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Sample records for heat problem solution

  1. Analytic solutions of inverse heat conduction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Najem, N. M.

    A direct analytic approach is systematically developed for solving inverse heat conduction problems in multi-dimensional finite regions. The inverse problems involve the determination of the surface conditions from the knowledge of the time variation of the temperature at an interior point in the region. In the present approach, the unknown surface temperature is represented by a polynominal in time and a splitting-up procedure is employed to develop a rapidly converging inverse solution. The least square technique is then utilized to estimate the unknown parameters associated with the solution. The method is developed first for the analysis of one-dimensional cases, and then it is generalized to handle two- and three-dimensional situations. It provides an efficient, stable and systematic approach for inverse heat condition problems. The stability and accuracy of the current method of analysis are demonstrated by several numerical examples chosen to provide a very strict test.

  2. Numberical Solution to Transient Heat Flow Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobiske, Ronald A.; Hock, Jeffrey L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the reduction of the one- and three-dimensional diffusion equation to the difference equation and its stability, convergence, and heat-flow applications under different boundary conditions. Indicates the usefulness of this presentation for beginning students of physics and engineering as well as college teachers. (CC)

  3. Solution to problems of bacterial impurity of heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, V. I.; Zamaleev, M. M.

    2015-09-01

    The article describes the problems of the operation of open and closed district heating systems related to the bacteriological contamination of heating-system water. It is noted that district heating systems are basically safe in sanitary epidemiological terms. Data on the dangers of sulfide contamination of heating systems are given. It is shown that the main causes of the development of sulfate-reducing and iron bacteria in heating systems are a significant biological contamination of source water to fuel heating systems, which is determined by water oxidizability, and a low velocity of the motion of heating-system water in the heating system elements. A case of sulfide contamination of a part of the outdoor heat-supply system of the city of Ulyanovsk is considered in detail. Measures for cleaning pipelines and heating system equipment from the waste products of sulfate-reducing bacteria and iron bacteria and for improving the quality of heating-system water by organizing the hydraulic and water-chemistry condition that makes it possible to avoid the bacteriological contamination of heating systems are proposed. The positive effect of sodium silicate on the prevention of sulfide contamination of heating systems is shown.

  4. Numerical solution of nonlinear heat problem with moving boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Mannai, Mona; Khabeev, Nail

    2012-01-01

    Two phase gas-liquid flow in pipes is widely spread in space applications: bubble flows appear in cryogenic components transport through fuel/oxidant supply lines. Another important application is based on the fact that in liquid flows with small bubbles a close contact between the two phases occurs resulting in high rates of transfer between them. The compactness of a system makes it ideally suited to serve as a space-based two-phase bio-reactor which forms an important unit in environmental control and life support system deployed onboard. A numerical method was developed for solving a nonlinear problem of thermal interaction between a spherical gas bubble and surrounding liquid. The system of equations for describing this interaction was formulated. It includes ordinary and nonlinear partial differential equations. The problem was solved using finite-difference technique by dividing the system into spherical layers inside the bubble and employing the new variable which "freezes" the moving boundary of the bubble. A numerical solution is obtained for the problem of radial bubble motion induced by a sudden pressure change in the liquid—a situation which corresponds to the behavior of bubbles beyond a shock wave front when the latter enters a bubble curtain.

  5. Finite difference solutions of heat conduction problems in multi-layered bodies with complex geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masiulaniec, K. C.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Dewitt, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical procedure is presented for analyzing a wide variety of heat conduction problems in multilayered bodies having complex geometry. The method is based on a finite difference solution of the heat conduction equation using a body fitted coordinate system transformation. Solution techniques are described for steady and transient problems with and without internal energy generation. Results are found to compare favorably with several well known solutions.

  6. Analysis and solution of the ill-posed inverse heat conduction problem

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.F.

    1981-01-01

    The inverse conduction problem arises when experimental measurements are taken in the interior of a body, and it is desired to calculate temperature and heat flux values on the surface. The problem is shown to be ill-posed, as the solution exhibits unstable dependence on the given data functions. A special solution procedure is developed for the one-dimensional case which replaces the heat conduction equation with an approximating hyperbolic equation. If viewed from a new perspective, where the roles of the spatial and time variables are interchanged, then an initial value problem for the damped wave equation is obtained. Since this formulation is well-posed, both analytic and numerical solution procedures are readily available. Sample calculations confirm that this approach produces consistent, reliable results for both linear and nonlinear problems.

  7. Heat Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Heat problems and heat cramps related to jogging can be caused by fluid imbalances, medications, dietary insufficiency, vomiting or diarrhea, among other factors. If the condition keeps reoccurring, the advice of a physician should be sought. Some preventive measures that can be taken include: (1) running during the cooler hours of the day; (2)…

  8. Solution of the stationary 2D inverse heat conduction problem by Treffetz method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cialkowski, Michael J.; Frąckowiak, Andrzej

    2002-05-01

    The paper presents analysis of a solution of Laplace equation with the use of FEM harmonic basic functions. The essence of the problem is aimed at presenting an approximate solution based on possibly large finite element. Introduction of harmonic functions allows to reduce the order of numerical integration as compared to a classical Finite Element Method. Numerical calculations conform good efficiency of the use of basic harmonic functions for resolving direct and inverse problems of stationary heat conduction. Further part of the paper shows the use of basic harmonic functions for solving Poisson’s equation and for drawing up a complete system of biharmonic and polyharmonic basic functions

  9. Numerical solution of fluid flow and heat tranfer problems with surface radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, S.; Bhatia, K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical scheme, based on the finite element method, to solve strongly coupled fluid flow and heat transfer problems. The surface radiation effect for gray, diffuse and isothermal surfaces is considered. A procedure for obtaining the view factors between the radiating surfaces is discussed. The overall solution strategy is verified by comparing the available results with those obtained using this approach. An analysis of a thermosyphon is undertaken and the effect of considering the surface radiation is clearly explained.

  10. Adjoint-weighted variational formulation for a direct computational solution of an inverse heat conduction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbone, Paul E.; Oberai, Assad A.; Harari, Isaac

    2007-12-01

    We consider the direct (i.e. non-iterative) solution of the inverse problem of heat conduction for which at least two interior temperature fields are available. The strong form of the problem for the single, unknown, thermal conductivity field is governed by two partial differential equations of pure advective transport. The given temperature fields must satisfy a compatibility condition for the problem to have a solution. We introduce a novel variational formulation, the adjoint-weighted equation (AWE), for solving the two-field problem. In this case, the gradients of two given temperature fields must be linearly independent in the entire domain, a weaker condition than the compatibility required by the strong form. We show that the solution of the AWE formulation is equivalent to that of the strong form when both are well posed. We prove that the Galerkin discretization of the AWE formulation leads to a stable, convergent numerical method that has optimal rates of convergence. We show computational examples that confirm these optimal rates. The AWE formulation shows good numerical performance on problems with both smooth and rough coefficients and solutions.

  11. Conduction heat transfer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    VanSant, J.H.

    1980-03-01

    This text is a collection of solutions to a variety of heat conduction problems found in numerous publications, such as textbooks, handbooks, journals, reports, etc. Its purpose is to assemble these solutions into one source that can facilitate the search for a particular problem solution. Generally, it is intended to be a handbook on the subject of heat conduction. This material is useful for engineers, scientists, technologists, and designers of all disciplines, particularly those who design thermal systems or estimate temperatures and heat transfer rates in structures. More than 500 problem solutions and relevant data are tabulated for easy retrieval. There are twelve sections of solutions which correspond with the class of problems found in each. Geometry, state, boundary conditions, and other categories are used to classify the problems. A case number is assigned to each problem for cross-referencing, and also for future reference. Each problem is concisely described by geometry and condition statements, and many times a descriptive sketch is also included. At least one source reference is given so that the user can review the methods used to derive the solutions. Problem solutions are given in the form of equations, graphs, and tables of data, all of which are also identified by problem case numbers and source references.

  12. Heat strain in the Canadian Forces chemical defence clothing: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    McLellan, T M; Frim, J

    1994-12-01

    The Canadian Forces chemical defence protective clothing can induce an overwhelming strain on one's ability to regulate body temperature. Recently a number of investigations have been completed at the Defence and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine that focused initially on understanding the interaction of metabolic rate, ambient temperature, and ambient vapour pressure on the severity of heat strain associated with wearing the protective clothing. This paper presents a summary of these initial studies together with an overview of different attempts to reduce heat strain during exercise in a hot environment. Factors such as improved aerobic fitness or a period of dry heat acclimation have little if any benefit on tolerance time while wearing the clothing during light or moderate exercise. The best solution to the problem of heat strain remains the use of microclimate conditioning (personal cooling), and these techniques have been successful for Naval and Air Force personnel. For our Land Forces, however, microclimate conditioning is not feasible until a lightweight high-energy power source is developed.

  13. Numerical Solution of Inverse Radiative-Conductive Transient Heat Transfer Problem in a Grey Participating Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmywaczyk, J.; Koniorczyk, P.

    2009-08-01

    The problem of simultaneous identification of the thermal conductivity Λ(T) and the asymmetry parameter g of the Henyey-Greenstein scattering phase function is under consideration. A one-dimensional configuration in a grey participating medium with respect to silica fibers for which the thermophysical and optical properties are known from the literature is accepted. To find the unknown parameters, it is assumed that the thermal conductivity Λ(T) may be represented in a base of functions {1, T, T 2, . . .,T K } so the inverse problem can be applied to determine a set of coefficients {Λ0, Λ1, . . ., Λ K ; g}. The solution of the inverse problem is based on minimization of the ordinary squared differences between the measured and model temperatures. The measured temperatures are considered known. Temperature responses measured or theoretically generated at several different distances from the heat source along an x axis of the specimen set are known as a result of the numerical solution of the transient coupled heat transfer in a grey participating medium. An implicit finite volume method (FVM) is used for handling the energy equation, while a finite difference method (FDM) is applied to find the sensitivity coefficients with respect to the unknown set of coefficients. There are free parameters in a model, so these parameters are changed during an iteration process used by the fitting procedure. The Levenberg- Marquardt fitting procedure is iteratively searching for best fit of these parameters. The source term in the governing conservation-of-energy equation taking into account absorption, emission, and scattering of radiation is calculated by means of a discrete ordinate method together with an FDM while the scattering phase function approximated by the Henyey-Greenstein function is expanded in a series of Legendre polynomials with coefficients {c l } = (2l + 1)g l . The numerical procedure proposed here also allows consideration of some cases of coupled heat

  14. Conduction heat transfer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    VanSant, J.H.

    1983-08-01

    This text is a collection of solutions to a variety of heat conduction problems found in numerous publications, such as textbooks, handbooks, journals, reports, etc. Its purpose is to assemble these solutions into one source that can facilitate the search for a particular problem solution. Generally, it is intended to be a handbook on the subject of heat conduction. There are twelve sections of solutions which correspond with the class of problems found in each. Geometry, state, boundary conditions, and other categories are used to classify the problems. Each problem is concisely described by geometry and condition statements, and many times a descriptive sketch is also included. The introduction presents a synopsis on the theory, differential equations, and boundary conditions for conduction heat transfer. Some discussion is given on the use and interpretation of solutions. Supplementary data such as mathematical functions, convection correlations, and thermal properties are included for aiding the user in computing numerical values from the solutions. 155 figs., 92 refs., 9 tabs.

  15. Analytical solutions to the problem of transient heat transfer in living tissue.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shitzer, A.; Chato, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    An analytical model of transient heat transfer in living biological tissue is considered. The model includes storage, generation, conduction, and convective transport of heat in the tissue. Solutions for rectangular and cylindrical coordinates are presented and discussed. Transient times for reaching the ?locally fully developed' temperature profile were found to be of the order of 5 to 25 min. These transients are dominated by a geometrical parameters and, to a lesser extent, by a parameter representing the ratio of heat supplied by blood flow to heat conducted in the tissue.

  16. Exact analytical solution to a transient conjugate heat-transfer problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sucec, J.

    1973-01-01

    An exact analytical solution is found for laminar, constant-property, slug flow over a thin plate which is also convectively cooled from below. The solution is found by means of two successive Laplace transformations when a transient in the plate and the fluid is initiated by a step change in the fluid inlet temperature. The exact solution yields the transient fluid temperature, surface heat flux, and surface temperature distributions. The results of the exact transient solution for the surface heat flux are compared to the quasi-steady values, and a criterion for the validity of the quasi-steady results is found. Also the effect of the plate coupling parameter on the surface heat flux are investigated.

  17. Analytical solution of two-phase spherical Stefan problem by heat polynomials and integral error functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharin, Stanislav N.; Sarsengeldin, Merey M.; Nouri, Hassan

    2016-08-01

    On the base of the Holm model, we represent two phase spherical Stefan problem and its analytical solution, which can serve as a mathematical model for diverse thermo-physical phenomena in electrical contacts. Suggested solution is obtained from integral error function and its properties which are represented in the form of series whose coefficients have to be determined. Convergence of solution series is proved.

  18. Solution of non-linear inverse heat conduction problems using the method of lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taler, J.; Duda, P.

    Two space marching methods for solving the one-dimensional nonlinear inverse heat conduction problems are presented. The temperature-dependent thermal properties and the boundary condition on the accessible part of the boundary of the body are known. Additional temperature measurements in time are taken with a sensor located in an arbitrary position within the solid, and the objective is to determine the surface temperature and heat flux on the remaining part of the unspecified boundary. The methods have the advantage that time derivatives are not replaced by finite differences and the good accuracy of the method results from an appropriate approximation of the first time derivative using smoothing polynomials. The extension of the first method presented in this study to higher dimensions inverse heat conduction problems is straightforward.

  19. Efficient technique for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional inverse problem of heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, B. F.

    1981-06-01

    A very efficient numerical technique has been developed to solve the one-dimensional inverse problem of heat conduction. The Gauss elimination algorithm for solving the tridiagonal system of linear algebraic equations associated with most implicit heat conduction codes is specialized to the inverse problem. When compared to the corresponding direct problem, the upper limit in additional computation time generally does not exceed 27-36%. The technique can be adapted to existing one-dimensional implicit heat conduction codes with minimal effort and applied to difference equations obtained from finite-difference, finite-element, finite control volume, or similar techniques, provided the difference equations are tridiagonal in form. It is also applicable to the nonlinear case in which thermal properties are temperature-dependent and is valid for one-dimensional radial cylindrical and spherical geometries as well as composite bodies. The calculations reported here were done by modifying a one-dimensional implicit (direct) heat conduction code. Program changes consisted of 13 additional lines of FORTRAN coding.

  20. Inverse heat conduction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlande, Helcio Rangel Barreto

    We present the solution of the following inverse problems: (1) Inverse Problem of Estimating Interface Conductance Between Periodically Contacting Surfaces; (2) Inverse Problem of Estimating Interface Conductance During Solidification via Conjugate Gradient Method; (3) Determination of the Reaction Function in a Reaction-Diffusion Parabolic Problem; and (4) Simultaneous Estimation of Thermal Diffusivity and Relaxation Time with Hyperbolic Heat Conduction Model. Also, we present the solution of a direct problem entitled: Transient Thermal Constriction Resistance in a Finite Heat Flux Tube. The Conjugate Gradient Method with Adjoint Equation was used in chapters 1-3. The more general function estimation approach was treated in these chapters. In chapter 1, we solve the inverse problem of estimating the timewise variation of the interface conductance between periodically contacting solids, under quasi-steady-state conditions. The present method is found to be more accurate than the B-Spline approach for situations involving small periods, which are the most difficult on which to perform the inverse analysis. In chapter 2, we estimate the timewise variation of the interface conductance between casting and mold during the solidification of aluminum. The experimental apparatus used in this study is described. In chapter 3, we present the estimation of the reaction function in a one dimensional parabolic problem. A comparison of the present function estimation approach with the parameter estimation technique, wing B-Splines to approximate the reaction function, revealed that the use of function estimation reduces the computer time requirements. In chapter 4 we present a finite difference solution for the transient constriction resistance in a cylinder of finite length with a circular contact surface. A numerical grid generation scheme was used to concentrate grid points in the regions of high temperature gradients in order to reduce discretization errors. In chapter 6, we

  1. Determination of thermophysical characteristics of solid materials by electrical modelling of the solutions to the inverse problems in nonsteady heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozdoba, L. A.; Krivoshei, F. A.

    1985-01-01

    The solution of the inverse problem of nonsteady heat conduction is discussed, based on finding the coefficient of the heat conduction and the coefficient of specific volumetric heat capacity. These findings are included in the equation used for the electrical model of this phenomenon.

  2. Benchmark problems and solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.

    1995-01-01

    The scientific committee, after careful consideration, adopted six categories of benchmark problems for the workshop. These problems do not cover all the important computational issues relevant to Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA). The deciding factor to limit the number of categories to six was the amount of effort needed to solve these problems. For reference purpose, the benchmark problems are provided here. They are followed by the exact or approximate analytical solutions. At present, an exact solution for the Category 6 problem is not available.

  3. Computational procedure for finite difference solution of one-dimensional heat conduction problems reduces computer time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iida, H. T.

    1966-01-01

    Computational procedure reduces the numerical effort whenever the method of finite differences is used to solve ablation problems for which the surface recession is large relative to the initial slab thickness. The number of numerical operations required for a given maximum space mesh size is reduced.

  4. Problems and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Examines some of the reasons tropical rain forests are being destroyed and ways people are working to protect these forests. Provides activities on how people can help, reason for saving the forests, individual actions related to forest problems and solutions, and issues and problems. Three copyable pages accompany activities. (Author/RT)

  5. Solution strategies for finite elements and finite volumes methods applied to flow and heat transfer problem in U-shaped geothermal exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egidi, Nadaniela; Giacomini, Josephin; Maponi, Pierluigi

    2016-06-01

    Matter of this paper is the study of the flow and the corresponding heat transfer in a U-shaped heat exchanger. We propose a mathematical model that is formulated as a forced convection problem for incompressible and Newtonian fluids and results in the unsteady Navier-Stokes problem. In order to get a solution, we discretise the equations with both the Finite Elements Method and the Finite Volumes Method. These procedures give rise to a non-symmetric indefinite quadratic system of equations. Thus, three regularisation techniques are proposed to make approximations effective and ideas to compare their results are provided.

  6. Generating Problems from Problems and Solutions from Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcavi, Abraham; Resnick, Zippora

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a geometrical solution to a problem that is usually solved geometrically as an example of how alternative solutions may enrich the teaching and learning of mathematics. (Contains 11 figures.)

  7. Cooling solutions for high heat load optics

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.; Harding, G.H.; Cox, M.P.; Lunt, D.

    1996-09-01

    Heat loads on optical components at third-generation synchrotron sources, such as the APS, present beamline designers with difficult and complex engineering problems. A number of solutions have been proposed, such as pin-post water cooling, cryogenic cooling, and liquid gallium cooling. This paper describes both a cryogenic cooling system and a liquid gallium pumping system that have been developed specifically for the APS high heat load beamlines. Also presented is a potential solution for the first mirrors on high heat load beamlines, based on liquid gallium internal cooling of a silicon carbide mirror. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Heat exchanger leakage problem location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejčík, Jiří; Jícha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Recent compact heat exchangers are very often assembled from numerous parts joined together to separate heat transfer fluids and to form the required heat exchanger arrangement. Therefore, the leak tightness is very important property of the compact heat exchangers. Although, the compact heat exchangers have been produced for many years, there are still technological problems associated with manufacturing of the ideal connection between the individual parts, mainly encountered with special purpose heat exchangers, e.g. gas turbine recuperators. This paper describes a procedure used to identify the leakage location inside the prime surface gas turbine recuperator. For this purpose, an analytical model of the leaky gas turbine recuperator was created to assess its performance. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data which were acquired during the recuperator thermal performance analysis. The differences between these two data sets are used to indicate possible leakage areas.

  9. Viking heat sterilization - Progress and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daspit, L. P.; Cortright, E. M.; Stern, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The Viking Mars landers to be launched in 1975 will carry experiments in biology, planetology, and atmospheric physics. A terminal dry-heat sterilization process using an inert gas was chosen to meet planetary quarantine requirements and preclude contamination of the biology experiment by terrestrial organisms. Deep sterilization is performed at the component level and terminal surface sterilization at the system level. Solutions to certain component problems relating to sterilization are discussed, involving the gyroscope, tape recorder, battery, electronic circuitry, and outgassing. Heat treatment placed special requirements on electronic packaging, including fastener preload monitoring and solder joints. Chemical and physical testing of nonmetallic materials was performed to establish data on their behavior in heat-treatment and vacuum environments. A Thermal Effects Test Model and a Proof Test Capsule were used. It is concluded that a space vehicle can be designed and fabricated to withstand heat sterilization requirements.

  10. Boiling and nonboiling heat transfer to electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Najibi, S.H.; Mueller-Steinhagen, H.; Jamialahmadi, M.

    1996-10-01

    Heat transfer to electrolyte solutions is a common engineering problem in the chemical and petrochemical industries. Nevertheless, only a few experimental investigations of heat transfer to electrolyte solutions can be found in the literature. To improve design of heat transfer equipment and to understand fouling characteristics, it is important to know the clean heat transfer coefficient of electrolyte solutions, and whether heat transfer to electrolyte solutions can be predicted with models found for less complicated fluids. A wide range of experiments were performed to determine the effects of various dissolved salts on forced-convective, pool boiling, and subcooled flow-boiling heat transfer. The effect of dissolved salts on bubble size and nucleation site density were also investigated. The measured heat transfer coefficients are compared with recommended correlations for the different heat transfer modes.

  11. New computer program solves wide variety of heat flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almond, J. C.

    1966-01-01

    Boeing Engineering Thermal Analyzer /BETA/ computer program uses numerical methods to provide accurate heat transfer solutions to a wide variety of heat flow problems. The program solves steady-state and transient problems in almost any situation that can be represented by a resistance-capacitance network.

  12. Numerical nonlinear inverse problem of determining wall heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zueco, J.; Alhama, F.; González Fernández, C. F.

    2005-03-01

    The inverse problem of determining time-variable surface heat flux in a plane wall, with constant or temperature dependent thermal properties, is numerically studied. Different kinds of incident heat flux, including rectangular waveform, are assumed. The solution is numerically solved as a function estimation problem, so that no a priori information for the functional waveforms of the unknown heat flux is needed. In all cases, a solution in the form of a piece-wise function is used to approach the incident flux. Transient temperature measurements at the boundary, from the solution of the direct problem, served as the simulated experimental data needed as input for the inverse analysis. Both direct and inverse heat conduction problems are solved using the network simulation method. The solution is obtained step-by-step by minimising the classical functional that compares the above input data with those obtained from the solution of the inverse problem. A straight line of variable slope and length is used for each one of the stretches of the desired solution. The influence of random error, number of functional terms and the effect of sensor location are studied. In all cases, the results closely agree with the solution.

  13. Solution of heat removal from nuclear reactors by natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitek, Pavel; Valenta, Vaclav

    2014-03-01

    This paper summarizes the basis for the solution of heat removal by natural convection from both conventional nuclear reactors and reactors with fuel flowing coolant (such as reactors with molten fluoride salts MSR).The possibility of intensification of heat removal through gas lift is focused on. It might be used in an MSR (Molten Salt Reactor) for cleaning the salt mixture of degassed fission products and therefore eliminating problems with iodine pitting. Heat removal by natural convection and its intensification increases significantly the safety of nuclear reactors. Simultaneously the heat removal also solves problems with lifetime of pumps in the primary circuit of high-temperature reactors.

  14. School Discipline: Problems Effecting Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzman, Andrew J.; Wiley, David B.

    1987-01-01

    Failure to solve school discipline problems is attributed to four factors: school district priorities, unclear problem dimensions, inadequate teacher training, and flaws in teacher/ administrator applied psychology. Psychological approaches that provide systems to control student behavior are described, including biophysical, interactionist, and…

  15. A Graphical Solution of Certain Selected Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Lindsay L.; Hess, Adrien L.

    1978-01-01

    Graphical solutions are illustrated for several algebra problems including finding roots of a quadratic equation, solving mixture and motion word problems, factoring the difference of two squares, and constructing the square root of a positive number. (MN)

  16. The Problem of Coronal Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Poedts, S.

    2010-12-14

    The inhomogeneous coronal plasma is a perfect environment for fast growing drift waves. The omnipresence of coronal magnetic loops implies gradients of the equilibrium plasma quantities like the density, magnetic field and temperature. These gradients are responsible for the excitation of drift waves that grow both within the two-component fluid description (both in the presence of collisions and without it) and within the two-component kinetic descriptions (due to purely kinetic effects). Some aspects of these phenomena are investigated here. In particular the analysis of the particle dynamics within the growing wave is compared with the corresponding fluid analysis. While both of them predict the stochastic heating, the threshold for the heating obtained from the single particle analysis is higher. The explanation for this effect is given. Also, the effects of the density gradient in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field vector are investigated within the kinetic theory, in both electrostatic and electromagnetic regimes. The electromagnetic regime implies the coupling of the gradient-driven drift wave with the Alfven wave. The growth rates for the two cases are calculated and compared. It is found that, in general, the electrostatic regime is characterized by stronger growth rates, as compared with the electromagnetic perturbations. The released amount of energy density due to this heating should be more dependent on the magnitude of the background magnetic field than on the coupling of the drift and Alfven waves. The stochastic heating is expected to be much higher in regions with a stronger magnetic field. On the whole, the energy release rate caused by the stochastic heating can be several orders of magnitude above the value presently accepted as necessary for a sustainable coronal heating. The vertical stratification and the very long wavelengths along the magnetic loops imply that a drift-Alfven wave, propagating as a twisted structure along the

  17. Numerical solutions for heat flow in adhesive lap joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, P. A.; Winfree, William P.

    1992-01-01

    The present formulation for the modeling of heat transfer in thin, adhesively bonded lap joints precludes difficulties associated with large aspect ratio grids required by standard FEM formulations. This quasi-static formulation also reduces the problem dimensionality (by one), thereby minimizing computational requirements. The solutions obtained are found to be in good agreement with both analytical solutions and solutions from standard FEM programs. The approach is noted to yield a more accurate representation of heat-flux changes between layers due to a disbond.

  18. Radioactive Waste...The Problem and Some Possible Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivier, Jean-Pierre

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear safety is a highly technical and controversial subject that has caused much heated debate and political concern. This article examines the problems involved in managing radioactive wastes and the techniques now used. Potential solutions are suggested and the need for international cooperation is stressed. (Author/MA)

  19. Down hole corrosion: Problems & possible solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, W.K.

    1995-12-31

    Over the past several years the industry has encountered many production problems in the Antrim play. Among these are calcium carbonate scale, NORM and C02 removal. One problem, the corrosion of steel within the production system, has developed due to the chemical nature of the Antrim gas and water. This corrosion has become a major problem for NOMECO and other operators. This paper will discuss the problem, its source and effects and some possible solutions.

  20. A Solution Framework for Environmental Characterization Problems

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes experiences developing a grid-enabled framework for solving environmental inverse problems. The solution approach taken here couples environmental simulation models with global search methods and requires readily available computational resources of the grid ...

  1. Quantum solution to the Byzantine agreement problem.

    PubMed

    Fitzi, M; Gisin, N; Maurer, U

    2001-11-19

    We present a solution to an old problem in distributed computing. In its simplest form, a sender has to broadcast some information to two receivers, but they have access only to pairwise communication channels. Unlike quantum key distribution, here the goal is not secrecy but agreement, and the adversary (one of the receivers or the sender himself) is not outside but inside the game. Using only classical channels this problem is provably impossible. The solution uses pairwise quantum channels and entangled qutrits.

  2. Quantum Solution to the Byzantine Agreement Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzi, Matthias; Gisin, Nicolas; Maurer, Ueli

    2001-11-01

    We present a solution to an old problem in distributed computing. In its simplest form, a sender has to broadcast some information to two receivers, but they have access only to pairwise communication channels. Unlike quantum key distribution, here the goal is not secrecy but agreement, and the adversary (one of the receivers or the sender himself) is not outside but inside the game. Using only classical channels this problem is provably impossible. The solution uses pairwise quantum channels and entangled qutrits.

  3. The Pizza Problem: A Solution with Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Kathryn G.; Mast, Caleb J.

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the issues of coaching and assessing. A preservice middle school teacher's unique solution to the Pizza problem was not what the professor expected. The student's solution strategy, based on sequences and a reinvention of Pascal's triangle, is explained in detail. (Contains 8 figures.)

  4. Solution to the Quantum Zermelo Navigation Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, Dorje C.; Meier, David M.

    2015-03-01

    The solution to the problem of finding a time-optimal control Hamiltonian to generate a given unitary gate, in an environment in which there exists an uncontrollable ambient Hamiltonian (e.g., a background field), is obtained. In the classical context, finding the time-optimal way to steer a ship in the presence of a background wind or current is known as the Zermelo navigation problem, whose solution can be obtained by working out geodesic curves on a space equipped with a Randers metric. The solution to the quantum Zermelo problem, which is shown here to take a remarkably simple form, is likewise obtained by finding explicit solutions to the geodesic equations of motion associated with a Randers metric on the space of unitary operators. The result reveals that the optimal control in a sense "goes along with the wind."

  5. Heat Transfer Problems of Mixed Refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Tetsu; Koyama, Shigeru; Goto, Masao; Takamatsu, Hiroshi

    From the point of view of the application of non-azeotropic mixed refrigerants to heat pump and refrigeration cycles, literatures on condensation and evaporation are surveyed and future problems to be studied are extracted. All researches on the relevant problems are recently started and still in developing way except for condensation on a single horizontal tube. Particularly, the studies for condensation and evaporation of mixed Freon refrigerant in a horizontal tube, which are the most important in practice, are far backward in comparison with single component refrigerant in every point of heat transfer characteristics, flow pattern and theoretical analysis.

  6. The numerical solution of thermoporoelastoplasticity problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivtsev, P. V.; Kolesov, A. E.; Sirditov, I. K.; Stepanov, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Before constructing buildings in permafrost areas the careful study of stress-strain state of soils and building foundations must be performed in order to estimate their bearing capacity and stability to avoid issues with maintenance. To determine stress-strain state of frozen soils the numerical modeling of thermoporoelastoplasticity problems is used. The mathematical model of considered problems includes the elasto-plasticity equations and equations of heat and mass transfer with phase transition. The computational algorithm is based on the finite element approximation in space and the finite difference approximation in time. As the model problem we consider the deformation of soil under house weight and heating. Special attention is given to thawing of frozen soils, which can cause additional deformations and lead to loss of stability.

  7. Asymptotic solution for heat convection-radiation equation

    SciTech Connect

    Mabood, Fazle; Ismail, Ahmad Izani Md; Khan, Waqar A.

    2014-07-10

    In this paper, we employ a new approximate analytical method called the optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM) to solve steady state heat transfer problem in slabs. The heat transfer problem is modeled using nonlinear two-point boundary value problem. Using OHAM, we obtained the approximate analytical solution for dimensionless temperature with different values of a parameter ε. Further, the OHAM results for dimensionless temperature have been presented graphically and in tabular form. Comparison has been provided with existing results from the use of homotopy perturbation method, perturbation method and numerical method. For numerical results, we used Runge-Kutta Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method. It was found that OHAM produces better approximate analytical solutions than those which are obtained by homotopy perturbation and perturbation methods, in the sense of closer agreement with results obtained from the use of Runge-Kutta Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method.

  8. Quantum solution to the Byzantine agreement problem.

    PubMed

    Fitzi, M; Gisin, N; Maurer, U

    2001-11-19

    We present a solution to an old problem in distributed computing. In its simplest form, a sender has to broadcast some information to two receivers, but they have access only to pairwise communication channels. Unlike quantum key distribution, here the goal is not secrecy but agreement, and the adversary (one of the receivers or the sender himself) is not outside but inside the game. Using only classical channels this problem is provably impossible. The solution uses pairwise quantum channels and entangled qutrits. PMID:11736379

  9. Nature, Human Nature, and Solutions to Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, B. C.

    This paper promotes an undergraduate course that would discuss the great ideas of Plato, St. Paul, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jean Paul Sartre, B. F. Skinner, and Konrad Lorenz. This course would help students understand human values and behaviors while focusing on historical, world, and national problems. Tentative solutions would then be…

  10. It's No Problem to Invent a Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graca, Rose M.

    2012-01-01

    A kindergarten class learns about inventions, inventors, and how to be an inventor. Engaging students in learning about pencil sharpeners led to researching and developing a lesson plan designed so students could learn how inventions are solutions to problems. Through identifying, researching, and brainstorming new inventions, the students…

  11. The Hubble Space Telescope: Problems and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villard, Ray

    1990-01-01

    Presented is the best understanding of the flaw discovered in the optics of the Hubble Space Telescope and the possible solutions to the problems. The spherical aberration in the telescope's mirror and its effect on the quality of the telescope's imaging ability is discussed. (CW)

  12. Loop observations and the coronal heating problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Fuentes, M. C.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    Coronal heating continues to be one of the fundamental problems of solar physics. In recent years, instrumental advances and the availability of data from space observatories produced important progress, imposing restrictions to the models proposed. However, since the physical processes occur at spatial scales below the present instrumental resolution, definitive answers are still due. Since the corona is strongly dominated by the magnetic field, active region plasma is confined in closed structures or loops. These are the basic observable blocks of the corona, so the analysis of their structure and evolution is essential to understand the heating. In this report, mainly addressed to astronomers not necessarily familiarized with the subject, we review some of the proposed heating models and we pay special attention to the sometimes confusing and apparently contradictory observations of coronal loops. We discuss the consequences of these observations for some of the heating models proposed, in particular those based on impulsive events known as nanoflares.

  13. Application of the hybrid method to inverse heat conduction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Han-Taw; Chang, Shiuh-Ming

    1990-04-01

    The hybrid method involving the combined use of Laplace transform method and the FEM method is considerably powerful for solving one-dimensional linear heat conduction problems. In the present method, the time-dependent terms are removed from the problem using the Laplace transform method, and then the FEM is applied to the space domain. The transformed temperature is inverted numerically to obtain the result in the physical quantity. The estimation of the surface heat flux or temperature from transient measured temperatures inside the solid agrees well with the analytical solution of the direct problem without Beck's sensitivity analysis and a least-square criterion. Due to no time step, the present method can directly calculate the surface conditions of an inverse problem without step by step computation in the time domain until the specific time is reached.

  14. Solving nonlinear heat transfer constant area fin problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Tables and graphs were compiled for solving nonlinear heat transfer constant area fin problems. The differential equation describing one-dimensional steady-state temperature distribution and heat flow under three modes of heat transfer with heat generation was investigated.

  15. Perturbation solutions of combustion instability problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Googerdy, A.; Peddieson, J., Jr.; Ventrice, M.

    1979-01-01

    A method involving approximate modal analysis using the Galerkin method followed by an approximate solution of the resulting modal-amplitude equations by the two-variable perturbation method (method of multiple scales) is applied to two problems of pressure-sensitive nonlinear combustion instability in liquid-fuel rocket motors. One problem exhibits self-coupled instability while the other exhibits mode-coupled instability. In both cases it is possible to carry out the entire linear stability analysis and significant portions of the nonlinear stability analysis in closed form. In the problem of self-coupled instability the nonlinear stability boundary and approximate forms of the limit-cycle amplitudes and growth and decay rates are determined in closed form while the exact limit-cycle amplitudes and growth and decay rates are found numerically. In the problem of mode-coupled instability the limit-cycle amplitudes are found in closed form while the growth and decay rates are found numerically. The behavior of the solutions found by the perturbation method are in agreement with solutions obtained using complex numerical methods.

  16. Multigrid solutions of elliptic fluid flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Nigel George

    1988-06-01

    An efficient FAS multigrid solution strategy is presented for the accurate and economic simulation of convection dominated flows. The use of a high-order approximation to the convective transport terms found in the governing equations of motion was investigated in conjunction with an unsegregated smoothing technique. Results are presented for a sequence of problems of increasing complexity requiring that careful attention be directed toward the proper treatment of different types of boundary condition. The classical two-dimensional problem of flow in a lid-driven cavity is investigated in depth for flows at Reynolds number of 100, 400 and 1000. This gives an extremely good indication of the power of a multigrid approach. Next, the solution methodology is applied to flow in a three-dimensional lid-driven cavity at different Reynolds numbers, with cross-reference being made to predictions obtained in the corresponding two-dimensional simulations, and to the flow over a step discontinuity in the case of an abruptly expanding channel. Although, at first sight, these problems appear to require only minor extensions to the existing approach, it is found that they are rather more idiosyncratic. Finally, the governing equations and numerical algorithm are extended to encompass the treatment of thermally driven flows. The solution to two such problems is presented and compared with corresponding results obtained by traditional methods.

  17. Existence of solutions of extremal problems

    SciTech Connect

    Rzhevskii, S.V.

    1995-09-01

    One of the main questions that arise in the investigation of extremal problems is the existence of solutions. The general approach to establishing solvability of extremal problems are typically in the form of sufficient conditions. In some cases, the verification of these conditions is quite complex. In this article, we consider the existence of solutions of the problem f(x) {r_arrow}inf, x {element_of}{Omega} defined by the nonempty closed set {Omega} in the n-dimensional Euclidean space R{sup n} and a continuous function f on {Omega}. We assume that for some set {Omega}{prime} {improper_subset} R{sup n} and some finite-valued continuous function {psi}(x) {le} 0 and the problem f(x){r_arrow}inf x {element_of} {Omega}{prime} has a finite value f{sub *} {equivalent_to} inf/x {element_of} {Omega} and a nonempty solution set X{sub *} {equivalent_to} (x {element_of} {Omega}{prime}{vert_bar}f(x) = f{sub *}{prime}).

  18. Analytical solutions to matrix diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kekäläinen, Pekka

    2014-10-06

    We report an analytical method to solve in a few cases of practical interest the equations which have traditionally been proposed for the matrix diffusion problem. In matrix diffusion, elements dissolved in ground water can penetrate the porous rock surronuding the advective flow paths. In the context of radioactive waste repositories this phenomenon provides a mechanism by which the area of rock surface in contact with advecting elements is greatly enhanced, and can thus be an important delay mechanism. The cases solved are relevant for laboratory as well for in situ experiments. Solutions are given as integral representations well suited for easy numerical solution.

  19. Problems and solutions for drawing fronts objectively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Donald W.; Whistler, James P.

    2001-06-01

    A recent requirement charged to the Aviation Weather Center (AWC) is to produce significant weather charts for aviation users with, among other forecast products, forecast locations of significant fronts. To increase forecaster productivity, the AWC decided to evaluate the possibility that fronts should be first drawn objectively. Hewson (1998) describes the basic technique which uses a variation on the Renard & Clarke (1965) frontal locator function to find the fronts. The AWC had to overcome many problems in implementing Hewson's techniques. This paper illuminates the problems and describes the AWC solutions. As a result of the AWC's success, objective frontal analyses and forecasts are now a reality, and the productivity of forecasters increased.

  20. Composting of MSW: Needs, problems and solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper is constructed of three complementary sections. The first section discusses the need for composting municipal solid waste (MSW). Too often as scientists and engineers the focus narrows to solve a specific problem within a system or to find the most cost effective solution. One habitually fails to examine concepts holistically due to tight schedules or work backlogs. One understands how things work and gets renumerated by the ability to scale up from the bench or pilot, keep costs down and to troubleshoot cranky processes. Sitting back to understand the reason why something like composting makes sense is a luxury one usually cannot afford. Section two discusses problems specific to MSW composting such as product quality, production stabilization, nuisance odors, and vector attraction. The final segment deals with some solutions to these difficulties.

  1. Possible solution of the Coriolis attenuation problem

    SciTech Connect

    Protopapas, P.; Klein, A.

    1997-04-01

    The most consistently useful simple model for the study of odd deformed nuclei, the particle-rotor model (strong-coupling limit of the core-particle coupling model) has nevertheless been beset by a long-standing problem: It is necessary in many cases to introduce an {ital ad hoc} parameter that reduces the size of the Coriolis interaction coupling the collective and single-particle motions. Of the numerous suggestions put forward for the origin of this supplementary interaction, none of those actually tested by calculations has been accepted as the solution of the problem. In this paper we seek a solution for the difficulty within the framework of a general formalism that starts from the spherical shell model and is capable of treating an arbitrary linear combination of multipole and pairing forces. With the restriction of the interaction to the familiar sum of a quadrupole multipole force and a monopole pairing force, we have previously studied a semimicroscopic version of the formalism whose framework is nevertheless more comprehensive than any previously applied to the problem. We obtained solutions for low-lying bands of several strongly deformed odd rare-earth nuclei and found good agreement with experiment, except for an exaggerated staggering of levels for K=(1)/(2) bands, which can be understood as a manifestation of the Coriolis attenuation problem. We argue that within the formalism utilized, the only way to improve the physics is to add interactions to the model Hamiltonian. We verify that by adding a magnetic dipole interaction of essentially fixed strength, we can fit the K=(1)/(2) bands without destroying the agreement with other bands. In addition we show that our solution also fits {sup 163}Er, a classic test case of Coriolis attenuation that we had not previously studied. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. A Novel Hypercomplex Solution to Kepler's Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condurache, C.; Martinuşi, V.

    2007-05-01

    By using a Sundman like regularization, we offer a unified solution to Kepler's problem by using hypercomplex numbers. The fundamental role in this paper is played by the Laplace-Runge-Lenz prime integral and by the hypercomplex numbers algebra. The procedure unifies and generalizes the regularizations offered by Levi-Civita and Kustaanheimo-Stiefel. Closed form hypercomplex expressions for the law of motion and velocity are deduced, together with inedite hypercomplex prime integrals.

  3. Nonclassical Symmetry Analysis of Heated Two-Dimensional Flow Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Imran; Naz, Rehana; Khan, Muhammad Danish

    2015-12-01

    This article analyses the nonclassical symmetries and group invariant solution of boundary layer equations for two-dimensional heated flows. First, we derive the nonclassical symmetry determining equations with the aid of the computer package SADE. We solve these equations directly to obtain nonclassical symmetries. We follow standard procedure of computing nonclassical symmetries and consider two different scenarios, ξ1≠0 and ξ1=0, ξ2≠0. Several nonclassical symmetries are reported for both scenarios. Furthermore, numerous group invariant solutions for nonclassical symmetries are derived. The similarity variables associated with each nonclassical symmetry are computed. The similarity variables reduce the system of partial differential equations (PDEs) to a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in terms of similarity variables. The reduced system of ODEs are solved to obtain group invariant solution for governing boundary layer equations for two-dimensional heated flow problems. We successfully formulate a physical problem of heat transfer analysis for fluid flow over a linearly stretching porous plat and, with suitable boundary conditions, we solve this problem.

  4. Application of CFD to aerothermal heating problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations by an Alternating Direction Implicit scheme, applied to two experimental investigations at NASA Langley Research Center are presented. The first is cooling by injection of a gas jet through the nose of an ogive-cone, and the second is the aerothermal environment in the gap formed by the wing and elevon section of a test model of the Space Shuttle. The simulations demonstrate that accurate pressure calculations are easily obtained on a coarse grid, witih convergence being obtained after the residual reduces by four orders of magnitude. However, accurate heating rates require a fine grid solution, with convergence requiring at least a reduction of six orders of magnitude in the residual. The effect of artificial dissipation on numerical results is also assessed.

  5. Application of CFD to aerothermal heating problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations by an alternating direction implicit scheme, applied to two experimental investigations are presented. The first is cooling by injection of a gas jet through the nose of an ogive-cone, and the second is the aerothermal environment in the gap formed by the wing and elevon section of a test model of the space shuttle. The simulations demonstrate that accurate pressure calculations are easily obtained on a coarse grid, while convergence is obtained after the residual reduces by four orders of magnitude. Accurate heating rates, however, require a fine grid solution, with convergence requiring at least a reduction of six orders of magnitude in the residual. The effect of artificial dissipation on numerical results is also assessed.

  6. Imaging obese patients: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Carucci, Laura R

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is an epidemic in the United States and Western World with an associated increasing impact on radiology departments. The increased prevalence of obesity in conjunction with the growing use and success of bariatric surgery results in an influx of obese patients into the health system in need of hospital services and care. Imaging services in particular are in demand in this patient population. Obese patients place special needs upon facilities and imaging equipment and also create technical challenges. This manuscript will address problems and potential solutions for imaging obese patients, specifically with regards to the modalities of radiography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Healthcare industry problems call for cooperative solutions.

    PubMed

    Schramm, C J

    1990-01-01

    The complexity of problems facing American health care--from extending health benefits to the uninsured to caring for people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome--require cooperative solutions involving providers, insurers, and policy makers. A spokesman for the health insurance industry presents ideas about the future of health care and discusses the role of insurers in meeting the challenges ahead. Among the items on the agenda: further growth of managed care; continued attempts to control costs and utilization; and sharing the burden of risk with consumers.

  8. An eigenvalue method for solving transient heat conduction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. M.; Skladany, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    The eigenvalue method, which has been used by researchers in structure mechanics, is applied to problems in heat conduction. Its formulation is decribed in terms of an examination of transient heat conduction in a square slab. Taking advantage of the availability of the exact solution, we compare the accuracy and other numerical properties of the eigenvalue method with those of existing numerical schemes. The comparsion shows that, overall, the eigenvalue method appears to be fairly attractive. Furthermore, only a few dominant eigenvalues and their corresponding eigenvectors need to be computed and retained to yield reasonably high accuracy. Greater savings are attained in the computation time for a transient problem with long time duration and a large computational domain.

  9. Travelers' Health: Problems with Heat and Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... for temperature swings. Prevention of Heat Disorders Heat Acclimatization Heat acclimatization is a process of physiologic adaptation ... there is no heat exposure. Physical Conditioning and Acclimatization Higher levels of physical fitness improve exercise tolerance ...

  10. Basic Health Physics: Problems and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevelacqua, Joseph John

    1999-01-01

    Radiation litigation, the cleanup and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, radon exposure, nuclear medicine, food irradiation, stricter regulatory climate--these are some of the reasons health physics and radiation protection professionals are increasingly called upon to upgrade their skills. Designed to prepare candidates for the American Board of Health Physics Comprehensive examination (Part I) and other certification examinations, Basic Health Physics: Problems and Solutions introduces professionals in the field to radiation protection principles and their practical application in routine and emergency situations. It features more than 650 worked examples illustrating concepts under discussion along with an in-depth coverage of sources of radiation, standards and regulations, biological effects of ionizing radiation, instrumentation, external and internal dosimetry, counting statistics, monitoring and interpretations, operational health physics, transportation and waste, nuclear emergencies, and more. Reflecting for the first time the true scope of health physics at an introductory level, Basic Health Physics: Problems and Solutions gives readers the tools to properly evaluate challenging situations in all areas of radiation protection, including the medical, university, power reactor, fuel cycle, research reactor, environmental, non-ionizing radiation, and accelerator health physics.

  11. Solution of the Generalized Noah's Ark Problem.

    PubMed

    Billionnet, Alain

    2013-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity (PD) of a set of species is a measure of the evolutionary distance among the species in the collection, based on a phylogenetic tree. Such a tree is composed of a root, internal nodes, and leaves that correspond to the set of taxa under study. With each edge of the tree is associated a non-negative branch length (evolutionary distance). If a particular survival probability is associated with each taxon, the PD measure becomes the expected PD measure. In the Noah's Ark Problem (NAP) introduced by Weitzman (1998), these survival probabilities can be increased at some cost. The problem is to determine how best to allocate a limited amount of resources to maximize the expected PD of the considered species. It is easy to formulate the NAP as a (difficult) nonlinear 0-1 programming problem. The aim of this article is to show that a general version of the NAP (GNAP) can be solved simply and efficiently with any set of edge weights and any set of survival probabilities by using standard mixed-integer linear programming software. The crucial point to move from a nonlinear program in binary variables to a mixed-integer linear program, is to approximate the logarithmic function by the lower envelope of a set of tangents to the curve. Solving the obtained mixed-integer linear program provides not only a near-optimal solution but also an upper bound on the value of the optimal solution. We also applied this approach to a generalization of the nature reserve problem (GNRP) that consists of selecting a set of regions to be conserved so that the expected PD of the set of species present in these regions is maximized. In this case, the survival probabilities of different taxa are not independent of each other. Computational results are presented to illustrate potentialities of the approach. Near-optimal solutions with hypothetical phylogenetic trees comprising about 4000 taxa are obtained in a few seconds or minutes of computing time for the GNAP, and in

  12. Wireless device connection problems and design solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ji-Won; Norman, Donald; Nam, Tek-Jin; Qin, Shengfeng

    2016-09-01

    Users, especially the non-expert users, commonly experience problems when connecting multiple devices with interoperability. While studies on multiple device connections are mostly concentrated on spontaneous device association techniques with a focus on security aspects, the research on user interaction for device connection is still limited. More research into understanding people is needed for designers to devise usable techniques. This research applies the Research-through-Design method and studies the non-expert users' interactions in establishing wireless connections between devices. The "Learning from Examples" concept is adopted to develop a study focus line by learning from the expert users' interaction with devices. This focus line is then used for guiding researchers to explore the non-expert users' difficulties at each stage of the focus line. Finally, the Research-through-Design approach is used to understand the users' difficulties, gain insights to design problems and suggest usable solutions. When connecting a device, the user is required to manage not only the device's functionality but also the interaction between devices. Based on learning from failures, an important insight is found that the existing design approach to improve single-device interaction issues, such as improvements to graphical user interfaces or computer guidance, cannot help users to handle problems between multiple devices. This study finally proposes a desirable user-device interaction in which images of two devices function together with a system image to provide the user with feedback on the status of the connection, which allows them to infer any required actions.

  13. An extended classical solution of the droplet growth problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Hallett, J.; Beesley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Problems of applying the classical kinetic theory to the growth of small droplets from vapor are examined. A solution for the droplet growth equation is derived which is based on the assumption of a diffusive field extending to the drop surface. The method accounts for partial thermal and mass accommodation at the interface and the kinetic limit to the mass and heat fluxes, and it avoids introducing the artifact of a discontinuity in the thermal and vapor field near the droplet. Consideration of the environmental fields in spherical geometry utilizing directional fluxes yields boundary values in terms of known parameters and a new Laplace transform integral.

  14. Landmine research: technology solutions looking for problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevelyan, James P.

    2004-09-01

    The global landmine problem came to the attention of researchers in the mid 1990's and by 1997 several advanced and expensive sensor research programs had started. Yet, by the end of 2003, there is little sign of a major advance in the technology available to humanitarian demining programs. Given the motivation and dedication of researchers, public goodwill to support such programs, and substantial research resources devoted to the problem, it is worth asking why these programs do not seem to have had an impact on demining costs or casualty rates. Perhaps there are factors that have been overlooked. This paper reviews several research programs to gain a deeper understanding of the problem. A possible explanation is that researchers have accepted mistaken ideas on the nature of the landmine problems that need to be solved. The paper provides several examples where the realities of minefield conditions are quite different to what researchers have been led to believe. Another explanation may lie in the political and economic realities that drive the worldwide effort to eliminate landmines. Most of the resources devoted to landmine clearance programs come from humanitarian aid budgets: landmine affected countries often contribute only a small proportion because they have different priorities based on realistic risk-based assessment of needs and political views of local people. Some aid projects have been driven by the need to find a market for demining technologies rather than by user needs. Finally, there is a common misperception that costs in less developed countries are intrinsically low, reflecting low rates paid for almost all classes of skilled labour. When actual productivity is taken into account, real costs can be higher than industrialized countries. The costs of implementing technological solutions (even using simple technologies) are often significantly under-estimated. Some political decisions may have discouraged thorough investigation of cost

  15. Inverse coefficient problems for one-dimensional heat transfer with a preservation of medium temperature condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oralsyn, Gulaym

    2016-08-01

    We study an inverse coefficient problem for a model equation for one-dimensional heat transfer with a preservation of medium temperature. It is needed (together with finding its solution) to find time dependent unknown coefficient of the equation. So, for this inverse problem, existence of an unique generalized solution is proved. The main difficulty of the considered problems is that the eigenfunction system of the corresponding boundary value problems does not have the basis property.

  16. Transfer of Solutions to Conditional Probability Problems: Effects of Example Problem Format, Solution Format, and Problem Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Alan F.; Van Haneghan, James P.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the results of a study examining how easily students are able to transfer frequency solutions to conditional probability problems to novel situations. University students studied either a problem solved using the traditional Bayes formula format or using a natural frequency (tree diagram) format. In addition, the example problem…

  17. Pseudo-updated constrained solution algorithm for nonlinear heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tovichakchaikul, S.; Padovan, J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper develops efficiency and stability improvements in the incremental successive substitution (ISS) procedure commonly used to generate the solution to nonlinear heat conduction problems. This is achieved by employing the pseudo-update scheme of Broyden, Fletcher, Goldfarb and Shanno in conjunction with the constrained version of the ISS. The resulting algorithm retains the formulational simplicity associated with ISS schemes while incorporating the enhanced convergence properties of slope driven procedures as well as the stability of constrained approaches. To illustrate the enhanced operating characteristics of the new scheme, the results of several benchmark comparisons are presented.

  18. A Solution in Search of Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Ferrofluids offered vast-problem solving potential. Under license for the NASA technology, Dr. Ronald Moskowitz and Dr. Ronald Rosensweig formed Ferrofluids Corporation. First problem they found a solution for was related to the manufacture of semiconductor "chips" for use in electronic systems. They developed a magnetic seal composed of ferrofluid and a magnetic circuit. Magnetic field confines the ferrofluid in the regions between the stationary elements and the rotary shaft of the seal. Result is a series of liquid barriers that totally bar passage of contaminants. Seal is virtually wear-proof and has a lifetime measured in billions of shaft revolutions. It has reduced maintenance, minimizes "downtime" of production equipment, and reduces the cost of expensive materials that had previously been lost through seal failures. Products based on ferrofluid are exclusion seals for computer disc drives and inertia dampers for stepper motors. Uses are performance-improving, failure-reducing coolants for hi-fi loudspeakers. Other applications include analytical instrumentation, medical equipment, industrial processes, silicon crystal growing furnaces, plasma processes, fusion research, visual displays, and automated machine tools.

  19. ESPs: On- and offshore problems and solutions. Part 4

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.; Wells, M.R.; Bearden, J.L.; Wilson, L.; Shepler, R.; Lannom, R.

    1996-03-01

    This is the fourth in a multipart series on the usage of electrical submersible pumps. This installment deals with high temperature, design, power consumption, run life, sweep efficiency and miscellaneous problems. The final installment next month will include a complete list of references. The column heating ``ESPs`` refers to the number of ESPs reported installed. Although all of the topics in this series can be considered ways of increasing run life and solving problems, the Run Life table includes several topics that specifically help to increase run life. Two cases were identified where ESPs are used to increase the sweep efficiency of a flood. The Sweep Efficiency table summarizes case histories where fluids were produced without the production losses that normally plague high volume systems. The Miscellaneous-Overall table includes several solutions that were part of an overall plan to increase run life. These strategies included automation, running and pulling procedures and surveillance.

  20. Locating CVBEM collocation points for steady state heat transfer problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V.

    1985-01-01

    The Complex Variable Boundary Element Method or CVBEM provides a highly accurate means of developing numerical solutions to steady state two-dimensional heat transfer problems. The numerical approach exactly solves the Laplace equation and satisfies the boundary conditions at specified points on the boundary by means of collocation. The accuracy of the approximation depends upon the nodal point distribution specified by the numerical analyst. In order to develop subsequent, refined approximation functions, four techniques for selecting additional collocation points are presented. The techniques are compared as to the governing theory, representation of the error of approximation on the problem boundary, the computational costs, and the ease of use by the numerical analyst. ?? 1985.

  1. Hydro-abrasive erosion: Problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, K.

    2014-03-01

    The number of hydro power plants with hydro-abrasive erosion is increasing worldwide. An overall approach is needed to minimize the impact of this phenomenon. Already at the start of the planning phase an evaluation should be done to quantify the erosion and the impact on the operation. For this, the influencing parameters and their impact on the erosion have to be known. The necessary information for the evaluation comprises among others the future design, the particle parameters of the water, which will pass the turbine, and the power plant owner's framework for the future operation like availability or maximum allowable efficiency loss, before an overhaul needs to be done. Based on this evaluation of the erosion, an optimised solution can then be found, by analysing all measures in relation to investments, energy production and maintenance costs as decision parameters. Often a more erosion-resistant design, instead of choosing the turbine design with the highest efficiency, will lead to higher revenue. The paper will discuss the influencing parameters on hydro-abrasive erosion and the problems to acquire this information. There are different optimisation possibilities, which will be shown in different case studies. One key aspect to reduce the erosion and prolong the operation time of the components is to coat all relevant parts. But it is very important that this decision is taken early in the design stage, as the design has to be adapted to the requirements of the coating process. The quality of coatings and their impact on the operation will be discussed in detail in the paper as due to the non-availability of standards many questions arise in projects.

  2. Asymptotic traveling wave solution for a credit rating migration problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jin; Wu, Yuan; Hu, Bei

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an asymptotic traveling wave solution of a free boundary model for pricing a corporate bond with credit rating migration risk is studied. This is the first study to associate the asymptotic traveling wave solution to the credit rating migration problem. The pricing problem with credit rating migration risk is modeled by a free boundary problem. The existence, uniqueness and regularity of the solution are obtained. Under some condition, we proved that the solution of our credit rating problem is convergent to a traveling wave solution, which has an explicit form. Furthermore, numerical examples are presented.

  3. Geometric Series: A New Solution to the Dog Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dion, Peter; Ho, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This article describes what is often referred to as the dog, beetle, mice, ant, or turtle problem. Solutions to this problem exist, some being variations of each other, which involve mathematics of a wide range of complexity. Herein, the authors describe the intuitive solution and the calculus solution and then offer a completely new solution…

  4. TOUGH Simulations of the Updegraff's Set of Fluid and Heat Flow Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.J.; Pruess , K.

    1992-11-01

    The TOUGH code [Pruess, 1987] for two-phase flow of water, air, and heat in penneable media has been exercised on a suite of test problems originally selected and simulated by C. D. Updegraff [1989]. These include five 'verification' problems for which analytical or numerical solutions are available, and three 'validation' problems that model laboratory fluid and heat flow experiments. All problems could be run without any code modifications (*). Good and efficient numerical performance, as well as accurate results were obtained throughout. Additional code verification and validation problems from the literature are briefly summarized, and suggestions are given for proper applications of TOUGH and related codes.

  5. Hurricanes as Heat Engines: Two Undergraduate Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyykko, Pekka

    2007-01-01

    Hurricanes can be regarded as Carnot heat engines. One reason that they can be so violent is that thermodynamically, they demonstrate large efficiency, [epsilon] = (T[subscript h] - T[subscript c]) / T[subscript h], which is of the order of 0.3. Evaporation of water vapor from the ocean and its subsequent condensation is the main heat transfer…

  6. Optimization of the heating surface shape in the contact melting problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomin, Sergei A.; Cheng, Shangmo

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of contact melting by the migrating heat source with an arbitrary shaped isothermal heating surface is presented. After the substantiated simplification, the governing equations are transformed to the convenient equations for engineering calculations relationships. Analytical solutions are used for numerical prediction of optimal shape of the heating surface. The problem is investigated for the constant and for temperature dependent physical properties of the melt.

  7. Using Problem-Solution Maps to Improve Students' Problem-Solving Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvaratnam, Mailoo; Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of problem solving as a learning tool is often diminished because students typically use only an algorithmic approach to get to the answer. We discuss a way of encouraging students to reflect on the solution to their problem by requiring them--after they have arrived at their solution--to draw solution maps. A solution map…

  8. Solution of a Simple Inelastic Scattering Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Stephen K.

    1975-01-01

    Provides an analytical solution of a model representing the collision of an atom with a harmonic oscillator, interacting via a repulsive square well potential. Presents results for various energies and strengths of inelastic scattering. (Author/CP)

  9. COYOTE: a finite-element computer program for nonlinear heat-conduction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1982-10-01

    COYOTE is a finite element computer program designed for the solution of two-dimensional, nonlinear heat conduction problems. The theoretical and mathematical basis used to develop the code is described. Program capabilities and complete user instructions are presented. Several example problems are described in detail to demonstrate the use of the program.

  10. Articulation and Transfer: Definitions, Problems, and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, M. Irene; And Others

    Although the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD), in Arizona, maintains an exemplary relationship and numerous transfer agreements with the state's public universities, systematic and operational problems still exist. Systematic problems include the accumulation of excessive college credit hours; changes in applicable transfer…

  11. Teaching Computer Science through Problems, Not Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fee, Samuel B.; Holland-Minkley, Amanda M.

    2010-01-01

    Regardless of the course topic, every instructor in a computing field endeavors to engage their students in deep problem-solving and critical thinking. One of the specific learning outcomes throughout our computer science curriculum is the development of independent, capable problem solving--and we believe good pedagogy can bring such about. Our…

  12. Some explicit solutions for a class of one-phase Stefan problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layeni, Olawanle P.; Johnson, Jesse V.

    2012-09-01

    Salva and Tarzia, [N.N. Salva, D.A. Tarzia, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 379 (2011) 240 - 244], gave explicit solutions of a similarity type for a class of free boundary problem for a semi-infinite material. In this paper, through an elementary approach and less stringent assumption on data, we obtain more general results than those given by their central result, and thereby construct explicit solutions for a wider class of Stefan problems with a type of variable heat flux boundary conditions. Further, explicit solutions of certain forced one-phase Stefan problems are given.

  13. Celestial mechanics: Fresh solutions to the four-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2016-05-01

    Describing the motion of three or more bodies under the influence of gravity is one of the toughest problems in astronomy. The report of solutions to a large subclass of the four-body problem is truly remarkable.

  14. Institutional solutions to drinking water problems: Maine case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The paper recounts how four Maine communities sought and found institutional solutions to drinking water problems. Each scenario describes the system, outlines the problems, reviews the chronology of events, points out the lessons learned and gives the system's current status.

  15. Nonlinear inverse problem for the estimation of time-and-space dependent heat transfer coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, A. M.; Beck, J. V.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a method and an algorithm for the direct estimation of the time-and-space dependent heat transfer coefficients from transient temperature data measured at approximate points inside a heat conducting solid. This inverse estimation problem is called herein the inverse heat transfer coefficient problem. An application considered in the present is the quenching of a solid in a liquid. The solution method used here is an extension of the sequential temperature future-information method introduced by Beck for solving the inverse heat conduction problem. The finite-difference method, based on the control volume approach, was used for the discretization of the direct heat conduction problem. Numerical results show that the proposed method is accurate and efficient.

  16. Toward a solution of the coincidence problem

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, Sergio del; Herrera, Ramon; Pavon, Diego

    2008-07-15

    The coincidence problem of late cosmic acceleration constitutes a serious riddle with regard to our understanding of the evolution of the Universe. Here we argue that this problem may someday be solved - or better understood - by expressing the Hubble expansion rate as a function of the ratio of densities (dark matter/dark energy) and observationally determining the said rate in terms of the redshift.

  17. The Finite Analytic Method for steady and unsteady heat transfer problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.-J.; Li, P.

    1980-01-01

    A new numerical method called the Finite Analytical Method for solving partial differential equations is introduced. The basic idea of the finite analytic method is the incorporation of the local analytic solution in obtaining the numerical solution of the problem. The finite analytical method first divides the total region of the problem into small subregions in which local analytic solutions are obtained. Then an algebraic equation is derived from the local analytic solution for each subregion relating an interior nodal value at a point P in the subregion to its neighboring nodal values. The assembly of all the local analytic solutions thus provides the finite-analytic numerical solution of the problem. In this paper the finite analytic method is illustrated in solving steady and unsteady heat transfer problems.

  18. Student Health Insurance: Problems and Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Student health insurance experiences the same inflationary trends as employee benefits, but is rarely viewed as a significant direct cost to an institution, nor is the bill as high as the costs associated with employee health plans. Several long-term solutions and strategies that could help colleges to contain the ever-escalating cost of providing…

  19. Classroom Acoustics: The Problem, Impact, and Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Frederick S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This article describes aspects of classroom acoustics that interfere with the ability of listeners to understand speech. It considers impacts on students and teachers and offers four possible solutions: noise control, signal control without amplification, individual amplification systems, and sound field amplification systems. (Author/DB)

  20. Finite volume solution of spherical dynamo problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, H.; Hansen, U.

    2003-04-01

    Presently, all existing numerical models of the geodynamo have been calculated by a spectral approach. Certainly a spectral method is ideally suited for the case of high or moderate Ekman number Ek. However, no solutions have been obtained for the regime of an Ekman number below Ek=10-5 to 10-6, which is relevant for the Earth's outer core. Therefore we are currently developing a finite volume method to simulate the geodynamo. Since a local method, like finite volume, is much better suited for massively parallel computation compared to a spectral method, we expect that we can use higher resolution models than previously possible. In addition, the finite volume approach allows an implicit calculation of the dominant Coriolis term in the low Ekman number regime. The development of the thermal and Navier Stokes solvers has been completed. Therefore we will discuss several test solutions of the magnetic induction equation. In addition, first solutions of a fully coupled dynamo model will be presented and compared to similiar spectral solutions.

  1. The residential space heating problem in Lithuania

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevicius, E.; Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1996-02-01

    This report gives preliminary data on housing in Lithuania. We focus on the actual housing structure now that much of the stock has been privatized-an action that carries with it uncertainty regarding who is responsible for heating energy use, who is responsible for conservation measures and retrofitting, and who benefits from these actions. The paper then discusses some of the measures undertaken by both property owners and by governmental agencies to ameliorate poor heating conditions. The report summarizes results from a number of recent studies of the potential for energy savings in heating Lithuanian multifamily buildings. In closing we recommend actions that should be taken soon to ensure that Lithuanian housing moves along a path to greater energy efficiency. Some signals as to where this path should go can be taken from European countries with similar climatic conditions.

  2. Multigrid solution strategies for adaptive meshing problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues which arise when combining multigrid strategies with adaptive meshing techniques for solving steady-state problems on unstructured meshes. A basic strategy is described, and demonstrated by solving several inviscid and viscous flow cases. Potential inefficiencies in this basic strategy are exposed, and various alternate approaches are discussed, some of which are demonstrated with an example. Although each particular approach exhibits certain advantages, all methods have particular drawbacks, and the formulation of a completely optimal strategy is considered to be an open problem.

  3. Cosmic strings - A problem or a solution?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, David P.; Bouchet, Francois R.

    1988-01-01

    The most fundamental issue in the theory of cosmic strings is addressed by means of Numerical Simulations: the existence of a scaling solution. The resolution of this question will determine whether cosmic strings can form the basis of an attractive theory of galaxy formation or prove to be a cosmological disaster like magnetic monopoles or domain walls. After a brief discussion of our numerical technique, results are presented which, though still preliminary, offer the best support to date of this scaling hypothesis.

  4. Alternative Solutions for Optimization Problems in Generalizability Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Piet F.

    1992-01-01

    Presents solutions for the problem of maximizing the generalizability coefficient under a budget constraint. Shows that the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality can be applied to derive optimal continuous solutions for the number of conditions of each facet. Illustrates the formal similarity between optimization problems in survey sampling and…

  5. Existence of solutions for some higher order boundary value problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charkrit, Sita; Kananthai, Amnuay

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with the existence of solutions for the higher order boundary value problem in the form where m is a given positive integer and is continuous. We introduce a new maximum principle of higher order equations and develop a monotone method in the presence of lower and upper solutions for this problem.

  6. Implicit solution of large-scale radiation diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P N; Graziani, F; Otero, I; Woodward, C S

    2001-01-04

    In this paper, we present an efficient solution approach for fully implicit, large-scale, nonlinear radiation diffusion problems. The fully implicit approach is compared to a semi-implicit solution method. Accuracy and efficiency are shown to be better for the fully implicit method on both one- and three-dimensional problems with tabular opacities taken from the LEOS opacity library.

  7. Problem Solvers: Solutions--Playing Basketball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    In this article, fourth grade Upper Allen Elementary School (Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania) teacher Jeffrey Smith describes his exploration of the Playing Basketball activity. Herein he describes how he found the problem to be an effective way to review concepts associated with the measurement of elapsed time with his students. Additionally, it…

  8. Real Problems, Virtual Solutions: Engaging Students Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, A. Fiona

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author explains how she used online blogs with more than 263 students over a period of four semesters in an introductory social problems course. She describes how she uses blogs to enhance student participation, engagement, and skill building. Finally, she provides an overview of students' qualitative assessments of the blog…

  9. Problem Solvers: Solutions--The Inaugural Address

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dause, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Fourth graders in Miss Dause's and Mrs. Hicks's mathematics classes at South Mountain Elementary School in Dillsburg, Pennsylvania, worked with the data from the Inauagural Address problem that was previously published published in the February 2013 issue of "Teaching Children Mathematics". This activity allowed students to…

  10. Solutions to the Triangular Bicycle Flags Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartweg, Kim

    2005-01-01

    Students in a fifth-grade general education class and a second-grade gifted class participated in the Triangular Bicycle Flags problem. The results indicated that providing students with geometric experiences at the correct van Hiele level is necessary for helping students move from one level of understanding to the next.

  11. English Preservice Teaching: Problems and Suggested Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naeem, Marwa Ahmed Refat

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the problems faced by Egyptian EFL prospective teachers during their first encounter with preservice teaching. The sample for the study included 135 prospective EFL teachers trained in five preparatory (middle) schools in Kafr El-Sheikh city, Egypt. At the end of their first year training course, the prospective…

  12. Cells mechanics with AFM: problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor; Dokukin, Maxim; Guz, Nataliia

    2012-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to study mechanics of cells. Cell is far from being a homogeneous medium. This creates a number of problems which will be discussed as well as the ways to solve them. We will focus on the following problems: 1. Cellular surface brush (microvilli, glycocalyx..) surrounds cells. A simple model to separate the brush and cell deformation will be overviewed. 2. Problem of nonlinearity of stress-strain relation. Although unsolved, this may indirectly tested: the rigidity modulus should be reasonably independent of penetration. We will show that it can be achieved when using relatively dull AFM probes (the radii of microns) only. 3. Heterogeneity of cell surface. Cells are not homogeneous over the surface. We will discuss the question how many points is enough to characterize the cell. We will exemplify the above with human cervical epithelial cells. We will demonstrate that without proper consideration of the above problems, the error in defining the modulus of rigidity can easily reach an order of magnitude.

  13. Viruses in Water: The Problem, Some Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerba, Charles P.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Increasing population and industrialization places heavy demands on water resources making recycling of wastewaters for domestic consumption inevitable. Eliminating human pathogenic viruses is a major problem of reclaiming wastewater. Present water treatment methods may not be sufficient to remove viruses. (MR)

  14. Can False Memories Prime Problem Solutions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.; Garner, Sarah R.; Dewhurst, Stephen A.; Ball, Linden J.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that false memories can prime performance on related implicit and explicit memory tasks. The present research examined whether false memories can also be used to prime higher order cognitive processes, namely, insight-based problem solving. Participants were asked to solve a number of compound remote associate task…

  15. On "Acknowledging" Problems and "Implementing" Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Jane

    One urgent practical problem faced by speech communication educators is the need to educate students with a serious concern for their subsequent employability. The shrinking academic job market for speech communication graduates is a reality with which speech communication educators must be concerned. Speech communicators are beginning to ask…

  16. Simulating water, solute, and heat transport in the subsurface with the VS2DI software package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    The software package VS2DI was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for simulating water, solute, and heat transport in variably saturated porous media. The package consists of a graphical preprocessor to facilitate construction of a simulation, a postprocessor for visualizing simulation results, and two numerical models that solve for flow and solute transport (VS2DT) and flow and heat transport (VS2DH). The finite-difference method is used to solve the Richards equation for flow and the advection-dispersion equation for solute or heat transport. This study presents a brief description of the VS2DI package, an overview of the various types of problems that have been addressed with the package, and an analysis of the advantages and limitations of the package. A review of other models and modeling approaches for studying water, solute, and heat transport also is provided. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  17. Exact optimal solution for a class of dual control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Suping; Qian, Fucai; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers a discrete-time stochastic optimal control problem for which only measurement equation is partially observed with unknown constant parameters taking value in a finite set of stochastic systems. Because of the fact that the cost-to-go function at each stage contains variance and the non-separability of the variance is so complicated that the dynamic programming cannot be successfully applied, the optimal solution has not been found. In this paper, a new approach to the optimal solution is proposed by embedding the original non-separable problem into a separable auxiliary problem. The theoretical condition on which the optimal solution of the original problem can be attained from a set of solutions of the auxiliary problem is established. In addition, the optimality of the interchanging algorithm is proved and the analytical solution of the optimal control is also obtained. The performance of this controller is illustrated with a simple example.

  18. The Effect of Alternative Solutions on Problem Solving Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shin-Yi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of instruction in alternative solutions on Taiwanese eighth-grade students' mathematical problem solving performance. This study was exploratory rather than experimental. Alternative-Solution Worksheet (ASW) was developed to encourage students' engagement with alternative solutions to…

  19. Marine geodesy - Problem areas and solution concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, N.

    1974-01-01

    This paper deals with a conceptional geodetic approach to solve various oceanic problems, such as submersible navigation under iced seas, demarcation/determination of boundaries in open ocean, resolving sea-level slope discrepancy, improving tsunami warning system, ecology, etc., etc. The required instrumentation is not described here. The achieved as well as desired positional accuracy estimates in open ocean for various tasks are also given.

  20. Computational solution of atmospheric chemistry problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jafri, J.; Ake, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive studies were performed on problems of interest in atmospheric chemistry. In addition to several minor projects, four major projects were performed and described (theoretical studies of ground and low-lying excited states of ClO2; ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of the methyl peroxy radical; electronic states ot the FO radical; and theoretical studies S02 (H2O) (sub n)).

  1. Ergonomics problems and solutions in biotechnology laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, T.W.; Stengel, J.W.; Fellingham-Gilbert, P.

    1995-03-01

    The multi-functional successful ergonomics program currently implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will be presented with special emphasis on recent findings in the Biotechnology laboratory environment. In addition to a discussion of more traditional computer-related repetitive stress injuries and associated statistics, the presentation will cover identification of ergonomic problems in laboratory functions such as pipetting, radiation shielding, and microscope work. Techniques to alleviate symptoms and prevent future injuries will be presented.

  2. Cosmic strings: A problem or a solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D.P.; Bouchet, F.R.

    1987-10-01

    The most fundamental issue in the theory of cosmic strings is addressed by means of Numerical Simulations: the existence of a scaling solution. The resolution of this question will determine whether cosmic strings can form the basis of an attractive theory of galaxy formation or prove to be a cosmological disaster like magnetic monopoles or domain walls. After a brief discussion of our numerical technique, results are presented which, though still preliminary, offer the best support to date of this scaling hypothesis. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Nonlinear Transient Problems Using Structure Compatible Heat Transfer Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Gene

    2000-01-01

    The report documents the recent effort to enhance a transient linear heat transfer code so as to solve nonlinear problems. The linear heat transfer code was originally developed by Dr. Kim Bey of NASA Largely and called the Structure-Compatible Heat Transfer (SCHT) code. The report includes four parts. The first part outlines the formulation of the heat transfer problem of concern. The second and the third parts give detailed procedures to construct the nonlinear finite element equations and the required Jacobian matrices for the nonlinear iterative method, Newton-Raphson method. The final part summarizes the results of the numerical experiments on the newly enhanced SCHT code.

  4. Asymptotic expansions of solutions of the heat conduction equation in internally bounded cylindrical geometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritchie, R.H.; Sakakura, A.Y.

    1956-01-01

    The formal solutions of problems involving transient heat conduction in infinite internally bounded cylindrical solids may be obtained by the Laplace transform method. Asymptotic series representing the solutions for large values of time are given in terms of functions related to the derivatives of the reciprocal gamma function. The results are applied to the case of the internally bounded infinite cylindrical medium with, (a) the boundary held at constant temperature; (b) with constant heat flow over the boundary; and (c) with the "radiation" boundary condition. A problem in the flow of gas through a porous medium is considered in detail.

  5. Simple Solutions for Space Station Audio Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Throughout this summer, a number of different projects were supported relating to various NASA programs, including the International Space Station (ISS) and Orion. The primary project that was worked on was designing and testing an acoustic diverter which could be used on the ISS to increase sound pressure levels in Node 1, a module that does not have any Audio Terminal Units (ATUs) inside it. This acoustic diverter is not intended to be a permanent solution to providing audio to Node 1; it is simply intended to improve conditions while more permanent solutions are under development. One of the most exciting aspects of this project is that the acoustic diverter is designed to be 3D printed on the ISS, using the 3D printer that was set up earlier this year. Because of this, no new hardware needs to be sent up to the station, and no extensive hardware testing needs to be performed on the ground before sending it to the station. Instead, the 3D part file can simply be uploaded to the station's 3D printer, where the diverter will be made.

  6. Numerical solution of large nonsymmetric eigenvalue problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saad, Youcef

    1988-01-01

    Several methods are discribed for combinations of Krylov subspace techniques, deflation procedures and preconditionings, for computing a small number of eigenvalues and eigenvectors or Schur vectors of large sparse matrices. The most effective techniques for solving realistic problems from applications are those methods based on some form of preconditioning and one of several Krylov subspace techniques, such as Arnoldi's method or Lanczos procedure. Two forms of preconditioning are considered: shift-and-invert and polynomial acceleration. The latter presents some advantages for parallel/vector processing but may be ineffective if eigenvalues inside the spectrum are sought. Some algorithmic details are provided that improve the reliability and effectiveness of these techniques.

  7. High order accurate solutions of viscous problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. E.; Turkel, Eli

    1993-01-01

    We consider a fourth order extension to MacCormack's scheme. The original extension was fourth order only for the inviscid terms but was second order for the viscous terms. We show how to modify the viscous terms so that the scheme is uniformly fourth order in the spatial derivatives. Applications are given to some boundary layer flows. In addition, for applications to shear flows the effect of the outflow boundary conditions are very important. We compare the accuracy of several of these different boundary conditions for both boundary layer and shear flows. Stretching at the outflow usually increases the oscillations in the numerical solution but the addition of a filtered sponge layer (with or without stretching) reduces such oscillations. The oscillations are generated by insufficient resolution of the shear layer. When the shear layer is sufficiently resolved then oscillations are not generated and there is less of a need for a nonreflecting boundary condition.

  8. The proton storage ring: Problems and solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) now operates with 35..mu..A at 20-Hz pulse repetition rate. Beam availability during 1988 suffered because of a number of problems with hardware reliability and from narrow operating margins for beam spill in the extraction line. A strong effort is underway to improve reliability with an eventual goal of obtaining beam availability in excess of 75%. Beam losses and the resulting component activation have limited operating currents to their present values. In detailed studies of the problem, loss rates were found to be approximately proportional to the circulating current and can be understood by a detailed accounting of emittance growth in the two-step injection process along with Coulomb scattering of the stored beam during multiple traversals of the injection foil. It is now apparent that the key to reducing losses is in reducing the number of foil traversals. A program of upgrades to reduce losses and improve the operating current is being planned. 8 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Bridging Solutions in Dose Finding Problems

    PubMed Central

    O’Quigley, John; Iasonos, Alexia

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The idea of bridging in dose-finding studies is closely linked to the problem of group heterogeneity. There are some distinctive features in the case of bridging which need to be considered if efficient estimation of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is to be accomplished. The case of two distinct populations is considered. In the bridging setting we usually have in mind two studies, corresponding to the two populations. In some cases, the first of these studies may have been completed while the second has yet to be initiated. In other cases, the studies take place simultaneously and information can then be shared among the two groups. The methodological problem is how to make most use of the information gained in the first study to help improve efficiency in the second. We describe the models that we can use for the purpose of bridging and study situations in which their use leads to overall improvements in performance as well as cases where there is no gain when compared to carrying out parallel studies. Simulations and an example in pediatric oncology help to provide further insight. PMID:25071878

  10. Food sustainability: problems, perspectives and solutions.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Tara

    2013-02-01

    The global food system makes a significant contribution to climate changing greenhouse gas emissions with all stages in the supply chain, from agricultural production through processing, distribution, retailing, home food preparation and waste, playing a part. It also gives rise to other major environmental impacts, including biodiversity loss and water extraction and pollution. Policy makers are increasingly aware of the need to address these concerns, but at the same time they are faced with a growing burden of food security and nutrition-related problems, and tasked with ensuring that there is enough food to meet the needs of a growing global population. In short, more people need to be fed better, with less environmental impact. How might this be achieved? Broadly, three main 'takes' or perspectives, on the issues and their interactions, appear to be emerging. Depending on one's view point, the problem can be conceptualised as a production challenge, in which case there is a need to change how food is produced by improving the unit efficiency of food production; a consumption challenge, which requires changes to the dietary drivers that determine food production; or a socio-economic challenge, which requires changes in how the food system is governed. This paper considers these perspectives in turn, their implications for nutrition and climate change, and their strengths and weaknesses. Finally, an argument is made for a reorientation of policy thinking which uses the insights provided by all three perspectives, rather than, as is the situation today, privileging one over the other. PMID:23336559

  11. Food sustainability: problems, perspectives and solutions.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Tara

    2013-02-01

    The global food system makes a significant contribution to climate changing greenhouse gas emissions with all stages in the supply chain, from agricultural production through processing, distribution, retailing, home food preparation and waste, playing a part. It also gives rise to other major environmental impacts, including biodiversity loss and water extraction and pollution. Policy makers are increasingly aware of the need to address these concerns, but at the same time they are faced with a growing burden of food security and nutrition-related problems, and tasked with ensuring that there is enough food to meet the needs of a growing global population. In short, more people need to be fed better, with less environmental impact. How might this be achieved? Broadly, three main 'takes' or perspectives, on the issues and their interactions, appear to be emerging. Depending on one's view point, the problem can be conceptualised as a production challenge, in which case there is a need to change how food is produced by improving the unit efficiency of food production; a consumption challenge, which requires changes to the dietary drivers that determine food production; or a socio-economic challenge, which requires changes in how the food system is governed. This paper considers these perspectives in turn, their implications for nutrition and climate change, and their strengths and weaknesses. Finally, an argument is made for a reorientation of policy thinking which uses the insights provided by all three perspectives, rather than, as is the situation today, privileging one over the other.

  12. Multiple Planets Problems and Solutions in Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Michael; Zhai, C.; Catanzarite, J.; Loredo, T.; McArthur, B.; Benedict, F.

    2009-01-01

    In early 2008, NASA asked the SIM project to conduct a double blind study to determine how well astrometry at the microarcsec level can detect Earth-like planets in the habitable zone in the environment of a multiple planet system. Astrometric planet detection looks for a periodic signature and confusion can result if two or more planets have orbital frequencies that can not be separated with a finite data set. 5 years of micro-arcsec level measurements from a mission like SIM, can not resolve orbital periods of planets separated by less than 0.2 cycles per year. Our solar system however has 4 planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune whose periods are all within 0.2 cycles/yr of each other. This paper describes the type of problems that arise and the procedures developed to work around these problems. The double blind study consisted of 48 multiple planet systems with a total of 98 planets and 483 asteroids and 48 of the 98 planets had a large enough signal to be detected, had they been "solo" planets. In the end the SIM science team was able to find 96% of the "48 planets", and 98% of the claimed detections were real. For terrestrial planets in the habitable zone all 13 planets were detected with no false positives.

  13. School Budgeting: Problems and Solutions. AASA Critical Issues Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hymes, Donald L.

    School budget problems are discussed in 13 chapters, and solutions are suggested. Case studies present successful experiences with various problems while brief subsections summarize recommended actions. The first two chapters note that budget problems are worsening and trace the causes to tax revolts, state involvement in education, and the…

  14. Skill Acquisition: Compilation of Weak-Method Problem Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John R.

    According to the ACT theory of skill acquisition, cognitive skills are encoded by a set of productions, which are organized according to a hierarchical goal structure. People solve problems in new domains by applying weak problem-solving procedures to declarative knowledge they have about this domain. From these initial problem solutions,…

  15. A two-model iteration algorithm for solving the inverse boundary-value problem of heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakovskii, S. L.

    1987-12-01

    A method is proposed for restoring the heat flux density on the boundary of a body which consists of the sequential solution of the direct problem for an adequate complex model and the invserse problem for a simplified heat transmission model.

  16. Public problems: Still waiting on the marketplace for solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Gover, J.; Carayannis, E.; Huray, P.

    1997-10-01

    This report addresses the need for government sponsored R and D to address real public problems. The motivation is that a public benefit of the money spent must be demonstrated. The areas identified as not having appropriate attention resulting in unmet public needs include healthcare cost, cost and benefits of regulations, infrastructure problems, defense spending misaligned with foreign policy objectives, the crime problem, energy impact on the environment, the education problem, low productivity growth industry sectors, the income distribution problem, the aging problem, the propagation of disease and policy changes needed to address the solution of these problems.

  17. On similarity solutions for turbulent and heated round jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Hwang, B. C.

    1986-01-01

    Commonly used empirical correlations for incompressible, heated round jets are shown to represent similarity solutions of the governing jet equations. These solutions give rise to self-similar eddy viscosities. Not all the similarity solutions are physically valid because some lead to zero eddy viscosities at the jet centerline. One physically valid solution is found to correlate best with round jet measurements and it gives a Gaussian error function description for the normalized mean velocity and temperature. Heat and momentum fluxes thus calculated are also in good agreement with measurements. Therefore, in addition to the classical similarity solution obtained by assuming constant eddy viscosity, another similarity solution to the jet equations is found where the eddy viscosity is self-similar.

  18. Hybrid modeling of direct and inverse problems of heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsevityi, Yu. M.

    1981-02-01

    The article explains the method of solving nonlinear problems of heat conduction with the aid of hybrid computer systems. It examines the possibility of using hybrid systems for realizing the method of optimum dynamic filtration.

  19. Solution to the Cosmic Ray Anisotropy Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertsch, Philipp; Funk, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In the standard diffusive picture for transport of cosmic rays (CRs), a gradient in the CR density induces a typically small, dipolar anisotropy in their arrival directions. This is being widely advertised as a tool for finding nearby sources. However, the predicted dipole amplitude at TeV and PeV energies exceeds the measured one by almost 2 orders of magnitude. Here, we critically examine the validity of this prediction, which is based on averaging over an ensemble of turbulent magnetic fields. We focus on (1) the deviations of the dipole in a particular random realization from the ensemble average, and (2) the possibility of a misalignment between the regular magnetic field and the CR gradient. We find that if the field direction and the gradient direction are close to ˜90 ° , the dipole amplitude is considerably suppressed and can be reconciled with observations, which sheds light on a long-standing problem. Furthermore, we show that the dipole direction in general does not coincide with the gradient direction, thus hampering the search for nearby sources.

  20. [Utilities: a solution of a decision problem?].

    PubMed

    Koller, Michael; Ohmann, Christian; Lorenz, Wilfried

    2008-01-01

    Utility is a concept that originates from utilitarianism, a highly influential philosophical school in the Anglo-American world. The cornerstone of utilitarianism is the principle of maximum happiness or utility. In the medical sciences, this utility approach has been adopted and developed within the field of medical decision making. On an operational level, utility is the evaluation of a health state or an outcome on a one-dimensional scale ranging from 0 (death) to 1 (perfect health). By adding the concept of expectancy, the graphic representation of both concepts in a decision tree results in the specification of expected utilities and helps to resolve complex medical decision problems. Criticism of the utility approach relates to the rational perspective on humans (which is rejected by a considerable fraction of research in psychology) and to the artificial methods used in the evaluation of utility, such as Standard Gamble or Time Trade Off. These may well be the reason why the utility approach has never been accepted in Germany. Nevertheless, innovative concepts for defining goals in health care are urgently required, as the current debate in Germany on "Nutzen" (interestingly translated as 'benefit' instead of as 'utility') and integrated outcome models indicates. It remains to be seen whether this discussion will lead to a re-evaluation of the utility approach.

  1. Solution to the π-Distortivity Problem.

    PubMed

    Perumalla, D Sravanakumar; Sebastian, Kizhakeyil L

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, the delocalized π system of benzene is believed to be responsible for its perfectly symmetric D6h geometry. However, it has also been suggested that the π system prefers a distorted D3h geometry. Arguments for this have been based on clever use of VB methods as well as through shifts in the frequency of the distortive b2u mode. Evidence has been provided through different ways of partitioning the total electronic energy between the σ and the π systems. These methods are plagued by the fact that there is no unique way to partition the energy, leading to questions regarding the validity of the conclusions. Here we note that even though energy cannot be partitioned exactly, force acting on a nucleus depends only on the single particle density and can hence be partitioned exactly. Using good-quality wave functions that are numerically found to obey the Hellmann-Feynman theorem to good accuracy, we calculate the σ and π components of the force and provide conclusive evidence of π-distortivity at the HF level. Our approach provides an unambiguous way to approach the problem with wave functions that account for electron correlation. Our calculations suggest that the conclusion is valid at the MP2 level, too. PMID:27504529

  2. A History of Aerospace Problems, Their Solutions, Their Lessons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The positive aspect of problem occurrences is the opportunity for learning and a challenge for innovation. The learning aspect is not restricted to the solution period of the problem occurrence, but can become the beacon for problem prevention on future programs. Problems/failures serve as a point of departure for scaling to new designs. To ensure that problems/failures and their solutions guide the future programs, a concerted effort has been expended to study these problems, their solutions, their derived lessons learned, and projections for future programs. This includes identification of technology thrusts, process changes, codes development, etc. However, they must not become an excuse for adding layers upon layers of standards, criteria, and requirements, but must serve as guidelines that assist instead of stifling engineers. This report is an extension of prior efforts to accomplish this task. Although these efforts only scratch the surface, it is a beginning that others must complete.

  3. Numerical solution of control problems governed by nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Heinkenschloss, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this presentation the author investigates an iterative method for the solution of optimal control problems. These problems are formulated as constrained optimization problems with constraints arising from the state equation and in the form of bound constraints on the control. The method for the solution of these problems uses the special structure of the problem arising from the bound constraint and the state equation. It is derived from SQP methods and projected Newton methods and combines the advantages of both methods. The bound constraint is satisfied by all iterates using a projection, the nonlinear state equation is satisfied in the limit. Only a linearized state equation has to be solved in every iteration. The solution of the linearized problems are done using multilevel methods and GMRES.

  4. Inverse problems and optimal experiment design in unsteady heat transfer processes identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artyukhin, Eugene A.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental-computational methods for estimating characteristics of unsteady heat transfer processes are analyzed. The methods are based on the principles of distributed parameter system identification. The theoretical basis of such methods is the numerical solution of nonlinear ill-posed inverse heat transfer problems and optimal experiment design problems. Numerical techniques for solving problems are briefly reviewed. The results of the practical application of identification methods are demonstrated when estimating effective thermophysical characteristics of composite materials and thermal contact resistance in two-layer systems.

  5. Solution of one problem of control connected with the reduction of iron-ore pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Glasko, V.B.; Kulagin, I.D.; Matytsyn, A.P.; Trubetskov, M.K.

    1985-06-01

    The article examines the mathematical model of the process of heating iron-ore pellets, and a gas blown through them, by high-frequency currents. On the basis of the solution of the problem of control it becomes possible to evaluate the efficiency of the heater and to choose the optimum operating conditions for it.

  6. Identification of the Thermal Conductivity and Heat Capacity in Unsteady Nonlinear Heat Conduction Problems Using the Boundary Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnic, D.; Elliott, L.; Ingham, D. B.

    1996-07-01

    In this study the inverse problem of the identification of temperature dependent thermal properties of a heat conducting body is investigated. The solution of the corresponding direct problem is obtained using a time marching boundary element method (BEM), which allows, without any need of interpolation and solution domain discretisation, efficient and accurate evaluation of the temperature everywhere inside the space-time dependent domain. Since the inverse problem, which requires the determination of the thermal conductivity and heat capacity from a finite set of temperature measurements taken inside the body, possesses poor uniqueness features, additional information is achieved by assuming that the thermal properties belong to a set of polynomials. Thus the inverse problem reduces to a parameter system estimation problem which is solved using the nonlinear least-squares method. Convergent and stable numerical results are obtained for the finite set of parameters which characterise the thermal properties for various test examples. Once the thermal properties are accurately obtained then the BEM determines automatically the temperature inside the solution domain and the remaining unspecified boundary values and the numerically obtained results show good agreement with the corresponding analytical solutions.

  7. Moving to solution: effects of movement priming on problem solving.

    PubMed

    Werner, K; Raab, M

    2013-01-01

    Embodied cognition theories suggest a link between bodily movements and cognitive functions. Given such a link, it is assumed that movement influences the two main stages of problem solving: creating a problem space and creating solutions. This study explores how specific the link between bodily movements and the problem-solving process is. Seventy-two participants were tested with variations of the two-string problem (Experiment 1) and the water-jar problem (Experiment 2), allowing for two possible solutions. In Experiment 1 participants were primed with arm-swing movements (swing group) and step movements on a chair (step group). In Experiment 2 participants sat in front of three jars with glass marbles and had to sort these marbles from the outer jars to the middle one (plus group) or vice versa (minus group). Results showed more swing-like solutions in the swing group and more step-like solutions in the step group, and more addition solutions in the plus group and more subtraction solutions in the minus group. This specificity of the connection between movement and problem-solving task will allow further experiments to investigate how bodily movements influence the stages of problem solving. PMID:23820945

  8. Moving to solution: effects of movement priming on problem solving.

    PubMed

    Werner, K; Raab, M

    2013-01-01

    Embodied cognition theories suggest a link between bodily movements and cognitive functions. Given such a link, it is assumed that movement influences the two main stages of problem solving: creating a problem space and creating solutions. This study explores how specific the link between bodily movements and the problem-solving process is. Seventy-two participants were tested with variations of the two-string problem (Experiment 1) and the water-jar problem (Experiment 2), allowing for two possible solutions. In Experiment 1 participants were primed with arm-swing movements (swing group) and step movements on a chair (step group). In Experiment 2 participants sat in front of three jars with glass marbles and had to sort these marbles from the outer jars to the middle one (plus group) or vice versa (minus group). Results showed more swing-like solutions in the swing group and more step-like solutions in the step group, and more addition solutions in the plus group and more subtraction solutions in the minus group. This specificity of the connection between movement and problem-solving task will allow further experiments to investigate how bodily movements influence the stages of problem solving.

  9. Optimal recovery of the solution of the heat equation from inaccurate data

    SciTech Connect

    Magaril-Il'yaev, G G; Osipenko, Konstantin Yu

    2009-06-30

    The problem of optimal recovery of the solution of the heat equation in the entire space at a fixed instant of time from inaccurate observations of this solution at some other instants of time is investigated. Explicit expressions for an optimal recovery method and its error are given. The solution of a similar problem with a priori information about the temperature distribution at some instants of time is also given. In all cases the optimal method uses information about at most two observations. Bibliography: 22 titles.

  10. The Reasons and Solutions for Problems in Rural School Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qingyang, Guo

    2013-01-01

    Based on investigations in six midwestern provinces/autonomous regions, Hubei, Henan, Guangxi, Yunnan, Shaanxi, and Inner Mongolia, this article analyzes the reasons for problems in the process of consolidating rural schools and their solutions.

  11. An Analysis of Children's Written Solutions to Word Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knifong, J. Dan; Holtan, Boyd

    1976-01-01

    Sixth graders wrote solutions to the word problems in the Metropolitan Achievement Test. Errors were analyzed and classified. At least 52 percent of errors were computational or clerical and could not be attributed to reading difficulties. (SD)

  12. Group Testing: Four Student Solutions to a Classic Optimization Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teague, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    This article describes several creative solutions developed by calculus and modeling students to the classic optimization problem of testing in groups to find a small number of individuals who test positive in a large population.

  13. Hamilton's Principle and Approximate Solutions to Problems in Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlitt, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Shows how to use the Ritz method for obtaining approximate solutions to problems expressed in variational form directly from the variational equation. Application of this method to classical mechanics is given. (MLH)

  14. Algebraic solution of the synthesis problem for coded sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Leukhin, Anatolii N

    2005-08-31

    The algebraic solution of a 'complex' problem of synthesis of phase-coded (PC) sequences with the zero level of side lobes of the cyclic autocorrelation function (ACF) is proposed. It is shown that the solution of the synthesis problem is connected with the existence of difference sets for a given code dimension. The problem of estimating the number of possible code combinations for a given code dimension is solved. It is pointed out that the problem of synthesis of PC sequences is related to the fundamental problems of discrete mathematics and, first of all, to a number of combinatorial problems, which can be solved, as the number factorisation problem, by algebraic methods by using the theory of Galois fields and groups. (fourth seminar to the memory of d.n. klyshko)

  15. Mixed Boundary Value Problems for Stationary Magnetohydrodynamic Equations of a Viscous Heat-Conducting Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Gennady

    2016-09-01

    We consider the boundary value problem for stationary magnetohydrodynamic equations of electrically and heat conducting fluid under inhomogeneous mixed boundary conditions for electromagnetic field and temperature and Dirichlet condition for the velocity. The problem describes the thermoelectromagnetic flow of a viscous fluid in 3D bounded domain with the boundary consisting of several parts with different thermo- and electrophysical properties. The global solvability of the boundary value problem is proved and the apriori estimates of the solution are derived. The sufficient conditions on the data are established which provide a local uniqueness of the solution.

  16. Mixed Boundary Value Problems for Stationary Magnetohydrodynamic Equations of a Viscous Heat-Conducting Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Gennady

    2016-04-01

    We consider the boundary value problem for stationary magnetohydrodynamic equations of electrically and heat conducting fluid under inhomogeneous mixed boundary conditions for electromagnetic field and temperature and Dirichlet condition for the velocity. The problem describes the thermoelectromagnetic flow of a viscous fluid in 3D bounded domain with the boundary consisting of several parts with different thermo- and electrophysical properties. The global solvability of the boundary value problem is proved and the apriori estimates of the solution are derived. The sufficient conditions on the data are established which provide a local uniqueness of the solution.

  17. Optimal distributed solution to the dining philosophers problem

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, S.P.; Banerji, D.K.

    1986-08-01

    An optimal distributed solution to the dining philosophers problem is presented. The solution is optimal in the sense that it incurs the least communication and computational overhead, and allows the maximum achievable concurrency. The worst case upper bound for concurrency is shown to be n div 3, n being the number of philosophers. There is no previous algorithm known to achieve this bound.

  18. General Solution of the Kenamond HE Problem 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann

    2015-12-15

    A general solution for programmed burn calculations of the light times produced by a singlepoint initiation of a single HE region surrounding an inert region has been developed. In contrast to the original solutions proposed in References 1 and 2, the detonator is no longer restricted to a location on a Cartesian axis and can be located at any point inside the HE region. This general solution has been implemented in the ExactPack suite of exact solvers for verification problems.

  19. Analytical Solution for Three-Dimensional, Unsteady Heat Conduction in a Multilayer Sphere

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Suneet; Jain, Prashant K.; Uddin, Rizwan

    2016-06-07

    An analytical solution has been obtained for the transient problem of three-dimensional multilayer heat conduction in a sphere with layers in the radial direction. The solution procedure can be applied to a hollow sphere or a solid sphere composed of several layers of various materials. In general, the separation of variables applied to 3D spherical coordinates has unique characteristics due to the presence of associated Legendre functions as the eigenfunctions. Moreover, an eigenvalue problem in the azimuthal direction also requires solution; again, its properties are unique owing to periodicity in the azimuthal direction. Therefore, extending existing solutions in 2D sphericalmore » coordinates to 3D spherical coordinates is not straightforward. In a spherical coordinate system, one can solve a 3D transient multilayer heat conduction problem without the presence of imaginary eigenvalues. A 2D cylindrical polar coordinate system is the only other case in which such multidimensional problems can be solved without the use of imaginary eigenvalues. The absence of imaginary eigenvalues renders the solution methodology significantly more useful for practical applications. The methodology described can be used for all three types of boundary conditions in the outer and inner surface of the sphere. Lastly, the solution procedure is demonstrated on an illustrative problem for which results are obtained.« less

  20. A direct analytical approach for solving linear inverse heat conduction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainajem, N. M.; Ozisik, M. N.

    1985-08-01

    The analytical approach presented for the solution of linear inverse heat conduction problems demonstrates that applied surface conditions involving abrupt changes with time can be effectively accommodated with polynomial representations in time over the entire time domain; the resulting inverse analysis predicts surface conditions accurately. All previous attempts have experienced difficulties in the development of analytic solutions that are applicable over the entire time domain when a polynomial representation is used.

  1. Sensitivity Equation Derivation for Transient Heat Transfer Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Gene; Chien, Ta-Cheng; Sheen, Jeenson

    2004-01-01

    The focus of the paper is on the derivation of sensitivity equations for transient heat transfer problems modeled by different discretization processes. Two examples will be used in this study to facilitate the discussion. The first example is a coupled, transient heat transfer problem that simulates the press molding process in fabrication of composite laminates. These state equations are discretized into standard h-version finite elements and solved by a multiple step, predictor-corrector scheme. The sensitivity analysis results based upon the direct and adjoint variable approaches will be presented. The second example is a nonlinear transient heat transfer problem solved by a p-version time-discontinuous Galerkin's Method. The resulting matrix equation of the state equation is simply in the form of Ax = b, representing a single step, time marching scheme. A direct differentiation approach will be used to compute the thermal sensitivities of a sample 2D problem.

  2. USING COMPUTERS IN EDUCATION--SOME PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SILBERMAN, HARRY F.

    POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS TO THE PROBLEM OF THE DESIGN OF COMPUTER-ASSISTED INSTRUCTION (CAI) PROGRAMS ARE TO COPY EXISTING METHODS, TO USE SCIENTIFIC METHODS, OR TO DESIGN PROGRAMS FITTED TO LOCAL NEEDS. THE BEST ANSWER TO THE PROBLEM OF INSTRUCTIONAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS NEEDED FOR CAI PROGRAMS IS COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF STUDENT PERFORMANCE DATA. TRAINING…

  3. The Permanent Career Problem and Some Partial Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perl, Martin L.; Good, R. H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Examines the employment problems of Ph.D. physicists in the traditional career areas of higher educatiion, industry, and government. Proposed solutions to the problem include not increasing physics graduate enrollment, annual manpower reports, student awareness of careers in non-traditional fields, and career mobility among older physicists. (GS)

  4. Fast multigrid solution of the advection problem with closed characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Yavneh, I.; Venner, C.H.; Brandt, A.

    1996-12-31

    The numerical solution of the advection-diffusion problem in the inviscid limit with closed characteristics is studied as a prelude to an efficient high Reynolds-number flow solver. It is demonstrated by a heuristic analysis and numerical calculations that using upstream discretization with downstream relaxation-ordering and appropriate residual weighting in a simple multigrid V cycle produces an efficient solution process. We also derive upstream finite-difference approximations to the advection operator, whose truncation terms approximate {open_quotes}physical{close_quotes} (Laplacian) viscosity, thus avoiding spurious solutions to the homogeneous problem when the artificial diffusivity dominates the physical viscosity.

  5. Solution of the stochastic control problem in unbounded domains.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P.; Moore, J.

    1973-01-01

    Bellman's dynamic programming equation for the optimal index and control law for stochastic control problems is a parabolic or elliptic partial differential equation frequently defined in an unbounded domain. Existing methods of solution require bounded domain approximations, the application of singular perturbation techniques or Monte Carlo simulation procedures. In this paper, using the fact that Poisson impulse noise tends to a Gaussian process under certain limiting conditions, a method which achieves an arbitrarily good approximate solution to the stochastic control problem is given. The method uses the two iterative techniques of successive approximation and quasi-linearization and is inherently more efficient than existing methods of solution.

  6. Leak testing of cryogenic components — problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, S. P.; Pandarkar, S. P.; Unni, T. G.; Sinha, A. K.; Mahajan, K.; Suthar, R. L.

    2008-05-01

    moderator pot was driving the MSLD out of range. Since it was very difficult to locate the leak by Tracer Probe Method, some other technique was ventured to solve the problem of leak location. Finally, it was possible to locate the leak by observing the change in Helium background reading of MSLD during masking/unmasking of the welded joints. This paper, in general describes the design and leak testing aspects of cryogenic components of Cold Neutron Source and in particular, the problems and solutions for leak testing of transfer lines and moderator pot.

  7. Resonant-Spin Flavour solutions to the Solar neutrino Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, O. G.

    2002-07-01

    Resonant spin-flavour solutions to the solar neutrino problem are introduced, in the framework of analytic solutions to the solar magneto-hydrodynamics equations. We study these solutions in a scheme with 3 effective parameters: the neutrino magnetic moment, the neutrino mass difference and mixing. We perform a fit of the solar neutrino data, including the recent SNO CC. We show how a rates-only analysis slightly flavours spin-flavour precession solutions over oscillations. In addition to the resonant solution, there is a new non-resonant solution in the dark-side. Both solutions lead to flat recoil energy spectra in excellent agreement with the latest SuperKamiokande data.

  8. Approximate solutions for certain bidomain problems in electrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Peter R.

    2008-10-01

    The simulation of problems in electrocardiography using the bidomain model for cardiac tissue often creates issues with satisfaction of the boundary conditions required to obtain a solution. Recent studies have proposed approximate methods for solving such problems by satisfying the boundary conditions only approximately. This paper presents an analysis of their approximations using a similar method, but one which ensures that the boundary conditions are satisfied during the whole solution process. Also considered are additional functional forms, used in the approximate solutions, which are more appropriate to specific boundary conditions. The analysis shows that the approximations introduced by Patel and Roth [Phys. Rev. E 72, 051931 (2005)] generally give accurate results. However, there are certain situations where functional forms based on the geometry of the problem under consideration can give improved approximations. It is also demonstrated that the recent methods are equivalent to different approaches to solving the same problems introduced 20years earlier.

  9. Series solution of hydromagnetic flow and heat transfer with Hall effect in a second grade fluid over a stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, Muhammad; Zaman, Haider; Ahmad, Masud

    2010-02-01

    We examine the problem of flow and heat transfer in a second grade fluid over a stretching sheet [K. Vajravelu, T. Roper, Int. J. Nonlinear Mech. 34, 1031 (1999)]. The equations considered by Vajravelu and Roper [K. Vajravelu, T. Roper, Int. J. Nonlinear Mech. 34, 1031 (1999)], are found to be incorrect in the literature. In this paper, we not only corrected the equation but found a useful analytic solution to this important problem. We also extended the problem for hydromagnetic flow and heat transfer with Hall effect. The explicit analytic homotopy solution for the velocity field and heat transfer are presented. Graphs for the velocity field, skin friction coefficient, and rate of heat transfer are presented. Tables for the skin friction coefficient and rate of heat transfer are also presented. The convergence of the solution is also properly checked and discussed.

  10. Solution of second order quasi-linear boundary value problems by a wavelet method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Youhe; Wang, Jizeng

    2015-03-10

    A wavelet Galerkin method based on expansions of Coiflet-like scaling function bases is applied to solve second order quasi-linear boundary value problems which represent a class of typical nonlinear differential equations. Two types of typical engineering problems are selected as test examples: one is about nonlinear heat conduction and the other is on bending of elastic beams. Numerical results are obtained by the proposed wavelet method. Through comparing to relevant analytical solutions as well as solutions obtained by other methods, we find that the method shows better efficiency and accuracy than several others, and the rate of convergence can even reach orders of 5.8.

  11. Fuzzy α-minimum spanning tree problem: definition and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian; Chen, Lu; Wang, Ke; Yang, Fan

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the minimum spanning tree problem is investigated on the graph with fuzzy edge weights. The notion of fuzzy ? -minimum spanning tree is presented based on the credibility measure, and then the solutions of the fuzzy ? -minimum spanning tree problem are discussed under different assumptions. First, we respectively, assume that all the edge weights are triangular fuzzy numbers and trapezoidal fuzzy numbers and prove that the fuzzy ? -minimum spanning tree problem can be transformed to a classical problem on a crisp graph in these two cases, which can be solved by classical algorithms such as the Kruskal algorithm and the Prim algorithm in polynomial time. Subsequently, as for the case that the edge weights are general fuzzy numbers, a fuzzy simulation-based genetic algorithm using Prüfer number representation is designed for solving the fuzzy ? -minimum spanning tree problem. Some numerical examples are also provided for illustrating the effectiveness of the proposed solutions.

  12. On the role of surface shape in a micro-scale heat conduction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinler, A.; Graur, I. A.; Barber, R. W.; Emerson, D. R.; Perrier, P.

    2012-05-01

    The present study investigates the importance of the surface shape in a micro-scale heat conduction problem. A heated infinitely-thin cylindrical shell is positioned in the middle of two concentric cylinders, and the heat transfer through a rarefied gas between the shell and the confining inner (or outer) cylinder is investigated. The study initially considers the solution of the first- and second-order temperature-jump models (i.e. the conventional heat equation with temperature-jump boundary conditions). The study then examines the numerical solution of the nonlinear Shakhov model kinetic equation subject to the Maxwell boundary condition using the discrete velocity method (DVM). The variable-hard-sphere molecular interaction model is taken into account in the temperature-jump models allowing the presence of significant temperature differences between surfaces to be considered. Anomalous temperature profiles near the convex (or concave) side of the shell are attributed to the effects of surface shape.

  13. Parallel solution of sparse one-dimensional dynamic programming problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Parallel computation offers the potential for quickly solving large computational problems. However, it is often a non-trivial task to effectively use parallel computers. Solution methods must sometimes be reformulated to exploit parallelism; the reformulations are often more complex than their slower serial counterparts. We illustrate these points by studying the parallelization of sparse one-dimensional dynamic programming problems, those which do not obviously admit substantial parallelization. We propose a new method for parallelizing such problems, develop analytic models which help us to identify problems which parallelize well, and compare the performance of our algorithm with existing algorithms on a multiprocessor.

  14. Comparisons of fixation of heat, radiation, and heat plus radiation damage by anisotonic sodium chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Azzam, E.I.

    1982-06-01

    Heat treatment at temperatures greater than 40 degrees C synergistically enhanced damage produced by ionizing radiation. Researchers experiments indicated that radiation damage in exponentially growing Chinese hamster cells could be fixed in a dose-dependent manner by postirradiation treatment with both hypertonic and hypotonic NaCl solutions. At a 1,000-rad dose level, survival could be depressed by a factor of about 260. For various treatments at either 42 or 45 degrees C, exposure after heating to anisotonic solutions did not result in the fixation of heat damage. When cells were heated at 45 degrees C for 5 minutes and irradiated with 500 rad before or after heating or given 500 rad without heating and then exposed to 0.05 M NaCl solutions for 120 minutes, survival was reduced by factors of 875, 667, and 12, respectively. For heat treatments at lower temperatures, such as 41.5 or 42 degrees C, less damage fixation for the combined treatments was observed. The data indicated that heat and radiation damage were different and damage from the combined treatments was not the same for low- and high-treatment temperatures.

  15. Solution algorithms for nonlinear transient heat conduction analysis employing element-by-element iterative strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, J. M.; Hughes, T. J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The particular problems investigated in the present study arise from nonlinear transient heat conduction. One of two types of nonlinearities considered is related to a material temperature dependence which is frequently needed to accurately model behavior over the range of temperature of engineering interest. The second nonlinearity is introduced by radiation boundary conditions. The finite element equations arising from the solution of nonlinear transient heat conduction problems are formulated. The finite element matrix equations are temporally discretized, and a nonlinear iterative solution algorithm is proposed. Algorithms for solving the linear problem are discussed, taking into account the form of the matrix equations, Gaussian elimination, cost, and iterative techniques. Attention is also given to approximate factorization, implementational aspects, and numerical results.

  16. Elementary solutions of the quantum planar two-center problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González León, M. A.; Mateos Guilarte, J.; de la Torre Mayado, M.

    2016-05-01

    The quantum problem of an electron moving in a plane under the field created by two Coulombian centers admits simple analytical solutions for some particular intercenter distances. These elementary eigenfunctions, akin to those found by Demkov for the analogous three-dimensional problem, are calculated using the framework of quasi-exact solvability of a pair of entangled ODE's descendants from the Heun equation. A different but interesting situation arises when the two centers have the same strength. In this case completely elementary solutions do not exist.

  17. Uniqueness theorems for some inverse heat-conduction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzylev, N. V.

    1980-04-01

    Heat treatment of metals, involving rapid thermal processes, is an example of situations where the mathematical determination of thermal characteristics makes it necessary to solve a certain inverse problem, i.e., from some information on the temperature field, obtained from direct measurements. The present paper deals with the uniqueness of inverse problems of this type. Uniqueness theorems are proven for the determination of the coefficients of a nonlinear parabolic equation from the boundary conditions.

  18. Solution of the determinantal assignment problem using the Grassmann matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcanias, Nicos; Leventides, John

    2016-02-01

    The paper provides a direct solution to the determinantal assignment problem (DAP) which unifies all frequency assignment problems of the linear control theory. The current approach is based on the solvability of the exterior equation ? where ? is an n -dimensional vector space over ? which is an integral part of the solution of DAP. New criteria for existence of solution and their computation based on the properties of structured matrices are referred to as Grassmann matrices. The solvability of this exterior equation is referred to as decomposability of ?, and it is in turn characterised by the set of quadratic Plücker relations (QPRs) describing the Grassmann variety of the corresponding projective space. Alternative new tests for decomposability of the multi-vector ? are given in terms of the rank properties of the Grassmann matrix, ? of the vector ?, which is constructed by the coordinates of ?. It is shown that the exterior equation is solvable (? is decomposable), if and only if ? where ?; the solution space for a decomposable ?, is the space ?. This provides an alternative linear algebra characterisation of the decomposability problem and of the Grassmann variety to that defined by the QPRs. Further properties of the Grassmann matrices are explored by defining the Hodge-Grassmann matrix as the dual of the Grassmann matrix. The connections of the Hodge-Grassmann matrix to the solution of exterior equations are examined, and an alternative new characterisation of decomposability is given in terms of the dimension of its image space. The framework based on the Grassmann matrices provides the means for the development of a new computational method for the solutions of the exact DAP (when such solutions exist), as well as computing approximate solutions, when exact solutions do not exist.

  19. BEM solution to transient free convective heat transfer in a viscous, electrically conducting, and heat generating fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Vajravelu, K.; Kassab, A.; Hadjinicolaou, A.

    1996-11-08

    The nonlinear partial differential equations for the transient free convective heat transfer in a viscous, electrically conducting, and heat-generating fluid past a vertical porous plate in the presence of free stream oscillations are solved by the boundary element method (BEM). Time-dependent fundamental solutions are employed in a time marching scheme to resolve the field variables. Numerical results are compared with previously reported analytical solutions in order to validate the developed BEM algorithm. These previous studies reported results for simpler versions of the problem, in which the convective effects in the momentum and energy equations were neglected in order to obtain analytical numerical solutions. The BEM results are shown to be in close agreement with the reported data. The effects of convection currents, the temperature-dependent heat sources (or sinks), the magnetic currents, and the viscous dissipation on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are assessed in a parametric study, which considers a variety of the dimensionless parameters Gr, Ec, Pr, M, and {gamma}. It is observed that {gamma} plays an important role in delaying the fluid flow reversal, present in the case of air, and acts to enhance the effect of Gr in augmenting the rate of heat transfer at the wall. The skin friction is observed to be an increasing function of Gr, Ec, and {gamma} and a decreasing function of M and Pr. However, the rate of heat transfer (in an absolute sense) is an increasing function of M, {gamma}, Gr, and Ec and a decreasing function of Pr. Of all the parameters, the Prandtl number has the strongest effect on the flow and heat transfer characteristics.

  20. Algorithm For Solution Of Subset-Regression Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhaegen, Michel

    1991-01-01

    Reliable and flexible algorithm for solution of subset-regression problem performs QR decomposition with new column-pivoting strategy, enables selection of subset directly from originally defined regression parameters. This feature, in combination with number of extensions, makes algorithm very flexible for use in analysis of subset-regression problems in which parameters have physical meanings. Also extended to enable joint processing of columns contaminated by noise with those free of noise, without using scaling techniques.

  1. A Monte Carlo solution of heat conduction and Poisson equations

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriu, M.

    2000-02-01

    A Monte Carlo method is developed for solving the heat conduction, Poisson, and Laplace equations. The method is based on properties of Brownian motion and Ito processes, the Ito formula for differentiable functions of these processes, and the similarities between the generator of Ito processes and the differential operators of these equations. The proposed method is similar to current Monte Carlo solutions, such as the fixed random walk, exodus, and floating walk methods, in the sense that it is local, that is, it determines the solution at a single point or a small set of points of the domain of definition of the heat conduction equation directly. However, the proposed and the current Monte Carlo solutions are based on different theoretical considerations. The proposed Monte Carlo method has some attractive features. The method does not require to discretize the domain of definition of the differential equation, can be applied to domains of any dimension and geometry, works for both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions, and provides simple solutions for the steady-state and transient heat equations. Several examples are presented to illustrate the application of the proposed method and demonstrate its accuracy.

  2. Water--Problems and Solutions. A Report Concerning the Problems and Solutions of Negative Water Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    Outdoor leaders constantly face problems created by water shortage and, to act effectively, must thoroughly understand the body's use of water and the ways to delay dehydration when water shortage occurs. Dehydration begins when there is a negative water balance, or more water lost than ingested, and progresses from the stage of dryness, to the…

  3. Methods for solving of inverse heat conduction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobilskaya, E.; Lyashenko, V.

    2016-10-01

    A general mathematical model of the high-temperature thermodiffusion that occurs in a limited environment is considered. Based on this model a formulation of inverse problems for homogeneous and inhomogeneous parabolic equations is proposed. The inverse problem aims at identifying one or several unknown parameters of the mathematical model. These parameters allow maintaining the required temperature distribution and concentration of distribution of substance in the whole area or in part. For each case (internal, external heat source or a combination) the appropriate method for solving the inverse problem is proposed.

  4. Solution to the cosmological horizon problem proposed by Zee

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, M.D.

    1981-08-15

    Applying a theory of gravity with broken symmetry, Zee has suggested a solution to the cosmological horizon problem. His idea has been criticized on two independent grounds by Linde and by Sato. In this paper, we suggest answers to both these criticisms.

  5. Networking: A Solution to the Campus Minicomputer Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, Joseph

    Minicomputer networking can be an alternative solution to the problem of implementing various computer systems in universities. In its simplest case, networking takes the form of multiple small computers communicating over telephone lines to a larger host minicomputer which in turn communicates with the central mainframe. Using computers in this…

  6. WATER CONSERVATION: LOCAL SOLUTIONS TO A GLOBAL PROBLEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water conservation issues are discussed. Local solutions to a global problem include changing old habits relating to the usage and abuse of water resources. While the suggested behavioral changes may not solve the world's pending water crisis, they may ease the impact of the l...

  7. Image Indexing and Retrieval: Some Problems and Proposed Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Graeme; Anderson, Douglas

    1996-01-01

    Image processing technology allows libraries to include photographs, paintings, monograph title pages, and maps in their databases. This article examines problems of and solutions to image indexing and retrieval, focusing on thesaurus-based indexing systems, visual thesauri and related hybrid systems, picture description languages, and image…

  8. A Linear Programming Solution to the Faculty Assignment Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslaw, Jon A.

    1976-01-01

    Investigates the problem of assigning faculty to courses at a university. A program is developed that is both efficient, in that integer programming is not required, and effective, in that it facilitates interaction by administration in determining the optimal solution. The results of some empirical tests are also reported. (Author)

  9. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2016-06-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7 ) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here

  10. Nonlocal Separable Solutions of the Inverse Scattering Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherghetta, Tony; Nambu, Yoichiro

    We extend the nonlocal separable potential solutions of Gourdin and Martin for the inverse scattering problem to the case where sin δ0 has more than N zeroes, δ0 being the s-wave scattering phase shift and δ0(0) - δ0(∞) = Nπ. As an example we construct the solution for the particular case of 4He and show how to incorporate a weakly bound state. Using a local square well potential chosen to mimic the real 4He potential, we compare the off-shell extension of the nonlocal potential solution with the exactly solvable square well. We then discuss how a nonlocal potential might be used to simplify the many-body problem of liquid 4He.

  11. Mixed boundary value problems for the stationary magnetohydrodynamics model of a viscous heat-conducting fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, G. V.

    2015-12-01

    The boundary value problem for the stationary magnetohydrodynamics model of a viscous heatconducting fluid considered under inhomogeneous mixed boundary conditions for an electromagnetic field and the temperature and Dirichlet condition for the velocity is investigated. This problem describes the flow of an electricaland heat-conducting liquid in a bounded three-dimensional domain the boundary of which consists of several parts with different thermoand electrophysical properties. Sufficient conditions imposed on the initial data to provide for global solvability of the problem and local uniqueness of its solution are established.

  12. Exact solution for an optimal impermeable parachute problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupu, Mircea; Scheiber, Ernest

    2002-10-01

    In the paper there are solved direct and inverse boundary problems and analytical solutions are obtained for optimization problems in the case of some nonlinear integral operators. It is modeled the plane potential flow of an inviscid, incompressible and nonlimited fluid jet, witch encounters a symmetrical, curvilinear obstacle--the deflector of maximal drag. There are derived integral singular equations, for direct and inverse problems and the movement in the auxiliary canonical half-plane is obtained. Next, the optimization problem is solved in an analytical manner. The design of the optimal airfoil is performed and finally, numerical computations concerning the drag coefficient and other geometrical and aerodynamical parameters are carried out. This model corresponds to the Helmholtz impermeable parachute problem.

  13. Integrated Force Method Solution to Indeterminate Structural Mechanics Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Halford, Gary R.

    2004-01-01

    Strength of materials problems have been classified into determinate and indeterminate problems. Determinate analysis primarily based on the equilibrium concept is well understood. Solutions of indeterminate problems required additional compatibility conditions, and its comprehension was not exclusive. A solution to indeterminate problem is generated by manipulating the equilibrium concept, either by rewriting in the displacement variables or through the cutting and closing gap technique of the redundant force method. Compatibility improvisation has made analysis cumbersome. The authors have researched and understood the compatibility theory. Solutions can be generated with equal emphasis on the equilibrium and compatibility concepts. This technique is called the Integrated Force Method (IFM). Forces are the primary unknowns of IFM. Displacements are back-calculated from forces. IFM equations are manipulated to obtain the Dual Integrated Force Method (IFMD). Displacement is the primary variable of IFMD and force is back-calculated. The subject is introduced through response variables: force, deformation, displacement; and underlying concepts: equilibrium equation, force deformation relation, deformation displacement relation, and compatibility condition. Mechanical load, temperature variation, and support settling are equally emphasized. The basic theory is discussed. A set of examples illustrate the new concepts. IFM and IFMD based finite element methods are introduced for simple problems.

  14. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in polymer solutions exposed to intermittent infrared radiation heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.J.; Lin, J.D.

    1998-06-01

    Drying is one of the essential steps in a number of industrial applications, such as the preserving of food and the drying of paint, pulp, and paper. The quality of paper tubes is significantly affected by the heat and mass transfer process. The drying of polymer solution plays a crucial role in the manufacturer of photographic film, synthetic fibers, adhesives, and a variety of other polymeric products. During drying of wet materials, simultaneous heat and mass transfer occurs both inside the medium and in the boundary layer of the drying agent. Drying is one of the most energy-consuming processes in the industrial sector and can also be very time consuming as, for example, in conventional convective drying by hot air, while minimum cost and energy consumption and maximum product quality are among the main concerns in industry today. Here, a theoretical study is performed that describes heat transfer and moisture variation while a polymer solution is exposed to high-intensity infrared radiation flux and/or an airflow. While the intermittent heating is considered, the authors investigate the influences of various radiation and convection parameters on the transfer of heat and moisture variation of coated layers on an optically thick substrate. During the tempering stage in the intermittent heating process, the convective mass transfer is included to simulate the ambient air in reality. The effects of radiation and convection parameters on the transfer processes are presented in terms of the rate of water content removal, heat transfer, and moisture distributions. Numerical results show that the rate of water removal from the polymer solution is dominated by both the adsorbed radiative heat energy and the distributions of water mass fraction in the polymer solution.

  15. Anti-anthropic solutions to the cosmic coincidence problem

    SciTech Connect

    Fedrow, Joseph M.; Griest, Kim E-mail: kgriest@ucsd.edu

    2014-01-01

    A cosmological constant fits all current dark energy data, but requires two extreme fine tunings, both of which are currently explained by anthropic arguments. Here we discuss anti-anthropic solutions to one of these problems: the cosmic coincidence problem- that today the dark energy density is nearly equal to the matter density. We replace the ensemble of Universes used in the anthropic solution with an ensemble of tracking scalar fields that do not require fine-tuning. This not only does away with the coincidence problem, but also allows for a Universe that has a very different future than the one currently predicted by a cosmological constant. These models also allow for transient periods of significant scalar field energy (SSFE) over the history of the Universe that can give very different observational signatures as compared with a cosmological constant, and so can be confirmed or disproved in current and upcoming experiments.

  16. A More General Solution of the Kenamond HE Problem 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann

    2015-12-15

    A more general solution for programmed burn calculations of the light times produced by an unobstructed line-of-sight, multi-point initiation of a composite HE region has been developed. The equations describing the interfaces between detonation fronts have also been included. In contrast to the original solutions proposed in References 1 and 2, four of the detonators are no longer restricted to specific locations on a Cartesian axis and can be located at any point inside the HE region. For the proposed solution, one detonator must be located at the origin. The more general solution for any locations on the 2D y-axis or 3D z-axis has been implemented in the ExactPack suite of exact solvers for verification problems. It could easily be changed to the most general case outlined above.

  17. Application of Genetic Algorithms in Nonlinear Heat Conduction Problems

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Waqar A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are employed to optimize dimensionless temperature in nonlinear heat conduction problems. Three common geometries are selected for the analysis and the concept of minimum entropy generation is used to determine the optimum temperatures under the same constraints. The thermal conductivity is assumed to vary linearly with temperature while internal heat generation is assumed to be uniform. The dimensionless governing equations are obtained for each selected geometry and the dimensionless temperature distributions are obtained using MATLAB. It is observed that GA gives the minimum dimensionless temperature in each selected geometry. PMID:24695517

  18. Transient modeling/analysis of hyperbolic heat conduction problems employing mixed implicit-explicit alpha method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; D'Costa, Joseph F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of mixed implicit-explicit finite element formulations for hyperbolic heat conduction problems involving non-Fourier effects. In particular, mixed implicit-explicit formulations employing the alpha method proposed by Hughes et al. (1987, 1990) are described for the numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction models, which involves time-dependent relaxation effects. Existing analytical approaches for modeling/analysis of such models involve complex mathematical formulations for obtaining closed-form solutions, while in certain numerical formulations the difficulties include severe oscillatory solution behavior (which often disguises the true response) in the vicinity of the thermal disturbances, which propagate with finite velocities. In view of these factors, the alpha method is evaluated to assess the control of the amount of numerical dissipation for predicting the transient propagating thermal disturbances. Numerical test models are presented, and pertinent conclusions are drawn for the mixed-time integration simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction models involving non-Fourier effects.

  19. CHAPARRAL: A library for solving large enclosure radiation heat transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, M.W.

    1995-08-01

    Large, three-dimensional enclosure radiation beat transfer problems place a heavy demand on computing resources such as computational cycles, memory requirements, disk I/O, and disk space usage. This is primarily due to the computational and memory requirements associated with the view factor calculation and subsequent access of the view factor matrix during solution of the radiosity matrix equation. This is a fundamental problem that constrains Sandia`s current modeling capabilities. Reducing the computational and memory requirements for calculating and manipulating view factors would enable an analyst to increase the level of detail at which a body could be modeled and would have a major impact on many programs at Sandia such as weapon and transportation safety programs, component survivability programs, energy programs, and material processing programs. CHAPARRAL is a library package written to address these problems and is specifically tailored towards the efficient solution of extremely large three-dimensional enclosure radiation heat transfer problems.

  20. Numerical solution-space analysis of satisfiability problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Alexander; Hartmann, A. K.

    2010-11-01

    The solution-space structure of the three-satisfiability problem (3-SAT) is studied as a function of the control parameter α (ratio of the number of clauses to the number of variables) using numerical simulations. For this purpose one has to sample the solution space with uniform weight. It is shown here that standard stochastic local-search (SLS) algorithms like average satisfiability (ASAT) exhibit a sampling bias, as does “Metropolis-coupled Markov chain Monte Carlo” (MCMCMC) (also known as “parallel tempering”) when run for feasible times. Nevertheless, unbiased samples of solutions can be obtained using the “ballistic-networking approach,” which is introduced here. It is a generalization of “ballistic search” methods and yields also a cluster structure of the solution space. As application, solutions of 3-SAT instances are generated using ASAT plus ballistic networking. The numerical results are compatible with a previous analytical prediction of a simple solution-space structure for small values of α and a transition to a clustered phase at αc≈3.86 , where the solution space breaks up into several non-negligible clusters. Furthermore, in the thermodynamic limit there are, even for α=4.25 close to the SAT-UNSAT transition αs≈4.267 , always clusters without any frozen variables. This may explain why some SLS algorithms are able to solve very large 3-SAT instances close to the SAT-UNSAT transition.

  1. Numerical solution-space analysis of satisfiability problems.

    PubMed

    Mann, Alexander; Hartmann, A K

    2010-11-01

    The solution-space structure of the three-satisfiability problem (3-SAT) is studied as a function of the control parameter α (ratio of the number of clauses to the number of variables) using numerical simulations. For this purpose one has to sample the solution space with uniform weight. It is shown here that standard stochastic local-search (SLS) algorithms like average satisfiability (ASAT) exhibit a sampling bias, as does "Metropolis-coupled Markov chain Monte Carlo" (MCMCMC) (also known as "parallel tempering") when run for feasible times. Nevertheless, unbiased samples of solutions can be obtained using the "ballistic-networking approach," which is introduced here. It is a generalization of "ballistic search" methods and yields also a cluster structure of the solution space. As application, solutions of 3-SAT instances are generated using ASAT plus ballistic networking. The numerical results are compatible with a previous analytical prediction of a simple solution-space structure for small values of α and a transition to a clustered phase at α(c)≈3.86 , where the solution space breaks up into several non-negligible clusters. Furthermore, in the thermodynamic limit there are, even for α=4.25 close to the SAT-UNSAT transition α(s)≈4.267 , always clusters without any frozen variables. This may explain why some SLS algorithms are able to solve very large 3-SAT instances close to the SAT-UNSAT transition. PMID:21230614

  2. Lessons Learned During Solutions of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Suna N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    Optimization research at NASA Glenn Research Center has addressed the design of structures, aircraft and airbreathing propulsion engines. During solution of the multidisciplinary problems several issues were encountered. This paper lists four issues and discusses the strategies adapted for their resolution: (1) The optimization process can lead to an inefficient local solution. This deficiency was encountered during design of an engine component. The limitation was overcome through an augmentation of animation into optimization. (2) Optimum solutions obtained were infeasible for aircraft and air-breathing propulsion engine problems. Alleviation of this deficiency required a cascading of multiple algorithms. (3) Profile optimization of a beam produced an irregular shape. Engineering intuition restored the regular shape for the beam. (4) The solution obtained for a cylindrical shell by a subproblem strategy converged to a design that can be difficult to manufacture. Resolution of this issue remains a challenge. The issues and resolutions are illustrated through six problems: (1) design of an engine component, (2) synthesis of a subsonic aircraft, (3) operation optimization of a supersonic engine, (4) design of a wave-rotor-topping device, (5) profile optimization of a cantilever beam, and (6) design of a cvlindrical shell. The combined effort of designers and researchers can bring the optimization method from academia to industry.

  3. Is comprehension of problem solutions resistant to misleading heuristic cues?

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Rakefet; Leiser, David; Shpigelman, Maya

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies in the domain of metacomprehension judgments have primarily used expository texts. When these texts include illustrations, even uninformative ones, people were found to judge that they understand their content better. The present study aimed to delineate the metacognitive processes involved in understanding problem solutions - a text type often perceived as allowing reliable judgments regarding understanding, and was not previously considered from a metacognitive perspective. Undergraduate students faced difficult problems. They then studied solution explanations with or without uninformative illustrations and provided judgments of comprehension (JCOMPs). Learning was assessed by application to near-transfer problems in an open-book test format. As expected, JCOMPs were polarized - they tended to reflect good or poor understanding. Yet, JCOMPs were higher for the illustrated solutions and even high certainty did not ensure resistance to this effect. Moreover, success in the transfer problems was lower in the presence of illustrations, demonstrating a bias stronger than that found with expository texts. Previous studies have suggested that weak learners are especially prone to being misled by superficial cues. In the present study, matching the difficulty of the task to the ability of the target population revealed that even highly able participants were not immune to misleading cues. The study extends previous findings regarding potential detrimental effects of illustrations and highlights aspects of the metacomprehension process that have not been considered before.

  4. Is comprehension of problem solutions resistant to misleading heuristic cues?

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Rakefet; Leiser, David; Shpigelman, Maya

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies in the domain of metacomprehension judgments have primarily used expository texts. When these texts include illustrations, even uninformative ones, people were found to judge that they understand their content better. The present study aimed to delineate the metacognitive processes involved in understanding problem solutions - a text type often perceived as allowing reliable judgments regarding understanding, and was not previously considered from a metacognitive perspective. Undergraduate students faced difficult problems. They then studied solution explanations with or without uninformative illustrations and provided judgments of comprehension (JCOMPs). Learning was assessed by application to near-transfer problems in an open-book test format. As expected, JCOMPs were polarized - they tended to reflect good or poor understanding. Yet, JCOMPs were higher for the illustrated solutions and even high certainty did not ensure resistance to this effect. Moreover, success in the transfer problems was lower in the presence of illustrations, demonstrating a bias stronger than that found with expository texts. Previous studies have suggested that weak learners are especially prone to being misled by superficial cues. In the present study, matching the difficulty of the task to the ability of the target population revealed that even highly able participants were not immune to misleading cues. The study extends previous findings regarding potential detrimental effects of illustrations and highlights aspects of the metacomprehension process that have not been considered before. PMID:23542811

  5. Numerical identification of boundary conditions on nonlinearly radiating inverse heat conduction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murio, Diego A.

    1991-01-01

    An explicit and unconditionally stable finite difference method for the solution of the transient inverse heat conduction problem in a semi-infinite or finite slab mediums subject to nonlinear radiation boundary conditions is presented. After measuring two interior temperature histories, the mollification method is used to determine the surface transient heat source if the energy radiation law is known. Alternatively, if the active surface is heated by a source at a rate proportional to a given function, the nonlinear surface radiation law is then recovered as a function of the interface temperature when the problem is feasible. Two typical examples corresponding to Newton cooling law and Stefan-Boltzmann radiation law respectively are illustrated. In all cases, the method predicts the surface conditions with an accuracy suitable for many practical purposes.

  6. Numerical solution of convection-diffusion problems in irregular domains mapped onto a circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asako, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Faghri, Mohammad; Asaba, Makoto

    1991-01-01

    A coordinate transformation methodology has been developed for convection-diffusion problems with an arbitrary solution domain. An algebraic coordinate transformation is used that maps the solution domain onto a circle. The transformed conservation equations are discretized by a control-volume finite difference technique. Sample computations are performed for fully developed flow and heat transfer in a polygonal duct, and for natural convection in a square cavity, to validate the present methodology. The numerical results obtained compared reasonably well, even in the extreme case of a rectangular domain mapped onto a circle.

  7. Solution of an insight problem at different age levels.

    PubMed

    Antonietti, A; Nava, B

    1995-06-01

    The purpose was to study performance on an insight problem by 3- to 25-yr.-olds. A task involving restructuring and requiring two wooden blocks be fitted together to form a tetrahedron was presented to five groups of 20 subjects each from kindergarten, primary school, secondary school, high school, and a university. The frequencies of solvers within each group increased from the first age group to the third but then remained constant. Solution times and frequencies of solutions attempted were not significantly different among the five groups. Perhaps insight does not follow the same developmental trend as other thinking processes. PMID:7478880

  8. Superlinear nonlocal fractional problems with infinitely many solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binlin, Zhang; Molica Bisci, Giovanni; Servadei, Raffaella

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we study the existence of infinitely many weak solutions for equations driven by nonlocal integrodifferential operators with homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions. A model for these operators is given by the fractional Laplacian where s ∈ (0, 1) is fixed. We consider different superlinear growth assumptions on the nonlinearity, starting from the well-known Ambrosetti-Rabinowitz condition. In this framework we obtain three different results about the existence of infinitely many weak solutions for the problem under consideration, by using the Fountain Theorem. All these theorems extend some classical results for semilinear Laplacian equations to the nonlocal fractional setting.

  9. The exact fundamental solution for the Benes tracking problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Bhashyam

    2009-05-01

    The universal continuous-discrete tracking problem requires the solution of a Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov forward equation (FPKfe) for an arbitrary initial condition. Using results from quantum mechanics, the exact fundamental solution for the FPKfe is derived for the state model of arbitrary dimension with Benes drift that requires only the computation of elementary transcendental functions and standard linear algebra techniques- no ordinary or partial differential equations need to be solved. The measurement process may be an arbitrary, discrete-time nonlinear stochastic process, and the time step size can be arbitrary. Numerical examples are included, demonstrating its utility in practical implementation.

  10. Geometric projection filter: an efficient solution to the SLAM problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Paul M.; Durrant-Whyte, Hugh F.

    2001-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the simultaneous localization and map building (SLAM) problem. The SLAM problem asks if it is possible for an autonomous vehicle to start in an unknown location in an unknown environment and then to incrementally build a map of this environment while simultaneously using this map to compute absolute vehicle location. Conventional approaches to this problem are plagued with a prohibitively large increase in computation with the size of the environment. This paper offers a new solution to the SLAM problem that is both consistent and computationally feasible. The proposed algorithm builds a map expressing the relationships between landmarks which is then transformed into landmark locations. Experimental results are presented employing the new algorithm on a subsea vehicle using a scanning sonar sensor.

  11. Analytic solution for heat flow through a general harmonic network.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Nahuel; Paz, Juan Pablo

    2014-10-01

    We present an analytic expression for the heat current through a general harmonic network coupled with Ohmic reservoirs. We use a method that enables us to express the stationary state of the network in terms of the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of a generalized cubic eigenvalue problem. In this way, we obtain exact formulas for the heat current and the local temperature inside the network. Our method does not rely on the usual assumptions of weak coupling to the environments or on the existence of an infinite cutoff in the environmental spectral densities. We use this method to study nonequilibrium processes without the weak coupling and Markovian approximations. As a first application of our method, we revisit the problem of heat conduction in two- and three-dimensional crystals with binary mass disorder. We complement previous results showing that for small systems the scaling of the heat current with the system size greatly depends on the strength of the interaction between system and reservoirs. This somewhat counterintuitive result seems not to have been noticed before.

  12. On the numerical solution of a three-dimensional inverse medium scattering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohage, Thorsten

    2001-12-01

    We examine the scattering of time-harmonic acoustic waves in inhomogeneous media. The problem is to recover a spatially varying refractive index in a three-dimensional medium from far-field measurements of scattered waves corresponding to incoming waves from all directions. This problem is exponentially ill-posed and of a large scale since a solution of the direct problem corresponds to solving a partial differential equation in R3 for each incident wave. We construct a preconditioner for the conjugate gradient method applied to the normal equation to solve the regularized linearized operator equation in each Newton step. This reduces the number of operator evaluations dramatically compared to standard regularized Newton methods. Our method can also be applied effectively to other exponentially ill-posed problems, for example, in impedance tomography, heat conduction and obstacle scattering. To solve the direct problems, we use an improved fast solver for the Lippmann-Schwinger equation suggested by Vainikko.

  13. Mathematical modeling of heat transfer problems in the permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornov, V. F.; Stepanov, S. P.; Vasilyeva, M. V.; Vasilyev, V. I.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we present results of numerical simulation of three-dimensional temperature fields in soils for various applied problems: the railway line in the conditions of permafrost for different geometries, the horizontal tunnel underground storage and greenhouses of various designs in the Far North. Mathematical model of the process is described by a nonstationary heat equation with phase transitions of pore water. The numerical realization of the problem is based on the finite element method using a library of scientific computing FEniCS. For numerical calculations we use high-performance computing systems.

  14. Variational nodal solution algorithms for multigroup criticality problems

    SciTech Connect

    Carrico, C.B.; Lewis, E.E.

    1991-01-01

    Variational nodal transport methods are generalized for the treatment of multigroup criticality problems. The generation of variational response matrices is streamlined and automated through the use of symbolic manipulation. A new red-black partitioned matrix algorithm for the solution of the within-group equations is formulated and shown to be at once both a regular matrix splitting and a synthetic acceleration method. The methods are implemented in X- Y geometry as a module of the Argonne National Laboratory code DIF3D. For few group problems highly accurate P[sub 3] eigenvalues are obtained with computing times comparable to those of an existing interface-current nodal transport method.

  15. Solution of magnetometry problems related to monitoring remote pipeline systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Andrey V.; Denisov, Alexey Y.; Narkhov, Eugene D.; Sapunov, Vladimir A.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to solve two fundamental tasks, i.e., to design the pipeline model with sufficient adequacy and reproducibility, and to solve the inverse problem for the transition from the experimental data on the magnetic field in the measurement area directly to the pipeline characteristics, which are necessary for mapping pipes location and finding coordinates of welds. The paper presents a mathematical ideal pipeline model in the geomagnetic field without considering the pipe material. The solution of the direct and inverse problems are described, and the directions of the model development and methods of data interpretation are presented.

  16. Explicit solutions of one-dimensional total variation problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makovetskii, Artyom; Voronin, Sergei; Kober, Vitaly

    2015-09-01

    This work deals with denosing of a one-dimensional signal corrupted by additive white Gaussian noise. A common way to solve the problem is to utilize the total variation (TV) method. Basically, the TV regularization minimizes a functional consisting of the sum of fidelity and regularization terms. We derive explicit solutions of the one-dimensional TV regularization problem that help us to restore noisy signals with a direct, non-iterative algorithm. Computer simulation results are provided to illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithm for restoration of noisy signals.

  17. Multiresolution strategies for the numerical solution of optimal control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sachin

    There exist many numerical techniques for solving optimal control problems but less work has been done in the field of making these algorithms run faster and more robustly. The main motivation of this work is to solve optimal control problems accurately in a fast and efficient way. Optimal control problems are often characterized by discontinuities or switchings in the control variables. One way of accurately capturing the irregularities in the solution is to use a high resolution (dense) uniform grid. This requires a large amount of computational resources both in terms of CPU time and memory. Hence, in order to accurately capture any irregularities in the solution using a few computational resources, one can refine the mesh locally in the region close to an irregularity instead of refining the mesh uniformly over the whole domain. Therefore, a novel multiresolution scheme for data compression has been designed which is shown to outperform similar data compression schemes. Specifically, we have shown that the proposed approach results in fewer grid points in the grid compared to a common multiresolution data compression scheme. The validity of the proposed mesh refinement algorithm has been verified by solving several challenging initial-boundary value problems for evolution equations in 1D. The examples have demonstrated the stability and robustness of the proposed algorithm. The algorithm adapted dynamically to any existing or emerging irregularities in the solution by automatically allocating more grid points to the region where the solution exhibited sharp features and fewer points to the region where the solution was smooth. Thereby, the computational time and memory usage has been reduced significantly, while maintaining an accuracy equivalent to the one obtained using a fine uniform mesh. Next, a direct multiresolution-based approach for solving trajectory optimization problems is developed. The original optimal control problem is transcribed into a

  18. HEAP: Heat Energy Analysis Program, a computer model simulating solar receivers. [solving the heat transfer problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program which can distinguish between different receiver designs, and predict transient performance under variable solar flux, or ambient temperatures, etc. has a basic structure that fits a general heat transfer problem, but with specific features that are custom-made for solar receivers. The code is written in MBASIC computer language. The methodology followed in solving the heat transfer problem is explained. A program flow chart, an explanation of input and output tables, and an example of the simulation of a cavity-type solar receiver are included.

  19. Baggie: A unique solution to an orbiter icing problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walkover, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    The orbiter icing problem, located in two lower surface mold line cavities, was solved. These two cavities are open during Shuttle ground operations and ascent, and are then closed after orbit insertion. If not protected, these cavities may be coated with ice, which may be detrimental to the adjacent thermal protection system (TPS) tiles if the ice breaks up during ascent, and may hinder the closing of the cavity doors if the ice does not break up. The problem of ice in these cavities was solved by the use of a passive mechanism called baggie, which is purge curtain used to enclose the cavity and is used in conjunction with gaseous nitrogen as the local purge gas. The baggie, the final solution, is unique in its simplicity, but its design and development were not. The final baggie design and its development testing are discussed. Also discussed are the baggie concepts and other solutions not used.

  20. Massively parallel solution of the assignment problem. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wein, J.; Zenios, S.

    1990-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the design, implementation and effectiveness of massively parallel algorithms for the solution of large-scale assignment problems. In particular, we study the auction algorithms of Bertsekas, an algorithm based on the method of multipliers of Hestenes and Powell, and an algorithm based on the alternating direction method of multipliers of Eckstein. We discuss alternative approaches to the massively parallel implementation of the auction algorithm, including Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel and a hybrid scheme. The hybrid scheme, in particular, exploits two different levels of parallelism and an efficient way of communicating the data between them without the need to perform general router operations across the hypercube network. We then study the performance of massively parallel implementations of two methods of multipliers. Implementations are carried out on the Connection Machine CM-2, and the algorithms are evaluated empirically with the solution of large scale problems. The hybrid scheme significantly outperforms all of the other methods and gives the best computational results to date for a massively parallel solution to this problem.

  1. An Improved Differential Evolution Solution for Software Project Scheduling Problem

    PubMed Central

    Biju, A. C.; Victoire, T. Aruldoss Albert; Mohanasundaram, Kumaresan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a differential evolution (DE) method for the software project scheduling problem (SPSP). The interest on finding a more efficient solution technique for SPSP is always a topic of interest due to the fact of ever growing challenges faced by the software industry. The curse of dimensionality is introduced in the scheduling problem by ever increasing software assignments and the number of staff who handles it. Thus the SPSP is a class of NP-hard problem, which requires a rigorous solution procedure which guarantees a reasonably better solution. Differential evolution is a direct search stochastic optimization technique that is fairly fast and reasonably robust. It is also capable of handling nondifferentiable, nonlinear, and multimodal objective functions like SPSP. This paper proposes a refined DE where a new mutation mechanism is introduced. The superiority of the proposed method is experimented and demonstrated by solving the SPSP on 50 random instances and the results are compared with some of the techniques in the literature. PMID:26495419

  2. Heat Capacity Study of Solution Grown Crystals of Isotactic Polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,H.; Cebe, P.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed measurements of the specific heat capacity on isotactic polystyrene (iPS) crystals grown from dilute solution. Solution grown crystal (SGC) samples had larger crystal fractions and greatly reduced rigid amorphous fractions compared to their bulk cold-crystallized counterparts. Heat capacity studies were performed from below the glass transition temperature to above the melting temperature by using quasi-isothermal temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) and standard DSC. Two or three endotherms are observed, which represent the melting of crystals. The small rigid amorphous fraction relaxes in a wide temperature range from just above the glass transition temperature to just below the first crystal melting endotherm. As in bulk iPS, 1 multiple reversing melting was found in iPS SGCs, supporting the view that double melting in iPS may be due to dual thermal stability distribution existing along one single lamella.2 The impact of reorganization and annealing on the melt endotherms was also investigated. Annealing occurs as a result of the very slow effective heating rate of the quasi-isothermal measurements compared to standard DSC. The improvement of crystal perfection through annealing causes the reversing melting endotherms to occur at a temperature higher than the endotherms seen in the standard DSC scan.

  3. Topological inversion for solution of geodesy-constrained geophysical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltogianni, Vasso; Stiros, Stathis

    2015-04-01

    Geodetic data, mostly GPS observations, permit to measure displacements of selected points around activated faults and volcanoes, and on the basis of geophysical models, to model the underlying physical processes. This requires inversion of redundant systems of highly non-linear equations with >3 unknowns; a situation analogous to the adjustment of geodetic networks. However, in geophysical problems inversion cannot be based on conventional least-squares techniques, and is based on numerical inversion techniques (a priori fixing of some variables, optimization in steps with values of two variables each time to be regarded fixed, random search in the vicinity of approximate solutions). Still these techniques lead to solutions trapped in local minima, to correlated estimates and to solutions with poor error control (usually sampling-based approaches). To overcome these problems, a numerical-topological, grid-search based technique in the RN space is proposed (N the number of unknown variables). This technique is in fact a generalization and refinement of techniques used in lighthouse positioning and in some cases of low-accuracy 2-D positioning using Wi-Fi etc. The basic concept is to assume discrete possible ranges of each variable, and from these ranges to define a grid G in the RN space, with some of the gridpoints to approximate the true solutions of the system. Each point of hyper-grid G is then tested whether it satisfies the observations, given their uncertainty level, and successful grid points define a sub-space of G containing the true solutions. The optimal (minimal) space containing one or more solutions is obtained using a trial-and-error approach, and a single optimization factor. From this essentially deterministic identification of the set of gridpoints satisfying the system of equations, at a following step, a stochastic optimal solution is computed corresponding to the center of gravity of this set of gridpoints. This solution corresponds to a

  4. Periodic solutions about the collinear Lagrangian solution in the general problem of three bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broucke, R.; Davoust, E.; Anderson, J. D.; Lass, H.; Blitzer, L.

    1981-01-01

    The article describes the solutions near Lagrange's circular collinear configuration in the planar problem of three bodies with three finite masses. The article begins with a detailed review of the properties of Lagrange's collinear solution. Lagrange's quintic equation is derived and several expressions are given for the angular velocity of the rotating frame. The equations of motion are then linearized near the circular collinear solution, and the characteristic equation is also derived in detail. The different types of roots and their corresponding solutions are discussed. The special case of two equal outer masses receives special attention, as well as the special case of two small outer masses. Finally, the fundamental family of periodic solutions is extended by numerical integration all the way up to and past a binary collision orbit. The stability and the bifurcations of this family are briefly enumerated.

  5. Periodic solutions about the collinear Lagrangian solution in the general problem of three bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broucke, R.; Davoust, E.; Anderson, J. D.; Lass, H.; Blitzer, L.

    1981-05-01

    The article describes the solutions near Lagrange's circular collinear configuration in the planar problem of three bodies with three finite masses. The article begins with a detailed review of the properties of Lagrange's collinear solution. Lagrange's quintic equation is derived and several expressions are given for the angular velocity of the rotating frame. The equations of motion are then linearized near the circular collinear solution, and the characteristic equation is also derived in detail. The different types of roots and their corresponding solutions are discussed. The special case of two equal outer masses receives special attention, as well as the special case of two small outer masses. Finally, the fundamental family of periodic solutions is extended by numerical integration all the way up to and past a binary collision orbit. The stability and the bifurcations of this family are briefly enumerated.

  6. Green's function of a heat problem with a periodic boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzhanov, Nurzhan E.

    2016-08-01

    In the paper, a nonlocal initial-boundary value problem for a non-homogeneous one-dimensional heat equation is considered. The domain under consideration is a rectangle. The classical initial condition with respect to t is put. A nonlocal periodic boundary condition by a spatial variable x is put. It is well-known that a solution of problem can be constructed in the form of convergent orthonormal series according to eigenfunctions of a spectral problem for an operator of multiple differentiation with periodic boundary conditions. Therefore Green's function can be also written in the form of an infinite series with respect to trigonometric functions (Fourier series). For classical first and second initial-boundary value problems there also exists a second representation of the Green's function by Jacobi function. In this paper we find the representation of the Green's function of the nonlocal initial-boundary value problem with periodic boundary conditions in the form of series according to exponents.

  7. On Comparison of Series and Numerical Solutions for Flow of Eyring-Powell Fluid with Newtonian Heating And Internal Heat Generation/Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Ali, Shafqat; Farooq, Muhammad Asif; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the combined effects of Newtonian heating and internal heat generation/absorption in the two-dimensional flow of Eyring-Powell fluid over a stretching surface. The governing non-linear analysis of partial differential equations is reduced into the ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. The resulting problems are computed for both series and numerical solutions. Series solution is constructed using homotopy analysis method (HAM) whereas numerical solution is presented by two different techniques namely shooting method and bvp4c. A comparison of homotopy solution with numerical solution is also tabulated. Both solutions are found in an excellent agreement. Dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are plotted and discussed for various emerging physical parameters. PMID:26402366

  8. On Comparison of Series and Numerical Solutions for Flow of Eyring-Powell Fluid with Newtonian Heating And Internal Heat Generation/Absorption.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Ali, Shafqat; Farooq, Muhammad Asif; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the combined effects of Newtonian heating and internal heat generation/absorption in the two-dimensional flow of Eyring-Powell fluid over a stretching surface. The governing non-linear analysis of partial differential equations is reduced into the ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. The resulting problems are computed for both series and numerical solutions. Series solution is constructed using homotopy analysis method (HAM) whereas numerical solution is presented by two different techniques namely shooting method and bvp4c. A comparison of homotopy solution with numerical solution is also tabulated. Both solutions are found in an excellent agreement. Dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are plotted and discussed for various emerging physical parameters.

  9. On Comparison of Series and Numerical Solutions for Flow of Eyring-Powell Fluid with Newtonian Heating And Internal Heat Generation/Absorption.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Ali, Shafqat; Farooq, Muhammad Asif; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the combined effects of Newtonian heating and internal heat generation/absorption in the two-dimensional flow of Eyring-Powell fluid over a stretching surface. The governing non-linear analysis of partial differential equations is reduced into the ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. The resulting problems are computed for both series and numerical solutions. Series solution is constructed using homotopy analysis method (HAM) whereas numerical solution is presented by two different techniques namely shooting method and bvp4c. A comparison of homotopy solution with numerical solution is also tabulated. Both solutions are found in an excellent agreement. Dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are plotted and discussed for various emerging physical parameters. PMID:26402366

  10. COMET solutions to whole core CANDU-6 benchmark problems

    SciTech Connect

    Forget, B.; Rahnema, F.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, the coarse mesh transport code COMET is used to solve CANDU-6 benchmark problems in two and three dimensional geometry. These problems are representative of a simplified quarter core reactor model. The COMET solutions, the core eigenvalue and the fuel pin fission density distribution, are compared to those from the Monte Carlo code MCNP using two-group cross sections. COMET decomposes the core volume into a set of non-overlapping sub-volumes (coarse meshes) and uses pre-computed heterogeneous response functions that are constructed using Legendre polynomials as boundary conditions to generate a user selected whole core solution (e.g., the core eigenvalue and fuel pin fission density distribution). These response functions are pre-computed by performing fixed source calculations with a modified version of MCNP in only the unique coarse meshes in the core. Reference solutions are calculated by MCNP5 with a two-group energy library generated with the HELIOS lattice code. In the 2-D problem, the angular current on the coarse mesh interfaces in COMET is expanded to 2. order in both spatial and angular variables. The COMET eigenvalue error is 0.09%. The corresponding average error in the fission density over all 3515 fuel pins is 0.5%. The maximum error observed is 2.0%. For the 3-D case, with 4. order expansion in space and azimuthal angle and 2. order expansion in the cosine of the polar angle, the eigenvalue differs from the reference solution by 0.05%. The average fission density error over the 42180 fuel pins is 0.7% with a maximum error of 3.3%. (authors)

  11. Addition of simultaneous heat and solute transport and variable fluid viscosity to SEAWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorne, D.; Langevin, C.D.; Sukop, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    SEAWAT is a finite-difference computer code designed to simulate coupled variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. This paper describes a new version of SEAWAT that adds the ability to simultaneously model energy and solute transport. This is necessary for simulating the transport of heat and salinity in coastal aquifers for example. This work extends the equation of state for fluid density to vary as a function of temperature and/or solute concentration. The program has also been modified to represent the effects of variable fluid viscosity as a function of temperature and/or concentration. The viscosity mechanism is verified against an analytical solution, and a test of temperature-dependent viscosity is provided. Finally, the classic Henry-Hilleke problem is solved with the new code. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Phononic heat transport in the transient regime: An analytic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuovinen, Riku; Säkkinen, Niko; Karlsson, Daniel; Stefanucci, Gianluca; van Leeuwen, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the time-resolved quantum transport properties of phonons in arbitrary harmonic systems connected to phonon baths at different temperatures. We obtain a closed analytic expression of the time-dependent one-particle reduced density matrix by explicitly solving the equations of motion for the nonequilibrium Green's function. This is achieved through a well-controlled approximation of the frequency-dependent bath self-energy. Our result allows for exploring transient oscillations and relaxation times of local heat currents, and correctly reduces to an earlier known result in the steady-state limit. We apply the formalism to atomic chains, and benchmark the validity of the approximation against full numerical solutions of the bosonic Kadanoff-Baym equations for the Green's function. We find good agreement between the analytic and numerical solutions for weak contacts and baths with a wide energy dispersion. We further analyze relaxation times from low to high temperature gradients.

  13. Degradation of aqueous DEA solutions in heat transfer tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Meisen, A.; Chakma, A.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were performed on the degradation of aqueous diethanolamine (DEA) solutions passing through a coiled heat transfer tube (2.0032 mm ID, 3.175 mm OD, 4.8 m long) immersed in a constant temperature bath. The operating conditions were: DEA flow rate 0.011 to 0.0172 L/s, DEA concentration 20 to 40 wt%, DEA temperature 60 to 200/sup 0/C, CO/sub 2/ partial pressure 1.38 to 4.18 MPa. The degradation rate was found to increase with temperature, DEA concentration and CO/sub 2/ partial pressure; it decreased with solution flow rate. The degradation was accompanied by the formation of a fouling deposit. A simple mathematical model is presented for predicting DEA degradation.

  14. Mapping solutions to an early multiplication word problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jane M.; Mulligan, Joanne

    1990-06-01

    Children's solutions to a variety of multiplication and division word problems were analysed in a cross-sectional pilot study of 34 children from Grades K to 2. Responses indicated a wide range of strategies used and these were further classified into developmental levels of strategy use. Because these data reflected the SOLO Taxonomy developmental model for classifying responses, a SOLO mapping procedure was used for further analysis. In this paper, the mapping procedure is applied to only one multiplication problem strategy, repeated addition, to exemplify the procedure. The mapping device employed in the analysis isolated three components of the problem-solving procedure: the cues given by the problem, the concepts and processes used by the children, and the responses given by the children. Responses to mathematical problems from children in this age group have not previously been used to elucidate the earlier modes of functioning in the SOLO Taxonomy. In particular this paper considers the Ikonic mode and the transition into the concrete Symbolic mode.

  15. Numerical Solution of the k-Eigenvalue Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Steven Paul

    2011-12-01

    Obtaining solutions to the k-eigenvalue form of the radiation transport equation is an important topic in the design and analysis of nuclear reactors. Although this has been an area of active interest in the nuclear engineering community for several decades, to date no truly satisfactory solution strategies exist. In general, existing techniques are either slow to converge for difficult problems or suffer from stability and robustness issues that can cause solvers to diverge for some problems. This work provides a comparison between a variety of methods and introduces a new strategy based on the Davidson method that has been used in other fields for many years but never for this problem. The Davidson method offers an alternative to the nested iteration structure inherent to standard approaches and allows expensive linear solvers to be replaced by a potentially cheap preconditioner. To fill the role of this preconditioner, a strategy based on a multigrid treatment of the energy variable is developed. Numerical experiments using the 2-D NEWT transport package are presented, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  16. Application of inverse heat conduction problem on temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zhou, G.; Dong, B.; Li, Q.; Liu, L. Q.

    2013-09-01

    For regenerative cooling devices, such as G-M refrigerator, pulse tube cooler or thermoacoustic cooler, the gas oscillating bring about temperature fluctuations inevitably, which is harmful in many applications requiring high stable temperatures. To find out the oscillating mechanism of the cooling temperature and improve the temperature stability of cooler, the inner temperature of the cold head has to be measured. However, it is difficult to measure the inner oscillating temperature of the cold head directly because the invasive temperature detectors may disturb the oscillating flow. Fortunately, the outer surface temperature of the cold head can be measured accurately by invasive temperature measurement techniques. In this paper, a mathematical model of inverse heat conduction problem is presented to identify the inner surface oscillating temperature of cold head according to the measured temperature of the outer surface in a GM cryocooler. Inverse heat conduction problem will be solved using control volume approach. Outer surface oscillating temperature could be used as input conditions of inverse problem and the inner surface oscillating temperature of cold head can be inversely obtained. A simple uncertainty analysis of the oscillating temperature measurement also will be provided.

  17. Novel Problem Solving - The NASA Solution Mechanism Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeton, Kathryn E.; Richard, Elizabeth E.; Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past five years, the Human Health and Performance (HH&P) Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has conducted a number of pilot and ongoing projects in collaboration and open innovation. These projects involved the use of novel open innovation competitions that sought solutions from "the crowd", non-traditional problem solvers. The projects expanded to include virtual collaboration centers such as the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC) and more recently a collaborative research project between NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF). These novel problem-solving tools produced effective results and the HH&P wanted to capture the knowledge from these new tools, to teach the results to the directorate, and to implement new project management tools and coursework. The need to capture and teach the results of these novel problem solving tools, the HH&P decided to create a web-based tool to capture best practices and case studies, to teach novice users how to use new problem solving tools and to change project management training/. This web-based tool was developed with a small, multi-disciplinary group and named the Solution Mechanism Guide (SMG). An alpha version was developed that was tested against several sessions of user groups to get feedback on the SMG and determine a future course for development. The feedback was very positive and the HH&P decided to move to the beta-phase of development. To develop the web-based tool, the HH&P utilized the NASA Tournament Lab (NTL) to develop the software with TopCoder under an existing contract. In this way, the HH&P is using one new tool (the NTL and TopCoder) to develop the next generation tool, the SMG. The beta-phase of the SMG is planed for release in the spring of 2014 and results of the beta-phase testing will be available for the IAC meeting in September. The SMG is intended to disrupt the way problem solvers and project managers approach problem solving and to increase the

  18. Stokes problem with a solution dependent slip bound: Stability of solutions with respect to domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslinger, Jaroslav; Stebel, Jan

    2016-09-01

    We study the Stokes problem in a bounded planar domain $\\Omega$ with a friction type boundary condition that switches between a slip and no-slip stage. Unlike our previous work [6], in the present paper the threshold value may depend on the velocity field. Besides the usual velocity-pressure formulation, we introduce an alternative formulation with three Lagrange multipliers which allows a more flexible treatment of the impermeability condition as well as optimum design problems with cost functions depending on the shear and/or normal stress. Our main goal is to determine under which conditions concerning smoothness of $\\Omega$, solutions to the Stokes system depend continuously on variations of $\\Omega$. Having this result at our disposal, we easily prove the existence of a solution to optimal shape design problems for a large class of cost functionals.

  19. Light Pollution: the Problem and the Potential Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, David L.

    Essentially all astronomical observing sites have been adversely affected by light pollution, the increasing sky glow above all cities worldwide. Those sites not now affected will be in time. There is no getting away from it. This sky glow is decreasing the value of our observing facilities, and several observatories have been compromised to the extent that ``dark sky" astronomy is no longer possible. Furthermore, this sky glow is also affecting almost all amateur astronomy and the general public, removing much of the universe from the view of us all. The change in only one generation is remarkable. Something must be done. Fortunately, there are solutions. They have been implemented to some extent in a number of locations, and we know they work. The problem is in building awareness of the issues and of the solutions and then in overcoming the apathy of most people, including astronomers, to do something to help implement the solutions. We are fortunate in that all of these solutions help to improve greatly the quality of our outdoor nighttime lighting, improving visibility, removing glare, saving energy and increasing the ambience of the nighttime environment. We can all win, and we must.

  20. Solution to certain problems in the failure of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodsell, Johnathan

    The present work contains the solution of two problems in composite structures. In the first, an approximate elasticity solution for prediction of the displacement, stress and strain fields within the m-layer, symmetric and balanced angle-ply composite laminate of finite-width subjected anticlastic bending deformation is developed. The solution is shown to recover classical laminated plate theory predictions at interior regions of the laminate and thereby illustrates the boundary layer character of this interlaminar phenomenon. The results exhibit the anticipated response in congruence with the solutions for uniform axial extension and uniform temperature change, where divergence of the interlaminar shearing stress is seen to occur at the intersection of the free-edge and planes between lamina of +theta and -theta orientation. The analytical results show excellent agreement with the finite-element predictions for the same boundary-value problem and thereby provide an efficient and compact solution available for parametric studies of the influence of geometry and material properties. The solution is combined with previously developed solutions for uniform axial extension and uniform temperature change of the identical laminate and the combined solution is exercised to compare the relative magnitudes of free-edge phenomenon arising from the different loading conditions, to study very thick laminates and laminates where the laminate width is less than the laminate thickness. Significantly, it was demonstrated that the solution is valid for arbitrary stacking sequence and the solution was exercised to examine antisymmetric and non-symmetric laminates. Finally, the solution was exercised to determine the dimensions of the boundary layer for very large numbers of layers. It was found that the dimension of the boundary layer width in bending is approximately twice that in uniform axial extension and uniform temperature change. In the second, the intrinsic flaw concept is

  1. Building Science and Technology Solutions for National Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Alan R.

    2012-06-05

    The nation's investment in Los Alamos has fostered scientific capabilities for national security missions. As the premier national security science laboratory, Los Alamos tackles: (1) Multidisciplinary science, technology, and engineering challenges; (2) Problems demanding unique experimental and computational facilities; and (3) Highly complex national security issues requiring fundamental breakthroughs. Our mission as a DOE national security science laboratory is to develop and apply science, technology, and engineering solutions that: (1) ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent; (2) protect against the nuclear threat; and (3) solve national security challenges.

  2. Problems and Solutions of Popularization of Accounting Computerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kan; Fu, YingLi; Gu, CaiDong; Zhang, Liang

    With the integration of China's economy and international markets, accounting computerization, which conducts accounting and accounting control by taking advantage of computer, has become a major component sector of accounting modernization and the main content of accounting reform. The popularization of accounting computerization is beyond question. Only this popularization can meet the requirement of knowledge economy for accounting information. It is the need to deepen accounting reform, to further enhance the level of accounting work and to achieve China's modernization of science and technology as well. This paper discusses problems and relevant solutions in the popularization process of accounting computerization so as to carry out this popularization better.

  3. New discretization and solution techniques for incompressible viscous flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.; Nicolaides, R. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    Several topics arising in the finite element solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are considered. Specifically, the question of choosing finite element velocity/pressure spaces is addressed, particularly from the viewpoint of achieving stable discretizations leading to convergent pressure approximations. The role of artificial viscosity in viscous flow calculations is studied, emphasizing work by several researchers for the anisotropic case. The last section treats the problem of solving the nonlinear systems of equations which arise from the discretization. Time marching methods and classical iterative techniques, as well as some modifications are mentioned.

  4. New discretization and solution techniques for incompressible viscous flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.; Nicolaides, R. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    This paper considers several topics arising in the finite element solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Specifically, the question of choosing finite element velocity/pressure spaces is addressed, particularly from the viewpoint of achieving stable discretizations leading to convergent pressure approximations. Following this, the role of artificial viscosity in viscous flow calculations is studied, emphasizing recent work by several researchers for the anisotropic case. The last section treats the problem of solving the nonlinear systems of equations which arise from the discretization. Time marching methods and classical iterative techniques, as well as some recent modifications are mentioned.

  5. Rank-one inverse scattering problem: Reformulation and analytic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartt, K.

    1984-03-01

    Using the K-matrix formalism, we give a simplified reformulation of the S-wave rank-one inverse scattering problem. The resulting Cauchy integral equation, obtained differently by Gourdin and Martin in their first paper, is tailored to rational representations of F(k)=k(δ0). Use of such F(k) permits a simple but general solution without integration, giving analytic form factors having a pole structure like the S matrix that are reducible to rational expressions using Padé approximants. Finally, we show a bound state pole condition is necessary, and makes the form factor unique.

  6. Rank-one inverse scattering problem: Reformulation and analytic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hartt, K.

    1984-03-01

    Using the K-matrix formalism, we give a simplified reformulation of the S-wave rank-one inverse scattering problem. The resulting Cauchy integral equation, obtained differently by Gourdin and Martin in their first paper, is tailored to rational representations of F(k) = k cot(delta/sub 0/). Use of such F(k) permits a simple but general solution without integration, giving analytic form factors having a pole structure like the S matrix that are reducible to rational expressions using Pade approximants. Finally, we show a bound state pole condition is necessary, and makes the form factor unique.

  7. Selected Spacecraft Magnetic Cleanliness Problems and their Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musmann, G.; Brunke, H.-P.; Mehlem, K.

    2012-05-01

    Four specific magnetic cleanliness problems from the last 30 years are discussed and their solutions are shown. These are the ESA GIOTTO Comet Halley de- spin motor compensation with its 1200 pole motors, the four CNES Mars Netlander solar petals optimization, 3- D field calculation and visualization using Visual Basic, the ESA ROSETTA huge solar petal 3-D field calculation, visualization and compensation and finally the NASA/ESA CASSINI-HUYGENS separation and its visualization with the help of Huygens magnetic cleanliness results.

  8. Exact solution of two phase spherical Stefan problem with two free boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavokin, Alexey A.; Nauryz, Targyn; Bizhigitova, Nazerke T.

    2016-08-01

    Solution of the heat equation in a spherical domain with two free boundaries (two-phase Stefan problem) when one of the subdomains degenerates at the initial time is considered. The use of conventional finite-difference methods in these cases is not expedient because of the degenerate domain. The solution is found in the form of combination of Integral Error functions series, [M. Sarsengeldin, and S. Kharin, Filomat, (2016), (in Press)] and then recurrent solvability of nonlinear algebraic equations for determining the coefficients of the series is proved. Such problems are of practical interest for the simulation of laser material processing as well for the modeling of thermal effects of electric arc that ignites during the opening of electric contacts [S. N. Kharin, and M. Sarsengeldin, Influence of contact materials on phenomena in a short electrical arc, in Key Engineering Materials, Trans tech publications, Islamabad, Pakistan, 2012, pp. 321-329].

  9. Finite element solution of optimal control problems with inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element method based on a weak Hamiltonian form of the necessary conditions is summarized for optimal control problems. Very crude shape functions (so simple that element numerical quadrature is not necessary) can be used to develop an efficient procedure for obtaining candidate solutions (i.e., those which satisfy all the necessary conditions) even for highly nonlinear problems. An extension of the formulation allowing for discontinuities in the states and derivatives of the states is given. A theory that includes control inequality constraints is fully developed. An advanced launch vehicle (ALV) model is presented. The model involves staging and control constraints, thus demonstrating the full power of the weak formulation to date. Numerical results are presented along with total elapsed computer time required to obtain the results. The speed and accuracy in obtaining the results make this method a strong candidate for a real-time guidance algorithm.

  10. Multidimensional Assessment of Criminal Recidivism: Problems, Pitfalls, and Proposed Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Vrieze, Scott I.; Grove, William M.

    2010-01-01

    All states have statutes in place to commit civilly individuals at high risk for violence. This note addresses difficulties in assessing such risk, but uses as an example the task of predicting sexual violence recidivism; the principles espoused here generalize to predicting all violence. As part of commitment process, mental health professionals, who are often psychologists, evaluate an individual’s risk of sexual recidivism. It is common for professionals conducting these risk assessments to use several actuarial risk prediction instruments (i.e., psychological tests). These tests rarely agree closely in the risk figures they provide. Serious epistemological and psychometric problems in the multivariate assessment of recidivism risk are pointed out. Sound psychometric, or in some cases heuristic, solutions to these problems are proffered, in hope of improving clinical practice. We focus on how to make these tests’ outputs commensurable, and discuss various ways to combine them in coherent, justifiable, fashions. PMID:20528065

  11. A mathematical solution to a network designing problem.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y

    1996-01-01

    One of the major open issues in neural network research includes a Network Designing Problem (NDP): find a polynomial-time procedure that produces minimal structures (the minimum intermediate size, thresholds and synapse weights) of multilayer threshold feed-forward networks so that they can yield outputs consistent with given sample sets of input-output data. The NDP includes as a subproblem a Network Training Problem (NTP) where the intermediate size is given. The NTP has been studied mainly by use of iterative algorithms of network training. This paper, making use of both rate distortion theory in information theory and linear algebra, solves the NDP mathematically rigorously. On the basis of this mathematical solution, it furthermore develops a mathematical solution procedure to the NDP that computes the minimal structure straightforwardly from the sample set. The procedure precisely attains the minimum intermediate size, although its computational time complexity can be of nonpolynomial order at worst cases. The paper also refers to a polynomial-time shortcut of the procedure for practical use that can reach an approximate minimum intermediate size with its error measurable. The shortcut, when the intermediate size is prespecified, reduces to a promising alternative as well to current network training algorithms to the NTP.

  12. Comet solutions to a stylized BWR benchmark problem

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a stylized 3-D BWR benchmark problem was used to evaluate the performance of the coarse mesh radiation transport method COMET. The benchmark problem consists of 560 fuel bundles at 3 different burnups and 3 coolant void states. The COMET solution was compared with the corresponding Monte Carlo reference solution using the same 2-group material cross section library for three control blade (rod) configurations, namely, all rods out (ARO), all rods in (ARI) and some rods in (SRJ). The differences in the COMET and MCNP eigenvalues were 43 pcm, 66 pcm and 32 pcm for the ARO, ARI and SRI cases, respectively. These differences are all within 3 standard deviations of the COMET uncertainty. The average relative differences in the bundle averaged fission densities for these three cases were 0.89%, 1.24%, and 1.05%, respectively. The corresponding differences in the fuel pin averaged fission densities were 1.24%, 1.84% and 1.29%, respectively. It was found that COMET is 3,000 times faster than Monte Carlo, while its statistical uncertainty in the fuel pin fission density is much lower than that of Monte Carlo (i.e., {approx}40 times lower). (authors)

  13. ULTRA-SHARP solution of the Smith-Hutton problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.; Mokhtari, Simin

    1992-01-01

    Highly convective scalar transport involving near-discontinuities and strong streamline curvature was addressed in a paper by Smith and Hutton in 1982, comparing several different convection schemes applied to a specially devised test problem. First order methods showed significant artificial diffusion, whereas higher order methods gave less smearing but had a tendency to overshoot and oscillate. Perhaps because unphysical oscillations are more obvious than unphysical smearing, the intervening period has seen a rise in popularity of low order artificially diffusive schemes, especially in the numerical heat transfer industry. The present paper describes an alternate strategy of using non-artificially diffusive high order methods, while maintaining strictly monotonic transitions through the use of simple flux limited constraints. Limited third order upwinding is usually found to be the most cost effective basic convection scheme. Tighter resolution of discontinuities can be obtained at little additional cost by using automatic adaptive stencil expansion to higher order in local regions, as needed.

  14. Series solution to coupled nonlinear heat and moisture transfer in slabs with temperature-dependent diffusivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Ryoichi

    2014-12-01

    The two-dimensional differential transform method (DTM) is applied to solve the one-dimensional coupled heat and moisture diffusion problem for a slab with temperature-dependent thermal and moisture diffusivities, which are expressed by a linear function and an exponential function of temperature, respectively. One surface of the slab is subjected to convective hygrothermal loading and the other has constant prescribed temperature and moisture. Approximate analytical (series) solutions for the temperature and moisture profiles in the slab are derived. The transformed functions included in the solutions are obtained through a simple recursive procedure. Numerical results for a slab subjected to a sudden change in surface temperature illustrate the effects of temperature-dependent diffusivities on the transient temperature and moisture profiles of the slab. The results indicate that the nonlinear effect originating from the varying moisture diffusivity is not negligible for resin composites. The DTMis a useful new analytical method for solving nonlinear coupled transient problems.

  15. Stability of Solutions to Classes of Traveling Salesman Problems.

    PubMed

    Niendorf, Moritz; Kabamba, Pierre T; Girard, Anouck R

    2016-04-01

    By performing stability analysis on an optimal tour for problems belonging to classes of the traveling salesman problem (TSP), this paper derives margins of optimality for a solution with respect to disturbances in the problem data. Specifically, we consider the asymmetric sequence-dependent TSP, where the sequence dependence is driven by the dynamics of a stack. This is a generalization of the symmetric non sequence-dependent version of the TSP. Furthermore, we also consider the symmetric sequence-dependent variant and the asymmetric non sequence-dependent variant. Amongst others these problems have applications in logistics and unmanned aircraft mission planning. Changing external conditions such as traffic or weather may alter task costs, which can render an initially optimal itinerary suboptimal. Instead of optimizing the itinerary every time task costs change, stability criteria allow for fast evaluation of whether itineraries remain optimal. This paper develops a method to compute stability regions for the best tour in a set of tours for the symmetric TSP and extends the results to the asymmetric problem as well as their sequence-dependent counterparts. As the TSP is NP-hard, heuristic methods are frequently used to solve it. The presented approach is also applicable to analyze stability regions for a tour obtained through application of the k -opt heuristic with respect to the k -neighborhood. A dimensionless criticality metric for edges is proposed, such that a high criticality of an edge indicates that the optimal tour is more susceptible to cost changes in that edge. Multiple examples demonstrate the application of the developed stability computation method as well as the edge criticality measure that facilitates an intuitive assessment of instances of the TSP. PMID:25910270

  16. Assessing student written problem solutions: A problem-solving rubric with application to introductory physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docktor, Jennifer L.; Dornfeld, Jay; Frodermann, Evan; Heller, Kenneth; Hsu, Leonardo; Jackson, Koblar Alan; Mason, Andrew; Ryan, Qing X.; Yang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Problem solving is a complex process valuable in everyday life and crucial for learning in the STEM fields. To support the development of problem-solving skills it is important for researchers and curriculum developers to have practical tools that can measure the difference between novice and expert problem-solving performance in authentic classroom work. It is also useful if such tools can be employed by instructors to guide their pedagogy. We describe the design, development, and testing of a simple rubric to assess written solutions to problems given in undergraduate introductory physics courses. In particular, we present evidence for the validity, reliability, and utility of the instrument. The rubric identifies five general problem-solving processes and defines the criteria to attain a score in each: organizing problem information into a Useful Description, selecting appropriate principles (Physics Approach), applying those principles to the specific conditions in the problem (Specific Application of Physics), using Mathematical Procedures appropriately, and displaying evidence of an organized reasoning pattern (Logical Progression).

  17. Continued development of a semianalytical solution for two-phase fluid and heat flow in a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, C.; Pruess, K.

    1991-06-01

    Over the past few years the authors have developed a semianalytical solution for transient two-phase water, air, and heat flow in a porous medium surrounding a constant-strength linear heat source, using a similarity variable {eta} = r/{radical}t. Although the similarity transformation approach requires a simplified geometry, all the complex physical mechanisms involved in coupled two-phase fluid and heat flow can be taken into account in a rigorous way, so that the solution may be applied to a variety of problems of current interest. The work was motivated by adverse to predict the thermohydrological response to the proposed geologic repository for heat-generating high-level nuclear wastes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in a partially saturated, highly fractured volcanic formation. The paper describes thermal and hydrologic conditions near the heat source; new features of the model; vapor pressure lowering; and the effective-continuum representation of a fractured/porous medium.

  18. Isothermal heat measurements of TBP-nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; Cavin, W.S.

    1994-12-16

    Net heats of reaction were measured in an isothermal calorimeter for both single phase (organic) and two phase (organic and aqueous) TBP/HNO{sub 3} reacting solutions at temperatures above 100 C. The oxidation rate constant was determined to be 5.4E-4 min{sup {minus}1} at 110 C for an open ``vented`` system as compared to 1.33 E-3 min{sup {minus}1} in the closed system. The heat released per unit material oxidized was also reduced. The oxidation in both phases was found to be first order in nitric acid and pseudo-zero order in butylnitrate and water. The hydrolysis (esterification) rate constant determined by Nichols` (1.33E-3 min{sup {minus}1}) fit the experimental data from this work well. Forced evaporation of the volatile components by the product gases from oxidation resulted in a cooling mechanism which more than balanced the heat from the oxidation reaction in the two-phased systems. Rate expressions were derived and rate constants determined for both the single and two phase systems. An approximating mathematical model was developed to fit the experimental data and to extrapolate beyond the experimental conditions. This model shows that one foot of ``reacting`` 14.3M HNO{sub 3} aqueous phase solution at 121 C will transport sufficient water to the organic phase to replace evaporative losses, maintaining endothermicity, for organic layers up to 12.2 + 6.0 feet deep. If the pressure in a reacting system is allowed to increase due to insufficient venting the temperature of the organic phase would increase in temperature to reach a new equilibrium. The rate of oxidation would increase not only due to the increase in temperature but also from the increased concentration of dissolved HNO{sub 3} reduction products. Another important factor is that the cooling system described in this work becomes less effective as the total pressure increases. These factors probably contributed to the explosion at Tomsk.

  19. A scalable framework for the solution of stochastic inverse problems using a sparse grid collocation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zabaras, N. Ganapathysubramanian, B.

    2008-04-20

    Experimental evidence suggests that the dynamics of many physical phenomena are significantly affected by the underlying uncertainties associated with variations in properties and fluctuations in operating conditions. Recent developments in stochastic analysis have opened the possibility of realistic modeling of such systems in the presence of multiple sources of uncertainties. These advances raise the possibility of solving the corresponding stochastic inverse problem: the problem of designing/estimating the evolution of a system in the presence of multiple sources of uncertainty given limited information. A scalable, parallel methodology for stochastic inverse/design problems is developed in this article. The representation of the underlying uncertainties and the resultant stochastic dependant variables is performed using a sparse grid collocation methodology. A novel stochastic sensitivity method is introduced based on multiple solutions to deterministic sensitivity problems. The stochastic inverse/design problem is transformed to a deterministic optimization problem in a larger-dimensional space that is subsequently solved using deterministic optimization algorithms. The design framework relies entirely on deterministic direct and sensitivity analysis of the continuum systems, thereby significantly enhancing the range of applicability of the framework for the design in the presence of uncertainty of many other systems usually analyzed with legacy codes. Various illustrative examples with multiple sources of uncertainty including inverse heat conduction problems in random heterogeneous media are provided to showcase the developed framework.

  20. A scalable framework for the solution of stochastic inverse problems using a sparse grid collocation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabaras, N.; Ganapathysubramanian, B.

    2008-04-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that the dynamics of many physical phenomena are significantly affected by the underlying uncertainties associated with variations in properties and fluctuations in operating conditions. Recent developments in stochastic analysis have opened the possibility of realistic modeling of such systems in the presence of multiple sources of uncertainties. These advances raise the possibility of solving the corresponding stochastic inverse problem: the problem of designing/estimating the evolution of a system in the presence of multiple sources of uncertainty given limited information. A scalable, parallel methodology for stochastic inverse/design problems is developed in this article. The representation of the underlying uncertainties and the resultant stochastic dependant variables is performed using a sparse grid collocation methodology. A novel stochastic sensitivity method is introduced based on multiple solutions to deterministic sensitivity problems. The stochastic inverse/design problem is transformed to a deterministic optimization problem in a larger-dimensional space that is subsequently solved using deterministic optimization algorithms. The design framework relies entirely on deterministic direct and sensitivity analysis of the continuum systems, thereby significantly enhancing the range of applicability of the framework for the design in the presence of uncertainty of many other systems usually analyzed with legacy codes. Various illustrative examples with multiple sources of uncertainty including inverse heat conduction problems in random heterogeneous media are provided to showcase the developed framework.

  1. Chemically contaminated casualties: different problems and possible solutions.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The initial response to mass casualty incidents is usually informal as uninjured and injured survivors and passersby assist the injured and take them to medical centers. This creates some problems, for example, most victims go to one or two hospitals and the least injured arrive first; but, on the whole, it works. However, the same response does not work when victims are contaminated, and some of the solutions that work when victims are only injured do not work when victims are contaminated. This article suggests an approach that accepts the reality of what happens-the first receiving hospital becomes contaminated--and suggests how planning can begin with that as a starting point. It stressed that current plans are based on false assumptions and that this can lead to inadequate preparation.

  2. General solutions of optimum problems in nonstationary flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miele, Angelo

    1955-01-01

    A general method concerning optimum problems in nonstationary flight is developed and discussed. Best flight techniques are determined for the following conditions: climb with minimum time, climb with minimum fuel consumption, steepest climb, descending and gliding flight with maximum time or with maximum distance. Optimum distributions of speed with altitude are derived assuming constant airplane weight and neglecting curvatures and squares of path inclination in the projection of the equation of motion on the normal to the flight path. The results of this paper differ from the well-known results obtained by neglecting accelerations with one exception, namely the case of gliding with maximum range. The paper is concluded with criticisms and remarks concerning the physical nature of the solutions and their usefulness for practical applications.

  3. A minimalist legislative solution to the problem of euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Komesaroff, Paul A; Charles, Stephen

    2015-05-18

    Intense debate has continued for many years about whether voluntary euthanasia or assisted suicide should be permitted by law. The community is bitterly divided and there has been vigorous opposition from medical practitioners and the Australian Medical Association. Despite differences of religious and philosophical convictions and ethical values, there is widespread community agreement that people with terminal illnesses are entitled to adequate treatment, and should also be allowed to make basic choices about when and how they die. A problem with the current law is that doctors who follow current best practice cannot be confident that they will be protected from criminal prosecution. We propose simple changes to Commonwealth and state legislation that recognise community concerns and protect doctors acting in accordance with best current practice. This minimalist solution should be widely acceptable to the community, including both the medical profession and those who object to euthanasia for religious reasons. Important areas of disagreement will persist that can be addressed in future debates.

  4. Graphene in therapeutics delivery: Problems, solutions and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    McCallion, Catriona; Burthem, John; Rees-Unwin, Karen; Golovanov, Alexander; Pluen, Alain

    2016-07-01

    Graphene based nanomaterials are being used experimentally to deliver therapeutic agents to cells or tissues both in vitro and in vivo. However, substantial challenges remain before moving to safe and effective use in humans. In particular, it is recognised that graphene molecules undergo complex interactions with solutes, proteins or cellular systems within the body, and that these interactions impact significantly on the behaviour or toxicity of the molecule. Approaches to overcome these problems include modification of the graphene or its combination with other molecules to accentuate favourable characteristics or modify adverse interactions. This has led to an emerging role for graphene as one part of highly-tailored multifunctional delivery vehicles. This review examines the knowledge that underpins present approaches to exploit graphene in therapeutics delivery, discussing both favourable and unfavourable aspects of graphene behaviour in biological systems and how these may be modified; then considers the present place of the molecule and the challenges for its further development.

  5. The PMHT: solutions for some of its problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieneke, Monika; Koch, Wolfgang

    2007-09-01

    Tracking multiple targets in a cluttered environment is a challenging task. Probabilistic Multiple Hypothesis Tracking (PMHT) is an efficient approach for dealing with it. Essentially PMHT is based on the method of Expectation-Maximization for handling with association conflicts. Linearity in the number of targets and measurements is the main motivation for a further development and extension of this methodology. Unfortunately, compared with the Probabilistic Data Association Filter (PDAF), PMHT has not yet shown its superiority in terms of track-lost statistics. Furthermore, the problem of track extraction and deletion is apparently not yet satisfactorily solved within this framework. Four properties of PMHT are responsible for its problems in track maintenance: Non-Adaptivity, Hospitality, Narcissism and Local Maxima. 1, 2 In this work we present a solution for each of them and derive an improved PMHT by integrating the solutions into the PMHT formalism. The new PMHT is evaluated by Monte-Carlo simulations. A sequential Likelihood-Ratio (LR) test for track extraction has been developed and already integrated into the framework of traditional Bayesian Multiple Hypothesis Tracking. 3 As a multi-scan approach, also the PMHT methodology has the potential for track extraction. In this paper an analogous integration of a sequential LR test into the PMHT framework is proposed. We present an LR formula for track extraction and deletion using the PMHT update formulae. As PMHT provides all required ingredients for a sequential LR calculation, the LR is thus a by-product of the PMHT iteration process. Therefore the resulting update formula for the sequential LR test affords the development of Track-Before-Detect algorithms for PMHT. The approach is illustrated by a simple example.

  6. Testable solution of the cosmological constant and coincidence problems

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Douglas J.; Barrow, John D.

    2011-02-15

    We present a new solution to the cosmological constant (CC) and coincidence problems in which the observed value of the CC, {Lambda}, is linked to other observable properties of the Universe. This is achieved by promoting the CC from a parameter that must be specified, to a field that can take many possible values. The observed value of {Lambda}{approx_equal}(9.3 Gyrs){sup -2}[{approx_equal}10{sup -120} in Planck units] is determined by a new constraint equation which follows from the application of a causally restricted variation principle. When applied to our visible Universe, the model makes a testable prediction for the dimensionless spatial curvature of {Omega}{sub k0}=-0.0056({zeta}{sub b}/0.5), where {zeta}{sub b}{approx}1/2 is a QCD parameter. Requiring that a classical history exist, our model determines the probability of observing a given {Lambda}. The observed CC value, which we successfully predict, is typical within our model even before the effects of anthropic selection are included. When anthropic selection effects are accounted for, we find that the observed coincidence between t{sub {Lambda}={Lambda}}{sup -1/2} and the age of the Universe, t{sub U}, is a typical occurrence in our model. In contrast to multiverse explanations of the CC problems, our solution is independent of the choice of a prior weighting of different {Lambda} values and does not rely on anthropic selection effects. Our model includes no unnatural small parameters and does not require the introduction of new dynamical scalar fields or modifications to general relativity, and it can be tested by astronomical observations in the near future.

  7. Exploiting New Features of COMSOL Version 4 on Conjugate Heat Transfer Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Freels, James D; Arimilli, Rao V; Bodey, Isaac T

    2010-01-01

    Users of COMSOL Multiphysics at version 3.5a and earlier have enjoyed many features that have provided not only a good user experience at the GUI interface, but also the capability to solve many classes of problems in a consistent manner with the physics being simulated. With the new release version 4.0 and later (4+) of COMSOL, the user is provided a dramatic new interface from which to interact, and many new features ``under the hood'' for solving problems more efficiently and with even greater accuracy and consistency than before. This paper will explore several of these new version 4+ features for the conjugate heat transfer class of problems. Our environment is challenging in that we demand high-quality solutions for nuclear-reactor systems and the models tend to become large and difficult to solve. Areas investigated include turbulence modeling, distributed parallel processing, solver scaling, and opengl graphics issues in a Linux computing environment.

  8. A spatiotemporal dynamic distributed solution to the MEG inverse problem

    PubMed Central

    Lamus, Camilo; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Temereanca, Simona; Brown, Emery N.; Purdon, Patrick L.

    2012-01-01

    MEG/EEG are non-invasive imaging techniques that record brain activity with high temporal resolution. However, estimation of brain source currents from surface recordings requires solving an ill-conditioned inverse problem. Converging lines of evidence in neuroscience, from neuronal network models to resting-state imaging and neurophysiology, suggest that cortical activation is a distributed spatiotemporal dynamic process, supported by both local and long-distance neuroanatomic connections. Because spatiotemporal dynamics of this kind are central to brain physiology, inverse solutions could be improved by incorporating models of these dynamics. In this article, we present a model for cortical activity based on nearest-neighbor autoregression that incorporates local spatiotemporal interactions between distributed sources in a manner consistent with neurophysiology and neuroanatomy. We develop a dynamic Maximum a Posteriori Expectation-Maximization (dMAP-EM) source localization algorithm for estimation of cortical sources and model parameters based on the Kalman Filter, the Fixed Interval Smoother, and the EM algorithms. We apply the dMAP-EM algorithm to simulated experiments as well as to human experimental data. Furthermore, we derive expressions to relate our dynamic estimation formulas to those of standard static models, and show how dynamic methods optimally assimilate past and future data. Our results establish the feasibility of spatiotemporal dynamic estimation in large-scale distributed source spaces with several thousand source locations and hundreds of sensors, with resulting inverse solutions that provide substantial performance improvements over static methods. PMID:22155043

  9. Flood problems in Bangladesh: Is there an indigenous solution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasid, Harun; Paul, Bimal Kanti

    1987-03-01

    Bangladesh, situated on the delta of the Ganges, the Brahmaputra, and the Meghna rivers, experiences two distinct types of inundations: (a) river floods resulting from excessive runoff contributed by monsoon precipitation and (b) coastal floods induced by storm surges of tropical cyclones. The river floods are normal annual events and human settlements and agricultural practices have adapted admirably well to their regimes. Abnormal floods that occur once in every few years cause serious damage to crops and properties. To minimize flood losses, a number of modern engineering projects have been constructed within Bangladesh. However, the successful solution of the problem would probably require some international collaboration for basinwide unified systems planning, since large parts of the drainage basins of Bangladesh lie beyond its borders. In the absence of such collaboration, internal resources should be utilized for the construction of smaller public projects, such as polders, and for encouraging and reinforcing various types of indigenous adjustments to floods. There are very few successful indigenous adjustments to coastal floods. Most of the structural solutions, such as community shelters and higher embankments, are expensive public projects that are probably beyond the means of the internal resources of the country.

  10. Numerical solution of an optimal control problem governed by three-phase non-isothermal flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temirbekov, Nurlan M.; Baigereyev, Dossan R.

    2016-08-01

    The paper focuses on the numerical implementation of a model optimal control problem governed by equations of three-phase non-isothermal flow in porous media. The objective is to achieve preassigned temperature distribution along the reservoir at a given time of development by controlling mass flow rate of heat transfer agent on the injection well. The problem of optimal control is formulated, the adjoint problem is presented, and an algorithm for the numerical solution is proposed. Results of computational experiments are presented for a test problem.

  11. A comparison study of the Eigenvalue method for the solution of the transient heat conduction equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, David B.

    1986-01-01

    This is a comparison study of the abilities of the eigenvalue method as a numerical method in solving the transient heat conduction equation. The eigenvalue method was compared to five other numerical methods; Runge-Kutta, Gears, extrapolation, fully implicit, and Crank-Nicolson. The latter were used to solve three physical problems: (1) a two dimensional slap which takes advantage of the symmetry of the problem; (2) the same slap problem without taking advantage of the symmetry; and (3) a cylindrical problem taking full advantage of symmetry. The scope of the study is to see which methods take less computer time while maintaining sufficient accuracy. The time it takes the computer to totally execute the program was used as the time comparison basis. The accuracy is a comparison of the exact solution to the numerical solution. A root mean square average of all the grid points per time step is used. The results of the study were surprising. The accuracy of the eigenvalue method is not any better than that of the Crank-Nicolson method. The computer times show that the eigenvalue is not the fastest for short transient times. A long transient problem with nonlinear terme was not used.

  12. Study on Latent Heat of Fusion of Ice in Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumano, Hiroyuki; Asaoka, Tatsunori; Saito, Akio; Okawa, Seiji

    In this study, latent heat of fusion of ice in aqueous solutions was measured to understand latent heat of fusion of ice slurries. Propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, ethanol, NaCl and NaNO3 solutions were examined as the aqueous solutions. In the measurement, pure ice was put into the solution, and the temperature variation of the solution due to the melting of the ice was measured. Then, the effective latent heat of fusion was calculated from energy balance equation. When ice melts in solution, the concentration of the solution varies due to the melting of the ice, and dilution heat must be considered. Therefore, the latent heat of fusion of ice in aqueous solutions was predicted by considering the effects of dilution and freezing-point depression. The latent heat of fusion was also measured by differential scanning calorimetry(DSC) to compare the results obtained from the experiments with that obtained by DSC. As the result, it was found that the effective latent heat of fusion of ice decreased with the increase of the concentration of solution, and the effective latent heat of fusion was calculated from latent heat of fusion of pure ice and the effects of freezing-point depression and the dilution heat.

  13. Technology Solutions Case Study: Foundation Heat Exchanger, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-01

    The foundation heat exchanger, developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is a new concept for a cost-effective horizontal ground heat exchanger that can be connected to water-to-water or water-to-air heat pump systems for space conditioning as well as domestic water heating.

  14. Improved time-space method for 3-D heat transfer problems including global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, T.S.; Wakashima, Shinichiro

    1999-07-01

    In this paper, the Time-Space Method (TSM) which has been proposed for solving general heat transfer and fluid flow problems was improved in order to cover global and urban warming. The TSM is effective in almost all-transient heat transfer and fluid flow problems, and has been already applied to the 2-D melting problems (or moving boundary problems). The computer running time will be reduced to only 1/100th--1/1000th of the existing schemes for 2-D and 3-D problems. However, in order to apply to much larger-scale problems, for example, global warming, urban warming and general ocean circulation, the SOR method (or other iterative methods) in four dimensions is somewhat tedious and provokingly slow. Motivated by the above situation, the authors improved the speed of iteration of the previous TSM by introducing the following ideas: (1) Timewise chopping: Time domain is chopped into small peaches to save memory requirement; (2) Adaptive iteration: Converged region is eliminated for further iteration; (3) Internal selective iteration: Equation with slow iteration speed in iterative procedure is selectively iterated to accelerate entire convergence; and (4) False transient integration: False transient term is added to the Poisson-type equation and the relevant solution is regarded as a parabolic equation. By adopting the above improvements, the higher-order finite different schemes and the hybrid mesh, the computer running time for the TSM is reduced to some 1/4600th of the conventional explicit method for a typical 3-D natural convection problem in a closed cavity. The proposed TSM will be more efficacious for large-scale environmental problems, such as global warming, urban warming and general ocean circulation, in which a tremendous computing time would be required.

  15. A Baryonic Solution to the Missing Satellites Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Kuhlen, Michael; Zolotov, Adi; Hooper, Dan

    2013-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that the inclusion of baryonic physics can alter the dark matter densities in the centers of low-mass galaxies, making the central dark matter slope more shallow than predicted in pure cold dark matter simulations. This flattening of the dark matter profile can occur in the most luminous subhalos around Milky Way mass galaxies. Zolotov et al. have suggested a correction to be applied to the central masses of dark matter-only satellites in order to mimic the affect of (1) the flattening of the dark matter cusp due to supernova feedback in luminous satellites and (2) enhanced tidal stripping due to the presence of a baryonic disk. In this paper, we apply this correction to the z = 0 subhalo masses from the high resolution, dark matter-only Via Lactea II (VL2) simulation, and find that the number of massive subhalos is dramatically reduced. After adopting a stellar mass to halo mass relationship for the VL2 halos, and identifying subhalos that are (1) likely to be destroyed by stripping and (2) likely to have star formation suppressed by photo-heating, we find that the number of massive, luminous satellites around a Milky Way mass galaxy is in agreement with the number of observed satellites around the Milky Way or M31. We conclude that baryonic processes have the potential to solve the missing satellites problem

  16. A BARYONIC SOLUTION TO THE MISSING SATELLITES PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Kuhlen, Michael; Zolotov, Adi; Hooper, Dan E-mail: mqk@astro.berkeley.edu E-mail: dhooper@fnal.gov

    2013-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that the inclusion of baryonic physics can alter the dark matter densities in the centers of low-mass galaxies, making the central dark matter slope more shallow than predicted in pure cold dark matter simulations. This flattening of the dark matter profile can occur in the most luminous subhalos around Milky Way mass galaxies. Zolotov et al. have suggested a correction to be applied to the central masses of dark matter-only satellites in order to mimic the affect of (1) the flattening of the dark matter cusp due to supernova feedback in luminous satellites and (2) enhanced tidal stripping due to the presence of a baryonic disk. In this paper, we apply this correction to the z = 0 subhalo masses from the high resolution, dark matter-only Via Lactea II (VL2) simulation, and find that the number of massive subhalos is dramatically reduced. After adopting a stellar mass to halo mass relationship for the VL2 halos, and identifying subhalos that are (1) likely to be destroyed by stripping and (2) likely to have star formation suppressed by photo-heating, we find that the number of massive, luminous satellites around a Milky Way mass galaxy is in agreement with the number of observed satellites around the Milky Way or M31. We conclude that baryonic processes have the potential to solve the missing satellites problem.

  17. Solute composition and heat shock proteins in rat renal medulla.

    PubMed

    Ohno, A; Müller, E; Fraek, M L; Thurau, K; Beck, F

    1997-05-01

    The high content of heat shock proteins (HSPs) 25 and 72 in the hyperosmotic inner medulla of the concentrating kidney has been ascribed to the high NaCl and urea concentrations in this kidney zone. To assess the effects of variations in the composition of solutes in the renal medulla on the intrarenal distribution of HSPs, rats were fed either a high- or low-Na diet for 3 weeks. These diets result in greatly differing urine and inner medullary solute composition. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot techniques were used to analyse HSP25 and HSP72 in the cortex, outer medulla and inner medulla. In addition, the amounts of organic osmolytes (sorbitol, myo-inositol, betaine and glycerophosphorylcholine) and urea in the tissue were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Intra- and extracellular electrolyte concentrations at the papillary tip were measured by electron microprobe analysis. In the high-Na group, urine osmolality was about 1000 mosmol/kg lower than in rats fed a low-Na diet, due to lower urea concentrations. The sum of urine sodium and potassium concentrations, however, did not differ between the two groups. Neither in the outer nor in the inner medulla was the sum of the concentrations of organic osmolytes affected by the dietary treatment. The sum of sodium, potassium and chloride concentrations did not differ between the two experimental groups, neither in the interstitial nor in the intracellular compartments. However, the urea content and the amounts of HSP25 and HSP72 were significantly lower in the inner medulla of the group of rats fed a high-Na diet. Our results suggest that urea participates in the regulation of the medullary levels of the HSPs and that both HSP25 and HSP72 are components of mechanisms protecting medullary cells against the deleterious effects of high urea concentrations.

  18. Numerical Solution of the Variational Data Assimilation Problem Using Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agoshkov, V. I.; Lebedv, S. A.; Parmuzin, E. I.

    2010-12-01

    The problem of variational assimilation of satellite observational data on the ocean surface temperature is formulated and numerically investigated in order to reconstruct surface heat fluxes with the use of the global three-dimensional model of ocean hydrothermodynamics developed at the Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences (INM RAS), and observational data on the ocean surface temperature over the year 2004. The algorithms of the numerical solution to the problem are elaborated and substantiated, and the data assimilation block is developed and incorporated into the global three-dimensional model. Numerical experiments are carried out with the use of the Indian Ocean water area as an example. Numerical experiments confirm the theoretical conclusions obtained and demonstrate the expediency of combining the model with a block of assimilating operational observational data on the surface temperature.

  19. Direct analytical solutions to non-uniform beam problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    The direct analytical solution to the vibration of non-uniform beams with and without discontinuities and with various boundary conditions is presented. Results are compared to results from the exact solution for certain cases where the exact solution has been obtained. It is shown that the direct solution converges to the exact solution, in fact, with 'indefinite accuracy' just as Hamilton stated that it would.

  20. Metal cladding envelope problems, retrofit solutions, and quality control investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colantonio, Antonio

    1992-04-01

    This paper deals with a case study of a building envelope retrofit of an insulated sheet steel and corrugated metal clad building. The building in discussion is a satellite testing facility which requires specific clean room conditions with controlled interior temperature (22 degree(s)C +/- 1 degree(s)C) and high relative humidity conditions (45% +/- 3%) to facilitate satellite testing programs. Preliminary mechanical system inspections indicated substantial increase in air intake to make up for air leakage losses. An infrared inspection along with an approximate air leakage test of the building envelope was requested by the client to determine the magnitude of the building envelope problem. This investigation concluded that significant air leakage was present throughout the building envelope and that existing mechanical systems did not have sufficient capacity to pressurize the building and negate wind and stack effect. Exfiltration particularly through openings on the top sections of the building were causing interior moisture to saturate wall insulation and render it ineffective. Concern for rusting of metal components was indicated. The subsequent envelope analysis discovered a number of typical metal building details that led to poor air tightness and wall insulation ineffectiveness. These were correlated to infrared investigation data. The retrofit solutions produced for this building not only apply to this building but to other similar building types. Further investigations indicated that air leakage and mechanical system performance were significant problems with buildings using metal cladding systems comparable to this building. Quality control before, during and after construction was identified as an important function of the architectural commissioning of the retrofit work and infrared investigations were used to verify locations of air leakage and insulation effectiveness.

  1. Milne, a routine for the numerical solution of Milne's problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Ajay; Mohankumar, N.

    2010-11-01

    The routine Milne provides accurate numerical values for the classical Milne's problem of neutron transport for the planar one speed and isotropic scattering case. The solution is based on the Case eigen-function formalism. The relevant X functions are evaluated accurately by the Double Exponential quadrature. The calculated quantities are the extrapolation distance and the scalar and the angular fluxes. Also, the H function needed in astrophysical calculations is evaluated as a byproduct. Program summaryProgram title: Milne Catalogue identifier: AEGS_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGS_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 701 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6845 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: PC under Linux or Windows Operating system: Ubuntu 8.04 (Kernel version 2.6.24-16-generic), Windows-XP Classification: 4.11, 21.1, 21.2 Nature of problem: The X functions are integral expressions. The convergence of these regular and Cauchy Principal Value integrals are impaired by the singularities of the integrand in the complex plane. The DE quadrature scheme tackles these singularities in a robust manner compared to the standard Gauss quadrature. Running time: The test included in the distribution takes a few seconds to run.

  2. 75 FR 34171 - Trueheat, Inc., a Subsidiary of Global Heating Solutions, Inc., Currently Known as Truheat, a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ...., Currently Known as Truheat, a Division of Three Heat LLC, Allegan, MI; Electro-Heat, Inc., a Subsidiary of Global Heating Solutions, Inc., Currently Known as Truheat, a Division of Three Heat LLC, Allegan, MI..., applicable to workers of TrueHeat, Inc., a subsidiary of Global Heating Solutions, Inc., Allegan,...

  3. EXACT SOLUTION OF HEAT CONDUCTION IN A TWO-DOMAIN COMPOSITE CYLINDER WITH AN ORTHOTROPIC OUTER LAYER.

    SciTech Connect

    C. AVILES-RAMOS; C. RUDY

    2000-11-01

    The transient exact solution of heat conduction in a two-domain composite cylinder is developed using the separation of variables technique. The inner cylinder is isotropic and the outer cylindrical layer is orthotropic. Temperature solutions are obtained for boundary conditions of the first and second kinds at the outer surface of the orthotropic layer. These solutions are applied to heat flow calorimeters modeling assuming that there is heat generation due to nuclear reactions in the inner cylinder. Heat flow calorimeter simulations are carried out assuming that the inner cylinder is filled with plutonium oxide powder. The first objective in these simulations is to predict the onset of thermal equilibrium of the calorimeter with its environment. Two types of boundary conditions at the outer surface of the orthotropic layer are used to predict thermal equilibrium. The procedure developed to carry out these simulations can be used as a guideline for the design of calorimeters. Another important application of these solutions is on the estimation of thermophysical properties of orthotropic cylinders. The thermal conductivities in the vertical, radial and circumferential directions of the orthotropic outer layer can be estimated using this exact solution and experimental data. Simultaneous estimation of the volumetric heat capacity and thermal conductivities is also possible. Furthermore, this solution has potential applications to the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem in this cylindrical geometry. An interesting feature of the construction of this solution is that two different sets of eigenfunctions need to be considered in the eigenfunction expansion. These eigenfunctions sets depend on the relative values of the thermal diffusivity of the inner cylinder and the thermal diffusivity in the vertical direction of the outer cylindrical layer.

  4. Immediate Truth--Temporal Contiguity between a Cognitive Problem and Its Solution Determines Experienced Veracity of the Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topolinski, Sascha; Reber, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    A temporal contiguity hypothesis for the experience of veracity is tested which states that a solution candidate to a cognitive problem is more likely to be experienced as correct the faster it succeeds the problem. Experiment 1 varied the onset time of the appearance of proposed solutions to anagrams (50 ms vs. 150 ms) and found for both correct…

  5. A minimalist legislative solution to the problem of euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Komesaroff, Paul A; Charles, Stephen

    2015-05-18

    Intense debate has continued for many years about whether voluntary euthanasia or assisted suicide should be permitted by law. The community is bitterly divided and there has been vigorous opposition from medical practitioners and the Australian Medical Association. Despite differences of religious and philosophical convictions and ethical values, there is widespread community agreement that people with terminal illnesses are entitled to adequate treatment, and should also be allowed to make basic choices about when and how they die. A problem with the current law is that doctors who follow current best practice cannot be confident that they will be protected from criminal prosecution. We propose simple changes to Commonwealth and state legislation that recognise community concerns and protect doctors acting in accordance with best current practice. This minimalist solution should be widely acceptable to the community, including both the medical profession and those who object to euthanasia for religious reasons. Important areas of disagreement will persist that can be addressed in future debates. PMID:25971571

  6. [Decentralization: part of the health system problem or the solution?].

    PubMed

    López-Casasnovas, G; Rico, A

    2003-01-01

    The greatest change experienced by the Spanish health system in the last two decades has probably been the devolution of power to the autonomous communities composing the Spanish state. This may generate tensions in the status quo and poses questions of whether decentralization of the health system is compatible with a cohesive national health system and whether this devolution of power is part of the problem of the health system or part of its solution. Generalized devolution occurring as rapidly as that produced in Spain (negotiated in slightly less than 6 months, with minimal financial agreements, without explicit legal frameworks in the areas of coordination and development of basic norms, and with a new agreement of general financing of the autonomous communities which possibly contains lacunae, etc.) presents an uncertain panorama. The possible misuse of the wide powers recently transferred to the autonomous communities could easily be used by those who would like to see a restoration of pre-democratic centralism to sow fear of the collapse of the health service as the cornerstone of the welfare state among the general public. The present article briefly addresses these questions.

  7. Approximate series solution of multi-dimensional, time fractional-order (heat-like) diffusion equations using FRDTM

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brajesh K.; Srivastava, Vineet K.

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to present a new approximate series solution of the multi-dimensional (heat-like) diffusion equation with time-fractional derivative in Caputo form using a semi-analytical approach: fractional-order reduced differential transform method (FRDTM). The efficiency of FRDTM is confirmed by considering four test problems of the multi-dimensional time fractional-order diffusion equation. FRDTM is a very efficient, effective and powerful mathematical tool which provides exact or very close approximate solutions for a wide range of real-world problems arising in engineering and natural sciences, modelled in terms of differential equations. PMID:26064639

  8. Approximate series solution of multi-dimensional, time fractional-order (heat-like) diffusion equations using FRDTM.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brajesh K; Srivastava, Vineet K

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of this paper is to present a new approximate series solution of the multi-dimensional (heat-like) diffusion equation with time-fractional derivative in Caputo form using a semi-analytical approach: fractional-order reduced differential transform method (FRDTM). The efficiency of FRDTM is confirmed by considering four test problems of the multi-dimensional time fractional-order diffusion equation. FRDTM is a very efficient, effective and powerful mathematical tool which provides exact or very close approximate solutions for a wide range of real-world problems arising in engineering and natural sciences, modelled in terms of differential equations.

  9. Implicit Solution of Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion Including Reactive Heating Source in Material Energy Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Shumaker, D E; Woodward, C S

    2005-05-03

    In this paper, the authors investigate performance of a fully implicit formulation and solution method of a diffusion-reaction system modeling radiation diffusion with material energy transfer and a fusion fuel source. In certain parameter regimes this system can lead to a rapid conversion of potential energy into material energy. Accuracy in time integration is essential for a good solution since a major fraction of the fuel can be depleted in a very short time. Such systems arise in a number of application areas including evolution of a star and inertial confinement fusion. Previous work has addressed implicit solution of radiation diffusion problems. Recently Shadid and coauthors have looked at implicit and semi-implicit solution of reaction-diffusion systems. In general they have found that fully implicit is the most accurate method for difficult coupled nonlinear equations. In previous work, they have demonstrated that a method of lines approach coupled with a BDF time integrator and a Newton-Krylov nonlinear solver could efficiently and accurately solve a large-scale, implicit radiation diffusion problem. In this paper, they extend that work to include an additional heating term in the material energy equation and an equation to model the evolution of the reactive fuel density. This system now consists of three coupled equations for radiation energy, material energy, and fuel density. The radiation energy equation includes diffusion and energy exchange with material energy. The material energy equation includes reaction heating and exchange with radiation energy, and the fuel density equation includes its depletion due to the fuel consumption.

  10. Exact Analytical Solution for 3D Time-Dependent Heat Conduction in a Multilayer Sphere with Heat Sources Using Eigenfunction Expansion Method

    PubMed Central

    Dalir, Nemat

    2014-01-01

    An exact analytical solution is obtained for the problem of three-dimensional transient heat conduction in the multilayered sphere. The sphere has multiple layers in the radial direction and, in each layer, time-dependent and spatially nonuniform volumetric internal heat sources are considered. To obtain the temperature distribution, the eigenfunction expansion method is used. An arbitrary combination of homogenous boundary condition of the first or second kind can be applied in the angular and azimuthal directions. Nevertheless, solution is valid for nonhomogeneous boundary conditions of the third kind (convection) in the radial direction. A case study problem for the three-layer quarter-spherical region is solved and the results are discussed. PMID:27433511

  11. Finite element method formulation in polar coordinates for transient heat conduction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is the formulation of the finite element method in polar coordinates to solve transient heat conduction problems. It is hard to find in the literature a formulation of the finite element method (FEM) in polar or cylindrical coordinates for the solution of heat transfer problems. This document shows how to apply the most often used boundary conditions. The global equation system is solved by the Crank-Nicolson method. The proposed algorithm is verified in three numerical tests. In the first example, the obtained transient temperature distribution is compared with the temperature obtained from the presented analytical solution. In the second numerical example, the variable boundary condition is assumed. In the last numerical example the component with the shape different than cylindrical is used. All examples show that the introduction of the polar coordinate system gives better results than in the Cartesian coordinate system. The finite element method formulation in polar coordinates is valuable since it provides a higher accuracy of the calculations without compacting the mesh in cylindrical or similar to tubular components. The proposed method can be applied for circular elements such as boiler drums, outlet headers, flux tubes. This algorithm can be useful during the solution of inverse problems, which do not allow for high density grid. This method can calculate the temperature distribution in the bodies of different properties in the circumferential and the radial direction. The presented algorithm can be developed for other coordinate systems. The examples demonstrate a good accuracy and stability of the proposed method.

  12. Exact triple integrals of beam functions. [in application of Galerkin method to heat and mass transfer problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhaveri, B. S.; Rosenberger, F.

    1982-01-01

    Definite triple integrals encountered in applying the Galerkin method to the problem of heat and mass transfer across rectangular enclosures are discussed. Rather than evaluating them numerically, the technique described by Reid and Harris (1958) was extended to obtain the exact solution of the integrals. In the process, four linear simultaneous equations with triple integrals as unknowns were obtained. These equations were then solved exactly to obtain the closed form solution. Since closed form representations of this type have been shown to be useful in solving nonlinear hydrodynamic problems by series expansion, the integrals are presented here in general form.

  13. General Boundary-Value Problems for the Heat Conduction Equation with Piecewise-Continuous Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsii, R. M.; Pazen, O. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    A constructive scheme for the construction of a solution of a mixed problem for the heat conduction equation with piecewise-continuous coefficients coordinate-dependent in the final interval is suggested and validated in the present work. The boundary conditions are assumed to be most general. The scheme is based on: the reduction method, the concept of quasi-derivatives, the currently accepted theory of the systems of linear differential equations, the Fourier method, and the modified method of eigenfunctions. The method based on this scheme should be related to direct exact methods of solving mixed problems that do not employ the procedures of constructing Green's functions or integral transformations. Here the theorem of eigenfunction expansion is adapted for the case of coefficients that have discontinuity points of the 1st kind. The results obtained can be used, for example, in investigating the process of heat transfer in a multilayer slab under conditions of ideal thermal contact between the layers. A particular case of piecewise-continuous coefficients is considered. A numerical example of calculation of a temperature field in a real four-layer building slab under boundary conditions of the 3rd kind (conditions of convective heat transfer) that model the phenomenon of fire near one of the external surfaces is given.

  14. Analytical and experimental studies for space boundary and geometry inverse heat conduction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tzu-Fang

    Inverse Heat Conduction Problems (IHCPs) have been widely used in engineering fields in recent decades. IHCPs are not the same as direct heat conduction problems which are ``well-posed''. IHCPs are made more difficult since they are inherently ``ill-posed'' that is, a small error perturbation will lead to a large error in the solution reconstructed. Prediction of an unknown in an IHCP is not an easy event. An IHCP also handles the desired information from measurements containing noise. A stable and accurate reliable inversion solver shall be studied. This dissertation is split into four parts. The first part describes space boundary IHCPs, and attempts to utilize noisy measurement data to predict unknown surface temperatures or heat fluxes. A new algorithm, using a Kalman Filter to filter the measurement noise combined with an implicit time-marching finite difference scheme, solves a space boundary IHCP. In the second part, errors in reconstruction of the temperature at each boundary of a one-dimensional IHCP can be presented by a simple relation. Each relation contains an unknown coefficient, which can be determined by using one simulation through the inversion solver of a pair of specified sensor locations. This relation can then be used to estimate the other recovery errors at the boundary without using the inverse solver. In the third part, an experimental study of temperature drop between two rough surfaces is conducted. The experimental data are analyzed by utilizing an inversion solver developed in this dissertation. In the fourth part, an IHCP with a melting process using the measured temperature and heat flux at one surface is solved by a new geometry inversion solver with a heat flux limiter to reconstruct the melting front location and the temperature history inside the test domain.

  15. Plane transient contact problem for rough sliding bodies with wear and heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevtushenko, A. A.; Pauk, V. Jo.

    1994-04-01

    Experimental investigation corroborates the interdependence of processes and phenomena taking place in the contact of solids. Previous publications are concerned with simultaneous calculation of the microgeometry of surfaces of bodies, their wear and the heat due to friction in the contact zone in steady contact problems. In the present paper an analogous contact problem has been considered. The model employs the Archard law of wear, in which the rate of material removal is proportional to pressure and speed of sliding. Contact pressure and temperatures at the interface are found from the solution of two governing integral equations. Green's functions are used to investigate the stresses and temperatures inside the two elastic bodies for a variety of material combinations and operating conditions.

  16. Solving Heat Conduction Problems in Movable Boundary Domains under Intensive Physical-Chemical Transformation Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garashchenko, A. N.; Rudzinsky, V. P.; Garashchenko, N. A.

    2016-02-01

    Results of solving problems of simulating temperature fields in domains with movable boundaries of characteristic zones of intensive physical-chemical and thermomechanical transformations to be realized in materials upon high-temperature heating have been presented. Intumescent fire-protective coatings based on organic and mineral materials are the object of study. Features of numerical realization of input equation systems taking into account, in particular, a dynamics of considerable increase and subsequent decrease of the intumescent layer thickness have been considered. Example calculations for structures of metal and wood protected with various coatings are given. Results of calculating two-dimensional temperature fields in polymer composite square-shaped structures with internal cruciform load-bearing elements have been presented. The intumescent coating is arranged on the external surface of a structure. The solution of the above-listed problems is of important significance to provide fire protection of different-purpose structures and products.

  17. Numerical solution of Williamson fluid flow past a stretching cylinder and heat transfer with variable thermal conductivity and heat generation/absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, M. Y.; Bibi, M.; Khan, Farzana; Salahuddin, T.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, Williamson fluid flow and heat transfer over a stretching cylinder is discussed. The thermal conductivity is assumed to be vary linearly with temperature. Heat generation/absorption effects are also taken into account. Modeled partial differential equations are converted into ordinary differential form by using appropriate transformations. Shooting method in conjunction with Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method is used to find the solution of the problem. Moreover, the effects of different flow parameters γ, λ, ɛ, β and Pr on velocity and temperature profiles are shown graphically. Local Nusselt number and skin friction coefficient are shown in tabular and graphical form.

  18. Entire nodal solutions to the pure critical exponent problem arising from concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Mónica

    2016-09-01

    We obtain new sign changing solutions to the problem We exhibit solutions up to (℘p) which blow up at a single point as p →2*, developing a peak whose asymptotic profile is a rescaling of a nonradial sign changing solution to problem (℘∞). We also obtain existence and multiplicity of sign changing nonradial solutions to the Bahri-Coron problem (℘2*) in annuli.

  19. Kurtosis Approach to Solution of a Nonlinear ICA Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Vu; Stubberud, Allen

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm for solving a particular nonlinear independent-component-analysis (ICA) problem, that differs from prior algorithms for solving the same problem, has been devised. The problem in question of a type known in the art as a post nonlinear mixing problem is a useful approximation of the problem posed by the mixing and subsequent nonlinear distortion of sensory signals that occur in diverse scientific and engineering instrumentation systems.

  20. SEAWAT Version 4: A Computer Program for Simulation of Multi-Species Solute and Heat Transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, Christian D.; Thorne, Daniel T.; Dausman, Alyssa M.; Sukop, Michael C.; Guo, Weixing

    2008-01-01

    The SEAWAT program is a coupled version of MODFLOW and MT3DMS designed to simulate three-dimensional, variable-density, saturated ground-water flow. Flexible equations were added to the program to allow fluid density to be calculated as a function of one or more MT3DMS species. Fluid density may also be calculated as a function of fluid pressure. The effect of fluid viscosity variations on ground-water flow was included as an option. Fluid viscosity can be calculated as a function of one or more MT3DMS species, and the program includes additional functions for representing the dependence on temperature. Although MT3DMS and SEAWAT are not explicitly designed to simulate heat transport, temperature can be simulated as one of the species by entering appropriate transport coefficients. For example, the process of heat conduction is mathematically analogous to Fickian diffusion. Heat conduction can be represented in SEAWAT by assigning a thermal diffusivity for the temperature species (instead of a molecular diffusion coefficient for a solute species). Heat exchange with the solid matrix can be treated in a similar manner by using the mathematically equivalent process of solute sorption. By combining flexible equations for fluid density and viscosity with multi-species transport, SEAWAT Version 4 represents variable-density ground-water flow coupled with multi-species solute and heat transport. SEAWAT Version 4 is based on MODFLOW-2000 and MT3DMS and retains all of the functionality of SEAWAT-2000. SEAWAT Version 4 also supports new simulation options for coupling flow and transport, and for representing constant-head boundaries. In previous versions of SEAWAT, the flow equation was solved for every transport timestep, regardless of whether or not there was a large change in fluid density. A new option was implemented in SEAWAT Version 4 that allows users to control how often the flow field is updated. New options were also implemented for representing constant

  1. What Makes an Insight Problem? The Roles of Heuristics, Goal Conception, and Solution Recoding in Knowledge-Lean Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle, Edward P.; MacGregor, James N.; Ormerod, Thomas C.

    2004-01-01

    Four experiments investigated transformation problems with insight characteristics. In Experiment 1, performance on a version of the 6-coin problem that had a concrete and visualizable solution followed a hill-climbing heuristic. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the difficulty of a version of the problem that potentially required insight for…

  2. Cues to solution, restructuring patterns, and reports of insight in creative problem solving.

    PubMed

    Cushen, Patrick J; Wiley, Jennifer

    2012-09-01

    While the subjective experience of insight during problem solving is a common occurrence, an understanding of the processes leading to solution remains relatively uncertain. The goal of this study was to investigate the restructuring patterns underlying solution of a creative problem, and how providing cues to solution may alter the process. Results show that both providing cues to solution and analyzing problem solving performance on an aggregate level may result in restructuring patterns that appear incremental. Analysis of performance on an individual level provides evidence for insight-like solution patterns. However, no evidence is found for a relationship between an individual's restructuring pattern and their subjective experience of insight during problem solving.

  3. The solution of large multi-dimensional Poisson problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    The Buneman algorithm for solving Poisson problems can be adapted to solve large Poisson problems on computers with a rotating drum memory so that the computation is done with very little time lost due to rotational latency of the drum.

  4. Organic Rankine cycle/heat pump technology working fluid problems

    SciTech Connect

    Baehr, H.D.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains papers that consider various options for improving the utilization of primary energy. The papers focus on improving the classical steam cycle by a bottoming-cycle that uses a working fluid different from steam. Also discussed are methods of improving waste heat utilization, especially by employing low temperature power cycles to generate shaft power or electricity by using heat pumps to boost waste heat temperature.

  5. Using Diagrams as Tools for the Solution of Non-Routine Mathematical Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantziara, Marilena; Gagatsis, Athanasios; Elia, Iliada

    2009-01-01

    The Mathematics education community has long recognized the importance of diagrams in the solution of mathematical problems. Particularly, it is stated that diagrams facilitate the solution of mathematical problems because they represent problems' structure and information (Novick & Hurley, 2001; Diezmann, 2005). Novick and Hurley were the first…

  6. The complete solution of the conformastat electrovacuum problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Guillermo A.; Vera, Raül

    2011-09-01

    We find the complete solution of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations without sources for static spacetimes in which the space of Killing trajectories is conformally flat. The result is used to present an improved local characterisation of the Majumdar-Papapetrou class of solutions.

  7. Finding Similarities and Differences in the Solutions of Word Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Stephen K.; Stebick, Sara; Comey, Brittany; Carroll, Donja

    2012-01-01

    This study extends the Rittle-Johnson and Star (2009) research agenda of identifying when solution comparisons are effective by combining their quantitative approach with the qualitative descriptive approach advocated by Lobato (2008). In Experiment 1 university students described similarities and differences between detailed solutions of…

  8. Parents' Aggressive Influences and Children's Aggressive Problem Solutions with Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duman, Sarah; Margolin, Gayla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined children's aggressive and assertive solutions to hypothetical peer scenarios in relation to parents' responses to similar hypothetical social scenarios and parents' actual marital aggression. The study included 118 children ages 9 to 10 years old and their mothers and fathers. Children's aggressive solutions correlated with…

  9. Solution of the Modified Bratu Problem in SAMRAI

    SciTech Connect

    Pernice, M; Gunney, B T

    2004-02-02

    A model implementation of the solution of an unsteady nonlinear reaction-diffusion on a SAMR grid using SAMRAI has been developed. This model implementation illustrates the use of new capabilities for implicit timestepping and solution of large-scale systems of nonlinear equations using implementations of inexact Newton methods found in KINSOL and PETSc. This document provides a detailed description of the implementation.

  10. A difference method for solving inverse heat-conduction problems concerning the determination of the geometric characteristics of a body or a field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitenko, N. I.

    1981-12-01

    The paper develops a difference method for solving inverse geometric problems of heat conduction relating to the determination of the coordinates of a moving boundary with respect to steps along the time axis. At every step, the desired function is expanded in a power series of the time coordinate; and the coefficients of this series are found through the multiple solution of direct heat-conduction problems for systems with moving phase boundaries. Numerical results indicate that the error of the solution of incorrectly stated inverse geometric problems differs only insignificantly from the error of the initial data.

  11. Numerical solution for Sakiadis flow of upper-convected Maxwell fluid using Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtaq, A.; Abbasbandy, S.; Mustafa, M.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Present work studies the well-known Sakiadis flow of Maxwell fluid along a moving plate in a calm fluid by considering the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model. This recently developed model has the tendency to describe the characteristics of relaxation time for heat flux. Some numerical local similarity solutions of the associated problem are computed by two approaches namely (i) the shooting method and (ii) the Keller-box method. The solution is dependent on some interesting parameters which include the viscoelastic fluid parameter β, the dimensionless thermal relaxation time γ and the Prandtl number Pr. Our simulations indicate that variation in the temperature distribution with an increase in local Deborah number γ is non-monotonic. The results for the Fourier's heat conduction law can be obtained as special cases of the present study.

  12. Entropy landscape of solutions in the binary perceptron problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haiping; Wong, K. Y. Michael; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2013-09-01

    The statistical picture of the solution space for a binary perceptron is studied. The binary perceptron learns a random classification of input random patterns by a set of binary synaptic weights. The learning of this network is difficult especially when the pattern (constraint) density is close to the capacity, which is supposed to be intimately related to the structure of the solution space. The geometrical organization is elucidated by the entropy landscape from a reference configuration and of solution-pairs separated by a given Hamming distance in the solution space. We evaluate the entropy at the annealed level as well as replica symmetric level and the mean field result is confirmed by the numerical simulations on single instances using the proposed message passing algorithms. From the first landscape (a random configuration as a reference), we see clearly how the solution space shrinks as more constraints are added. From the second landscape of solution-pairs, we deduce the coexistence of clustering and freezing in the solution space.

  13. The Lunar Internal Structure Model: Problems and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedyev, Yuri; Gusev, Alexander; Petrova, Natalia; Varaksina, Natalia

    decomposition of gravitational field of the Moon of members up to 165th order with a high degree of accuracy. Judging from the given data, the distinctive feature of the Moon’s gravitational field is that harmonics of the third and even the fourth order are comparable with harmonics of the second order, except for member J2. General conclusion: according to recent data, the true figure of the Moon is much more complex than a three-axis ellipsoid. Gravitational field and dynamic figure of the multilayered Moon: One of the main goals of selenodesy is the study of a dynamic figure of the Moon which determines distribution of the mass within the Moon’s body. A dynamic figure is shaped by the inertia ellipsoid set by values of resultant moments of inertia of the Moon A, B, C and their orientation in space. Selenoid satellites (SS) open new and most perspective opportunities in the study of gravitational field and the Moon’s figure. SSs “Moon 10”, “Apollo”, “Clementine”, “Lunar Prospector” trajectory tracking data processing has allowed for identification of coefficients in decomposition of gravitational field of the Moon of members up to 165th order with a high degree of accuracy. Judging from the given data, the distinctive feature of the Moon’s gravitational field is that harmonics of the third and even the fourth order are comparable with harmonics of the second order. Difference from zero of c-coefficients proves asymmetry of gravitational fields on the visible and invisible sides of the Moon. As a first attempt at solving the problem, the report presents the survey of internal structure of the Moon, tabulated values of geophysical parameters and geophysical profile of the Moon, including liquid lunar core, analytical solution of Clairaut’s equation for the two-layer model of the Moon; mathematical and bifurcational analysis of solution based on physically justified task options; original debugged software in VBA programming language for computer

  14. Stiff-system problems and solutions at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, A.C.

    1982-03-01

    Difficult stiff system problems encountered at LLNL are typified by those arising from various atmospheric kinetics models, which include reaction kinetics and transport in up to two space dimensions. Approaches devised for these problems resulted in several general purpose stiff system solvers. These have since evolved into a new systematized collection of solvers, called ODEPACK, based on backward differentiation formulas in the stiff case. A model kinetics-transport problem is used to illustrate the various solvers.

  15. Lunar Dust on Heat Rejection System Surfaces: Problems and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Jaworske, Donald A.

    2007-01-01

    Heat rejection from power systems will be necessary for human and robotic activity on the lunar surface. Functional operation of such heat rejection systems is at risk of degradation as a consequence of dust accumulation. The Apollo astronauts encountered marked degradation of performance in heat rejection systems for the lunar roving vehicle, science packages, and other components. Although ground testing of dust mitigation concepts in support of the Apollo mission identified mitigation tools, the brush concept adopted by the Apollo astronauts proved essentially ineffective. A better understanding of the issues associated with the impact of lunar dust on the functional performance of heat rejection systems and its removal is needed as planning gets underway for human and robotic missions to the Moon. Renewed emphasis must also be placed on ground testing of pristine and dust-covered heat rejection system surfaces to quantify degradation and address mitigation concepts. This paper presents a review of the degradation in performance of heat rejection systems encountered on the lunar surface to-date, and will discuss current activities underway to evaluate the durability of candidate heat rejection system surfaces and current dust mitigation concepts.

  16. An inexact Newton method for fully-coupled solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S.; Walker, H.F.

    1997-02-01

    The solution of the governing steady transport equations for momentum, heat and mass transfer in flowing fluids can be very difficult. These difficulties arise from the nonlinear, coupled, nonsymmetric nature of the system of algebraic equations that results from spatial discretization of the PDEs. In this manuscript the authors focus on evaluating a proposed nonlinear solution method based on an inexact Newton method with backtracking. In this context they use a particular spatial discretization based on a pressure stabilized Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation of the low Mach number Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport. The discussion considers computational efficiency, robustness and some implementation issues related to the proposed nonlinear solution scheme. Computational results are presented for several challenging CFD benchmark problems as well as two large scale 3D flow simulations.

  17. Finite element solution of optimal control problems with state-control inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1992-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the weak Hamiltonian finite-element formulation is amenable to the solution of optimal control problems with inequality constraints which are functions of both state and control variables. Difficult problems can be treated on account of the ease with which algebraic equations can be generated before having to specify the problem. These equations yield very accurate solutions. Owing to the sparse structure of the resulting Jacobian, computer solutions can be obtained quickly when the sparsity is exploited.

  18. Technology Solutions Case Study: Heat Pump Water Heater Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-08-01

    In this project, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory studied heat pump water heaters, an efficient, cost-effective alternative to traditional electric resistance water heaters that can improve energy efficiency by up to 62%.

  19. Hardware problems encountered in solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, M.

    1978-01-01

    Numerous problems in the design, production, installation, and operation of solar energy systems are discussed. Described are hardware problems, which range from simple to obscure and complex, and their resolution.

  20. Auditing Management Practices in Schools: Recurring Communication Problems and Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwijze-Koning, Karen H.; de Jong, Menno D. T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Over the past ten years, most Dutch high schools have been confronted with mergers, curriculum reforms, and managerial changes. As a result, the pressure on the schools' communication systems has increased and several problems have emerged. This paper aims to examine recurring clusters of communication problems in high schools.…

  1. Item Characteristic Curve Solutions to Three Intractable Testing Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marco, Gary L.

    1977-01-01

    This paper summarizes three studies that illustrate how application of the three-parameter logistic test model helped solve three relatively intractable testing problems. The three problems are: designing a multi-purpose test, evaluating an multi-level test, and equating a test on the basis of pretest statistics. (Author/JKS)

  2. Teenage Pregnancy: A Continuing Problem Defies Easy Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beachum-Bilby, Sheila

    1997-01-01

    The goals, grantmaking strategies, and interests of the Mott Foundation with regard to identifying problems and developing programs for adolescent women are reviewed in a brief introduction. Four articles address various aspects of the problem of teenage pregnancy. The title article provides a review of recent statistics on a decline in the teen…

  3. Problems and Solutions Related to College Students' Belief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jinming

    2008-01-01

    With China staying in its social transition period, its changes in economy, politics and culture have influenced college students' thought to a large extent. Currently, in spite of the healthy and upward mainstream thought among college students, there are also some problems. This article elaborates on the problems and manifestations in college…

  4. Transdisciplinary Variation in Engineering Curricula. Problems and Means for Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakobsen, Arne; Bucciarelli, Louis L.

    2007-01-01

    An essential difficulty in solving practical problems that are not like the ones a student has solved before is discerning the core of the problem. It is claimed that discernment has to be trained by variation--by varying the context of the assignments in which students have to identify and grasp their "underlying form". A decisive challenge in…

  5. Solution of the minimum time-to-climb problem by matched asymptotic expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1976-01-01

    Application of singular perturbation techniques to trajectory optimization problems of flight mechanics is discussed. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to obtain an approximate solution to the aircraft minimum time-to-climb problem. Outer, boundary-layer, and composite solutions are obtained to zeroth and first orders. A stability criterion is derived for the zeroth-order boundary-layer solutions (the theory requires a form of boundary-layer stability). A numerical example is considered for which it is shown that the stability criterion is satisfied and a useful numerical solution is obtained. The zeroth-order solution proves to be a poor approximation, but the first-order solution gives a good approximation for both the trajectory and the minimum time-to-climb. The computational cost of the singular perturbation solution is considerably less than that of a steepest descent solution. Thus singular perturbation methods appear to be promising for the solution of optimal control problems.

  6. Clearance of serum solutes by hemofiltration in dogs with severe heat stroke

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously reported that hemofiltration (HF) may be an effective additional means of treating heat stroke when rapid cooling is not effective. Methods Dogs were assigned to a heat stroke (control) or heat stroke + hemofiltration (HF) group (n = 8 each group). After heat stroke induction, dogs in the HF group received HF for 3 h. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine were measured at baseline and 1, 2, and 3 h after heat stroke. Clearance rates of solutes were determined 1, 2, and 3 h after the start of HF. Results Serum concentrations of all solutes tended to increase with time after heat stroke in the control group, but decreased (BUN, creatinine) or remained relatively unchanged (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10) with time in the HF group. Concentrations of all solutes were significantly lower in the HF group compared with the control group at 2 and 3 h (P < 0.05). Clearance rates for small molecular weight solutes were high, while those for larger molecular weight solutes were low. Conclusion HF prevents heat stroke-induced increases in serum cytokine concentrations and is effective for clearing small molecular weight solutes from serum, but less effective for clearing larger molecular weight solutes, including TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10. PMID:25145441

  7. Verification of high-order mixed FEM solution of transient Magnetic diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R; White, D A

    2005-05-12

    We develop and present high order mixed finite element discretizations of the time dependent electromagnetic diffusion equations for solving eddy current problems on 3D unstructured grids. The discretizations are based on high order H(grad), H(curl) and H(div) conforming finite element spaces combined with an implicit and unconditionally stable generalized Crank-Nicholson time differencing method. We develop three separate electromagnetic diffusion formulations, namely the E (electric field), H (magnetic field) and the A-{phi} (potential) formulations. For each formulation, we also provide a consistent procedure for computing the secondary variables F (current flux density) and B (magnetic flux density), as these fields are required for the computation of electromagnetic force and heating terms. We verify the error convergence properties of each formulation via a series of numerical experiments on canonical problems with known analytic solutions. The key result is that the different formulations are equally accurate, even for the secondary variables J and B, and hence the choice of which formulation to use depends mostly upon relevance of the Natural and Essential boundary conditions to the problem of interest. In addition, we highlight issues with numerical verification of finite element methods which can lead to false conclusions on the accuracy of the methods.

  8. Relationships between Undergraduates' Argumentation Skills, Conceptual Quality of Problem Solutions, and Problem Solving Strategies in Introductory Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebello, Carina M.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the effects of alternative forms of argumentation on undergraduates' physics solutions in introductory calculus-based physics. A two-phase concurrent mixed methods design was employed to investigate relationships between undergraduates' written argumentation abilities, conceptual quality of problem solutions, as well…

  9. Offshore asphaltene and wax deposition: Problems/solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Leontaritis, K.J. |

    1996-05-01

    Many production facilities around the world suffer from either asphaltene or wax deposition. Such problems seriously threaten economic production from many offshore reservoirs due to the high cost of remedial measures. Offshore facilities are especially susceptible to such deposition for a number of reasons. This article presents ideas and methodologies on how to predict, diagnose, prevent, or mitigate problems caused by organic deposition in offshore production facilities. In one facility where these ideas were put to use, despite the debilitating magnitude of the problems, the field has been produced for more than 14 years with minimum environmental impact. Principal conclusions developed are discussed in this paper.

  10. Hiding quiet solutions in random constraint satisfaction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zdeborova, Lenka; Krzakala, Florent

    2008-01-01

    We study constraint satisfaction problems on the so-called planted random ensemble. We show that for a certain class of problems, e.g., graph coloring, many of the properties of the usual random ensemble are quantitatively identical in the planted random ensemble. We study the structural phase transitions and the easy-hard-easy pattern in the average computational complexity. We also discuss the finite temperature phase diagram, finding a close connection with the liquid-glass-solid phenomenology.

  11. Aquatic acetylene-reduction techniques: solutions to several problems.

    PubMed

    Flett, R J; Hamilton, R D; Campbell, N E

    1976-01-01

    Previous methods of performing aquatic acetylene-reduction assays are described and several problems associated with them are discussed. A refinement of these older techniques is introduced and problems that it overcomes are also discussed. A depth profile of nitrogen fixation (C2H4 production), obtained by the refined technique, is shown for a fertilized Canadian Shield lake in the Experimental Lakes Area of northwestern Ontario. PMID:814983

  12. Aquatic acetylene-reduction techniques: solutions to several problems.

    PubMed

    Flett, R J; Hamilton, R D; Campbell, N E

    1976-01-01

    Previous methods of performing aquatic acetylene-reduction assays are described and several problems associated with them are discussed. A refinement of these older techniques is introduced and problems that it overcomes are also discussed. A depth profile of nitrogen fixation (C2H4 production), obtained by the refined technique, is shown for a fertilized Canadian Shield lake in the Experimental Lakes Area of northwestern Ontario.

  13. An investigation of the accuracy of finite difference methods in the solution of linear elasticity problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauld, N. R., Jr.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    The accuracy of the finite difference method in the solution of linear elasticity problems that involve either a stress discontinuity or a stress singularity is considered. Solutions to three elasticity problems are discussed in detail: a semi-infinite plane subjected to a uniform load over a portion of its boundary; a bimetallic plate under uniform tensile stress; and a long, midplane symmetric, fiber reinforced laminate subjected to uniform axial strain. Finite difference solutions to the three problems are compared with finite element solutions to corresponding problems. For the first problem a comparison with the exact solution is also made. The finite difference formulations for the three problems are based on second order finite difference formulas that provide for variable spacings in two perpendicular directions. Forward and backward difference formulas are used near boundaries where their use eliminates the need for fictitious grid points.

  14. The Contributions of Working Memory and Executive Functioning to Problem Representation and Solution Generation in Algebraic Word Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kerry; Ng, Ee Lynn; Ng, Swee Fong

    2009-01-01

    Solving algebraic word problems involves multiple cognitive phases. The authors used a multitask approach to examine the extent to which working memory and executive functioning are associated with generating problem models and producing solutions. They tested 255 11-year-olds on working memory (Counting Recall, Letter Memory, and Keep Track),…

  15. Heats of immersion of titania powders in primer solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siriwardane, R.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The oxide layer present on titanium alloys can play an important role in determining the strength and durability of adhesive bonds. Here, three titania powders in different crystalline phases, rutile-R1, anatase-A1, and anatase-A2, are characterized by several techniques. These include microelectrophoresis, X-ray diffractometry, surface area pore volume analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and measurements of the heats of immersion. Of the three powders, R1 has the highest heat of immersion in water, while the interaction between water and A1 powder is low. Experimental data also suggest a specific preferential interaction of polyphenylquinoxaline with anatase.

  16. New numerical methods for open-loop and feedback solutions to dynamic optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pradipto

    The topic of the first part of this research is trajectory optimization of dynamical systems via computational swarm intelligence. Particle swarm optimization is a nature-inspired heuristic search method that relies on a group of potential solutions to explore the fitness landscape. Conceptually, each particle in the swarm uses its own memory as well as the knowledge accumulated by the entire swarm to iteratively converge on an optimal or near-optimal solution. It is relatively straightforward to implement and unlike gradient-based solvers, does not require an initial guess or continuity in the problem definition. Although particle swarm optimization has been successfully employed in solving static optimization problems, its application in dynamic optimization, as posed in optimal control theory, is still relatively new. In the first half of this thesis particle swarm optimization is used to generate near-optimal solutions to several nontrivial trajectory optimization problems including thrust programming for minimum fuel, multi-burn spacecraft orbit transfer, and computing minimum-time rest-to-rest trajectories for a robotic manipulator. A distinct feature of the particle swarm optimization implementation in this work is the runtime selection of the optimal solution structure. Optimal trajectories are generated by solving instances of constrained nonlinear mixed-integer programming problems with the swarming technique. For each solved optimal programming problem, the particle swarm optimization result is compared with a nearly exact solution found via a direct method using nonlinear programming. Numerical experiments indicate that swarm search can locate solutions to very great accuracy. The second half of this research develops a new extremal-field approach for synthesizing nearly optimal feedback controllers for optimal control and two-player pursuit-evasion games described by general nonlinear differential equations. A notable revelation from this development

  17. Psychological considerations of man in space: Problems & solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, J.; Kass, R.; Samaltedinov, I.

    With concrete plans for long duration flight taking form a new impetus is lent to preparing man for this hostile and unnatural environment. Cramped conditions, isolation from family and loved ones, work stress, fear, and incompatibility with fellow crew, are but a few of the problems suffered by astronauts and cosmonauts during their long missions in orbit about the earth. Although criteria for selection of crew is one aspect of attacking the problem, it has not solved it Notwithstanding good selection, team combination, and counselling before flight, problems have still occurred with unwanted consequences. Incompatibility of team members, far from being the exception, has been frequent. This has been detrímental both physiologically and psychologically for the individual as well as for the operational success and safety of the missions. Because problems will inevitably occur in future long duration missions, especially when they are of international and multi-cultural nature, the importance of dealing with them is underlined. This paper takes a different approach towards ameliorating these problems, namely that of psychological group training before a mission.

  18. Genetic solutions to infertility caused by heat stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reproductive function in mammals is very susceptible to disruption by heat stress. In lactating dairy cows, for example, pregnancy rates per insemination can be as low as 10-15% in the summer vs. 25-40% in cool weather. Reduced fertility in females is caused by a combination of 1) the negative cons...

  19. A Heat Vulnerability Index and Adaptation Solutions for Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Kathryn; Abrahams, Leslie; Hegglin, Miriam; Klima, Kelly

    2015-10-01

    With increasing evidence of global warming, many cities have focused attention on response plans to address their populations' vulnerabilities. Despite expected increased frequency and intensity of heat waves, the health impacts of such events in urban areas can be minimized with careful policy and economic investments. We focus on Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and ask two questions. First, what are the top factors contributing to heat vulnerability and how do these characteristics manifest geospatially throughout Pittsburgh? Second, assuming the City wishes to deploy additional cooling centers, what placement will optimally address the vulnerability of the at risk populations? We use national census data, ArcGIS geospatial modeling, and statistical analysis to determine a range of heat vulnerability indices and optimal cooling center placement. We find that while different studies use different data and statistical calculations, all methods tested locate additional cooling centers at the confluence of the three rivers (Downtown), the northeast side of Pittsburgh (Shadyside/Highland Park), and the southeast side of Pittsburgh (Squirrel Hill). This suggests that for Pittsburgh, a researcher could apply the same factor analysis procedure to compare data sets for different locations and times; factor analyses for heat vulnerability are more robust than previously thought.

  20. A Heat Vulnerability Index and Adaptation Solutions for Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Kathryn; Abrahams, Leslie; Hegglin, Miriam; Klima, Kelly

    2015-10-01

    With increasing evidence of global warming, many cities have focused attention on response plans to address their populations' vulnerabilities. Despite expected increased frequency and intensity of heat waves, the health impacts of such events in urban areas can be minimized with careful policy and economic investments. We focus on Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and ask two questions. First, what are the top factors contributing to heat vulnerability and how do these characteristics manifest geospatially throughout Pittsburgh? Second, assuming the City wishes to deploy additional cooling centers, what placement will optimally address the vulnerability of the at risk populations? We use national census data, ArcGIS geospatial modeling, and statistical analysis to determine a range of heat vulnerability indices and optimal cooling center placement. We find that while different studies use different data and statistical calculations, all methods tested locate additional cooling centers at the confluence of the three rivers (Downtown), the northeast side of Pittsburgh (Shadyside/Highland Park), and the southeast side of Pittsburgh (Squirrel Hill). This suggests that for Pittsburgh, a researcher could apply the same factor analysis procedure to compare data sets for different locations and times; factor analyses for heat vulnerability are more robust than previously thought. PMID:26333158

  1. A Heat Vulnerability Index and Adaptation Solutions for Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, K.; Abrahams, L.; Bradford, K.; Hegglin, M.

    2015-12-01

    With increasing evidence of global warming, many cities have focused attention on response plans to address their populations' vulnerabilities. Despite expected increased frequency and intensity of heat waves, the health impacts of such events in urban areas can be minimized with careful policy and economic investments. We focus on Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and ask two questions. First, what are the top factors contributing to heat vulnerability and how do these characteristics manifest geospatially throughout Pittsburgh? Second, assuming the City wishes to deploy additional cooling centers, what placement will optimally address the vulnerability of the at risk populations? We use national census data, ArcGIS geospatial modeling, and statistical analysis to determine a range of heat vulnerability indices and optimal cooling center placement. We find that while different studies use different data and statistical calculations, all methods tested locate additional cooling centers at the confluence of the three rivers (Downtown), the northeast side of Pittsburgh (Shadyside/ Highland Park), and the southeast side of Pittsburgh (Squirrel Hill). This suggests that for Pittsburgh, a researcher could apply the same factor analysis procedure to compare datasets for different locations and times; factor analyses for heat vulnerability are more robust than previously thought.

  2. Sangomas: problem or solution for South Africa's health care system.

    PubMed

    Cook, Cynthia T

    2009-03-01

    We discuss the problems associated with legalizing traditional healers--Sangomas--for the South African health care system and their role in the management and treatment of HIV/AIDS and the resistance of professional medical organizations to recognize their contribution. We list some of the diseases and conditions that can be diagnosed and/or treated by traditional healers and the efficacy of the treatment. We conclude with the problem of Sangomas identifying witches within a community and how this may affect their legitimacy. PMID:19331259

  3. Sangomas: problem or solution for South Africa's health care system.

    PubMed

    Cook, Cynthia T

    2009-03-01

    We discuss the problems associated with legalizing traditional healers--Sangomas--for the South African health care system and their role in the management and treatment of HIV/AIDS and the resistance of professional medical organizations to recognize their contribution. We list some of the diseases and conditions that can be diagnosed and/or treated by traditional healers and the efficacy of the treatment. We conclude with the problem of Sangomas identifying witches within a community and how this may affect their legitimacy.

  4. Inverse heat transfer problem of thermal contact conductance estimation in periodically contacting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaeefard, M. H.; Goudarzi, K.; Mazidi, M. Sh.

    2009-06-01

    The problems involving periodic contacting surfaces have different practical applications. An inverse heat conduction problem for estimating the periodic Thermal Contact Conductance (TCC) between one-dimensional, constant property contacting solids has been investigated with conjugate gradient method (CGM) of function estimation. This method converges very rapidly and is not so sensitive to the measurement errors. The advantage of the present method is that no a priori information is needed on the variation of the unknown quantities, since the solution automatically determines the functional form over the specified domain. A simple, straight forward technique is utilized to solve the direct, sensitivity and adjoint problems, in order to overcome the difficulties associated with numerical methods. Two general classes of results, the results obtained by applying inexact simulated measured data and the results obtained by using data taken from an actual experiment are presented. In addition, extrapolation method is applied to obtain actual results. Generally, the present method effectively improves the exact TCC when exact and inexact simulated measurements input to the analysis. Furthermore, the results obtained with CGM and the extrapolation results are in agreement and the little deviations can be negligible.

  5. A practical solution to Hanford's tank waste problem

    SciTech Connect

    Siemer, D.D.

    2013-07-01

    The main characteristics of the Hanford radwaste are: -) it is extremely dilute and generates little heat, -) it is comprised of materials incompatible with high loading in borosilicate glass, and -) it is already situated at a good geological repository site. We propose that Hanford's radwaste should be homogenized (not separated), converted to an iron phosphate (Fe-P) glass 'aggregate' (marbles, gems, or cullet), that is then slurried up with a cementitious grout and pumped into Hanford's 'best preserved' tanks for disposal. This proposal is efficient, safe and cheap.

  6. Impact of heat treatment on miscibility of proteins and disaccharides in frozen solutions.

    PubMed

    Izutsu, Ken-ichi; Yomota, Chikako; Okuda, Haruhiro; Kawanishi, Toru; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of heat treatment (annealing) on the miscibility of concentrated protein and disaccharide mixtures in the freezing segment of lyophilization. Frozen solutions containing a protein (e.g., recombinant human albumin, chicken egg lysozyme, bovine plasma immunoglobulin G, or a humanized IgG1k monoclonal antibody) and a non-reducing disaccharide (e.g., sucrose or trehalose) showed single thermal transitions of the solute mixtures (glass transition temperature of maximally freeze-concentrated solutes: T(g)(')) in their first heating scans. Heat treatment (e.g., -5 °C, 30 min) of some disaccharide-rich mixture frozen solutions at temperatures far above their T(g)(') induced two-step T(g)(') transitions in the subsequent scans, suggesting the separation of the solutes into concentrated protein-disaccharide mixture phase and disaccharide phase. Other frozen solutions showed a single transition of the concentrated solute mixture both before and after heat treatment. The apparent effects of the heat treatment temperature and time on the changes in thermal properties suggest molecular reordering of the concentrated solutes from a kinetically fixed mixture state to a more thermodynamically favorable state as a result of increased mobility. The implications of these phenomena on the quality of protein formulations are discussed.

  7. Fast and optimal solution to the Rankine-Hugoniot problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Scudder, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    A new, definitive, reliable and fast iterative method is described for determining the geometrical properties of a shock (i.e., theta sub Bn, yields N, V sub s and M sub A), the conservation constants and the self-consistent asymptotic magnetofluid variables, that uses the three dimensional magnetic field and plasma observations. The method is well conditioned and reliable at all theta sub Bn angles regardless of the shock strength or geometry. Explicit proof of uniqueness of the shock geometry solution by either analytical or graphical methods is given. The method is applied to synthetic and real shocks, including a bow shock event and the results are then compared with those determined by preaveraging methods and other iterative schemes. A complete analysis of the confidence region and error bounds of the solution is also presented.

  8. Analytic Solutions of Liquid-Drop Impact Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, M. B.

    1981-07-01

    The pressure in an impacting liquid drop against both a rigid and an elastic target is calculated for the period when the contact region is expanding faster than the wave speed in the liquid. For very low speed impact a geometrical-acoustics model is shown to give a good representation of the solution, until the edge speed approaches the wave speed. A self-similar solution, that takes account of nonlinear effects, is used in the neighbourhood of the contact edge. Comparisons are made with linear theory and numerical calculations. It is shown that linear theory is totally inadequate in predicting the escape of the shock system from the contact edge and that numerical calculations have used too large a time step to calculate the time of escape correctly. The delay in escape time from the previous theoretical predictions of Heymann (1969) is attributed to the elasticity of the target, an effect that is taken into account in the present work.

  9. The Parabolas of Artzt in the Solution of a Geometric Problem of Minimum Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaoudatos, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    The article describes the solution of a geometric problem and how this problem was formed. During the investigation process, I discovered that the inscribed parabola in a triangle, known as the parabola of Artzt, a mathematical subject developed almost 120 years ago, was the decisive idea which directed me towards the solution. Moreover, in the…

  10. Expanding the Space of Plausible Solutions in a Medical Tutoring System for Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazi, Hameedullah; Haddawy, Peter; Suebnukarn, Siriwan

    2009-01-01

    In well-defined domains such as Physics, Mathematics, and Chemistry, solutions to a posed problem can objectively be classified as correct or incorrect. In ill-defined domains such as medicine, the classification of solutions to a patient problem as correct or incorrect is much more complex. Typical tutoring systems accept only a small set of…

  11. An Optical Wavelength-Based Solution to the 3-SAT Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goliaei, Sama; Jalili, Saeed

    The NP-complete is a class of complexity including many real-world problems. Although many efforts made to find efficient solutions to NP-complete problems, no such a solution having polynomial complexity of used resources is found yet.

  12. Multiple Solutions to Problems in Mathematics Teaching: Do Teachers Really Value Them?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingolbali, Erhan

    2011-01-01

    Solving problems in different ways is strongly advised for mathematics learning and teaching. There is, however, little data available on the examination of teachers' openness to and evaluation of different solutions to the problems. In this paper, the author examines classroom teachers' openness to different solutions (or to what extent they…

  13. An Efficient Algorithm for Partitioning and Authenticating Problem-Solutions of eLeaming Contents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewan, Jahangir; Chowdhury, Morshed; Batten, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Content authenticity and correctness is one of the important challenges in eLearning as there can be many solutions to one specific problem in cyber space. Therefore, the authors feel it is necessary to map problems to solutions using graph partition and weighted bipartite matching. This article proposes an efficient algorithm to partition…

  14. An adaptive computation mesh for the solution of singular perturbation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackbill, J. U.; Saltzman, J.

    1980-01-01

    In singular perturbation problems, control of zone size variation can affect the effort required to obtain accurate, numerical solutions of finite difference equations. The mesh is generated by the solution of potential equations. Numerical results for a singular perturbation problem in two dimensions are presented. The mesh was used in calculations of resistive magnetohydrodynamic flow in two dimensions.

  15. Closed solutions to a differential-difference equation and an associated plate solidification problem.

    PubMed

    Layeni, Olawanle P; Akinola, Adegbola P; Johnson, Jesse V

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct and novel formalisms for deriving exact closed solutions of a class of variable-coefficient differential-difference equations arising from a plate solidification problem are introduced. Thereupon, exact closed traveling wave and similarity solutions to the plate solidification problem are obtained for some special cases of time-varying plate surface temperature. PMID:27540506

  16. Comparison of Two Instructional Strategies for Teaching the Solution to Verbal Problems. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassler, Otto C.; And Others

    Two distinct strategies for teaching the solution to verbal problems were compared. Programs of instruction were prepared that reflected the Polya Method (read and understand the problem, plan for a solution, carry out the plan, and check the result) and the Dahmus Method (translate the verbal statements into mathematical symbols prior to solving…

  17. Solutions of the Noh Problem for Various Equations of State Using Lie Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Axford, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    A method for developing invariant equations of state for which solutions of the Noh problem will exist is developed. The ideal gas equation of state is shown to be a special case of the general method. Explicit solutions of the Noh problem in planar, cylindrical and spherical geometry are determined for a Mie-Gruneisen and the stiff gas equation of state.

  18. [Methodology of occupational fitness examination: problems and ways to solutions].

    PubMed

    Karulina, O A; Boiko, I V

    2013-01-01

    The article covers improvement of occupational fitness examination methodology in workers exposed to occupational hazards, based on longstanding experience of practical work in industrial medicine. The authors examined main causes of controversies and conflict situations in occupational fitness examination, possible ways to solve the problems in accordance with contemporary evidence-based medicine principles.

  19. Pencils solution to an egg-citing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Boon Leong; Ooi, Gary; Keh, Chooi Yiang

    1999-02-01

    Here is an egg-citing contest that will make physics interesting and fun while allowing students to practice creative problem solving. Have each student drop a raw egg from an upper level of a building. The egg that falls fastest to the ground without breaking wins the contest.

  20. To the editor: Two solutions in search of a problem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two recent articles in Hepatology suggest that the problems of fructose-induced fibrosis severity in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis (NASH) could be solved if their exposure were limited either directly through diet or indirectly through curcu...

  1. Environmental Problems, Causes, and Solutions: An Open Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Negev, Maya; Garb, Yaakov; Biller, Roni; Sagy, Gonen; Tal, Alon

    2010-01-01

    In a national evaluation of environmental literacy in Israel, (Negev, Sagy, Garb, Salzberg, & Tal, 2008), the authors included both multiple choice questions and open questions. In this article the authors describe the qualitative analysis of the answers to an open question regarding a local environmental problem. Most participants specified solid…

  2. Drama That Delivers: Real-Life Problems, Students' Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hery, Nancy Duffy

    Drama and role playing are effective ways for teachers, school counselors, and other individuals who work with young people to teach and discuss sensitive issues. The eight plays in this publication are designed to help middle school students develop critical-thinking, problem-solving, and logical decision-making skills. The eight scripts use a…

  3. Technology: The Problem or the Solution to Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstone, Susan; Teatum, Jim

    2011-01-01

    One-third of the population of US children is considered obese and two-thirds of the adult population falls into the same category. These figures have tripled over the last 30 years. This demonstrates that the existing strategies to combat obesity do not work and it is time to look for alternatives. The recommendation is to turn the problem into a…

  4. GENERAL: A New Solution to Detectable Byzantine Agreement Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Meng, Luo-Ming; Zhu, Fu-Chen

    2009-12-01

    We present a new quantum protocol for solving detectable Byzantine agreement problem between three parties by employing one quantum key distribution protocol. The protocol is suggested by a special four-qubit entangled state instead of singlet states, which shows that singlet states are not necessary to achieve detectable Byzantine agreement.

  5. Application of remote sensing to solution of ecological problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, A.

    1972-01-01

    The application of remote sensing techniques to solving ecological problems is discussed. The three phases of environmental ecological management are examined. The differences between discovery and exploitation of natural resources and their ecological management are described. The specific application of remote sensing to water management is developed.

  6. Household Hazardous Waste: Everyone's Problem--Everyone's Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evenson, Linda

    1985-01-01

    Examines the household hazardous waste problem, addressing several areas related to regulation, disposal, and control. Also gives a list of safer alternatives for household cleaners/disinfectants, paint products, and pesticides. Indicates that individuals can collectively make a difference in public exposure by changing purchases and practices.…

  7. Creativity, Problem Solving, and Solution Set Sightedness: Radically Reformulating BVSR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonton, Dean Keith

    2012-01-01

    Too often, psychological debates become polarized into dichotomous positions. Such polarization may have occurred with respect to Campbell's (1960) blind variation and selective retention (BVSR) theory of creativity. To resolve this unnecessary controversy, BVSR was radically reformulated with respect to creative problem solving. The reformulation…

  8. Multivariate Analysis of Ipsative Data: Problems and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, James E.; Chissom, Brad S.

    The term "ipsative" refers to measurement based on intra-individual comparisons. The research literature in the social sciences contains many cautions about using ipsative data in multivariate analysis. The purpose of this paper is to identify the problems associated with the multivariate and regression analyses of ipsative data and to provide…

  9. AACSB Accreditation in China--Current Situation, Problems, and Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xinrui; Gao, Yan

    2012-01-01

    This paper first introduces the background of the AACSB (Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business) accreditation, and then analyzes the current status of the participation of Chinese business schools in AACSB accreditation. Based on the data analysis, the paper points out that there are two main problems in the Chinese business…

  10. Computer-Assisted Rare Book Cataloguing: Problems and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Victoria

    This study proposes answers to questions of how and why computers can be used to catalog rare books. Divided into two parts, the first examines the nature of rare book cataloging needs and considers problems associated with machine-readable rare book cataloging. The question of how rare book cataloging differs from standard cataloging is analyzed…

  11. Behaviorism: part of the problem or part of the solution.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J G

    1978-01-01

    The form frequently taken by behavior-modification programs is analyzed in terms of the parent science, Behaviorism. Whereas Behaviorism assumes that behavior is the result of contingencies, and that lasting behavior change involves changing the contingencies that give rise to and support the behavior, most behavior-modification programs merely arrange special contingencies in a special environment to eliminate the "problem" behavior. Even when the problem behavior is as widespread as alcoholism and crime, behavior modifiers focus on "fixing" the alcoholic and the criminal, not on changing the societal contingencies that prevail outside the therapeutic environment and continue to produce alcoholics and criminals. The contingencies that shape this method of dealing with behavioral problems are also analyzed, and this analysis leads to a criticism of the current social structure as a behavior control system. Although applied behaviorists have frequently focused on fixing individuals, the science of Behaviorism provides the means to analyze the structures, the system, and the forms of societal control that produce the "problems". PMID:649524

  12. The asymptotics of the solutions of the Signorini problem without friction or with small friction

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, S.A.

    1994-12-25

    We find the first few terms of the asymptotic expansion of a regular solution of the two-dimensional Signorini problem with a small coefficient of friction. As the fundamental approximation we take the solution of the limiting problem without friction. This solution is assumed to be known, and it is assumed that the region of contact consists of a finite number of arcs, on each of which one boundary condition or another is realized. We study the asymptotics of the solution of the Signorini problem without friction under small load variation.

  13. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water.

    PubMed

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R

    2013-03-21

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F(-) and a Na(+) ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na(+) and F(-) ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity ΔC(p) stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na(+) ion, it decreases upon charging the F(-) ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q = -0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  14. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-03-21

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F{sup -} and a Na{sup +} ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na{sup +} and F{sup -} ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity {Delta}C{sub p} stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na{sup +} ion, it decreases upon charging the F{sup -} ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q=-0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  15. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-03-01

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F- and a Na+ ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na+ and F- ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity ΔCp stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na+ ion, it decreases upon charging the F- ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q = -0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  16. Comparing the use of multimedia animations and written solutions in facilitating problem solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Neelam; Nguyen, Dong-Hai; Chen, Zhongzhou; Rebello, N. Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    We compared the use of solutions to a problem in the form of multimedia animations and static worksheets to help students learn how to solve physics problems that required the use of mathematical integration. We administered four tasks related to electricity and magnetism problems. In each task, students individually attempted a pre-test problem followed by a worksheet problem based on the same concept. Then, we provided students the solution to the worksheet problem either as a narrated multimedia animation or in a written format. Finally, all students solved a post-test problem. Results indicate that on all four tasks, there was a statistically significant improvement in problem solving scores for both the animation and written solution treatments. We found no significant differences between the treatments.

  17. Generalized solutions to Protter problems for 3-D Keldysh type equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristov, T.; Popivanov, N.; Schneider, M.

    2014-12-01

    Some three-dimensional boundary value problems for equations of Keldysh type are studied. Such type problems, but for equations of Tricomi type are stated by M. H. Protter [25] as 3-D analogues of Darboux or Cauchy-Goursat plane problems. It is well known that in contrast of well-posedness of 2D problems, the Protter problems are strongly ill-posed. In [12] Protter problem for Keldysh type equations is formulated and it is shown that it is not correctly set since the homogeneous adjoint problem has infinitely many nontrivial classical solutions. In the present paper a notion for generalized solution to Protter problem for Keldysh type equations is introduced. Further, results for existence and uniqueness of such solution are obtained.

  18. A probabilistic solution of robust H∞ control problem with scaled matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, R.; Gong, J. Y.

    2016-07-01

    This paper addresses the robust H∞ control problem with scaled matrices. It is difficult to find a global optimal solution for this non-convex optimisation problem. A probabilistic solution, which can achieve globally optimal robust performance within any pre-specified tolerance, is obtained by using the proposed method based on randomised algorithm. In the proposed method, the scaled H∞ control problem is divided into two parts: (1) assume the scaled matrices be random variables, the scaled H∞ control problem is converted to a convex optimisation problem for the fixed sample of the scaled matrix and a optimal solution corresponding to the fixed sample is obtained; (2) a probabilistic optimal solution is obtained by using the randomised algorithm based on a finite number N optimal solutions, which are obtained in part (1). The analysis shows that the worst case complexity of proposed method is a polynomial.

  19. COYOTE : a finite element computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems. Part I, theoretical background.

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, Micheal W.; Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

    2010-03-01

    The need for the engineering analysis of systems in which the transport of thermal energy occurs primarily through a conduction process is a common situation. For all but the simplest geometries and boundary conditions, analytic solutions to heat conduction problems are unavailable, thus forcing the analyst to call upon some type of approximate numerical procedure. A wide variety of numerical packages currently exist for such applications, ranging in sophistication from the large, general purpose, commercial codes, such as COMSOL, COSMOSWorks, ABAQUS and TSS to codes written by individuals for specific problem applications. The original purpose for developing the finite element code described here, COYOTE, was to bridge the gap between the complex commercial codes and the more simplistic, individual application programs. COYOTE was designed to treat most of the standard conduction problems of interest with a user-oriented input structure and format that was easily learned and remembered. Because of its architecture, the code has also proved useful for research in numerical algorithms and development of thermal analysis capabilities. This general philosophy has been retained in the current version of the program, COYOTE, Version 5.0, though the capabilities of the code have been significantly expanded. A major change in the code is its availability on parallel computer architectures and the increase in problem complexity and size that this implies. The present document describes the theoretical and numerical background for the COYOTE program. This volume is intended as a background document for the user's manual. Potential users of COYOTE are encouraged to become familiar with the present report and the simple example analyses reported in before using the program. The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, COYOTE, is presented in detail. COYOTE is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems

  20. Twin solution calorimeter determines heats of formation of alloys at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darby, J. B., Jr.; Kleb, R.; Kleppa, O. J.

    1968-01-01

    Calvert-type, twin liquid metal solution calorimeter determines the heats of formation of transition metal alloys at high temperatures. The twin differential calorimeter measures the small heat effects generated over extended periods of time, has maximum operating temperature of 1073 degrees K and an automatic data recording system.

  1. Optimal heat transport solutions for Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondak, David; Smith, Leslie M.; Waleffe, Fabian

    2015-12-01

    Steady flows that optimize heat transport are obtained for two-dimensional Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection with no-slip horizontal walls for a variety of Prandtl numbers $Pr$ and Rayleigh number up to $Ra\\sim 10^9$. Power law scalings of $Nu\\sim Ra^{\\gamma}$ are observed with $\\gamma\\approx 0.31$, where the Nusselt number $Nu$ is a non-dimensional measure of the vertical heat transport. Any dependence of the scaling exponent on $Pr$ is found to be extremely weak. On the other hand, the presence of two local maxima of $Nu$ with different horizontal wavenumbers at the same $Ra$ leads to the emergence of two different flow structures as candidates for optimizing the heat transport. For $Pr \\lesssim 7$, optimal transport is achieved at the smaller maximal wavenumber. In these fluids, the optimal structure is a plume of warm rising fluid which spawns left/right horizontal arms near the top of the channel, leading to downdrafts adjacent to the central updraft. For $Pr > 7$ at high-enough Ra, the optimal structure is a single updraft absent significant horizontal structure, and characterized by the larger maximal wavenumber.

  2. Heat and mass transfer at adiabatic evaporation of binary zeotropic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, M. S.; Makarova, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Results of numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer in a laminar flow of three-component gas at adiabatic evaporation of binary solutions from a flat plate are presented. The studies were carried out for the perfect solution of ethanol/methanol and zeotrope solutions of water/acetone, benzene/acetone, and ethanol/acetone. The liquid-vapor equilibrium is described by the Raoult law for the ideal solution and Carlson-Colburn model for real solutions. The effect of gas temperature and liquid composition on the heat and diffusion flows, and temperature of vapor-gas mixture at the interface is analyzed. The formula for calculating the temperature of the evaporation surface for the binary liquid mixtures using the similarity of heat and mass transfer was proposed. Data of numerical simulations are in a good agreement with the results of calculations based on the proposed dependence for all examined liquid mixtures in the considered range of temperatures and pressures.

  3. Proper use of medical language: Main problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Aleixandre-Benavent, R; Valderrama Zurián, J C; Bueno-Cañigral, F J

    2015-10-01

    Medical language should be characterized by its precision, emotional neutrality and stability. The effective communication of results of scientific studies depends on compliance with current standards of drafting and style; texts with defects can hinder interest in the findings. In this study, we discuss some of the most common problems and errors in medical language, including the abuse of abbreviations and foreign words, the use of improper words, syntax errors and solecisms, the most common errors in titles and the abuse of capital letters and the gerund. Investigators have effective tools for dealing with these problems, such as quality texts, critical dictionaries of questions and difficulties with the Spanish language and various drafting and style manuals. PMID:25982421

  4. Beyond Λ CDM: Problems, solutions, and the road ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Philip; Akrami, Yashar; Adamek, Julian; Baker, Tessa; Bellini, Emilio; Beltrán Jiménez, Jose; Bentivegna, Eloisa; Camera, Stefano; Clesse, Sébastien; Davis, Jonathan H.; Di Dio, Enea; Enander, Jonas; Heavens, Alan; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Hu, Bin; Llinares, Claudio; Maartens, Roy; Mörtsell, Edvard; Nadathur, Seshadri; Noller, Johannes; Pasechnik, Roman; Pawlowski, Marcel S.; Pereira, Thiago S.; Quartin, Miguel; Ricciardone, Angelo; Riemer-Sørensen, Signe; Rinaldi, Massimiliano; Sakstein, Jeremy; Saltas, Ippocratis D.; Salzano, Vincenzo; Sawicki, Ignacy; Solomon, Adam R.; Spolyar, Douglas; Starkman, Glenn D.; Steer, Danièle; Tereno, Ismael; Verde, Licia; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; von Strauss, Mikael; Winther, Hans A.

    2016-06-01

    Despite its continued observational successes, there is a persistent (and growing) interest in extending cosmology beyond the standard model, Λ CDM. This is motivated by a range of apparently serious theoretical issues, involving such questions as the cosmological constant problem, the particle nature of dark matter, the validity of general relativity on large scales, the existence of anomalies in the CMB and on small scales, and the predictivity and testability of the inflationary paradigm. In this paper, we summarize the current status of Λ CDM as a physical theory, and review investigations into possible alternatives along a number of different lines, with a particular focus on highlighting the most promising directions. While the fundamental problems are proving reluctant to yield, the study of alternative cosmologies has led to considerable progress, with much more to come if hopes about forthcoming high-precision observations and new theoretical ideas are fulfilled.

  5. Structural qualia: a solution to the hard problem of consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Loorits, Kristjan

    2014-01-01

    The hard problem of consciousness has been often claimed to be unsolvable by the methods of traditional empirical sciences. It has been argued that all the objects of empirical sciences can be fully analyzed in structural terms but that consciousness is (or has) something over and above its structure. However, modern neuroscience has introduced a theoretical framework in which also the apparently non-structural aspects of consciousness, namely the so called qualia or qualitative properties, can be analyzed in structural terms. That framework allows us to see qualia as something compositional with internal structures that fully determine their qualitative nature. Moreover, those internal structures can be identified which certain neural patterns. Thus consciousness as a whole can be seen as a complex neural pattern that misperceives some of its own highly complex structural properties as monadic and qualitative. Such neural pattern is analyzable in fully structural terms and thereby the hard problem is solved. PMID:24672510

  6. Problems and Solutions in Click Chemistry Applied to Drug Probes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Weilong; Sun, Bo; Lu, Cheng; Yu, Hengheng; Wang, Changhua; He, Lingfei; Gu, Ju; Chen, Shuang; Liu, Yanrong; Jing, Xiangyan; Bi, Zhun; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Honggang; Sun, Tao; Yang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule fluorescent probes have been widely used in target identification, but this method has many disadvantages. For example, the identified proteins are usually complex, and additional biochemical studies are needed to distinguish real targets from interference results. To address this problem, we propose a series of strategies for improving the efficiency of target identification. First, pretreatment with a lower concentration of hydrogen peroxide can shield against thiol interference. Second, the use of benzophenone as a photo-affinity group is not appropriate, and diazirines are preferred. Third, if cytoskeleton proteins or stress proteins are captured, the interference must be carefully eliminated. The specificity of target identification can be improved by optimizing these three strategies. In this paper, we discuss the problems associated with the use of the click reaction in living cells and provide important complementary techniques for photo-affinity probes based on the click chemistry reaction. PMID:27782133

  7. Finite element solution of transient fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, Gordon C.; Cheng, Raymond S.; Hambric, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element approach using NASTRAN is developed for solving time-dependent fluid-structure interaction problems, with emphasis on the transient scattering of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. Finite elements are used for modeling both structure and fluid domains to facilitate the graphical display of the wave motion through both media. For the liquid, the use of velocity potential as the fundamental unknown results in a symmetric matrix equation. The approach is illustrated for the problem of transient scattering from a submerged elastic spherical shell subjected to an incident tone burst. The use of an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of acoustics, a necessary ingredient to the procedure, is summarized.

  8. DOCUMENT: an interactive, online solution to four documentation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Girill, T.R.; Luk, C.H.

    1983-05-01

    An adequate delivery system for user documentation addresses the problems of easy access, versatile publication, convenient administration, and good document quality. At the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center the DOCUMENT program helps solve these problems by providing a high level of service through strategies that can readily be exported to other contexts. Dividing machine-readable documents into keyword windows permits fully online, subject-oriented access to all passages. An adaptive, three-tier user interface extends flexible viewing control to novices and experts alike. DOCUMENT also supports online subject, title, and date catalogs, and provides on-demand output of hard-copy and microfiche. Several other document delivery systems are compared with DOCUMENT, and all have more rigid human interfaces, more structural display units for text, or more cumbersome output options.

  9. [Reference standards in diagnostic research: problems and solutions].

    PubMed

    de Groot, Joris A H; Reitsma, Johannes B; Moons, Karel G M

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of diagnostic tests is of utmost importance as biased test results may lead to wrong decisions in clinical practice. In diagnostic accuracy research the results of a diagnostic test, model or strategy are compared to those of the reference standard, i.e. the best available method to determine whether a certain condition or disease is present or absent. Problems with the reference standard lead to biased test results. The umbrella term for this is 'verification bias'. Verification bias arises if the reference standard cannot be applied to all patients, if investigators use different reference standards or simply because there is no reference standard. Correction of these problems is often possible, and, if it is applied in a transparent and reproducible fashion it will deliver useful diagnostic information. Clinicians who use a diagnostic test should take possible verification bias into account.

  10. Common solution to the cosmic ray anisotropy and gradient problems.

    PubMed

    Evoli, Carmelo; Gaggero, Daniele; Grasso, Dario; Maccione, Luca

    2012-05-25

    Multichannel cosmic ray spectra and the large scale cosmic ray anisotropy can hardly be made compatible in the framework of conventional isotropic and homogeneous propagation models. These models also have problems explaining the longitude distribution and the radial emissivity gradient of the γ-ray Galactic interstellar emission. We argue here that accounting for a physically motivated correlation between the cosmic ray escape time and the spatially dependent magnetic turbulence power can naturally solve both problems. Indeed, by exploiting this correlation we find propagation models that fit a wide set of cosmic ray spectra, and consistently reproduce the cosmic ray anisotropy in the energy range 10(2)-10(4) GeV and the γ-ray longitude distribution recently measured by Fermi-LAT.

  11. Solution of the multiple dosing problem using linear programming.

    PubMed

    Hacisalihzade, S S; Mansour, M

    1985-07-01

    A system theoretical approach to drug concentration-time data analysis is introduced after the discussion of some relevant concepts as they are used in system theory. The merits of this approach are demonstrated in multiple dosing problem. It is shown that dosage minimization without stringent constraints does not result in the desired therapeutic effect. In a different optimization the discrepancy between the actual and the desired time-histories of the relevant substance's plasma concentration is minimized. It is shown that both of these optimizations can be reduced to linear programming problems which are easily solvable with today's computers. These methods are demonstrated in a case study of dopaminergic substitution in Parkinson's disease where computer simulations show them to yield excellent results. Finally, the limits of this approach are also discussed.

  12. MODEL 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE FABRICATION PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    May, C; Allen Smith, A

    2008-05-07

    The Model 9975 Shipping Package is the latest in a series (9965, 9968, etc.) of radioactive material shipping packages that have been the mainstay for shipping radioactive materials for several years. The double containment vessels are relatively simple designs using pipe and pipe cap in conjunction with the Chalfont closure to provide a leak-tight vessel. The fabrication appears simple in nature, but the history of fabrication tells us there are pitfalls in the different fabrication methods and sequences. This paper will review the problems that have arisen during fabrication and precautions that should be taken to meet specifications and tolerances. The problems and precautions can also be applied to the Models 9977 and 9978 Shipping Packages.

  13. Proper use of medical language: Main problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Aleixandre-Benavent, R; Valderrama Zurián, J C; Bueno-Cañigral, F J

    2015-10-01

    Medical language should be characterized by its precision, emotional neutrality and stability. The effective communication of results of scientific studies depends on compliance with current standards of drafting and style; texts with defects can hinder interest in the findings. In this study, we discuss some of the most common problems and errors in medical language, including the abuse of abbreviations and foreign words, the use of improper words, syntax errors and solecisms, the most common errors in titles and the abuse of capital letters and the gerund. Investigators have effective tools for dealing with these problems, such as quality texts, critical dictionaries of questions and difficulties with the Spanish language and various drafting and style manuals.

  14. Problems and our solutions for implementing telemedicine systems.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, I; Sawada, Y; Ashihara, T; Takashima, Y

    1999-12-01

    There are several problems on the practical use of telemedicine, for example, the difficulties involved in promoting communication between medical facilities, uncooperative clinicians, and the absence of high-speed circuits and high-resolution CRT. From the Japanese point of view, we suggest ways to resolve these problems. We will analyze and propose scenarios for realizing successful communications among medical institutions, medical communication and its characteristics, barriers to the promotion of communications among medical institutions, second-opinion centers, and separate satellites and separate circuits. We also mention the World Wide Web for teleconsultation, provision of assistance to people with data handicaps via a communications satellite, and assistance to programs designed for training telemedicine specialists. Using a communication satellite, we offer programs that explain preventive medicine, support activities for nursing at home, explain the risks of fast food, and support activities for the handicapped and women in a simple manner to computer illiterates.

  15. Optimal Parametric Discrete Event Control: Problem and Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Christopher H

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel optimization problem for discrete event control, similar in spirit to the optimal parametric control problem common in statistical process control. In our problem, we assume a known finite state machine plant model $G$ defined over an event alphabet $\\Sigma$ so that the plant model language $L = \\LanM(G)$ is prefix closed. We further assume the existence of a \\textit{base control structure} $M_K$, which may be either a finite state machine or a deterministic pushdown machine. If $K = \\LanM(M_K)$, we assume $K$ is prefix closed and that $K \\subseteq L$. We associate each controllable transition of $M_K$ with a binary variable $X_1,\\dots,X_n$ indicating whether the transition is enabled or not. This leads to a function $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n)$, that returns a new control specification depending upon the values of $X_1,\\dots,X_n$. We exhibit a branch-and-bound algorithm to solve the optimization problem $\\min_{X_1,\\dots,X_n}\\max_{w \\in K} C(w)$ such that $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n) \\models \\Pi$ and $\\LanM(M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n)) \\in \\Con(L)$. Here $\\Pi$ is a set of logical assertions on the structure of $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n)$, and $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n) \\models \\Pi$ indicates that $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n)$ satisfies the logical assertions; and, $\\Con(L)$ is the set of controllable sublanguages of $L$.

  16. Collaboration Results - Applying Technical Solutions To Environmental Remediation Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, G.; Fiore, J.; Walker, J.; DeRemer, C.; Wight, E.

    2002-02-26

    Within the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM), the Office of Science and Technology (OST) identifies and develops innovative technologies that accelerate cleanup of high-priority environmental contamination problems and enable EM closure sites to meet closure schedules. OST manages an integrated research and development program that is essential to completing timely and cost-effective cleanup and stewardship of DOE sites. While innovative technologies can make significant contributions to the cleanup process, in some cases, EM has encountered unexpected barriers to their implementation. Technical obstacles are expected, but administrative challenges-such as regulatory, organizational, and stakeholder issues-must also be addressed. OST has found that collaborative needs identification and problem solving are essential components in overcoming these barriers. Collaboration helps EM meet its cleanup goals, close sites, and reduce the overall cost of cleanup at DOE sites nationwide. This paper presents examples of OST's collaboration efforts that expedite site closure and solve specific cleanup problems at EM sites.

  17. Towards a Finite Volume Solution of Spherical Dynamo Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, H.; Hansen, U.

    2001-12-01

    Presently, all existing numerical methods to simulate the geodynamo use a spectral approach. Although a spectral expansion in spherical harmonics avoids the well known pole problem, such an approach has certain drawbacks. An efficient calculation of non-linear terms requires a spectral transform method, which prevents an implicit implementation of these terms. In addition, spectral transformations require global communication, which makes these methods less suitable for massively parallel computation. To avoid these problems, we are currently developing a finite volume method to simulate the geodynamo. The governing equations are formulated in a cartesian frame of reference, but the discretisation is adapted to a spherical shell. The grid is generated by the projection of an inscribed cube to the spherical surface, followed by an orthogonalization of the grid. Topologically this method maps the spherical shell to six cubes. We use domain decomposition and standard message passing routines for a parallel implementation of the method. We will present and compare results for various convection problems: creeping flows, infinite Prandtl number flows, and flows in rapidly rotating spheres.

  18. Multipartite continuous-variable solution for the Byzantine agreement problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neigovzen, Rodion; Rodó, Carles; Adesso, Gerardo; Sanpera, Anna

    2008-06-01

    We demonstrate that the Byzantine agreement (detectable broadcast) is also solvable in the continuous-variable scenario with multipartite entangled Gaussian states and Gaussian operations (homodyne detection). Within this scheme we find that Byzantine agreement requires a minimum amount of entanglement in the multipartite states used in order to achieve a solution. We discuss realistic implementations of the protocol, which consider the possibility of having inefficient homodyne detectors, not perfectly correlated outcomes, and noise in the preparation of the resource states. The proposed protocol is proven to be robust and efficiently applicable under such nonideal conditions.

  19. Future of primary healthcare education: current problems and potential solutions.

    PubMed

    Lord, J

    2003-10-01

    This review examines the origins of primary care and the pressures currently faced in terms of patient expectation, regulation, accountability, and work force shortages. It recognises the appropriateness of adding to the burden in primary care further by the shift both of more services and more medical education from secondary care. Some conclusions are drawn concerning potential solutions including skill mix changes, centralisation of services, a change in attitudes to professional mistakes, increased protected development time, evidence based education, and academic, leadership, and feedback skills for general practitioners. Six recommendations are offered as a prescription for organisational and educational change. PMID:14612596

  20. Assessing Student Written Problem Solutions: A Problem-Solving Rubric with Application to Introductory Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docktor, Jennifer L.; Dornfeld, Jay; Frodermann, Evan; Heller, Kenneth; Hsu, Leonardo; Jackson, Koblar Alan; Mason, Andrew; Ryan, Qing X.; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Problem solving is a complex process valuable in everyday life and crucial for learning in the STEM fields. To support the development of problem-solving skills it is important for researchers and curriculum developers to have practical tools that can measure the difference between novice and expert problem-solving performance in authentic…

  1. Boundary-integral methods in elasticity and plasticity. [solutions of boundary value problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendelson, A.

    1973-01-01

    Recently developed methods that use boundary-integral equations applied to elastic and elastoplastic boundary value problems are reviewed. Direct, indirect, and semidirect methods using potential functions, stress functions, and displacement functions are described. Examples of the use of these methods for torsion problems, plane problems, and three-dimensional problems are given. It is concluded that the boundary-integral methods represent a powerful tool for the solution of elastic and elastoplastic problems.

  2. Conservation laws and associated Lie point symmetries admitted by the transient heat conduction problem for heat transfer in straight fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndlovu, Partner; Moitsheki, Rasselo

    2013-08-01

    Some new conservation laws for the transient heat conduction problem for heat transfer in a straight fin are constructed. The thermal conductivity is given by a power law in one case and by a linear function of temperature in the other. Conservation laws are derived using the direct method when thermal conductivity is given by the power law and the multiplier method when thermal conductivity is given as a linear function of temperature. The heat transfer coefficient is assumed to be given by the power law function of temperature. Furthermore, we determine the Lie point symmetries associated with the conserved vectors for the model with power law thermal conductivity.

  3. A new solution for a chronic problem; aqueous enteric coating.

    PubMed

    Rafati, Hasan; Ghassempour, Alireza; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad

    2006-11-01

    In this research, we have reconsidered the current enteric coating techniques and offered a new solution using both theoretical and practical approaches. This approach is based on the fact that salt formation can solubilize the pH-sensitive polymers in water. However, having applied the polymer solution onto the dosage form's surface, the polymer should be converted to the nonionized form for delayed release action. Ammonium hydrogen carbonate (AHC) is used as a buffering agent with dual actions of salting in and desalting the polymer. Following the application of the coating medium onto the dosage form's surface and drying, AHC dissociate completely to ammonia, carbon dioxide, and water converting the polymer to its nonionized form. FT-IR studies on free film samples further confirmed the proposed mechanism. A range of pH-sensitive polymers and other ingredients in water have been successfully applied at the surface of a model ASA tablets, using pan coating technique. According to the SEM observation, the coating layer is very dense and rigid, despite the fact that, the coated amount of the polymers is quit small. The enteric tablets maintain their shapes in acid medium and passed the USP dissolution test for DR ASA tablets. PMID:16886197

  4. Solutions of some problems in applied mathematics using MACSYMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Punjabi, Alkesh; Lam, Maria

    1987-01-01

    Various Symbolic Manipulation Programs (SMP) were tested to check the functioning of their commands and suitability under various operating systems. Support systems for SMP were found to be relatively better than the one for MACSYMA. The graphics facilities for MACSYMA do not work as expected under the UNIX operating system. Not all commands for MACSYMA function as described in the manuals. Shape representation is a central issue in computer graphics and computer-aided design. Aside from appearance, there are other application dependent, desirable properties like continuity to certain order, symmetry, axis-independence, and variation-diminishing properties. Several shape representations are studied, which include the Osculatory Method, a Piecewise Cubic Polynomial Method using two different slope estimates, Piecewise Cubic Hermite Form, a method by Harry McLaughlin, and a Piecewise Bezier Method. They are applied to collected physical and chemical data. Relative merits and demerits of these methods are examined. Kinematics of a single link, non-dissipative robot arm is studied using MACSYMA. Lagranian is set-up and Lagrange's equations are derived. From there, Hamiltonian equations of motion are obtained. Equations suggest that bifurcation of solutions can occur, depending upon the value of a single parameter. Using the characteristic function W, the Hamilton-Jacobi equation is derived. It is shown that the H-J equation can be solved in closed form. Analytical solutions to the H-J equation are obtained.

  5. Problems and Solutions for Interprofessional Education in North American Dental Schools.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sara C; Donoff, Robert Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is a relatively new part of dental education. Its implementation is mandated by accreditation standards, but it is also essential to good patient care. Diverse dental schools from various regions of North America outline problems they have faced in IPE and the solutions that they have found to surmount these problems. Commonalities and unique features of these problems and solutions are discussed. PMID:27671955

  6. On solutions of the mixed Dirichlet-Navier problem for the polyharmonic equation in exterior domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matevosyan, O. A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the unique solvability of the mixed Dirichlet-Navier problem for the polyharmonic equation in exterior domains under the assumption that a generalized solution of this problem has a bounded Dirichlet integral with weight | x| a . Depending on the value of the parameter a, we prove a uniqueness theorem or present exact formulas for the dimension of the solution space of the mixed Dirichlet-Navier problem in the exterior of a compact set.

  7. Stability estimates for solution of Bitsadze-Samarskii type inverse elliptic problem with Dirichlet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyyev, Charyyar; Akyüz, Gulzipa

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we discuss well-posedness of Bitsadze-Samarskii type inverse elliptic problem with Dirichlet conditions. We establish abstract results on stability and coercive stability estimates for the solution of this inverse problem. Then, the abstract results are applied to three overdetermined problems for the multi-dimensional elliptic equation with different boundary conditions. Stability inequalities for solutions of these applications are obtained.

  8. Fast Combinatorial Algorithm for the Solution of Linearly Constrained Least Squares Problems

    DOEpatents

    Van Benthem, Mark H.; Keenan, Michael R.

    2008-11-11

    A fast combinatorial algorithm can significantly reduce the computational burden when solving general equality and inequality constrained least squares problems with large numbers of observation vectors. The combinatorial algorithm provides a mathematically rigorous solution and operates at great speed by reorganizing the calculations to take advantage of the combinatorial nature of the problems to be solved. The combinatorial algorithm exploits the structure that exists in large-scale problems in order to minimize the number of arithmetic operations required to obtain a solution.

  9. [New image of occupational medicine--current problems, future solutions].

    PubMed

    Andrzejak, Ryszard; Beck, Bogusław; Urban, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    Current problems in occupational medicine result mainly from the situation in which existing structures are not appropriately adapted to the changes in economy, work market structures and social and demographic trends, which rapidly appeared within the last decade. The Act of Occupational Medicine Service in force precisely defines the duties of occupational medicine services. However, although the legal powers seem clear and detailed, the possibility of real actions is not put in order and encounters many barriers. The changes in structures of economy, enterprises and work market result in the situation in which despite the obligatory preventive examination system, there is a large group of people that are not subject to them. Care of workers in bigger companies or institutions is also the source of problems concerning mainly the examination range, but also the identification of new threats connected with ergonomics, psychological or biological factors; their limiting, monitoring and prevention. A broad issue of provided service qualities is closely connected with the problems mentioned above. Another question is defining the quality control system, the execution of post-control suggestions and the possibility of applying possible sanctions. A significant task is also to modify the examining and specialisation acquirement system. In the creation of the new image of occupational medicine in Poland the most significant issue is to correct the current legal grounds by introducing new standards of health protection for working people, enable to provide high- quality services, create the conditions for functioning of multidiscipline teams preventively caring of working people, being a guarantee of health and economic benefits for the society.

  10. Particulate problem solutions for rod pumped producing wells

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    Sand and other fluid entrained particulates can cause substantial operational problems for rod pumped producing wells. These problems take the form of down-hole pump wear, plunger sticking, and/or catastrophic breakage of pump components. A six year study of 600+ pump investigations shows that problems with particulates account for a substantial number of the total barrel and plunger failures. Many of these failures could have been avoided through the proper application of API and special pump designs as well as certain choices of pump variables. These pump variables and designs will be addressed along with operating parameters. How hard is sand? How large is it? Should plunger and barrel choices take these variables into account? Also, metal plungers must {open_quotes}slip{close_quotes} fluid for proper lubrication. Too much slippage leads to pump inefficiencies. However, down-hole pump efficiencies based on slippage need to be balanced against pump longevity due to proper selection for particulate production. Some time-proven rules of thumb can be applied to make these choices, and an included chart will make plunger slippage calculations simple and straightforward. Scale which sticks to pump surfaces dictates the choice of a different style down-hole pump. A straight-forward modification of an RH style API pump has proved successful in these conditions. Fluid and particulate production with and without attendant gas production requires a different approach to down-hole pump selection. Several successful older pump designs as well as some recently proven new designs will be described. A test program has been completed and actual applications have shown that an API Tubing Pump derivative can pump large volumes of particulate laden fluid without characteristic sticking of the plunger.

  11. Solution of simple numerical problems using spreadsheet programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggi, F.

    1986-11-01

    Spreadsheet programs are now extensively used for the analysis of business problems. A spreadsheet program reproduces the structure of a large page with columns and rows. The intersection of a column and a row defines a cell, each cell being identified by a column letter and a row number, starting at the upper left. The screen is a window over this matrix, whose dimensions depend on the machine's resources. Unlike that which occurs with paper spreadsheets, the elements (cells) of such a matrix structure can hold not only labels or numerical values but also mathematical formulae relating them to other matrix elements.

  12. Regulatory Solutions to the Problem of High Generic Drug Costs

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jing; Sarpatwari, Ameet; Kesselheim, Aaron S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have highlighted dramatic price increases for several older generic drugs, including a number of essential products used to treat deadly infectious diseases. Although most of these medicines have been widely available at reasonable prices for decades, some manufacturers have seized on unique features of the pharmaceutical marketplace to seek substantial profits. In this Perspective, we examine limitations in current price regulation among public and private payors and consider several reforms that could address the problem of expensive generic drugs through improved competition. PMID:26693494

  13. Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer, and Solute Transport at Nuclear Waste Storage Tanks in the Hanford Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Steefel, Carl I.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2002-03-01

    At the Hanford site, highly radioactive and chemically aggressive waste fluids have leaked from underground storage tanks into the vadose zone. This paper addresses hydrogeological issues at the 241-SX tank farm, especially focusing on tank SX-108 which is one of the highest heat load, supernate density and ionic strength tanks at Hanford and a known leaker. The behavior of contaminants in the unsaturated zone near SX-108 is determined by an interplay of multiphase fluid flow and heat transfer processes with reactive chemical transport in a complex geological setting. Numerical simulation studies were performed to obtain a better understanding of mass and energy transport in the unique hydrogeologic system created by the SX tank farm. Problem parameters are patterned after conditions at tank SX-108, and measured data were used whenever possible. Borrowing from techniques developed in geothermal and petroleum reservoir engineering, our simulations feature a comprehensive description of multiphase processes, including boiling and condensation phenomena, and precipitation and dissolution of solids. We find that the thermal perturbation from the tank causes large-scale redistribution of moisture and alters water seepage patterns. During periods of high heat load, fluid and heat flow near the tank is dominated by vapor-liquid counterflow (heat pipe), which provides a much more efficient mechanism than heat conduction for dissipating tank heat. The heat pipe mechanism is also very effective in concentrating dissolved solids near the heat source, where salts may precipitate even if they were only present in small concentrations in ambient fluids. Tank leaks that released aqueous fluids of high ionic strength into the vadose zone were also modeled. The heat load causes formation dryout beneath the tank, which is accompanied by precipitation of solutes.

  14. An inverse problem of parameter estimation for time-fractional heat conduction in a composite medium using carbon-carbon experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Qiao; Yu, Bo; Jiang, Xiaoyun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a time-fractional heat conduction problem is mathematically proposed for an experimental heat conduction process in a 3-layer composite medium. A numerical solution to the direct problem is obtained with finite difference method. In regard to the inverse problem, the optimal order of Caputo fractional derivative is estimated with Levenberg-Marquardt method. Comparing with the carbon-carbon experimental data, the results show that the time-fractional heat conduction model provides an effective and accurate simulation of the experimental data. The rationality of the proposed time-fractional model and validity of Levenberg-Marquardt method in solving the time-fractional inverse heat conduction problem are also manifested according to the results. By conducting the sensitivity analysis, the feasibility of the parameter estimation is further discussed.

  15. Numerical solution techniques for unsteady transonic aerodynamics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F.; Bridgeman, J. O.

    1980-01-01

    Basic concepts of finite difference solution techniques for unsteady transonic flows are presented. The hierarchy of mathematical forumulations that approximate the Navier-Stokes equations are reviewed. The basic concepts involved in constructing numerical algorthms to solve these formulations are given. Semi-implicit and implicit schemes are constructed and analyzed. The discussion focuses primarily on techniques for solving the low frequency transonic small disturbance equation. This is the simplest formulation that contains the essence of inviscid unsteady transonic flow physics. The low frequency formulation is emphasized here because codes based on this theory can be run in minutes of processor time on currently available computers. Furthermore, numerical techniques involved in solving this simple formulation also apply to the more complicated formulations. Extensions to these formulations are briefly described. An indication of the present capability for solving unsteady transonic flows is provided. Important areas of future research for the advancement of computational unsteady transonic aerodynamics are described.

  16. On the solution of a lubrication problem with particulate solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, F.; Khonsari, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    The lubrication characteristic of a fluid with solid particles is studied using the continuum theory of mixtures. The governing equations are formulated and appropriate boundary conditions are introduced for an arbitrary-shaped lubricant film thickness. As a special case, closed-form analytical perturbation solutions for pressure and shear stress are obtained for a mixture of a conventional oil and solid particles with small values of solid-volume fraction sheared in the clearance space of an infinitely long slider bearing. It is found that when compared with a pure fluid, the mixture of the fluid and solid generates a higher pressure and therefore a higher load-carrying capacity with the added advantage of a reduction in the coefficient of friction.

  17. Heat-transfer tests of aqueous ethylene glycol solutions in an electrically heated tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardo, Everett; Eian, Carroll S

    1945-01-01

    As part of an investigation of the cooling characteristics of liquid-cooled engines, tests were conducted with an electrically heated single-tube heat exchanger to determine the heat-transfer characteristics of an-e-2 ethylene glycol and other ethylene glycol-water mixtures. Similar tests were conducted with water and commercial butanol (n-butyl alcohol) for check purposes. The results of tests conducted at an approximately constant liquid-flow rate of 0.67 pound per second (Reynolds number, 14,500 to 112,500) indicate that at an average liquid temperature 200 degrees f, the heat-transfer coefficients obtained using water, nominal (by volume) 30 percent-70 percent and 70 percent-30 percent glycol-water mixtures are approximately 3.8, 2.8, and 1.4 times higher, respectively, than the heat-transfer coefficients obtained using an-e-2 ethylene glycol.

  18. Solution to the Sigma Problem of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, Oliver; Komissarov, Serguei S.; Keppens, Rony

    2014-03-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) provide a unique test-bed for the study of highly relativistic processes right at our astronomical doorstep. In this contribution we will show results from the first 3D RMHD simulations of PWN. Of key interest to our study is the long standing "sigma-problem" that challenges MHD models of Pulsars and their nebulae now for 3 decades. Earlier 2D MHD models were very successful in reproducing the morphology of the inner Crab nebula showing a jet, torus, concentric wisps and a variable knot. However, these models are limited to a purely toroidal field geometry which leads to an exaggerated compression of the termination shock and polar jet — in contrast to the observations. In three dimensions, the toroidal field structure is susceptible to current driven instabilities; hence kink instability and magnetic dissipation govern the dynamics of the nebula flow. This leads to a resolution of the sigma-problem once also the pulsar's obliqueness (striped wind) is taken into account. In addition, we present polarized synchrotron maps constructed from the 3D simulations, showing the wealth of morphological features reproduced in 2D is preserved in the 3D case.

  19. FLOCK provides reliable solutions to the "number of populations" problem.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Pierre; Turgeon, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Identifying groups of individuals forming coherent genetic clusters is relevant to many fields of biology. This paper addresses the K-partition problem: given a collection of genotypes, partition those genotypes into K groups, each group being a sample of the K source populations that are represented in the collection of genotypes. This problem involves allocating genotypes to genetic groups while building those groups at the same time without the use of any other a priori information. FLOCK is a non-Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm that uses an iterative method to partition a collection of genotypes into k groups. Rules to estimate K are formulated and their validity firmly established by running simulations under several migration rates, migration regimes, number of loci, and values of K. FLOCK tended to build clusters largely consistent with the source samples. The performance of FLOCK was also compared with that of STRUCTURE and BAPS. FLOCK provided more accurate allocations to clusters and more reliable estimates of K; it also ran much faster than STRUCTURE. FLOCK is based on an entirely novel approach and provides a true alternative to the existing, MCMC based, algorithms. FLOCK v.2.0 for microsatellites or for AFLP markers can be downloaded from http://www.bio.ulaval.ca/no_cache/departement/professeurs/fiche_des_professeurs/professeur/11/13/. PMID:22615162

  20. Photoreceptor twist: a solution to the false-color problem.

    PubMed Central

    Wehner, R; Bernard, G D

    1993-01-01

    In bees and many other insects the majority of photoreceptors are twisted like a corkscrew. Here we show that this structural feature of insect eyes-whose very existence was a source of dispute for several years-is necessary for reliable encoding of information about color. Light reflected from waxy plant surfaces is partially linearly polarized. Moreover, insect photoreceptor membranes are dichroic and thus sensitive to the polarized glare originating from plant surfaces. Taken together, these two phenomena create a serious false-color problem: in the bee's trichromatic color vision system, the color values of a particular part of a plant could be affected not only by the spectral but also by the polarization properties of the reflecting surface. As demonstrated by spectroscopic measurements and optical analyses, the hue of color of a given surface of a plant would change dramatically with the direction of illumination and the bee's line of sight, if the bee possessed straight and thus highly "polarization-sensitive" photoreceptors. However, this false-color problem is overcome completely in photoreceptors that are twisted by exactly the amount we have found to occur in the worker-bee's eye. PMID:11607379

  1. Problems and Their Solutions in Genetic Counseling Education in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kohzaki, Hidetsugu

    2014-01-01

    With the expansion of novel chromosome testing, a career as a certified genetic counselor has been gathering a lot of attention. However, few people certified as a genetic counselor after completing postgraduate courses are able to find employment as a genetic counselor, and their salaries are quite low. It is also questionable whether or not such newly graduated genetic counselors, who have limited life experience and knowledge, can fully understand family issues and properly perform counseling sessions. To address these issues, a wide range of education and training may be necessary. In this study, we examined current problems in genetic counseling education in Japan, and proposed effective measures to address these problems. Toward creating a new society, we are currently establishing a national qualification system and cultivating qualified professionals capable of providing patients with accurate information on chromosome and genetic testing. In addition, these professionals could encourage younger generations to have an interest in genetic counseling. I also hope that these professionals will work not only in Japan but all over the world. PMID:25121085

  2. On uniqueness of quasi-regular solutions to Protter problem for Keldish type equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristov, T. D.; Popivanov, N. I.; Schneider, M.

    2013-12-01

    Some three-dimensional boundary value problems for mixed type equations of second kind are studied. Such type problems, but for mixed type equations of first kind are stated by M. Protter in the fifties. For hyperbolic-elliptic equations they are multidimensional analogue of the classical two-dimensional Morawetz-Guderley transonic problem. For hyperbolic and weakly hyperbolic equations the Protter problems are 3D analogues of Darboux or Cauchy-Goursat plane problems. In this case, in contrast of well-posedness of 2D problems, the new problems are strongly ill-posed. In this paper are given similar statement of Protter problems for equations of Keldish type, involving lower order terms. It is shown that the new problems are also ill-posed. A notion of quasi-regular solution is given and sufficient conditions for uniqueness of such solutions are found. The dependence of lower order terms is also studied.

  3. Problem Definition and Solution Concept for En Route Constrained Airspace Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven; Vivona, Robert

    2000-01-01

    NASA's AATT Program is investigating potential ground-based decision support tool (DST) development for en route controllers and managers. NASA's previous work in en route DST development has focused on Transition airspace, where aircraft are impacted by constraints associated with the transition of aircraft from en route to terminal airspace. This paper investigates the problems associated with aircraft in non-transitional en route airspace, termed Constrained Airspace. A literature search was performed to catalog previously identified constrained airspace problems. The results of this search were investigated with industry representatives to validate these problems were significant in constrained airspace. Three general problem areas were identified. The first problem area involves negative impacts caused by a loss of airspace (e.g., activation of Special Use Airspace (SUA), weather cell formation, and overloaded sectors). The second problem area is the lack of identifying and taking advantage of gained airspace (e.g., SUA deactivation, weather dissipation, and sector loading reductions). The third problem area is unforeseen negative impacts caused by the acceptance of user routing requests (e.g., a route change into an area of congestion that negated the users intended benefit). Based upon the problems identified, an operational concept was developed for a DST to help handle these problems efficiently. The goal is to strategically identify constrained airspace problems and to provide functionality to support ARTCC TMUs in resolving the identified impacts. The capability lends itself well to TMU and Airline Operations Center (AOC) collaboration.

  4. Similarity solution for the flow behind a shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux in magnetogasdynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of a spherical (or cylindrical) shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux, in the presence of a spacially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field, driven out by a moving piston is investigated. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. The shock wave moves with variable velocity and the total energy of the wave is non-constant. Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow-field behind the shock and the effects of variation of the heat transfer parameters, the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas, both, decreases the compressibility of the gas and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. Further, it is investigated that with an increase in the parameters of radiative and conductive heat transfer the tendency of formation of maxima in the distributions of heat flux, density and isothermal speed of sound decreases. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is form at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion, chemical detonation, rupture of a pressurized vessels, in the analysis of data from exploding wire experiments, and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or reentry vehicles, etc. The findings of the present works provided a clear picture of whether and how the non-idealness parameter, conductive and radiative heat transfer parameters and the magnetic field affect the flow behind the shock

  5. On relative periodic solutions of the planar general three-body problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broucke, R.

    1975-01-01

    We describe two relatively simple reductions to order 6 for the planar general three-body problem. We also show that this reduction leads to the distinction between two types of periodic solutions: absolute or relative periodic solutions. An algorithm for obtaining relative periodic solutions using heliocentric coordinates is then described. It is concluded from the periodicity conditions that relative periodic solutions must form families with a single parameter. Finally, two such families have been obtained numerically and are described in some detail.

  6. On solutions of mixed boundary-value problems for the elasticity system in unbounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matevossian, H. A.

    2003-10-01

    We study the properties of generalized solutions of mixed boundary-value problems for the linear system of elasticity theory in the exterior of a compact set and in a half-space under the assumption that the energy integral with weight \\vert x\\vert^a is finite for such solutions. Depending on the value of the parameter a, a uniqueness criterion is established for these solutions, and exact formulae are obtained for the dimension of the space of solutions.

  7. {open_quotes}Open vessel{close_quotes} heat balance for TBP-nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; Cavin, W.S.; Laurinat, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Heat balances were performed for both single phase (organic) and two phase (organic and aqueous) TBP/HNO{sub 3} solutions at temperatures above 100{degrees}C. The balance included the heat produced from oxidation minus losses from evaporation and butylnitrate formation by esterification. Net heat measurements were performed using an isothermal calorimeter. Losses from evaporation were determined from the volume of condensate produced (ice bath trap) and the component concentrate Carbon and nitrogen balances were performed to determine the stoichiometry of the reaction. The heat from oxidation was then calculated using the heats of formation of the reactants and products. Balances were obtained assuming that the heat from esterification was near zero (negligibly small). For two layered reaction systems the net heat was maintained endothermic, and constant with time, due to the transport of water to the organic phase by bubble mixing at the interface. This transported was replaced the water lost in the organic phase by evaporation.

  8. A serious problem of the heated thermocouple flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Satoh, M; Kumada, K; Tsunekawa, K; Soma, T

    1980-09-01

    In the measurement of regional blood flow with heated thermocouple flowmeter, we frequently observed puzzling phenomenon that the measured values were augmented while the flow was actually diminished and vice versa (Inversion). "Inversion" was directly attrebutable to the structure of the thermocouple probe. A countermeasure against "Inversion" was found to lie in the arrangement of the hot junction in the center of the heater, and in practical application, it must be checked by stopping the flow at each measurement. Overcoming this technical liability should pave the way for a marked improvement in the reliability of this method which, despite possessing many excellent characteristics for determining regional blood flow, is not widely used.

  9. An iterative transformation procedure for numerical solution of flutter and similar characteristics-value problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gossard, Myron L

    1952-01-01

    An iterative transformation procedure suggested by H. Wielandt for numerical solution of flutter and similar characteristic-value problems is presented. Application of this procedure to ordinary natural-vibration problems and to flutter problems is shown by numerical examples. Comparisons of computed results with experimental values and with results obtained by other methods of analysis are made.

  10. An Analysis of Diagram Modification and Construction in Students' Solutions to Applied Calculus Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bremigan, Elizabeth George

    2005-01-01

    In the study reported here, I examined the diagrams that mathematically capable high school students produced in solving applied calculus problems in which a diagram was provided in the problem statement. Analyses of the diagrams contained in written solutions to selected free-response problems from the 1996 BC level Advanced Placement Calculus…

  11. The problems of antibiotic resistance in cystic fibrosis and solutions.

    PubMed

    López-Causapé, Carla; Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Macià, María D; Oliver, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Chronic respiratory infection is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. One of the hallmarks of these infections, led by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is their long-term (lifelong) persistence despite intensive antimicrobial therapy. Antimicrobial resistance in CF is indeed a multifactorial problem, which includes physiological changes, represented by the transition from the planktonic to the biofilm mode of growth and the acquisition of multiple (antibiotic resistance) adaptive mutations catalyzed by frequent mutator phenotypes. Emerging multidrug-resistant CF pathogens, transmissible epidemic strains and transferable genetic elements (such as those encoding class B carbapenemases) also significantly contribute to this concerning scenario. Strategies directed to combat biofilm growth, prevent the emergence of mutational resistance, promote the development of novel antimicrobial agents against multidrug-resistant strains and implement strict infection control measures are thus needed. PMID:25541089

  12. Fiberglass sucker rods - a futuristic solution to today's problem wells

    SciTech Connect

    Treadway, R.B.; Focazio, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    A new fiberglass sucker rod design was developed, which incorporated many new and major modifications to correct the problems that had plagued the previous rod. This paper documents the success of these rods in depths ranging from 5,000'-10,000', and production ranges of 150 - 700 barrels of fluid per day. In addition, Amoco had also installed over fifty strings of fiberglass rods in their other four West Texas and Eastern New Mexico districts, and several are being evaluated in East Texas and on the Gulf Coast. At the present time, all of these additional installations show the same success as those reported in this paper. The changes in the manufacturing process, the use of a computer program for performance prediction, and the development of a new load range diagram are also discussed. Final data indicate that, when designed and installed properly, fiberglass sucker rods are a viable, economic, and often preferable alternative to steel sucker rods.

  13. Alternate solution to a discrete car parking problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texter, John

    1989-11-01

    A few years ago, P. J. Flory [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 61, 1518 (1939)] solved a statistical problem analogous to determining the random-irreversible saturation formation of a 1×2 overlayer on a linear n lattice, by deriving an expression for the fraction of empty lattice points. Methods are presented here for both the enumeration and construction of saturation configurations. This alternate approach is derived from the theory of partitions and incorporates shift and sum-rule operators for the calculation of configurational probabilities. The fraction of filled lattice points is evaluated, and the configurational probabilities provide distribution functions for saturation configurations having different saturation levels (for fixed n). These distribution functions can be used to calculate sequence selective properties in addition to average saturation levels. Applications are illustrated in the analysis of the randomness of dehydrochlorination of polyvinylchloride and the distribution of UV-induced cyclobutyl-thymine dimers in Tetrahymena pyriformis DNA.

  14. Solution of the Traffic Jam Problem through Fuzzy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Shery

    2010-11-01

    The major hurdle of a city planning council is to handle the traffic jam problem. The number of vehicles on roads increases day by day. Also the number of vehicles is directly proportional to the width of the road (including that of parallel roads). But it is not always possible to make roads or to increase width of the road corresponding to the increase in the number of vehicles. Also we cannot tell a person not to buy a vehicle. So trying to minimise the traffic jam is the only possible way to overcome this hurdle. Here we try to develop a method to avoid traffic jam through a mathematical approach (through fuzzy applications). This method helps to find a suitable route from an origin to a destination with lesser time than other routes.

  15. Solutions to problems of weathering in Antarctic eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strait, Melissa M.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was performed for major and trace elements on a suite of eucrites from both Antarctic and non-Antarctic sources. The chemistry was examined to see if there was an easy way to distinguish Antarctic eucrites that had been disturbed in their trace elements systematics from those that had normal abundances relative to non-Antarctic eucrites. There was no simple correlation found, and identifying the disturbed meteorites still remains a problem. In addition, a set of mineral separates from an eucrite were analyzed. The results showed no abnormalities in the chemistry and provides a possible way to use Antarctic eucrites that were disturbed in modelling of the eucrite parent body.

  16. Bacteriocins: Novel Solutions to Age Old Spore-Related Problems?

    PubMed

    Egan, Kevin; Field, Des; Rea, Mary C; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin; Cotter, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides produced by bacteria, which have the ability to kill or inhibit other bacteria. Many bacteriocins are produced by food grade lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Indeed, the prototypic bacteriocin, nisin, is produced by Lactococcus lactis, and is licensed in over 50 countries. With consumers becoming more concerned about the levels of chemical preservatives present in food, bacteriocins offer an alternative, more natural approach, while ensuring both food safety and product shelf life. Bacteriocins also show additive/synergistic effects when used in combination with other treatments, such as heating, high pressure, organic compounds, and as part of food packaging. These features are particularly attractive from the perspective of controlling sporeforming bacteria. Bacterial spores are common contaminants of food products, and their outgrowth may cause food spoilage or food-borne illness. They are of particular concern to the food industry due to their thermal and chemical resistance in their dormant state. However, when spores germinate they lose the majority of their resistance traits, making them susceptible to a variety of food processing treatments. Bacteriocins represent one potential treatment as they may inhibit spores in the post-germination/outgrowth phase of the spore cycle. Spore eradication and control in food is critical, as they are able to spoil and in certain cases compromise the safety of food by producing dangerous toxins. Thus, understanding the mechanisms by which bacteriocins exert their sporostatic/sporicidal activity against bacterial spores will ultimately facilitate their optimal use in food. This review will focus on the use of bacteriocins alone, or in combination with other innovative processing methods to control spores in food, the current knowledge and gaps therein with regard to bacteriocin-spore interactions and discuss future research approaches to enable spores to be more

  17. Bacteriocins: Novel Solutions to Age Old Spore-Related Problems?

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Kevin; Field, Des; Rea, Mary C.; Ross, R. Paul; Hill, Colin; Cotter, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides produced by bacteria, which have the ability to kill or inhibit other bacteria. Many bacteriocins are produced by food grade lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Indeed, the prototypic bacteriocin, nisin, is produced by Lactococcus lactis, and is licensed in over 50 countries. With consumers becoming more concerned about the levels of chemical preservatives present in food, bacteriocins offer an alternative, more natural approach, while ensuring both food safety and product shelf life. Bacteriocins also show additive/synergistic effects when used in combination with other treatments, such as heating, high pressure, organic compounds, and as part of food packaging. These features are particularly attractive from the perspective of controlling sporeforming bacteria. Bacterial spores are common contaminants of food products, and their outgrowth may cause food spoilage or food-borne illness. They are of particular concern to the food industry due to their thermal and chemical resistance in their dormant state. However, when spores germinate they lose the majority of their resistance traits, making them susceptible to a variety of food processing treatments. Bacteriocins represent one potential treatment as they may inhibit spores in the post-germination/outgrowth phase of the spore cycle. Spore eradication and control in food is critical, as they are able to spoil and in certain cases compromise the safety of food by producing dangerous toxins. Thus, understanding the mechanisms by which bacteriocins exert their sporostatic/sporicidal activity against bacterial spores will ultimately facilitate their optimal use in food. This review will focus on the use of bacteriocins alone, or in combination with other innovative processing methods to control spores in food, the current knowledge and gaps therein with regard to bacteriocin-spore interactions and discuss future research approaches to enable spores to be more

  18. Closed-form analytical solutions of high-temperature heat pipe startup and frozen startup limitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Y.; Faghri, A.

    1992-01-01

    Previous numerical and experimental studies indicate that the high-temperature heat pipe startup process is characterized by a moving hot zone with relatively sharp fronts. Based on the above observation, a flat-front model for an approximate analytical solution is proposed. A closed-form solution related to the temperature distribution in the hot zone and the hot zone length as a function of time are obtained. The analytical results agree well with the corresponding experimental data, and provide a quick prediction method for the heat pipe startup performance. Finally, a heat pipe limitation related to the frozen startup process is identified, and an explicit criterion for the high-temperature heat pipe startup is derived. The frozen startup limit identified in this paper provides a fundamental guidance for high-temperature heat pipe design.

  19. A sensor array is the solution to the CBRNE problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaby, James A.

    2004-11-01

    Chemical/Biological/Radiological/Nuclear/Explosives (CBRNE) is a threat to all forces that deploy to any part of the globe. Lightweight expeditionary forces are especially vulnerable because they operate with minimum force structure in or near enemy forces and may become indirect targets due to the proximity of opposing forces. There is currently no integrated tactical, agile CBRNE detect-to-warn and detect-to-treat detection system suitable for lightweight expeditionary forces. The current solutions are often outside the deployment and support constraints of expeditionary forces. Expeditionary forces, typically, require a 30-day capability without re-supply and must maximize resources. Situational awareness is limited with little or no automation. Due to the limitations in existing detectors, no detector has been found to be the magic bullet for all types of agents. An array of sensors that are redundant and overlap the capabilities of each and the limitations of each technology, on the other hand, would provide a level of security that is progressively more acceptable to the warfighter. Initially, the array will be composed of integrated commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) and government-off-the-shelf (GOTS) CBRNE samplers, identification devices, tamper sensors, and communications and alert equipment. The sensor array will plug-and-play new technologies as they become available.

  20. Cold Heat Release Characteristics of Solidified Oil Droplet-Water Solution Latent Heat Emulsion by Air Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shin-Ichi

    The present work investigates the cold heat-release characteristics of the solidified oil droplets (tetradecane, C14H30, freezing point 278.9 K)/water solution emulsion as a latent heat-storage material having a low melting point. An air bubbles-emulsion direct-contact heat exchange method is selected for the cold heat-results from the solidified oil droplet-emulsion layer. This type of direct-contact method results in the high thermal efficiency. The diameter of air bubbles in the emulsion increases as compared with that in the pure water. The air bubbles blown from a nozzle show a strong mixing behavior during rising in the emulsion. The temperature effectiveness, the sensible heat release time and the latent heat release time have been measured as experimental parameters. The useful nondimensional emulsion level equations for these parameters have been derived in terms of the nondimensional emalsion level expressed the emulsion layer dimensions, Reynolds number for air flow, Stefan number and heat capacity ratio.

  1. On a difference scheme for nonlocal heat transfer boundary-value problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhymbek, Meiram E.; Sadybekov, Makhmud A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method of solving nonlocal problems for the heat equation with finite difference method. The main important feature of these problems is their non-self-adjointness. This non-self-adjointness causes major difficulties in their analytical and numerical solving. The problems, which boundary conditions do not possess strong regularity, are less studied. The scope of study of the paper justifies possibility of building a stable difference scheme with weights for abovementioned type of problems.

  2. Integro-differential method of solving the inverse coefficient heat conduction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. L.; Zasyad'Ko, A. A.; Frolov, G. A.

    2010-03-01

    On the basis of differential transformations, a stable integro-differential method of solving the inverse heat conduction problem is suggested. The method has been tested on the example of determining the thermal diffusivity on quasi-stationary fusion and heating of a quartz glazed ceramics specimen.

  3. Analytical solution of the heat equation in a longitudinally pumped cubic solid-state laser.

    PubMed

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Nadgaran, Hamid; Mousave, Laleh

    2008-05-01

    Knowledge about the temperature distribution inside solid-state laser crystals is essential for calculation of thermal phase shift, thermal lensing, thermally induced birefringence, and heat-induced crystal bending. Solutions for the temperature distribution for the case of steady-state heat loading have appeared in the literature only for simple cylindrical crystal shapes and are usually based on numerical techniques. For the first time, to our knowledge, a full analytical solution of the heat equation for an anisotropic cubic cross-section solid-state crystal is presented. The crystal is assumed to be longitudinally pumped by a Gaussian pump profile. The pump power attenuation along the crystal and the real cooling mechanisms, such as convection, are considered in detail. A comparison between our analytical solutions and its numerical counterparts shows excellent agreement when just a few terms are employed in the series solutions.

  4. An exact closed form solution for constant area compressible flow with friction and heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturas, J. I.

    1971-01-01

    The well-known differential equation for the one-dimensional flow of a compressible fluid with heat transfer and wall friction has no known solution in closed form for the general case. This report presents a closed form solution for the special case of constant heat flux per unit length and constant specific heat. The solution was obtained by choosing the square of a dimensionless flow parameter as one of the independent variables to describe the flow. From this exact solution, an approximate simplified form is derived that is applicable for predicting subsonic flow performance characteristics for many types of constant area passages in internal flow. The data included in this report are considered sufficiently accurate for use as a guide in analyzing and designing internal gas flow systems.

  5. Analytical solution of the heat equation in a longitudinally pumped cubic solid-state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Nadgaran, Hamid; Mousave, Laleh

    2008-05-01

    Knowledge about the temperature distribution inside solid-state laser crystals is essential for calculation of thermal phase shift, thermal lensing, thermally induced birefringence, and heat-induced crystal bending. Solutions for the temperature distribution for the case of steady-state heat loading have appeared in the literature only for simple cylindrical crystal shapes and are usually based on numerical techniques. For the first time, to our knowledge, a full analytical solution of the heat equation for an anisotropic cubic cross-section solid-state crystal is presented. The crystal is assumed to be longitudinally pumped by a Gaussian pump profile. The pump power attenuation along the crystal and the real cooling mechanisms, such as convection, are considered in detail. A comparison between our analytical solutions and its numerical counterparts shows excellent agreement when just a few terms are employed in the series solutions.

  6. Response of a stably stratified atmosphere to low-level heating - An application to the heat island problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baik, Jong-Jin

    1992-01-01

    Two-dimensional airflow characteristics past a heat island are investigated using both a linear analytic model and a nonlinear numerical model in the context of the response of a stably stratified atmosphere to specified low-level heating in a constant shear flow. Results from the steady-state, linear, analytic solutions exhibit typical flow response fields that gravity waves produce in response to the local heat source in the presence of environmental flow. The magnitude of the perturbation vertical velocity is shown to be much larger in the shear-flow case than in the uniform-flow case. Two distinct flow features are observed for larger heating amplitude (hence, larger nonlinearity factor): the gravity-wave-type response field on the upstream side of the heat island and the strong updraft circulation cell located on the downstream side. As the heating amplitude increases, the updraft circulation cell strengthens and shifts farther downwind. The strong updraft cell is believed to be partly responsible for precipitation enhancement observed on the downstream side of the heat island. It is found that the continuing downwind propagation of the updraft circulation cell is related to basic-state wind speed.

  7. Problems Related to Computer Ethics: Origins of the Problems and Suggested Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuzu, Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Increasing use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) help individuals to solve several everyday problems, which used to be harder, more complicated and time consuming. Even though ICTs provide individuals with many advantages, they might also serve as grounds for several societal and ethical problems which vary in accordance with…

  8. Development of Schema Knowledge in the Classroom: Effects upon Problem Representation and Problem Solution of Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Shu-Er

    Students with a semester or more of instruction often display remarkable naivety about the language that they have been studying and often prove unable to manage simple programming problems. The main purpose of this study was to create a set of problem-plan-program types for the BASIC programming language to help high school students build plans…

  9. Author identities an interoperability problem solved by a collaborative solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, D.; Czerniak, A.; Schirnick, C.

    2012-12-01

    The identity of authors and data providers is crucial for personalized interoperability. The marketplace of available identifiers is packed and the right choice is getting more and more complicated. Even though there are more then 15 different systems available there are still some under development and proposed to come up by the end of 2012 ('PubMed Central Author ID' and ORCID). Data Management on a scale beyond the size of a single research institute but on the scale of a scientific site including a university with student education program needs to tackle this problem and so did the Kiel Data Management an Infrastructure. The main problem with the identities of researchers is the quite high frequency changes in positions during a scientist life. The required system needed to be a system that already contained the potential of preregistered people with their scientific publications from other countries, institutions and organizations. Scanning the author ID marketplace brought up, that there us a high risk of additional workload to the researcher itself or the administration due to the fact that individuals need to register an ID for themselves or the chosen register is not yet big enough to simply find the right entry. On the other hand libraries deal with authors and their publications now for centuries and they have high quality catalogs with person identities already available. Millions of records internationally mapped are available by collaboration with libraries and can be used in exactly the same scope. The international collaboration between libraries (VIAF) provides a mapping between libraries from the US, CA, UK, FR, GER and many more. The international library author identification system made it possible to actually reach at the first matching a success of 60% of all scientists. The additional advantage is that librarians can finalize the Identity system in a kind of background process. The Kiel Data Management Infrastructure initiated a web service

  10. Relationships between undergraduates' argumentation skills, conceptual quality of problem solutions, and problem solving strategies in introductory physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebello, Carina M.

    This study explored the effects of alternative forms of argumentation on undergraduates' physics solutions in introductory calculus-based physics. A two-phase concurrent mixed methods design was employed to investigate relationships between undergraduates' written argumentation abilities, conceptual quality of problem solutions, as well as approaches and strategies for solving argumentative physics problems across multiple physics topics. Participants were assigned via stratified sampling to one of three conditions (control, guided construct, or guided evaluate) based on gender and pre-test scores on a conceptual instrument. The guided construct and guided evaluate groups received tasks and prompts drawn from literature to facilitate argument construction or evaluation. Using a multiple case study design, with each condition serving as a case, interviews were conducted consisting of a think-aloud problem solving session paired with a semi-structured interview. The analysis of problem solving strategies was guided by the theoretical framework on epistemic games adapted by Tuminaro and Redish (2007). This study provides empirical evidence that integration of written argumentation into physics problems can potentially improve the conceptual quality of solutions, expand their repertoire of problem solving strategies and show promise for addressing the gender gap in physics. The study suggests further avenues for research in this area and implications for designing and implementing argumentation tasks in introductory college physics.

  11. Solution accelerators for large scale 3D electromagnetic inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Gregory A.; Boggs, Paul T.

    2004-04-05

    We provide a framework for preconditioning nonlinear 3D electromagnetic inverse scattering problems using nonlinear conjugate gradient (NLCG) and limited memory (LM) quasi-Newton methods. Key to our approach is the use of an approximate adjoint method that allows for an economical approximation of the Hessian that is updated at each inversion iteration. Using this approximate Hessian as a preconditoner, we show that the preconditioned NLCG iteration converges significantly faster than the non-preconditioned iteration, as well as converging to a data misfit level below that observed for the non-preconditioned method. Similar conclusions are also observed for the LM iteration; preconditioned with the approximate Hessian, the LM iteration converges faster than the non-preconditioned version. At this time, however, we see little difference between the convergence performance of the preconditioned LM scheme and the preconditioned NLCG scheme. A possible reason for this outcome is the behavior of the line search within the LM iteration. It was anticipated that, near convergence, a step size of one would be approached, but what was observed, instead, were step lengths that were nowhere near one. We provide some insights into the reasons for this behavior and suggest further research that may improve the performance of the LM methods.

  12. Animal and human innovation: novel problems and novel solutions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This theme issue explores how and why behavioural innovation occurs, and the consequences of innovation for individuals, groups and populations. A vast literature on human innovation exists, from the development of problem-solving in children, to the evolution of technology, to the cultural systems supporting innovation. A more recent development is a growing literature on animal innovation, which has demonstrated links between innovation and personality traits, cognitive traits, neural measures, changing conditions, and the current state of the social and physical environment. Here, we introduce these fields, define key terms and discuss the potential for fruitful exchange between the diverse fields researching innovation. Comparisons of innovation between human and non-human animals provide opportunities, but also pitfalls. We also summarize some key findings specifying the circumstances in which innovation occurs, discussing factors such as the intrinsic nature of innovative individuals and the environmental and socio-ecological conditions that promote innovation, such as necessity, opportunity and free resources. We also highlight key controversies, including the relationship between innovation and intelligence, and the notion of innovativeness as an individual-level trait. Finally, we discuss current research methods and suggest some novel approaches that could fruitfully be deployed. PMID:26926273

  13. Animal and human innovation: novel problems and novel solutions.

    PubMed

    Reader, Simon M; Morand-Ferron, Julie; Flynn, Emma

    2016-03-19

    This theme issue explores how and why behavioural innovation occurs, and the consequences of innovation for individuals, groups and populations. A vast literature on human innovation exists, from the development of problem-solving in children, to the evolution of technology, to the cultural systems supporting innovation. A more recent development is a growing literature on animal innovation, which has demonstrated links between innovation and personality traits, cognitive traits, neural measures, changing conditions, and the current state of the social and physical environment. Here, we introduce these fields, define key terms and discuss the potential for fruitful exchange between the diverse fields researching innovation. Comparisons of innovation between human and non-human animals provide opportunities, but also pitfalls. We also summarize some key findings specifying the circumstances in which innovation occurs, discussing factors such as the intrinsic nature of innovative individuals and the environmental and socio-ecological conditions that promote innovation, such as necessity, opportunity and free resources. We also highlight key controversies, including the relationship between innovation and intelligence, and the notion of innovativeness as an individual-level trait. Finally, we discuss current research methods and suggest some novel approaches that could fruitfully be deployed.

  14. A laser-based solution to industrial decontamination problems

    SciTech Connect

    Edelson, M.C.; Pang, Ho-ming; Ferguson, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    The ability of lasers to deposit significant amounts of energy on surfaces located at large distances from the laser can be exploited to solve very difficult industrial problems. The Ames Laboratory has been working in partnership with Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies (LMIT) to apply laser technologies to the decontamination of radioactively contaminated surfaces located in hostile environments. Many such applications exist within former USDOE and nuclear industry facilities. As opposed to laser coating removal systems, which are designed to ``strip`` relatively soft coatings from a substrate without damage to the substrate, the system being developed by Ames - LMIT is designed to remove contaminants that are embedded within the metal surface itself. The system generates irradiance levels sufficient to remove microns of metal from a surface and an off-gas system that prevents the redeposition of materials removed from the surface. Process control is assisted by monitoring the laser-generated plasma produced during laser surface ablation. Results achieved using this apparatus for various metal types will be presented along with a discussion of other potential industrial applications.

  15. Light Particle Solution to the Cosmic Lithium Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudelis, Andreas; Pospelov, Maxim; Pradler, Josef

    2016-05-01

    We point out that the cosmological abundance of 7Li can be reduced down to observed values if during its formation, big bang nucleosynthesis is modified by the presence of light electrically neutral particles X that have substantial interactions with nucleons. We find that the lithium problem can be solved without affecting the precisely measured abundances of deuterium and helium if the following conditions are satisfied: the mass (energy) and lifetimes of such particles are bounded by 1.6 MeV ≤mX(EX)≤20 MeV and few 100 s ≲τX≲104 s , and the abundance times the absorption cross section by either deuterium or 7Be are comparable to the Hubble rate, nXσabsv ˜H , at the time of 7Be formation. We include X -initiated reactions into the primordial nucleosynthesis framework, observe that it leads to a substantial reduction of the freeze-out abundances of 7Li + 7Be, and find specific model realizations of this scenario. Concentrating on the axionlike-particle case, X =a , we show that all these conditions can be satisfied if the coupling to d quarks is in the range of fd-1˜TeV-1 , which can be probed at intensity frontier experiments.

  16. Light Particle Solution to the Cosmic Lithium Problem.

    PubMed

    Goudelis, Andreas; Pospelov, Maxim; Pradler, Josef

    2016-05-27

    We point out that the cosmological abundance of ^{7}Li can be reduced down to observed values if during its formation, big bang nucleosynthesis is modified by the presence of light electrically neutral particles X that have substantial interactions with nucleons. We find that the lithium problem can be solved without affecting the precisely measured abundances of deuterium and helium if the following conditions are satisfied: the mass (energy) and lifetimes of such particles are bounded by 1.6  MeV≤m_{X}(E_{X})≤20  MeV and few100s≲τ_{X}≲10^{4}  s, and the abundance times the absorption cross section by either deuterium or ^{7}Be are comparable to the Hubble rate, n_{X}σ_{abs}v∼H, at the time of ^{7}Be formation. We include X-initiated reactions into the primordial nucleosynthesis framework, observe that it leads to a substantial reduction of the freeze-out abundances of ^{7}Li+^{7}Be, and find specific model realizations of this scenario. Concentrating on the axionlike-particle case, X=a, we show that all these conditions can be satisfied if the coupling to d quarks is in the range of f_{d}^{-1}∼TeV^{-1}, which can be probed at intensity frontier experiments. PMID:27284644

  17. Animal and human innovation: novel problems and novel solutions.

    PubMed

    Reader, Simon M; Morand-Ferron, Julie; Flynn, Emma

    2016-03-19

    This theme issue explores how and why behavioural innovation occurs, and the consequences of innovation for individuals, groups and populations. A vast literature on human innovation exists, from the development of problem-solving in children, to the evolution of technology, to the cultural systems supporting innovation. A more recent development is a growing literature on animal innovation, which has demonstrated links between innovation and personality traits, cognitive traits, neural measures, changing conditions, and the current state of the social and physical environment. Here, we introduce these fields, define key terms and discuss the potential for fruitful exchange between the diverse fields researching innovation. Comparisons of innovation between human and non-human animals provide opportunities, but also pitfalls. We also summarize some key findings specifying the circumstances in which innovation occurs, discussing factors such as the intrinsic nature of innovative individuals and the environmental and socio-ecological conditions that promote innovation, such as necessity, opportunity and free resources. We also highlight key controversies, including the relationship between innovation and intelligence, and the notion of innovativeness as an individual-level trait. Finally, we discuss current research methods and suggest some novel approaches that could fruitfully be deployed. PMID:26926273

  18. Conversion disorder: current problems and potential solutions for DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon; LaFrance, W Curt; Brown, Richard; Spiegel, David; Levenson, James L; Sharpe, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Conversion disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) describes neurological symptoms, including weakness, numbness and events resembling epilepsy or syncope, which can be positively identified as not being due to recognised neurological disease. This review combines perspectives from psychiatry, psychology and neurology to identify and discuss key problems with the current diagnostic DSM-IV criteria for conversion disorder and to make the following proposals for DSM-5: (a) abandoning the label "conversion disorder" and replacing it with an alternative term that is both theoretically neutral and potentially more acceptable to patients and practitioners; (b) relegating the requirements for "association of psychological factors" and the "exclusion of feigning" to the accompanying text; (c) adding a criterion requiring clinical findings of internal inconsistency or incongruity with recognised neurological or medical disease and altering the current 'disease exclusion' criteria to one in which the symptom must not be 'better explained' by a disease if present, (d) adding a 'cognitive symptoms' subtype. We also discuss whether conversion symptoms are better classified with other somatic symptom disorders or with dissociative disorders and how we might address the potential heterogeneity of conversion symptoms in classification.

  19. Mechanical solution for a mechanical problem: Tennis elbow

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Lateral epicondylitis is a relatively common clinical problem, easily recognized on palpation of the lateral protuberance on the elbow. Despite the “itis” suffix, it is not an inflammatory process. Therapeutic approaches with topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids and anesthetics have limited benefit, as would be expected if inflammation is not involved. Other approaches have included provision of healing cytokines from blood products or stem cells, based on the recognition that this repetitive effort-derived disorder represents injury. Noting calcification/ossification of tendon attachments to the lateral epicondyle (enthesitis), dry needling, radiofrequency, shock wave treatments and surgical approaches have also been pursued. Physiologic approaches, including manipulation, therapeutic ultrasound, phonophoresis, iontophoresis, acupuncture and exposure of the area to low level laser light, has also had limited success. This contrasts with the benefit of a simple mechanical intervention, reducing the stress on the attachment area. This is based on displacement of the stress by use of a thin (3/4-1 inch) band applied just distal to the epicondyle. Thin bands are required, as thick bands (e.g., 2-3 inch wide) simply reduce muscle strength, without significantly reducing stress. This approach appears to be associated with a failure rate less than 1%, assuming the afflicted individual modifies the activity that repeatedly stresses the epicondylar attachments. PMID:23878775

  20. Flow and heat transfer characteristics of drag reducing surfactant solution in a helically coiled pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Aly, Wael I. A.; Haruki, Naoto; Horibe, Akihiko

    2005-08-01

    The reduction characteristic of turbulent drag and heat transfer of drag reduction surfactant solution flowing in a helically coiled pipe were experimentally investigated. The drag reduction surfactant used in the present study was the amine oxide type nonionic surfactant of oleyldihydroxyethylamineoxide (ODEAO, C22H45NO3=371). The zwitterion surfactant of cetyldimethylaminoaciticacidbetaine (CDMB, C20H41NO2=327) was added by 10% to the ODEAO solution in order to avoid the chemical degradation of ODEAO by ionic impurities in a test tape water. The experiments of flow drag and heat transfer reduction were carried out in the helically coiled pipe of coil to pipe diameter ratio of 37.5 and the helically coiled pipe length to pipe diameter of 1180.5 (pipe diameter of 14.4 mm) at various concentrations, temperatures and flow velocities of the ODEAO surfactant solution. The ODEAO solution showed a non-Newtonian behavior at high concentration of the ODEAO. From the experimental results, it was observed that the friction factor of the ODEAO surfactant solution flowing through the coiled pipe was decreased to a great extent in comparison with water as a Newtonian fluid in the turbulent flow region. Heat transfer measurements for water and the ODEAO solution were performed in both laminar and turbulent flow regions under the uniform heat flux boundary condition. The heat transfer coefficients for the ODEAO solution flow were the same as water flow in the laminar region. On the other hand, heat transfer reduction of the ODEAO solution flow was remarkedly reduced as compared with that of the water flow in the turbulent flow region.

  1. Exploiting special problem structure when reliably investigating the solution of systems of IVPs and DDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, W. H.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years we have developed a class of reliable order p methods for the approximate solution of general systems of initial value problems (IVPs) and delay differential equations (DDEs). In the theoretical analysis of these methods we have identified several trade-offs that do arise and have to be addressed when applying these methods to problems that exhibit special structure. Similar trade-offs also arise when one is concerned with investigating other important properties of the solutions. We will give examples of such trade-offs that arise when investigating the sensitivities of the solutions, and when very accurate approximate solutions are required.

  2. Active Solution Space and Search on Job-shop Scheduling Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masato; Ida, Kenichi; Gen, Mitsuo

    In this paper we propose a new searching method of Genetic Algorithm for Job-shop scheduling problem (JSP). The coding method that represent job number in order to decide a priority to arrange a job to Gannt Chart (called the ordinal representation with a priority) in JSP, an active schedule is created by using left shift. We define an active solution at first. It is solution which can create an active schedule without using left shift, and set of its defined an active solution space. Next, we propose an algorithm named Genetic Algorithm with active solution space search (GA-asol) which can create an active solution while solution is evaluated, in order to search the active solution space effectively. We applied it for some benchmark problems to compare with other method. The experimental results show good performance.

  3. A transportronic solution to the problem of interorbital transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, William C.

    1992-01-01

    An all-electronic transportation system described by the term 'transportronics' is examined as a means of solving the current problem of the high cost of transporting material from low-Earth orbit (LEO) to geostationary orbit (GEO). In this transportation system, low cost electric energy at the surface of the Earth is efficiently converted into microwave power which is then efficiently formed into a narrow beam which is kept incident upon the orbital transfer vehicles (OTV's) by electronic tracking. The incident beam is efficiently captured and converted into DC power by a device which has a very high ratio of DC power output to its mass. Because the mass of the electric thruster is also low, the resulting acceleration is unprecedented for electric-propelled vehicles. However, the performance of the system in terms of transit times from LEO to GEO is penalized by the short time of contact between the beam and the vehicle in low-Earth orbits. This makes it necessary to place the Earth based transmitters and the vehicles in the equatorial plane thus introducing many geopolitical factors. Technically, however, such a system as described in the report may out-perform any other approach to transportation in the LEO to GEO regime. The report describes and analyzes all portions of the beamed microwave power transmission system in considerable detail. An economic analysis of the operating and capital costs is made with the aid of a reference system capable of placing about 130,000 kilograms of payload into GEO each year. More mature states of the system are then examined, to a level in which 60,000 metric tons per year could be placed into GEO.

  4. FCL: A solution to fault current problems in DC networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cointe, Y.; Tixador, P.; Villard, C.

    2008-02-01

    Within the context of the electric power market liberalization, DC networks have many interests compared to AC ones. New energy landscapes open the way of a diversified production. Innovative interconnection diagrams, in particular using DC buses, are under development. In this case it is not possible to defer the fault current interruption in the AC side. DC fault current cutting remains a difficult problem. FCLs (Fault Current Limiters) enable to limit the current to a preset value, lower than the theoretical short-circuit current. For this application Coated Conductors (CC) offer an excellent opportunity. Due to these promising characteristics we build a test bench and work on the implementation of these materials. The test bench is composed by 10 power amplifiers, to reach 4 kVA in many configurations of current and voltage. We carried out limiting experiments on DyBaCuO CC from EHTS, samples are about five centimeters long and many potential measuring points are pasted on the shunt to estimate the quench homogeneity. Thermal phenomena in FCLs are essential, numerical models are important to calculate the maximum temperatures. To validate these models we measure the CC temperature by depositing thermal sensors (Cu resistance) above the shunt layer and the substrate. An electrical insulation with a low thermal resistivity between the CC and the sensors is necessary. We use a thin layer of Parylene because of its good mechanical and electrical insulation properties at low temperature. The better quench behaviour of CC for temperatures close to the critical temperature has been confirmed. The measurements are in good agreement with simulations, this validates the thermal models.

  5. Natural gas production problems : solutions, methodologies, and modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Herrin, James M.; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Basinski, Paul M.; Olsson, William Arthur; Arnold, Bill Walter; Broadhead, Ronald F.; Knight, Connie D.; Keefe, Russell G.; McKinney, Curt; Holm, Gus; Holland, John F.; Larson, Rich; Engler, Thomas W.; Lorenz, John Clay

    2004-10-01

    Natural gas is a clean fuel that will be the most important domestic energy resource for the first half the 21st centtuy. Ensuring a stable supply is essential for our national energy security. The research we have undertaken will maximize the extractable volume of gas while minimizing the environmental impact of surface disturbances associated with drilling and production. This report describes a methodology for comprehensive evaluation and modeling of the total gas system within a basin focusing on problematic horizontal fluid flow variability. This has been accomplished through extensive use of geophysical, core (rock sample) and outcrop data to interpret and predict directional flow and production trends. Side benefits include reduced environmental impact of drilling due to reduced number of required wells for resource extraction. These results have been accomplished through a cooperative and integrated systems approach involving industry, government, academia and a multi-organizational team within Sandia National Laboratories. Industry has provided essential in-kind support to this project in the forms of extensive core data, production data, maps, seismic data, production analyses, engineering studies, plus equipment and staff for obtaining geophysical data. This approach provides innovative ideas and technologies to bring new resources to market and to reduce the overall environmental impact of drilling. More importantly, the products of this research are not be location specific but can be extended to other areas of gas production throughout the Rocky Mountain area. Thus this project is designed to solve problems associated with natural gas production at developing sites, or at old sites under redevelopment.

  6. Problems of hearing impaired children and suggested solutions.

    PubMed

    Prasad, B

    1992-01-01

    Factors related to development of verbal skills in hearing-impaired children include early diagnosis, early age of obtaining hearing aids, and early intervention. The development of speech occurs in the first 2 years of one's life. In addition to the hearing aid the child should also get early stimulation and training by parents and professionals toward developing speech and language. The hearing-impaired child is likely to get the benefit of a hearing aid only if it amplifies sound in accordance with his or her hearing loss. Proper audiological examination assesses the level of hearing loss and helps select a suitable hearing aid by conducting an aided audiogram. Parents who accept their child's problem are in a better emotional state to assist their child. The relationship between the degree of hearing impairment and development of verbal skills is analyzed by performance on the verbal section of the Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC). Analysis of WISC results showed that in a group of 24 children with severe to profound hearing loss only 12% were able to answer questions on the verbal section of WISC. These children were attending normal schools and had developed almost normal speech and language with high parental involvement. In a group of 16 children with moderate and conductive hearing loss 80% were able to deal with the verbal section. Hearing-impaired children who attend school have better prospects of receiving structured stimulation for language development. There are only 2 special schools available for 3-5 year old children in Delhi. Services could be improved by spelling out in the educational policy of training programs for teachers of hearing-impaired children that 1) the method of teaching must be decided on the basis of the hearing-impaired child's capabilities and 2) teachers must conduct proper auditory stimulation programs.

  7. A transportronic solution to the problem of interorbital transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, William C.

    1992-07-01

    An all-electronic transportation system described by the term 'transportronics' is examined as a means of solving the current problem of the high cost of transporting material from low-Earth orbit (LEO) to geostationary orbit (GEO). In this transportation system, low cost electric energy at the surface of the Earth is efficiently converted into microwave power which is then efficiently formed into a narrow beam which is kept incident upon the orbital transfer vehicles (OTV's) by electronic tracking. The incident beam is efficiently captured and converted into DC power by a device which has a very high ratio of DC power output to its mass. Because the mass of the electric thruster is also low, the resulting acceleration is unprecedented for electric-propelled vehicles. However, the performance of the system in terms of transit times from LEO to GEO is penalized by the short time of contact between the beam and the vehicle in low-Earth orbits. This makes it necessary to place the Earth based transmitters and the vehicles in the equatorial plane thus introducing many geopolitical factors. Technically, however, such a system as described in the report may out-perform any other approach to transportation in the LEO to GEO regime. The report describes and analyzes all portions of the beamed microwave power transmission system in considerable detail. An economic analysis of the operating and capital costs is made with the aid of a reference system capable of placing about 130,000 kilograms of payload into GEO each year. More mature states of the system are then examined, to a level in which 60,000 metric tons per year could be placed into GEO.

  8. On the black carbon problem and its solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    electrification. However, the real solution, to be implemented over a 20-40 year period is complete conversion of the combustion infrastructure to electricity and electrolytic hydrogen, where the electricity is all produced by near-zero emitting wind, water, and solar (WWS) based energy technologies. Such a conversion would reduce BC and greenhouse gases simultaneously with cooling aerosol particles. This would ramp down the presence of both warming and cooling agents, but still cause net reduction of global warming, while reducing devastating health impacts that are occurring from both warming and cooling aerosols.

  9. Knowledge representation and problem solution in expert and novice youth baseball players.

    PubMed

    French, K E; Nevett, M E; Spurgeon, J H; Graham, K C; Rink, J E; McPherson, S L

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in knowledge representation and problem solutions in expert and novice youth baseball players. Ninety-four players in two age divisions, 7-8 years of age and 9-10 years of age, were assigned to three levels of expertise: high; average; and low skilled. Each subject participated in an interview session to elicit knowledge representation and solutions to five different defensive game situations. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed for content, solution to the problem, errors in problem solution, and qualitative trends. The frequency of advanced solutions to each of the five situations were analyzed in separate chi-square tests for age and expertise. Differences among the levels of expertise were found for the accuracy of solutions to three complex situations. Age was significant for only one situation. Patterns of knowledge content accessed during advanced and less advanced responses indicated both experts and novices were in a beginning stage of developing baseball knowledge structures. Errors in problem solutions indicated children had difficulty monitoring critical conditions and making correct inferences. Players' and teammates' ability to execute baseball skills seemed to influence the content and structure of tactical knowledge accessed during problem solution.

  10. The self-similar solutions of the problem of carbon dioxide injection into the reservoir saturated with methane and its hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musakaev, N. G.; Khasanov, M. K.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper the research of carbon dioxide injection into a porous medium initially saturated with methane and its hydrate was performed. The mathematical model of heat and mass transfer in a porous media, accompanied by the formation of carbon dioxide hydrate, is presented. The self-similar solutions, for the axisymmetric problem definition, were built. These solutions describe the distribution of the fluid parameters in a reservoir.

  11. Spectral methods and their implementation to solution of aerodynamic and fluid mechanic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    Fundamental concepts underlying spectral collocation methods, especially pertaining to their use in the solution of partial differential equations, are outlined. Theoretical accuracy results are reviewed and compared with results from test problems. A number of practical aspects of the construction and use of spectral methods are detailed, along with several solution schemes which have found utility in applications of spectral methods to practical problems. Results from a few of the successful applications of spectral methods to problems of aerodynamic and fluid mechanic interest are then outlined, followed by a discussion of the problem areas in spectral methods and the current research under way to overcome these difficulties.

  12. Axi-symmetric generalized thermoelastic diffusion problem with two-temperature and initial stress under fractional order heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deswal, Sunita; Kalkal, Kapil Kumar; Sheoran, Sandeep Singh

    2016-09-01

    A mathematical model of fractional order two-temperature generalized thermoelasticity with diffusion and initial stress is proposed to analyze the transient wave phenomenon in an infinite thermoelastic half-space. The governing equations are derived in cylindrical coordinates for a two dimensional axi-symmetric problem. The analytical solution is procured by employing the Laplace and Hankel transforms for time and space variables respectively. The solutions are investigated in detail for a time dependent heat source. By using numerical inversion method of integral transforms, we obtain the solutions for displacement, stress, temperature and diffusion fields in physical domain. Computations are carried out for copper material and displayed graphically. The effect of fractional order parameter, two-temperature parameter, diffusion, initial stress and time on the different thermoelastic and diffusion fields is analyzed on the basis of analytical and numerical results. Some special cases have also been deduced from the present investigation.

  13. Solution of the Problem of the Couette Flow for a Fermi Gas with Almost Specular Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedrikova, E. A.; Latyshev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    A solution of the Couette problem for a Fermi gas is constructed. The kinetic Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) equation is used. Almost specular boundary conditions are considered. Formulas for the mass flux and the heat flux of the gas are obtained. These fluxes are proportional to the difference of the tangential momentum accommodation coefficients of the molecules. An expression for the viscous drag force acting on the walls of the channel is also found. An analysis of the macroparameters of the gas is performed. The limit to classical gases is taken. The obtained results are found to go over to the known results in this limit.

  14. Visualization of protein interaction networks: problems and solutions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Visualization concerns the representation of data visually and is an important task in scientific research. Protein-protein interactions (PPI) are discovered using either wet lab techniques, such mass spectrometry, or in silico predictions tools, resulting in large collections of interactions stored in specialized databases. The set of all interactions of an organism forms a protein-protein interaction network (PIN) and is an important tool for studying the behaviour of the cell machinery. Since graphic representation of PINs may highlight important substructures, e.g. protein complexes, visualization is more and more used to study the underlying graph structure of PINs. Although graphs are well known data structures, there are different open problems regarding PINs visualization: the high number of nodes and connections, the heterogeneity of nodes (proteins) and edges (interactions), the possibility to annotate proteins and interactions with biological information extracted by ontologies (e.g. Gene Ontology) that enriches the PINs with semantic information, but complicates their visualization. Methods In these last years many software tools for the visualization of PINs have been developed. Initially thought for visualization only, some of them have been successively enriched with new functions for PPI data management and PIN analysis. The paper analyzes the main software tools for PINs visualization considering four main criteria: (i) technology, i.e. availability/license of the software and supported OS (Operating System) platforms; (ii) interoperability, i.e. ability to import/export networks in various formats, ability to export data in a graphic format, extensibility of the system, e.g. through plug-ins; (iii) visualization, i.e. supported layout and rendering algorithms and availability of parallel implementation; (iv) analysis, i.e. availability of network analysis functions, such as clustering or mining of the graph, and the possibility to

  15. Comparison of DSMC and CFD Solutions of Fire II Including Radiative Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to compute rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows is becoming more important as missions such as Earth reentry, landing high mass payloads on Mars, and the exploration of the outer planets and their satellites are being considered. These flows may also contain significant radiative heating. To prepare for these missions, NASA is developing the capability to simulate rarefied, ionized flows and to then calculate the resulting radiative heating to the vehicle's surface. In this study, the DSMC codes DAC and DS2V are used to obtain charge-neutral ionization solutions. NASA s direct simulation Monte Carlo code DAC is currently being updated to include the ability to simulate charge-neutral ionized flows, take advantage of the recently introduced Quantum-Kinetic chemistry model, and to include electronic energy levels as an additional internal energy mode. The Fire II flight test is used in this study to assess these new capabilities. The 1634 second data point was chosen for comparisons to be made in order to include comparisons to computational fluid dynamics solutions. The Knudsen number at this point in time is such that the DSMC simulations are still tractable and the CFD computations are at the edge of what is considered valid. It is shown that there can be quite a bit of variability in the vibrational temperature inferred from DSMC solutions and that, from how radiative heating is computed, the electronic temperature is much better suited for radiative calculations. To include the radiative portion of heating, the flow-field solutions are post-processed by the non-equilibrium radiation code HARA. Acceptable agreement between CFD and DSMC flow field solutions is demonstrated and the progress of the updates to DAC, along with an appropriate radiative heating solution, are discussed. In addition, future plans to generate more high fidelity radiative heat transfer solutions are discussed.

  16. Combination of graph heuristics in producing initial solution of curriculum based course timetabling problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Juliana; Hussin, Naimah Mohd

    2016-08-01

    The construction of population of initial solution is a crucial task in population-based metaheuristic approach for solving curriculum-based university course timetabling problem because it can affect the convergence speed and also the quality of the final solution. This paper presents an exploration on combination of graph heuristics in construction approach in curriculum based course timetabling problem to produce a population of initial solutions. The graph heuristics were set as single and combination of two heuristics. In addition, several ways of assigning courses into room and timeslot are implemented. All settings of heuristics are then tested on the same curriculum based course timetabling problem instances and are compared with each other in terms of number of population produced. The result shows that combination of saturation degree followed by largest degree heuristic produce the highest number of population of initial solutions. The results from this study can be used in the improvement phase of algorithm that uses population of initial solutions.

  17. Methods of noninvasive electrophysiological heart examination basing on solution of inverse problem of electrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2015-09-01

    The article represents the main noninvasive methods of heart electrical activity examination, theoretical bases of solution of electrocardiography inverse problem, application of different methods of heart examination in clinical practice, and generalized achievements in this sphere in global experience.

  18. Entropy landscape and non-Gibbs solutions in constraint satisfaction problems.

    PubMed

    Dall'Asta, L; Ramezanpour, A; Zecchina, R

    2008-03-01

    We study the entropy landscape of solutions for the bicoloring problem in random graphs, a representative difficult constraint satisfaction problem. Our goal is to classify which types of clusters of solutions are addressed by different algorithms. In the first part of the study we use the cavity method to obtain the number of clusters with a given internal entropy and determine the phase diagram of the problem--e.g., dynamical, rigidity, and satisfiability-unsatisfiability (SAT-UNSAT) transitions. In the second part of the paper we analyze different algorithms and locate their behavior in the entropy landscape of the problem. For instance, we show that a smoothed version of a decimation strategy based on belief propagation is able to find solutions belonging to subdominant clusters even beyond the so-called rigidity transition where the thermodynamically relevant clusters become frozen. These nonequilibrium solutions belong to the most probable unfrozen clusters. PMID:18517340

  19. A method for overcoming the velocity space filamentation problem in collisionless plasma model solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, Alexander J.

    1987-01-01

    The solution of filtered Vlasov-Maxwell equations, rather than the Vlasov-Maxwell equations themselves, is shown to ameliorate the velocity space filamentation problem in collisionless plasma models. Exact field solutions and filtered velocity distribution functions are obtained without introducing errors. Proper selection of the filter width is demonstrated to inhibit development of velocity space filamentation and, it is conjectured, position space filamentation. The results of sample calculations of both filtered and nonfiltered field solutions illustrate a high degree of agreement between both solutions, with significant savings in computational time and memory requirements with the filtered solutions.

  20. Effective-medium model of wire metamaterials in the problems of radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Mirmoosa, M. S. Nefedov, I. S. Simovski, C. R.; Rüting, F.

    2014-06-21

    In the present work, we check the applicability of the effective medium model (EMM) to the problems of radiative heat transfer (RHT) through so-called wire metamaterials (WMMs)—composites comprising parallel arrays of metal nanowires. It is explained why this problem is so important for the development of prospective thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems. Previous studies of the applicability of EMM for WMMs were targeted by the imaging applications of WMMs. The analogous study referring to the transfer of radiative heat is a separate problem that deserves extended investigations. We show that WMMs with practically realizable design parameters transmit the radiative heat as effectively homogeneous media. Existing EMM is an adequate tool for qualitative prediction of the magnitude of transferred radiative heat and of its effective frequency band.

  1. The behavior of hyperbolic heat equations' solutions near their parabolic limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Gabriel B.; Ortiz, Omar E.; Reula, Oscar A.

    1994-08-01

    Standard energy methods are used to study the relation between the solutions of one parameter families of hyperbolic systems of equations describing heat propagation near their parabolic limits, which for these cases are the usual diffusive heat equation. In the linear case it is proven that given any solution to the hyperbolic equations there is always a solution to the diffusion equation which after a short time stays very close to it for all times. The separation between these solutions depends on the square of the ratio between the assumed very short decay time appearing in Cattaneo's relation and the usual characteristic smoothing time (initial data dependent) of the limiting diffusive equation. The techniques used in the linear case can be readily used for nonlinear equations. As an example we consider the theories of heat propagation introduced by Coleman, Fabrizio, and Owen, and prove that near a solution to the limiting diffusive equation there is always a solution to the nonlinear hyperbolic equations for a time which usually is much longer than the decay time of the corresponding Cattaneo relation. An alternative derivation of the heat theories of divergence type, which are consistent with thermodynamic principles, is given as an appendix.

  2. Approximate analytical solution for the problem of an inclusion in a viscoelastic solid under finite strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingerman, K. M.; Shavyrin, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    The approximate analytical solution of a quasi-static plane problem of the theory of viscoelasticity is obtained under finite strains. This is the problem of the stress-strain state in an infinite body with circular viscoelastic inclusion. The perturbation technique, Laplace transform, and complex Kolosov-Muskhelishvili's potentials are used for the solution. The numerical results are presented. The nonlinear effects and the effects of viscosity are estimated.

  3. Some notes on the numerical solution of shear-lag and mathematically related problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul

    1939-01-01

    The analysis of box beams with shear deformation of the flanges can be reduced to the solution of a differential equation. The same equation is met in other problems of stress analysis. No analytical solutions of this equation can be given for practical cases, and numerical methods of evaluation must be used. Available methods are briefly discussed. Two numerical examples show the application of the step-by-step method of integration to shear-lag problems.

  4. Note: An explicit solution of the optimal superposition and Eckart frame problems.

    PubMed

    Cioslowski, Jerzy

    2016-07-14

    Attention is called to an explicit solution of both the optimal superposition and Eckart frame problems that requires neither matrix diagonalization nor quaternion algebra. A simple change in one variable that enters the expression for the solution matrix T allows for selection of T representing either a proper rotation or a more general orthogonal transformation. The issues concerning the use of these alternative selections and the equivalence of the two problems are addressed. PMID:27421427

  5. Finite Element Solution of 1D Boundary Value Linear and Nonlinear Problems with Nonlocal Jump Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, M. N.

    2007-10-01

    We consider stationary linear and nonlinear problems on non-connected layers with distinct material properties. A version of the finite element method (FEM) is used for discretization of the continuous problems. We formulate sufficient conditions under which we prove the discrete maximum principle and convergence of the numerical higher-order finite elements solution. Efficient algorithm for solution of the FEM algebraic equations is proposed. Numerical experiments are also discussed.

  6. On the covering of a Hill's region by solutions in the restricted three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Valery; Polekhin, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    We consider two classical celestial-mechanical systems: the planar restricted circular three-body problem and its simplification, the Hill's problem. Numerical and analytical analyses of the covering of a Hill's region by solutions starting with zero velocity at its boundary are presented. We show that, in all considered cases, there always exists an area inside a Hill's region that is uncovered by the solutions.

  7. Note: An explicit solution of the optimal superposition and Eckart frame problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioslowski, Jerzy

    2016-07-01

    Attention is called to an explicit solution of both the optimal superposition and Eckart frame problems that requires neither matrix diagonalization nor quaternion algebra. A simple change in one variable that enters the expression for the solution matrix T allows for selection of T representing either a proper rotation or a more general orthogonal transformation. The issues concerning the use of these alternative selections and the equivalence of the two problems are addressed.

  8. Abelian solutions of the soliton equations and Riemann-Schottky problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krichever, Igor M.

    2008-12-01

    The present article is an exposition of the author's talk at the conference dedicated to the 70th birthday of S.P. Novikov. The talk contained the proof of Welters' conjecture which proposes a solution of the classical Riemann-Schottky problem of characterizing the Jacobians of smooth algebraic curves in terms of the existence of a trisecant of the associated Kummer variety, and a solution of another classical problem of algebraic geometry, that of characterizing the Prym varieties of unramified covers.

  9. Analysing student written solutions to investigate if problem-solving processes are evident throughout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Regina; McLoughlin, Eilish; Finlayson, Odilla E.

    2016-07-01

    An interdisciplinary science course has been implemented at a university with the intention of providing students the opportunity to develop a range of key skills in relation to: real-world connections of science, problem-solving, information and communications technology use and team while linking subject knowledge in each of the science disciplines. One of the problems used in this interdisciplinary course has been selected to evaluate if it affords students the opportunity to explicitly display problem-solving processes. While the benefits of implementing problem-based learning have been well reported, far less research has been devoted to methods of assessing student problem-solving solutions. A problem-solving theoretical framework was used as a tool to assess student written solutions to indicate if problem-solving processes were present. In two academic years, student problem-solving processes were satisfactory for exploring and understanding, representing and formulating, and planning and executing, indicating that student collaboration on problems is a good initiator of developing these processes. In both academic years, students displayed poor monitoring and reflecting (MR) processes at the intermediate level. A key impact of evaluating student work in this way is that it facilitated meaningful feedback about the students' problem-solving process rather than solely assessing the correctness of problem solutions.

  10. The numerical solution of the boundary inverse problem for a parabolic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, V. V.; Vasilyeva, M. V.; Kardashevsky, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    Boundary inverse problems occupy an important place among the inverse problems of mathematical physics. They are connected with the problems of diagnosis, when additional measurements on one of the borders or inside the computational domain are necessary to restore the boundary regime in the other border, inaccessible to direct measurements. The boundary inverse problems belong to a class of conditionally correct problems, and therefore, their numerical solution requires the development of special computational algorithms. The paper deals with the solution of the boundary inverse problem for one-dimensional second-order parabolic equations, consisting in the restoration of boundary regime according to measurements inside the computational domain. For the numerical solution of the inverse problem it is proposed to use an analogue of a computational algorithm, proposed and developed to meet the challenges of identification of the right side of the parabolic equations in the works P.N.Vabishchevich and his students based on a special decomposition of solving the problem at each temporal layer. We present and discuss the results of a computational experiment conducted on model problems with quasi-solutions, including with random errors in the input data.

  11. Global solutions to the two-dimensional Riemann problem for a system of conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yicheng; Cai, Shaohong; Zhao, Yuanying

    2016-06-01

    We study the global solutions to the two-dimensional Riemann problem for a system of conservation laws. The initial data are three constant states separated by three rays emanating from the origin. Under the assumption that each ray in the initial data outside of the origin projects exactly one planar contact discontinuity, this problem is classified into five cases. By the self-similar transformation, the reduced system changes type from being elliptic near the origin to being hyperbolic far away in self-similar plane. Then in hyperbolic region, applying the generalized characteristic analysis method, a Goursat problem is solved to describe the interactions of planar contact discontinuities. While, in elliptic region, a boundary value problem arises. It is proved that this boundary value problem admits a unique solution. Based on these preparations, five explicit solutions and their corresponding criteria can be obtained in self-similar plane.

  12. Using a derivative-free optimization method for multiple solutions of inverse transport problems

    DOE PAGES

    Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-14

    Identifying unknown components of an object that emits radiation is an important problem for national and global security. Radiation signatures measured from an object of interest can be used to infer object parameter values that are not known. This problem is called an inverse transport problem. An inverse transport problem may have multiple solutions and the most widely used approach for its solution is an iterative optimization method. This paper proposes a stochastic derivative-free global optimization algorithm to find multiple solutions of inverse transport problems. The algorithm is an extension of a multilevel single linkage (MLSL) method where a meshmore » adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm is incorporated into the local phase. Furthermore, numerical test cases using uncollided fluxes of discrete gamma-ray lines are presented to show the performance of this new algorithm.« less

  13. Integral solutions to transient nonlinear heat (mass) diffusion with a power-law diffusivity: a semi-infinite medium with fixed boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristov, Jordan

    2016-03-01

    Closed form approximate solutions to nonlinear heat (mass) diffusion equation with power-law nonlinearity of the thermal (mass) diffusivity have been developed by the integral-balance method avoiding the commonly used linearization by the Kirchhoff transformation. The main improvement of the solution is based on the double-integration technique and a new approach to the space derivative. Solutions to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary condition problems have been developed and benchmarked against exact numerical and approximate analytical solutions available in the literature.

  14. Calculating Probabilistic Distance to Solution in a Complex Problem Solving Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudol, Leigh Ann; Rivers, Kelly; Harris, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    In complex problem solving domains, correct solutions are often comprised of a combination of individual components. Students usually go through several attempts, each attempt reflecting an individual solution state that can be observed during practice. Classic metrics to measure student performance over time rely on counting the number of…

  15. Teaching and Testing Solutions to the Problem of Debilitating Effects of Test Anxiety on Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Kennedy T.; Horton, Margaret W.

    Educational solutions to the problem of test anxiety were explored. Test anxiety has a debilitating effect on performance which increases over the school years. The solution is, first, to measure test anxiety so that the extent of it, as well as the effectiveness of programs designed to alleviate it, can be measured. The seven-item Comfort Index,…

  16. Renormalized entropy solutions of the Cauchy problem for a first-order inhomogeneous quasilinear equation

    SciTech Connect

    Panov, E Yu

    2013-10-31

    The concept of a renormalized entropy solution of the Cauchy problem for an inhomogeneous quasilinear equation of the first order is introduced. Existence and uniqueness theorems are proved, together with a comparison principle. Connections with generalized entropy solutions are investigated. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  17. Solutions of TEAM Problem No. 13 using integral equations in a sequential and parallel computing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kettunen, L.; Forsman, K.; Levine, D.; Gropp, W.

    1993-12-31

    In this paper a brief discussion of h-type volume integral formulations implemented in GFUNET/CORAL code is given and solutions of TEAM benchmark No. 13 are shown. GFUNET/CORAL is a general purpose code for 2D and 3D magnetostatics. Solutions of TEAM problem No. 13 are computed using both a sequential and parallel version of GFUNET/CORAL.

  18. The Effect of Solution Heat Treatment on an Advanced Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Kantzos, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    Five heat treat options for an advanced nickel-base disk alloy, LSHR, have been investigated. These included two conventional solution heat treat cycles, subsolvus/oil quench and supersolvus/fan cool, which yield fine grain and coarse grain microstructure disks respectively, as well as three advanced dual microstructure heat treat (DMHT) options. The DMHT options produce disks with a fine grain bore and a coarse grain rim. Based on an overall evaluation of the mechanical property data, it was evident that the three DMHT options achieved a desirable balance of properties in comparison to the conventional solution heat treatments for the LSHR alloy. However, one of the DMHT options, SUB/DMHT, produced the best set of properties, largely based on dwell crack growth data. Further evaluation of the SUB/DMHT option in spin pit experiments on a generic disk shape demonstrated the advantages and reliability of a dual grain structure at the component level.

  19. The general solution to the classical problem of finite Euler Bernoulli beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.; Amba-Rao, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical solution is obtained for the problem of free and forced vibrations of a finite Euler Bernoulli beam with arbitrary (partially fixed) boundary conditions. The effects of linear viscous damping, Winkler foundation, constant axial tension, a concentrated mass, and an arbitrary forcing function are included in the analysis. No restriction is placed on the values of the parameters involved, and the solution presented here contains all cited previous solutions as special cases.

  20. The general solution to the classical problem of the finite Euler-Bernoulli beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.; Amba-Rao, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical solution is obtained for the problem of free and forced vibrations of a finite Euler-Bernoulli beam with arbitrary (partially fixed) boundary conditions. The effects of linear viscous damping, Winkler foundation, constant axial tension, a concentrated mass, and an arbitrary forcing function are included in the analysis. No restriction is placed on the values of the parameters involved, and the solution presented here contains all cited previous solutions as special cases.