binding of SCH529074. This amino acid change also inhibits HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of p53. Our novel findings indicate that through its interaction with p53 DBD, SCH529074 restores DNA binding activity to mutant p53 and inhibits HDM2-mediated ubiquitination.

  18. Dynamics of p53: A Master Decider of Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qingyin; Beaver, Jill M.; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Zunzhen

    2017-01-01

    Cellular stress-induced temporal alterations—i.e., dynamics—are typically exemplified by the dynamics of p53 that serve as a master to determine cell fate. p53 dynamics were initially identified as the variations of p53 protein levels. However, a growing number of studies have shown that p53 dynamics are also manifested in variations in the activity, spatial location, and posttranslational modifications of p53 proteins, as well as the interplay among all p53 dynamical features. These are essential in determining a specific outcome of cell fate. In this review, we discuss the importance of the multifaceted features of p53 dynamics and their roles in the cell fate decision process, as well as their potential applications in p53-based cancer therapy. The review provides new insights into p53 signaling pathways and their potentials in the development of new strategies in p53-based cancer therapy. PMID:28208785

  19. mTORC1 and p53

    PubMed Central

    Hasty, Paul; Sharp, Zelton Dave; Curiel, Tyler J.; Campisi, Judith

    2013-01-01

    A balance must be struck between cell growth and stress responses to ensure that cells proliferate without accumulating damaged DNA. This balance means that optimal cell proliferation requires the integration of pro-growth and stress-response pathways. mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) is a pleiotropic kinase found in complex 1 (mTORC1). The mTORC1 pathway governs a response to mitogenic signals with high energy levels to promote protein synthesis and cell growth. In contrast, the p53 DNA damage response pathway is the arbiter of cell proliferation, restraining mTORC1 under conditions of genotoxic stress. Recent studies suggest a complicated integration of these pathways to ensure successful cell growth and proliferation without compromising genome maintenance. Deciphering this integration could be key to understanding the potential clinical usefulness of mTORC1 inhibitors like rapamycin. Here we discuss how these p53-mTORC1 interactions might play a role in the suppression of cancer and perhaps the development of cellular senescence and organismal aging. PMID:23255104

  20. Spectroscopic characterization of the interaction of phenosafranin and safranin O with double stranded, heat denatured and single stranded calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ishita; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of phenosafranin and safranin O with double stranded, heat denatured and single stranded calf thymus DNA has been studied by fluorescence, absorbance and circular dichroic techniques. Binding to the double stranded and heat denatured DNA conformations induced strong quenching in the fluorescence spectra of both dyes. Linear Scatchard plots indicated the binding to be of one type and the affinity evaluated to be of the order of 10(5) M(-1) with double stranded and heat denatured DNAs. Fluorescence quenching was much weaker with the single stranded DNA and the binding affinity was one order lower. Ferrocyanide quenching studies revealed that the fluorescence emission of the dye molecules bound to the double stranded and heat denatured DNAs was quenched much less compared to that bound to the single stranded DNA. Further, there was significant emission polarization for the bound dyes and strong energy transfer from the DNA base pairs to the dye molecules indicating intercalative binding. Salt dependence of the binding phenomenon revealed that electrostatic forces have significant role in the binding process. The intercalation of these molecules to double stranded and heat denatured DNA and simple stacking to single strands was proved by these fluorescence techniques. Support to the fluorescence results have been derived from absorption and circular dichroic results. Phenosafranin was revealed to be a stronger binding species compared to safranin O.

  1. Ferroptosis: A missing puzzle piece in the p53 blueprint?

    PubMed

    Wang, Shang-Jui; Ou, Yang; Jiang, Le; Gu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Recent evidence indicates that canonical functions of p53 (i.e., apoptosis and growth arrest) are dispensable for p53-mediated tumor suppression. We have uncovered a novel function of p53 that contributes to tumor suppression through regulation of cystine metabolism, reactive oxygen species responses, and ferroptosis. The p53-mediated ferroptotic response via SLC7A11 denotes an extra layer of defense against tumorigenesis in conjunction with other p53 functions.

  2. Overcoming immunosuppression to enhance a p53MVA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Nicola; Chung, Vincent; Cristea, Mihaela; Ellenhorn, Joshua DI; Diamond, Don J

    2014-11-01

    A Phase I trial of a p53-targeting modified vaccinia Ankara (p53MVA) vaccine in patients afflicted with refractory gastrointestinal cancers demonstrated enhanced T-cell recognition of p53 following vaccination. However, this effect was transient suggesting that p53MVA requires combination with immunomodulatory agents to deliver clinical benefit. Here, we outline our rationale for combining p53MVA with immunomodulatory chemotherapy in a forthcoming trial.

  3. SV40 and p53 as team players in childhood lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Heinsohn, Susanne; Scholz, Roswitha; Kabisch, Hartmut

    2011-05-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) is known to be potently oncogenic and can induce several types of tumours, such as lymphoma. p53 was discovered as a cellular partner of the SV40 large T-antigen, the oncoprotein of this virus. There have not been many studies on SV40 and p53 in lymphomas and the ones that exist, are controversial. A comparison of these two components in lymphoma has not been reported previously. We examined 91 lymphomas [60 B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (B-NHLs), 19 B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALLs), 7 B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias and 5 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias] for the presence of SV40. Overall, 40 samples from 12 B-NHL/19 B-ALL patients were additionally investigated for p53 mutation in the hot-spot exons 5 to 8. Overall, we found 62/91 lymphomas to be SV40-positive, among them 16/19 B-ALLs and 38/60 B-NHLs. SV40 was absent in 147 of the 149 blood control samples. We found 11 p53 mutations in 19 B-ALL patients: 5 in exon 5 (codons 132, 141, 143, 155 and 181), 4 in exon 7 (codons 236, 238 and 248), 2 in exon 8 (codon 273). In B-NHL patients we found p53-mutations in 9/12 samples: 6 of these in 3 lymph nodes (LNs). One LN harboured 3 different p53 mutations: Exon 5 (codon 132), exon 6 (codon 213) and exon 8 (codon 288). Another LN showed 2 different p53 mutations: Exon 6 (codon 213) and exon 8 (codon 285). Except for 1 nonsense mutation in an LN of a B-NHL patient, all 20 mutations were missense mutations, 2 were homozygous, both found in B-NHL-samples, and one of these (codon 175) is known to cause the global denaturation of p53. All occur in the DNA-binding domain of p53. All specimens showing a p53 mutation, were SV40-positive. p53 mutaions found in LNs of B-NHL patients harbour high SV40 copy numbers. Our data strongly support an important role for SV40, as well as a strong association of SV40 and p53 in childhood lympho-proliferative disorders.

  4. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in tumors is crucial for its oncogenic activities, while depletion of mutant p53 attenuates malignant properties of cancer cells. Thus, mutant p53 is an attractive druggable target for cancer therapy. Different approaches have been taken to develop small-molecule compounds that specifically target mutant p53. These include compounds that restore wild-type conformation and transcriptional activity of mutant p53, induce depletion of mutant p53, inhibit downstream pathways of oncogenic mutant p53, and induce synthetic lethality to mutant p53. In this review article, we comprehensively discuss the current strategies targeting oncogenic mutant p53 in cancers, with special focus on compounds that restore wild-type p53 transcriptional activity of mutant p53 and those reducing mutant p53 levels.

  5. The 90-kDa Heat Shock Protein Hsp90 Protects Tubulin against Thermal Denaturation*

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Felix; Moullintraffort, Laura; Heichette, Claire; Chrétien, Denis; Garnier, Cyrille

    2010-01-01

    Hsp90 and tubulin are among the most abundant proteins in the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. Although Hsp90 plays key roles in maintaining its client proteins in their active state, tubulin is essential for fundamental processes such as cell morphogenesis and division. Several studies have suggested a possible connection between Hsp90 and the microtubule cytoskeleton. Because tubulin is a labile protein in its soluble form, we investigated whether Hsp90 protects it against thermal denaturation. Both proteins were purified from porcine brain, and their interaction was characterized in vitro by using spectrophotometry, sedimentation assays, video-enhanced differential interference contrast light microscopy, and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Our results show that Hsp90 protects tubulin against thermal denaturation and keeps it in a state compatible with microtubule polymerization. We demonstrate that Hsp90 cannot resolve tubulin aggregates but that it likely binds early unfolding intermediates, preventing their aggregation. Protection was maximal at a stoichiometry of two molecules of Hsp90 for one of tubulin. This protection does not require ATP binding and hydrolysis by Hsp90, but it is counteracted by geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of Hsp90. PMID:20110359

  6. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms for p53-mediated differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chylicki, K; Ehinger, M; Svedberg, H; Gullberg, U

    2000-11-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein can induce both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Moreover, we and others have shown previously that p53 is a potent mediator of differentiation. For example, expression of ptsp53, a temperature-inducible form of p53, induces differentiation of leukemic monoblastic U-937 cells. The functions of p53 have for long been believed to be dependent on the transactivating capacity of p53. However, recent data show that both p53-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis can be induced independently of p53-mediated transcriptional activation, indicating alternative pathways for p53-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. The bcl-2 proto-oncogene contributes to the development of certain malignancies, probably by inhibition of apoptosis. Interestingly, Bcl-2 has been shown to inhibit p53-mediated apoptosis as well as p53-mediated transcriptional activation. Asking whether Bcl-2 would interfere with the p53-mediated differentiation of U-937 cells, we stably transfected bcl-2 to U-937 cells inducibly expressing p53. Although the established Bcl-2-expressing clones were resistant to p53-mediated apoptosis, we did not observe any interference of Bcl-2 with the p53-mediated differentiation, suggesting separable pathways for p53 in mediating apoptosis and differentiation of U-937 cells. Neither did expression of Bcl-2 interfere with p53-induced expression of endogenous p21, suggesting that p53-induced differentiation might be dependent on the transcriptional activity of p53. To further investigate whether the p53-mediated differentiation of U-937 cells depends on the transcriptional activity of p53, we overexpressed transactivation-deficient p53, a transcriptionally inactive p53 mutant in these cells. However, in contrast to the effects of wild-type p53, expression of trans-activation-deficient p53 did neither induce signs of apoptosis nor of differentiation in U-937 cells. Our results indicate that the transcriptional activity of p53 is essential

  7. Iron Metabolism Regulates p53 Signaling through Direct Heme-p53 Interaction and Modulation of p53 Localization, Stability, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jia; Sheng, Xiangpeng; Chang, ZeNan; Wu, Qian; Wang, Sheng; Xuan, Zongliang; Li, Dan; Wu, Yalan; Shang, Yongjia; Kong, Xiangtao; Yu, Long; Li, Lin; Ruan, Kangchen; Hu, Hongyu; Huang, Ying; Hui, Lijian; Xie, Dong; Wang, Fudi; Hu, Ronggui

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Iron excess is closely associated with tumorigenesis in multiple types of human cancers, with underlying mechanisms yet unclear. Recently, iron deprivation has emerged as a major strategy for chemotherapy, but it exerts tumor suppression only on select human malignancies. Here, we report that the tumor suppressor protein p53 is downregulated during iron excess. Strikingly, the iron polyporphyrin heme binds to p53 protein, interferes with p53-DNA interactions, and triggers both nuclear export and cytosolic degradation of p53. Moreover, in a tumorigenicity assay, iron deprivation suppressed wild-type p53-dependent tumor growth, suggesting that upregulation of wild-type p53 signaling underlies the selective efficacy of iron deprivation. Our findings thus identify a direct link between iron/heme homeostasis and the regulation of p53 signaling, which not only provides mechanistic insights into iron-excess-associated tumorigenesis but may also help predict and improve outcomes in iron-deprivation-based chemotherapy. PMID:24685134

  8. p53 regulation of metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Eyal; Vousden, Karen H

    2010-04-01

    During the course of tumorigenesis, cells acquire a number of alterations that contribute to the acquisition of the malignant phenotype, allowing them to survive and flourish in increasingly hostile environments. Cancer cells can be characterized by perturbations in the control of cell proliferation and growth, resistance to death, and alterations in their interactions with the microenvironment. Underpinning many of these changes are shifts in metabolism that allow cancer cells to use alternative pathways for energy production and building the macromolecules necessary for growth, as well as regulating the generation of signaling molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the past few years, it became clear that p53, the most studied, if not most important, tumor suppressor protein, can also directly control metabolic traits of cells.

  9. Deconstructing p53 transcriptional networks in tumor suppression.

    PubMed

    Bieging, Kathryn T; Attardi, Laura D

    2012-02-01

    p53 is a pivotal tumor suppressor that induces apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest and senescence in response to stress signals. Although p53 transcriptional activation is important for these responses, the mechanisms underlying tumor suppression have been elusive. To date, no single or compound mouse knockout of specific p53 target genes has recapitulated the dramatic tumor predisposition that characterizes p53-null mice. Recently, however, analysis of knock-in mice expressing p53 transactivation domain mutants has revealed a group of primarily novel direct p53 target genes that may mediate tumor suppression in vivo. We present here an overview of well-known p53 target genes and the tumor phenotypes of the cognate knockout mice, and address the recent identification of new p53 transcriptional targets and how they enhance our understanding of p53 transcriptional networks central for tumor suppression.

  10. Hitting cancers' weak spots: vulnerabilities imposed by p53 mutation.

    PubMed

    Gurpinar, Evrim; Vousden, Karen H

    2015-08-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a critical role in limiting malignant development and progression. Almost all cancers show loss of p53 function, through either mutation in the p53 gene itself or defects in the mechanisms that activate p53. While reactivation of p53 can effectively limit tumor growth, this is a difficult therapeutic goal to achieve in the many cancers that do not retain wild type p53. An alternative approach focuses on identifying vulnerabilities imposed on cancers by virtue of the loss of or alterations in p53, to identify additional pathways that can be targeted to specifically kill or inhibit the growth of p53 mutated cells. These indirect ways of exploiting mutations in p53 - which occur in more than half of all human cancers - provide numerous exciting therapeutic possibilities.

  11. Mechanisms That Enhance Sustainability of p53 Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Kyoung; Jackson, Trachette L.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 protein shows various dynamic responses depending on the types and extent of cellular stresses. In particular, in response to DNA damage induced by γ-irradiation, cells generate a series of p53 pulses. Recent research has shown the importance of sustaining repeated p53 pulses for recovery from DNA damage. However, far too little attention has been paid to understanding how cells can sustain p53 pulses given the complexities of genetic heterogeneity and intrinsic noise. Here, we explore potential molecular mechanisms that enhance the sustainability of p53 pulses by developing a new mathematical model of the p53 regulatory system. This model can reproduce many experimental results that describe the dynamics of p53 pulses. By simulating the model both deterministically and stochastically, we found three potential mechanisms that improve the sustainability of p53 pulses: 1) the recently identified positive feedback loop between p53 and Rorα allows cells to sustain p53 pulses with high amplitude over a wide range of conditions, 2) intrinsic noise can often prevent the dampening of p53 pulses even after mutations, and 3) coupling of p53 pulses in neighboring cells via cytochrome-c significantly reduces the chance of failure in sustaining p53 pulses in the presence of heterogeneity among cells. Finally, in light of these results, we propose testable experiments that can reveal important mechanisms underlying p53 dynamics. PMID:23755198

  12. Mechanisms that enhance sustainability of p53 pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Kyoung; Jackson, Trachette L

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 protein shows various dynamic responses depending on the types and extent of cellular stresses. In particular, in response to DNA damage induced by γ-irradiation, cells generate a series of p53 pulses. Recent research has shown the importance of sustaining repeated p53 pulses for recovery from DNA damage. However, far too little attention has been paid to understanding how cells can sustain p53 pulses given the complexities of genetic heterogeneity and intrinsic noise. Here, we explore potential molecular mechanisms that enhance the sustainability of p53 pulses by developing a new mathematical model of the p53 regulatory system. This model can reproduce many experimental results that describe the dynamics of p53 pulses. By simulating the model both deterministically and stochastically, we found three potential mechanisms that improve the sustainability of p53 pulses: 1) the recently identified positive feedback loop between p53 and Rorα allows cells to sustain p53 pulses with high amplitude over a wide range of conditions, 2) intrinsic noise can often prevent the dampening of p53 pulses even after mutations, and 3) coupling of p53 pulses in neighboring cells via cytochrome-c significantly reduces the chance of failure in sustaining p53 pulses in the presence of heterogeneity among cells. Finally, in light of these results, we propose testable experiments that can reveal important mechanisms underlying p53 dynamics.

  13. Multiple stress signals activate mutant p53 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Young-Ah; Post, Sean M.; Elizondo-Fraire, Ana C.; Maccio, Danela R.; Jackson, James G.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Van Pelt, Carolyn; Terzian, Tamara; Lozano, Guillermina

    2012-01-01

    p53 levels are tightly regulated in normal cells, and thus the wild-type p53 protein is nearly undetectable until stimulated through a variety of stresses. In response to stress, p53 is released from its negative regulators, mainly Mdm2, allowing p53 to be stabilized to activate cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis programs. Many of the upstream signals that regulate wild type p53 are known; however, limited information for the regulation of mutant p53 exists. Previously, we demonstrated that wild-type and mutant p53R172H are regulated in a similar manner in the absence of Mdm2 or p16. Additionally, this stabilization of mutant p53 is responsible for the gain-of-function metastatic phenotype observed in the mouse. In this report, we examined the role of oncogenes, DNA damage, and reactive oxygen species, signals that stabilize wild type p53, on the stabilization of mutant p53 in vivo and the consequences of this expression on tumor formation and survival. These factors stabilized mutant p53 protein which often times contributed to exacerbated tumor phenotypes. These findings, coupled with the fact that patients carry p53 mutations without stabilization of p53, suggest that personalized therapeutic schemes may be needed for individual patients depending on their p53 status. PMID:21983037

  14. Interference with p53 protein inhibits hematopoietic and muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The involvement of p53 protein in cell differentiation has been recently suggested by some observations made with tumor cells and the correlation found between differentiation and increased levels of p53. However, the effect of p53 on differentiation is in apparent contrast with the normal development of p53-null mice. To test directly whether p53 has a function in cell differentiation, we interfered with the endogenous wt-p53 protein of nontransformed cells of two different murine histotypes: 32D myeloid progenitors, and C2C12 myoblasts. A drastic inhibition of terminal differentiation into granulocytes or myotubes, respectively, was observed upon expression of dominant- negative p53 proteins. This inhibition did not alter the cell cycle withdrawal typical of terminal differentiation, nor p21(WAF1/CIP1) upregulation, indicating that interference with endogenous p53 directly affects cell differentiation, independently of the p53 activity on the cell cycle. We also found that the endogenous wt-p53 protein of C2C12 cells becomes transcriptionally active during myogenesis, and this activity is inhibited by p53 dominant-negative expression. Moreover, we found that p53 DNA-binding and transcriptional activities are both required to induce differentiation in p53-negative K562 cells. Taken together, these data strongly indicate that p53 is a regulator of cell differentiation and it exerts this role, at least in part, through its transcriptional activity. PMID:8698814

  15. Annexin A2 and PSF proteins interact with p53 IRES and regulate translation of p53 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Sharathchandra, Arandkar; Lal, Ridhima; Khan, Debjit; Das, Saumitra

    2012-12-01

    p53 mRNA has been shown to be translated into two isoforms, full-length p53 (FL-p53) and a truncated isoform ΔN-p53, which modulates the functions of FL-p53 and also has independent functions. Previously, we have shown that translation of p53 and ΔN-p53 can be initiated at Internal Ribosome Entry Sites (IRES). These two IRESs were shown to regulate the translation of p53 and ΔN-p53 in a distinct cell-cycle phase-dependent manner. Earlier observations from our laboratory also suggest that the structural integrity of the p53 RNA is critical for IRES function and is compromised by mutations that affect the structure as well as RNA protein interactions. In the current study, using RNA affinity approach we have identified Annexin A2 and PTB associated Splicing Factor (PSF/SFPQ) as novel ITAFs for p53 IRESs. We have showed that the purified Annexin A2 and PSF proteins specifically bind to p53 IRES elements. Interestingly, in the presence of calcium ions Annexin A2 showed increased binding with p53 IRES. Immunopulldown experiments suggest that these two proteins associate with p53 mRNA ex vivo as well. Partial knockdown of Annexin A2 and PSF showed decrease in p53 IRES activity and reduced levels of both the p53 isoforms. More importantly the interplay between Annexin A2, PSF and PTB proteins for binding to p53mRNA appears to play a crucial role in IRES function. Taken together, our observations suggest pivotal role of two new trans-acting factors in regulating the p53-IRES function, which in turn influences the synthesis of p53 isoforms.

  16. Acquisition of p53 mutations in response to the non-genotoxic p53 activator Nutlin-3.

    PubMed

    Aziz, M H; Shen, H; Maki, C G

    2011-11-17

    Wild-type p53 is a stress-responsive tumor suppressor and potent growth inhibitor. Genotoxic stresses (for example, ionizing and ultraviolet radiation or chemotherapeutic drug treatment) can activate p53, but also induce mutations in the P53 gene, and thus select for p53-mutated cells. Nutlin-3a (Nutlin) is pre-clinical drug that activates p53 in a non-genotoxic manner. Nutlin occupies the p53-binding pocket of murine double minute 2 (MDM2), activating p53 by blocking the p53-MDM2 interaction. Because Nutlin neither binds p53 directly nor introduces DNA damage, we hypothesized Nutlin would not induce P53 mutations, and, therefore, not select for p53-mutated cells. To test this, populations of SJSA-1 (p53 wild-type) cancer cells were expanded that survived repeated Nutlin exposures, and individual clones were isolated. Group 1 clones were resistant to Nutlin-induced apoptosis, but still underwent growth arrest. Surprisingly, while some Group 1 clones retained wild-type p53, others acquired a heterozygous p53 mutation. Apoptosis resistance in Group 1 clones was associated with decreased PUMA induction and decreased caspase 3/7 activation. Group 2 clones were resistant to both apoptosis and growth arrest induced by Nutlin. Group 2 clones had acquired mutations in the p53-DNA-binding domain and expressed only mutant p53s that were induced by Nutlin treatment, but were unable to bind the P21 and PUMA gene promoters, and unable to activate transcription. These results demonstrate that non-genotoxic p53 activation (for example, by Nutlin treatment) can lead to the acquisition of somatic mutations in p53 and select for p53-mutated cells. These findings have implications for the potential clinical use of Nutlin and other small molecule MDM2 antagonists.

  17. Utility of birefringence changes due to collagen thermal denaturation rate process analysis: vessel wall temperature estimation for new short term heating balloon angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kenji; Shimazaki, Natsumi; Gotoh, Maya; Nakatani, Eriko; Arai, Tsunenori

    2007-02-01

    Our photo thermal reaction heating architecture balloon realizes less than 10 s short term heating that can soften vessel wall collagen without damaging surrounding tissue thermally. New thermal balloon angioplasty, photo-thermo dynamic balloon angioplasty (PTDBA) has experimentally shown sufficient opening with 2 atm low pressure dilation and prevention of chronic phase restenosis and acute phase thrombus in vivo. Even though PTDBA has high therapeutic potential, the most efficient heating condition is still under study, because relationship of treatment and thermal dose to vessel wall is not clarified yet. To study and set the most efficient heating condition, we have been working on establishment of temperature history estimation method from our previous experimental results. Heating target of PTDBA, collagen, thermally denatures following rate process. Denaturation is able to be quantified with measured collagen birefringence value. To express the denaturation with equation of rate process, the following ex vivo experiments were performed. Porcine extracted carotid artery was soaked in two different temperature saline baths to enforce constant temperature heating. Higher temperature bath was set to 40 to 80 degree Celsius and soaking duration was 5 to 40 s. Samples were observed by a polarizing microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The birefringence was measured by polarizing microscopic system using Brace-Koehler compensator 1/30 wavelength. The measured birefringence showed temperature dependency and quite fit with the rate process equation. We think vessel wall temperature is able to be estimated using the birefringence changes due to thermal denaturation.

  18. Heat-denaturation and aggregation of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) globulins as affected by the pH value.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Outi E; Zannini, Emanuele; Koehler, Peter; Arendt, Elke K

    2016-04-01

    The influence of heating (100 °C; 0-15 min) on the relative molecular mass, protein unfolding and secondary structure of quinoa globulins was studied at pH 6.5 (low solubility), 8.5 and 10.5 (high solubility). The patterns of denaturation and aggregation varied with pH. Heating triggered the disruption of the disulfide bonds connecting the acidic and basic chains of the chenopodin subunits at pH 8.5 and 10.5, but not at pH 6.5. Large aggregates unable to enter a 4% SDS-PAGE gel were formed at pH 6.5 and 8.5, which became soluble under reducing conditions. Heating at pH 10.5 lead to a rapid dissociation of the native chenopodin and to the disruption of the subunits, but no SDS-insoluble aggregates were formed. No major changes in secondary structure occurred during a 15 min heating, but an increase in hydrophobicity indicated unfolding of the tertiary structure in all samples.

  19. A p53 Super-tumor Suppressor Reveals a Tumor Suppressive p53-Ptpn14-Yap Axis in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mello, Stephano S; Valente, Liz J; Raj, Nitin; Seoane, Jose A; Flowers, Brittany M; McClendon, Jacob; Bieging-Rolett, Kathryn T; Lee, Jonghyeob; Ivanochko, Danton; Kozak, Margaret M; Chang, Daniel T; Longacre, Teri A; Koong, Albert C; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Kim, Seung K; Vogel, Hannes; Wood, Laura D; Hruban, Ralph H; Curtis, Christina; Attardi, Laura D

    2017-10-09

    The p53 transcription factor is a critical barrier to pancreatic cancer progression. To unravel mechanisms of p53-mediated tumor suppression, which have remained elusive, we analyzed pancreatic cancer development in mice expressing p53 transcriptional activation domain (TAD) mutants. Surprisingly, the p53(53,54) TAD2 mutant behaves as a "super-tumor suppressor," with an enhanced capacity to both suppress pancreatic cancer and transactivate select p53 target genes, including Ptpn14. Ptpn14 encodes a negative regulator of the Yap oncoprotein and is necessary and sufficient for pancreatic cancer suppression, like p53. We show that p53 deficiency promotes Yap signaling and that PTPN14 and TP53 mutations are mutually exclusive in human cancers. These studies uncover a p53-Ptpn14-Yap pathway that is integral to p53-mediated tumor suppression. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutant p53: One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand.

    PubMed

    Walerych, Dawid; Lisek, Kamil; Del Sal, Giannino

    2015-01-01

    Encoded by the mutated variants of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene, mutant p53 proteins are getting an increased experimental support as active oncoproteins promoting tumor growth and metastasis. p53 missense mutant proteins are losing their wild-type tumor suppressor activity and acquire oncogenic potential, possessing diverse transforming abilities in cell and mouse models. Whether various mutant p53s differ in their oncogenic potential has been a matter of debate. Recent discoveries are starting to uncover the existence of mutant p53 downstream programs that are common to different mutant p53 variants. In this review, we discuss a number of studies on mutant p53, underlining the advantages and disadvantages of alternative experimental approaches that have been used to describe the numerous mutant p53 gain-of-function activities. Therapeutic possibilities are also discussed, taking into account targeting either individual or multiple mutant p53 proteins in human cancer.

  1. Mitochondrial matrix P53 sensitizes cells to oxidative stress☆

    PubMed Central

    Koczor, Christopher A.; Torres, Rebecca A.; Fields, Earl J.; Boyd, Amy; Lewis, William

    2013-01-01

    A mitochondrial matrix-specific p53 construct (termed p53–290) in HepG2 cells was utilized to determine the impact of p53 in the mitochondrial matrix following oxidative stress. H2O2 exposure reduced cellular proliferation similarly in both p53–290 and vector cells, and p53–290 cells demonstrating decreased cell viability at 1 mM H2O2 (~85% viable). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) abundance was decreased in a dose-dependent manner in p53–290 cells while no change was observed in vector cells. Oximetric analysis revealed reduced maximal respiration and reserve capacity in p53–290 cells. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial matrix p53 sensitizes cells to oxidative stress by reducing mtDNA abundance and mitochondrial function. PMID:23499753

  2. Activation and activities of the p53 tumour suppressor protein

    PubMed Central

    Bálint, É; Vousden, K H

    2001-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor protein inhibits malignant progression by mediating cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or repair following cellular stress. One of the major regulators of p53 function is the MDM2 protein, and multiple forms of cellular stress activate p53 by inhibiting the MDM2-mediated degradation of p53. Mutations in p53, or disruption of the pathways that allow activation of p53, seem to be a general feature of all cancers. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the pathways that regulate p53 and the pathways that are induced by p53, as well as their implications for cancer therapy. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747320

  3. Differential Scanning Calorimetry Analysis of the Effects of Heat and Pressure on Protein Denaturation in Soy Flour Mixed with Various Types of Plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Kweon, Meera; Slade, Louise; Levine, Harry

    2017-02-01

    The effects of heat and pressure on protein denaturation in soy flour were explored by an experimental design that used pressure (atmospheric to 600 MPa), temperature (room to 90 °C), time (1 to 60 min), and type of aqueous plasticizer (NaCl, sucrose, betaine, and lactobionic acid (LBA)) as factors. When 50% (w/w) soy flour-water paste was high hydrostatic pressure (HHP)-treated for 20 min at 25 °C, the treatment at 200 MPa showed a small effect on denaturation of only the 7S soy globulin, but the treatment at 600 MPa showed a significant effect on denaturation of both the 7S and 11S soy globulins. The treatment at 60 °C showed a less-pronounced effect on denaturation of the 11S globulin, even at 600 MPa, but that at 90 °C showed a similar extent of denaturation of the 11S globulin at 600 MPa to that at 25 °C. Chaotropic 2N NaCl, 50% sucrose-, 50% betaine-, or 50% LBA-water solutions showed protective effects on protein denaturation during HHP treatment at 25 °C. Although LBA enhanced the extent of thermostability of soy protein less than did 2N NaCl, LBA exhibited better stabilization against pressure. The results from DSC analysis demonstrated that thermostable soy proteins were not always barostable. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  4. Reversible denaturation of oligomeric human chaperonin 10: denatured state depends on chemical denaturant.

    PubMed Central

    Guidry, J. J.; Moczygemba, C. K.; Steede, N. K.; Landry, S. J.; Wittung-Stafshede, P.

    2000-01-01

    Chaperonins cpn60/cpn10 (GroEL/GroES in Escherichia coli) assist folding of nonnative polypeptides. Folding of the chaperonins themselves is distinct in that it entails assembly of a sevenfold symmetrical structure. We have characterized denaturation and renaturation of the recombinant human chaperonin 10 (cpn10), which forms a heptamer. Denaturation induced by chemical denaturants urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) as well as by heat was monitored by tyrosine fluorescence, far-ultraviolet circular dichroism, and cross-linking; all denaturation reactions were reversible. GuHCl-induced denaturation was found to be cpn10 concentration dependent, in accord with a native heptamer to denatured monomer transition. In contrast, urea-induced denaturation was not cpn10 concentration dependent, suggesting that under these conditions cpn10 heptamers denature without dissociation. There were no indications of equilibrium intermediates, such as folded monomers, in either denaturant. The different cpn10 denatured states observed in high [GuHCl] and high [urea] were supported by cross-linking experiments. Thermal denaturation revealed that monomer and heptamer reactions display the same enthalpy change (per monomer), whereas the entropy-increase is significantly larger for the heptamer. A thermodynamic cycle for oligomeric cpn10, combining chemical denaturation with the dissociation constant in absence of denaturant, shows that dissociated monomers are only marginally stable (3 kJ/mol). The thermodynamics for co-chaperonin stability appears conserved; therefore, instability of the monomer could be necessary to specify the native heptameric structure. PMID:11152122

  5. p53-dependent ceramide response to genotoxic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Dbaibo, G S; Pushkareva, M Y; Rachid, R A; Alter, N; Smyth, M J; Obeid, L M; Hannun, Y A

    1998-01-01

    Both p53 and ceramide have been implicated in the regulation of growth suppression. p53 has been proposed as the "guardian of the genome" and ceramide has been suggested as a "tumor suppressor lipid. " Both molecules appear to regulate cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the relationship between p53 and ceramide. We found that treatment of Molt-4 cells with low concentrations of actinomycin D or gamma-irradiation, which activate p53-dependent apoptosis, induces apoptosis only in cells expressing normal levels of p53. In these cells, p53 activation was followed by a dose- and time-dependent increase in endogenous ceramide levels which was not seen in cells lacking functional p53 and treated similarly. Similar results were seen in irradiated L929 cells whereby the p53-deficient clone was significantly more resistant to irradiation and exhibited no ceramide response. However, in p53-independent systems, such as growth suppression induced by TNF-alpha or serum deprivation, ceramide accumulated irrespective of the upregulation of p53, indicating that p53 regulates ceramide accumulation in only a subset of growth-suppressive pathways. Finally, ceramide did not increase p53 levels when used at growth-suppressive concentrations. Also, when cells lacking functional p53, either due to mutation or the expression of the E6 protein of human papilloma virus, were treated with exogenous ceramide, there was equal growth suppression, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis as compared with cells expressing normal p53. These results indicate that p53 is unlikely to function "downstream" of ceramide. Instead, they suggest that, in situations where p53 performs a critical regulatory role, such as the response to genotoxic stress, it functions "upstream" of ceramide. These studies begin to define a relationship between these two pathways of growth inhibition. PMID:9664074

  6. p53, ROS and senescence in the control of aging.

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Arnaud; Vousden, Karen H

    2010-08-01

    In addition to its function as a tumour suppressor, p53 is also involved in an increasing number of pathology associated with aging. Several activities of p53 appear contribute to its role in aging; one function that might be particularly relevant in this context is the regulation of senescence. The control of ROS and senescence by p53 may help to explain how p53 can function to both restrain and promote aging.

  7. G-actin guides p53 nuclear transport: potential contribution of monomeric actin in altered localization of mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Taniya; Guha, Deblina; Manna, Argha; Panda, Abir Kumar; Bhat, Jyotsna; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2016-01-01

    p53 preserves genomic integrity by restricting anomaly at the gene level. Till date, limited information is available for cytosol to nuclear shuttling of p53; except microtubule-based trafficking route, which utilizes minus-end directed motor dynein. The present study suggests that monomeric actin (G-actin) guides p53 traffic towards the nucleus. Histidine-tag pull-down assay using purified p53(1–393)-His and G-actin confirms direct physical association between p53 and monomeric G-actin. Co-immunoprecipitation data supports the same. Confocal imaging explores intense perinuclear colocalization between p53 and G-actin. To address atomistic details of the complex, constraint-based docked model of p53:G-actin complex was generated based on crystal structures. MD simulation reveals that p53 DNA-binding domain arrests very well the G-actin protein. Docking benchmark studies have been carried out for a known crystal structure, 1YCS (complex between p53DBD and BP2), which validates the docking protocol we adopted. Co-immunoprecipitation study using “hot-spot” p53 mutants suggested reduced G-actin association with cancer-associated p53 conformational mutants (R175H and R249S). Considering these findings, we hypothesized that point mutation in p53 structure, which diminishes p53:G-actin complexation results in mutant p53 altered subcellular localization. Our model suggests p53Arg249 form polar-contact with Arg357 of G-actin, which upon mutation, destabilizes p53:G-actin interaction and results in cytoplasmic retention of p53R249S. PMID:27601274

  8. P53 mutations and cancer: a tight linkage

    PubMed Central

    Pisconti, Salvatore; Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    P53 is often mutated in solid tumors, in fact, somatic changes involving the gene encoding for p53 (TP53) have been discovered in more than 50% of human malignancies and several data confirmed that p53 mutations represent an early event in cancerogenesis. Main p53 functions consist in cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, senescence and apoptosis induction in response to mutagenic stimuli, and, to exert those functions, p53 acts as transcriptional factor. Recent data have highlighted another very important role of p53, consisting in regulate cell metabolism and cell response to oxidative stress. Majority of tumor suppressor genes, such as adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), retinoblastoma-associated protein (RB) and Von-Hippel-Lindau (VHL) are inactivated by deletion or early truncation mutations in tumors, resulting in the decreased or loss of expression of their proteins. Differently, most p53 mutations in human cancer are missense mutations, which result in the production of full-length mutant p53 proteins. It has been reported that mutant p53 proteins and wild type p53 proteins often regulate same cellular biological processes with opposite effects. So, mutant p53 has been reported to supply the cancer cells of glucose and nutrients, and, to avoid reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated damage during oxidative stress. These last features are able to render tumor cells resistant to ionizing radiations and chemotherapy. A future therapeutic approach in tumors bearing p53 mutations may be to deplete cancer cells of their energy reserves and antioxidants. PMID:28149884

  9. Tumor suppressor p53 protects mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Pingping; Wei, Jianchao; Zhu, Zixiang; Shi, Zixue; Shao, Donghua; Ma, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is involved in regulating immune responses, which contribute to antitumor and antiviral activity. However, whether p53 has anti-bacterial functions remains unclear. Listeria monocytogenes (LM) causes listeriosis in humans and animals, and it is a powerful model for studying innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, we illustrate an important regulatory role of p53 during LM infection. p53 knockout (p53KO) mice were more susceptible to LM infection, which was manifested by a shorter survival time and lower survival rate. p53KO mice showed significant impairments in LM eradication. Knockdown of p53 in RAW264.7 and HeLa cells resulted in increased invasion and intracellular survival of LM. Furthermore, the invasion and intracellular survival of LM was inhibited in p53-overexpressing RAW264.7 and HeLa cells. LM-infected p53KO mice exhibited severe clinical symptoms and organ injury, presumably because of the abnormal production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-18. Decreased IFN-γ and GBP1 productions were observed in LM-infected p53-deficient mice or cells. The combination of these defects likely resulted in the overwhelming LM infection in the p53KO mice. These observations indicate that p53 serves as an important regulator of the host innate immune that protects against LM infection. PMID:27644341

  10. Mutant p53 protein localized in the cytoplasm inhibits autophagy.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Eugenia; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Soussi, Thierry; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-10-01

    The knockout, knockdown or chemical inhibition of p53 stimulates autophagy. Moreover, autophagy-inducing stimuli such as nutrient depletion, rapamycin or lithium cause the depletion of cytoplasmic p53, which in turn is required for the induction of autophagy. Here, we show that retransfection of p53(-/-) HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with wild type p53 decreases autophagy down to baseline levels. Surprisingly, one third among a panel of 22 cancer-associated p53 single amino acid mutants also inhibited autophagy when transfected into p53(-/-) cells. Those variants of p53 that preferentially localize to the cytoplasm effectively repressed autophagy, whereas p53 mutants that display a prominently nuclear distribution failed to inhibit autophagy. The investigation of a series of deletion mutants revealed that removal of the DNA-binding domain from p53 fails to interfere with its role in the regulation of autophagy. Altogether, these results identify the cytoplasmic localization of p53 as the most important feature for p53-mediated autophagy inhibition. Moreover, the structural requirements for the two biological activities of extranuclear p53, namely induction of apoptosis and inhibition of autophagy, are manifestly different.

  11. Identification of p53-target genes in Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Mandriani, Barbara; Castellana, Stefano; Rinaldi, Carmela; Manzoni, Marta; Venuto, Santina; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Galceran, Juan; Nieto, M. Angela; Borsani, Giuseppe; Monti, Eugenio; Mazza, Tommaso; Merla, Giuseppe; Micale, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    To orchestrate the genomic response to cellular stress signals, p53 recognizes and binds to DNA containing specific and well-characterized p53-responsive elements (REs). Differences in RE sequences can strongly affect the p53 transactivation capacity and occur even between closely related species. Therefore, the identification and characterization of a species-specific p53 Binding sistes (BS) consensus sequence and of the associated target genes may help to provide new insights into the evolution of the p53 regulatory networks across different species. Although p53 functions were studied in a wide range of species, little is known about the p53-mediated transcriptional signature in Danio rerio. Here, we designed and biochemically validated a computational approach to identify novel p53 target genes in Danio rerio genome. Screening all the Danio rerio genome by pattern-matching-based analysis, we found p53 RE-like patterns proximal to 979 annotated Danio rerio genes. Prioritization analysis identified a subset of 134 candidate pattern-related genes, 31 of which have been investigated in further biochemical assays. Our study identified runx1, axin1, traf4a, hspa8, col4a5, necab2, and dnajc9 genes as novel direct p53 targets and 12 additional p53-controlled genes in Danio rerio genome. The proposed combinatorial approach resulted to be highly sensitive and robust for identifying new p53 target genes also in additional animal species. PMID:27581768

  12. Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    therapy, carboplatin, paclitaxel, polymeric drug delivery, polymer -adenovirus hybrid 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...modified p53, tumor suppressor, high grade serous carcinoma, combination therapy, carboplatin, paclitaxel, polymeric drug delivery, polymer ...WSLP ( polymer ) has been successfully synthesized, and a subset of adenoviral constructs have been cloned (p53, p53-CC, EGFP control). Major results

  13. Genetic basis for p53 overexpression in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Davidoff, A M; Humphrey, P A; Iglehart, J D; Marks, J R

    1991-01-01

    Overexpression of an activated form of the p53 protein may be involved in neoplastic transformation. We found widespread overexpression of p53 by immunohistochemical staining in 11 (22%) of 49 primary invasive human breast cancers. Northern blot analysis showed that this overexpression was not due to an increase in the steady-state level of p53 mRNA. The p53 gene was directly sequenced in 7 of these tumors with elevated levels of the protein and, in each case, a mutation that altered the coding sequence for p53 was found in a highly conserved region of the gene. Whereas 4 of these tumors contained only a mutant p53 allele, the other 3 tumors exhibited coding sequences from both a mutant and a wild-type allele. p53 mutations have previously been correlated with allelic loss of part of chromosome 17p that contains the p53 locus. Examination of all 49 breast tumors revealed a 61% frequency of deletion at or near the p53 locus. However, the presence of allelic deletion did not correlate with overexpression of the protein. Six tumors that were deleted but did not express high levels of the protein were sequenced and all retained a wild-type p53 allele. In this series of human breast cancers, overexpression of the p53 protein, not allelic loss on chromosome 17p, was always associated with mutation of the p53 gene. Images PMID:2052583

  14. Identification of p53-target genes in Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Mandriani, Barbara; Castellana, Stefano; Rinaldi, Carmela; Manzoni, Marta; Venuto, Santina; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Galceran, Juan; Nieto, M Angela; Borsani, Giuseppe; Monti, Eugenio; Mazza, Tommaso; Merla, Giuseppe; Micale, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    To orchestrate the genomic response to cellular stress signals, p53 recognizes and binds to DNA containing specific and well-characterized p53-responsive elements (REs). Differences in RE sequences can strongly affect the p53 transactivation capacity and occur even between closely related species. Therefore, the identification and characterization of a species-specific p53 Binding sistes (BS) consensus sequence and of the associated target genes may help to provide new insights into the evolution of the p53 regulatory networks across different species. Although p53 functions were studied in a wide range of species, little is known about the p53-mediated transcriptional signature in Danio rerio. Here, we designed and biochemically validated a computational approach to identify novel p53 target genes in Danio rerio genome. Screening all the Danio rerio genome by pattern-matching-based analysis, we found p53 RE-like patterns proximal to 979 annotated Danio rerio genes. Prioritization analysis identified a subset of 134 candidate pattern-related genes, 31 of which have been investigated in further biochemical assays. Our study identified runx1, axin1, traf4a, hspa8, col4a5, necab2, and dnajc9 genes as novel direct p53 targets and 12 additional p53-controlled genes in Danio rerio genome. The proposed combinatorial approach resulted to be highly sensitive and robust for identifying new p53 target genes also in additional animal species.

  15. Cold denaturation of staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Griko, Y V; Privalov, P L; Sturtevant, J M; Venyaminov SYu

    1988-01-01

    Denaturation of staphylococcal nuclease was studied in a temperature range from -7 to 70 degrees C by scanning microcalorimetry and spectropolarimetry. It was found that the native protein is maximally stable at about 20 degrees C and is denatured upon heating and cooling from this temperature. The heat and cold denaturation processes are approximated rather well by a two-state transition showing that the molecule is composed of a single cooperative system. The main difference between these two processes is in the sign of the enthalpy and entropy of denaturation: whereas the heat denaturation proceeds with increases in the enthalpy and entropy, the cold denaturation proceeds with decreases in both quantities. The inversion of the enthalpy sign occurs at about 15 degrees C in an acetate buffer, but this temperature can be raised by addition of urea to the solvent. PMID:3368446

  16. Salicylic Acid and Ethylene Pathways Are Differentially Activated in Melon Cotyledons by Active or Heat-Denatured Cellulase from Trichoderma longibrachiatum

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Christelle; Blanc, Frédéric; Le Claire, Emilie; Besnard, Olivier; Nicole, Michel; Baccou, Jean-Claude

    2001-01-01

    Infiltration of cellulase (EC 3.2.1.4) from Trichoderma longibrachiatum into melon (Cucumis melo) cotyledons induced several key defense mechanisms and hypersensitive reaction-like symptoms. An oxidative burst was observed 3 hours after treatment and was followed by activation of ethylene and salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathways leading to marked induction of peroxidase and chitinase activities. The treatment of cotyledons by heat-denatured cellulase also led to some induction of peroxidase and chitinase activities, but the oxidative burst and SA production were not observed. Co-infiltration of aminoethoxyvinil-glycine (an ethylene inhibitor) with the active cellulase did not affect the high increase of peroxidase and chitinase activities. In contrast, co-infiltration of aminoethoxyvinil-glycine with the denatured enzyme blocked peroxidase and chitinase activities. Our data suggest that the SA pathway (induced by the cellulase activity) and ethylene pathway (induced by heat-denatured and active protein) together coordinate the activation of defense mechanisms. We found a partial interaction between both signaling pathways since SA caused an inhibition of the ethylene production and a decrease in peroxidase activity when co-infiltrated with denatured cellulase. Treatments with active or denatured cellulase caused a reduction in powdery mildew (Sphaerotheca fuliginea) disease. PMID:11553761

  17. Targeting p53 Null Neuroblastomas through RLIP76**

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Jyotsana; Yadav, Sushma; Nagaprashantha, Lokesh Dalasanur; Vatsyayan, Rit; Singhal, Sharad S; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    The search for p53-independent mechanism of cancer cell killing is highly relevant to pediatric neuroblastomas, where successful therapy is limited by its transformation into p53 mutant and a highly drug-resistant neoplasm. Our studies on the drug-resistant p53 mutant as compared with drug-resistant p53 wild-type neuroblastoma revealed a novel mechanism for resistance to apoptosis: a direct role of p53 in regulating the cellular concentration of pro-apoptotic alkenals by functioning as a specific and saturable allosteric inhibitor of the alkenal-glutathione-conjugate transporter, RLIP76. The RLIP76-p53 complex was demonstrated both using immuno-precipitation analyses of purified proteins as well as by immuno-fluorescence analysis. Drug transport studies revealed that p53 inhibited both basal and PKCα stimulated transport of glutathione-conjugates of 4HNE (GS-HNE) and cisplatin. Drug resistance was significantly greater for p53 mutant as compared with p53 wild-type neuroblastoma cell lines, but both were susceptible to depletion of RLIP76 by antisense alone. In addition, inhibition of RLIP76 significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. Taken together, these studies provide powerful evidence for a novel mechanism for drug and apoptosis resistance in p53 mutant neuroblastoma, based on a model of regulation of p53 induced apoptosis by RLIP76, where p53 is a saturable and specific allosteric inhibitor of RLIP76, and p53 loss results in over-expression of RLIP76; thus, in the absence of p53, the drug and glutathione-conjugate transport activities of RLIP76 are enhanced. Most importantly, our findings strongly indicate RLIP76 as a novel target for therapy of drug-resistant and p53 mutant neuroblastoma. PMID:21411502

  18. Functional evolution of the p53 regulatory network through its target response elements

    PubMed Central

    Jegga, Anil G.; Inga, Alberto; Menendez, Daniel; Aronow, Bruce J.; Resnick, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional network evolution is central to the development of complex biological systems. Networks can evolve through variation of master regulators and/or by changes in regulation of genes within networks. To gain insight into meaningful evolutionary differences in large networks, it is essential to address the functional consequences of sequence differences in response elements (REs) targeted by transcription factors. Using a combination of custom bioinformatics and multispecies alignment of promoter regions, we investigated the functional evolution of REs in terms of responsiveness to the sequence-specific transcription factor p53, a tumor suppressor and master regulator of stress responses. We identified REs orthologous to known p53 targets in human and rodent cells or alternatively REs related to the established p53 consensus. The orthologous REs were assigned p53 transactivation capabilities based on rules determined from model systems, and a functional heat map was developed to visually summarize conservation of sequence and relative level of responsiveness to p53 for 47 REs in 14 species. Individual REs exhibited marked differences in transactivation potentials and widespread evolutionary turnover. Functional differences were often not predicted from consensus sequence evaluations. Of the established human p53 REs analyzed, 91% had sequence conservation in at least one nonprimate species compared with 67.5% for functional conservation. Surprisingly, there was almost no conservation of functional REs for genes involved in DNA metabolism or repair between humans and rodents, suggesting important differences in p53 stress responses and cancer development. PMID:18187580

  19. p53 as an Effector or Inhibitor of Therapy Response.

    PubMed

    Ablain, Julien; Poirot, Brigitte; Esnault, Cécile; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; de Thé, Hugues

    2015-12-04

    Although integrity of the p53 signaling pathway in a given tumor was expected to be a critical determinant of response to therapies, most clinical studies failed to link p53 status and treatment outcome. Here, we present two opposite situations: one in which p53 is an essential effector of cure by targeted leukemia therapies and another one in advanced breast cancers in which p53 inactivation is required for the clinical efficacy of dose-dense chemotherapy. If p53 promotes or blocks therapy response, therapies must be tailored on its status in individual tumors. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  20. Unravelling mechanisms of p53-mediated tumour suppression

    PubMed Central

    Bieging, Kathryn T.; Mello, Stephano Spano; Attardi, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    p53 is a crucial tumour suppressor that responds to diverse stress signals by orchestrating specific cellular responses, including transient cell cycle arrest, cellular senescence and apoptosis, which are all processes associated with tumour suppression. However, recent studies have challenged the relative importance of these canonical cellular responses for p53-mediated tumour suppression and have highlighted roles for p53 in modulating other cellular processes, including metabolism, stem cell maintenance, invasion and metastasis, as well as communication within the tumour microenvironment. In this Opinion article, we discuss the roles of classical p53 functions, as well as emerging p53-regulated processes, in tumour suppression. PMID:24739573

  1. p53: its mutations and their impact on transcription.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Catherine; Pearsall, Isabella; Yeudall, Andrew; Deb, Swati Palit; Deb, Sumitra

    2014-01-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor protein whose key function is to maintain the integrity of the cell. Mutations in p53 have been found in up to 50 % of all human cancers and cause an increase in oncogenic phenotypes such as proliferation and tumorigenicity. Both wild-type and mutant p53 have been shown to transactivate their target genes, either through directly binding to DNA, or indirectly through protein-protein interactions. This review discusses possible mechanisms behind both wild-type and mutant p53-mediated transactivation and touches on the concept of addiction to mutant p53 of cancer cells and how that may be used for future therapies.

  2. Quaternary structure of the specific p53–DNA complex reveals the mechanism of p53 mutant dominance

    PubMed Central

    Aramayo, Ricardo; Sherman, Michael B.; Brownless, Kathryne; Lurz, Rudi; Okorokov, Andrei L.; Orlova, Elena V.

    2011-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor is a transcriptional activator that controls cell fate in response to various stresses. p53 can initiate cell cycle arrest, senescence and/or apoptosis via transactivation of p53 target genes, thus preventing cancer onset. Mutations that impair p53 usually occur in the core domain and negate the p53 sequence-specific DNA binding. Moreover, these mutations exhibit a dominant negative effect on the remaining wild-type p53. Here, we report the cryo electron microscopy structure of the full-length p53 tetramer bound to a DNA-encoding transcription factor response element (RE) at a resolution of 21 Å. While two core domains from both dimers of the p53 tetramer interact with DNA within the complex, the other two core domains remain available for binding another DNA site. This finding helps to explain the dominant negative effect of p53 mutants based on the fact that p53 dimers are formed co-translationally before the whole tetramer assembles; therefore, a single mutant dimer would prevent the p53 tetramer from binding DNA. The structure indicates that the Achilles’ heel of p53 is in its dimer-of-dimers organization, thus the tetramer activity can be negated by mutation in only one allele followed by tumourigenesis. PMID:21764777

  3. Induction of apoptosis by cytoplasmically localized wild-type p53 and the S121F mutant super p53

    PubMed Central

    YASUDA, KATSUHIRO; KATO, SHUNSUKE; SAKAMOTO, YASUHIRO; WATANABE, GOU; MASHIKO, SATSUKI; SATO, ATSUKO; KAKUDO, YUICHI; ISHIOKA, CHIKASHI

    2012-01-01

    After DNA damage, p53 is accumulated in the nucleus and transactivates downstream genes and induces apoptosis. There are two pathways in p53-dependent apoptosis, the transactivation-dependent and -independent pathway. In this study, we constructed p53-inducible glioblastoma cell lines and analyzed them for the induction of apoptosis and transactivation of p53-downstream genes after the nuclear or cytoplasmic expression of p53. To sequester p53 in the cytoplasm, we used p53 mutant with arginine to glycine substitution at residue 306 (R306G). Wild-type p53 retained the ability to arrest the cell cycle, and a p53 mutant with serine to phenylalanine substitution at residue 121 (S121F), which has a strong ability to induce apoptosis, retained this ability even when both the wild-type and p53 and S121F mutant were exclusively sequestered from the nucleus into the cytoplasm. Notably, cytoplasmically sequestered wild-type p53 and S121F mutant transactivated the downstream genes with distinct expression profiles, and the strong apoptotic ability of S121F was not associated with its transactivation activity. These results underscore the existence of transactivation-independent apoptosis and cytoplasmic function of p53. PMID:22783376

  4. Lysine methylation represses p53 activity in teratocarcinoma cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiajun; Dou, Zhixun; Sammons, Morgan A.; Levine, Arnold J.; Berger, Shelley L.

    2016-01-01

    TP53 (which encodes the p53 protein) is the most frequently mutated gene among all human cancers, whereas tumors that retain the wild-type TP53 gene often use alternative mechanisms to repress the p53 tumor-suppressive function. Testicular teratocarcinoma cells rarely contain mutations in TP53, yet the transcriptional activity of wild-type p53 is compromised, despite its high expression level. Here we report that in the teratocarcinoma cell line NTera2, p53 is subject to lysine methylation at its carboxyl terminus, which has been shown to repress p53’s transcriptional activity. We show that reduction of the cognate methyltransferases reactivates p53 and promotes differentiation of the NTera2 cells. Furthermore, reconstitution of methylation-deficient p53 mutants into p53-depleted NTera2 cells results in elevated expression of p53 downstream targets and precocious loss of pluripotent gene expression compared with re-expression of wild-type p53. Our results provide evidence that lysine methylation of endogenous wild-type p53 represses its activity in cancer cells and suggest new therapeutic possibilities of targeting testicular teratocarcinoma. PMID:27535933

  5. Pyrimidine biosynthesis links mitochondrial respiration to the p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Khutornenko, Anastasia A.; Roudko, Vladimir V.; Chernyak, Boris V.; Vartapetian, Andrey B.; Chumakov, Peter M.; Evstafieva, Alexandra G.

    2010-01-01

    While many functions of the p53 tumor suppressor affect mitochondrial processes, the role of altered mitochondrial physiology in a modulation of p53 response remains unclear. As mitochondrial respiration is affected in many pathologic conditions such as hypoxia and intoxications, the impaired electron transport chain could emit additional p53-inducing signals and thereby contribute to tissue damage. Here we show that a shutdown of mitochondrial respiration per se does not trigger p53 response, because inhibitors acting in the proximal and distal segments of the respiratory chain do not activate p53. However, strong p53 response is induced specifically after an inhibition of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 (the electron transport chain complex III). The p53 response is triggered by the deficiency in pyrimidines that is developed due to a suppression of the functionally coupled mitochondrial pyrimidine biosynthesis enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). In epithelial carcinoma cells the activation of p53 in response to mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III inhibitors does not require phosphorylation of p53 at Serine 15 or up-regulation of p14ARF. Instead, our data suggest a contribution of NQO1 and NQO2 in stabilization of p53 in the nuclei. The results establish the deficiency in pyrimidine biosynthesis as the cause of p53 response in the cells with impaired mitochondrial respiration. PMID:20566882

  6. p53 genes function to restrain mobile elements

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Annika; Jones, Amanda E.; D'Brot, Alejandro; Lu, Wan-Jin; Kurtz, Paula; Moran, John V.; Rakheja, Dinesh; Chen, Kenneth S.; Hammer, Robert E.; Comerford, Sarah A.; Amatruda, James F.; Abrams, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, p53 genes govern stress response networks by specifying adaptive transcriptional responses. The human member of this gene family is mutated in most cancers, but precisely how p53 functions to mediate tumor suppression is not well understood. Using Drosophila and zebrafish models, we show that p53 restricts retrotransposon activity and genetically interacts with components of the piRNA (piwi-interacting RNA) pathway. Furthermore, transposon eruptions occurring in the p53− germline were incited by meiotic recombination, and transcripts produced from these mobile elements accumulated in the germ plasm. In gene complementation studies, normal human p53 alleles suppressed transposons, but mutant p53 alleles from cancer patients could not. Consistent with these observations, we also found patterns of unrestrained retrotransposons in p53-driven mouse and human cancers. Furthermore, p53 status correlated with repressive chromatin marks in the 5′ sequence of a synthetic LINE-1 element. Together, these observations indicate that ancestral functions of p53 operate through conserved mechanisms to contain retrotransposons. Since human p53 mutants are disabled for this activity, our findings raise the possibility that p53 mitigates oncogenic disease in part by restricting transposon mobility. PMID:26701264

  7. Chemical Variations on the p53 Reactivation Theme

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Carlos J. A.; Rodrigues, Cecília M. P.; Moreira, Rui; Santos, Maria M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Among the tumor suppressor genes, p53 is one of the most studied. It is widely regarded as the “guardian of the genome”, playing a major role in carcinogenesis. In fact, direct inactivation of the TP53 gene occurs in more than 50% of malignancies, and in tumors that retain wild-type p53 status, its function is usually inactivated by overexpression of negative regulators (e.g., MDM2 and MDMX). Hence, restoring p53 function in cancer cells represents a valuable anticancer approach. In this review, we will present an updated overview of the most relevant small molecules developed to restore p53 function in cancer cells through inhibition of the p53-MDMs interaction, or direct targeting of wild-type p53 or mutated p53. In addition, optimization approaches used for the development of small molecules that have entered clinical trials will be presented. PMID:27187415

  8. Chemical Variations on the p53 Reactivation Theme.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carlos J A; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; Moreira, Rui; Santos, Maria M M

    2016-05-13

    Among the tumor suppressor genes, p53 is one of the most studied. It is widely regarded as the "guardian of the genome", playing a major role in carcinogenesis. In fact, direct inactivation of the TP53 gene occurs in more than 50% of malignancies, and in tumors that retain wild-type p53 status, its function is usually inactivated by overexpression of negative regulators (e.g., MDM2 and MDMX). Hence, restoring p53 function in cancer cells represents a valuable anticancer approach. In this review, we will present an updated overview of the most relevant small molecules developed to restore p53 function in cancer cells through inhibition of the p53-MDMs interaction, or direct targeting of wild-type p53 or mutated p53. In addition, optimization approaches used for the development of small molecules that have entered clinical trials will be presented.

  9. Stable and pH-sensitive protein nanogels made by self-assembly of heat denatured soy protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nannan; Lin, Lianzhu; Sun, Weizheng; Zhao, Mouming

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we examined the possibility of preparing stable soy protein nanogels by simply heating homogeneous soy protein dispersion. The protein nanogels formed were characterized by z-average hydrodynamic diameter, polydispersity index, turbidity, ζ-potential, morphology, and their stability to pH and ionic strength change. Soy protein dispersion (1% w/v) was homogeneous around pH 5.9 where it had the lowest polydispersity index (∼0.1). Stable and spherical nanogels were formed by heating soy protein dispersion at pH 5.9 under 95 °C. They sustained constantly low polydispersity index (∼0.1) in the investigated pH range of 6.06-7.0 and 2.6-3.0. The nanogels were pH-sensitive and would swell with pH change. They were stable at 0-200 mM NaCl concentration. Denaturation of soy glycinin was the prerequisite for the formation of stable nanogels. Soy protein nanogels had a core-shell structure with basic polypeptides and β subunits interacting together as the hydrophobic core; and acid polypeptides, α', and α subunits locating outside the core as hydrophilic shell. The inner structure of soy protein nanogels was mainly stabilized by disulfide bonds cross-linked network and hydrophobic interaction. Soy protein nanogels made in this study would be useful as functional ingredients in biotechnological, pharmaceutical, and food industries.

  10. Regulation of p53 during senescence in normal human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Reuben H; Kang, Mo K; Kim, Terresa; Yang, Paul; Bae, Susan; Williams, Drake W; Phung, Samantha; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Hong, Christine; Park, No-Hee

    2015-01-01

    p53, the guardian of the genome, is a tumor suppressor protein and critical for the genomic integrity of the cells. Many studies have shown that intracellular level of p53 is enhanced during replicative senescence in normal fibroblasts, and the enhanced level of p53 is viewed as the cause of senescence. Here, we report that, unlike in normal fibroblasts, the level of intracellular p53 reduces during replicative senescence and oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). We found that the intracellular p53 level was also decreased in age-dependent manner in normal human epithelial tissues. Senescent NHKs exhibited an enhanced level of p16INK4A, induced G2 cell cycle arrest, and lowered the p53 expression and transactivation activity. We found that low level of p53 in senescent NHKs was due to reduced transcription of p53. The methylation status at the p53 promoter was not altered during senescence, but senescent NHKs exhibited notably lower level of acetylated histone 3 (H3) at the p53 promoter in comparison with rapidly proliferating cells. Moreover, p53 knockdown in rapidly proliferating NHKs resulted in the disruption of fidelity in repaired DNA. Taken together, our study demonstrates that p53 level is diminished during replicative senescence and OIS and that such diminution is associated with H3 deacetylation at the p53 promoter. The reduced intracellular p53 level in keratinocytes of the elderly could be a contributing factor for more frequent development of epithelial cancer in the elderly because of the loss of genomic integrity of cells. PMID:26138448

  11. The function of Drosophila p53 isoforms in apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, B; Rotelli, M; Dixon, M; Calvi, B R

    2015-01-01

    The p53 protein is a major mediator of the cellular response to genotoxic stress and is a crucial suppressor of tumor formation. In a variety of organisms, p53 and its paralogs, p63 and p73, each encode multiple protein isoforms through alternative splicing, promoters, and translation start sites. The function of these isoforms in development and disease are still being defined. Here, we evaluate the apoptotic potential of multiple isoforms of the single p53 gene in the genetic model Drosophila melanogaster. Most previous studies have focused on the p53A isoform, but it has been recently shown that a larger p53B isoform can induce apoptosis when overexpressed. It has remained unclear, however, whether one or both isoforms are required for the apoptotic response to genotoxic stress. We show that p53B is a much more potent inducer of apoptosis than p53A when overexpressed. Overexpression of two newly identified short isoforms perturbed development and inhibited the apoptotic response to ionizing radiation. Analysis of physiological protein expression indicated that p53A is the most abundant isoform, and that both p53A and p53B can form a complex and co-localize to sub-nuclear compartments. In contrast to the overexpression results, new isoform-specific loss-of-function mutants indicated that it is the shorter p53A isoform, not full-length p53B, that is the primary mediator of pro-apoptotic gene transcription and apoptosis after ionizing radiation. Together, our data show that it is the shorter p53A isoform that mediates the apoptotic response to DNA damage, and further suggest that p53B and shorter isoforms have specialized functions. PMID:25882045

  12. Hyperglycemia promotes p53-Mdm2 interaction but reduces p53 ubiquitination in RINm5F cells.

    PubMed

    Barzalobre-Gerónimo, R; Raúl, Barzalobre-Gerónimo; Flores-López, L A; Antonio, Flores-López Luis; Baiza-Gutman, L A; Arturo, Baiza-Gutman Luis; Cruz, M; Miguel, Cruz; García-Macedo, R; Rebeca, García-Macedo; Ávalos-Rodríguez, A; Alejandro, Ávalos-Rodríguez; Contreras-Ramos, A; Alejandra, Contreras-Ramos; Díaz-Flores, A; Margarita, Díaz-Flores; Ortega-Camarillo, C; Clara, Ortega-Camarillo

    2015-07-01

    The apoptosis of β cells induced by hyperglycemia has been associated with p53 mobilization to mitochondria and p53 phosphorylation. Murine double minute 2 (Mdm2) induces the degradation of p53 and thereby protects cells from apoptosis. We studied the effect of glucose at high concentration on the ability of Mdm2 to ubiquitinate p53 and promote its degradation. RINm5F cells were grown in RPMI-1640 medium with 5 or 30 mM glucose for varying periods of time. After this treatment, the expression of Mdm2 was measured using real-time PCR. The phosphorylation of Mdm2 at Ser166, p53 at Ser15, and the kinases Akt and ATM were measured by Western blotting. The formation of the p53-Mdm2 complex and p53 ubiquitination was assessed by p53 immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence. Our results showed that high glucose reduced Mdm2 mRNA expression and protein concentration and increased Mdm2 and Akt phosphorylation, albeit with slower kinetics for Akt. It also promoted p53-Mdm2 complex formation, whereas p53 ubiquitination was suppressed. Furthermore, phosphorylation of both p53 Ser15 and ATM was increased in the presence of 30 mM glucose. These data indicate that high concentration glucose decrease the mRNA expression and cytosolic concentration of Mdm2. However, although the increase in glucose promoted the phosphorylation of Mdm2, it also decreased p53 ubiquitination, thus avoiding p53 degradation. In hyperglycemic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, the reduction of pancreatic β cells mass is favored by stabilization of p53 in association with low p53 ubiquitination and reduced expression of Mdm2.

  13. Analyses of p53 antibodies in sera of patients with lung carcinoma define immunodominant regions in the p53 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Schlichtholz, B.; Trédaniel, J.; Lubin, R.; Zalcman, G.; Hirsch, A.; Soussi, T.

    1994-01-01

    Antibodies specific for human p53 were analysed in sera of lung cancer patients. We detected p53 antibodies in the sera of 24% (10/42) of patients with lung carcinoma. The distribution was as follows: 4/9 small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs), 2/18 squamous cell lung carcinomas (SCCs), 2/10 adenocarcinomas (ADCs) and 2/5 large-cell lung carcinomas (LCCs). p53 antibodies were always present at the time of diagnosis and did not appear during progression of the disease. Using an original peptide-mapping procedure, we precisely localised the p53 epitopes recognised by p53 antibodies. Immunodominant epitopes reacting with antibodies were localised in the amino and carboxy termini of the protein, similar to those found in breast carcinoma patients or in animals immunised with p53. In light of these data, we suggest that p53 antibodies occur via a self-immunisation process that is the consequence of p53 accumulation in tumour cells. p53 antibodies were also detected in two patients without detected malignant disease. One of these patients died 6 months later of lung carcinoma, suggesting that p53 antibodies may be a precocious marker of p53 alteration. Images Figure 2 PMID:7514026

  14. The p53 isoform delta133p53ß regulates cancer cell apoptosis in a RhoB-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Arsic, Nikola; Ho-Pun-Cheung, Alexandre; Evelyne, Crapez; Assenat, Eric; Jarlier, Marta; Anguille, Christelle; Colard, Manon; Pezet, Mikaël

    2017-01-01

    The TP53 gene plays essential roles in cancer. Conventionally, wild type (WT) p53 is thought to prevent cancer development and metastasis formation, while mutant p53 has transforming abilities. However, clinical studies failed to establish p53 mutation status as an unequivocal predictive or prognostic factor of cancer progression. The recent discovery of p53 isoforms that can differentially regulate cell cycle arrest and apoptosis suggests that their expression, rather than p53 mutations, could be a more clinically relevant biomarker in patients with cancer. In this study, we show that the p53 isoform delta133p53ß is involved in regulating the apoptotic response in colorectal cancer cell lines. We first demonstrate delta133p53ß association with the small GTPase RhoB, a well-described anti-apoptotic protein. We then show that, by inhibiting RhoB activity, delta133p53ß protects cells from camptothecin-induced apoptosis. Moreover, we found that high delta133p53 mRNA expression levels are correlated with higher risk of recurrence in a series of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (n = 36). Our findings describe how a WT TP53 isoform can act as an oncogene and add a new layer to the already complex p53 signaling network. PMID:28212429

  15. C-Abl as a modulator of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Levav-Cohen, Yaara; Goldberg, Zehavit; Zuckerman, Valentina; Grossman, Tamar; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal . E-mail: haupt@md.huji.ac.il

    2005-06-10

    P53 is renowned as a cellular tumor suppressor poised to instigate remedial responses to various stress insults that threaten DNA integrity. P53 levels and activities are kept under tight regulation involving a complex network of activators and inhibitors, which determine the type and extent of p53 growth inhibitory signaling. Within this complexity, the p53-Mdm2 negative auto-regulatory loop serves as a major route through which intra- and extra-cellular stress signals are channeled to appropriate p53 responses. Mdm2 inhibits p53 transcriptional activities and through its E3 ligase activity promotes p53 proteasomal degradation either within the nucleus or following nuclear export. Upon exposure to stress signals these actions of Mdm2 have to be moderated, or even interrupted, in order to allow sufficient p53 to accumulate in an active form. Multiple mechanisms involving a variety of factors have been demonstrated to mediate this interruption. C-Abl is a critical factor that under physiological conditions is required for the maximal and efficient accumulation of active p53 in response to DNA damage. C-Abl protects p53 by antagonizing the inhibitory effect of Mdm2, an action that requires a direct interplay between c-Abl and Mdm2. In addition, c-Abl protects p53 from other inhibitors of p53, such as the HPV-E6/E6AP complex, that inhibits and degrades p53 in HPV-infected cells. Surprisingly, the oncogenic form of c-Abl, the Bcr-Abl fusion protein in CML cells, also promotes the accumulation of wt p53. However, in contrast to the activation of p53 by c-Abl, its oncogenic form, Bcr-Abl, counteracts the growth inhibitory activities of p53 by modulating the p53-Mdm2 loop. Thus, it appears that by modulating the p53-Mdm2 loop, c-Abl and its oncogenic forms critically determine the type and extent of the cellular response to DNA damage.

  16. p53 regulation upon genotoxic stress: intricacies and complexities

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Rajni; Kohli, Saishruti; Das, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    p53, the revered savior of genomic integrity, receives signals from diverse stress sensors and strategizes to maintain cellular homeostasis. However, the predominance of p53 overshadows the fact that this herculean task is no one-man show; rather, there is a huge army of regulators that reign over p53 at various levels to avoid an unnecessary surge in its levels and sculpt it dynamically to favor one cellular outcome over another. This governance starts right at the time of p53 translation, which is gated by proteins that bind to p53 mRNA and keep a stringent check on p53 protein levels. The same effect is also achieved by ubiquitylases and deubiquitylases that fine-tune p53 turnover and miRNAs that modulate p53 levels, adding precision to this entire scheme. In addition, extensive covalent modifications and differential protein interactions allow p53 to trigger a tailor-made response for a given circumstance. To magnify the marvel, these various tiers of regulation operate simultaneously and in various combinations. In this review, we have tried to provide a glimpse into this bewildering labyrinth. We believe that further studies will result in a better understanding of p53 regulation and that new insights will help unravel many aspects of cancer biology. PMID:27308356

  17. Targeting the p53 Pathway in Ewing Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Neilsen, Paul M.; Pishas, Kathleen I.; Callen, David F.; Thomas, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor plays a pivotal role in the prevention of oncogenic transformation. Cancers frequently evade the potent antitumour surveillance mechanisms of p53 through mutation of the TP53 gene, with approximately 50% of all human malignancies expressing dysfunctional, mutated p53 proteins. Interestingly, genetic lesions in the TP53 gene are only observed in 10% of Ewing Sarcomas, with the majority of these sarcomas expressing a functional wild-type p53. In addition, the p53 downstream signaling pathways and DNA-damage cell cycle checkpoints remain functionally intact in these sarcomas. This paper summarizes recent insights into the functional capabilities and regulation of p53 in Ewing Sarcoma, with a particular focus on the cross-talk between p53 and the EWS-FLI1 gene rearrangement frequently associated with this disease. The development of several activators of p53 is discussed, with recent evidence demonstrating the potential of small molecule p53 activators as a promising systemic therapeutic approach for the treatment of Ewing Sarcomas with wild-type p53. PMID:21197471

  18. Protective role of p53 in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yazhen; Yin, Shutao; Yan, Mingzhu; Win, Sanda; Aung Than, Tin; Aghajan, Mariam; Hu, Hongbo; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2017-05-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor with a pro-death role in many conditions. However, in some contexts, evidence supports a pro-survival function. p53 has been shown to be activated in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity but the impact of this on toxicity is uncertain. In the present study, we have found that p53 plays a protective role in APAP-induced liver injury. We inhibited p53 using three different approaches in mice, pifithrin-α (PFTα), knockdown of p53 expression with antisense oligonucleotide, and p53 knockout. Mice were treated with APAP (300mg/kg) i.p. and after 24h in all three conditions, the liver injury was more severe as reflected in higher ALT levels and great area of necrosis in histology of the liver. Conversely, a p53 activator, nutlin-3a, decreased the liver injury induced by APAP. In the p53 inhibition models, enhanced sustained JNK activation was seen in the early time course, while the JNK was suppressed with the p53 activator. In conclusion, p53 plays a novel protective role in APAP induced liver injury through inhibiting the activation of JNK, a key mediator in APAP-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of p53 isoforms and aggregations in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, SeJin; An, Seong Soo A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract p53 is a master regulatory protein that is involved in diverse cellular metabolic processes such as apoptosis, DNA repair, and cell cycle arrest. The protective function of p53 (in its homotetrameric form) as a tumor suppressor is lost in more than 50% of human cancers. Despite considerable experimental evidence suggesting the presence of multiple p53 states, it has been difficult to correlate the status of p53 with cancer response to treatments and clinical outcomes, which suggest the importance of complex but essential p53 regulatory pathways. Recent studies have indicated that the expression pattern of p53 isoforms may play a crucial role in regulating normal and cancer cell fates in response to diverse stresses. The human TP53 gene encodes at least 12 p53 isoforms, which are produced in normal tissue through alternative initiation of translation, usage of alternative promoters, and alternative splicing. Furthermore, some researchers have suggested that the formation of mutant p53 aggregates may be associated with cancer pathogenesis due to loss-of function (LoF), dominant-negative (DN), and gain-of function (GoF) effects. As different isoforms or the aggregation state of p53 may influence tumorigenesis, this review aims to examine the correlation of p53 isoforms and aggregation with cancer. PMID:27368003

  20. Mitofusin-2 is a novel direct target of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weilin; Cheng, Xiaofei; Lu, Jianju; Wei, Jianfeng; Fu, Guanghou; Zhu, Feng; Jia, Changku; Zhou, Lin; Xie, Haiyang; Zheng, Shusen

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Mfn2 is a novel target gene of p53. {yields} Mfn2 mRNA and protein levels can be up-regulated in a p53-dependent manner. {yields} Mfn2 promoter activity can be elevated by the p53 protein. {yields} P53 protein binds the Mfn2 promoter directly both in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: The tumor suppressor p53 modulates transcription of a number of target genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, and other important cellular responses. Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2) is a novel suppressor of cell proliferation that may also exert apoptotic effects via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Through bioinformatics analysis, we identified a p53 binding site in the Mfn2 promoter. Consistent with this, we showed that the p53 protein binds the Mfn2 promoter directly both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, we found that Mfn2 mRNA and protein levels are up-regulated in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, luciferase assays revealed that the activity of the wild-type Mfn2 promoter, but not a mutated version of the promoter, was up-regulated by p53. These results indicate that Mfn2 is a novel p53-inducible target gene, which provides insight into the regulation of Mfn2 and its associated activities in the inhibition of cell proliferation, promotion of apoptosis, and modulation of tumor suppression.

  1. p53: key conductor of all anti-acne therapies.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2017-09-19

    This review based on translational research predicts that the transcription factor p53 is the key effector of all anti-acne therapies. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and isotretinoin (13-cis retinoic acid) enhance p53 expression. Tetracyclines and macrolides via inhibiting p450 enzymes attenuate ATRA degradation, thereby increase p53. Benzoyl peroxide and hydrogen peroxide elicit oxidative stress, which upregulates p53. Azelaic acid leads to mitochondrial damage associated with increased release of reactive oxygen species inducing p53. p53 inhibits the expression of androgen receptor and IGF-1 receptor, and induces the expression of IGF binding protein 3. p53 induces FoxO1, FoxO3, p21 and sestrin 1, sestrin 2, and tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), the key inducer of isotretinoin-mediated sebocyte apoptosis explaining isotretinoin's sebum-suppressive effect. Anti-androgens attenuate the expression of miRNA-125b, a key negative regulator of p53. It can thus be concluded that all anti-acne therapies have a common mode of action, i.e., upregulation of the guardian of the genome p53. Immortalized p53-inactivated sebocyte cultures are unfortunate models for studying acne pathogenesis and treatment.

  2. NAD+ Modulates p53 DNA Binding Specificity and Function

    PubMed Central

    McLure, Kevin G.; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kastan, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    DNA damage induces p53 DNA binding activity, which affects tumorigenesis, tumor responses to therapies, and the toxicities of cancer therapies (B. Vogelstein, D. Lane, and A. J. Levine, Nature 408:307-310, 2000; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Both transcriptional and transcription-independent activities of p53 contribute to DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and aneuploidy prevention (M. B. Kastan et al., Cell 71:587-597, 1992; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Small-molecule manipulation of p53 DNA binding activity has been an elusive goal, but here we show that NAD+ binds to p53 tetramers, induces a conformational change, and modulates p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro. Niacinamide (vitamin B3) increases the rate of intracellular NAD+ synthesis, alters radiation-induced p53 DNA binding specificity, and modulates activation of a subset of p53 transcriptional targets. These effects are likely due to a direct effect of NAD+ on p53, as a molecule structurally related to part of NAD+, TDP, also inhibits p53 DNA binding, and the TDP precursor, thiamine (vitamin B1), inhibits intracellular p53 activity. Niacinamide and thiamine affect two p53-regulated cellular responses to ionizing radiation: rereplication and apoptosis. Thus, niacinamide and thiamine form a novel basis for the development of small molecules that affect p53 function in vivo, and these results suggest that changes in cellular energy metabolism may regulate p53. PMID:15509798

  3. Modifying the Cold Gelation Properties of Quinoa Protein Isolate: Influence of Heat-Denaturation pH in the Alkaline Range.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Outi E; Zannini, Emanuele; Arendt, Elke K

    2015-09-01

    Heat-denaturation of quinoa protein isolate (QPI) at alkali pH and its influence on the physicochemical and cold gelation properties was investigated. Heating QPI at pH 8.5 led to increased surface hydrophobicity and decreases in free and bound sulfhydryl group contents. Heating at pH 10.5 caused a lesser degree of changes in sulfhydryl groups and surface hydrophobicity, and the resulting solutions showed drastically increased solubility. SDS PAGE revealed the presence of large aggregates only in the sample heated at pH 8.5, suggesting that any aggregates present in the sample heated at pH 10.5 were non-covalently bound and disintegrated in the presence of SDS. Reducing conditions partially dissolved the aggregates in the pH 8.5 heated sample indicating the occurrence of disulphide bonding, but caused no major alterations in the separation pattern of the pH 10.5 heated sample. Denaturation pH influenced the cold gelation properties greatly. Solutions heated at pH 8.5 formed a coarse coagulum with maximum G' of 5 Pa. Heat-denaturation at 10.5 enabled the proteins to form a finer and regularly structured gel with a maximum G' of 1140 Pa. Particle size analysis showed that the pH 10.5 heated sample contained a higher level of very small particles (0.1-2 μm), and these readily aggregated into large particles (30-200 μm) when pH was lowered to 5.5. Differences in the nature of aggregates formed during heating may explain the large variation in gelation properties.

  4. On p53 revival using system oriented drug dosage design.

    PubMed

    Haseeb, Muhammad; Azam, Shumaila; Bhatti, A I; Azam, Rizwan; Ullah, Mukhtar; Fazal, Sahar

    2017-02-21

    We propose a new paradigm in the drug design for the revival of the p53 pathway in cancer cells. It is shown that the current strategy of using small molecule based Mdm2 inhibitors is not enough to adequately revive p53 in cancerous cells, especially when it comes to the extracting pulsating behavior of p53. This fact has come to notice when a novel method for the drug dosage design is introduced using system oriented concepts. As a test case, small molecule drug Mdm2 repressor Nutlin 3a is considered. The proposed method determines the dose of Nutlin to revive p53 pathway functionality. For this purpose, PBK dynamics of Nutlin have also been integrated with p53 pathway model. The p53 pathway is the focus of researchers for the last thirty years for its pivotal role as a frontline cancer suppressant protein due to its effect on cell cycle checkpoints and cell apoptosis in response to a DNA strand break. That is the reason for finding p53 being absent in more than 50% of tumor cancers. Various drugs have been proposed to revive p53 in cancer cells. Small molecule based drugs are at the foremost and are the subject of advanced clinical trials. The dosage design of these drugs is an important issue. We use control systems concepts to develop the drug dosage so that the cancer cells can be treated in appropriate time. We investigate by using a computational model how p53 protein responds to drug Nutlin 3a, an agent that interferes with the MDM2-mediated p53 regulation. The proposed integrated model describes in some detail the regulation network of p53 including the negative feedback loop mediated by MDM2 and the positive feedback loop mediated by Mdm2 mRNA as well as the reversible represses of MDM2 caused by Nutlin. The reported PBK dynamics of Nutlin 3a are also incorporated to see the full effect. It has been reported that p53 response to stresses in two ways. Either it has a sustained (constant) p53 response, or there are oscillations in p53 concentration. The

  5. Secondary breast cancer in patients presenting with osteosarcoma: possible involvement of germline p53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Russo, C L; McIntyre, J; Goorin, A M; Link, M P; Gebhardt, M C; Friend, S H

    1994-01-01

    Second malignancies following treatment for osteosarcoma are unusual. Breast cancer occurring in patients with osteosarcoma has been reported following therapeutic chest irradiation. We now report three cases of breast cancer occurring in young women who were successfully treated for osteosarcoma. These women had not received therapeutic chest irradiation and in two of the three women there was no family history of breast cancer. Peripheral blood was available for study from one case. Of import, this case demonstrated a germline mutation in exon 7 of the tumor suppressor gene, p53. The mutation was detected by constant denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and confirmed by DNA sequencing. In this particular patient, inactivation of the p53 gene may be involved in the development of both the first and second malignancy.

  6. The Transactivation Domains of the p53 Protein.

    PubMed

    Raj, Nitin; Attardi, Laura D

    2017-01-03

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a transcriptional activator, with discrete domains that participate in sequence-specific DNA binding, tetramerization, and transcriptional activation. Mutagenesis and reporter studies have delineated two distinct activation domains (TADs) and specific hydrophobic residues within these TADs that are critical for their function. Knockin mice expressing p53 mutants with alterations in either or both of the two TADs have revealed that TAD1 is critical for responses to acute DNA damage, whereas both TAD1 and TAD2 participate in tumor suppression. Biochemical and structural studies have identified factors that bind either or both TADs, including general transcription factors (GTFs), chromatin modifiers, and negative regulators, helping to elaborate a model through which p53 activates transcription. Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of the p53 TADs through phosphorylation also regulate TAD activity. Together, these studies on p53 TADs provide great insight into how p53 serves as a tumor suppressor.

  7. Senescence and aging: the critical roles of p53.

    PubMed

    Rufini, A; Tucci, P; Celardo, I; Melino, G

    2013-10-24

    p53 functions as a transcription factor involved in cell-cycle control, DNA repair, apoptosis and cellular stress responses. However, besides inducing cell growth arrest and apoptosis, p53 activation also modulates cellular senescence and organismal aging. Senescence is an irreversible cell-cycle arrest that has a crucial role both in aging and as a robust physiological antitumor response, which counteracts oncogenic insults. Therefore, via the regulation of senescence, p53 contributes to tumor growth suppression, in a manner strictly dependent by its expression and cellular context. In this review, we focus on the recent advances on the contribution of p53 to cellular senescence and its implication for cancer therapy, and we will discuss p53's impact on animal lifespan. Moreover, we describe p53-mediated regulation of several physiological pathways that could mediate its role in both senescence and aging.

  8. p53 isoform Δ133p53 promotes efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cells and ensures genomic integrity during reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lu; Pan, Xiao; Chen, Haide; Rao, Lingjun; Zeng, Yelin; Hang, Honghui; Peng, Jinrong; Xiao, Lei; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have great potential in regenerative medicine, but this depends on the integrity of their genomes. iPS cells have been found to contain a large number of de novo genetic alterations due to DNA damage response during reprogramming. Thus, to maintain the genetic stability of iPS cells is an important goal in iPS cell technology. DNA damage response can trigger tumor suppressor p53 activation, which ensures genome integrity of reprogramming cells by inducing apoptosis and senescence. p53 isoform Δ133p53 is a p53 target gene and functions to not only antagonize p53 mediated apoptosis, but also promote DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here we report that Δ133p53 is induced in reprogramming. Knockdown of Δ133p53 results 2-fold decrease in reprogramming efficiency, 4-fold increase in chromosomal aberrations, whereas overexpression of Δ133p53 with 4 Yamanaka factors showes 4-fold increase in reprogamming efficiency and 2-fold decrease in chromosomal aberrations, compared to those in iPS cells induced only with 4 Yamanaka factors. Overexpression of Δ133p53 can inhibit cell apoptosis and promote DNA DSB repair foci formation during reprogramming. Our finding demonstrates that the overexpression of Δ133p53 not only enhances reprogramming efficiency, but also results better genetic quality in iPS cells. PMID:27874035

  9. Targeting cancer stem cells with p53 modulators

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Ryo; Appella, Ettore; Kopelovich, Levy; DeLeo, Albert B.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) typically over-express aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Thus, ALDHbright tumor cells represent targets for developing novel cancer prevention/treatment interventions. Loss of p53 function is a common genetic event during cancer development wherein small molecular weight compounds (SMWC) that restore p53 function and reverse tumor growth have been identified. Here, we focused on two widely studied p53 SMWC, CP-31398 and PRIMA-1, to target ALDHbright CSC in human breast, endometrial and pancreas carcinoma cell lines expressing mutant or wild type (WT) p53. CP-31398 and PRIMA-1 significantly reduced CSC content and sphere formation by these cell lines in vitro. In addition, these agents were more effective in vitro against CSC compared to cisplatin and gemcitabine, two often-used chemotherapeutic agents. We also tested a combinatorial treatment in methylcholantrene (MCA)-treated mice consisting of p53 SMWC and p53-based vaccines. Yet using survival end-point analysis, no increased efficacy in the presence of either p53 SMWC alone or with vaccine compared to vaccine alone was observed. These results may be due, in part, to the presence of immune cells, such as activated lymphocytes expressing WT p53 at levels comparable to some tumor cells, wherein further increase of p53 expression by p53 SMWC may alter survival of these immune cells and negatively impact an effective immune response. Continuous exposure of mice to MCA may have also interfered with the action of these p53 SMWC, including potential direct interaction with MCA. Nonetheless, the effect of p53 SMWC on CSC and cancer treatment remains of great interest. PMID:27074569

  10. TRIM65 negatively regulates p53 through ubiquitination

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Ma, Chengyuan; Zhou, Tong; Liu, Ying; Sun, Luyao; Yu, Zhenxiang

    2016-04-22

    Tripartite-motif protein family member 65 (TRIM65) is an important protein involved in white matter lesion. However, the role of TRIM65 in human cancer remains less understood. Through the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) gene alteration database, we found that TRIM65 is upregulated in a significant portion of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients. Our cell growth assay revealed that TRIM65 overexpression promotes cell proliferation, while knockdown of TRIM65 displays opposite effect. Mechanistically, TRIM65 binds to p53, one of the most critical tumor suppressors, and serves as an E3 ligase toward p53. Consequently, TRIM65 inactivates p53 through facilitating p53 poly-ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Notably, chemotherapeutic reagent cisplatin induction of p53 is markedly attenuated in response to ectopic expression of TRIM65. Cell growth inhibition by TRIM65 knockdown is more significant in p53 positive H460 than p53 negative H1299 cells, and knockdown of p53 in H460 cells also shows compromised cell growth inhibition by TRIM65 knockdown, indicating that p53 is required, at least in part, for TRIM65 function. Our findings demonstrate TRIM65 as a potential oncogenic protein, highly likely through p53 inactivation, and provide insight into development of novel approaches targeting TRIM65 for NSCLC treatment, and also overcoming chemotherapy resistance. - Highlights: • TRIM65 expression is elevated in NSCLC. • TRIM65 inactivates p53 through mediating p53 ubiquitination and degradation. • TRIM65 attenuates the response of NSCLC cells to cisplatin.

  11. The Transcription Factor p53 Influences Microglial Activation Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Suman; Nesser, Nicole K.; Hopkins, Stephanie; Myers, Scott J.; Case, Amanda; Lee, Rona J.; Seaburg, Luke A.; Uo, Takuma; Murphy, Sean P.; Morrison, Richard S.; Garden, Gwenn A.

    2011-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases are influenced by the innate immune response in the central nervous system (CNS). Microglia, have pro-inflammatory and subsequently neurotoxic actions as well as anti-inflammatory functions that promote recovery and repair. Very little is known about the transcriptional control of these specific microglial behaviors. We have previously shown that in HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), the transcription factor p53 accumulates in microglia and that microglial p53 expression is required for the in vitro neurotoxicity of the HIV coat glycoprotein gp120. These findings suggested a novel function for p53 in regulating microglial activation. Here we report that in the absence of p53, microglia demonstrate a blunted response to interferon-γ, failing to increase expression of genes associated with classical macrophage activation or secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. Microarray analysis of global gene expression profiles revealed increased expression of genes associated with anti-inflammatory functions, phagocytosis and tissue repair in p53 knockout (p53−/−) microglia compared with those cultured from strain matched p53 expressing (p53+/+) mice. We further observed that p53−/− microglia demonstrate increased phagocytic activity in vitro and expression of markers for alternative macrophage activation both in vitro and in vivo. In HAND brain tissue, the alternative activation marker CD163 was expressed in a separate subset of microglia than those demonstrating p53 accumulation. These data suggest that p53 influences microglial behavior, supporting the adoption of a pro-inflammatory phenotype, while p53 deficiency promotes phagocytosis and gene expression associated with alternative activation and anti-inflammatory functions. PMID:21598312

  12. Physical interaction between bacterial heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 and Hsp70 chaperones mediates their cooperative action to refold denatured proteins.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Hitoshi; Fujita, Kensaku; Ohtaki, Aguru; Watanabe, Satoru; Narumi, Shoichi; Maruyama, Takahiro; Suenaga, Emi; Misono, Tomoko S; Kumar, Penmetcha K R; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2014-02-28

    In eukaryotes, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an essential ATP-dependent molecular chaperone that associates with numerous client proteins. HtpG, a prokaryotic homolog of Hsp90, is essential for thermotolerance in cyanobacteria, and in vitro it suppresses the aggregation of denatured proteins efficiently. Understanding how the non-native client proteins bound to HtpG refold is of central importance to comprehend the essential role of HtpG under stress. Here, we demonstrate by yeast two-hybrid method, immunoprecipitation assays, and surface plasmon resonance techniques that HtpG physically interacts with DnaJ2 and DnaK2. DnaJ2, which belongs to the type II J-protein family, bound DnaK2 or HtpG with submicromolar affinity, and HtpG bound DnaK2 with micromolar affinity. Not only DnaJ2 but also HtpG enhanced the ATP hydrolysis by DnaK2. Although assisted by the DnaK2 chaperone system, HtpG enhanced native refolding of urea-denatured lactate dehydrogenase and heat-denatured glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. HtpG did not substitute for DnaJ2 or GrpE in the DnaK2-assisted refolding of the denatured substrates. The heat-denatured malate dehydrogenase that did not refold by the assistance of the DnaK2 chaperone system alone was trapped by HtpG first and then transferred to DnaK2 where it refolded. Dissociation of substrates from HtpG was either ATP-dependent or -independent depending on the substrate, indicating the presence of two mechanisms of cooperative action between the HtpG and the DnaK2 chaperone system.

  13. p53 SUMOylation promotes its nuclear export by facilitating its release from the nuclear export receptor CRM1.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Aleixo; Li, Dawei; Zhao, Lisa Y; Godsey, Adam; Liao, Daiqing

    2013-09-01

    Chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1) mediates p53 nuclear export. Although p53 SUMOylation promotes its nuclear export, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that tethering of a small, ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) moiety to p53 markedly increases its cytoplasmic localization. SUMO attachment to p53 does not affect its oligomerization, suggesting that subunit dissociation required for exposing p53's nuclear export signal (NES) is unnecessary for p53 nuclear export. Surprisingly, SUMO-mediated p53 nuclear export depends on the SUMO-interacting motif (SIM)-binding pocket of SUMO-1. The CRM1 C-terminal domain lacking the NES-binding groove interacts with tetrameric p53, and the proper folding of the p53 core domain, rather than the presence of the N- or C-terminal tails, appears to be important for p53-CRM1 interaction. The CRM1 Huntington, EF3, a subunit of PP2A, and TOR1 9 (HEAT9) loop, which regulates GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran binding and cargo release, contains a prototypical SIM. Remarkably, disruption of this SIM in conjunction with a mutated SIM-binding groove of SUMO-1 markedly enhances the binding of CRM1 to p53-SUMO-1 and their accumulation in the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), as well as their persistent association in the cytoplasm. We propose that SUMOylation of a CRM1 cargo such as p53 at the NPCs unlocks the HEAT9 loop of CRM1 to facilitate the disassembly of the transporting complex and cargo release to the cytoplasm.

  14. Endocytosis of heat-denatured albumin by cultured rat Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brouwer, A.; Knook, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Purified Kupffer cells were obtained by centrifugal elutriation of sinusoidal cells isolated by pronase treatment of the rat liver. The endocytosis of radioactively labeled heat-aggregated colloidal albumin (CA /sup 125/I) was investigated in maintenance cultures of the purified Kupffer cells. The endocytic capacity of the cells was studied during 4 days of culture. Maximum uptake was observed after 24 hr of culture, with a gradual decline during the following days. When the uptake was measured after incubation with increasing concentrations of CA /sup 125/I, a saturation effect was observed. This finding and the observed high rate of uptake are strong indications that receptor sites on the cell membrane are involved in the mechanism of endocytosis. The uptake of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was inhibited by the metabolic inhibitors fluoride and antimycin A, indicating that endocytosis of CA /sup 125/I is dependent on energy derived from both glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. The mechanism of internalization may also require the action of microfilaments as well as intact microtubules, since both cytochalasin B and colchicine inhibited the uptake of CA /sup 125/I. The intracellular degradation of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was strongly inhibited by chloroquine but not by colchicine. The degradation of ingested CA /sup 125/I occurred within the Kupffer cell lysosomes.

  15. Regulation of iron homeostasis by the p53-ISCU pathway

    PubMed Central

    Funauchi, Yuki; Tanikawa, Chizu; Yi Lo, Paulisally Hau; Mori, Jinichi; Daigo, Yataro; Takano, Atsushi; Miyagi, Yohei; Okawa, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuda, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of iron in tissues increases the risk of cancer, but iron regulatory mechanisms in cancer tissues are largely unknown. Here, we report that p53 regulates iron metabolism through the transcriptional regulation of ISCU (iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme), which encodes a scaffold protein that plays a critical role in Fe-S cluster biogenesis. p53 activation induced ISCU expression through binding to an intronic p53-binding site. Knockdown of ISCU enhanced the binding of iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1), a cytosolic Fe-S protein, to an iron-responsive element in the 5′ UTR of ferritin heavy polypeptide 1 (FTH1) mRNA and subsequently reduced the translation of FTH1, a major iron storage protein. In addition, in response to DNA damage, p53 induced FTH1 and suppressed transferrin receptor, which regulates iron entry into cells. HCT116 p53+/+ cells were resistant to iron accumulation, but HCT116 p53−/− cells accumulated intracellular iron after DNA damage. Moreover, excess dietary iron caused significant elevation of serum iron levels in p53−/− mice. ISCU expression was decreased in the majority of human liver cancer tissues, and its reduced expression was significantly associated with p53 mutation. Our finding revealed a novel role of the p53-ISCU pathway in the maintenance of iron homeostasis in hepatocellular carcinogenesis. PMID:26560363

  16. Regulation of p53 and MDM2 activity by MTBP.

    PubMed

    Brady, Mark; Vlatkovic, Nikolina; Boyd, Mark T

    2005-01-01

    p53 is a critical coordinator of a wide range of stress responses. To facilitate a rapid response to stress, p53 is produced constitutively but is negatively regulated by MDM2. MDM2 can inhibit p53 in multiple independent ways: by binding to its transcription activation domain, inhibiting p53 acetylation, promoting nuclear export, and probably most importantly by promoting proteasomal degradation of p53. The latter is achieved via MDM2's E3 ubiquitin ligase activity harbored within the MDM2 RING finger domain. We have discovered that MTBP promotes MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of p53 and also MDM2 stabilization in an MDM2 RING finger-dependent manner. Moreover, using small interfering RNA to down-regulate endogenous MTBP in unstressed cells, we have found that MTBP significantly contributes to MDM2-mediated regulation of p53 levels and activity. However, following exposure of cells to UV, but not gamma-irradiation, MTBP is destabilized as part of the coordinated cellular response. Our findings suggest that MTBP differentially regulates the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of MDM2 towards two of its most critical targets (itself and p53) and in doing so significantly contributes to MDM2-dependent p53 homeostasis in unstressed cells.

  17. REGgamma modulates p53 activity by regulating its cellular localization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Yu, Guowu; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhao, Dengpan; Wang, Ying; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jiang; Li, Lei; Zeng, Yu; Dang, Yongyan; Wang, Chuangui; Gao, Guang; Long, Weiwen; Lonard, David M; Qiao, Shanlou; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Zhang, Bianhong; Luo, Honglin; Li, Xiaotao

    2010-12-01

    The proteasome activator REGγ mediates a shortcut for the destruction of intact mammalian proteins. The biological roles of REGγ and the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we provide evidence that REGγ regulates cellular distribution of p53 by facilitating its multiple monoubiquitylation and subsequent nuclear export and degradation. We also show that inhibition of p53 tetramerization by REGγ might further enhance cytoplasmic relocation of p53 and reduce active p53 in the nucleus. Furthermore, multiple monoubiquitylation of p53 enhances its physical interaction with HDM2 and probably facilitates subsequent polyubiquitylation of p53, suggesting that monoubiquitylation can act as a signal for p53 degradation. Depletion of REGγ sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptosis, validating its crucial role in the control of apoptosis, probably through regulation of p53 function. Using a mouse xenograft model, we show that REGγ knockdown results in a significant reduction of tumor growth, suggesting an important role for REGγ in tumor development. Our study therefore demonstrates that REGγ-mediated inactivation of p53 is one of the mechanisms involved in cancer progression.

  18. Glioblastoma cells inhibit astrocytic p53-expression favoring cancer malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Biasoli, D; Sobrinho, M F; da Fonseca, A C C; de Matos, D G; Romão, L; de Moraes Maciel, R; Rehen, S K; Moura-Neto, V; Borges, H L; Lima, F R S

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment has a dynamic and usually cancer-promoting function during all tumorigenic steps. Glioblastoma (GBM) is a fatal tumor of the central nervous system, in which a substantial number of non-tumoral infiltrated cells can be found. Astrocytes neighboring these tumor cells have a particular reactive phenotype and can enhance GBM malignancy by inducing aberrant cell proliferation and invasion. The tumor suppressor p53 has a potential non-cell autonomous function by modulating the expression of secreted proteins that influence neighbor cells. In this work, we investigated the role of p53 on the crosstalk between GBM cells and astrocytes. We show that extracellular matrix (ECM) from p53+/− astrocytes is richer in laminin and fibronectin, compared with ECM from p53+/+ astrocytes. In addition, ECM from p53+/− astrocytes increases the survival and the expression of mesenchymal markers in GBM cells, which suggests haploinsufficient phenotype of the p53+/– microenvironment. Importantly, conditioned medium from GBM cells blocks the expression of p53 in p53+/+ astrocytes, even when DNA was damaged. These results suggest that GBM cells create a dysfunctional microenvironment based on the impairment of p53 expression that in turns exacerbates tumor endurance. PMID:25329722

  19. Podocyte p53 Limits the Severity of Experimental Alport Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Ryosuke; Suico, Mary Ann; Kai, Yukari; Omachi, Kohei; Motomura, Keishi; Koga, Tomoaki; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Koyama, Kosuke; Yokota, Tsubasa; Taura, Manabu; Shuto, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is one of the most common types of inherited nephritis caused by mutation in one of the glomerular basement membrane components. AS is characterized by proteinuria at early stage of the disease and glomerular hyperplastic phenotype and renal fibrosis at late stage. Here, we show that global deficiency of tumor suppressor p53 significantly accelerated AS progression in X-linked AS mice and decreased the lifespan of these mice. p53 protein expression was detected in 21-week-old wild-type mice but not in age-matched AS mice. Expression of proinflammatory cytokines and profibrotic genes was higher in p53+/− AS mice than in p53+/+ AS mice. In vitro experiments revealed that p53 modulates podocyte migration and positively regulates the expression of podocyte-specific genes. We established podocyte-specific p53 (pod-p53)-deficient AS mice, and determined that pod-p53 deficiency enhanced the AS-induced renal dysfunction, foot process effacement, and alteration of gene-expression pattern in glomeruli. These results reveal a protective role of p53 in the progression of AS and in maintaining glomerular homeostasis by modulating the hyperplastic phenotype of podocytes in AS. PMID:25967122

  20. Recognition of Local DNA Structures by p53 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brázda, Václav; Coufal, Jan

    2017-01-01

    p53 plays critical roles in regulating cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and metabolism and is commonly mutated in human cancer. These roles are achieved by interaction with other proteins, but particularly by interaction with DNA. As a transcription factor, p53 is well known to bind consensus target sequences in linear B-DNA. Recent findings indicate that p53 binds with higher affinity to target sequences that form cruciform DNA structure. Moreover, p53 binds very tightly to non-B DNA structures and local DNA structures are increasingly recognized to influence the activity of wild-type and mutant p53. Apart from cruciform structures, p53 binds to quadruplex DNA, triplex DNA, DNA loops, bulged DNA and hemicatenane DNA. In this review, we describe local DNA structures and summarize information about interactions of p53 with these structural DNA motifs. These recent data provide important insights into the complexity of the p53 pathway and the functional consequences of wild-type and mutant p53 activation in normal and tumor cells. PMID:28208646

  1. Regulation of neuronal P53 activity by CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Z.; Shimizu, Saori; Patel, Jeegar P.; Nelson, Autumn; Le, My-Thao; Mullen-Przeworski, Anna; Brandimarti, Renato; Fatatis, Alessandro; Meucci, Olimpia

    2009-01-01

    Abnormal activation of CXCR4 during inflammatory/infectious states may lead to neuronal dysfunction or damage. The major goal of this study was to determine the coupling of CXCR4 to p53-dependent survival pathways in primary neurons. Neurons were stimulated with the HIV envelope protein gp120IIIB or the endogenous CXCR4 agonist, SDF-1α. We found that gp120 stimulates p53 activity and induces expression of the p53 pro-apoptotic target Apaf-1 in cultured neurons. Inhibition of CXCR4 by AMD3100 abrogates the effect of gp120 on both p53 and Apaf-1. Moreover, gp120 neurotoxicity is markedly reduced by the p53-inhibitor, pifithrin-α. The viral protein also regulates p53 phosphorylation and expression of other p53-responsive genes, such as MDM2 and p21. Conversely, SDF-1α, which can promote neuronal survival, increases p53 acetylation and p21 expression in neurons. Thus, the stimulation of different p53 targets could be instrumental in determining the outcome of CXCR4 activation on neuronal survival in neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:16005638

  2. Recognition of Local DNA Structures by p53 Protein.

    PubMed

    Brázda, Václav; Coufal, Jan

    2017-02-10

    p53 plays critical roles in regulating cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and metabolism and is commonly mutated in human cancer. These roles are achieved by interaction with other proteins, but particularly by interaction with DNA. As a transcription factor, p53 is well known to bind consensus target sequences in linear B-DNA. Recent findings indicate that p53 binds with higher affinity to target sequences that form cruciform DNA structure. Moreover, p53 binds very tightly to non-B DNA structures and local DNA structures are increasingly recognized to influence the activity of wild-type and mutant p53. Apart from cruciform structures, p53 binds to quadruplex DNA, triplex DNA, DNA loops, bulged DNA and hemicatenane DNA. In this review, we describe local DNA structures and summarize information about interactions of p53 with these structural DNA motifs. These recent data provide important insights into the complexity of the p53 pathway and the functional consequences of wild-type and mutant p53 activation in normal and tumor cells.

  3. Anoikis triggers Mdm2-dependent p53 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Chen, Tina Chunyuan; Kapila, Yvonne L.

    2010-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a key role in cell–cell communication and signaling, and the signals it propagates are important for tissue remodeling and survival. However, signals from disease-altered ECM may lead to anoikis—apoptotic cell death triggered by loss of ECM contacts. Previously, we found that an altered fibronectin matrix triggers anoikis in human primary ligament cells via a pathway that requires p53 transcriptional downregulation. Here we show that this p53 reduction is suppressed by transfecting cells with Mdm2 antisense oligonucleotides or small interfering RNA. Similar results were found in cells treated to prevent p53 and Mdm2 interactions. When p53 was overexpressed in cells lacking Mdm2 and p53, p53 levels were unaffected by anoikis conditions. However, cells cotransfected with p53 and wild type Mdm2, but not a mutant Mdm2, exhibited decreased p53 levels in response to anoikis conditions. Thus, cells under anoikis conditions undergo p53 degradation that is mediated by Mdm2. PMID:20577896

  4. Discovery of Novel Isatin-Based p53 Inducers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of isatin Schiff base derivatives were identified during in silico screening of the small molecule library for novel activators of p53. The compounds selected based on molecular docking results were further validated by a high-content screening assay using U2OS human osteosarcoma cells with an integrated EGFP-expressing p53-dependent reporter. The hit compounds activated and stabilized p53, as shown by Western blotting, at higher rates than the well-known positive control Nutlin-3. Thus, the p53-activating compounds identified by this approach represent useful molecular probes for various cancer studies. PMID:26288684

  5. p53 family interactions and yeast: together in anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Sara; Leão, Mariana; Raimundo, Liliana; Ramos, Helena; Soares, Joana; Saraiva, Lucília

    2016-04-01

    The p53 family proteins are among the most appealing targets for cancer therapy. A deeper understanding of the complex interplay that these proteins establish with murine double minute (MDM)2, MDMX, and mutant p53 could reveal new exciting therapeutic opportunities in cancer treatment. Here, we summarize the most relevant advances in the biology of p53 family protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and the latest pharmacological developments achieved from targeting these interactions. We also highlight the remarkable contributions of yeast-based assays to this research. Collectively, we emphasize promising strategies, based on the inhibition of p53 family PPIs, which have expedited anticancer drug development.

  6. The Mechanism of p53 Rescue by SUSP4.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hyoung; Lee, Chewook; Lee, Si-Hyung; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Han, Joan J; Cha, Eun-Ji; Lim, Ji-Eun; Cho, Ye-Jin; Hong, Seung-Hee; Han, Kyou-Hoon

    2017-01-24

    p53 is an important tumor-suppressor protein deactivation of which by mdm2 results in cancers. A SUMO-specific protease 4 (SUSP4) was shown to rescue p53 from mdm2-mediated deactivation, but the mechanism is unknown. The discovery by NMR spectroscopy of a "p53 rescue motif" in SUSP4 that disrupts p53-mdm2 binding is presented. This 29-residue motif is pre-populated with two transient helices connected by a hydrophobic linker. The helix at the C-terminus binds to the well-known p53-binding pocket in mdm2 whereas the N-terminal helix serves as an affinity enhancer. The hydrophobic linker binds to a previously unidentified hydrophobic crevice in mdm2. Overall, SUSP4 appears to use two synergizing modules, the p53 rescue motif described here and a globular-structured SUMO-binding catalytic domain, to stabilize p53. A p53 rescue motif peptide exhibits an anti-tumor activity in cancer cell lines expressing wild-type p53. A pre-structures motif in the intrinsically disordered proteins is thus important for target recognition. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The proteasome activator PA28γ, a negative regulator of p53, is transcriptionally up-regulated by p53.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhen-Xing; Yuan, Dong-Mei; Zhuo, Yi-Ming; Yi, Xin; Zhou, Ji; Xu, Zao-Xu; Zhou, Jian-Lin

    2014-02-13

    PA28γ (also called REGγ, 11Sγ or PSME3) negatively regulates p53 activity by promoting its nuclear export and/or degradation. Here, using the RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE) method, we identified the transcription start site of the PA28γ gene. Assessment with the luciferase assay demonstrated that the sequence -193 to +16 is the basal promoter. Three p53 binding sites were found within the PA28γ promoter utilizing a bioinformatics approach and were confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation and biotinylated DNA affinity precipitation experiments. The p53 protein promotes PA28γ transcription, and p53-stimulated transcription of PA28γ can be inhibited by PA28γ itself. Our results suggest that PA28γ and p53 form a negative feedback loop, which maintains the balance of p53 and PA28γ in cells.

  8. The Proteasome Activator PA28γ, a Negative Regulator of p53, Is Transcriptionally Up-Regulated by p53

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhen-Xing; Yuan, Dong-Mei; Zhuo, Yi-Ming; Yi, Xin; Zhou, Ji; Xu, Zao-Xu; Zhou, Jian-Lin

    2014-01-01

    PA28γ (also called REGγ, 11Sγ or PSME3) negatively regulates p53 activity by promoting its nuclear export and/or degradation. Here, using the RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE) method, we identified the transcription start site of the PA28γ gene. Assessment with the luciferase assay demonstrated that the sequence −193 to +16 is the basal promoter. Three p53 binding sites were found within the PA28γ promoter utilizing a bioinformatics approach and were confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation and biotinylated DNA affinity precipitation experiments. The p53 protein promotes PA28γ transcription, and p53-stimulated transcription of PA28γ can be inhibited by PA28γ itself. Our results suggest that PA28γ and p53 form a negative feedback loop, which maintains the balance of p53 and PA28γ in cells. PMID:24531141

  9. Effect of heat, pH, ultrasonication and ethanol on the denaturation of whey protein isolate using a newly developed approach in the analysis of difference-UV spectra.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Athanasios; Andreadis, Marios; Moschakis, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    A newly developed method of analysis of difference-UV spectra was successfully implemented in the study of the effect of heat, pH, ultrasonication and ethanol on the denaturation of whey protein isolate. It was found that whey proteins exhibit their highest stability against heat denaturation at pH 3.75. At very low pH values, i.e. 2.5, they exhibited considerable cold denaturation, while after heating at this pH value, the supplementary heat denaturation rate was lower compared to that at neutral pH. The highest heat denaturation rates were observed at pH values higher than neutral. High power sonication on whey proteins, previously heated at 90°C for 30min, resulted in a rather small reduction of the fraction of the heat denatured protein aggregates. Finally, when ethanol was used as a cosolvent in the concentration range 20-50%, a sharp increase in the degree of denaturation, compared to the native protein solution, was observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The p53 gene and protein in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, D.N. )

    1994-01-01

    Because p53 gene alterations are commonplace in human tumors and because p53 protein is involved in a number of important cellular pathways, p53 has become a topic of intensive investigation, both by basic scientists and clinicians. p53 was initially identified by two independent laboratories in 1979 as a 53 kilodalton (kD) protein that complexes with the large T antigen of SV40 virus. Shortly thereafter, it was shown that the E1B oncoprotein of adenovirus also binds p53. The binding of two different oncogenic viral tumor proteins to the same cellular protein suggested that p53 might be integral to tumorigenesis. The human p53 cDNA and gene were subsequently cloned in the mid-1980s, and analysis of p53 gene alterations in human tumors followed a few year later. During these 10 years, researchers grappling with the vagaries of p53 first characterized the gene as an oncogene, then as a tumor suppressor gene, and most recently as both a tumor suppressor gene and a so-called [open quotes]dominant negative[close quotes] oncogene. The last few years have seen an explosion in work on this single gene and its protein product. A review of a computerized medical database revealed approximately 650 articles on p53 in 1992 alone. p53 has assumed importance in neuro-oncology because p53 mutations and protein alterations are frequent in the common diffuse, fibrillary astrocytic tumors of adults. p53 mutations in astrocytomas were first described in 1989 and were followed by more extensive analyses of gene mutations and protein alterations in adult astrocytomas. The gene has also been studied in less common brain tumors. Elucidating the role of p53 in brain tumorigenesis will not only enhance understanding of brain tumor biology but may also contribute to improved diagnosis and therapy. This discussion reviews key aspects of the p53 gene and protein, and describe their emerging roles in central nervous system neoplasia. 102 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Targeted point mutations of p53 lead to dominant-negative inhibition of wild-type p53 function.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Annemieke; Flores, Elsa R; Miranda, Barbara; Hsieh, Harn-Mei; van Oostrom, Conny Th M; Sage, Julien; Jacks, Tyler

    2002-03-05

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers, and germ-line p53 mutations cause a familial predisposition for cancer. Germ-line or sporadic p53 mutations are usually missense and typically affect the central DNA-binding domain of the protein. Because p53 functions as a tetrameric transcription factor, mutant p53 is thought to inhibit the function of wild-type p53 protein. Here, we studied the possible dominant-negative inhibition of wild-type p53 protein by two different, frequently occurring point mutations. The R270H and P275S mutations were targeted into the genome of mouse embryonic stem cells to allow the analysis of the effects of the mutant proteins expressed in normal cells at single-copy levels. In embryonic stem cells, the presence of a heterozygous point-mutated allele resulted in delayed transcriptional activation of several p53 downstream target genes on exposure to gamma irradiation. Doxorubicin-induced apoptosis was severely affected in the mutant embryonic stem cells compared with wild-type cells. Heterozygous mutant thymocytes had a severe defect in p53-dependent apoptotic pathways after treatment with gamma irradiation or doxorubicin, whereas p53-independent apoptotic pathways were intact. Together these data demonstrate that physiological expression of point-mutated p53 can strongly limit overall cellular p53 function, supporting the dominant-negative action of such mutants. Also, cells heterozygous for such mutations may be compromised in terms of tumor suppression and response to chemotherapeutic agents.

  12. Mechanisms of p53 Functional De-Regulation: Role of the IκB-α/p53 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Carrà, Giovanna; Crivellaro, Sabrina; Taulli, Riccardo; Guerrasio, Angelo; Saglio, Giuseppe; Morotti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    TP53 is one of the most frequently-mutated and deleted tumor suppressors in cancer, with a dramatic correlation with dismal prognoses. In addition to genetic inactivation, the p53 protein can be functionally inactivated in cancer, through post-transductional modifications, changes in cellular compartmentalization, and interactions with other proteins. Here, we review the mechanisms of p53 functional inactivation, with a particular emphasis on the interaction between p53 and IκB-α, the NFKBIA gene product. PMID:27916821

  13. p53 facilitates pRb cleavage in IL-3-deprived cells: novel pro-apoptotic activity of p53.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, E; Oren, M

    1998-01-01

    In the interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent lymphoid cell line DA-1, functional p53 is required for efficient apoptosis in response to IL-3 withdrawal. Activation of p53 in these cells, by either DNA damage or p53 overexpression, results in a vital growth arrest in the presence of IL-3 and in accelerated apoptosis in its absence. Thus, IL-3 can control the choice between p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Here we report that the cross-talk between p53 and IL-3 involves joint control of pRb cleavage and degradation. Depletion of IL-3 results in caspase-mediated pRb cleavage, occurring preferentially within cells which express functional p53. Moreover, pRb can be cleaved efficiently by extracts prepared from DA-1 cells but not from their derivatives which lack p53 function. Inactivation of pRb through expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 oncogene overrides the effect of IL-3 in a p53-dependent manner. Our data suggest a novel role for p53 in the regulation of cell death and a novel mechanism for the cooperation between p53 and survival factor deprivation. Thus, p53 makes cells permissive to pRb cleavage, probably by controlling the potential activity of a pRb-cleaving caspase, whereas IL-3 withdrawal provides signals that turn on this potential activity and lead to the actual cleavage and subsequent degradation of pRb. Elimination of a presumptive anti-apoptotic effect of pRb may then facilitate conversion of p53-mediated growth arrest into apoptosis. PMID:9649429

  14. Quantifying levels of p53 mutation in mouse skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Verkler, Tracie L; Couch, Letha H; Howard, Paul C; Parsons, Barbara L

    2005-06-01

    Allele-specific competitive blocker PCR (ACB-PCR) amplification and quantification was developed for mouse p53 codon 270 CGT-->TGT base substitution and codon 244/245 AAC/CGC-->AAT/TGC tandem mutation. PCR products corresponding to p53 mutant and wild-type DNA sequences were generated. These DNAs were mixed in known proportions to construct samples with defined mutant fractions and the allele-specific detection of each mutation was systematically optimized. Each assay was used to analyze eight simulated solar light (SSL)-induced tumors. By analyzing mutant fraction (MF) standards in parallel with PCR products generated from tumor samples, p53 mutants could be quantified as subpopulations within the tumors. All eight tumors contained detectable levels of p53 codon 270 CGT-->TGT mutation. Three tumors had p53 MFs between 10(-4) and 10(-3). Five tumors had p53 MFs between 10(-3) and 10(-2). None of the eight mouse skin tumors had measurable levels of p53 codon 244/245 tandem mutation. Frequent detection of p53 codon 270 CGT-->TGT mutation provides additional evidence that a pyrimidine dinucleotide overlapping a methylated CpG site (Pyr(me)CG) is a susceptible target for SSL-induced mutagenesis. The absence of p53 codon 244/245 mutation in tumors may be explained by its mutant p53 phenotype and/or indicate that this site is not methylated. These initial results indicate that p53 codon 270 CGT-->TGT mutation may be a sensitive biomarker for SSL- or UV-induced mutagenesis. This mutational endpoint may be useful for evaluating the co-carcinogenicity of compounds administered in combination with UV or SSL.

  15. Influence of Human p53 on Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian p53 is a super tumor suppressor and plays a key role in guarding genome from DNA damage. However, p53 has not been found in plants which do not bear cancer although they constantly expose to ionizing radiation of ultraviolet light. Here we introduced p53 into the model plant Arabidopsis and examined p53-conferred phenotype in plant. Most strikingly, p53 caused early senescence and fasciation. In plants, fasciation has been shown as a result of the elevated homologous DNA recombination. Consistently, a reporter with overlapping segments of the GUS gene (1445) showed that the frequency of homologous recombination was highly induced in p53-transgenic plants. In contrast to p53, SUPPRESSOR OF NPR1-1 INDUCIBLE 1 (SNI1), as a negative regulator of homologous recombination in plants, is not present in mammals. Comet assay and clonogenic survival assay demonstrated that SNI1 inhibited DNA damage repair caused by either ionizing radiation or hydroxyurea in human osteosarcoma U2OS cancer cells. RAD51D is a recombinase in homologous recombination and functions downstream of SNI1 in plants. Interestingly, p53 rendered the sni1 mutants madly branching of inflorescence, a phenotype of fasciation, whereas rad51d mutant fully suppressed the p53-induced phenotype, indicating that human p53 action in plant is mediated by the SNI1-RAD51D signaling pathway. The reciprocal species-swap tests of p53 and SNI1 in human and Arabidopsis manifest that these species-specific proteins play a common role in homologous recombination across kingdoms of animals and plants. PMID:27648563

  16. The structure formed by inverted repeats in p53 response elements determines the transactivation activity of p53 protein.

    PubMed

    Brázda, Václav; Čechová, Jana; Battistin, Michele; Coufal, Jan; Jagelská, Eva B; Raimondi, Ivan; Inga, Alberto

    2017-01-29

    The TP53 gene is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer and p53 protein plays a crucial role in gene expression and cancer protection. Its role is manifested by interactions with other proteins and DNA. p53 is a transcription factor that binds to DNA response elements (REs). Due to the palindromic nature of the consensus binding site, several p53-REs have the potential to form cruciform structures. However, the influence of cruciform formation on the activity of p53-REs has not been evaluated. Therefore, we prepared sets of p53-REs with identical theoretical binding affinity in their linear state, but different probabilities to form extra helical structures, for in vitro and in vivo analyses. Then we evaluated the presence of cruciform structures when inserted into plasmid DNA and employed a yeast-based assay to measure transactivation potential of these p53-REs cloned at a chromosomal locus in isogenic strains. We show that transactivation in vivo correlated more with relative propensity of an RE to form cruciforms than to its predicted in vitro DNA binding affinity for wild type p53. Structural features of p53-REs could therefore be an important determinant of p53 transactivation function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. p53 downregulates the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Sara; Toufektchan, Eléonore; Lejour, Vincent; Bardot, Boris; Toledo, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations affecting telomere maintenance or DNA repair may, respectively, cause dyskeratosis congenita or Fanconi anaemia, two clinically related bone marrow failure syndromes. Mice expressing p53Δ31, a mutant p53 lacking the C terminus, model dyskeratosis congenita. Accordingly, the increased p53 activity in p53Δ31/Δ31 fibroblasts correlated with a decreased expression of 4 genes implicated in telomere syndromes. Here we show that these cells exhibit decreased mRNA levels for additional genes contributing to telomere metabolism, but also, surprisingly, for 12 genes mutated in Fanconi anaemia. Furthermore, p53Δ31/Δ31 fibroblasts exhibit a reduced capacity to repair DNA interstrand crosslinks, a typical feature of Fanconi anaemia cells. Importantly, the p53-dependent downregulation of Fanc genes is largely conserved in human cells. Defective DNA repair is known to activate p53, but our results indicate that, conversely, an increased p53 activity may attenuate the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway, defining a positive regulatory feedback loop. PMID:27033104

  18. Unfolded p53: a potential biomarker for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lanni, Cristina; Uberti, Daniela; Racchi, Marco; Govoni, Stefano; Memo, Maurizio

    2007-08-01

    The identification of biological markers of AD can improve diagnostic accuracy and therapy follow-up as well as provide information on the pathogenesis of the disease. We recently found that fibroblasts derived from AD patients expressed an altered conformational status of p53 and were less sensitive to p53-dependent apoptosis compared to fibroblasts from non-AD subjects. When investigating the mechanism of such alteration, we found that the exposure to nanomolar concentrations of amyloid-beta (Abeta) 1-40 peptide induced the expression of an unfolded p53 protein isoform in fibroblasts derived from non-AD subjects. These data suggest that the tertiary structure of p53 and the sensitivity to p53-dependent apoptosis is influenced by low concentrations of soluble Abeta. On this basis, we hypothesized that low amounts of soluble Abeta induce early pathological changes at cellular level that may precede the amyloidogenic cascade. One of these changes is the induction of a novel conformational state of p53. If low amounts of Abeta peptide, not resulting in cytotoxic effects, are responsible for p53 structure changes, it could be possible to consider the unfolded p53 both as an agent participating to the early pathogenesis and as a specific marker of the early stage of AD.

  19. p53 aerobics: the major tumor suppressor fuels your workout.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Jan-Philipp; Gu, Wei

    2006-07-01

    In addition to its role as the central regulator of the cellular stress response, p53 can regulate aerobic respiration via the novel transcriptional target SCO2, a critical regulator of the cytochrome c oxidase complex (Matoba et al., 2006). Loss of p53 results in decreased oxygen consumption and aerobic respiration and promotes a switch to glycolysis, thereby reducing endurance during physical exercise.

  20. A Platform for Interrogating Cancer-Associated p53 Alleles

    PubMed Central

    D’Brot, Alejandro; Kurtz, Paula; Regan, Erin; Jakubowski, Brandon; Abrams, John M

    2016-01-01

    p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. Compelling evidence argues that full transformation involves loss of growth suppression encoded by wild-type p53 together with poorly understood oncogenic activity encoded by missense mutations. Furthermore, distinguishing disease alleles from natural polymorphisms is an important clinical challenge. To interrogate the genetic activity of human p53 variants, we leveraged the Drosophila model as an in vivo platform. We engineered strains that replace the fly p53 gene with human alleles, producing a collection of stocks that are, in effect, ‘humanized’ for p53 variants. Like the fly counterpart, human p53 transcriptionally activated a biosensor and induced apoptosis after DNA damage. However, all humanized strains representing common alleles found in cancer patients failed to complement in these assays. Surprisingly, stimulus-dependent activation of hp53 occurred without stabilization, demonstrating that these two processes can be uncoupled. Like its fly counterpart, hp53 formed prominent nuclear foci in germline cells but cancer-associated p53 variants did not. Moreover, these same mutant alleles disrupted hp53 foci and inhibited biosensor activity, suggesting that these properties are functionally linked. Together these findings establish a functional platform for interrogating human p53 alleles and suggest that simple phenotypes could be used to stratify disease variants. PMID:26996664

  1. Expression of P53 protein after exposure to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, A. M.; Salvador, C.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Ostrosky, P.; Brandan, M. E.

    2001-10-01

    One of the most important tumor suppressor genes is p53 gene, which is involved in apoptotic cell death, cell differentiation and cell cycle arrest. The expression of p53 gene can be evaluated by determining the presence of P53 protein in cells using Western Blot assay with a chemiluminescent method. This technique has shown variabilities that are due to biological factors. Film developing process can influence the quality of the p53 bands obtained. We irradiated tumor cell lines and human peripheral lymphocytes with 137Cs and 60Co gamma rays to standardize irradiation conditions, to compare ionizing radiation with actinomycin D and to reduce the observed variability of P53 protein induction levels. We found that increasing radiation doses increase P53 protein induction while it decreases viability. We also conclude that ionizing radiation could serve as a positive control for Western Blot analysis of protein P53. In addition, our results show that the developing process may play an important role in the quality of P53 protein bands and data interpretation.

  2. Interaction of p53 with the human Rad51 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Buchhop, S; Gibson, M K; Wang, X W; Wagner, P; Stürzbecher, H W; Harris, C C

    1997-01-01

    p53 is thought to function in the maintenance of genomic stability by modulating transcription and interacting with cellular proteins to influence the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. p53 mutations occur in >50% of human cancers, and cells which lack wild type p53 accumulate karyotypic abnormalities such as amplifications, deletions, inversions and translocations. We propose that p53 hinders these promiscuous recombinational events by interacting with cellular recombination and repair machinery. We recently reported that p53 can directly bind in vivo to human Rad51 (hRad51) protein and in vitro to its bacterial homologue RecA. We used GST-fusion and his-tagged protein systems to further investigate the physical interaction between p53 and hRad51, homologue of the yeast Rad51 protein that is involved in recombination and DNA double strand repair. The hRad51 binds to wild-type p53 and to a lesser extent, point mutants 135Y, 249S and 273H. This binding is not mediated by a DNA or RNA intermediate. Mapping studies using a panel of p53 deletion mutants indicate that hRad51 could bind to two regions of p53; one between amino acids 94 and 160 and a second between 264 and 315. Addition of anti-p53 antibody PAb421 (epitope 372-381 amino acids) inhibited the interaction with hRad51. In contrast, p53 interacts with the region between aa 125 and 220 of hRad51, which is highly conserved among Rad51 related proteins from bacteria to human. In Escherichia coli ecA protein, this region is required for homo-oligomerization, suggesting that p53 might disrupt the interaction between RecA and Rad51 subunits, thus inhibiting biochemical functions of Rad51 like proteins. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that p53 interaction with hRAD51 may influence DNA recombination and repair and that additional modifications of p53 by mutation and protein binding may affect this interaction. PMID:9380510

  3. p53 prevents neurodegeneration by regulating synaptic genes.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Paola; Frost, Bess; Peng, Shouyong; Yang, Yawei J; Park, Peter J; Feany, Mel

    2014-12-16

    DNA damage has been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies, but the consequences of genotoxic stress to postmitotic neurons are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that p53, a key mediator of the DNA damage response, plays a neuroprotective role in a Drosophila model of tauopathy. Further, through a whole-genome ChIP-chip analysis, we identify genes controlled by p53 in postmitotic neurons. We genetically validate a specific pathway, synaptic function, in p53-mediated neuroprotection. We then demonstrate that the control of synaptic genes by p53 is conserved in mammals. Collectively, our results implicate synaptic function as a central target in p53-dependent protection from neurodegeneration.

  4. p53 in the DNA damage repair process

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ashley B.; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The cells in the human body are continuously challenged by a variety of genotoxic attacks. Erroneous repair of the DNA can lead to mutations and chromosomal aberrations that can alter the functions of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes, thus causing cancer development. As a central tumor suppressor, p53 guards the genome by orchestrating a variety of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms. Already early in metazoan evolution, p53 started controlling the apoptotic demise of genomically compromised cells. p53 plays a prominent role as a facilitator of DNA repair by halting the cell cycle to allow time for the repair machineries to restore genome stability. In addition, p53 took on diverse roles to also directly impact the activity of various DNA repair systems. It thus appears as if p53 is multitasking in protecting from cancer development by maintaining genome stability. PMID:27048304

  5. The p53 core domain is a molten globule at low pH: functional implications of a partially unfolded structure.

    PubMed

    Bom, Ana Paula D Ano; Freitas, Monica S; Moreira, Flavia S; Ferraz, Danielly; Sanches, Daniel; Gomes, Andre M O; Valente, Ana Paula; Cordeiro, Yraima; Silva, Jerson L

    2010-01-22

    p53 is a transcription factor that maintains genome integrity, and its function is lost in 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are clustered within the core domain. Here, we investigate the effects of low pH on the structure of the wild-type (wt) p53 core domain (p53C) and the R248Q mutant. At low pH, the tryptophan residue is partially exposed to the solvent, suggesting a fluctuating tertiary structure. On the other hand, the secondary structure increases, as determined by circular dichroism. Binding of the probe bis-ANS (bis-8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate) indicates that there is an increase in the exposure of hydrophobic pockets for both wt and mutant p53C at low pH. This behavior is accompanied by a lack of cooperativity under urea denaturation and decreased stability under pressure when p53C is in acidic pH. Together, these results indicate that p53C acquires a partially unfolded conformation (molten-globule state) at low pH (5.0). The hydrodynamic properties of this conformation are intermediate between the native and denatured conformation. (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR spectroscopy confirms that the protein has a typical molten-globule structure at acidic pH when compared with pH 7.2. Human breast cells in culture (MCF-7) transfected with p53-GFP revealed localization of p53 in acidic vesicles, suggesting that the low pH conformation is present in the cell. Low pH stress also tends to favor high levels of p53 in the cells. Taken together, all of these data suggest that p53 may play physiological or pathological roles in acidic microenvironments.

  6. p53-dependent and p53-independent anticancer activity of a new indole derivative in human osteosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cappadone, C.; Stefanelli, C.; Malucelli, E.; Zini, M.; Onofrillo, C.; Locatelli, A.; Rambaldi, M.; Sargenti, A.; Merolle, L.; Farruggia, G.; Graziadio, A.; Montanaro, L.; Iotti, S.

    2015-11-13

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone, occurring most frequently in children and adolescents. The mechanism of formation and development of OS have been studied for a long time. Tumor suppressor pathway governed by p53 gene are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. Moreover, loss of wild-type p53 activity is thought to be a major predictor of failure to respond to chemotherapy in various human cancers. In previous studies, we described the activity of a new indole derivative, NSC743420, belonging to the tubulin inhibitors family, capable to induce apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle in the G2/M phase of various cancer cell lines. However, this molecule has never been tested on OS cell line. Here we address the activity of NSC743420 by examine whether differences in the p53 status could influence its effects on cell proliferation and death of OS cells. In particular, we compared the effect of the tested molecule on p53-wild type and p53-silenced U2OS cells, and on SaOS2 cell line, which is null for p53. Our results demonstrated that NSC743420 reduces OS cell proliferation by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. In particular, the molecule induces proliferative arrest that culminate to apoptosis in SaOS2 p53-null cells, while it brings a cytostatic and differentiating effect in U2OS cells, characterized by the cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and increased alkaline phosphatase activity. - Highlights: • The indole derivative NSC743420 induces antitumor effects on osteosarcoma cells. • p53 status could drive the activity of antitumor agents on osteosarcoma cells. • NSC743420 induces cytostatic and differentiating effects on U2OS cells. • NSC743420 causes apoptosis on p53-null SaOS2 cells.

  7. Low Levels of p53 Protein and Chromatin Silencing of p53 Target Genes Repress Apoptosis in Drosophila Endocycling Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bingqing; Mehrotra, Sonam; Ng, Wei Lun; Calvi, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death is an important response to genotoxic stress that prevents oncogenesis. It is known that tissues can differ in their apoptotic response, but molecular mechanisms are little understood. Here, we show that Drosophila polyploid endocycling cells (G/S cycle) repress the apoptotic response to DNA damage through at least two mechanisms. First, the expression of all the Drosophila p53 protein isoforms is strongly repressed at a post-transcriptional step. Second, p53-regulated pro-apoptotic genes are epigenetically silenced in endocycling cells, preventing activation of a paused RNA Pol II by p53-dependent or p53-independent pathways. Over-expression of the p53A isoform did not activate this paused RNA Pol II complex in endocycling cells, but over-expression of the p53B isoform with a longer transactivation domain did, suggesting that dampened p53B protein levels are crucial for apoptotic repression. We also find that the p53A protein isoform is ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome in endocycling cells. In mitotic cycling cells, p53A was the only isoform expressed to detectable levels, and its mRNA and protein levels increased after irradiation, but there was no evidence for an increase in protein stability. However, our data suggest that p53A protein stability is regulated in unirradiated cells, which likely ensures that apoptosis does not occur in the absence of stress. Without irradiation, both p53A protein and a paused RNA pol II were pre-bound to the promoters of pro-apoptotic genes, preparing mitotic cycling cells for a rapid apoptotic response to genotoxic stress. Together, our results define molecular mechanisms by which different cells in development modulate their apoptotic response, with broader significance for the survival of normal and cancer polyploid cells in mammals. PMID:25211335

  8. p53 and MDM2 in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Noon, Aidan P.; Vlatković, Nikolina; Polański, Radosław; Maguire, Maria; Shawki, Howida; Parsons, Keith; Boyd, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer and follows an unpredictable disease course. To improve prognostication, a better understanding of critical genes associated with disease progression is required. The objective of this review was to focus attention on 2 such genes, p53 and murine double minute 2 (MDM2), and to provide a comprehensive summary and critical analysis of the literature regarding these genes in RCC. Information was compiled by searching the PubMed database for articles that were published or e-published up to April 1, 2009. Search terms included renal cancer, renal cell carcinoma, p53, and MDM2. Full articles and any supplementary data were examined; and, when appropriate, references were checked for additional material. All studies that described assessment of p53 and/or MDM2 in renal cancer were included. The authors concluded that increased p53 expression, but not p53 mutation, is associated with reduced overall survival/more rapid disease progression in RCC. There also was evidence that MDM2 up-regulation is associated with decreased disease-specific survival. Two features of RCC stood out as unusual and will require further investigation. First, increased p53 expression is tightly linked with increased MDM2 expression; and, second, patients who have tumors that display increased p53 and MDM2 expression may have the poorest overall survival. Because there was no evidence to support the conclusion that p53 mutation is associated with poorer survival, it seemed clear that increased p53 expression in RCC occurs independent of mutation. Further investigation of the mechanisms leading to increased p53/MDM2 expression in RCC may lead to improved prognostication and to the identification of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:20052733

  9. p53-independent death and p53-induced protection against apoptosis in fibroblasts treated with chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Malcomson, R. D.; Oren, M.; Wyllie, A. H.; Harrison, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    Many recent studies have implicated p53 in the cellular response to injury and induction of cell death by apoptosis. In a rat embryonal fibroblast cell line transformed with c-Ha-ras and a mutant temperature-sensitive p53 (val135), cells were G1 arrested at the permissive temperature of 32 degrees C when overexpressed p53 was in wild-type conformation. In this state cells were resistant to apoptosis induced by etoposide (at up to 50 microM) or bleomycin (15 microU ml-1). Cells at 37 degrees C with overexpressed p53 in mutant conformation were freed from this growth arrest, continued proliferating and showed dose-dependent increases in apoptosis. This death is independent of wild-type p53 function. Control cells containing a non-temperature-sensitive mutant p53 (phe132) were sensitive to both etoposide and bleomycin after 24 h at 32 degrees C and 37 degrees C, indicating that the results are not simply due to temperature effects on pharmacokinetics or DNA damage. Our data show that induction of a stable p53-mediated growth arrest renders these cells much less likely to undergo apoptosis in response to certain anti-cancer drugs, and we conclude that the regulatory role of p53 in apoptosis is influenced by the particular cellular context in which this gene is expressed. PMID:7547247

  10. Energetic Landscape of MDM2-p53 Interactions by Computational Mutagenesis of the MDM2-p53 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Kelly M; Beyer, George A

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase MDM2, a principle regulator of the tumor suppressor p53, plays an integral role in regulating cellular levels of p53 and thus a prominent role in current cancer research. Computational analysis used MUMBO to rotamerize the MDM2-p53 crystal structure 1YCR to obtain an exhaustive search of point mutations, resulting in the calculation of the ΔΔG comprehensive energy landscape for the p53-bound regulator. The results herein have revealed a set of residues R65-E69 on MDM2 proximal to the p53 hydrophobic binding pocket that exhibited an energetic profile deviating significantly from similar residues elsewhere in the protein. In light of the continued search for novel competitive inhibitors for MDM2, we discuss possible implications of our findings on the drug discovery field.

  11. Long story short: p53 mediates innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Miciak, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The story of p53 and how we came to understand it is punctuated by fundamental insights into the essence of cancer. In the decades since its discovery, p53 has been shown to be centrally involved in most, if not all, of the cellular processes that maintain tissue homeostasis. Extensive functional analyses of p53 and its tumor-associated mutants have illuminated many of the common defects shared by most cancer cells. As the central character in a tale that continues to unfold, p53 has become increasingly familiar and yet remains surprisingly inscrutable. New relationships periodically come to light, and surprising, novel activities continue to emerge, thereby revealing new dimensions and aspects of its function. What lies at the very core of this complex protagonist? What is its prime motivation? As every avid reader knows, the elements of character are profoundly shaped by adversity – originating from within and without. And so it is with p53. This review will briefly recap the coordinated responses of p53 to viral infection, and outline a hypothetical model that would explain how an abundance of seemingly unrelated phenotypic attributes may in the end reflect a singular function. All stories eventually draw to a conclusion. This epic tale may eventually leave us with the realization that p53, most simply described, is a protein that evolved to mediate immune surveillance. PMID:26951863

  12. Ferroptosis as a p53-mediated activity during tumour suppression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Le; Kon, Ning; Li, Tongyuan; Wang, Shang-Jui; Su, Tao; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Baer, Richard; Gu, Wei

    2015-04-02

    Although p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis serve as critical barriers to cancer development, emerging evidence suggests that the metabolic activities of p53 are also important. Here we show that p53 inhibits cystine uptake and sensitizes cells to ferroptosis, a non-apoptotic form of cell death, by repressing expression of SLC7A11, a key component of the cystine/glutamate antiporter. Notably, p53(3KR), an acetylation-defective mutant that fails to induce cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis, fully retains the ability to regulate SLC7A11 expression and induce ferroptosis upon reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced stress. Analysis of mutant mice shows that these non-canonical p53 activities contribute to embryonic development and the lethality associated with loss of Mdm2. Moreover, SLC7A11 is highly expressed in human tumours, and its overexpression inhibits ROS-induced ferroptosis and abrogates p53(3KR)-mediated tumour growth suppression in xenograft models. Our findings uncover a new mode of tumour suppression based on p53 regulation of cystine metabolism, ROS responses and ferroptosis.

  13. Long story short: p53 mediates innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Miciak, Jessica; Bunz, Fred

    2016-04-01

    The story of p53 and how we came to understand it is punctuated by fundamental insights into the essence of cancer. In the decades since its discovery, p53 has been shown to be centrally involved in most, if not all, of the cellular processes that maintain tissue homeostasis. Extensive functional analyses of p53 and its tumor-associated mutants have illuminated many of the common defects shared by most cancer cells. As the central character in a tale that continues to unfold, p53 has become increasingly familiar and yet remains surprisingly inscrutable. New relationships periodically come to light, and surprising, novel activities continue to emerge, thereby revealing new dimensions and aspects of its function. What lies at the very core of this complex protagonist? What is its prime motivation? As every avid reader knows, the elements of character are profoundly shaped by adversity--originating from within and without. And so it is with p53. This review will briefly recap the coordinated responses of p53 to viral infection, and outline a hypothetical model that would explain how an abundance of seemingly unrelated phenotypic attributes may in the end reflect a singular function. All stories eventually draw to a conclusion. This epic tale may eventually leave us with the realization that p53, most simply described, is a protein that evolved to mediate immune surveillance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. p53 and the pathogenesis of skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, Cara L.; Ananthaswamy, Honnavara N.

    2007-11-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene and gene product are among the most diverse and complex molecules involved in cellular functions. Genetic alterations within the p53 gene have been shown to have a direct correlation with cancer development and have been shown to occur in nearly 50% of all cancers. p53 mutations are particularly common in skin cancers and UV irradiation has been shown to be a primary cause of specific 'signature' mutations that can result in oncogenic transformation. There are certain 'hot-spots' in the p53 gene where mutations are commonly found that result in a mutated dipyrimidine site. This review discusses the role of p53 from normal function and its dysfunction in pre-cancerous lesions and non-melanoma skin cancers. Additionally, special situations are explored, such as Li-Fraumeni syndrome in which there is an inherited p53 mutation, and the consequences of immune suppression on p53 mutations and the resulting increase in non-melanoma skin cancer in these patients.

  15. Pancreatic adenocarcinomas frequently show p53 gene mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, A.; Capelli, P.; Mukai, K.; Zamboni, G.; Oda, T.; Iacono, C.; Hirohashi, S.

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-four pancreatic adenocarcinomas were studied for the presence of p53 gene mutations by the single-strand conformation polymorphism method and by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. p53 protein expression was immunohistochemically evaluated using monoclonal PAb1801 and polyclonal CM1 antibodies. Mutations were detected in 14 cases. The transitions were six G to A and two A to G; the transversions were one C to G and two A to C; the remaining three were frameshift mutations. Immunostaining results were identical with both antibodies. Nuclear immunohistochemical p53-positive cells were found in nine p53 mutated cases and in 12 cases in which no mutation was detected. In most of these latter cases only a minority of cancer cells showed immunohistochemical positivity. Twenty-nine cases, including all p53 mutated cancers, were known to contain codon 12 Ki-ras gene mutations. Also in the light of the demonstrated cooperation of ras and p53 gene alterations in the transformation of cultured cells, our data suggest that p53 mutation is one of the genetic defects that may have a role in the pathogenesis of a proportion of pancreatic cancers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8494051

  16. The role of p53 in cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing-ding; Qin, Zheng-hong; Wang, Jin

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene has recently been shown to mediate metabolic changes in cells under physiological and pathological conditions. It has been revealed that p53 regulates energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and amino acid metabolism through balancing glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) as well as the autophagy pathway. p53 is activated by metabolic stress through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways. p53 regulates OXPHOS through the transcriptional regulation of fructose-2,6-bisphosophatase, TP53-induced glycolysis regulator (TIGAR) and synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase (SCO2) subunit of complex IV of the electron transport chain. p53 also indirectly influences the energy metabolism through regulating glucose transporter (GLUT) expression, glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and fatty acid synthase (FAS). In addition, p53 regulates autophagy to provide cell metabolites for surviving through damage regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM1). Here we review the recent findings to elucidate the important role of p53 in cell metabolism. PMID:20729871

  17. p53 and the Pathogenesis of Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Cara L.

    2007-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene and gene product are among the most diverse and complex molecules involved in cellular functions. Genetic alterations within the p53 gene have been shown to have a direct correlation with cancer development and have been shown to occur in nearly 50% of all cancers. p53 mutations are particularly common in skin cancers and UV irradiation has been shown to be a primary cause of specific ‘signature’ mutations that can result in oncogenic transformation. There are certain ‘hot-spots’ in the p53 gene where mutations are commonly found that result in a mutated dipyrimidine site. This review discusses the role of p53 from normal function and its dysfunction in pre-cancerous lesions and non-melanoma skin cancers. Additionally, special situations are explored, such as Li-Fraumeni syndrome in which there is an inherited p53 mutation, and the consequences of immune suppression on p53 mutations and the resulting increase in non-melanoma skin cancer in these patients. PMID:17270229

  18. Crosstalk between p53 and TGF-β Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Elston, Rebecca; Inman, Gareth J.

    2012-01-01

    Wild-type p53 and TGF-β are key tumour suppressors which regulate an array of cellular responses. TGF-β signals in part via the Smad signal transduction pathway. Wild-type p53 and Smads physically interact and coordinately induce transcription of a number of key tumour suppressive genes. Conversely mutant p53 generally subverts tumour suppressive TGF-β responses, diminishing transcriptional activation of key TGF-β target genes. Mutant p53 can also interact with Smads and this enables complex formation with the p53 family member p63 and blocks p63-mediated activation of metastasis suppressing genes to promote tumour progression. p53 and Smad function may also overlap during miRNA biogenesis as they can interact with the same components of the Drosha miRNA processing complex to promote maturation of specific subsets of miRNAs. This paper investigates the crosstalk between p53 and TGF-β signalling and the potential roles this plays in cancer biology. PMID:22545213

  19. Targeting p53-MDM2-MDMX Loop for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Zeng, Shelya X.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in anti-tumorigenesis and cancer therapy. It has been described as “the guardian of the genome”, because it is essential for conserving genomic stability by preventing mutation, and its mutation and inactivation are highly related to all human cancers. Two important p53 regulators, MDM2 and MDMX, inactivate p53 by directly inhibiting its transcriptional activity and mediating its ubiquitination in a feedback fashion, as their genes are also the transcriptional targets of p53. On account of the importance of the p53-MDM2- MDMX loop in the initiation and development of wild type p53-containing tumors, intensive studies over the past decade have been aiming to identify small molecules or peptides that could specifically target individual protein molecules of this pathway for developing better anti-cancer therapeutics. In this chapter, we review the approaches for screening and discovering efficient and selective MDM2 inhibitors with emphasis on the most advanced synthetic small molecules that interfere with the p53-MDM2 interaction and are currently on Phase I clinical trials. Other therapeutically useful strategies targeting this loop, which potentially improve the prospects of cancer therapy and prevention, will also be discussed briefly. PMID:25201201

  20. p53 regulates the mevalonate pathway in human glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Laezza, C; D'Alessandro, A; Di Croce, L; Picardi, P; Ciaglia, E; Pisanti, S; Malfitano, A M; Comegna, M; Faraonio, R; Gazzerro, P; Bifulco, M

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate (MVA) pathway is an important metabolic pathway implicated in multiple aspects of tumorigenesis. In this study, we provided evidence that p53 induces the expression of a group of enzymes of the MVA pathway including 3′-hydroxy-3′-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, MVA kinase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase and farnesyl diphosphate farnesyl transferase 1, in the human glioblastoma multiforme cell line, U343 cells, and in normal human astrocytes, NHAs. Genetic and pharmacologic perturbation of p53 directly influences the expression of these genes. Furthermore, p53 is recruited to the gene promoters in designated p53-responsive elements, thereby increasing their transcription. Such effect was abolished by site-directed mutagenesis in the p53-responsive element of promoter of the genes. These findings highlight another aspect of p53 functions unrelated to tumor suppression and suggest p53 as a novel regulator of the MVA pathway providing insight into the role of this pathway in cancer progression. PMID:26469958

  1. p53MVA therapy in patients with refractory gastrointestinal malignancies elevates p53-specific CD8+ T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, Nicola R; Carrol, Mary; Kaltcheva, Teodora; Qian, Dajun; Lim, Dean; Leong, Lucille; Chu, Peiguo; Kim, Joseph; Chao, Joseph; Fakih, Marwan; Yen, Yun; Espenschied, Jonathan; Ellenhorn, Joshua D I; Diamond, Don J; Chung, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To conduct a Phase I trial of a Modified Vaccinia Ankara vaccine delivering wild type human p53 (p53MVA) in patients with refractory gastrointestinal cancers. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Three patients were vaccinated with 1.0 × 108 pfu p53MVA followed by nine patients at 5.6 × 108 pfu. Toxicity was classified using the NCI Common Toxicity Criteria and clinical responses were assessed by CT scan. Peripheral blood samples were collected pre- and post-immunization for immunophenotyping, monitoring of p53MVA induced immune response and examination of PD-1 checkpoint inhibition in vitro. RESULTS: p53MVA immunization was well tolerated at both doses, with no adverse events above grade 2. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells showing enhanced recognition of a p53 overlapping peptide library were detectable after the first immunization, particularly in the CD8+ T cell compartment (p=0.03). However in most patients this did not expand further with the second and third immunization. The frequency of PD-1+ T cells detectable in patients PBMC was significantly higher than in healthy controls. Furthermore, the frequency of PD-1+ CD8+ T cells showed an inverse correlation with the peak CD8+ p53 response (p=0.02) and antibody blockade of PD-1 in vitro increased the p53 immune responses detected after the second or third immunizations. Induction of strong T cell and antibody responses to the MVA backbone were also apparent. CONCLUSION: p53MVA was well tolerated and induced robust CD8+ T cell responses. Combination of p53MVA with immune checkpoint inhibition could help sustain immune responses and lead to enhanced clinical benefit. PMID:24987057

  2. Genotoxic stress-induced expression of p53 and apoptosis in leukemic clam hemocytes with cytoplasmically sequestered p53.

    PubMed

    Böttger, Stefanie; Jerszyk, Emily; Low, Ben; Walker, Charles

    2008-02-01

    In nature, the soft shell clam, Mya arenaria, develops a fatal blood cancer in which a highly conserved homologue for wild-type human p53 protein is rendered nonfunctional by cytoplasmic sequestration. In untreated leukemic clam hemocytes, p53 is complexed throughout the cytoplasm with overexpressed variants for both clam homologues (full-length variant, 1,200-fold and truncated variant, 620-fold above normal clam hemocytes) of human mortalin, an Hsp70 family protein. In vitro treatment with etoposide only and in vivo treatment with either etoposide or mitoxantrone induces DNA damage, elevates expression (600-fold) and promotes nuclear translocation of p53, and results in apoptosis of leukemic clam hemocytes. Pretreatment with wheat germ agglutinin followed by etoposide treatment induces DNA damage and elevates p53 expression (893-fold) but does not overcome cytoplasmic sequestration of p53 or induce apoptosis. We show that leukemic clam hemocytes have an intact p53 pathway, and that maintenance of this tumor phenotype requires nuclear absence of p53, resulting from its localization in the cytoplasm of leukemic clam hemocytes. The effects of these topoisomerase II poisons may result as mortalin-based cytoplasmic tethering is overwhelmed by de novo expression of p53 protein after DNA damage induced by genotoxic stress. Soft shell clam leukemia provides excellent in vivo and in vitro models for developing genotoxic and nongenotoxic cancer therapies for reactivating p53 transcription in human and other animal cancers displaying mortalin-based cytoplasmic sequestration of the p53 tumor suppressor, such as colorectal cancers and primary and secondary glioblastomas, though not apparently leukemias or lymphomas.

  3. The p53 status of cultured human premalignant oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, J. E.; Clark, L. J.; Yeudall, W. A.; Mitchell, R.; Mackenzie, K.; Chang, S. E.; Parkinson, E. K.

    1994-01-01

    Around 60% of oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) have been shown to harbour p53 mutations, and other studies have demonstrated mutant p53 genes in normal and dysplastic squamous epithelium adjacent to these SCCs. In line with these earlier studies we show here that DOK, a keratinocyte cell line derived from a dysplasia, displays elevated levels of p53 protein and harbours a 12 bp in-frame deletion of the p53 gene spanning codons 188-191. In contrast, the coding region of the p53 gene was normal in a series of six benign recurrent laryngeal papillomas and a series of four premalignant oral erythroplakia biopsies and their cell cultures. All but one of these lesions were free of malignancy at the time of biopsy, in contrast to the premalignant lesions studied by previous investigators, but keratinocytes cultured from these lesions all displayed a partially transformed phenotype that was less pronounced than that of DOK. Since three out of four of the erythroplakia patients developed SCC within 1 year of biopsy, these lesions were by definition premalignant. The availability of strains of partially transformed keratinocytes from premalignant erythroplakias which possess normal p53 genes should enable us to test the role of mutant p53 in the progression of erythroplakia to SCC. The premalignant tissues and cultures were also tested for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV), which is known to inactivate p53 function in some cases. Only the benign papillomas were shown to contain high levels of either HPV 6 or HPV 11 E6 DNA, but not both, and none of the samples contained detectable levels of HPV 16, HPV 18 or HPV 33 E6 DNA or L1 DNA of several other HPV types. There was therefore no evidence to suggest that p53 was being inactivated by a highly oncogenic HPV in these samples. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7917902

  4. p53-Induced inflammation exacerbates cardiac dysfunction during pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yohko; Shimizu, Ippei; Katsuumi, Goro; Jiao, Shuang; Suda, Masayoshi; Hayashi, Yuka; Minamino, Tohru

    2015-08-01

    The rates of death and disability caused by severe heart failure are still unacceptably high. There is evidence that the sterile inflammatory response has a critical role in the progression of cardiac remodeling in the failing heart. The p53 signaling pathway has been implicated in heart failure, but the pathological link between p53 and inflammation in the failing heart is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate a critical role of p53-induced inflammation in heart failure. Expression of p53 was increased in cardiac endothelial cells and bone marrow cells in response to pressure overload, leading to up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1) expression by endothelial cells and integrin expression by bone marrow cells. Deletion of p53 from endothelial cells or bone marrow cells significantly reduced ICAM1 or integrin expression, respectively, as well as decreasing cardiac inflammation and ameliorating systolic dysfunction during pressure overload. Conversely, overexpression of p53 in bone marrow cells led to an increase of integrin expression and cardiac inflammation that reduced systolic function. Norepinephrine markedly increased p53 expression in endothelial cells and macrophages. Reducing β2-adrenergic receptor expression in endothelial cells or bone marrow cells attenuated cardiac inflammation and improved systolic dysfunction during pressure overload. These results suggest that activation of the sympathetic nervous system promotes cardiac inflammation by up-regulating ICAM1 and integrin expression via p53 signaling to exacerbate cardiac dysfunction. Inhibition of p53-induced inflammation may be a novel therapeutic strategy for heart failure. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Robustness of the p53 network and biological hackers.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Hubank, Michael; Tsoka, Sophia; Bogle, I David L; Papageorgiou, Lazaros G

    2005-06-06

    The p53 protein interaction network is crucial in regulating the metazoan cell cycle and apoptosis. Here, the robustness of the p53 network is studied by analyzing its degeneration under two modes of attack. Linear Programming is used to calculate average path lengths among proteins and the network diameter as measures of functionality. The p53 network is found to be robust to random loss of nodes, but vulnerable to a targeted attack against its hubs, as a result of its architecture. The significance of the results is considered with respect to mutational knockouts of proteins and the directed attacks mounted by tumour inducing viruses.

  6. Regulation of p53 function by lysine methylation.

    PubMed

    West, Lisandra E; Gozani, Or

    2011-06-01

    The reversible and dynamic methylation of proteins on lysine residues can greatly increase the signaling potential of the modified factor. In addition to histones, several other nuclear factors such as the tumor suppressor and transcription factor p53 undergo lysine methylation, suggesting that this modification may be a common mechanism for modulating protein–protein interactions and key cellular signaling pathways. This article focuses on how lysine methylation events on the C-terminal tail of p53 are generated, sensed and transduced to modulate p53 functions.

  7. POSTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATIONS OF P53: UPSTREAM SIGNALING PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2003-10-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is posttranslational modified at >20 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the upstream signaling pathways whose activation in response to various genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses result in p53 posttranslational modifications.

  8. The emerging role of p53 in exercise metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Jonathan D; Close, Graeme L; Drust, Barry; Morton, James P

    2014-03-01

    The major tumour suppressor protein, p53, is one of the most well-studied proteins in cell biology. Often referred to as the Guardian of the Genome, the list of known functions of p53 include regulatory roles in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, angiogenesis, DNA repair and cell senescence. More recently, p53 has been implicated as a key molecular player regulating substrate metabolism and exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. In this context, the study of p53 therefore has obvious implications for both human health and performance, given that impaired mitochondrial content and function is associated with the pathology of many metabolic disorders such as ageing, type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer, as well as reduced exercise performance. Studies on p53 knockout (KO) mice collectively demonstrate that ablation of p53 content reduces intermyofibrillar (IMF) and subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondrial yield, reduces cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-α protein content whilst also reducing mitochondrial respiration and increasing reactive oxygen species production during state 3 respiration in IMF mitochondria. Additionally, p53 KO mice exhibit marked reductions in exercise capacity (in the magnitude of 50 %) during fatiguing swimming, treadmill running and electrical stimulation protocols. p53 may regulate contractile-induced increases in mitochondrial content via modulating mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) content and/or activity, given that p53 KO mice display reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA, Tfam messenger RNA and protein levels. Furthermore, upon muscle contraction, p53 is phosphorylated on serine 15 and subsequently translocates to the mitochondria where it forms a complex with Tfam to modulate expression of mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the COX complex. In human skeletal muscle, the exercise-induced phosphorylation of p53(Ser15) is enhanced in conditions

  9. Restoring expression of wild-type p53 suppresses tumor growth but does not cause tumor regression in mice with a p53 missense mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongxing; Suh, Young-Ah; Fuller, Maren Y.; Jackson, James G.; Xiong, Shunbin; Terzian, Tamara; Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Bankson, James A.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Lozano, Guillermina

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 is a tumor suppressor. As such, the P53 gene is frequently altered in human cancers. However, over 80% of the P53 mutations found in human cancers are missense mutations that lead to expression of mutant proteins that not only lack p53 transcriptional activity but exhibit new functions as well. Recent studies show that restoration of p53 expression leads to tumor regression in mice carrying p53 deletions. However, the therapeutic efficacy of restoring p53 expression in tumors containing p53 missense mutations has not been evaluated. Here we demonstrate that restoring wild-type p53 expression halted tumor growth in mice inheriting a p53R172H missense mutation that is equivalent to a P53 missense mutation detected in approximately 6% of human cancers. However, it did not lead to tumor regression, as was observed in mice lacking p53. We further showed that the dominant-negative effect of the mutant p53 encoded by p53R172H dampened the activity of the restored wild-type p53. We therefore conclude that in a mutant p53 background, p53 restoration has the therapeutic potential to suppress tumor progression. Our findings support using p53 restoration as a strategy to treat human cancers with P53 missense mutations and provide direction for optimizing p53 restoration in cancer therapy. PMID:21285512

  10. Restoring expression of wild-type p53 suppresses tumor growth but does not cause tumor regression in mice with a p53 missense mutation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongxing; Suh, Young-Ah; Fuller, Maren Y; Jackson, James G; Xiong, Shunbin; Terzian, Tamara; Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Bankson, James A; El-Naggar, Adel K; Lozano, Guillermina

    2011-03-01

    The transcription factor p53 is a tumor suppressor. As such, the P53 gene is frequently altered in human cancers. However, over 80% of the P53 mutations found in human cancers are missense mutations that lead to expression of mutant proteins that not only lack p53 transcriptional activity but exhibit new functions as well. Recent studies show that restoration of p53 expression leads to tumor regression in mice carrying p53 deletions. However, the therapeutic efficacy of restoring p53 expression in tumors containing p53 missense mutations has not been evaluated. Here we demonstrate that restoring wild-type p53 expression halted tumor growth in mice inheriting a p53(R172H) missense mutation that is equivalent to a P53 missense mutation detected in approximately 6% of human cancers. However, it did not lead to tumor regression, as was observed in mice lacking p53. We further showed that the dominant-negative effect of the mutant p53 encoded by p53(R172H) dampened the activity of the restored wild-type p53. We therefore conclude that in a mutant p53 background, p53 restoration has the therapeutic potential to suppress tumor progression. Our findings support using p53 restoration as a strategy to treat human cancers with P53 missense mutations and provide direction for optimizing p53 restoration in cancer therapy.

  11. Morphological Heterogeneity of p53 Positive and p53 Negative Nuclei in Breast Cancers Stratified by Clinicopathological Variables

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Katrin; Dimmer, Volker; Haroske, Gunter; Meyer, Wolfdietrich; Theissig, Franz; Thieme, Berit; Kunze, Klaus Dietmar

    1997-01-01

    The study was aimed to detect differences in nuclear morphology between nuclear populations as well as between tumours with different p53 expression in breast cancers with different clinicopathological features, which also reflect the stage of tumour progression. The p53 immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin sections from 88 tumour samples. After the cells had been localised by means of an image cytometry workstation and their immunostaining had been categorised visually, the sections were destained and stained by the Feulgen protocol. The nuclei were relocated and measured cytometrically by the workstation. There were significant differences in the nuclear features between tumours as well as between nuclear populations with different p53 expression in the most subgroups. The variability of nuclear shape in tumour groups, classified by the tumour size or the lymph node status, increase with the p53 immunoreactive score, whereas in tumours grouped by the Bloom–Richardson grade features of the chromatin distribution were different between the p53 staining categories. The nuclear subpopulations showed differences in the amount and distribution of chromatin in most subgroups. The results demonstrate the relationship between the nuclear morphology and the p53 expression in different stages of breast cancers. The p53 status is an important factor of the biological behaviour but not the only one. PMID:9313826

  12. Regulation of p53 by TopBP1: a Potential Mechanism for p53 Inactivation in Cancer▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kang; Bellam, Naresh; Lin, Hui-Yi; Wang, Bing; Stockard, Cecil R.; Grizzle, William E.; Lin, Weei-Chin

    2009-01-01

    Proper control of the G1/S checkpoint is essential for normal proliferation. The activity of p53 must be kept at a very low level under unstressed conditions to allow growth. Here we provide evidence supporting a crucial role for TopBP1 in actively repressing p53. Depletion of TopBP1 upregulates p53 target genes involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and enhances DNA damage-induced apoptosis. The regulation is mediated by an interaction between the seventh and eighth BRCT domains of TopBP1 and the DNA-binding domain of p53, leading to inhibition of p53 promoter binding activity. Importantly, TopBP1 overexpression is found in 46 of 79 primary breast cancer tissues and is associated with high tumor grade and shorter patient survival time. Overexpression of TopBP1 to a level comparable to that seen in breast tumors leads to inhibition of p53 target gene expression and DNA damage-induced apoptosis and G1 arrest. Thus, a physiological level of TopBP1 is essential for normal G1/S transition, but a pathological level of TopBP1 in cancer may perturb p53 function and contribute to an aggressive tumor behavior. PMID:19289498

  13. p53 in cell invasion, podosomes, and invadopodia

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Alan S

    2014-01-01

    Cell invasion of the extracellular matrix is prerequisite to cross tissue migration of tumor cells in cancer metastasis, and vascular smooth muscle cells in atherosclerosis. The tumor suppressor p53, better known for its roles in the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis, has ignited much interest in its function as a suppressor of cell migration and invasion. How p53 and its gain-of-function mutants regulate cell invasion remains a puzzle and a challenge for future studies. In recent years, podosomes and invadopodia have also gained center stage status as veritable apparatus specialized in cell invasion. It is not clear, however, whether p53 regulates cell invasion through podosomes and invadopodia. In this review, evidence supporting a negative role of p53 in podosomes formation in vascular smooth muscle cells will be surveyed, and signaling nodes that may mediate this regulation in other cell types will be explored. PMID:24714032

  14. Characterization of the human p53 gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, S.P.; Crawford, L.

    1989-05-01

    Transcriptional deregulation of the p53 gene may play an important part in the genesis of some tumors. The authors report here an accurate determination of the transcriptional start sites of the human p53 gene and show that the majority of p53 mRNA molecules do not contain a postulated stem-loop structure at their 5' ends. Recombinant plasmids of the human p53 promoter-leader region fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat) were constructed. After transfection into rodent or human cells, a 350-base-pair fragment spanning the promoter region conferred 4% of the CAT activity mediated by the simian virus 40 early promoter/enhancer. They monitored the efficiency with which 15 3' and 5' promoter deletion constructs initiated transcription. Their results show that an 85-base-pair fragment, previously thought to have resided in exon 1, is that is required for full promoter activity.

  15. [Role of the p53 tumor suppressor in metabolism].

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Linares, Laetitia Karine; Le Cam, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is an essential downstream effector of various cellular stress response pathways that is functionally inactivated in most, if not all, tumors. Since its discovery more than 30 years ago, its role in the control of cell proliferation, senescence and cell survival has been widely described. However, growing evidences from several laboratories indicate that p53 has important transcriptional and non-transcriptional functions in the control of metabolism, including the regulation of glycolysis, glutaminolysis or mitochondrial respiration. Originally identified using in vitro cellular models, this previously underestimated role of p53 has been confirmed in vivo in various genetically engineered mouse models. These recent data suggest that p53 functions in various metabolic pathways significantly contribute to its role in adult tissue homeostasis, aging as well as tumor suppression. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  16. p53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog regulates p53 in vivo in the adult mouse eye lens

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Rangel, Gilberto; Ortega-Martínez, Marta; Sepúlveda-Saavedra, Julio; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Purpose p53 is a transcription factor that plays an important role in preventing cancer development. p53 participates in relevant aspects of cell biology, including apoptosis and cell cycle control and must be strictly regulated to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. p53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog (Mdm2) is an important negative regulator of p53. The purpose of this study was to determine if Mdm2 regulates p53 in vivo in the adult lens. Methods We analyzed mice expressing human p53 transgene (Tgp53) selectively in the lens in the presence or absence of Mdm2. Mice with the required genotypes were obtained by crossing transgenic, mdm2+/−, and p53−/− mice. Eye phenotype and lens histology and ultrastructure were analyzed in adult mice. Results In a wild-type genetic background (mdm2+/+), lens damage and microphthalmia were observed only in mice homozygous for Tgp53 (t/t). However, in an mdm2 null background, just one allele of Tgp53 (mdm2−/−/Tgp53t/0 mice) was sufficient to cause lens damage and microphthalmia. Furthermore, Mdm2 in only one allele was sufficient to rescue these deleterious effects, since the mdm2+/−/Tgp53t/0 mice had eye size and lens morphology similar to the control mice. Conclusions Mdm2 regulates p53 in the adult lens in vivo. This information may have relevance for analyzing normal and pathological conditions of the lens, and designing cancer therapies targeting Mdm2–p53 interaction. PMID:24339722

  17. p53-dependent delayed effects of radiation vary according to time of irradiation of p53 + / - mice.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that in p53 (+ / -) mice that had been given a whole-body dose of 3 Gy at 8 weeks of age, p53-dependent delayed effects of radiation, as manifested in T-cell receptor (TCR) variant fractions (VF) instability in mouse splenocytes, were biphasic, namely, induction of TCR-VF mutation reappeared at 44 weeks. The manifestation of the delayed effects and the measures of biological markers varied according to the timing of irradiation. We also reported that the decrease in function of the p53 gene was related to the effects of a delayed mutation. In the present study, we investigated the functions and mutations of the p53 gene in old age for p53 (+ / -) mice following irradiation at various ages. p53 (+ / -) mice were given a whole-body dose of 3 Gy at 8, 28 or 40 weeks of age. There were significant differences for all variables tested at 8 weeks of age. This was similarly the case for mice irradiated at 28 weeks of age, in which there were also significant differences in TCR VF and the percentage of apoptosis. In mice irradiated at 40 weeks of age, there were significant differences for all considered variables except for the p53 allele. We demonstrated that the different patterns of delayed mutation of the p53 gene at 56 weeks of age depended on the age at which mice had undergone 3-Gy whole-body irradiation. Our conclusions are limited to variation in p53-dependent delayed effects according to the time of irradiation.

  18. The p53-Deficient Mouse as a Breast Cancer Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    mammary tumor progression in a relatively controlled fashion within a reasonable length of time. Elucidation of the biological processes affected by p53...role of p53 loss in the mammary tumorigenesis process . The primary goals of the remaining years will be to extend these studies by looking at other...regulation and cell proliferation; (2) angiogenesis; and (3) invasiveness and metastases. The particular genes which regulate these biological processes will

  19. Mechanisms of Breast Carcinogenesis Involving Wild-Type p53

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    were transfected into five p53-negative tumor cell lines. A published study from our laboratory demonstrated that in osteosarcoma Saos-2 cells, wild...Nelson, C. E., Gryka, M. A., Litwak, G., Gebhardt , M., level of p53 that was expressed in the cells in both these studies Bressac, B., Ozturk, M., Baker...40). Here the osteosarcoma Saos-2 and the breast potent transcriptional activation domain (8) that is linked to a carcinoma MDA-MB-453 cell lines

  20. A naturally occurring 4-bp deletion in the intron 4 of p53 creates a spectrum of novel p53 isoforms with anti-apoptosis function.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hui; Tao, Ting; Huang, Delai; Ou, Zhao; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2015-01-01

    p53 functions as a tumor suppressor by transcriptionally regulating the expression of genes involved in controlling cell proliferation or apoptosis. p53 and its isoform Δ133p53/Δ113p53 form a negative regulation loop in that p53 activates the expression of Δ133p53/Δ113p53 while Δ133p53/Δ113p53 specifically antagonizes p53 apoptotic activity. This pathway is especially important to safeguard the process of embryogenesis because sudden activation of p53 by DNA damage signals or developmental stress is detrimental to a developing embryo. Here we report the identification of five novel p53 isoforms. p53β is generated due to alternative splicing of the intron 8 of p53 while the other four, namely, TA2p53, TA3p53, TA4p53 and TA5p53, result from the combination of alternative splicing of intron 1 (within intron 4 of the p53 gene) of the Δ113p53 gene and a naturally occurring CATT 4 bp deletion within the alternative splicing product in zebrafish. The CATT 4 bp deletion creates four translation start codons which are in-frame to the open reading frame of Δ113p53. We also show that TAp53 shares the same promoter with Δ113p53 and functions to antagonize p53 apoptotic activity. The identification of Δ113p53/TA2/3/4/5p53 reveals a pro-survival mechanism which operates robustly during embryogenesis in response to the DNA-damage condition.

  1. p53 and MDM2 protein expression in actinic cheilitis.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Maria da Conceição Andrade; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Xavier, Flávia Caló Aquino; Moreira, André Luis Gomes; Reis, Sílvia Regina Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially malignant lip lesion caused by excessive and prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation, which can lead to histomorphological alterations indicative of abnormal cell differentiation. In this pathology, varying degrees of epithelial dysplasia may be found. There are few published studies regarding the p53 and MDM2 proteins in actinic cheilitis. Fifty-eight cases diagnosed with actinic cheilitis were histologically evaluated using Banóczy and Csiba (1976) parameters, and were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis using the streptavidin-biotin method in order to assess p53 and MDM2 protein expression. All studied cases expressed p53 proteins in basal and suprabasal layers. In the basal layer, the nuclei testing positive for p53 were stained intensely, while in the suprabasal layer, cells with slightly stained nuclei were predominant. All cases also tested positive for the MDM2 protein, but with varying degrees of nuclear expression and a predominance of slightly stained cells. A statistically significant correlation between the percentage of p53 and MDM2-positive cells was established, regardless of the degree of epithelial dysplasia. The expression of p53 and MDM2 proteins in actinic cheilitis can be an important indicator in lip carcinogenesis, regardless of the degree of epithelial dysplasia.

  2. Post-translational regulation enables robust p53 regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays important roles in DNA damage repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Due to its critical functions, the level of p53 is tightly regulated by a negative feedback mechanism to increase its tolerance towards fluctuations and disturbances. Interestingly, the p53 level is controlled by post-translational regulation rather than transcriptional regulation in this feedback mechanism. Results We analyzed the dynamics of this feedback to understand whether post-translational regulation provides any advantages over transcriptional regulation in regard to disturbance rejection. When a disturbance happens, even though negative feedback reduces the steady-state error, it can cause a system to become less stable and transiently overshoots, which may erroneously trigger downstream reactions. Therefore, the system needs to balance the trade-off between steady-state and transient errors. Feedback control and adaptive estimation theories revealed that post-translational regulation achieves a better trade-off than transcriptional regulation, contributing to a more steady level of p53 under the influence of noise and disturbances. Furthermore, post-translational regulation enables cells to respond more promptly to stress conditions with consistent amplitude. However, for better disturbance rejection, the p53- Mdm2 negative feedback has to pay a price of higher stochastic noise. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that the p53-Mdm2 feedback favors regulatory mechanisms that provide the optimal trade-offs for dynamic control. PMID:23992617

  3. Tumourigenesis associated with the p53 tumour suppressor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, F.; Syrjänen, S.; Tervahauta, A.; Syrjänen, K.

    1993-01-01

    The p53 gene is contained within 16-20 kb of cellular DNA located on the short arm of human chromosome 17 at position 17p13.1. This gene encodes a 393-amino-acid nuclear phosphoprotein involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. Current evidence suggests that loss of normal p53 function is associated with cell transformation in vitro and development of neoplasms in vivo. More than 50% of human malignancies of epithelial, mesenchymal, haematopoietic, lymphoid, and central nervous system origin analysed thus far, were shown to contain an altered p53 gene. The oncoproteins derived from several tumour viruses, including the SV40 large T antigen, the adenovirus E1B protein and papillomavirus E6 protein, as well as specific cellular gene products, e.g. murine double minute-2 (MDM2), were found to bind to the wild-type p53 protein and presumably lead to inactivation of this gene product. Therefore, the inactivation of p53 tumour suppressor gene is currently regarded as an almost universal step in the development of human cancers. The current data on p53-associated tumourigenesis are briefly discussed in this minireview. PMID:8398688

  4. UHRF2, another E3 ubiquitin ligase for p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Fangmin; Yang, Yan; Qian, Guanhua; Duan, Changzhu

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 associates with p53 in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 interacts with p53 through its SRA/YDG domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 ubiquitinates p53 in vivo and in vitro. -- Abstract: UHRF2, ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 2, is a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is involved in cell cycle and epigenetic regulation. UHRF2 interacts with multiple cell cycle proteins, including cyclins (A2, B1, D1, and E1), CDK2, and pRb; moreover, UHRF2 could ubiquitinate cyclin D1 and cyclin E1. Also, UHRF2 has been shown to be implicated in epigenetic regulation by associating with DNMTs, G9a, HDAC1, H3K9me2/3 and hemi-methylated DNA. We found that UHRF2 associates with tumor suppressor protein p53, and p53 is ubiquitinated by UHRF2 in vivo and in vitro. Given that both UHRF2 and p53 are involved in cell cycle regulation, this study may suggest a novel signaling pathway on cell proliferation.

  5. Tracing the Evolution of the p53 Tetramerization Domain

    PubMed Central

    Joerger, Andreas C.; Wilcken, Rainer; Andreeva, Antonina

    2014-01-01

    Summary The tetrameric transcription factors p53, p63, and p73 evolved from a common ancestor and play key roles in tumor suppression and development. Surprisingly, p63 and p73 require a second helix in their tetramerization domain for the formation of stable tetramers that is absent in human p53, raising questions about the evolutionary processes leading to diversification. Here we determined the crystal structure of the zebrafish p53 tetramerization domain, which contains a second helix, reminiscent of p63 and p73, combined with p53-like features. Through comprehensive phylogenetic analyses, we systematically traced the evolution of vertebrate p53 family oligomerization domains back to the beginning of multicellular life. We provide evidence that their last common ancestor also had an extended p63/p73-like domain and pinpoint evolutionary events that shaped this domain during vertebrate radiation. Domain compaction and transformation of a structured into a flexible, intrinsically disordered region may have contributed to the expansion of the human p53 interactome. PMID:25185827

  6. Ribosomal Proteins Control or Bypass p53 during Nucleolar Stress

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Annapina; Russo, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    The nucleolus is the site of ribosome biogenesis, a complex process that requires the coordinate activity of all three RNA polymerases and hundreds of non-ribosomal factors that participate in the maturation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and assembly of small and large subunits. Nevertheless, emerging studies have highlighted the fundamental role of the nucleolus in sensing a variety of cellular stress stimuli that target ribosome biogenesis. This condition is known as nucleolar stress and triggers several response pathways to maintain cell homeostasis, either p53-dependent or p53-independent. The mouse double minute (MDM2)-p53 stress signaling pathways are activated by multiple signals and are among the most important regulators of cellular homeostasis. In this review, we will focus on the role of ribosomal proteins in p53-dependent and p53-independent response to nucleolar stress considering novel identified regulators of these pathways. We describe, in particular, the role of ribosomal protein uL3 (rpL3) in p53-independent nucleolar stress signaling pathways. PMID:28085118

  7. Mdm2 links genotoxic stress and metabolism to p53.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongfeng; Li, Baojie

    2010-12-01

    Mouse double minute 2 (Mdm2) gene was isolated from a cDNA library derived from transformed mouse 3T3 cells, and was classified as an oncogene as it confers 3T3 and Rat2 cells tumorigenicity when overexpressed. It encodes a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling ubiquitin E3 ligase, with its main target being tumor suppressor p53, which is mutated in more than 50% of human primary tumors. Mdm2's oncogenic activity is mainly mediated by p53, which is activated by various stresses, especially genotoxic stress, via Atm (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and Atr (Atm and Rad3-related). Activated p53 inhibits cell proliferation, induces apoptosis or senescence, and maintains genome integrity. Mdm2 is also a target gene of p53 transcription factor. Thus, Mdm2 and p53 form a feedback regulatory loop. External and internal cues, through multiple signaling pathways, can act on Mdm2 to regulate p53 levels and cell proliferation, death, and senescence. This review will focus on how Mdm2 is regulated under genotoxic stress, and by the Akt1-mTOR-S6K1 pathway that is activated by insulin, growth factors, amino acids, or energy status.

  8. The p53 Transcriptional Network Influences Microglia Behavior and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Aloi, Macarena S; Su, Wei; Garden, Gwenn A

    2015-01-01

    The tumor-suppressor protein p53 belongs to a family of proteins that play pivotal roles in multiple cellular functions including cell proliferation, cell death, genome stability, and regulation of inflammation. Neuroinflammation is a common feature of central nervous system (CNS) pathology, and microglia are the specialized resident population of CNS myeloid cells that initiate innate immune responses. Microglia maintain CNS homeostasis through pathogen containment, phagocytosis of debris, and initiation of tissue-repair cascades. However, an unregulated pro-inflammatory response can lead to tissue injury and dysfunction in both acute and chronic inflammatory states. Therefore, regulation of the molecular signals that control the induction, magnitude, and resolution of inflammation are necessary for optimal CNS health. We and others have described a novel mechanism by which p53 transcriptional activity modulates microglia behaviors in vitro and in vivo. Activation of p53 induces expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) that support microglia pro-inflammatory functions and suppress anti-inflammatory and tissue repair behaviors. In this review, we introduce the previously described roles of the p53 signaling network and discuss novel functions of p53 in the microglia-mediated inflammatory response in CNS health and disease. Ultimately, improved understanding of the molecular regulators modulated by p53 transcriptional activity in microglia will enhance the development of rational therapeutic strategies to harness the homeostatic and tissue repair functions of microglia.

  9. p53 protein, EGF receptor, and anti-p53 antibodies in serum from patients with occupationally derived lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, J; Presek, P; Braun, A; Bauer, P; Konietzko, N; Wiesner, B; Woitowitz, H-J

    1999-01-01

    The oncogene product epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R), the tumour suppressor gene product p53 and anti-p53 antibodies are detectable in the serum of certain cancer patients. Increased levels of some of these products were reported in lung cancer patients after occupational asbestos exposure and after exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or vinylchloride. In the first step, this study investigated the possible diagnostic value of serum EGF-R, p53-protein and anti-p53 antibodies, measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in lung tumour patients. In addition to being investigated on a molecular epidemiological basis, these parameters were examined as biomarkers of carcinogenesis, especially with regard to asbestos incorporation effects or of radon-induced lung cancers. Also, a possible effect of cigarette smoking and age dependence were studied. A total of 116 male patients with lung or pleural tumours were examined. The histological classification was four small-cell cancers, six large-cell cancers, 32 adenocarcinomas, 47 squamous carcinomas, 12 mixed lung carcinomas, five diffuse malignant mesotheliomas and ten lung metastasis of extrapulmonary tumours. Twenty-two lung cancers and all mesotheliomas were related to asbestos, 22 lung cancers were related to ionizing radiation and 61 patients had cigarette smoke-related lung cancer. Besides these patients 50 male patients with non-malignant lung or pleural diseases were included; of the latter eight subjects suffered from asbestosis. Controls were 129 male subjects without any lung disease. No significantly elevated or decreased serum values for p53 protein, EGF-R, or anti-p53 antibodies as a function of histological tumour type, age, or degree and type of exposure (asbestos, smoking, ionizing radiation) could be found. The utility of p53-protein, EGF-R and anti-p53 antibodies as routine biomarkers for screening occupationally derived lung cancers is limited. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign

  10. Laser-based measurement of transition probabilities of neon 2p 53s-2p 53p transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Takashi; Goto, Chiaki; Uetani, Yasunori; Fukuda, Kuniya

    1985-01-01

    By using the magic-angle, pulsed-excitation method in the presence of a magnetic field, the authors have measured the branching ratios for 2p 53s-2p 53p transitions in neon. By combining values for the lifetime of the upper levels with the branching ratios, they have determined the transition probabilities of 31 transitions. The results are in good agreement with those from emission spectroscopy of a high-pressure are plasma by Bridges and Wiese.

  11. Analysis of Thermally Denatured Depth in Laser Vaporization for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia using a Simulation of Light Propagation and Heat Transfer (secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Junya; Honda, Norihiro; Hazama, Hisanao; Ioritani, Naomasa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Laser vaporization of the prostate is expected as a less invasive treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), via the photothermal effect. In order to develop safer and more effective laser vaporization of the prostate, it is essential to set optimal irradiation parameters based on quantitative evaluation of temperature distribution and thermally denatured depth in prostate tissue. Method: A simulation model was therefore devised with light propagation and heat transfer calculation, and the vaporized and thermally denatured depths were estimated by the simulation model. Results: The results of the simulation were compared with those of an ex vivo experiment and clinical trial. Based on the accumulated data, the vaporized depth strongly depended on the distance between the optical fiber and the prostate tissue, and it was suggested that contact laser irradiation could vaporize the prostate tissue most effectively. Additionally, it was suggested by analyzing thermally denatured depth comprehensively that laser irradiation at the distance of 3 mm between the optical fiber and the prostate tissue was useful for hemostasis. Conclusions: This study enabled quantitative and reproducible analysis of laser vaporization for BPH and will play a role in clarification of the safety and efficacy of this treatment. PMID:28765672

  12. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields induce apoptosis in p53-wildtype and p53-null HCT116 colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, Emily H; Schoenbach, Karl H; Beebe, Stephen J

    2007-09-01

    Non-ionizing radiation produced by nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) is an alternative to ionizing radiation for cancer treatment. NsPEFs are high power, low energy (non-thermal) pulses that, unlike plasma membrane electroporation, modulate intracellular structures and functions. To determine functions for p53 in nsPEF-induced apoptosis, HCT116p53(+/+) and HCT116p53(-/-) colon carcinoma cells were exposed to multiple pulses of 60 kV/cm with either 60 ns or 300 ns durations and analyzed for apoptotic markers. Several apoptosis markers were observed including cell shrinkage and increased percentages of cells positive for cytochrome c, active caspases, fragmented DNA, and Bax, but not Bcl-2. Unlike nsPEF-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells (Beebe et al. 2003a) active caspases were observed before increases in cytochrome c, which occurred in the presence and absence of Bax. Cell shrinkage occurred only in cells with increased levels of Bax or cytochrome c. NsPEFs induced apoptosis equally in HCT116p53(+/+) and HCT116p53(-/-) cells. These results demonstrate that non-ionizing radiation produced by nsPEFs can act as a non-ligand agonist with therapeutic potential to induce apoptosis utilizing mitochondrial-independent mechanisms in HCT116 cells that lead to caspase activation and cell death in the presence or absence of p-53 and Bax.

  13. Phosphorylation of p53 by TAF1 inactivates p53-dependent transcription in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Lin, Joy C.; Piluso, Landon G.; Dhahbi, Joseph M.; Bobadilla, Selene; Spindler, Stephen R.; Liu, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    Summary While p53 activation has long been studied, the mechanisms by which its targets genes are restored to their pre-activation state are less clear. We report here that TAF1 phosphorylates p53 at Thr55, leading to dissociation of p53 from the p21 promoter and inactivation of transcription late in the DNA damage response. We further show that cellular ATP level might act as a molecular switch for Thr55 phosphorylation on the p21 promoter, indicating that TAF1 is a cellular ATP sensor. Upon DNA damage, cells undergo PARP-1-dependent ATP depletion, which is correlated with reduced TAF1 kinase activity and Thr55 phosphorylation, resulting in p21 activation. As cellular ATP levels recover, TAF1 is able to phosphorylate p53 on Thr55, which leads to dissociation of p53 from the p21 promoter. ChIP-sequencing analysis reveals p53 dissociates from promoters genome-wide as cells recover from DNA damage, suggesting the general nature of this mechanism. PMID:24289924

  14. MIF family members cooperatively inhibit p53 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Brock, Stephanie E; Rendon, Beatriz E; Xin, Dan; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Mitchell, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is induced by genotoxic stress in both normal and transformed cells and serves to transcriptionally coordinate cell cycle checkpoint control and programmed cell death responses. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an autocrine and paracrine acting cytokine/growth factor that promotes lung adenocarcinoma cell motility, anchorage-independence and neo-angiogenic potential. Several recent studies indicate that the only known homolog of MIF, D-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT - also referred to as MIF-2), has functionally redundant activities with MIF and cooperatively promotes MIF-dependent pro-tumorigenic phenotypes. We now report that MIF and D-DT synergistically inhibit steady state p53 phosphorylation, stabilization and transcriptional activity in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. The combined loss of MIF and D-DT by siRNA leads to dramatically reduced cell cycle progression, anchorage independence, focus formation and increased programmed cell death when compared to individual loss of MIF or D-DT. Importantly, p53 mutant and p53 null lung adenocarcinoma cell lines were only nominally rescued from the cell growth effects of MIF/D-DT combined deficiency suggesting only a minor role for p53 in these transformed cell growth phenotypes. Finally, increased p53 activation was found to be independent of aberrantly activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) that occurs in response to MIF/D-DT-deficiency but is dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) that mediate aberrant AMPK activation in these cells. Combined, these findings suggest that both p53 wildtype and mutant human lung adenocarcinoma tumors rely on MIF family members for maximal cell growth and survival.

  15. R248Q mutation--Beyond p53-DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jeremy W K; Lama, Dilraj; Lukman, Suryani; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S; Sim, Adelene Y L

    2015-12-01

    R248 in the DNA binding domain (DBD) of p53 interacts directly with the minor groove of DNA. Earlier nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies indicated that the R248Q mutation resulted in conformation changes in parts of DBD far from the mutation site. However, how information propagates from the mutation site to the rest of the DBD is still not well understood. We performed a series of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to dissect sterics and charge effects of R248 on p53-DBD conformation: (i) wild-type p53 DBD; (ii) p53 DBD with an electrically neutral arginine side-chain; (iii) p53 DBD with R248A; (iv) p53 DBD with R248W; and (v) p53 DBD with R248Q. Our results agree well with experimental observations of global conformational changes induced by the R248Q mutation. Our simulations suggest that both charge- and sterics are important in the dynamics of the loop (L3) where the mutation resides. We show that helix 2 (H2) dynamics is altered as a result of a change in the hydrogen bonding partner of D281. In turn, neighboring L1 dynamics is altered: in mutants, L1 predominantly adopts the recessed conformation and is unable to interact with the major groove of DNA. We focused our attention the R248Q mutant that is commonly found in a wide range of cancer and observed changes at the zinc-binding pocket that might account for the dominant negative effects of R248Q. Furthermore, in our simulations, the S6/S7 turn was more frequently solvent exposed in R248Q, suggesting that there is a greater tendency of R248Q to partially unfold and possibly lead to an increased aggregation propensity. Finally, based on the observations made in our simulations, we propose strategies for the rescue of R248Q mutants.

  16. StHsp14.0, a small heat shock protein of Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7, protects denatured proteins from aggregation in the partially dissociated conformation.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tetsuya; Oka, Toshihiko; Nakagome, Atsushi; Tsukada, Yoshihiro; Yasunaga, Takuo; Yohda, Masafumi

    2011-10-01

    The small heat shock protein (sHsp), categorized into a class of molecular chaperones, binds and stabilizes denatured proteins for the purpose of preventing aggregation. The sHsps undergo transition between different oligomeric states to control their nature. We have been studying the function of sHsp of Sulfolobus tokodaii, StHsp14.0. StHsp14.0 exists as 24meric oligomer, and exhibits oligomer dissociation and molecular chaperone activity over 80°C. We constructed and characterized StHsp14.0 mutants with replacement of the C-terminal IKI to WKW, IKF, FKI and FKF. All mutant complexes dissociated into dimers at 50°C. Among them, StHsp14.0FKF is almost completely dissociated, probably to dimers. All mutants protected citrate synthase (CS) from thermal aggregation at 50°C. But, the activity of StHsp14.0FKF was the lowest. Then, we examined the complexes of StHsp14.0 mutants with denatured CS by SAXS. StHsp14.0WKW protects denatured CS by forming the globular complexes of 24 subunits and a substrate. StHsp14.0FKF also formed similar complex but the number of subunits in the complex is a little smaller. These results suggest that the dimer itself exhibits low chaperone activity, and a partially dissociated oligomer of StHsp14.0 protects a denatured protein from interacting with other molecules by surrounding it.

  17. Dynamics of Delayed p53 Mutations in Mice Given Whole-Body Irradiation at 8 Weeks

    SciTech Connect

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira; Kakihara, Hiroyo; Mabuchi, Yo; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Michikawa, Yuichi; Imai, Takashi; Norimura, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Ionizing irradiation might induce delayed genotoxic effects in a p53-dependent manner. However, a few reports have shown a p53 mutation as a delayed effect of radiation. In this study, we investigated the p53 gene mutation by the translocation frequency in chromosome 11, loss of p53 alleles, p53 gene methylation, p53 nucleotide sequence, and p53 protein expression/phosphorylation in p53{sup +/+} and p53{sup +/-} mice after irradiation at a young age. Methods and Materials: p53{sup +/+} and p53{sup +/-} mice were exposed to 3 Gy of whole-body irradiation at 8 weeks of age. Chromosome instability was evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. p53 allele loss was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction, and p53 methylation was evaluated by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. p53 sequence analysis was performed. p53 protein expression was evaluated by Western blotting. Results: The translocation frequency in chromosome 11 showed a delayed increase after irradiation. In old irradiated mice, the number of mice that showed p53 allele loss and p53 methylation increased compared to these numbers in old non-irradiated mice. In two old irradiated p53{sup +/-} mice, the p53 sequence showed heteromutation. In old irradiated mice, the p53 and phospho-p53 protein expressions decreased compared to old non-irradiated mice. Conclusion: We concluded that irradiation at a young age induced delayed p53 mutations and p53 protein suppression.

  18. Prognostic Value of p53 Expression Intensity in Urothelial Cancers.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Samina; Inam, Qazi Adil; Ashraf, Sobia; Khan, M Safdar; Khokhar, M Abbas; Awan, Nukhbatullah

    2017-04-01

    To determine association of immunohistochemical expression intensity of p53 with grade and stage of urothelial cancers. Descriptive cross-sectional analytical study. Pathology Department, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, from January to December 2016. Data of transurethral resection/radical cystesctomy urinary bladder biopsies was collected. Clinical, radiological and cystoscopic findings of patients were noted from patients' charts in the Urology Ward. Biopsies were graded histologically according to WHO 2004 grading system. TNM system was used for pathological staging. On selected slides, immunoshistochemistry for p53 was applied. Nuclear immunoreactivity was considered positive if present in >10% of tumor cells and negative if <10% of tumor cells. Intensity was considered weak (less than 15% cells) and strong (more than 15% cells). Data was analyzed by SPSS version 21. Linear-by-linear association was calculated between p53 expression and stage of urothelial tumors, Chi-Square test was used to see association between grade and intensity of p53. Qualitative variables, like grade and stage of carcinoma along with p53 expression, were calculated in terms of frequencies and percentages. P ≤ 0.05 was taken as significant. Out of the 70 patients, 61 (87%) were males and 9 (13%) females. Out of 25 low grade lesions, 4 (16%) cases were p53 positive; and out of 45 high grade lesions, 41 (91%) cases were p53 positive. There was 33% (2/6 cases) positivity in Tis, 55% (16/29 cases) in T1, 72% in T2 (21/29), and 100% in T3a (5/5 cases) and T3b (1/1 case). Strong intensity of p53 staining was noted to be 5.4% (n=25) of low grade and 94.6% (n=45) of high grade tumors. p53 expression was greater and more frequently strong in higher grade and stage of urothelial carcinoma. It can be used as a prognostic marker in predicting higher grade and stage of bladder cancer.

  19. Regulation of p53 is critical for vertebrate limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yun, Maximina H; Gates, Phillip B; Brockes, Jeremy P

    2013-10-22

    Extensive regeneration of the vertebrate body plan is found in salamander and fish species. In these organisms, regeneration takes place through reprogramming of differentiated cells, proliferation, and subsequent redifferentiation of adult tissues. Such plasticity is rarely found in adult mammalian tissues, and this has been proposed as the basis of their inability to regenerate complex structures. Despite their importance, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the differentiated state during regeneration remain unclear. Here, we analyzed the role of the tumor-suppressor p53 during salamander limb regeneration. The activity of p53 initially decreases and then returns to baseline. Its down-regulation is required for formation of the blastema, and its up-regulation is necessary for the redifferentiation phase. Importantly, we show that a decrease in the level of p53 activity is critical for cell cycle reentry of postmitotic, differentiated cells, whereas an increase is required for muscle differentiation. In addition, we have uncovered a potential mechanism for the regulation of p53 during limb regeneration, based on its competitive inhibition by ΔNp73. Our results suggest that the regulation of p53 activity is a pivotal mechanism that controls the plasticity of the differentiated state during regeneration.

  20. The evolution of thymic lymphomas in p53 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Dudgeon, Crissy; Chan, Chang; Kang, Wenfeng; Sun, Yvonne; Emerson, Ryan; Robins, Harlan

    2014-01-01

    Germline deletion of the p53 gene in mice gives rise to spontaneous thymic (T-cell) lymphomas. In this study, the p53 knockout mouse was employed as a model to study the mutational evolution of tumorigenesis. The clonality of the T-cell repertoire from p53 knockout and wild-type thymic cells was analyzed at various ages employing TCRβ sequencing. These data demonstrate that p53 knockout thymic lymphomas arose in an oligoclonal fashion, with tumors evolving dominant clones over time. Exon sequencing of tumor DNA revealed that all of the independently derived oligoclonal mouse tumors had a deletion in the Pten gene prior to the formation of the TCRβ rearrangement, produced early in development. This was followed in each independent clone of the thymic lymphoma by the amplification or overexpression of cyclin Ds and Cdk6. Alterations in the expression of Ikaros were common and blocked further development of CD-4/CD-8 T cells. While the frequency of point mutations in the genome of these lymphomas was one per megabase, there were a tremendous number of copy number variations producing the tumors’ driver mutations. The initial inherited loss of p53 functions appeared to delineate an order of genetic alterations selected for during the evolution of these thymic lymphomas. PMID:25452272

  1. p53 as a retrovirus-induced oxidative stress modulator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Wong, Paul K Y

    2015-01-01

    Infection of astrocytes by the neuropathogenic mutant of Moloney murine leukemia virus, ts1, exhibits increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and signs of oxidative stress compared with uninfected astrocytes. Previously, we have demonstrated that ts1 infection caused two separate events of ROS upregulation. The first upregulation occurs during early viral establishment in host cells and the second during the virus-mediated apoptotic process. In this study, we show that virus-mediated ROS upregulation activates the protein kinase, ataxia telangiectasia mutated, which in turn phosphorylates serine 15 on p53. This activation of p53 however, is unlikely associated with ts1-induced cell death. Rather p53 appears to be involved in suppressing intracellular ROS levels in astrocytes under oxidative stress. The activated p53 appears to delay retroviral gene expression by suppressing NADPH oxidase, a superoxide-producing enzyme. These results suggest that p53 plays a role as a retrovirus-mediated oxidative stress modulator. © 2015 The Authors.

  2. Two faces of p53: aging and tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Francis; Campisi, Judith; Bhaumik, Dipa

    2007-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein, often termed guardian of the genome, integrates diverse physiological signals in mammalian cells. In response to stress signals, perhaps the best studied of which is the response to DNA damage, p53 becomes functionally active and triggers either a transient cell cycle arrest, cell death (apoptosis) or permanent cell cycle arrest (cellular senescence). Both apoptosis and cellular senescence are potent tumor suppressor mechanisms that irreversibly prevent damaged cells from undergoing neoplastic transformation. However, both processes can also deplete renewable tissues of proliferation-competent progenitor or stem cells. Such depletion, in turn, can compromise the structure and function of tissues, which is a hallmark of aging. Moreover, whereas apoptotic cells are by definition eliminated from tissues, senescent cells can persist, acquire altered functions, and thus alter tissue microenvironments in ways that can promote both cancer and aging phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that increased p53 activity can, at least under some circumstances, promote organismal aging. Here, we discuss the role of p53 as a key regulator of the DNA damage responses, and discuss how p53 integrates the outcome of the DNA damage response to optimally balance tumor suppression and longevity. PMID:17942417

  3. Role of p53 in the progression of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Busuttil, Rita A; Zapparoli, Giada V; Haupt, Sue; Fennell, Christina; Wong, Stephen Q; Pang, Jia-Min B; Takeno, Elena A; Mitchell, Catherine; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Fox, Stephen; Haupt, Ygal; Dobrovic, Alexander; Boussioutas, Alex

    2014-12-15

    Intestinal metaplasia (IM) is a premalignant lesion associated with gastric cancer (GC) but is poorly described in terms of molecular changes. Here, we explored the role of TP53, a commonly mutated gene in GC, to determine if p53 protein expression and/or the presence of somatic mutations in TP53 can be used as a predictive marker for patients at risk of progressing to GC from IM. Immunohistochemistry and high resolution melting were used to determine p53 protein expression and TP53 mutation status respectively in normal gastric mucosa, IM without concurrent GC (IM-GC), IM with concurrent GC (IM+GC) and GC. This comparative study revealed an incremental increase in p53 expression levels with progression of disease from normal mucosa, via an IM intermediate to GC. TP53 mutations however, were not detected in IM but occurred frequently in GC. Further, we identified increased protein expression of Mdm2/x, both powerful regulators of p53, in 100% of the IM+GC cohort with these samples also exhibiting high levels of wild-type p53 protein. Our data suggests that TP53 mutations occur late in gastric carcinogenesis contributing to the final transition to cancer. We also demonstrated involvement of Mdmx in GC.

  4. The expanding regulatory universe of p53 in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fesler, Andrew; Zhang, Ning; Ju, Jingfang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppresser gene TP53 is one of the most frequently deleted or mutated genes in gastrointestinal cancers. As a transcription factor, p53 regulates a number of important protein coding genes to control cell cycle, cell death, DNA damage/repair, stemness, differentiation and other key cellular functions. In addition, p53 is also able to activate the expression of a number of small non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) through direct binding to the promoter region of these miRNAs.  Many miRNAs have been identified to be potential tumor suppressors by regulating key effecter target mRNAs. Our understanding of the regulatory network of p53 has recently expanded to include long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Like miRNA, lncRNAs have been found to play important roles in cancer biology.  With our increased understanding of the important functions of these non-coding RNAs and their relationship with p53, we are gaining exciting new insights into the biology and function of cells in response to various growth environment changes. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the ever expanding involvement of non-coding RNAs in the p53 regulatory network and its implications for our understanding of gastrointestinal cancer.

  5. Alternate splicing of the p53 inhibitor HDMX offers a superior prognostic biomarker than p53 mutation in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Lenos, Kristiaan; Grawenda, Anna M; Lodder, Kirsten; Kuijjer, Marieke L; Teunisse, Amina F A S; Repapi, Emmanouela; Grochola, Lukasz F; Bartel, Frank; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Wuerl, Peter; Taubert, Helge; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Bond, Gareth L; Jochemsen, Aart G

    2012-08-15

    Conventional high-grade osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone malignancy. Although altered expression of the p53 inhibitor HDMX (Mdmx/Mdm4) is associated with cancer risk, progression, and outcome in other tumor types, little is known about its role in osteosarcoma. High expression of the Hdmx splice variant HDMX-S relative to the full-length transcript (the HDMX-S/HDMX-FL ratio) correlates with reduced HDMX protein expression, faster progression, and poorer survival in several cancers. Here, we show that the HDMX-S/HDMX-FL ratio positively correlates with less HDMX protein expression, faster metastatic progression, and a trend to worse overall survival in osteosarcomas. We found that the HDMX-S/HDMX-FL ratio associated with common somatic genetic lesions connected with p53 inhibition, such as p53 mutation and HDM2 overexpression in osteosarcoma cell lines. Interestingly, this finding was not limited to osteosarcomas as we observed similar associations in breast cancer and a variety of other cancer cell lines, as well as in tumors from patients with soft tissue sarcoma. The HDMX-S/HDMX-FL ratio better defined patients with sarcoma with worse survival rates than p53 mutational status. We propose a novel role for alternative splicing of HDMX, whereby it serves as a mechanism by which HDMX protein levels are reduced in cancer cells that have already inhibited p53 activity. Alternative splicing of HDMX could, therefore, serve as a more effective biomarker for p53 pathway attenuation in cancers than p53 gene mutation.

  6. p53 as a Regulator of Lipid Metabolism in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced proliferation and survival are common features of cancer cells. Cancer cells are metabolically reprogrammed which aids in their survival in nutrient-poor environments. Indeed, changes in metabolism of glucose and glutamine are essential for tumor progression. Thus, metabolic reprogramming is now well accepted as a hallmark of cancer. Recent findings suggest that reprogramming of lipid metabolism also occurs in cancer cells, since lipids are used for biosynthesis of membranes, post-translational modifications, second messengers for signal transduction, and as a source of energy during nutrient deprivation. The tumor suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that controls the expression of proteins involved in cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis, and senescence. p53 also regulates cellular metabolism, which appears to play a key role in its tumor suppressive activities. In this review article, we summarize non-canonical functions of wild-type and mutant p53 on lipid metabolism and discuss their association with cancer progression. PMID:27973397

  7. p53 and gamma radiation in the normal breast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yajing; Appleyard, M Virginia C L; Coates, Phillip J; Thompson, Alastair M

    2009-11-01

    With the increasing use of radiation as adjuvant therapy in breast cancer, the effects of gamma radiation on the remaining normal breast are of increasing importance. The complexities of multiple cellular types within breast tissues and the role of the pleiotropic Tumour Protein 53 (TP53, p53) protein with its downstream transcriptional targets and cellular processes may be central to the effects on residual normal breast tissues. While a detailed understanding of p53 protein-mediated responses in normal breast tissues remains elusive, p53 appears to have a pivotal role in the effects of gamma radiation on normal breast epithelium, but not stromal cells, which may account for the differing clinical effects of gamma radiation in women treated for breast cancer.

  8. p53 on the crossroad between regeneration and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charni, Meital; Aloni-Grinstein, Ronit; Molchadsky, Alina; Rotter, Varda

    2017-01-01

    Regeneration and tumorigenesis share common molecular pathways, nevertheless the outcome of regeneration is life, whereas tumorigenesis leads to death. Although the process of regeneration is strictly controlled, malignant transformation is unrestrained. In this review, we discuss the involvement of TP53, the major tumor-suppressor gene, in the regeneration process. We point to the role of p53 as coordinator assuring that regeneration will not shift to carcinogenesis. The fluctuation in p53 activity during the regeneration process permits a tight control. On one hand, its inhibition at the initial stages allows massive proliferation, on the other its induction at advanced steps of regeneration is essential for preservation of robustness and fidelity of the regeneration process. A better understanding of the role of p53 in regulation of regeneration may open new opportunities for implementation of TP53-based therapies, currently available for cancer patients, in regenerative medicine. PMID:27768121

  9. Mapping of UV photoproducts along the human P53 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tornaletti, S.; Rozek, D.; Pfeifer, G.P.

    1994-12-31

    Methods to detect DNA adducts at the DNA sequence level in mammalian cells have been developed, and it is now possible to relate adduct frequency and repair efficiency with mutations at certain nucleotide positions in human cancer-relevant genes. Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene have been found in a large proportion of human skin cancers. These mutations are predominantly C to T transitions and CC to TT double transition mutations, two types of base alterations specifically induced by UV light. In order to find possible correlations between adduct distribution and mutations at specific p53 sequences, we have mapped at single-base resolution the distribution of cyclobutane dimers (CBD) and (6-4) photoproducts along the p53 gene in UV-irradiated human skin fibroblasts by ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LMPCR).

  10. The PIDDosome activates p53 in response to supernumerary centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Luca L.; Schuler, Fabian; Sladky, Valentina; Haschka, Manuel D.; Soratroi, Claudia; Eiterer, Lisa; Demetz, Egon; Weiss, Guenter; Geley, Stephan; Nigg, Erich A.; Villunger, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Centrosomes, the main microtubule-organizing centers in animal cells, are replicated exactly once during the cell division cycle to form the poles of the mitotic spindle. Supernumerary centrosomes can lead to aberrant cell division and have been causally linked to chromosomal instability and cancer. Here, we report that an increase in the number of mature centrosomes, generated by disrupting cytokinesis or forcing centrosome overduplication, triggers the activation of the PIDDosome multiprotein complex, leading to Caspase-2-mediated MDM2 cleavage, p53 stabilization, and p21-dependent cell cycle arrest. This pathway also restrains the extent of developmentally scheduled polyploidization by regulating p53 levels in hepatocytes during liver organogenesis. Taken together, the PIDDosome acts as a first barrier, engaging p53 to halt the proliferation of cells carrying more than one mature centrosome to maintain genome integrity. PMID:28130345

  11. p53 regulates cytoskeleton remodeling to suppress tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Araki, Keigo; Ebata, Takahiro; Guo, Alvin Kunyao; Tobiume, Kei; Wolf, Steven John; Kawauchi, Keiko

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cells possess unique characteristics such as invasiveness, the ability to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and an inherent stemness. Cell morphology is altered during these processes and this is highly dependent on actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is, therefore, important for determination of cell fate. Mutations within the TP53 (tumor suppressor p53) gene leading to loss or gain of function (GOF) of the protein are often observed in aggressive cancer cells. Here, we highlight the roles of p53 and its GOF mutants in cancer cell invasion from the perspective of the actin cytoskeleton; in particular its reorganization and regulation by cell adhesion molecules such as integrins and cadherins. We emphasize the multiple functions of p53 in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton remodeling in response to the extracellular microenvironment, and oncogene activation. Such an approach provides a new perspective in the consideration of novel targets for anti-cancer therapy.

  12. Enhanced radiosensitization of p53 mutant cells by oleamide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Chung, Da Yeon; Lee, Su-Jae; Ja Jhon, Gil; Lee, Yun-Sil . E-mail: yslee@kcch.re.kr

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Effect of oleamide, an endogenous fatty-acid primary amide, on tumor cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) has never before been explored. Methods and Materials: NCI H460, human lung cancer cells, and human astrocytoma cell lines, U87 and U251, were used. The cytotoxicity of oleamide alone or in combination with IR was determined by clonogenic survival assay, and induction of apoptosis was estimated by FACS analysis. Protein expressions were confirmed by Western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis of Bax by use of confocal microscopy was also performed. The combined effect of IR and oleamide to suppress tumor growth was studied by use of xenografts in the thighs of nude mice. Results: Oleamide in combination with IR had a synergistic effect that decreased clonogenic survival of lung-carcinoma cell lines and also sensitized xenografts in nude mice. Enhanced induction of apoptosis of the cells by the combined treatment was mediated by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which resulted in the activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3 accompanied by cytochrome c release and Bid cleavage. The synergistic effects of the combined treatment were more enhanced in p53 mutant cells than in p53 wild-type cells. In p53 wild-type cells, both oleamide and radiation induced Bax translocation to mitochondria. On the other hand, in p53 mutant cells, radiation alone slightly induced Bax translocation to mitochondria, whereas oleamide induced a larger translocation. Conclusions: Oleamide may exhibit synergistic radiosensitization in p53 mutant cells through p53-independent Bax translocation to mitochondria.

  13. p53 gene alterations and protein accumulation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertorelle, R; Esposito, G; Belluco, C; Bonaldi, L; Del Mistro, A; Nitti, D; Lise, M; Chieco-Bianchi, L

    1996-01-01

    Aim—To correlate immunohistochemical staining with single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the p53 gene in colorectal cancer in order to understand how the findings provided by the two techniques complement each other in defining p53 functional status. Methods—Frozen tumour tissue from 94 patients with colorectal cancer was studied for p53 protein accumulation and gene mutations. Accumulation of p53 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry using PAb1801 and BP53-12-1 monoclonal antibodies. The findings were then compared with SSCP analysis of exons 5 to 8 of the p53 gene. All cases with a positive result by SSCP analysis were confirmed by sequencing. Results—Nuclear staining was observed in 51 (54.2%) cases. SSCP analysis of the DNA amplified by PCR revealed that the electrophoretic pattern had shifted in 30 cases; sequence analysis confirmed the occurrence of a mutation in 29 cases and of a polymorphism in one. In 27 cases both assays gave a positive result, and in 40 both were negative; therefore, concordance between PCR-SSCP and immunohistochemistry was seen in 72% of cases. Conclusion—The data indicate that positive immunostaining corresponds with the presence of a mutation in most, but not all, cases studied; other mechanisms could be responsible for stabilisation and accumulation of p53 protein in the nucleus. Nonsense mutations which do not confer stability on the protein will not be detected by immunohistochemistry and false negative results can also occur with SSCP analysis. Images PMID:16696056

  14. Lung cancer stem cells, p53 mutations and MDM2.

    PubMed

    Gadepalli, Venkat Sundar; Deb, Swati Palit; Deb, Sumitra; Rao, Raj R

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few decades, advances in cancer research have enabled us to understand the different mechanisms that contribute to the aberrant proliferation of normal cells into abnormal cells that result in tumors. In the pursuit to find cures, researchers have primarily focused on various molecular level changes that are unique to cancerous cells. In humans, about 50 % or more cancers have a mutated tumor suppressor p53 gene thereby resulting in accumulation of p53 protein and losing its function to activate the target genes that regulate cell cycle and apoptosis. Extensive research conducted in murine cancer models with activated p53, loss of p53, or p53 missense mutations have facilitated researchers to understand the role of this key protein. Despite the identification of numerous triggers that causes lung cancer specific cure still remain elusive. One of the primary reasons attributed to this is due to the fact that the tumor tissue is heterogeneous and contains numerous sub-populations of cells. Studies have shown that a specific sub-population of cells termed as cancer stem cells (CSCs) drive the recurrence of cancer in response to standard chemotherapy. These CSCs are mutated cells with core properties similar to those of adult stem cells. They reside in a microenvironment within the tumor tissue that supports their growth and make them less susceptible to drug treatment. These cells possess properties of symmetric self-renewal and migration thus driving tumor formation and metastasis. Therefore, research specifically targeting these cells has gained prominence towards developing new therapeutic agents against cancer. This chapter focuses on lung cancer stem cells, p53 mutations noted in these cells, and importance of MDM2 interactions. Further, research approaches for better understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive CSC function and developing appropriate therapies are discussed.

  15. Tumor hypoxia, p53, and prognosis in cervical cancers.

    PubMed

    Haensgen, G; Krause, U; Becker, A; Stadler, P; Lautenschlaeger, C; Wohlrab, W; Rath, F W; Molls, M; Dunst, J

    2001-07-15

    The p53 protein is involved in the regulation of initiation of apoptosis. In vitro, p53-deficient cells do not respond to hypoxia with apoptosis as do p53-normal cells, and this may lead to a relative growth advantage of cells without a functioning p53 under hypoxia. On the basis of this hypothesis, a selection of cells with a functionally inactive p53 may occur in hypoxic tumors. The development of uterine cervical carcinomas is closely associated with infections of human papilloma viruses, which may cause a degradation of the tumor suppressor gene p53, resulting in a restriction of apoptosis. Thus, cervical cancers have often a functionally inactive p53. The purpose of our clinical study was therefore to investigate the association between p53, hypoxia, and prognosis in cervical cancers in which the oxygenation status can be determined by clinical methods. Seventy patients with locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer Stages IIB (n = 14), IIIB (n = 49), and IVA (n = 7) were investigated in the period from 1996 through 1999. All were treated with definitive radiotherapy with curative intent by a combination of external radiotherapy plus high-dose-rate afterloading. Before therapy, tumor oxygenation was measured with a needle probe polarographically using the Eppendorf histograph. Hypoxic tumors were defined as those with pO(2) measurements below 5 mm Hg (HF5). Pretreatment biopsies were taken and analyzed immunohistologically for p53 protein expression with the DO-7 antibody. The DNA index was measured by flow cytometry. The statistical data analysis was done with SPSS 9.0 for Windows. The 3-year overall survival was 55% for the whole group of patients. Clinical prognostic factors in a multivariate analysis were pretreatment hemoglobin level (3-year survival 62% for patients with a pretreatment hemoglobin > or =11 g/dl vs. 27% for hemoglobin <11 g/dl, p = 0.006) and FIGO stage (Stage IIB: 65%; Stage IIIB: 60%; Stage IVA: 29%, p = 0.01). Sixty of the 70

  16. Regulation of Mammary Progenitor Cells by p53 and Parity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    family was shown to be depleted in the m ammary progenitor cells and highly expressed in the m ore differentiated cell types and the let-7c sensor...apoptosis and tumor suppression. Nat. Med. 4, 835-838 (1998). 21. Giono, L. E. & Manfredi, J. J. The p53 tumor suppressor participates in multiple ...Schauble, B., zur, H. A., Esteve, J. & Ohgaki, H. Tumors associated with p53 germline mutations: a synopsis of 91 families . Am. J. Pathol. 150, 1-13 (1997

  17. HSP25 down-regulation enhanced p53 acetylation by dissociation of SIRT1 from p53 in doxorubicin-induced H9c2 cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Qu, Shunlin; Wei, Xing; Feng, Yansheng; Zhu, Honglin; Deng, Jia; Wang, Kangkai; Liu, Ke; Liu, Meidong; Zhang, Huali; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2016-03-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play important roles in cellular stress resistance. Previous reports had already suggested that HSP27 played multiple roles in preventing doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Although HSP25 might have biological functions similar to its human homolog HSP27, the mechanism of HSP25 is still unclear in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. To investigate HSP25 biological function on doxorubicin-induced apoptosis, flow cytometry was employed to analyze cell apoptosis in over-expressing HSP25 H9c2 cells in presence of doxorubicin. Unexpectedly, the H9c2 cells of over-expressing HSP25 have no protective effect on doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Moreover, no detectable interactions were detected by coimmunoprecipitation between HSP25 and cytochrome c, and HSP25 over-expression failed in preventing cytochrome c release induced by doxorubicin. However, down-regulation of endogenous HSP25 by a specific small hairpin RNA aggravates apoptosis in H9c2 cells. Subsequent studies found that HSP25, but not HSP90, HSP70, and HSP20, interacted with SIRT1. Knockdown of HSP25 decreased the interaction between SIRT1 and p53, leading to increased p53 acetylation on K379, up-regulated pro-apoptotic Bax protein expression, induced cytochrome c release, and triggered caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. These findings indicated a novel mechanism by which HSP25 regulated p53 acetylation through dissociation of SIRT1 from p53 in doxorubicin-induced H9c2 cell apoptosis.

  18. Apoptosis and p53 expression in rat adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tak, Paul P; Klapwijk, Maartje S; Broersen, Sophie FM; van de Geest, Deliana A; Overbeek, Marieke; Firestein, Gary S

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: RA is a chronic inflammatory disorder that is characterized by inflammation and proliferation of synovial tissue. The amount of DNA fragmentation is significantly increased in rheumatoid synovium. Only low numbers of apoptotic cells are present in rheumatoid synovial tissue, however. The proportion of cells with DNA strand breaks is so great that this disparity suggests impaired apoptosis. Therefore, the development of novel therapeutic strategies that are aimed at inducing apoptosis in rheumatoid synovial tissue is an attractive goal. Although animal models for arthritis only approximate RA, they provide a useful test system for the evaluation of apoptosis-inducing therapies. AA in rats is among the most commonly used animal models for RA. For the interpretation of such studies, it is essential to characterize the extent to which apoptosis occurs during the natural course of the disease. Therefore, we evaluated the number of apoptotic cells and the expression of p53 in various phases of AA. Materials and methods: In order to generate the AA rat model, Lewis rats were immunized with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mineral oil on day 0. Paw swelling usually started around day 10. For the temporal analysis rats were sacrificed on days 0, 5 (prearthritis), 11 (onset of arthritis), 17 (accelerating arthritis), or 23 (chronic arthritis). For the detection of apoptotic cells, the hind paws were harvested on days 0(n=6),5 (n=6), 11 (n=6), 17 (n=6), or 23 (n=4). The right ankle joints were fixed in formalin, decalcified in ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid, embedded in paraffin, and sectioned. The TUNEL method was applied. The percentage of TUNEL-positive cells of the total inflammatory cell infiltrate was noted. For Western blot analysis, hind paws were harvested on days 0 (n=2), 5 (n=3), 11 (n=4), 17 (n=4), or 23 (n=4). In addition, hind paws of normal rats (n=2) were studied. The right ankle joints were snap frozen and pulverized. Synovial tissue was also

  19. Heterozygous p53V172F mutation in cisplatin-resistant human tumor cells promotes MDM4 recruitment and decreases stability and transactivity of p53

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaolei; Lozano, Guillermina; Siddik, Zahid H.

    2017-01-01

    Cisplatin is an important antitumor agent, but its clinical utility is often limited by multifactorial mechanism of resistance. Loss of tumor suppressor p53 function is a major mechanism, affected by either mutation in the DNA binding domain or dysregulation by overexpression of p53 inhibitors MDM2 and MDM4 that destabilize p53 by increasing its proteosomal degradation. In the present study, cisplatin-resistant 2780CP/Cl-16 ovarian tumor cells expressed a heterozygous, temperature-sensitive p53V172F mutation, which reduced p53 half-life by 2- to 3-fold compared to homozygous wild-type p53 in parental A2780 cells. Although reduced p53 stability in 2780CP/Cl-16 cells was associated with moderate cellular overexpression of MDM2 or MDM4 (<1.5-fold), their binding to p53 was substantially enhanced (5- to 8-fold). The analogous cisplatin-resistant 2780CP/Cl-24 cells, which express loss of p53 heterozygosity, retained the p53V172F mutation and high p53-MDM4 binding, but demonstrated lower p53-bound MDM2 that was associated with reduced p53 ubiquitination and enhanced p53 stability. The inference that p53 was unstable as a hetromeric p53wt/p53V172F complex was confirmed in 2780CP/Cl-24 cells transfected with wild-type (wt) p53 or multimer-inhibiting p53L344P mutant, and further supported by normalization of p53 stability in both resistant cell lines grown at the permissive temperature of 32.5°C. Surprisingly, in 2780CP/Cl-16 and 2780CP/Cl-24 models, cisplatin-induced transactivity of p53 was attenuated at 37°C, and this correlated with cisplatin resistance. However, downregulation of MDM2 or MDM4 by siRNA in either resistant cell line induced p53 and restored p21 transactivation at 37°C, as did cisplatin-induced DNA damage at 32.5°C that coincided with reduced p53-MDM4 binding and cisplatin resistance. These results demonstrate that cisplatin-mediated p53V172F mutation regulates p53 stability at the normothermic temperature, but it is the increased recruitment of MDM4

  20. 1800MHz Microwave Induces p53 and p53-Mediated Caspase-3 Activation Leading to Cell Apoptosis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fuqiang; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Yiduo; Cui, Jiesheng; He, Sailing; Wang, Guanyu

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that exposure of mammalian cells to microwave radiation may have adverse effects such as induction of cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying microwave induced mammalian cell apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism: exposure to 1800MHz microwave radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis through cytochrome c-mediated caspase-3 activation pathway. We first measured intensity of microwave radiation from several electronic devices with an irradiation detector. Mouse NIH/3T3 and human U-87 MG cells were then used as receivers of 1800MHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at a power density of 1209 mW/m2. Following EMR exposure, cells were analyzed for viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage, p53 expression, and caspase-3 activity. Our analysis revealed that EMR exposure significantly decreased viability of NIH/3T3 and U-87 MG cells, and increased caspase-3 activity. ROS burst was observed at 6 h and 48 h in NIH/3T3 cells, while at 3 h in U-87 MG cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and in situ TUNEL assay detected that EMR exposure increased DNA damage, which was significantly restrained in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant). Moreover, EMR exposure increased the levels of p53 protein and p53 target gene expression, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondrion, and increased caspase-3 activity. These events were inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor) and caspase inhibitor. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that 1800MHz EMR induces apoptosis-related events such as ROS burst and more oxidative DNA damage, which in turn promote p53-dependent caspase-3 activation through release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion. These findings thus provide new insights into physiological mechanisms underlying microwave-induced cell apoptosis. PMID:27689798

  1. 1800MHz Microwave Induces p53 and p53-Mediated Caspase-3 Activation Leading to Cell Apoptosis In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fuqiang; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Yiduo; Cui, Jiesheng; He, Sailing; Wang, Guanyu

    Recent studies have reported that exposure of mammalian cells to microwave radiation may have adverse effects such as induction of cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying microwave induced mammalian cell apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism: exposure to 1800MHz microwave radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis through cytochrome c-mediated caspase-3 activation pathway. We first measured intensity of microwave radiation from several electronic devices with an irradiation detector. Mouse NIH/3T3 and human U-87 MG cells were then used as receivers of 1800MHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at a power density of 1209 mW/m2. Following EMR exposure, cells were analyzed for viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage, p53 expression, and caspase-3 activity. Our analysis revealed that EMR exposure significantly decreased viability of NIH/3T3 and U-87 MG cells, and increased caspase-3 activity. ROS burst was observed at 6 h and 48 h in NIH/3T3 cells, while at 3 h in U-87 MG cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and in situ TUNEL assay detected that EMR exposure increased DNA damage, which was significantly restrained in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant). Moreover, EMR exposure increased the levels of p53 protein and p53 target gene expression, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondrion, and increased caspase-3 activity. These events were inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor) and caspase inhibitor. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that 1800MHz EMR induces apoptosis-related events such as ROS burst and more oxidative DNA damage, which in turn promote p53-dependent caspase-3 activation through release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion. These findings thus provide new insights into physiological mechanisms underlying microwave-induced cell apoptosis.

  2. NRF2 and p53: Januses in cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Rotblat, Barak; Melino, Gerry; Knight, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, also known as NFE2L2 or NRF2, is a master regulator of the anti-oxidative stress response and positively controls the expression of a battery of anti-oxidative stress response proteins and enzymes implicated in detoxification and glutathione generation. Although its detoxifying activity is important in cancer prevention, it has recently been shown that cancer cells also exploit its protective functions to thrive and resist chemotherapy. NRF2 was also shown to the pentose phosphate pathway and glutaminolysis, which promotes purine synthesis for supporting rapid proliferation and glutathione for providing anti-oxidative stress protection. Evidence obtained from cancer patients and cell lines suggest that NRF2 is highly active in a variety of human cancers and is associated with aggressiveness. p53 is a tumor suppressor that also promotes an anti-oxidative stress metabolic program and glutaminolysis. Here we will discuss the similarities between NRF2 and p53 and review evidence that p53 might be exploited by cancer cells to gain protection against oxidative stress, as is the case for NRF2. We discuss findings of co-regulation between these transcription factors and propose possible therapeutic strategies that can be used for treatment of cancers that harbor WT p53 and express high levels of NRF2. PMID:23174755

  3. p53 and MDM2: antagonists or partners in crime?

    PubMed

    Eischen, Christine M; Lozano, Guillermina

    2009-03-03

    Therapeutics that disrupt the p53-MDM2 interaction show promise for cancer treatment but surprisingly have different biological outcomes. A study by Enge et al. in this issue of Cancer Cell shows that the ability of MDM2 to target hnRNP K for degradation contributes to the decision to induce apoptosis rather than cell-cycle arrest.

  4. Distinct tumor protein p53 mutants in breast cancer subgroups.

    PubMed

    Dumay, Anne; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Wittmer, Evelyne; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Bertheau, Philippe; Espié, Marc; Plassa, Louis-François; Cottu, Paul; Marty, Michel; André, Fabrice; Sotiriou, Christos; Pusztai, Lajos; de Thé, Hugues

    2013-03-01

    Tumor protein p53 (TP53) is mutated in approximately 30% of breast cancers, but this frequency fluctuates widely between subclasses. We investigated the p53 mutation status in 572 breast tumors, classified into luminal, basal and molecular apocrine subgroups. As expected, the lowest mutation frequency was observed in luminal (26%), and the highest in basal (88%) tumors. Luminal tumors showed significantly higher frequency of substitutions (82 vs. 65%), notably A/T to G/C transitions (31 vs. 15%), whereas molecular apocrine and basal tumors presented much higher frequencies of complex mutations (deletions/insertions) (36 and 33%, respectively, vs. 18%). Accordingly, missense mutations were significantly more frequent in luminal tumors (75 vs. 54%), whereas basal tumors displayed significantly increased rates of TP53 truncations (43 vs. 25%), resulting in loss of function and/or expression. Interestingly, as basal tumors, molecular apocrine tumors presented with a high rate of complex mutations, but paradoxically, these were not associated with increased frequency of p53 truncation. As in luminal tumors, this could reflect a selective pressure for p53 gain of function, possibly through P63/P73 inactivation. Collectively, these observations point not only to different mechanisms of TP53 alterations, but also to different functional consequences in the different breast cancer subtypes. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  5. Immunohistochemical detection of P53 and Mdm2 in vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Bakry, Ola A.; Hammam, Mostafa A.; Wahed, Moshira M. Abdel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Vitiligo is a common depigmented skin disorder that is caused by selective destruction of melanocytes. It is generally accepted that the main function of melanin resides in the protection of skin cells against the deleterious effect of ultraviolet rays (UVRs). Association of vitiligo and skin cancer has been a subject of controversy. Occurrence of skin cancer in long-lasting vitiligo is rare despite multiple evidences of DNA damage in vitiliginous skin. Aim: To detect the expression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins in both depigmented and normally pigmented skin of vitiligo patients and to compare it to control subjects suffering from nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Materials and Methods: Thirty-four patients with vitiligo and 30 age and sex-matched patients with nodulo-ulcerative basal cell carcinoma (BCC) as a control group were selected. Both patients and control subjects had outdoor occupations. Skin biopsies were taken from each case and control subjects. Histopathological examination of Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections was done. Expression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins were examined immunohistochemically. Results: Both P53 and Mdm2 were strongly expressed in depigmented as well as normally pigmented skin of vitiligo patients. This expression involved the epidermis, skin adnexa and blood vessels with significant differences between cases and controls. Conclusions: The overexpression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins in both normally pigmented and depigmented skin of patients with vitiligo could contribute to the decreased occurrence of actinic damage and NMSC in these patients. PMID:23189248

  6. The Hunger Games: p53 regulates metabolism upon serine starvation.

    PubMed

    Tavana, Omid; Gu, Wei

    2013-02-05

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to support a high proliferative rate. A new study shows that, upon serine starvation, the tumor suppressor p53 activates p21 to shift metabolic flux from purine biosynthesis to glutathione production, which enhances cellular proliferation and viability by combating ROS (Maddocks et al., 2013). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A role for p53 in selenium-induced senescence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The tumor suppressor p53 and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase play important roles in the senescence response to oncogene activation and DNA damage. We have previously shown that selenium-containing compounds can activate an ATM-dependent senescence response in MRC-5 normal fibroblasts...

  8. p53-Dependent suppression of genome instability in germ cells.

    PubMed

    Otozai, Shinji; Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Oda, Shoji; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Ryo, Haruko; Sato, Ayuko; Nomura, Taisei; Mitani, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Tohru; Inohara, Hidenori; Todo, Takeshi

    2014-02-01

    Radiation increases mutation frequencies at tandem repeat loci. Germline mutations in γ-ray-irradiated medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were studied, focusing on the microsatellite loci. Mismatch-repair genes suppress microsatellite mutation by directly removing altered sequences at the nucleotide level, whereas the p53 gene suppresses genetic alterations by eliminating damaged cells. The contribution of these two defense mechanisms to radiation-induced microsatellite instability was addressed. The spontaneous mutation frequency was significantly higher in msh2(-/-) males than in wild-type fish, whereas there was no difference in the frequency of radiation-induced mutations between msh2(-/-) and wild-type fish. By contrast, irradiated p53(-/-) fish exhibited markedly increased mutation frequencies, whereas their spontaneous mutation frequency was the same as that of wild-type fish. In the spermatogonia of the testis, radiation induced a high level of apoptosis both in wild-type and msh2(-/-) fish, but negligible levels in p53(-/-) fish. The results demonstrate that the msh2 and p53 genes protect genome integrity against spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation by two different pathways: direct removal of mismatches and elimination of damaged cells.

  9. Structures of oncogenic, suppressor and rescued p53 core-domain variants: mechanisms of mutant p53 rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Wallentine, Brad D.; Wang, Ying; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Tan, Martha; Senear, Donald F.; Luecke, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined in order to gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53. To gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53, X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined. These include an oncogenic mutant, V157F, two single-site suppressor mutants, N235K and N239Y, and the rescued cancer mutant V157F/N235K/N239Y. The V157F mutation substitutes a smaller hydrophobic valine with a larger hydrophobic phenylalanine within strand S4 of the hydrophobic core. The structure of this cancer mutant shows no gross structural changes in the overall fold of the p53 core domain, only minor rearrangements of side chains within the hydrophobic core of the protein. Based on biochemical analysis, these small local perturbations induce instability in the protein, increasing the free energy by 3.6 kcal mol{sup −1} (15.1 kJ mol{sup −1}). Further biochemical evidence shows that each suppressor mutation, N235K or N239Y, acts individually to restore thermodynamic stability to V157F and that both together are more effective than either alone. All rescued mutants were found to have wild-type DNA-binding activity when assessed at a permissive temperature, thus pointing to thermodynamic stability as the critical underlying variable. Interestingly, thermodynamic analysis shows that while N239Y demonstrates stabilization of the wild-type p53 core domain, N235K does not. These observations suggest distinct structural mechanisms of rescue. A new salt bridge between Lys235 and Glu198, found in both the N235K and rescued cancer mutant structures, suggests a rescue mechanism that relies on stabilizing the

  10. Epimorphic regeneration in mice is p53-independent.

    PubMed

    Arthur, L Matthew; Demarest, Renee M; Clark, Lise; Gourevitch, Dmitri; Bedelbaeva, Kamila; Anderson, Rhonda; Snyder, Andrew; Capobianco, Anthony J; Lieberman, Paul; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Heber-Katz, E

    2010-09-15

    The process of regeneration is most readily studied in species of sponge, hydra, planarian and salamander (i.e., newt and axolotl). The closure of MRL mouse ear pinna through-and-through holes provides a mammalian model of unusual wound healing/regeneration in which a blastema-like structure closes the ear hole and cartilage and hair follicles are replaced. Recent studies, based on a broad level of DNA damage and a cell cycle pattern of G₂/M "arrest," showed that p21(Cip1/Waf1) was missing from the MRL mouse ear and that a p21-null mouse could close its ear holes. Given the p53/p21 axis of control of DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence, we tested the role of p53 in the ear hole regenerative response. Using backcross mice, we found that loss of p53 in MRL mice did not show reduced healing. Furthermore, cross sections of MRL. p53(-/-) mouse ears at 6 weeks post-injury showed an increased level of adipocytes and chondrocytes in the region of healing whereas MRL or p21(-/-) mice showed chondrogenesis alone in this same region, though at later time points. In addition, we also investigated other cell cycle-related mutant mice to determine how p21 was being regulated. We demonstrate that p16 and Gadd45 null mice show little healing capacity. Interestingly, a partial healing phenotype in mice with a dual Tgfβ/Rag2 knockout mutation was seen. These data demonstrate an independence of p53 signaling for mouse appendage regeneration and suggest that the role of p21 in this process is possibly through the abrogation of the Tgfβ/Smad pathway.

  11. Targeting GRP75 improves HSP90 inhibitor efficacy by enhancing p53-mediated apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weiwei; Yan, Lichong; Yang, Ling; Liu, Xiaoyu; E, Qiukai; Gao, Peiye; Ye, Xiaofei; Liu, Wen; Zuo, Ji

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitors are potential drugs for cancer therapy. The inhibition of HSP90 on cancer cell growth largely through degrading client proteins, like Akt and p53, therefore, triggering cancer cell apoptosis. Here, we show that the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG can induce the expression of GRP75, a member of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family, which, in turn, attenuates the anti-growth effect of HSP90 inhibition on cancer cells. Additionally, 17-AAG enhanced binding of GRP75 and p53, resulting in the retention of p53 in the cytoplasm. Blocking GRP75 with its inhibitor MKT-077 potentiated the anti-tumor effects of 17-AAG by disrupting the formation of GRP75-p53 complexes, thereby facilitating translocation of p53 into the nuclei and leading to the induction of apoptosis-related genes. Finally, dual inhibition of HSP90 and GRP75 was found to significantly inhibit tumor growth in a liver cancer xenograft model. In conclusion, the GRP75 inhibitor MKT-077 enhances 17-AAG-induced apoptosis in HCCs and increases p53-mediated inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Dual targeting of GRP75 and HSP90 may be a useful strategy for the treatment of HCCs.

  12. A novel mutant p53 binding partner BAG5 stabilizes mutant p53 and promotes mutant p53 GOFs in tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xuetian; Zhao, Yuhan; Huang, Grace; Li, Jun; Zhu, Junlan; Feng, Zhaohui; Hu, Wenwei

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human tumors. Many tumor-associated mutant p53 (mutp53) proteins gain new tumor-promoting activities, including increased proliferation, metastasis and chemoresistance of tumor cells, which are defined as gain-of-functions (GOFs). Mutp53 proteins often accumulate at high levels in human tumors, which is important for mutp53 to exert their GOFs. The mechanism underlying mutp53 proteins accumulation in tumors is not fully understood. Here, we report that BAG5, a member of Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG) family proteins, promotes mutp53 accumulation in tumors, which in turn enhances mutp53 GOFs. Mechanistically, BAG5 interacts with mutp53 proteins to protect mutp53 from ubiquitination and degradation by E3 ubiquitin ligases MDM2 and CHIP, which in turn promotes mutp53 protein accumulation and therefore GOFs in promoting cell proliferation, tumor growth, cell migration and chemoresistance. BAG5 is frequently overexpressed in many human tumors and the overexpression of BAG5 is associated with poor prognosis of cancer patients. Altogether, this study revealed that inhibition of mutp53 degradation by BAG5 is a novel and critical mechanism underlying mutp53 protein accumulation and GOFs in cancer. Furthermore, our results also uncovered that promoting mutp53 accumulation and GOFs is a novel mechanism of BAG5 in tumorigenesis. PMID:27807478

  13. An in silico algorithm for identifying stabilizing pockets in proteins: test case, the Y220C mutant of the p53 tumor suppressor protein

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Dennis; Bauer, Matthias R.; Fersht, Alan R.; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein performs a critical role in stimulating apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to oncogenic stress. The function of p53 can be compromised by mutation, leading to increased risk of cancer; approximately 50% of cancers are associated with mutations in the p53 gene, the majority of which are in the core DNA-binding domain. The Y220C mutation of p53, for example, destabilizes the core domain by 4 kcal/mol, leading to rapid denaturation and aggregation. The associated loss of tumor suppressor functionality is associated with approximately 75 000 new cancer cases every year. Destabilized p53 mutants can be ‘rescued’ and their function restored; binding of a small molecule into a pocket on the surface of mutant p53 can stabilize its wild-type structure and restore its function. Here, we describe an in silico algorithm for identifying potential rescue pockets, including the algorithm's integration with the Dynameomics molecular dynamics data warehouse and the DIVE visual analytics engine. We discuss the results of the application of the method to the Y220C p53 mutant, entailing finding a putative rescue pocket through MD simulations followed by an in silico search for stabilizing ligands that dock into the putative rescue pocket. The top three compounds from this search were tested experimentally and one of them bound in the pocket, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance, and weakly stabilized the mutant. PMID:27503952

  14. [Structural organization of the human p53 gene. I. Molecular cloning of the human p53 gene].

    PubMed

    Bukhman, V L; Ninkina, N N; Chumakov, P M; Khilenkova, M A; Samarina, O P

    1987-09-01

    Human p53 gene was cloned from the normal human placenta DNA and DNA from the strain of human kidney carcinoma transplanted into nude mice. Representative gene library from tumor strain of human kidney carcinoma and library of 15 kb EcoRI fragments of DNA from normal human placenta were constructed. Maniatis gene library was also used. Five clones were isolated from kidney carcinoma library; they covered 27 kb and included full-length p53 gene of 19.5 kb and flanking sequences. From normal placenta libraries three overlapped clones were obtained. Restriction map of cloned sequences was constructed and polarity of the p53 gene determined. The first intron of the gene is large (10.4 kb); polymorphic BglII site was observed in this intron, which allows to discriminate between allelic genes. One of these (BglII-) is ten times more abundant that the other (BglII+). Both allelic genes are able to synthesize the 2.8 kb p53 gene.

  15. Depression of p53-independent Akt survival signals after high-LET radiation in mutated p53 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Takahashi, Akihisa; Nakagawa, Yosuke

    Although mutations and deletions in the p53 tumor suppressor gene lead to resistance to low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, high-LET radiation efficiently induces cell lethality and apoptosis regardless of the p53 gene status. Recently, it has been suggested that the induction of p53-independent apoptosis takes place through the activation of Caspase-9 which results in the cleavage of Caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). This study was designed to examine if high-LET radiation depresses the activities of serine/threonine protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) and Akt-related proteins. Human gingival cancer cells (Ca9-22 cells) harboring a mutated p53 (mp53) gene were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays or Fe-ion beams. The cellular contents of Akt-related proteins participating in cell survival signals were analyzed with Western blotting analysis 1 h, 2 h, 3 h and 6 h after irradiation. Cell cycle distributions after irradiation were assayed with flow cytometric analysis.Akt-related protein levels were decreased when cells were irradiated with high-LET radiation. High-LET radiation increased G _{2}/M phase arrests and suppressed the progression of the cell cycle much more efficiently when compared to low-LET radiation. These results suggest that high-LET radiation enhances apoptosis through the activation of Caspase-3 and Caspase-9, and depresses cell growth by suppressing Akt-related signals, even in the mp53 cells.

  16. p53 mutation is a poor prognostic indicator for survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing surgical tumour ablation.

    PubMed Central

    Honda, K.; Sbisà, E.; Tullo, A.; Papeo, P. A.; Saccone, C.; Poole, S.; Pignatelli, M.; Mitry, R. R.; Ding, S.; Isla, A.; Davies, A.; Habib, N. A.

    1998-01-01

    Forty-two patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were resected and their tumours were analysed for p53 mutations by GC-clamped denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and gene sequencing. All the exons have been analysed in this study. Eight of 12 HCCs with cirrhosis due to viral hepatitis and the two patients with sarcomatoid changes displayed p53 mutations. In contrast, no mutation was observed in the fibrolamellar variant (n = 9), non-cirrhotics (n = 13) and alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 6). The mutations observed were in exons 5-8. Two mutations were observed in codons 136 and 213 as well as a T insertion between residues 156 and 157 (exon 5) and these are reported for the first time in HCC. Likewise, the silent mutation polymorphism in codon 213 was noticed in 3 of the 42 patients. Survival analysis of these patients after surgery showed the mean and median survival in patients with wild-type p53 to be 60 and 43 months respectively. In the group with p53 mutations, the mean and median survival was 15 and 12 months. The difference was statistically significant (P= 0.003). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9514057

  17. p53 mutation, but not p53 overexpression, correlates with survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Mineta, H.; Borg, A.; Dictor, M.; Wahlberg, P.; Akervall, J.; Wennerberg, J.

    1998-01-01

    Survival in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) was compared with overexpression and mutation of the p53 gene. Archival tissue from 77 tumours was analysed for protein expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC) with the monoclonal antibody Do-7, and for the presence of mutation in exons 5-8 using single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP), followed by DNA sequencing in SSCP-positive cases. p53 expression was scored as high (>70% nuclei stained) in 25 (32%) tumours, as intermediate (10-70% nuclei stained) in 19 (25%) tumours and as low (<10% nuclei stained) in 33 (43%) tumours. Twelve (18%) tumours exhibited gene mutation (ten missense and two nonsense mutations) and an additional five tumours contained changes that could not result in amino acid substitution or protein truncation. There was no correlation between gene expression and mutation, mutations being equally frequent in tumours with either high (4/25), intermediate (4/19) or low protein expression (4/33). Fifty-eight patients were eligible for survival analysis. There was a strong correlation between p53 mutation and cause-specific survival; median survival among mutated cases was 12.5 months compared with >160 months among non-mutated patients (P < 0.005). There was no correlation between p53 overexpression and survival. The results suggest that p53 mutation status is an important prognostic factor in HNSCC, and that IHC analysis of protein overexpression is an inadequate measure of gene mutation in these tumours. Images Figure 1 PMID:9792155

  18. Functional repair of p53 mutation in colorectal cancer cells using trans-splicing.

    PubMed

    He, Xingxing; Liao, Jiazhi; Liu, Fang; Yan, Junwei; Yan, Jingjun; Shang, Haitao; Dou, Qian; Chang, Ying; Lin, Jusheng; Song, Yuhu

    2015-02-10

    Mutation in the p53 gene is arguably the most frequent type of gene-specific alterations in human cancers. Current p53-based gene therapy contains the administration of wt-p53 or the suppression of mutant p53 expression in p53-defective cancer cells. . We hypothesized that trans-splicing could be exploited as a tool for the correction of mutant p53 transcripts in p53-mutated human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. In this study, the plasmids encoding p53 pre-trans-splicing molecules (PTM) were transfected into human CRC cells carrying p53 mutation. The plasmids carrying p53-PTM repaired mutant p53 transcripts in p53-mutated CRC cells, which resulted in a reduction in mutant p53 transcripts and an induction of wt-p53 simultaneously. Intratumoral administration of adenovirus vectors carrying p53 trans-splicing cassettes suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts. Repair of mutant p53 transcripts by trans-splicing induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in p53-defective colorectal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated for the first time that trans-splicing was exploited as a strategy for the repair of mutant p53 transcripts, which revealed that trans-splicing would be developed as a new therapeutic approach for human colorectal cancers carrying p53 mutation.

  19. Functional repair of p53 mutation in colorectal cancer cells using trans-splicing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Yan, Junwei; Yan, Jingjun; Shang, Haitao; Dou, Qian; Chang, Ying; Lin, Jusheng; Song, Yuhu

    2015-01-01

    Mutation in the p53 gene is arguably the most frequent type of gene-specific alterations in human cancers. Current p53-based gene therapy contains the administration of wt-p53 or the suppression of mutant p53 expression in p53-defective cancer cells. We hypothesized that trans-splicing could be exploited as a tool for the correction of mutant p53 transcripts in p53-mutated human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. In this study, the plasmids encoding p53 pre-trans-splicing molecules (PTM) were transfected into human CRC cells carrying p53 mutation. The plasmids carrying p53-PTM repaired mutant p53 transcripts in p53-mutated CRC cells, which resulted in a reduction in mutant p53 transcripts and an induction of wt-p53 simultaneously. Intratumoral administration of adenovirus vectors carrying p53 trans-splicing cassettes suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts. Repair of mutant p53 transcripts by trans-splicing induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in p53-defective colorectal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated for the first time that trans-splicing was exploited as a strategy for the repair of mutant p53 transcripts, which revealed that trans-splicing would be developed as a new therapeutic approach for human colorectal cancers carrying p53 mutation. PMID:25576916

  20. FTIR observation of compression recovery of the secondary structure of heat denaturated ribonuclease A in sucrose solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Chatani, E.; Kato, M.

    2010-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of pressure on the secondary structure of ribonuclease A using FTIR spectroscopy. In the presence of 47 %w/w sucrose, the intensity of an amide I' peak assigned to β-sheets of ribonuclease A was slightly recovered by applying pressure up to 200 MPa, while the peak was monotonically decreased with increasing pressure in the absence of sucrose. The present study is the first observation of the compression recovery of β-sheets in a protein by pressure in high concentration of sucrose. This result is consistent with a pressure perturbation calorimetric study (Ravindra et al. 2004 Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 6 1952) reported that the sign of volume change of the protein thermal denaturation changed from negative to positive by adding sugars.

  1. Targeted rescue of a destabilized mutant of p53 by an in silico screened drug

    PubMed Central

    Boeckler, Frank M.; Joerger, Andreas C.; Jaggi, Gaurav; Rutherford, Trevor J.; Veprintsev, Dmitry B.; Fersht, Alan R.

    2008-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is mutationally inactivated in ≈50% of human cancers. Approximately one-third of the mutations lower the melting temperature of the protein, leading to its rapid denaturation. Small molecules that bind to those mutants and stabilize them could be effective anticancer drugs. The mutation Y220C, which occurs in ≈75,000 new cancer cases per annum, creates a surface cavity that destabilizes the protein by 4 kcal/mol, at a site that is not functional. We have designed a series of binding molecules from an in silico analysis of the crystal structure using virtual screening and rational drug design. One of them, a carbazole derivative (PhiKan083), binds to the cavity with a dissociation constant of ≈150 μM. It raises the melting temperature of the mutant and slows down its rate of denaturation. We have solved the crystal structure of the protein–PhiKan083 complex at 1.5-Å resolution. The structure implicates key interactions between the protein and ligand and conformational changes that occur on binding, which will provide a basis for lead optimization. The Y220C mutant is an excellent “druggable” target for developing and testing novel anticancer drugs based on protein stabilization. We point out some general principles in relationships between binding constants, raising of melting temperatures, and increase of protein half-lives by stabilizing ligands. PMID:18650397

  2. Benzyl Isothiocyanate potentiates p53 signaling and antitumor effects against breast cancer through activation of p53-LKB1 and p73-LKB1 axes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bei; Nagalingam, Arumugam; Kuppusamy, Panjamurthy; Muniraj, Nethaji; Langford, Peter; Győrffy, Balázs; Saxena, Neeraj K.; Sharma, Dipali

    2017-01-01

    Functional reactivation of p53 pathway, although arduous, can potentially provide a broad-based strategy for cancer therapy owing to frequent p53 inactivation in human cancer. Using a phosphoprotein-screening array, we found that Benzyl Isothiocynate, (BITC) increases p53 phosphorylation in breast cancer cells and reveal an important role of ERK and PRAS40/MDM2 in BITC-mediated p53 activation. We show that BITC rescues and activates p53-signaling network and inhibits growth of p53-mutant cells. Mechanistically, BITC induces p73 expression in p53-mutant cells, disrupts the interaction of p73 and mutant-p53, thereby releasing p73 from sequestration and allowing it to be transcriptionally active. Furthermore, BITC-induced p53 and p73 axes converge on tumor-suppressor LKB1 which is transcriptionally upregulated by p53 and p73 in p53-wild-type and p53-mutant cells respectively; and in a feed-forward mechanism, LKB1 tethers with p53 and p73 to get recruited to p53-responsive promoters. Analyses of BITC-treated xenografts using LKB1-null cells corroborate in vitro mechanistic findings and establish LKB1 as the key node whereby BITC potentiates as well as rescues p53-pathway in p53-wild-type as well as p53-mutant cells. These data provide first in vitro and in vivo evidence of the integral role of previously unrecognized crosstalk between BITC, p53/LKB1 and p73/LKB1 axes in breast tumor growth-inhibition. PMID:28071670

  3. p53 and ribosome biogenesis stress: the essentials.

    PubMed

    Golomb, Lior; Volarevic, Sinisa; Oren, Moshe

    2014-08-19

    Cell proliferation and cell growth are two tightly linked processes, as the proliferation program cannot be executed without proper accumulation of cell mass, otherwise endangering the fate of the two daughter cells. It is therefore not surprising that ribosome biogenesis, a key element in cell growth, is regulated by many cell cycle regulators. This regulation is exerted transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally, in conjunction with numerous intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Those signals eventually converge at the nucleolus, the cellular compartment that is not only responsible for executing the ribosome biogenesis program, but also serves as a regulatory hub, responsible for integrating and transmitting multiple stress signals to the omnipotent cell fate gatekeeper, p53. In this review we discuss when, how and why p53 is activated upon ribosomal biogenesis stress, and how perturbation of this critical regulatory interplay may impact human disease.

  4. p53-independent p21 induction by MELK inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Tatsuo; Kato, Taigo; Kiyotani, Kazuma; Tarhan, Yunus Emre; Saloura, Vassiliki; Chung, Suyoun; Ueda, Koji; Nakamura, Yusuke; Park, Jae-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    MELK play critical roles in human carcinogenesis through activation of cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis and maintenance of stemness. Therefore, MELK is a promising therapeutic target for a wide range of cancers. Although p21 is a well-known p53-downstream gene, we found that treatment with a potent MELK inhibitor, OTS167, could induce p21 protein expression in cancer cell lines harboring loss-of-function TP53 mutations. We also confirmed that MELK knockdown by siRNA induced the p21 expression in p53-deficient cancer cell lines and caused the cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. Further analysis indicated that FOXO1 and FOXO3, two known transcriptional regulators of p21, were phosphorylated by MELK and thus be involved in the induction of p21 after MELK inhibition. Collectively, our herein findings suggest that MELK inhibition may be effective for human cancers even if TP53 is mutated. PMID:28938528

  5. Targeting p53 as a general tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Theobald, M; Biggs, J; Dittmer, D; Levine, A J; Sherman, L A

    1995-01-01

    A major barrier to the design of immunotherapeutics and vaccines for cancer is the idiosyncratic nature of many tumor antigens and the possibility that T cells may be tolerant of broadly distributed antigens. We have devised an experimental strategy that exploits species differences in protein sequences to circumvent tolerance of high-affinity T cells. HLA transgenic mice were used to obtain cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for peptides from the human p53 tumor-suppressor molecule presented in association with HLA-A2.1. Although such p53-specific cytotoxic T cells did not recognize nontransformed human cells, they were able to lyse a wide variety of human tumor cells lines, thus confirming the existence of broadly distributed determinants that may serve as targets for immunotherapy. PMID:8618830

  6. C23 promotes tumorigenesis via suppressing p53 activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Hu, Guilin; Fang, Xing; Hu, Yamin; Tao, Tingting; Wei, Xin; Tang, Haitao; Huang, Baojun; Hu, Wanglai

    2016-01-01

    C23 is an abundant and multi-functional protein, which plays an important role in various biological processes, including ribosome biogenesis and maturation, cell cycle checkpoints and transcriptional regulation [1, 2]. However, the role of C23 in controlling tumorigenesis has not been well defined. Here we report that C23 is highly expressed in cancer cells and the elevated expression of C23 facilitates cancer cell proliferation in vitro and tumor xenograft growth in vivo. Notably, C23 binds to p53 through its GAR domain and suppresses the transcriptional activity of p53 under DNA damage and hypoxia. Moreover, the GAR domain is critical for C23-mediated tumor cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings reveal a novel role of C23 in tumorigenesis and suggest that C23 may represent a potential therapeutic target for treating malignancy. PMID:27506938

  7. p53's choice of myocardial death or survival: Oxygen protects infarct myocardium by recruiting p53 on NOS3 promoter through regulation of p53-Lys(118) acetylation.

    PubMed

    Gogna, Rajan; Madan, Esha; Khan, Mahmood; Pati, Uttam; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2013-11-01

    Myocardial infarction, an irreversible cardiac tissue damage, involves progressive loss of cardiomyocytes due to p53-mediated apoptosis. Oxygenation is known to promote cardiac survival through activation of NOS3 gene. We hypothesized a dual role for p53, which, depending on oxygenation, can elicit apoptotic death signals or NOS3-mediated survival signals in the infarct heart. p53 exhibited a differential DNA-binding, namely, BAX-p53RE in the infarct heart or NOS3-p53RE in the oxygenated heart, which was regulated by oxygen-induced, post-translational modification of p53. In the infarct heart, p53 was heavily acetylated at Lys(118) residue, which was exclusively reversed in the oxygenated heart, apparently regulated by oxygen-dependent expression of TIP60. The inhibition of Lys(118) acetylation promoted the generation of NOS3-promoting prosurvival form of p53. Thus, oxygenation switches p53-DNA interaction by regulating p53 core-domain acetylation, promoting a prosurvival transcription activity of p53. Understanding this novel oxygen-p53 survival pathway will open new avenues in cardioprotection molecular therapy.

  8. p53's choice of myocardial death or survival: Oxygen protects infarct myocardium by recruiting p53 on NOS3 promoter through regulation of p53-Lys118 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Gogna, Rajan; Madan, Esha; Khan, Mahmood; Pati, Uttam; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction, an irreversible cardiac tissue damage, involves progressive loss of cardiomyocytes due to p53-mediated apoptosis. Oxygenation is known to promote cardiac survival through activation of NOS3 gene. We hypothesized a dual role for p53, which, depending on oxygenation, can elicit apoptotic death signals or NOS3-mediated survival signals in the infarct heart. p53 exhibited a differential DNA-binding, namely, BAX-p53RE in the infarct heart or NOS3-p53RE in the oxygenated heart, which was regulated by oxygen-induced, post-translational modification of p53. In the infarct heart, p53 was heavily acetylated at Lys118 residue, which was exclusively reversed in the oxygenated heart, apparently regulated by oxygen-dependent expression of TIP60. The inhibition of Lys118 acetylation promoted the generation of NOS3-promoting prosurvival form of p53. Thus, oxygenation switches p53-DNA interaction by regulating p53 core-domain acetylation, promoting a prosurvival transcription activity of p53. Understanding this novel oxygen-p53 survival pathway will open new avenues in cardioprotection molecular therapy. PMID:24096875

  9. Regulation of Mammary Progenitor Cells by p53 and Parity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer among women in the United States. A full term pregnancy early in...reproductive life can reduce breast cancer incidence in women by up to 50% and p53, an important tumor suppressor gene, was shown to be a major effector...Introduction Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer among women in the United States1. Understanding the

  10. Axis of ageing: telomeres, p53 and mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ergün; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2013-01-01

    Progressive DNA damage and mitochondrial decline are both considered to be prime instigators of natural ageing. Traditionally, these two pathways have been viewed largely in isolation. However, recent studies have revealed a molecular circuit that directly links DNA damage to compromised mitochondrial biogenesis and function via p53. This axis of ageing may account for both organ decline and disease development associated with advanced age and could illuminate a path for the development of relevant therapeutics. PMID:22588366

  11. Cytoskeleton-anchoring of Conformational Mutant-like p53, but not shorter isoforms p53β and p47 (ΔN40p53) in Senescent Human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Koji

    2017-05-23

    Cytoskeleton anchoring of conformational mutant-like p53 is prominent in human senescent cell. The present research investigated the structural basis of vimentin cytoskeleton-anchoring of human p53. GFP-fused wild type p53, mutant p53, those of the various truncated isoforms including p53β and p47, were expressed in the vimentin-expressing cells: mouse fibroblasts, COS-7 cells, young and senescent human fibroblasts, and HeLa cells (non-vimentin-expressing). A cancer-specific mutant p53V143A-GFP expressed in mouse fibroblasts, exclusively anchored on the vimentin cytoskeleton. Class I mutant p53R175C-GFP and class II mutant p53R175S-GFP localized in the nuclei of COS-7 cells. A class Ⅲmutant p53R175X-GFP (X: D, F, W or Y), cancer-specific mutant p53V143A-GFP and p53R249S-GFP, exclusively anchored on the vimentin cytoskeleton of COS-7 cells. The deletions of p53R249S and p53V143A at the C-terminus (ΔC63) exclusively promoted the nuclear import of the deleted mutant p53 in COS-7 and HeLa cells, whereas the deletions at the N-terminus (ΔN40) or C-terminus (ΔC33) were ineffective. Thus, the cancer-specific mutant p53R249S and p53V143A adopt distinct mutant conformation and thereby the C-terminal region (aa331-360) potently interacts with the vimentin cytoskeleton and HeLa cells' cytoskeleton. Wild type p53-GFP exclusively localized in the nuclei of growing young fibroblast, in contrast to the significant cytoplasmic retention in senescent human fibroblasts. The deletion of p53 at the N-terminus or at the C-terminus (ΔN40 or ΔC63) results in a significant nuclear import of the shorter isoforms, p53β and p47. Senescent fibroblasts promote p53 to adopt a hotspot mutant like-conformation which significantly overrides the nuclear import due to the potent cytoskeleton-anchoring. Interestingly, the shorter p53 isoforms can escape from the cytoskeleton-anchoring. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Non-Canonical Cell Death Induced by p53

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Atul; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death is a vital biological process for multicellular organisms to maintain cellular homeostasis, which is regulated in a complex manner. Over the past several years, apart from apoptosis, which is the principal mechanism of caspase-dependent cell death, research on non-apoptotic forms of programmed cell death has gained momentum. p53 is a well characterized tumor suppressor that controls cell proliferation and apoptosis and has also been linked to non-apoptotic, non-canonical cell death mechanisms. p53 impacts these non-canonical forms of cell death through transcriptional regulation of its downstream targets, as well as direct interactions with key players involved in these mechanisms, in a cell type- or tissue context-dependent manner. In this review article, we summarize and discuss the involvement of p53 in several non-canonical modes of cell death, including caspase-independent apoptosis (CIA), ferroptosis, necroptosis, autophagic cell death, mitotic catastrophe, paraptosis, and pyroptosis, as well as its role in efferocytosis which is the process of clearing dead or dying cells. PMID:27941671

  13. Non-Canonical Cell Death Induced by p53.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Atul; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2016-12-09

    Programmed cell death is a vital biological process for multicellular organisms to maintain cellular homeostasis, which is regulated in a complex manner. Over the past several years, apart from apoptosis, which is the principal mechanism of caspase-dependent cell death, research on non-apoptotic forms of programmed cell death has gained momentum. p53 is a well characterized tumor suppressor that controls cell proliferation and apoptosis and has also been linked to non-apoptotic, non-canonical cell death mechanisms. p53 impacts these non-canonical forms of cell death through transcriptional regulation of its downstream targets, as well as direct interactions with key players involved in these mechanisms, in a cell type- or tissue context-dependent manner. In this review article, we summarize and discuss the involvement of p53 in several non-canonical modes of cell death, including caspase-independent apoptosis (CIA), ferroptosis, necroptosis, autophagic cell death, mitotic catastrophe, paraptosis, and pyroptosis, as well as its role in efferocytosis which is the process of clearing dead or dying cells.

  14. p53 gene mutations in asbestos associated cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, B C; Fu, D C; Miao, Q; Wang, H H; You, B R

    1998-09-01

    The accumulation of mutant p53 protein in cancer cells was observed by immunohistochemistry analysis. DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue. Exons 5, 7 and 8 were amplified and studied by PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis. Ten cases of asbestos associated cancer tissue were studied, of which five cases had adenocarcinoma, and the other five had mesothelioma, squamous carcinoma, small cell lung cancer, adenosquamous carcinoma and malignant lymphoma respectively. Employing monoclonal antibody PAb1801, five cases were found to be mutant p53 protein positive. Seven cases were found to have mutations by PCR-SSCP. A total of 7 cases (8 mutations) were found to be positive and 4 cases were found to be positive by both of these analyses. Of the 8 mutations found by SSCP analysis, 4(50%, 4/8) were clustered in exon 8. A high mutation frequency was noticed in adenocarcinoma (80%, 4/5). Sequencing analysis on two specimens revealed two hotspot mutations. In codon 234, TAC for tyrosin was mutated to AAC for asparagine by a T to A transversion of the first letter. In codon 273, CGT for arginine was mutated to AGT for serine by a C to A transversion of the first letter. In conclusion, the mutation of p53 gene is common in asbestos associated cancers. However, the mutational spectrum of asbestos associated cancers might be different from that of non-asbestos associated cancers.

  15. Yin Yang 1 Promotes Thymocyte Survival by Downregulating p53.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Foreman, Daniel P; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Krangel, Michael S

    2016-03-15

    Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is a zinc finger protein that functions as a transcriptional activator or repressor and participates in multiple biological processes, including development and tumorigenesis. To investigate the role of YY1 in developing T cells, we used mouse models that depleted YY1 at two distinct stages of thymocyte development. When YY1 was depleted in CD4(-)CD8(-) double-negative thymocytes, development to the CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive stage was impaired, due to increased apoptosis that prevented expansion of post-β-selection thymocytes. When YY1 was depleted in double-positive thymocytes, they underwent increased cell-autonomous apoptosis in vitro and displayed a shorter lifespan in vivo, as judged by their ability to undergo secondary Vα-to-Jα recombination. Mechanistically, we found that the increased apoptosis in YY1-deficient thymocytes was attributed to overexpression of p53, because concurrent loss of p53 completely rescued the developmental defects of YY1-deficient thymocytes. These results indicated that YY1 functions as a critical regulator of thymocyte survival and that it does so by suppressing the expression of p53.

  16. Molecular dynamics of the full-length p53 monomer

    PubMed Central

    Chillemi, Giovanni; Davidovich, Pavel; D’Abramo, Marco; Mametnabiev, Tazhir; Garabadzhiu, Alexander Vasilievich; Desideri, Alessandro; Melino, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    The p53 protein is frequently mutated in a very large proportion of human tumors, where it seems to acquire gain-of-function activity that facilitates tumor onset and progression. A possible mechanism is the ability of mutant p53 proteins to physically interact with other proteins, including members of the same family, namely p63 and p73, inactivating their function. Assuming that this interaction might occurs at the level of the monomer, to investigate the molecular basis for this interaction, here, we sample the structural flexibility of the wild-type p53 monomeric protein. The results show a strong stability up to 850 ns in the DNA binding domain, with major flexibility in the N-terminal transactivations domains (TAD1 and TAD2) as well as in the C-terminal region (tetramerization domain). Several stable hydrogen bonds have been detected between N-terminal or C-terminal and DNA binding domain, and also between N-terminal and C-terminal. Essential dynamics analysis highlights strongly correlated movements involving TAD1 and the proline-rich region in the N-terminal domain, the tetramerization region in the C-terminal domain; Lys120 in the DNA binding region. The herein presented model is a starting point for further investigation of the whole protein tetramer as well as of its mutants. PMID:23974096

  17. Electrophoretic detection of protein p53 in human leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Paponov, V.D.; Kupsik, E.G.; Shcheglova, E.G.; Yarullin, N.N.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have found an acid-soluble protein with mol. wt. of about 53 kD in peripheral blood leukocytes of persons with Down's syndrome. It was present in different quantities in all 20 patients tested, but was virtually not discovered in 12 healthy blood donors. This paper determines the possible identity of this protein with protein p53 from mouse ascites carcinoma by comparing their electrophoretic mobilities, because the accuracy of electrophoretic determination of the molecular weight of proteins is not sufficient to identify them. The paper also describes experiments to detect a protein with electrophoretic mobility identical with that of a protein in the leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome in leukocytes of patients with leukemia. To discover if protein p53 is involved in cell proliferation, the protein composition of leukocytes from healthy blood donors, cultured in the presence and absence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA), was compared. Increased incorporation of H 3-thymidine by leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome is explained by the presence of a population of immature leukocytes actively synthesizing DNA in the peripheral blood of these patients, and this can also explain the presence of protein p53 in the leukocytes of these patients.

  18. Behavior of Heat-Denatured Whey: Buttermilk Protein Aggregates during the Yogurt-Making Process and Their Influence on Set-Type Yogurt Properties.

    PubMed

    Saffon, Maxime; Richard, Véronique; Jiménez-Flores, Rafael; Gauthier, Sylvie F; Britten, Michel; Pouliot, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of using heat-denatured whey:buttermilk protein aggregate in acid-set type yogurt production. Whey and buttermilk (25:75) protein concentrate was adjusted to pH 4.6, heated at 90 °C for 5 min, homogenized and freeze-dried. Set-type yogurts were prepared from skim milk standardized to 15% (w/v) total solids and 4.2% (w/v) protein using different levels of powdered skim milk or freeze-dried protein aggregate. The use of the protein aggregate significantly modified yogurt texture, but did not affect the water-holding capacity of the gel. Confocal laser-scanning microscope images showed the presence of large particles in milk enriched with protein aggregate, which directly affected the homogeneity of the clusters within the protein matrix. Thiol groups were freed during heating of the protein aggregate suspended in water, suggesting that the aggregates could interact with milk proteins during heating.

  19. Behavior of Heat-Denatured Whey:Buttermilk Protein Aggregates during the Yogurt-Making Process and Their Influence on Set-Type Yogurt Properties

    PubMed Central

    Saffon, Maxime; Richard, Véronique; Jiménez-Flores, Rafael; Gauthier, Sylvie F.; Britten, Michel; Pouliot, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of using heat-denatured whey:buttermilk protein aggregate in acid-set type yogurt production. Whey and buttermilk (25:75) protein concentrate was adjusted to pH 4.6, heated at 90 °C for 5 min, homogenized and freeze-dried. Set-type yogurts were prepared from skim milk standardized to 15% (w/v) total solids and 4.2% (w/v) protein using different levels of powdered skim milk or freeze-dried protein aggregate. The use of the protein aggregate significantly modified yogurt texture, but did not affect the water-holding capacity of the gel. Confocal laser-scanning microscope images showed the presence of large particles in milk enriched with protein aggregate, which directly affected the homogeneity of the clusters within the protein matrix. Thiol groups were freed during heating of the protein aggregate suspended in water, suggesting that the aggregates could interact with milk proteins during heating. PMID:28239128

  20. Green Tea Polyphenols Induce p53-Dependent and p53-Independent Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells through Two Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Karishma; Thakur, Vijay S.; Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Nawab, Akbar; Babcook, Melissa A.; Jackson, Mark W.; Gupta, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 is commonly observed in human prostate cancer and is associated with therapeutic resistance. We have previously demonstrated that green tea polyphenols (GTP) induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells irrespective of p53 status. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these observations remain elusive. Here we investigated the mechanisms of GTP-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells stably-transfected with short hairpin-RNA against p53 (LNCaPshp53) and control vector (LNCaPshV). GTP treatment induced p53 stabilization and activation of downstream targets p21/waf1 and Bax in a dose-dependent manner specifically in LNCaPshV cells. However, GTP-induced FAS upregulation through activation of c-jun-N-terminal kinase resulted in FADD phosphorylation, caspase-8 activation and truncation of BID, leading to apoptosis in both LNCaPshV and LNCaPshp53 cells. In parallel, treatment of cells with GTP resulted in inhibition of survival pathway, mediated by Akt deactivation and loss of BAD phosphorylation more prominently in LNCaPshp53 cells. These distinct routes of cell death converged to a common pathway, leading to loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, cytochrome c release and activation of terminal caspases, resulting in PARP-cleavage. GTP-induced apoptosis was attenuated with JNK inhibitor, SP600125 in both cell lines; whereas PI3K-Akt inhibitor, LY294002 resulted in increased cell death prominently in LNCaPshp53 cells, establishing the role of two distinct pathways of GTP-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, GTP exposure resulted in inhibition of class I HDAC protein, accumulation of acetylated histone-H3 in total cellular chromatin, resulting in increased accessibility of transcription factors to bind with the promoter sequences of p21/waf1 and Bax, regardless of the p53 status of cells, consistent with effects elicited by an HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A. These results demonstrate that GTP induces

  1. Expression of mutant protein p53 and Hsp70 and Hsp90 chaperones in cockles Cerastoderma edule affected by neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Díaz, S; Cao, A; Villalba, A; Carballal, M J

    2010-07-01

    High prevalence of disseminated neoplasia has been found in cockles Cerastoderma edule of Galicia (NW Spain). Disseminated neoplasia has been associated with high mortalities of various bivalve species. In vertebrates, proteins such as p53 and heat shock proteins (HSPs) play important roles in carcinogenesis. The protein p53 has been detected in neoplastic cells of bivalve molluscs such as Mytilus edulis, Mytilus trossulus, Mya arenaria, Spisula solidissima, Crassostrea rhizophorae and Crassostrea gigas. In this study, western blotting analyses were used to test the expression of Hsp70, Hsp90 and mutant p53 proteins in the cells and plasma of the haemolymph of cockles showing various intensities of neoplasia. Disseminated neoplasia was previously diagnosed by examination of stained haemolymph monolayers with light microscopy. In the present study, mutant p53 was detected in haemolymph cells of cockles diagnosed as affected by moderate and heavy neoplasia intensity, whereas it was not detected in cockles with either no or light neoplasia. The higher the neoplasia intensity, the higher the levels of Hsp70 and Hsp90. These proteins were not found in plasma. The results reveal the possible association between p53 and HSPs in neoplastic cells of cockles, which could prevent p53 from carrying out its functions, as occurs in human cancers.

  2. Binding kinetics of mutant p53R175H with wild type p53 and p63: A Surface Plasmon Resonance and Atomic Force Spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2017-09-01

    The oncogenic mutant p53R175H, one of the most frequently occurring in human cancers and usually associated with poor prognosis and chemo resistance, can exert a dominant negative effect over p53 family members, namely wild type p53, p63 and p73, inhibiting their oncosuppressive function. Novel anticancer strategies based on drugs able to prevent the formation of complexes between p53R175H and the p53 family members call for a deeper knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of their interaction. To this aim, p53R175H/p63 and p53R175H/p53 complexes were investigated in vitro by using Surface Plasmon Resonance and Atomic Force Spectroscopy, two emerging and complementary techniques able to provide interaction kinetic information, in near physiological conditions and without any labelling. Both approaches show that p53R175H forms a very specific and highly stable bimolecular complex with both p63 and p53; with these interactions being characterized by a very high affinity with equilibrium dissociation constant, KD, of about 10(-9)M. These kinetics results, discussed also in connection with those previously reported for the interaction of p53R175H with p73, could inspire the design of suitable anticancer drugs able to antagonize the interaction of p53R175H with the p53 family members, by restoring then their anti-tumour function. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Reactivating p53 functions by suppressing its novel inhibitor iASPP: a potential therapeutic opportunity in p53 wild-type tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Peixin; Ihira, Kei; Hamada, Junichi; Watari, Hidemichi; Yamada, Takahiro; Hosaka, Masayoshi; Hanley, Sharon J.B.; Kudo, Masataka; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    Although mutational inactivation of p53 is found in 50% of all human tumors, a subset of tumors display defective p53 function, but retain wild-type (WT) p53. Here, direct and indirect mechanisms leading to the loss of WT p53 activities are discussed. We summarize the oncogenic roles of iASPP, an inhibitor of WT p53, in promoting proliferation, invasion, drug or radiation-resistance and metastasis. From the therapeutic view, we highlight promising perspectives of microRNA-124, peptide and small molecules that reduce or block iASPP for the treatment of cancer. High iASPP expression enhances proliferation, aggressive behavior, the resistance to radiation/chemotherapy and correlates with poor prognosis in a range of human tumors. Overexpression of iASPP accelerates tumorigenesis and invasion through p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. MicroRNA-124 directly targets iASPP and represses the growth and invasiveness of cancer cells. The disruption of iASPP-p53 interaction by a p53-derived peptide A34 restores p53 function in cancer cells. The inhibition of iASPP phosphorylation with small molecules induces p53-dependent apoptosis and growth suppression. The mechanisms underlying aberrant expression of iASPP in human tumors should be further investigated. Reactivating WT p53 functions by targeting its novel inhibitor iASPP holds promise for potential therapeutic interventions in the treatment of WT p53-containing tumors. PMID:26343523

  4. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 transfer radiosensitizes H1299 cells to subclinical-dose carbon-ion irradiation through the restoration of p53 function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Zhang, Hong; Duan, Xin; Hao, Jifang; Xie, Yi; Zhou, Qingming; Wang, Yanling; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Tao

    2009-02-01

    To determine whether adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 transfer after radiotherapy could radiosensitize non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells to subclinical-dose carbon-ion beam (C-beam), H1299 cells were exposed to a C-beam or gamma-ray and then infected with 5 MOI of AdCMV-p53 or GFP (C-beam or gamma-ray with p53 or GFP). Cell cycle was detected by flow cytometric analysis. The apoptosis was examined by a fluorescent microscope with DAPI staining. DNA fragmentation was monitored by the TUNEL assay. P53 mRNA was detected by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The expression of p53, MDM(2), and p21 was monitored by Western blot. Survival fractions were determined by colony-forming assay. The percentages of G(1)-phase cells in C-beam with p53 increased by 8.2%-16.0%, 5.2%-7.0%, and 5.8%-18.9%, respectively, compared with C-beam only, gamma-ray with p53, or p53 only. The accumulation of G(2)-phase cells in C-beam with p53 increased by 5.7%-8.9% and 8.8%-14.8%, compared with those in gamma-ray with p53 or p53 only, respectively. The percentage of apoptosis for C-beam with p53 increased by 7.4%-19.1%, 5.8%-11.7%, and 5.2 %-19.2%, respectively, compared with C-beam only, gamma-ray with p53, or p53 only. The level of p53 mRNA in C-beam with p53 was significantly higher than that in p53 only. The expression level of p53 and p21 in C-beam with p53 was significantly higher than that in both C-beam with GFP and p53 only. The survival fractions for C-beam with p53 were significantly less than those for the other groups (p < 0.05). The data suggested that AdCMV-p53 transfer could more efficiently radiosensitize H1299 cells to subclinical-dose C-beam irradiation through the restoration of p53 function.

  5. E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades negatively regulates the exonuclear function of p53

    PubMed Central

    Jung, J H; Bae, S; Lee, J Y; Woo, S R; Cha, H J; Yoon, Y; Suh, K-S; Lee, S-J; Park, I-C; Jin, Y-W; Lee, K-H; An, S; Lee, J H

    2011-01-01

    Following DNA damage, p53 translocates to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, where it triggers transcription-independent apoptosis by binding to Bcl-2 family proteins. However, little is known about how this exonuclear function of p53 is regulated. Here, we identify and characterize a p53-interacting protein called Hades, an E3 ligase that interacts with p53 in the mitochondria. Hades reduces p53 stability via a mechanism that requires its RING-finger domain with ubiquitin ligase activity. Hades polyubiquitinates p53 in vitro independent of Mdm2 and targets a critical lysine residue in p53 (lysine 24) distinct from those targeted by Mdm2. Hades inhibits a p53-dependent mitochondrial cell death pathway by inhibiting p53 and Bcl-2 interactions. These findings show that Hades-mediated p53 ubiquitination is a novel mechanism for negatively regulating the exonuclear function of p53. PMID:21597459

  6. E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades negatively regulates the exonuclear function of p53.

    PubMed

    Jung, J H; Bae, S; Lee, J Y; Woo, S R; Cha, H J; Yoon, Y; Suh, K-S; Lee, S-J; Park, I-C; Jin, Y-W; Lee, K-H; An, S; Lee, J H

    2011-12-01

    Following DNA damage, p53 translocates to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, where it triggers transcription-independent apoptosis by binding to Bcl-2 family proteins. However, little is known about how this exonuclear function of p53 is regulated. Here, we identify and characterize a p53-interacting protein called Hades, an E3 ligase that interacts with p53 in the mitochondria. Hades reduces p53 stability via a mechanism that requires its RING-finger domain with ubiquitin ligase activity. Hades polyubiquitinates p53 in vitro independent of Mdm2 and targets a critical lysine residue in p53 (lysine 24) distinct from those targeted by Mdm2. Hades inhibits a p53-dependent mitochondrial cell death pathway by inhibiting p53 and Bcl-2 interactions. These findings show that Hades-mediated p53 ubiquitination is a novel mechanism for negatively regulating the exonuclear function of p53.

  7. p53 loss-of-heterozygosity is a necessary prerequisite for mutant p53 stabilization and gain-of-function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alexandrova, Evguenia M; Mirza, Safia A; Xu, Sulan; Schulz-Heddergott, Ramona; Marchenko, Natalia D; Moll, Ute M

    2017-03-09

    Missense mutations in TP53 comprise >75% of all p53 alterations in cancer, resulting in highly stabilized mutant p53 proteins that not only lose their tumor-suppressor activity, but often acquire oncogenic gain-of-functions (GOFs). GOF manifests itself in accelerated tumor onset, increased metastasis, increased drug resistance and shortened survival in patients and mice. A known prerequisite for GOF is mutant p53 protein stabilization, which itself is linked to aberrant protein conformation. However, additional determinants for mutant p53 stabilization likely exist. Here we show that in initially heterozygous mouse tumors carrying the hotspot GOF allele R248Q (p53Q/+), another necessary prerequisite for mutant p53 stabilization and GOF in vivo is loss of the remaining wild-type p53 allele, termed loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH). Thus, in mouse tumors with high frequency of p53 LOH (osteosarcomas and fibrosarcomas), we find that mutant p53 protein is stabilized (16/17 cases, 94%) and tumor onset is significantly accelerated compared with p53+/- tumors (GOF). In contrast, in mouse tumors with low frequency of p53 LOH (MMTV-Neu breast carcinomas), mutant p53 protein is not stabilized (16/20 cases, 80%) and GOF is not observed. Of note, human genomic databases (TCGA, METABRIC etc.) show a high degree of p53 LOH in all examined tumor types that carry missense p53 mutations, including sarcomas and breast carcinomas (with and without HER2 amplification). These data - while cautioning that not all genetic mouse models faithfully represent the human situation - demonstrate for the first time that p53 LOH is a critical prerequisite for missense mutant p53 stabilization and GOF in vivo.

  8. The in vitro phosphorylation of p53 by calcium-dependent protein kinase C--characterization of a protein-kinase-C-binding site on p53.

    PubMed

    Delphin, C; Huang, K P; Scotto, C; Chapel, A; Vincon, M; Chambaz, E; Garin, J; Baudier, J

    1997-05-01

    We show that, in vitro, Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylates recombinant murine p53 protein on several residues contained within a conserved basic region of 25 amino acids, located in the C-terminal part of the protein. Accordingly, synthetic p53-(357-381)-peptide is phosphorylated by PKC at multiple Ser and Thr residues, including Ser360, Thr365, Ser370 and Thr377. We also establish that p53-(357-381)-peptide at micromolar concentrations has the ability to stimulate sequence-specific DNA binding by p53. That stimulation is lost upon phosphorylation by PKC. To further characterise the mechanisms that regulate PKC-dependent phosphorylation of p53-(357-381)-peptide, the phosphorylation of recombinant p53 and p53-(357-381)-peptide by PKC were compared. The results suggest that phosphorylation of full-length p53 on the C-terminal PKC sites is highly dependent on the accessibility of the phosphorylation sites and that a domain on p53 distinct from p53-(357-381)-peptide is involved in binding PKC. Accordingly, we have identified a conserved 27-amino-acid peptide, p53-(320-346)-peptide, within the C-terminal region of p53 and adjacent to residues 357-381 that interacts with PKC in vitro. The interaction between p53-(320-346)-peptide and PKC inhibits PKC autophosphorylation and the phosphorylation of substrates, including p53-(357-381)-peptide, neurogranin and histone H1. Conventional Ca2+-dependent PKC alpha, beta and gamma and the catalytic fragment of PKC (PKM) were nearly equally susceptible to inhibition by p53-(320-346)-peptide. The Ca2+-independent PKC delta was much less sensitive to inhibition. The significance of these findings for understanding the in vivo phosphorylation of p53 by PKC are discussed.

  9. Somatic mutation analysis of p53 and ST7 tumor suppressor genes in gastric carcinoma by DHPLC.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chong; Xu, Hui-Mian; Ren, Qun; Ao, Yang; Wang, Zhen-Ning; Ao, Xue; Jiang, Li; Luo, Yang; Zhang, Xue

    2003-12-01

    To verify the effectiveness of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) in detecting somatic mutation of p53 gene in gastric carcinoma tissues. The superiority of this method has been proved in the detection of germline mutations, but it was not very affirmative with respect to somatic mutations in tumor specimens. ST7 gene, a candidate tumor suppressor gene identified recently at human chromosome 7q31.1, was also detected because LOH at this site has also been widely reported in stomach cancer. DNA was extracted from 39 cases of surgical gastric carcinoma specimen and their correspondent normal mucosa. Seven fragments spanning the 11 exons were used to detect the mutation of p53 gene and the four exons reported to have mutations in ST7 gene were amplified by PCR and directly analyzed by DHPLC without mixing with wild-type allele. In the analysis of p53 gene mutation, 9 aberrant DHPLC chromatographies were found in tumor tissues, while their normal-adjacent counterparts running in parallel showed a normal shape. Subsequent sequencing revealed nine sequence variations, 1 polymorphism and 8 mutations including 3 mutations not reported before. The mutation rate of p53 gene (21%) was consistent with that previously reported. Furthermore, no additional aberrant chromatography was found when wild-type DNA was added into the DNA of other 30 tumor samples that showed normal shapes previously. The positivity of p53 mutations was significantly higher in intestinal-type carcinomas (40%) than that in diffuse-type (8.33%) carcinomas of the stomach. No mutation of ST7 gene was found. DHPLC is a very convenient method for the detection of somatic mutations in gastric carcinoma. The amount of wild type alleles supplied by the non-tumorous cells in gastric tumor specimens is enough to form heteroduplex with mutant alleles for DHPLC detection. ST7 gene may not be the target gene of inactivation at 7q31 site in gastric carcinoma.

  10. Differential regulation of the REGγ–proteasome pathway by p53/TGF-β signalling and mutant p53 in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Amjad; Wang, Zhuo; Fu, Junjiang; Ji, Lei; Liu, Jiang; Li, Lei; Wang, Hui; Chen, Jiwu; Caulin, Carlos; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Zhang, Pei; Xiao, Jianru; Zhang, Bianhong; Li, Xiaotao

    2013-01-01

    Proteasome activity is frequently enhanced in cancer to accelerate metastasis and tumorigenesis. REGγ, a proteasome activator known to promote p53/p21/p16 degradation, is often overexpressed in cancer cells. Here we show that p53/TGF-β signalling inhibits the REGγ–20S proteasome pathway by repressing REGγ expression. Smad3 and p53 interact on the REGγ promoter via the p53RE/SBE region. Conversely, mutant p53 binds to the REGγ promoter and recruits p300. Importantly, mutant p53 prevents Smad3/N-CoR complex formation on the REGγ promoter, which enhances the activity of the REGγ–20S proteasome pathway and contributes to mutant p53 gain of function. Depletion of REGγ alters the cellular response to p53/TGF-β signalling in drug resistance, proliferation, cell cycle progression and proteasome activity. Moreover, p53 mutations show a positive correlation with REGγ expression in cancer samples. These findings suggest that targeting REGγ–20S proteasome for cancer therapy may be applicable to human tumours with abnormal p53/Smad protein status. Furthermore, this study demonstrates a link between p53/TGF-β signalling and the REGγ–20S proteasome pathway, and provides insight into the REGγ/p53 feedback loop. PMID:24157709

  11. Oxazoloisoindolinones with in vitro antitumor activity selectively activate a p53-pathway through potential inhibition of the p53-MDM2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Soares, Joana; Pereira, Nuno A L; Monteiro, Ângelo; Leão, Mariana; Bessa, Cláudia; Dos Santos, Daniel J V A; Raimundo, Liliana; Queiroz, Glória; Bisio, Alessandra; Inga, Alberto; Pereira, Clara; Santos, Maria M M; Saraiva, Lucília

    2015-01-23

    One of the most appealing targets for anticancer treatment is the p53 tumor suppressor protein. In half of human cancers, this protein is inactivated due to endogenous negative regulators such as MDM2. Actually, restoring the p53 activity, particularly through the inhibition of its interaction with MDM2, is considered a valuable therapeutic strategy against cancers with a wild-type p53 status. In this work, we report the synthesis of nine enantiopure phenylalaninol-derived oxazolopyrrolidone lactams and the evaluation of their biological effects as p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. Using a yeast-based screening assay, two oxazoloisoindolinones, compounds 1b and 3a, were identified as potential p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. The molecular mechanism of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further validated in human colon adenocarcinoma HCT116 cells with wild-type p53 (HCT116 p53(+/+)) and in its isogenic derivative without p53 (HCT116 p53(-/-)). Indeed, using these cells, we demonstrated that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a exhibited a p53-dependent in vitro antitumor activity through induction of G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The selective activation of a p53-apoptotic pathway by oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further supported by the occurrence of PARP cleavage only in p53-expressing HCT116 cells. Moreover, oxazoloisoindolinone 3a led to p53 protein stabilization and to the up-regulation of p53 transcriptional activity with increased expression levels of several p53 target genes, as p21(WAF1/CIP1), MDM2, BAX and PUMA, in p53(+/+) but not in p53(-/-) HCT116 cells. Additionally, the ability of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a to block the p53-MDM2 interaction in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Finally, the molecular docking analysis of the interactions between the synthesized compounds and MDM2 revealed that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a binds to MDM2. Altogether, this work adds, for the first time, the oxazoloisoindolinone scaffold to the list of

  12. Mechanisms of Breast Carcinogenesis Involving Wild-Type p53

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    36 Saos-2 osteosarcoma null control 30 24 43 5 Gy 13 32 52 HL-60 promyelocytic null control 37 24 5 leukemia 5 Gy 11 45 37 a Data were determined...Gryka, M. A., Litwak, G., Gebhardt , M., level of p53 that was expressed in the cells in both these studies Bressac, B., Ozturk, M., Baker, S. J...Cdc25C (x2) (46). amounts of a plasmid expressing wild-type p 5 3 , or a plasmid Cell Lines-The osteosarcoma Saos-2 cell line and the breast carci

  13. Mutant p53 accumulates in cycling and proliferating cells in the normal tissues of p53 R172H mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Goh, Amanda M; Xue, Yuezhen; Leushacke, Marc; Li, Ling; Wong, Julin S; Chiam, Poh Cheang; Rahmat, Siti Aishah Binte; Mann, Michael B; Mann, Karen M; Barker, Nick; Lozano, Guillermina; Terzian, Tamara; Lane, David P

    2015-07-20

    The tumour suppressor p53 is regulated primarily at the protein level. In normal tissues its levels are maintained at a very low level by the action of specific E3 ligases and the ubiquitin proteosome pathway. The mutant p53 protein contributes to transformation, metastasis and drug resistance. High levels of mutant p53 can be found in tumours and the accumulation of mutant p53 has previously been reported in pathologically normal cells in human skin. We show for the first time that similarly elevated levels of mutant p53 can be detected in apparently normal cells in a mutant p53 knock-in mouse model. In fact, in the small intestine, mutant p53 spontaneously accumulates in a manner dependent on gene dosage and cell type. Mutant p53 protein is regulated similarly to wild type p53, which can accumulate rapidly after induction by ionising radiation or Mdm2 inhibitors, however, the clearance of mutant p53 protein is much slower than wild type p53. The accumulation of the protein in the murine small intestine is limited to the cycling, crypt base columnar cells and proliferative zone and is lost as the cells differentiate and exit the cell cycle. Loss of Mdm2 results in even higher levels of p53 expression but p53 is still restricted to proliferating cells in the small intestine. Therefore, the small intestine of these p53 mutant mice is an experimental system in which we can dissect the molecular pathways leading to p53 accumulation, which has important implications for cancer prevention and therapy.

  14. Effects of prostaglandin E2 on p53 mRNA transcription and p53 mutagenesis during T-cell-independent human B-cell clonal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Shabirul; Yan, Xiao Jie; Rosen, Lisa; McCormick, Steven; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Mongini, Patricia K. A.

    2014-01-01

    Within T-cell-dependent germinal centers, p53 gene transcription is repressed by Bcl-6 and is thus less vulnerable to mutation. Malignant lymphomas within inflamed extranodal sites exhibit a relatively high incidence of p53 mutations. The latter might originate from normal B-cell clones manifesting activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID) and up-regulated p53 following T-cell-independent (TI) stimulation. We here examine p53 gene transcription in such TI clones, with a focus on modulatory effects of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and evaluate progeny for p53 mutations. Resting IgM+IgD+CD27− B cells from human tonsils were labeled with CFSE and stimulated in vitro with complement-coated antigen surrogate, IL-4, and BAFF ± exogenous PGE2 (50 nM) or an analog specific for the EP2 PGE2 receptor. We use flow cytometry to measure p53 and AID protein within variably divided blasts, qRT-PCR of p53 mRNA from cultures with or without actinomycin D to monitor mRNA transcription/stability, and single-cell p53 RT-PCR/sequencing to assess progeny for p53 mutations. We report that EP2 signaling triggers increased p53 gene transcriptional activity in AID+ cycling blasts (P<0.01). Progeny exhibit p53 mutations at a frequency (8.5×10−4) greater than the baseline error rate (<0.8×10−4). We conclude that, devoid of the repressive influences of Bcl-6, dividing B lymphoblasts in inflamed tissues should display heightened p53 transcription and increased risk of p53 mutagenesis.—Haque, S., Yan, X. J., Rosen, L., McCormick, S., Chiorazzi, N., Mongini, P. K. A. Effects of prostaglandin E2 on p53 mRNA transcription and p53 mutagenesis during T-cell-independent human B-cell clonal expansion. PMID:24145719

  15. Mutant p53 accumulates in cycling and proliferating cells in the normal tissues of p53 R172H mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Leushacke, Marc; Li, Ling; Wong, Julin S.; Chiam, Poh Cheang; Rahmat, Siti Aishah Binte; Mann, Michael B.; Mann, Karen M.; Barker, Nick; Lozano, Guillermina; Terzian, Tamara; Lane, David P.

    2015-01-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 is regulated primarily at the protein level. In normal tissues its levels are maintained at a very low level by the action of specific E3 ligases and the ubiquitin proteosome pathway. The mutant p53 protein contributes to transformation, metastasis and drug resistance. High levels of mutant p53 can be found in tumours and the accumulation of mutant p53 has previously been reported in pathologically normal cells in human skin. We show for the first time that similarly elevated levels of mutant p53 can be detected in apparently normal cells in a mutant p53 knock-in mouse model. In fact, in the small intestine, mutant p53 spontaneously accumulates in a manner dependent on gene dosage and cell type. Mutant p53 protein is regulated similarly to wild type p53, which can accumulate rapidly after induction by ionising radiation or Mdm2 inhibitors, however, the clearance of mutant p53 protein is much slower than wild type p53. The accumulation of the protein in the murine small intestine is limited to the cycling, crypt base columnar cells and proliferative zone and is lost as the cells differentiate and exit the cell cycle. Loss of Mdm2 results in even higher levels of p53 expression but p53 is still restricted to proliferating cells in the small intestine. Therefore, the small intestine of these p53 mutant mice is an experimental system in which we can dissect the molecular pathways leading to p53 accumulation, which has important implications for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:26255629

  16. A SENSITIVE IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE ASSAY FOR DETECTION OF P53 PROTEIN ACCUMULATION IN SPUTUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    p53 mutations are common genetic alterations in lung cancers and usually result in p53 protein accumulation in tumor cells. Sputum is noninvasive to collect and ideal for screening p53 abnormalities. This study was to determine the feasibility of detecting p53 protein accumulatio...

  17. Release of targeted p53 from the mitochondrion as an early signal during mitochondrial dysfunction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased accumulation of p53 tumor suppressor protein is an early response to low-level stressors. To investigate the fate of mitochondrial-sequestered p53, mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) on a p53-deficient genetic background were transfected with p53-EGFP fusion protei...

  18. Release of targeted p53 from the mitochondrion as an early signal during mitochondrial dysfunction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased accumulation of p53 tumor suppressor protein is an early response to low-level stressors. To investigate the fate of mitochondrial-sequestered p53, mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) on a p53-deficient genetic background were transfected with p53-EGFP fusion protei...

  19. Identification of two novel functional p53 responsive elements in the herpes simplex virus-1 genome.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jui-Cheng; Kuta, Ryan; Armour, Courtney R; Boehmer, Paul E

    2014-07-01

    Analysis of the herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) genome reveals two candidate p53 responsive elements (p53RE), located in proximity to the replication origins oriL and oriS, referred to as p53RE-L and p53RE-S, respectively. The sequences of p53RE-L and p53RE-S conform to the p53 consensus site and are present in HSV-1 strains KOS, 17, and F. p53 binds to both elements in vitro and in virus-infected cells. Both p53RE-L and p53RE-S are capable of conferring p53-dependent transcriptional activation onto a heterologous reporter gene. Importantly, expression of the essential immediate early viral transactivator ICP4 and the essential DNA replication protein ICP8, that are adjacent to p53RE-S and p53RE-L, are repressed in a p53-dependent manner. Taken together, this study identifies two novel functional p53RE in the HSV-1 genome and suggests a complex mechanism of viral gene regulation by p53 which may determine progression of the lytic viral replication cycle or the establishment of latency.

  20. Identification of two novel functional p53 responsive elements in the Herpes Simplex Virus-1 genome

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jui-Cheng; Kuta, Ryan; Armour, Courtney R.; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) genome reveals two candidate p53 responsive elements (p53RE), located in proximity to the replication origins oriL and oriS, referred to as p53RE-L and p53RE-S, respectively. The sequences of p53RE-L and p53RE-S conform to the p53 consensus site and are present in HSV-1 strains KOS, 17, and F. p53 binds to both elements in vitro and in virus-infected cells. Both p53RE-L and p53RE-S are capable of conferring p53-dependent transcriptional activation onto a heterologous reporter gene. Importantly, expression of the essential immediate early viral transactivator ICP4 and the essential DNA replication protein ICP8, that are adjacent to p53RE-S and p53RE-L, are repressed in a p53-dependent manner. Taken together, this study identifies two novel functional p53RE in the HSV-1 genome and suggests a complex mechanism of viral gene regulation by p53 which may determine progression of the lytic viral replication cycle or the establishment of latency. PMID:25010269

  1. Role of p53 within the regulatory network controlling muscle mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Ayesha; Carter, Heather N; Iqbal, Sobia; Hood, David A

    2011-10-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is recognized to contribute significantly to the regulation of mitochondrial content. Mice without p53 have reduced endurance capacity and muscle performance. However, the function of p53 in muscle remains to be fully established. Understanding how p53 coordinates mitochondrial homeostasis will facilitate a better comprehension of how exercise could constitute as a therapy for cancer treatment.

  2. Understanding the α-Helix to Coil Transition in Polypeptides Using Network Rigidity: Predicting Heat and Cold Denaturation in Mixed Solvent Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Donald J.; Wood, Gregory G.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic stability in polypeptides is described using a novel Distance Constraint Model (DCM). Here, microscopic interactions are represented as constraints. A topological arrangement of constraints define a mechanical framework. Each constraint in the framework is associated with an enthalpic and entropic contribution. All accessible topological arrangements of distance constraints form an ensemble of mechanical frameworks, each representing a microstate of the polypeptide. A partition function is calculated exactly using a transfer matrix approach, where in many respects the DCM is similar to the Lifson–Roig model. The crucial difference is that the effect of network rigidity is explicitly calculated for each mechanical framework in the ensemble. Network rigidity is a mechanical interaction that provides a mechanism for long-range molecular cooperativity and enables a proper treatment of the nonadditivity of a microscopic free energy decomposition. Accounting for (1) helix ↔ coil conformation changes along the backbone similar to the Lifson–Roig model, (2) i to i + 4 hydrogen-bond formation ↔ breaking similar to the Zimm–Bragg model, and (3) structured ↔ unstructured solvent interaction (hydration effects), a six-parameter DCM describes normal and inverted helix– coil transitions in polypeptides. Under suitable mixed solvent conditions heat and cold denaturation is predicted. Model parameters are fitted to experimental data showing different degrees of cold denaturation in monomeric polypeptides in aqueous hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) solution at various HFIP concentrations. By assuming a linear HFIP concentration dependence (up to 6% by mole fraction) on model parameters, all essential experimentally observed features are captured. PMID:15307195

  3. p53 Suppresses E2F1-dependent PLK1 expression upon DNA damage by forming p53-E2F1-DNA complex.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhe; Cao, Ji-Xiang; Li, Shu-Yan; An, Guo-Shun; Ni, Ju-Hua; Jia, Hong-Ti

    2013-12-10

    E2F1 is implicated in transcriptional activation of polo-like kinase-1 (PLK1), but yet the mechanism is not fully understood. PLK1 suppression plays an important checkpoint role in response to DNA damage. Suppression of the PLK1 gene by binding of p53 to upstream p53RE2 element in the promoter has been recently revealed. Here we report another mechanism, in which p53 interacts with E2F1 to form p53-E2F1-DNA complex repressing E2F1-dependent PLK1 expression. PLK1 was downregulated in cisplatin exposed HCT116p53(+/+) but not HCT116p53(-/-) cells, indicating p53-suppressed PLK1 upon DNA damage. Co-transfection and reporter enzyme assays revealed that p53 suppressed but E2F1 promoted PLK1 gene activation. 5'-Deletion and substitution mutations showed multiple positive cis-elements residing in the PLK1 promoter, of which at least two E2F1 sites at positions -75/-68 and -40/-32 were required for the full activity of the promoter. Combination of 5'-deletion and substitution mutations with over-expression of p53 showed that suppression of the PLK1 gene by p53 was E2F1-dependent: mutation of the E2F1 site at position -75/-68 partially abrogated suppression activity of p53; mutation of E2F1 site at position -40/-32 released from p53 suppression of PLK1 gene completely. Co-immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that DNA damage promoted p53-E2F1 interaction, thereby creating a p53-E2F1 complex assembly on the PLK1 promoter in vitro. The in vivo formation of p53-E2F1-PLK1 promoter complex upon DNA damage was further evidenced by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and re-ChIP. In addition, we showed that suppression of PLK1 by p53 promoted apoptosis. Our data suggest that p53 may interact with E2F1 to form p53-E2F1-DNA complex suppressing E2F1-dependent PLK1 expression. The model of p53 action on E2F1-activated PLK1 gene may explain at least partly how p53 as a suppressor regulates the downstream effects of E2F1 in cellular stresses including DNA

  4. Limiting the power of p53 through the ubiquitin proteasome pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is critical in restraining the activities of the p53 tumor suppressor. Numerous E3 and E4 ligases regulate p53 levels. Additionally, deubquitinating enzymes that modify p53 directly or indirectly also impact p53 function. When alterations of these proteins result in increased p53 activity, cells arrest in the cell cycle, senesce, or apoptose. On the other hand, alterations that result in decreased p53 levels yield tumor-prone phenotypes. This review focuses on the physiological relevance of these important regulators of p53 and their therapeutic implications. PMID:25128494

  5. The Role of Mutant p53 in Progression of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    p53 can be inducibly knocked down by siRNA. RNA was purified from MIA - PaCa -1 cells that are uninduced or induced to...mutant p53 is knocked down in MIA - PaCa -1 cells (Fig. 7B). These data suggest that mutant p53 confers cancer cells growth advantages by regulating down...Identification of novel target genes of mutant p53 . (A) MIA - PaCa -1-p53KD-4 and MIA - PaCa -1-p53KD-4 cells were un-induced (-) or induced (+) to express p53

  6. Regulation of p53 Activity by Reversible-Acetylation in Prostate Tumor Suppression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    localization of HDAC1. A. The subcellular localization of endogenous HDAC1 was determined in p300 expressing H1299 cells by immunostaining with an antibody...p53 following transfection into p53 (-/-) H1299 cells. Cells were transfected with p53wt alone (a, g, m), p53wt and myc-p300 (b, d, h, j, n, p), p53wt...signal that promotes p53 export to the cytoplasm. Materials and Methods Cell lines and transfection - H1299 human cells, p53(-/-), MDM2(-/-) mouse

  7. Activation of p53-dependent responses in tumor cells treated with a PARC-interacting peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali, Roberta; Cesi, Vincenzo; Tanno, Barbara; Ferrari-Amorotti, Giovanna; Dominici, Carlo; Calabretta, Bruno; Raschella, Giuseppe

    2008-04-04

    We tested the activity of a p53 carboxy-terminal peptide containing the PARC-interacting region in cancer cells with wild type cytoplasmic p53. Peptide delivery was achieved by fusing it to the TAT transduction domain (TAT-p53-C-ter peptide). In a two-hybrid assay, the tetramerization domain (TD) of p53 was necessary and sufficient to bind PARC. The TAT-p53-C-ter peptide disrupted the PARC-p53 complex. Peptide treatment caused p53 nuclear relocation, p53-dependent changes in gene expression and enhancement of etoposide-induced apoptosis. These studies suggest that PARC-interacting peptides are promising candidates for the enhancement of p53-dependent apoptosis in tumors with wt cytoplasmic p53.

  8. Mutant p53 and ETS2, a Tale of Reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Luis Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    TP53 is one of the most frequently inactivated tumor suppressor genes in human cancer. However, unlike other tumor suppressor genes whose expression is lost, TP53 is usually inactivated as a result of a single nucleotide change within the coding region. Typically, these single nucleotide mutations result in a codon change that creates an amino acid substitution. Thus, unlike other tumor suppressor genes whose expression is lost due to genetic or epigenetic changes, the p53 gene primarily suffers missense mutations, and therefore, the cells retain and express a mutant form of the p53 protein (mtp53). It is now well established that mtp53 contributes to tumor development through its gain-of-function (GOF) activities. These GOF activities can arise from novel protein-protein interactions that can either disable other tumor suppressors (e.g., p63 and p73) or enable oncogenes such as ETS2, an ETS family member. In this review, I will focus on the identification of the mtp53/ETS2 complex and outline the diverse activities that this transcriptional regulatory complex controls to promote cancer.

  9. Mutant p53 (p53-R248Q) functions as an oncogene in promoting endometrial cancer by up-regulating REGγ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huihui; Bao, Wei; Jiang, Feizhou; Che, Qi; Chen, Zheng; Wang, Fangyuan; Tong, Huan; Dai, Chenyun; He, Xiaoying; Liao, Yun; Liu, Binya; Sun, Jing; Wan, Xiaoping

    2015-05-01

    P53 mutation plays a pivotal role in tumorigenesis of endometrial cancer (EC), here we report that the gain-of-function mutant p53-R248Q targets the proteasome activator REGγ to promote EC progression. Increased p53 expression significantly correlated with high pathological grade and lymph node metastasis in EC specimens. Manipulation of p53-R248Q in EC cells caused coincident changes in REGγ expression, and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with PCR further indicated that p53-R248Q bound to the REGγ gene promoter at a p53 responsive element. Silencing of REGγ in EC cells attenuated the cell proliferation, migration and invasion abilities, whereas overexpression of p53-R248Q rescued these activities. Overexpression of REGγ also induced an epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype. Moreover, a mouse xenograft tumor model showed that REGγ promoted tumor growth, further demonstrating a p53-R248Q-REGγ oncogenic pathway. Finally, examination of EC and normal endometrium specimens confirmed the oncogenic role of REGγ, in that REGγ was more highly overexpressed in p53-positive specimens than in p53-negative specimens. Our data suggest that REGγ is a promising therapeutic target for EC with the p53-R248Q mutation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A leucine-rich nuclear export signal in the p53 tetramerization domain: regulation of subcellular localization and p53 activity by NES masking.

    PubMed Central

    Stommel, J M; Marchenko, N D; Jimenez, G S; Moll, U M; Hope, T J; Wahl, G M

    1999-01-01

    Appropriate subcellular localization is crucial for regulating p53 function. We show that p53 export is mediated by a highly conserved leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) located in its tetramerization domain. Mutation of NES residues prevented p53 export and hampered tetramer formation. Although the p53-binding protein MDM2 has an NES and has been proposed to mediate p53 export, we show that the intrinsic p53 NES is both necessary and sufficient for export. This report also demonstrates that the cytoplasmic localization of p53 in neuroblastoma cells is due to its hyperactive nuclear export: p53 in these cells can be trapped in the nucleus by the export-inhibiting drug leptomycin B or by binding a p53-tetramerization domain peptide that masks the NES. We propose a model in which regulated p53 tetramerization occludes its NES, thereby ensuring nuclear retention of the DNA-binding form. We suggest that attenuation of p53 function involves the conversion of tetramers into monomers or dimers, in which the NES is exposed to the proteins which mediate their export to the cytoplasm. PMID:10075936

  11. Long non-coding RNA NEAT1 is a transcriptional target of p53 and modulates p53-induced transactivation and tumor-suppressor function.

    PubMed

    Idogawa, Masashi; Ohashi, Tomoko; Sasaki, Yasushi; Nakase, Hiroshi; Tokino, Takashi

    2017-03-14

    p53 is one of the most important tumor suppressor genes, and the direct transcriptional targets of p53 must be explored to elucidate its functional mechanisms. Thus far, the p53 targets that have been primarily studied are protein-coding genes. Our previous study revealed that several long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are direct transcriptional targets of p53, and knockdown of specific lncRNAs modulates p53-induced apoptosis. In this study, analysis of next-generation chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) data for p53 revealed that the lncRNA NEAT1 is a direct transcriptional target of p53. The suppression of NEAT1 induction by p53 attenuates the inhibitory effect of p53 on cancer cell growth and also modulates gene transactivation, including that of many lncRNAs. Furthermore, low expression of NEAT1 is related to poor prognosis in several cancers. These results indicate that the induction of NEAT1 expression contributes to the tumor-suppressor function of p53 and suggest that p53 and NEAT1 constitute a transcriptional network contributing to various biological functions and tumor suppression.

  12. DDP-induced cytotoxicity is not influenced by p53 in nine human ovarian cancer cell lines with different p53 status.

    PubMed Central

    De Feudis, P.; Debernardis, D.; Beccaglia, P.; Valenti, M.; Graniela Siré, E.; Arzani, D.; Stanzione, S.; Parodi, S.; D'Incalci, M.; Russo, P.; Broggini, M.

    1997-01-01

    Nine human ovarian cancer cell lines that express wild-type (wt) or mutated (mut) p53 were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity induced by cisplatin (DDP). The concentrations inhibiting the growth by 50% (IC50) were calculated for each cell line, and no differences were found between cells expressing wt p53 and mut p53. Using, for each cell line, the DDP IC50, we found that these concentrations were able to induce an increase in p53 levels in all four wt-p53-expressing cell lines and in one out of five mut-p53-expressing cell lines. WAF1 and GADD45 mRNAs were also increased by DDP treatment, independently of the presence of a wt p53. Bax levels were only marginally affected by DDP, and this was observed in both wt-p53- and mut-p53-expressing cells. DDP-induced apoptosis was evident 72 h after treatment, and the percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis was slightly higher for wt-p53-expressing cells. However, at doses near the IC50, the percentage of apoptotic cells was less than 20% in all the cell lines investigated. We conclude that the presence of wt p53 is not a determinant for the cytotoxicity induced by DDP in human ovarian cancer cell lines. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9275024

  13. Structure of the p53 C-terminus bound to 14-3-3: implications for stabilization of the p53 tetramer.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Benjamin; Mondry, Justine; Thiel, Philipp; Weyand, Michael; Ottmann, Christian

    2010-04-16

    The adaptor protein 14-3-3 binds to and stabilizes the tumor suppressor p53 and enhances its anti-tumour activity. In the regulatory C-terminal domain of p53 several 14-3-3 binding motifs have been identified. Here, we report the crystal structure of the extreme C-terminus (residues 385-393, p53pT387) of p53 in complex with 14-3-3sigma at a resolution of 1.28A. p53pT387 is accommodated by 14-3-3 in a yet unrecognized fashion implying a rationale for 14-3-3 binding to the active p53 tetramer. The structure exhibits a potential binding site for small molecules that could stabilize the p53/14-3-3 protein complex suggesting the possibility for therapeutic intervention. Copyright 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Akt phosphorylates myc-associated zinc finger protein (MAZ), releases P-MAZ from the p53 promoter, and activates p53 transcription.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Ping; Lan, Keng-Hsin; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2016-05-28

    The p53 protein is a cell cycle regulator. When the cell cycle progresses, p53 plays an important role in putting a brake on the G1 phase to prevent unwanted errors during cell division. Akt is a downstream kinase of receptor tyrosine kinase. Upon activation, Akt phorphorylates IKK that then phosphorylates IκB and releases NF-κB, leading to transcriptional activation of Dmp1. Dmp1 is a transcriptional activator of Arf. It has been known that oncogene activation stabilizes p53 through transcriptional activation of Arf, which then binds and inhibits Mdm2. In the current study, we show that myc-associated zinc finger protein (MAZ) is a transcriptional repressor of the p53 promoter. Akt phosphorylates MAZ at Thr385, and the phosphorylated MAZ is released from the p53 promoter, leading to transcriptional activation of p53, a new mechanism that contributes to increased p53 protein pool during oncogene activation.

  15. Regulation of Human p53 Activity and Cell Localization by Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anirban; Stewart, Deborah; Matlashewski, Greg

    2004-01-01

    The development of cancer is a multistep process involving mutations in proto-oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and other genes which control cell proliferation, telomere stability, angiogenesis, and other complex traits. Despite this complexity, the cellular pathways controlled by the p53 tumor suppressor protein are compromised in most, if not all, cancers. In normal cells, p53 controls cell proliferation, senescence, and/or mediates apoptosis in response to stress, cell damage, or ectopic oncogene expression, properties which make p53 the prototype tumor suppressor gene. Defining the mechanisms of regulation of p53 activity in normal and tumor cells has therefore been a major priority in cell biology and cancer research. The present study reveals a novel and potent mechanism of p53 regulation originating through alternative splicing of the human p53 gene resulting in the expression of a novel p53 mRNA. This novel p53 mRNA encodes an N-terminally deleted isoform of p53 termed p47. As demonstrated within, p47 was able to effectively suppress p53-mediated transcriptional activity and impair p53-mediated growth suppression. It was possible to select for p53-null cells expressing p47 alone or coexpressing p53 in the presence of p47 but not cells expressing p53 alone. This showed that p47 itself does not suppress cell viability but could control p53-mediated growth suppression. Interestingly, p47 was monoubiquitinated in an Mdm2-independent manner, and this was associated with its export out of the nucleus. In the presence of p47, there was a reduction in Mdm2-mediated polyubiquitination and degradation of p53, and this was also associated with increased monoubiquitination and nuclear export of p53. The expression of p47 through alternative splicing of the p53 gene thus has a major influence over p53 activity at least in part through controlling p53 ubiquitination and cell localization. PMID:15340061

  16. DIMP53-1: A novel small-molecule dual inhibitor of p53-MDM2/X interactions with multifunctional p53-dependent anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    Soares, Joana; Espadinha, Margarida; Raimundo, Liliana; Ramos, Helena; Gomes, Ana Sara; Gomes, Sara; Loureiro, Joana B; Inga, Alberto; Reis, Flávio; Gomes, Célia; Santos, Maria M M; Saraiva, Lucília

    2017-03-10

    The transcription factor p53 plays a crucial role in cancer development and dissemination, and thus p53-targeted therapies are amongst the most encouraging anticancer strategies. In human cancers with wild-type (wt) p53, its inactivation by interaction with murine double minute (MDM)2 and MDMX is a common event. Simultaneous inhibition of the p53 interaction with both MDMs is crucial to restore the tumor suppressor activity of p53. Here we describe the synthesis of the new tryptophanol-derived oxazoloisoindolinone DIMP53-1 and identify its activity as a dual inhibitor of the p53-MDM2/X interactions using a yeast-based assay. DIMP53-1 caused growth inhibition, mediated by p53 stabilization and upregulation of p53 transcriptional targets involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, in wt p53-expressing tumor cells, including MDM2- or MDMX-overexpressing cells. Importantly, DIMP53-1 abolishes the p53-MDM2/X interactions by binding to p53, in human colon adenocarcinoma HCT116 cells. DIMP53-1 also inhibited the migration and invasion of HCT116 cells, and the migration and tube formation of HMVEC-D endothelial cells. Notably, in human tumor xenograft mice models, DIMP53-1 showed a p53-dependent antitumor activity through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation and angiogenesis. Finally, no genotoxicity or undesirable toxic effects were observed with DIMP53-1. In conclusion, DIMP53-1 is a novel p53 activator, which potentially binds to p53 inhibiting its interaction with MDM2 and MDMX. Although target-directed, DIMP53-1 has a multifunctional activity, targeting major hallmarks of cancer through its anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-angiogenic, anti-invasive and anti-migratory properties. DIMP53-1 is a promising anticancer drug candidate and an encouraging starting point to develop improved derivatives for clinical application.

  17. p53 alteration in morphologically normal/benign breast tissue in patients with triple-negative high-grade breast carcinomas: breast p53 signature?

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Stolla, Moritz; Ring, Brian Z; Yang, Qi; Laughlin, Todd S; Rothberg, Paul G; Skinner, Kristin; Hicks, David G

    2016-09-01

    p53 alterations have been identified in approximately 23% of breast carcinomas, particularly in hormone receptor-negative high-grade carcinomas. It is considered to be an early event in breast carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, the putative precursor lesion of high-grade breast carcinoma remains elusive. Breast excision specimens from 93 triple-negative high-grade invasive ductal carcinomas, 48 estrogen receptor (ER)-positive/progesterone receptor-positive/Her2-negative non-high-grade invasive ductal carcinomas, and 50 mammoplasty breasts were selected. At least 2 tissue blocks with tumor and adjacent benign tissue were sectioned and subjected to immunohistochemistry staining for p53. TP53 gene sequencing was performed on select tumors. Further immunohistochemistry staining for ER and Ki-67 was performed on consecutive sections of tissue with p53-positive normal/benign cells. Of the 93 high-grade carcinomas, 51 (55%) were positive for p53 alteration, whereas only 3 (6.25%) of the 48 non-high-grade carcinomas were p53 altered. Focal p53 positivity in adjacent normal/benign breast tissue was identified in 19 cases, and 18 of them also had p53 alteration in their carcinomas. Only 1 case had focal p53 staining in normal/benign tissue, but the tumor was negative for p53 alteration. No p53 staining positivity was identified in the mammoplasty specimens. The p53-stained normal/benign cells were ER negative and did not show an increase in the Ki-67 labeling index. These findings indicate that the p53 staining positivity in normal/benign breast tissue is not a random event. It could be considered as the "p53 signature" in breast and serve as an indicator for future potential risk of p53-positive high-grade breast carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Effect of recombinant human p53 adenovirus (Ad-p53) combined with EGFR inhibitor gefitinib on the sensitivity of breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinzhao; Guan, Xiyun; Wang, Leilei; Xie, Li; Liu, Qi; Yu, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    To observe the impact of concurrent administration of recombinant human p53 adenovirus (Ad-p53) with EGFR inhibitor gefitinib on breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells. MDA-MB-468 cells were treated with Ad-p53 and/or gefitinib. The effect of Ad-p53 and gefitinib on the growth of MDA-MB-468 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to detect the alteration of p53,EGFR, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway and apoptosis-related proteins. Ad-p53 combined with gefitinib was used in vivo to explore their effect on tumor xenograft in nude mice. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the p53 expression in vivo. The MTT assay showed a stronger inhibitory effect of gefitinib on MDA-MB-468 cells infected with Ad-p53 than on the control cells. Cell apoptosis assay revealed that the apoptosis rates of MDA-MB-468 cells in vehicle-treated group, Ad-p53 group, gefitinib group, and combination group were 8.5%, 17.4%, 20.5% and 32.6%, respectively. The apoptosis rate of MDA-MB-468 cells in the combination group was higher than that in other groups (P < 0.05, for all) . Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of p53 was significantly up-regulated in the presence of Ad-p53. The combination of Ad-p53 and gefitinib significantly down-regulated p-Akt (S473)(P < 0.01) and up-regulated caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3 (P < 0.01 for both). Tumor inhibition rates (TIR) in the Ad-p53, gefitinib, and combination groups were 35.7%, 28.7% and 74.4%, respectively. Ad-p53 and gefitinib combination therapy significantly reduced the tumor burden in nude mice (P < 0.05 for all).Immunohistochemistry showed that after intratumoral administration of Ad-p53, wild-type p53 was increased (P < 0.01). p53 expressions in the vehicle-treated, Ad-p53, gefitinib and combination groups were 45.2%, 80.1%, 50.7% and 90.6%, respectively. Wild-type p53 may reverse the sensitivity of MDA-MB-468 cells to gefitinib through

  19. E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 negatively regulates tumor suppressor p53 to promote tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Zhang, C; Wang, X L; Ly, P; Belyi, V; Xu-Monette, Z Y; Young, K H; Hu, W; Feng, Z

    2014-11-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 has a key role in maintaining genomic stability and preventing tumorigenesis through its regulation of cellular stress responses, including apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence. To ensure its proper levels and functions in cells, p53 is tightly regulated mainly through post-translational modifications, such as ubiquitination. Here, we identified E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 as a novel p53 target gene and negative regulator to regulate p53-mediated stress responses. In response to stress, such as DNA damage, p53 binds to the p53 responsive element in the promoter of the TRIM32 gene and transcriptionally induces the expression of TRIM32 in cells. In turn, TRIM32 interacts with p53 and promotes p53 degradation through ubiquitination. Thus, TRIM32 negatively regulates p53-mediated apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence in response to stress. TRIM32 is frequently overexpressed in different types of human tumors. TRIM32 overexpression promotes cell oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis in mice in a largely p53-dependent manner. Taken together, our results demonstrated that as a novel p53 target and a novel negative regulator for p53, TRIM32 has an important role in regulation of p53 and p53-mediated cellular stress responses. Furthermore, our results also revealed that impairing p53 function is a novel mechanism for TRIM32 in tumorigenesis.

  20. Mutant p53 in cancer: Accumulation, gain-of-function and therapy.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xuetian; Zhao, Yuhan; Xu, Yang; Zheng, Min; Feng, Zhaohui; Hu, Wenwei

    2017-04-05

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in tumor suppression. p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer, and over half of human cancers contain p53 mutations. Majority of p53 mutations in cancer are missense mutations, leading to the expression of full-length mutant p53 protein. While the critical role of wild type p53 in tumor suppression has been firmly established, mounting evidence has demonstrated that many tumor-associated mutant p53 proteins not only lose tumor suppressive function of wild type p53, but also gain new activities to promote tumorigenesis independently of wild type p53, termed gain-of-function. Mutant p53 protein often accumulates to very high levels in tumors, contributing to malignant progression. Recently, mutant p53 has become an attractive target for cancer therapy. Further understanding of the mechanisms underlying mutant p53 protein accumulation and gain-of-function will accelerate the development of targeted therapies for human cancer harboring mutant p53. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the studies on mutant p53 protein accumulation and gain-of-function as well as targeted therapies for mutant p53 in human cancer.

  1. Ligand dependent restoration of human TLR3 signaling and death in p53 mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Daniel; Lowe, Julie M.; Snipe, Joyce; Resnick, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Diversity within the p53 transcriptional network can arise from a matrix of changes that include target response element sequences and p53 expression level variations. We previously found that wild type p53 (WT p53) can regulate expression of most innate immune-related Toll-like-receptor genes (TLRs) in human cells, thereby affecting immune responses. Since many tumor-associated p53 mutants exhibit change-of-spectrum transactivation from various p53 targets, we examined the ability of twenty-five p53 mutants to activate endogenous expression of the TLR gene family in p53 null human cancer cell lines following transfection with p53 mutant expression vectors. While many mutants retained the ability to drive TLR expression at WT levels, others exhibited null, limited, or change-of-spectrum transactivation of TLR genes. Using TLR3 signaling as a model, we show that some cancer-associated p53 mutants amplify cytokine, chemokine and apoptotic responses after stimulation by the cognate ligand poly(I:C). Furthermore, restoration of WT p53 activity for loss-of-function p53 mutants by the p53 reactivating drug RITA restored p53 regulation of TLR3 gene expression and enhanced DNA damage-induced apoptosis via TLR3 signaling. Overall, our findings have many implications for understanding the impact of WT and mutant p53 in immunological responses and cancer therapy. PMID:27533082

  2. Translational approaches targeting the p53 pathway for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Essmann, Frank; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor blocks cancer development by triggering apoptosis or cellular senescence in response to oncogenic stress or DNA damage. Consequently, the p53 signalling pathway is virtually always inactivated in human cancer cells. This unifying feature has commenced tremendous efforts to develop p53-based anti-cancer therapies. Different strategies exist that are adapted to the mechanisms of p53 inactivation. In p53-mutated tumours, delivery of wild-type p53 by adenovirus-based gene therapy is now practised in China. Also, remarkable progress has been made in the development of p53-binding drugs that can rescue and reactivate the function of mutant or misfolded p53. Other biologic approaches include the development of oncolytic viruses that are designed to specifically replicate in and kill p53-defective cells. Inactivation of wt-p53 frequently results from dysregulation of MDM2, an E3 ligase that regulates p53 levels. Small-molecule drugs that inhibit the interaction of MDM2 and p53 and block p53 degradation are currently tested in clinical trials. This survey highlights the recent developments that attempt to modulate the function of p53 and outlines strategies that are being investigated for pharmacological intervention in the p53 pathway. PMID:21718309

  3. The isolation of an RNA aptamer targeting to p53 protein with single amino acid mutation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Rashid, Farooq; Shah, Abdullah; Awan, Hassaan M.; Wu, Mingming; Liu, An; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Tao; Luo, Zhaofeng; Shan, Ge

    2015-01-01

    p53, known as a tumor suppressor, is a DNA binding protein that regulates cell cycle, activates DNA repair proteins, and triggers apoptosis in multicellular animals. More than 50% of human cancers contain a mutation or deletion of the p53 gene, and p53R175 is one of the hot spots of p53 mutation. Nucleic acid aptamers are short single-stranded oligonucleotides that are able to bind various targets, and they are typically isolated from an experimental procedure called systematic evolution of ligand exponential enrichment (SELEX). Using a previously unidentified strategy of contrast screening with SELEX, we have isolated an RNA aptamer targeting p53R175H. This RNA aptamer (p53R175H-APT) has a significantly stronger affinity to p53R175H than to the wild-type p53 in both in vitro and in vivo assays. p53R175H-APT decreased the growth rate, weakened the migration capability, and triggered apoptosis in human lung cancer cells harboring p53R175H. Further analysis actually indicated that p53R175H-APT might partially rescue or correct the p53R175H to function more like the wild-type p53. In situ injections of p53R175H-APT to the tumor xenografts confirmed the effects of this RNA aptamer on p53R175H mutation in mice. PMID:26216949

  4. A nanobody modulates the p53 transcriptional program without perturbing its functional architecture

    PubMed Central

    Bethuyne, Jonas; De Gieter, Steven; Zwaenepoel, Olivier; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Durinck, Kaat; Verhelle, Adriaan; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Speleman, Frank; Loris, Remy; Gettemans, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The p53 transcription factor plays an important role in genome integrity. To perform this task, p53 regulates the transcription of genes promoting various cellular outcomes including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence. The precise regulation of this activity remains elusive as numerous mechanisms, e.g. posttranslational modifications of p53 and (non-)covalent p53 binding partners, influence the p53 transcriptional program. We developed a novel, non-invasive tool to manipulate endogenous p53. Nanobodies (Nb), raised against the DNA-binding domain of p53, allow us to distinctively target both wild type and mutant p53 with great specificity. Nb3 preferentially binds ‘structural’ mutant p53, i.e. R175H and R282W, while a second but distinct nanobody, Nb139, binds both mutant and wild type p53. The co-crystal structure of the p53 DNA-binding domain in complex with Nb139 (1.9 Å resolution) reveals that Nb139 binds opposite the DNA-binding surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nb139 does not disturb the functional architecture of the p53 DNA-binding domain using conformation-specific p53 antibody immunoprecipitations, glutaraldehyde crosslinking assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Functionally, the binding of Nb139 to p53 allows us to perturb the transactivation of p53 target genes. We propose that reduced recruitment of transcriptional co-activators or modulation of selected post-transcriptional modifications account for these observations. PMID:25324313

  5. Detection of the anti-P53 antibodies in dogs with tumors.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Noriko; Okuda, Masaru; Toyama, Naomi; Oikawa, Tatsuo; Inokuma, Hisashi; Morimoto, Masahiro; Hayashi, Toshiharu; Une, Satoshi; Nakaichi, Munekazu; Taura, Yasuho; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Onishi, Takafumi

    2002-11-01

    To detect the anti-P53 antibodies of dogs with tumors, a GST-recombinant canine (rc) P53 fusion protein was expressed and purified. Immunoblot analysis was performed using this GST-rcP53 fusion protein as an antigen and serum samples from dogs suffering from tumors as primary antibodies. Out of 16 serum samples obtained from various tumor cases, four samples showed reaction with GST-rcP53. In contrast, serum from other 12 dogs with tumors, four dogs with non-neoplastic diseases and two control healthy dogs (as controls) did not show any reaction with GST-rcP53 in immunoblotting. The p53 gene mutation and the P53 protein expression were examined, using the tumor tissues to explore the relationship between the existence of the GST-rcP53 bands, gene mutations of p53 and the accumulation of P53 protein. One case, which showed a clear GST-rcP53 band, had a point mutation of the p53 cDNA and showed nuclear accumulation of P53 protein. These results suggest that the anti-P53 antibodies are also produced in tumor dogs with p53 gene mutations.

  6. The isolation of an RNA aptamer targeting to p53 protein with single amino acid mutation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Rashid, Farooq; Shah, Abdullah; Awan, Hassaan M; Wu, Mingming; Liu, An; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Tao; Luo, Zhaofeng; Shan, Ge

    2015-08-11

    p53, known as a tumor suppressor, is a DNA binding protein that regulates cell cycle, activates DNA repair proteins, and triggers apoptosis in multicellular animals. More than 50% of human cancers contain a mutation or deletion of the p53 gene, and p53R175 is one of the hot spots of p53 mutation. Nucleic acid aptamers are short single-stranded oligonucleotides that are able to bind various targets, and they are typically isolated from an experimental procedure called systematic evolution of ligand exponential enrichment (SELEX). Using a previously unidentified strategy of contrast screening with SELEX, we have isolated an RNA aptamer targeting p53R175H. This RNA aptamer (p53R175H-APT) has a significantly stronger affinity to p53R175H than to the wild-type p53 in both in vitro and in vivo assays. p53R175H-APT decreased the growth rate, weakened the migration capability, and triggered apoptosis in human lung cancer cells harboring p53R175H. Further analysis actually indicated that p53R175H-APT might partially rescue or correct the p53R175H to function more like the wild-type p53. In situ injections of p53R175H-APT to the tumor xenografts confirmed the effects of this RNA aptamer on p53R175H mutation in mice.

  7. p53 is an Important Regulator of CCL2 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tang, X.; Asano, M.; O’Reilly, A.; Farquhar, A.; Yang, Y.; Amar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The p53 protein is a sequence-specific DNA-binding factor that regulates inflammatory genes such as CCL2/MCP-1 that may play a role in various diseases. A recent study has indicated that the knockdown of human p53 leads to a strong negative regulation of CCL2 induction. We are therefore interested in how p53 regulates CCL2 gene expression. In the following study, our findings indicate that UV-induced p53 accumulation in mouse macrophages significantly decreases LPS-induced CCL2 production, and that p53 binds to CCL2 5’UTR in the region (16-35). We also found that a p53 domain (p53pep170) mimics full length p53 to down-regulate CCL2 promoter activity. Treatment of p53-deficient mouse primary macrophages with synthetic p53pep170 was found to decrease LPS-induced production of CCL2 without association with cellular endogenous p53. CCL2 production induced by lentiCLG in human monocytes or mouse primary macrophages was blocked in the presence of p53pep170. Overall, these results demonstrate that p53 or its derived peptide (p53pep170) is an important regulator of CCL2 gene expression via its binding activity, and acts as a novel model for future studies linking p53 and its short peptide to pave the way to possible pharmaceutical intervention of CCL2-mediated inflammatory and cancer diseases. PMID:22804246

  8. Okadaic acid mediates p53 hyperphosphorylation and growth arrest in cells with wild-type p53 but increases aberrant mitoses in cells with non-functional p53.

    PubMed

    Milczarek, G J; Chen, W; Gupta, A; Martinez, J D; Bowden, G T

    1999-06-01

    The protein phosphatase inhibitor and tumor promoting agent okadaic acid (OA), has been shown previously to induce hyperphosphorylation of p53 protein, which in turn correlated with increased transactivation or apoptotic function. However, how the tumor promotion effects of OA relate to p53 tumor supressor function (or dysfunction) remain unclear. Rat embryonic fibroblasts harboring a temperature-sensitive mouse p53 transgene were treated with 50 nM doses of OA. At the wild-type permissive temperature this treatment resulted in: (i) the hyperphosphorylation of sites within tryptic peptides of the transactivation domain of p53; (ii) an increase in p53 affinity for a p21(waf1) promotor oligonucleotide; (iii) an increase in cellular steady state levels of p21(waf1) message; (iv) a G2/M cell cycle blockage in addition to the G1/S arrest previously associated with p53; and (v) no increased incidence of apoptosis. On the other hand, OA treatment at the mutated p53 permissive temperature resulted in a relatively high incidence of aberrant mitosis with no upregulation of p21(waf1) message. These results suggest that while wild-type p53 blocks the proliferative effects of OA through p21(waf1)-mediated growth arrest, cells with non-functional p53 cannot arrest and suffer relatively high levels of OA-mediated aberrant mitoses.

  9. Cellular senescence: ex vivo p53-dependent asymmetric cell kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    Although senescence is a defining property of euploid mammalian cells, its physiologic basis remains obscure. Previously, cell kinetics properties of normal tissue cells have not been considered in models for senescence. We now provide evidence that senescence is in fact the natural consequence of normal in vivo somatic stem cell kinetics extended in culture. This concept of senescence is based on our discovery that cells engineered to conditionally express the well-recognized tumor suppressor protein and senescence factor, p53, exhibit asymmetric cell kinetics. In vivo, asymmetric cell kinetics are essential for maintenance of somatic stem cells; ex vivo, the same cell kinetics yield senescence as a simple kinetic endpoint. This new “asymmetric cell kinetics model” for senescence suggests novel strategies for the isolation and propagation of somatic tissue stem cells in culture. PMID:12488624

  10. A Regulatory Loop Composed of RAP80-HDM2-p53 Provides RAP80-enhanced p53 Degradation by HDM2 in Response to DNA Damage*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Menendez, Daniel; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Resnick, Michael A.; Jetten, Anton M.

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitin interaction motif-containing protein RAP80 plays a key role in DNA damage response signaling. Using genomic and functional analysis, we established that the expression of the RAP80 gene is regulated in a DNA damage-responsive manner by the master regulator p53. This regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through a noncanonical p53 response element in the RAP80 promoter. Although it is inducible by p53, RAP80 is also able to regulate p53 through an association with both p53 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2, providing HDM2-dependent enhancement of p53 polyubiquitination. Depletion of RAP80 by small interfering RNA stabilizes p53, which, following DNA damage, results in an increased transactivation of several p53 target genes as well as greater apoptosis. Consistent with these observations, exogenous expression of RAP80 selectively inhibits p53-dependent transactivation of target genes in an mdm2-dependent manner in MEF cells. Thus, we identify a new DNA damage-associated role for RAP80. It can function in an autoregulatory loop consisting of RAP80, HDM2, and the p53 master regulatory network, implying an important role for this loop in genome stability and oncogenesis. PMID:19433585

  11. Aurora B interacts with NIR-p53, leading to p53 phosphorylation in its DNA-binding domain and subsequent functional suppression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liming; Ma, Chi A; Zhao, Yongge; Jain, Ashish

    2011-01-21

    NIR (novel INHAT repressor) is a transcriptional co-repressor with inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase (INHAT) activity and has previously been shown to physically interact with and suppress p53 transcriptional activity and function. However, the mechanism by which NIR suppresses p53 is not completely understood. Using a proteomic approach, we have identified the Aurora kinase B as a novel binding partner of NIR. We show that Aurora B, NIR and p53 exist in a protein complex in which Aurora B binds to NIR, thus also indirectly associates with p53. Functionally, overexpression of Aurora B or NIR suppresses p53 transcriptional activity, and depletion of Aurora B or NIR causes p53-dependent apoptosis and cell growth arrest, due to the up-regulation of p21 and Bax. We then demonstrate that Aurora B phosphorylates multiple sites in the p53 DNA-binding domain in vitro, and this phosphorylation probably also occurs in cells. Importantly, the Aurora B-mediated phosphorylation on Ser(269) or Thr(284) significantly compromises p53 transcriptional activity. Taken together, these results provide novel insight into NIR-mediated p53 suppression and also suggest an additional way for p53 regulation.

  12. Atomic structure of DUSP26, a novel p53 phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Lokareddy, Ravi Kumar; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Cingolani, Gino

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of p53 phosphorylation is critical to control its stability and biological activity. Dual Specificity Phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) is a brain phosphatase highly overexpressed in neuroblastoma, which has been implicated in dephosphorylating phospho-Ser20 and phospho-Ser37 in the p53 transactivation domain (TAD). In this paper, we report the 1.68Å crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant (Cys152Ser) of DUSP26 lacking the first N-terminal 60 residues (ΔN60-C/S-DUSP26). This structure reveals the architecture of a dual-specificity phosphatase domain related in structure to Vaccinia virus VH1. DUSP26 adopts a closed conformation of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-binding loop, which results in an unusually shallow active site pocket and buried catalytic cysteine. A water molecule trapped inside the PTP-binding loop makes close contacts both with main chain and side chain atoms. The hydrodynamic radius (RH) of ΔN60-C/S-DUSP26 measured from velocity sedimentation analysis (RH ~22.7 Å) and gel filtration chromatography (RH ~21.0 Å) is consistent with a globular monomeric protein of ~18 kDa. Instead in crystal, ΔN60-C/S-DUSP26 is more elongated (RH ~37.9 Å), likely due to the extended conformation of C-terminal helix α9, which swings away from the phosphatase core to generate a highly basic surface. As in the case of the phosphatase MKP-4, we propose that a substrate-induced conformational change, possibly involving rearrangement of helix α9 with respect to the phosphatase core, allows DUSP26 to adopt a catalytically active conformation. The structural characterization of DUSP26 presented in this paper provides the first atomic insight into this disease-associated phosphatase. PMID:23298255

  13. Shifting p53-induced senescence to cell death by TIS21(/BTG2/Pc3) gene through posttranslational modification of p53 protein.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ok Ran; Ryu, Min Sook; Lim, In Kyoung

    2016-09-01

    Cellular senescence and apoptosis can be regulated by p53 activity, although the underlying mechanism of the switch between the two events remains largely unknown. Cells exposed to cancer chemotherapy can escape to senescence phenotype rather than undergoing apoptosis. By employing adenoviral transduction of p53 or TIS21 genes, we observed shifting of p53 induced-senescence to apoptosis in EJ bladder cancer cells, which express H-RasV12 and mutant p53; transduction of p53 increased H-RasV12 expression along with senescence phenotypes, whereas coexpression with TIS21 (p53+TIS21) induced cell death rather than senescence. The TIS21-mediated switch of senescence to apoptosis was accompanied by nuclear translocation of p53 protein and its modifications on Ser-15 and Ser-46 phosphorylation and acetylations on Lys-120, -320, -373 and -382 residues. Mechanistically, TIS21(/BTG2) regulated posttranslational modification of p53 via enhancing miR34a and Bax expressions as opposed to inhibiting SIRT1 and Bcl2 expression. At the same time, TIS21 increased APAF-1 and p53AIP1 expressions, but inhibited the interaction of p53 with iASPP. In vitro tumorigenicity was significantly reduced in the p53+TIS21 expresser through inhibiting micro-colony proliferation by TIS21. Effect of TIS21 on the regulation of p53 activity was confirmed by knockdown of TIS21 expression by RNA interference. Therefore, we suggest TIS21 expression as an endogenous cell death inducer at the downstream of p53 gene, which might be useful for intractable cancer chemotherapy.

  14. Crystal Structure of a p53 Core Tetramer Bound to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Malecka, Kimberly A.; Ho, William C.; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2008-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 regulates downstream genes in response to many cellular stresses and is frequently mutated in human cancers. Here, we report the use of a crosslinking strategy to trap a tetrameric p53 DNA binding domain (p53DBD) bound to DNA and the X-ray crystal structure of the protein/DNA complex. The structure reveals that two p53DBD dimers bind to B form DNA with no relative twist and that a p53 tetramer can bind to DNA without introducing significant DNA bending. The numerous dimer-dimer interactions involve several strictly conserved residues thus suggesting a molecular basis for p53DBD-DNA binding cooperativity. Surface residue conservation of the p53DBD tetramer bound to DNA highlights possible regions of other p53 domain or p53 cofactor interactions. PMID:18978813

  15. Long Noncoding RNA PURPL Suppresses Basal p53 Levels and Promotes Tumorigenicity in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao Ling; Subramanian, Murugan; Jones, Matthew F; Chaudhary, Ritu; Singh, Deepak K; Zong, Xinying; Gryder, Berkley; Sindri, Sivasish; Mo, Min; Schetter, Aaron; Wen, Xinyu; Parvathaneni, Swetha; Kazandjian, Dickran; Jenkins, Lisa M; Tang, Wei; Elloumi, Fathi; Martindale, Jennifer L; Huarte, Maite; Zhu, Yuelin; Robles, Ana I; Frier, Susan M; Rigo, Frank; Cam, Maggie; Ambs, Stefan; Sharma, Sudha; Harris, Curtis C; Dasso, Mary; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Lal, Ashish

    2017-09-05

    Basal p53 levels are tightly suppressed under normal conditions. Disrupting this regulation results in elevated p53 levels to induce cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and tumor suppression. Here, we report the suppression of basal p53 levels by a nuclear, p53-regulated long noncoding RNA that we termed PURPL (p53 upregulated regulator of p53 levels). Targeted depletion of PURPL in colorectal cancer cells results in elevated basal p53 levels and induces growth defects in cell culture and in mouse xenografts. PURPL associates with MYBBP1A, a protein that binds to and stabilizes p53, and inhibits the formation of the p53-MYBBP1A complex. In the absence of PURPL, MYBBP1A interacts with and stabilizes p53. Silencing MYBBP1A significantly rescues basal p53 levels and proliferation in PURPL-deficient cells, suggesting that MYBBP1A mediates the effect of PURPL in regulating p53. These results reveal a p53-PURPL auto-regulatory feedback loop and demonstrate a role for PURPL in maintaining basal p53 levels. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Tetramerization-defects of p53 result in aberrant ubiquitylation and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Lang, Valérie; Pallara, Chiara; Zabala, Amaia; Lobato-Gil, Sofia; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Farrás, Rosa; Hjerpe, Roland; Torres-Ramos, Monica; Zabaleta, Lorea; Blattner, Christine; Hay, Ronald T; Barrio, Rosa; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Fernandez-Recio, Juan; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Aillet, Fabienne

    2014-07-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 regulates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression, senescence and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effect of single point mutations in the oligomerization domain (OD) on tetramerization, transcription, ubiquitylation and stability of p53. As predicted by docking and molecular dynamics simulations, p53 OD mutants show functional defects on transcription, Mdm2-dependent ubiquitylation and 26S proteasome-mediated degradation. However, mutants unable to form tetramers are well degraded by the 20S proteasome. Unexpectedly, despite the lower structural stability compared to WT p53, p53 OD mutants form heterotetramers with WT p53 when expressed transiently or stably in cells wild type or null for p53. In consequence, p53 OD mutants interfere with the capacity of WT p53 tetramers to be properly ubiquitylated and result in changes of p53-dependent protein expression patterns, including the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and PUMA under basal and adriamycin-induced conditions. Importantly, the patient derived p53 OD mutant L330R (OD1) showed the more severe changes in p53-dependent gene expression. Thus, in addition to the well-known effects on p53 stability, ubiquitylation defects promote changes in p53-dependent gene expression with implications on some of its functions.

  17. ACTIVATION OF p53 IN DOWN SYNDROME AND IN THE Ts65Dn MOUSE BRAIN IS ASSOCIATED WITH A PRO-APOPTOTIC PHENOTYPE

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Barone, Eugenio; Arena, Andrea; Lanzillotta, Chiara; Brokeaart, Diede; Blarzino, Carla; Head, Elizabeth; Butterfield, D Allan; Perluigi, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability resulting from trisomy of chromosome 21. The main feature of DS neuropathology includes early onset of Alzheimer's disease, with deposition of senile plaques and tangles. We hypothesized that apoptosis may be activated in the presence of AD neuropathology in DS, thus we measured proteins associated with upstream and downstream pathways of p53 in the frontal cortex from DS cases with and without AD pathology and from Ts65Dn mice, at different ages. We observed increased acetylation and phosphorylation of p53, coupled to reduced MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and lower levels of SIRT1. Activation of p53 was associated with a number of down-stream targets (bax, PARP1, caspase-3, heat shock proteins and PGC1α) that were modulated in both DS and DS/AD compared with age-matched controls. In particular, the most relevant changes (increased p-p53, acetyl-p53 and reduced formation of MDM2/p53 complex) were found to be modified only in the presence of AD pathology in DS. In addition, a similar pattern of alterations in the p53 pathway were found in Ts65Dn mice. These results suggest that p53 may integrate different signals, which can result in a pro-apoptotic-phenotype contributing to AD neuropathology in people with DS. PMID:26967221

  18. Prediction of dual agents as an activator of mutant p53 and inhibitor of Hsp90 by docking, molecular dynamic simulation and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Maryam; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Hassanzadeh, Farshid; Amanlou, Massoud

    2015-09-01

    Heat shock protein90s (Hsp90s) play a crucial role in the development of cancer, and their inhibitors are a main target for tumor suppression. P53 also is a tumor suppressor, but in cancer cells, mutations in the p53 gene lead to the inactivation and accumulation of protein. For instance, the ninth p53 cancer mutation, Y220C, destabilizes the p53 core domain. Small molecules have been assumed to bind to Y220C DNA-binding domain and reactivate cellular mutant p53 functions. In this study, one of the mutant p53 activators is suggested as an Hsp90 inhibitor according to a pyrazole scaffold. To confirm a new ligand as a dual agent, molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulations were performed on both proteins (p53 and Hsp90). Molecular dynamic simulations were also conducted to evaluate the obtained results on the other two pyrazole structures, one known as Hsp90 inhibitor and the other as the reported mutant p53 activator. The findings indicate that the new ligand was stable in the active site of both proteins. Finally, a virtual screening was performed on ZINC database, and a set of new dual agents was proposed according to the new ligand scaffold. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shi-Wei; Wu, Chun-Ying; Wang, Yen-Ting; Kao, Jun-Kai; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chia-Che; Mu, Szu-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu; Chiu, Husan-Wen; Chang, Chuan-Hsun; Liang, Shu-Mei; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Jau-Ling; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2013-02-15

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status.

  20. A dual role of p53 in the control of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Chiara Maiuri, M; Morselli, Eugenia; Criollo, Alfredo; D'Amelio, Marcello; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; Cecconi, Francesco; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-08-01

    Genotoxic stress can induce autophagy in a p53-dependent fashion and p53 can transactivate autophagy-inducing genes. We have observed recently that inactivation of p53 by deletion, depletion or inhibition can trigger autophagy. Thus, human and mouse cells subjected to knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53 manifest signs of autophagy such as depletion of p62/SQSTM1, LC3 lipidation, redistribution of GFP-LC3 in cytoplasmic puncta, and accumulation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes, both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of p53 causes autophagy in enucleated cells, indicating that the cytoplasmic, non-nuclear pool of p53 can regulate autophagy. Accordingly, retransfection of p53(-/-) cells with wild-type p53 as well as a p53 mutant that is excluded from the nucleus (due to the deletion of the nuclear localization sequence) can inhibit autophagy, whereas retransfection with a nucleus-restricted p53 mutant (in which the nuclear localization sequence has been deleted) does not inhibit autophagy. Several distinct autophagy inducers (e.g., starvation, rapamycin, lithium, tunicamycin and thapsigargin) stimulate the rapid degradation of p53. In these conditions, inhibition of the p53-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2 can avoid p53 depletion and simultaneously prevent the activation of autophagy. Moreover, a p53 mutant that lacks the HDM2 ubiquitinylation site and hence is more stable than wild-type p53 is particularly efficient in suppressing autophagy. In conclusion, p53 plays a dual role in the control of autophagy. On the one hand, nuclear p53 can induce autophagy through transcriptional effects. On the other hand, cytoplasmic p53 may act as a master repressor of autophagy.

  1. Both p53-PUMA/NOXA-Bax-mitochondrion and p53-p21cip1 pathways are involved in the CDglyTK-mediated tumor cell suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhendong; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Libin; Tang, Aifa; Zhai, Qinna; Wen, Jianxiang; Yao, Li; Li, Pengfei

    2009-09-04

    CDglyTK fusion suicide gene has been well characterized to effectively kill tumor cells. However, the exact mechanism and downstream target genes are not fully understood. In our study, we found that CDglyTK/prodrug treatment works more efficiently in p53 wild-type (HONE1) cells than in p53 mutant (CNE1) cells. We then used adenovirus-mediated gene delivery system to either knockdown or overexpress p53 and its target genes in these cells. Consistent results showed that both p53-PUMA/NOXA/Bcl2-Bax and p53-p21 pathways contribute to the CDglyTK induced tumor cell suppression. Our work for the first time addressed the role of p53 related genes in the CDglyTK/prodrug system.

  2. Development of multi-epitope vaccines targeting wild-type sequence p53 peptides.

    PubMed

    DeLeo, Albert B; Whiteside, Theresa L

    2008-09-01

    Loss of p53 tumor-suppressor function is the most common abnormality in human cancer, which can result in enhanced presentation to immune cells of wild-type (wt)-sequence peptides from tumor p53 molecules, thus providing the rationale for wt p53 peptide-based cancer vaccines. We review evidence from preclinical murine tumor models and preclinical studies that led to the clinical introduction of wt p53 peptide-based vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. Overall, this review illustrates the complex process of wt p53 epitope selection and the issues and concerns involved in the application of p53-based vaccines for patients with cancer.

  3. The p53 Protein is an Unusually Shaped Tetramer that Binds Directly to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Paula N.; Chen, Xinbin; Bargonetti, Jill; Prives, Carol

    1993-04-01

    We have analyzed the size and structure of native immunopurified human p53 protein. By using a combination of chemical crosslinking, gel filtration chromatography, and zonal velocity gradient centrifugation, we have determined that the predominant form of p53 in such preparations is a tetramer. The behavior of purified p53 in gels and sucrose gradients implies that the protein has an extended shape. Wild-type p53 has been shown to bind specifically to sites in cellular and viral DNA. We show in this study by Southwestern ligand blotting and by analysis of DNA-bound crosslinked p53 that p53 monomers, dimers, and tetramers can bind directly to DNA.

  4. Light-scattering study of the structure of aggregates and gels formed by heat-denatured whey protein isolate and beta-lactoglobulin at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Najet; Mehalebi, Soraya; Nicolai, Taco; Durand, Dominique; Riaublanc, Alain

    2007-04-18

    The structure of aggregates and gels formed by heat-denatured whey protein isolate (WPI) has been studied at pH 7 and different ionic strengths using light scattering and turbidimetry. The results were compared with those obtained for pure beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg). WPI aggregates were found to have the same self-similar structure as pure beta-Lg aggregates. WPI formed gels above a critical concentration that varied from close to 100 g/L in the absence of added salt to about 10 g/L at 0.2 M NaCl. At low ionic strength (<0.05 M NaCl) homogeneous transparent gels were formed, while at higher ionic strength the gels became turbid but had the same self-similar structure as reported earlier for pure beta-Lg. The length scale characterizing the heterogeneity of the gels increased exponentially with increasing NaCl concentration for both WPI and pure beta-Lg, but the increase was steeper for the former.

  5. Gene expression profiling analysis reveals arsenic-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in p53-proficient and p53-deficient cells through differential gene pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xiaozhong Robinson, Joshua F.; Gribble, Elizabeth; Hong, Sung Woo; Sidhu, Jaspreet S.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2008-12-15

    Arsenic (As) is a well-known environmental toxicant and carcinogen as well as an effective chemotherapeutic agent. The underlying mechanism of this dual capability, however, is not fully understood. Tumor suppressor gene p53, a pivotal cell cycle checkpoint signaling protein, has been hypothesized to play a possible role in mediating As-induced toxicity and therapeutic efficiency. In this study, we found that arsenite (As{sup 3+}) induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner in both p53{sup +/+} and p53{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). There was, however, a distinction between genotypes in the apoptotic response, with a more prominent induction of caspase-3 in the p53{sup -/-} cells than in the p53{sup +/+} cells. To examine this difference further, a systems-based genomic analysis was conducted comparing the critical molecular mechanisms between the p53 genotypes in response to As{sup 3+}. A significant alteration in the Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway was found in both genotypes. In p53{sup +/+} MEFs, As{sup 3+} induced p53-dependent gene expression alterations in DNA damage and cell cycle regulation genes. However, in the p53{sup -/-} MEFs, As{sup 3+} induced a significant up-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes (Noxa) and down-regulation of genes in immune modulation. Our findings demonstrate that As-induced cell death occurs through a p53-independent pathway in p53 deficient cells while apoptosis induction occurs through p53-dependent pathway in normal tissue. This difference in the mechanism of apoptotic responses between the genotypes provides important information regarding the apparent dichotomy of arsenic's dual mechanisms, and potentially leads to further advancement of its utility as a chemotherapeutic agent.

  6. Cycloheximide suppresses radiation-induced apoptosis in MOLT-4 cells with Arg72 variant of p53 through translational inhibition of p53 accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Azusa; Morita, Akinori; Ohya, Soichiro; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Enomoto, Atsushi; Ikekita, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia cell line MOLT-4 is highly radiosensitive, and thus it is often used as a model of p53-dependent radiation-induced apoptosis. Two branches of the p53-mediated apoptotic pathway are reported: "transcription-dependent" and "transcription-independent." However, the relative contribution of each in different types of cells is not yet clearly defined. Moreover, recent studies have shown that the codon 72 polymorphic variants of p53 show different sensitivities to apoptosis signals. The Arg72 variant has a more potent apoptosis-inducing activity in mitochondria than the Pro72 variant. Here, we initially investigated the codon 72 polymorphism of p53 in MOLT-4 cells. Analysis of the p53 exon 4 genomic DNA sequence, which includes codon 72, revealed that MOLT-4 cells are homozygous for the allele encoding Arg72. We next investigated the involvement of the transcription-independent function of p53 using an RNA synthesis inhibitor, actinomycin D (ActD), and a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide (CHX), and found that the apoptosis was suppressed by CHX but not by ActD. We also revealed that the suppressive effect of CHX on apoptosis was specifically mediated by p53, using a p53-knockdown MOLT-4 transfectant. Furthermore, the suppressive effect of CHX on apoptosis was highly correlated with the suppression of p53 protein accumulation, and less correlated with the suppression of p53 target genes expression. These results indicated that p53 transactivation is not necessary to induce apoptosis, and that p53 protein accumulation itself is both necessary and sufficient to do so.

  7. Small heat shock protein Hsp27 protects myosin S1 from heat-induced aggregation, but not from thermal denaturation and ATPase inactivation.

    PubMed

    Markov, Denis I; Pivovarova, Anastasia V; Chernik, Ivan S; Gusev, Nikolai B; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2008-04-30

    We applied different methods, such as turbidity measurements, dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry and co-sedimentation assay, to analyze the interaction of small heat shock protein Hsp27 with isolated myosin head (myosin subfragment 1, S1) under heat-stress conditions. Upon heating at 43 degrees C, Hsp27 effectively suppresses S1 aggregation, and this effect is enhanced by mutations mimicking Hsp27 phosphorylation. However, Hsp27 was unable to prevent thermal unfolding of myosin heads and to maintain their ATPase activity under heat-shock conditions.

  8. Acetylation of Lysine 382 and Phosphorylation of Serine 392 in p53 Modulate the Interaction between p53 and MDC1 In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shahar, Or David; Gabizon, Ronen; Feine, Oren; Alhadeff, Raphael; Ganoth, Assaf; Argaman, Liron; Shimshoni, Elee; Friedler, Assaf; Goldberg, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Occurrence of DNA damage in a cell activates the DNA damage response, a survival mechanism that ensures genomics stability. Two key members of the DNA damage response are the tumor suppressor p53, which is the most frequently mutated gene in cancers, and MDC1, which is a central adaptor that recruits many proteins to sites of DNA damage. Here we characterize the in vitro interaction between p53 and MDC1 and demonstrate that p53 and MDC1 directly interact. The p53-MDC1 interaction is mediated by the tandem BRCT domain of MDC1 and the C-terminal domain of p53. We further show that both acetylation of lysine 382 and phosphorylation of serine 392 in p53 enhance the interaction between p53 and MDC1. Additionally, we demonstrate that the p53-MDC1 interaction is augmented upon the induction of DNA damage in human cells. Our data suggests a new role for acetylation of lysine 382 and phosphorylation of serine 392 in p53 in the cellular stress response and offers the first evidence for an interaction involving MDC1 that is modulated by acetylation. PMID:24194938

  9. Mdm2 and Mdm4 Loss Regulates Distinct p53 Activities

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Juan A.; Iwakuma, Tomoo; Terzian, Tamara; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Lozano, Guillermina

    2009-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of p53 is a hallmark of most human tumors. Loss of p53 function also occurs by overexpression of negative regulators such as MDM2 and MDM4. Deletion of Mdm2 or Mdm4 in mice results in p53-dependent embryo lethality due to constitutive p53 activity. However, Mdm2−/− and Mdm4−/− embryos display divergent phenotypes, suggesting that Mdm2 and Mdm4 exert distinct control over p53. To explore the interaction between Mdm2 and Mdm4 in p53 regulation, we first generated mice and cells that are triple null for p53, Mdm2, and Mdm4. These mice had identical survival curves and tumor spectrum as p53−/− mice, substantiating the principal role of Mdm2 and Mdm4 as negative p53 regulators. We next generated mouse embryo fibroblasts null for p53 with deletions of Mdm2, Mdm4, or both; introduced a retrovirus expressing a temperature-sensitive p53 mutant, p53A135V; and examined p53 stability and activity. In this system, p53 activated distinct target genes, leading to apoptosis in cells lacking Mdm2 and a cell cycle arrest in cells lacking Mdm4. Cells lacking both Mdm2 and Mdm4 had a stable p53 that initiated apoptosis similar to Mdm2-null cells. Additionally, stabilization of p53 in cells lacking Mdm4 with the Mdm2 antagonist nutlin-3 was sufficient to induce a cell death response. These data further differentiate the roles of Mdm2 and Mdm4 in the regulation of p53 activities. PMID:18567799

  10. Identification of GRO1 as a critical determinant for mutant p53 gain of function.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wensheng; Chen, Xinbin

    2009-05-01

    Mutant p53 gain of function contributes to cancer progression, increased invasion and metastasis potentials, and resistance to anticancer therapy. The ability of mutant p53 to acquire its gain of function is shown to correlate with increased expression of progrowth genes, such as c-MYC, MDR1, and NF-kappaB2. However, most of the published studies to identify mutant p53 target genes were performed in a cell system that artificially overexpresses mutant p53. Thus, it remains unclear whether such mutant p53 targets can be regulated by endogenous physiological levels of mutant p53. Here, we utilized SW480 and MIA-PaCa-2 cells, in which endogenous mutant p53 can be inducibly knocked down, to identify mutant p53 target genes that potentially mediate mutant p53 gain of function. We found that knockdown of mutant p53 inhibits GRO1 expression, whereas ectopic expression of mutant R175H in p53-null HCT116 cells increases GRO1 expression. In addition, we found that endogenous mutant p53 is capable of binding to and activating the GRO1 promoter. Interestingly, ectopic expression of GRO1 can rescue the proliferative defect in SW480 and MIA-PaCa-2 cells induced by knockdown of mutant p53. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous GRO1 inhibits cell proliferation and thus abrogates mutant p53 gain of function in SW480 cells. Taken together, our findings define a novel mechanism by which mutant p53 acquires its gain of function via transactivating the GRO1 gene in cancer cells. Thus, targeting GRO1 for cancer therapy would be applicable to a large portion of human tumors with mutant p53, but the exploration of GRO1 as a potential target should take the mutation status of p53 into consideration.

  11. Tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 is a major mediator of p53 antioxidant function.

    PubMed

    Cano, Carla E; Gommeaux, Julien; Pietri, Sylvia; Culcasi, Marcel; Garcia, Stéphane; Seux, Mylène; Barelier, Sarah; Vasseur, Sophie; Spoto, Rose P; Pébusque, Marie-Josèphe; Dusetti, Nelson J; Iovanna, Juan L; Carrier, Alice

    2009-01-01

    p53 exerts its tumor suppressor function mainly through transcriptional induction of target genes involved in several processes, including cell cycle checkpoints, apoptosis, and regulation of cell redox status. p53 antioxidant function is dependent on its transcriptional activity and proceeds by sequential induction of antioxidant and proapoptotic targets. However, none of the thus far renowned p53 targets have proved able to abolish on their own the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation caused by p53 deficiency, therefore pointing to the existence of other prominent and yet unknown p53 antioxidant targets. Here, we show that TP53INP1 represents such a target. Indeed, TP53INP1 transcript induction on oxidative stress is strictly dependent on p53. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and splenocytes derived from TP53INP1-deficient (inp1(-/-)) mice accumulate intracellular ROS, whereas overexpression of TP53INP1 in p53-deficient MEFs rescues ROS levels to those of p53-proficient cells, indicating that TP53INP1 antioxidant function is p53 independent. Furthermore, accumulation of ROS in inp1(-/-) cells on oxidant challenge is associated with decreased expression of p53 targets p21/Cdkn1a, Sesn2, TAp73, Puma, and Bax. Mutation of p53 Ser(58) (equivalent to human p53 Ser(46)) abrogates transcription of these genes, indicating that TP53INP1-mediated p53 Ser(58) phosphorylation is implicated in this process. In addition, TP53INP1 deficiency results in an antioxidant (N-acetylcysteine)-sensitive acceleration of cell proliferation. Finally, TP53INP1 deficiency increases oxidative stress-related lymphoma incidence and decreases survival of p53(+/-) mice. In conclusion, our data show that TP53INP1 is a major actor of p53-driven oxidative stress response that possesses both a p53-independent intracellular ROS regulatory function and a p53-dependent transcription regulatory function.

  12. Differentiation-dependent p53 regulation of nucleotide excision repair in keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Li, G.; Ho, V. C.; Mitchell, D. L.; Trotter, M. J.; Tron, V. A.

    1997-01-01

    The role of the tumor suppressor p53 in repair of ultraviolet light (UV)-induced DNA damage was evaluated using a host-cell reactivation (HCR) assay. HCR determines a cell's ability to repair UV-damaged DNA through reactivation of a transfected CAT reported plasmid. Most UV damage is removed through nucleotide excision repair (NER). Primary murine keratinocytes isolated from p53-deficient and wild-type p53 mice were used in the HCR assay. The NER was reduced in p53-/- keratinocytes as compared with p53+/+ keratinocytes. The reduced DNA repair in p53-/- mice was confirmed with a radioimmunoassay comparing cyclobutane dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) photoproducts in p53+/+ and p53-/- keratinocytes after the cells were exposed to UV irradiation. Our results demonstrate that wildtype p53 plays a significant role in regulating NER. Furthermore, as there is evidence that p53 protein levels decrease after keratinocytes become differentiated, we sought to determine whether p53 plays a role in NER in differentiated keratinocytes. Differentiation of the keratinocytes by increasing the Ca2+ concentration in the culture media resulted in a marked reduction in NER equally in both p53+/+ and p53-/- groups. This finding suggests that reduced DNA repair after differentiation is p53 independent. A similar reduction in HCR was confirmed in differentiated human keratinocytes. These data, taken together, indicate that p53 or p53-regulated proteins enhance NER in basal undifferentiated keratinocytes but not in differentiated cells. As nonmelanoma skin cancers originate from the basal keratinocytes, our findings suggest that loss of p53 may contribute to the pathogenesis of this common skin cancer. PMID:9095000

  13. Validation of MdmX as a therapeutic target for reactivating p53 in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Daniel; Warr, Matthew R.; Martins, Carla P.; Brown Swigart, Lamorna; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Evan, Gerard I.

    2011-01-01

    MdmX, also known as Mdm4, is a critical negative regulator of p53, and its overexpression serves to block p53 tumor suppressor function in many cancers. Consequently, inhibiting MdmX has emerged as an attractive approach to restoring p53 function in those cancers that retain functional p53. However, the consequences of acute systemic MdmX inhibition in normal adult tissues remain unknown. To determine directly the effects of systemic MdmX inhibition in normal tissues and in tumors, we crossed mdmX−/− mice into the p53ERTAM knockin background. In place of wild-type p53, p53ERTAM knockin mice express a variant of p53, p53ERTAM, that is completely dependent on 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen for its activity. MdmX inhibition was then modeled by restoring p53 function in these MdmX-deficient mice. We show that MdmX is continuously required to buffer p53 activity in adult normal tissues and their stem cells. Importantly, the effects of transient p53 restoration in the absence of MdmX are nonlethal and reversible, unlike transient p53 restoration in the absence of Mdm2, which is ineluctably lethal. We also show that the therapeutic impact of restoring p53 in a tumor model is enhanced in the absence of MdmX, affording a significant extension of life span over p53 restoration in the presence of MdmX. Hence, systemic inhibition of MdmX is both a feasible therapeutic strategy for restoring p53 function in tumors that retain wild-type p53 and likely to be significantly safer than inhibition of Mdm2. PMID:21852537

  14. Impact of the p53 status of tumor cells on extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The p53 protein is the best studied target in human cancer. For decades, p53 has been believed to act mainly as a tumor suppressor and by transcriptional regulation. Only recently, the complex and diverse function of p53 has attracted more attention. Using several molecular approaches, we studied the impact of different p53 variants on extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis signaling. Results We reproduced the previously published results within intrinsic apoptosis induction: while wild-type p53 promoted cell death, different p53 mutations reduced apoptosis sensitivity. The prediction of the impact of the p53 status on the extrinsic cell death induction was much more complex. The presence of p53 in tumor cell lines and primary xenograft tumor cells resulted in either augmented, unchanged or reduced cell death. The substitution of wild-type p53 by mutant p53 did not affect the extrinsic apoptosis inducing capacity. Conclusions In summary, we have identified a non-expected impact of p53 on extrinsic cell death induction. We suggest that the impact of the p53 status of tumor cells on extrinsic apoptosis signaling should be studied in detail especially in the context of therapeutic approaches that aim to restore p53 function to facilitate cell death via the extrinsic apoptosis pathway. PMID:23594441

  15. Acetylation Is Crucial for p53-Mediated Ferroptosis and Tumor Suppression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shang-Jui; Li, Dawei; Ou, Yang; Jiang, Le; Chen, Yue; Zhao, Yingming; Gu, Wei

    2016-10-04

    Although previous studies indicate that loss of p53-mediated cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and senescence does not completely abrogate its tumor suppression function, it is unclear how the remaining activities of