Science.gov

Sample records for heat removal facility

  1. Design and Scaling of the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, Darius D.; Gerardi, Craig D.; Bremer, Nathan C.; Farmer, Mitchell T.

    2014-01-01

    The Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) reflects a 1/2 scale model of one conceptual design for passive safety in advanced reactors. The project was initiated in 2010 primarily to conduct ex-vessel, passive decay heat removal experiments in support of the Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), Small Modular Reactor (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) programs while also generating data for code validation purposes. The facility successfully demonstrated scoping objectives in late 2013, and is expected to begin testing by early 2014. The following paper summarizes some of the key design and scaling considerations used in construction of the experimental facility, along with an overview of the current instrumentation and data acquisition methods. Details of the distributed fiber optic temperature system will be presented, which introduces a level of data density suitable for CFD validation and is a first-of-its-kind for largescale thermal hydraulics facilities.

  2. Scalability of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) data to VHTR/NGNP RCCS designs.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R .B.; Feldman, E. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-07

    Passive safety in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is strongly dependent on the thermal performance of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). Scaled experiments performed in the Natural Shutdown Test Facility (NSTF) are to provide data for assessing and/or improving computer code models for RCCS phenomena. Design studies and safety analyses that are to support licensing of the VHTR will rely on these models to achieve a high degree of certainty in predicted design heat removal rate. To guide in the selection and development of an appropriate set of experiments a scaling analysis has been performed for the air-cooled RCCS option. The goals were to (1) determine the phenomena that dominate the behavior of the RCCS, (2) determine the general conditions that must be met so that these phenomena and their relative importance are preserved in the experiments, (3) identify constraints specific to the NSTF that potentially might prevent exact similitude, and (4) then to indicate how the experiments can be scaled to prevent distortions in the phenomena of interest. The phenomena identified as important to RCCS operation were also the subject of a recent PIRT study. That work and the present work collectively indicate that the main phenomena influencing RCCS heat removal capability are (1) radiation heat transport from the vessel to the air ducts, (2) the integral effects of momentum and heat transfer in the air duct, (3) buoyancy at the wall inside the air duct giving rise to mixed convection, and (4) multidimensional effects inside the air duct caused by non-uniform circumferential heat flux and non-circular geometry.

  3. Facilities removal working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  4. Experimental investigations on decay heat removal in advanced nuclear reactors using single heater rod test facility: Air alone in the annular gap

    SciTech Connect

    Bopche, Santosh B.; Sridharan, Arunkumar

    2010-11-15

    During a loss of coolant accident in nuclear reactors, radiation heat transfer accounts for a significant amount of the total heat transfer in the fuel bundle. In case of heavy water moderator nuclear reactors, the decay heat of a fuel bundle enclosed in the pressure tube and outer concentric calandria tube can be transferred to the moderator. Radiation heat transfer plays a significant role in removal of decay heat from the fuel rods to the moderator, which is available outside the calandria tube. A single heater rod test facility is designed and fabricated as a part of preliminary investigations. The objective is to anticipate the capability of moderator to remove decay heat, from the reactor core, generated after shut down. The present paper focuses mainly on the role of moderator in removal of decay heat, for situation with air alone in the annular gap of pressure tube and calandria tube. It is seen that the naturally aspirated air is capable of removing the heat generated in the system compared to the standstill air or stagnant water situations. It is also seen that the flowing moderator is capable of removing a greater fraction of heat generated by the heater rod compared to a stagnant pool of boiling moderator. (author)

  5. Design Report for the ½ Scale Air-Cooled RCCS Tests in the Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, D. D.; Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Bremer, N.; Aeschlimann, R. W.

    2014-06-01

    The Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) is a large scale thermal hydraulics test facility that has been built at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The facility was constructed in order to carry out highly instrumented experiments that can be used to validate the performance of passive safety systems for advanced reactor designs. The facility has principally been designed for testing of Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) concepts that rely on natural convection cooling for either air or water-based systems. Standing 25-m in height, the facility is able to supply up to 220 kW at 21 kW/m2 to accurately simulate the heat fluxes at the walls of a reactor pressure vessel. A suite of nearly 400 data acquisition channels, including a sophisticated fiber optic system for high density temperature measurements, guides test operations and provides data to support scaling analysis and modeling efforts. Measurements of system mass flow rate, air and surface temperatures, heat flux, humidity, and pressure differentials, among others; are part of this total generated data set. The following report provides an introduction to the top level-objectives of the program related to passively safe decay heat removal, a detailed description of the engineering specifications, design features, and dimensions of the test facility at Argonne. Specifications of the sensors and their placement on the test facility will be provided, along with a complete channel listing of the data acquisition system.

  6. Position paper -- Waste storage tank heat removal

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, M.D.

    1995-01-03

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on the heat removal system to be used on the waste storage tanks currently being designed for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF), project W-236A. The current preliminary design for the waste storage primary tank heat removal system consists of the following subsystems: (1) a once-through dome space ventilation system; (2) a recirculation dome space ventilation system; and (3) an annulus ventilation system. Recently completed and ongoing studies have evaluated alternative heat removal systems in an attempt to reduce system costs and to optimize heat removal capabilities. In addition, a thermal/heat transfer analysis is being performed that will provide assurance that the heat removal systems selected will be capable of removing the total primary tank design heat load of 1.25 MBtu/hr at an allowable operating temperature of 190 F. Although 200 F is the design temperature limit, 190 F has been selected as the maximum allowable operating temperature limit based on instrumentation sensitivity, instrumentation location sensitivity, and other factors. Seven options are discussed and recommendations are made.

  7. Topical report : CFD analysis for the applicability of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) for the simulation of the VHTR RCCS.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C. P.

    2007-05-16

    The Very High Temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) is one of the GEN IV reactor concepts that have been proposed for thermochemical hydrogen production and other process-heat applications like coal gasification. The United States Department of Energy has selected the VHTR for further research and development, aiming to demonstrate emissions-free electricity and hydrogen production at a future time. One of the major safety advantages of the VHTR is the potential for passive decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-side of the RCCS is very similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that has been proposed for the PRISM reactor design. The design and safety analysis of the RVACS have been based on extensive analytical and experimental work performed at ANL. The Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) at ANL that simulates at full scale the air-side of the RVACS was built to provide experimental support for the design and analysis of the PRISM RVACS system. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that the NSTF facility can be used to generate RCCS experimental data: to validate CFD and systems codes for the analysis of the RCCS; and to support the design and safety analysis of the RCCS. At this time no reference design is available for the NGNP. The General Atomics (GA) gas turbine - modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) has been used in many analyses as a starting reference design. In the GT-MHR the reactor outlet temperature is 850 C, while the target outlet reactor temperature in VHTR is 1000 C. VHTR scoping studies with a reactor outlet temperature of 1000 C have been performed at GA and INEL. Although the reactor outlet temperature in the VHTR is significantly higher than in the GT-MHR, the peak temperature in the reactor vessel (which is the heat source for the RCCS) is not drastically different. In this work, analyses have been performed using reactor vessel

  8. Sandia Laboratories Radiant Heat Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, P. H.; Nakos, J. T.; Strait, B. G.

    1980-02-01

    The capabilities and limitations of the Radiant Heat Facility are described along with the two main types of testing equipment, i.e., quartz lamps and graphite resistor heater arrays. The data acquistion capabilities and instrumentation techniques are outlined, and a short discussion of the theory of radiation heat transfer is presented.

  9. Heat-Flux-Measuring Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus simulates conditions in turbine engines. Automated facility generates and measures transient and steady-state heat fluxes at flux densities from 0.3 to 6 MW/m(Sup2) and temperatures from 100 to 1,200 K. Positioning arm holds heat-flux gauge at focal point of arc lamp. Arm previously chilled gauge in liquid nitrogen in Dewar flask. Cooling water flows through lamp to heat exchanger. Used to develop heat-flux gauges for turbine blades and to test materials for durability under rapidly changing temperatures.

  10. Feasibility study for use of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) for VHTR water-cooled RCCS shutdown.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.; Farmer, M.T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-31

    In summary, a scaling analysis of a water-cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) system was performed based on generic information on the RCCS design of PBMR. The analysis demonstrates that the water-cooled RCCS can be simulated at the ANL NSTF facility at a prototypic scale in the lateral direction and about half scale in the vertical direction. Because, by necessity, the scaling is based on a number of approximations, and because no analytical information is available on the performance of a reference water-cooled RCCS, the scaling analysis presented here needs to be 'validated' by analysis of the steady state and transient performance of a reference water-cooled RCCS design. The analysis of the RCCS performance by CFD and system codes presents a number of challenges including: strong 3-D effects in the cavity and the RCCS tubes; simulation of turbulence in flows characterized by natural circulation, high Rayleigh numbers and low Reynolds numbers; validity of heat transfer correlations for system codes for heat transfer in the cavity and the annulus of the RCCS tubes; the potential of nucleate boiling in the tubes; water flashing in the upper section of the RCCS return line (during limiting transient); and two-phase flow phenomena in the water tanks. The limited simulation of heat transfer in cavities presented in Section 4.0, strongly underscores the need of experimental work to validate CFD codes, and heat transfer correlations for system codes, and to support the analysis and design of the RCCS. Based on the conclusions of the scaling analysis, a schematic that illustrates key attributes of the experiment system is shown in Fig. 4. This system contains the same physical elements as the PBMR RCCS, plus additional equipment to facilitate data gathering to support code validation. In particular, the prototype consists of a series of oval standpipes surrounding the reactor vessel to provide cooling of the reactor cavity during both normal and off

  11. Heat exchanger with a removable tube section

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.

    1975-07-29

    A heat exchanger is described in which the tube sheet is secured against primary liquid pressure, but which allows for easy removal of the tube section. The tube section is supported by a flange which is secured by a number of shear blocks, each of which extends into a slot which is immovable with respect to the outer shell of the heat exchanger. (auth)

  12. Automated Heat-Flux-Calibration Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    Computer control speeds operation of equipment and processing of measurements. New heat-flux-calibration facility developed at Lewis Research Center. Used for fast-transient heat-transfer testing, durability testing, and calibration of heat-flux gauges. Calibrations performed at constant or transient heat fluxes ranging from 1 to 6 MW/m2 and at temperatures ranging from 80 K to melting temperatures of most materials. Facility developed because there is need to build and calibrate very-small heat-flux gauges for Space Shuttle main engine (SSME).Includes lamp head attached to side of service module, an argon-gas-recirculation module, reflector, heat exchanger, and high-speed positioning system. This type of automated heat-flux calibration facility installed in industrial plants for onsite calibration of heat-flux gauges measuring fluxes of heat in advanced gas-turbine and rocket engines.

  13. Heat treatment of exchangers to remove coke

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.D.

    1990-02-20

    This patent describes a process for preparing furfural coke for removal from metallic surfaces. It comprises: heating the furfural coke without causing an evolution of heat capable of undesirably altering metallurgical properties of the surfaces in the presence of a gas containing molecular oxygen at a sufficient temperature below 800{degrees}F (427{degrees}C) for a sufficient time to change the crush strength of the coke so as to permit removal with a water jet at a pressure of five thousand pounds per square inch.

  14. Treatment Facility F: Accelerated Removal and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J.J.; Buettner, M.H.; Carrigan, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    The Accelerated Removal and Validation (ARV) phase of remediation at the Treatment Facility F (TFF) site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was designed to accelerate removal of gasoline from the site when compared to normal, single shift, pump-and-treat operations. The intent was to take advantage of the in-place infrastructure plus the increased underground temperatures resulting from the Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project (DUSDP). Operations continued 24-hours (h) per day between October 4 and December 12, 1993. Three contaminant removal rate enhancement approaches were explored during the period of continuous operation. First, we tried several configurations of the vapor pumping system to maximize the contaminant removal rate. Second, we conducted two brief trials of air injection into the lower steam zone. Results were compared with computer models, and the process was assessed for contaminant removal rate enhancement. Third, we installed equipment to provide additional electrical heating of contaminated low-permeability soil. Four new electrodes were connected into the power system. Diagnostic capabilities at the TFF site were upgraded so that we could safely monitor electrical currents, soil temperatures, and water treatment system processes while approximately 300 kW of electrical energy was being applied to the subsurface.

  15. Methods of Helium Injection and Removal for Heat Transfer Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haight, Harlan; Kegley, Jeff; Bourdreaux, Meghan

    2008-01-01

    While augmentation of heat transfer from a test article by helium gas at low pressures is well known, the method is rarely employed during space simulation testing because the test objectives usually involve simulation of an orbital thermal environment. Test objectives of cryogenic optical testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Cryogenic Facility (XRCF) have typically not been constrained by orbital environment parameters. As a result, several methods of helium injection have been utilized at the XRCF since 1999 to decrease thermal transition times. A brief synopsis of these injection (and removal) methods including will be presented.

  16. Methods of Helium Injection and Removal for Heat Transfer Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    While augmentation of heat transfer from a test article by helium gas at low pressures is well known, the method is rarely employed during space simulation testing because the test objectives are to simulate an orbital thermal environment. Test objectives of cryogenic optical testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) have typically not been constrained by orbital environment parameters. As a result, several methods of helium injection have been utilized at the XRCF since 1999 to decrease thermal transition times. A brief synopsis of these injection (and removal) methods including will be presented.

  17. Passive shut-down heat removal system

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv; Sharbaugh, John E.

    1988-01-01

    An improved shut-down heat removal system for a liquid metal nuclear reactor of the type having a vessel for holding hot and cold pools of liquid sodium is disclosed herein. Generally, the improved system comprises a redan or barrier within the reactor vessel which allows an auxiliary heat exchanger to become immersed in liquid sodium from the hot pool whenever the reactor pump fails to generate a metal-circulating pressure differential between the hot and cold pools of sodium. This redan also defines an alternative circulation path between the hot and cold pools of sodium in order to equilibrate the distribution of the decay heat from the reactor core. The invention may take the form of a redan or barrier that circumscribes the inner wall of the reactor vessel, thereby defining an annular space therebetween. In this embodiment, the bottom of the annular space communicates with the cold pool of sodium, and the auxiliary heat exchanger is placed in this annular space just above the drawn-down level that the liquid sodium assumes during normal operating conditions. Alternatively, the redan of the invention may include a pair of vertically oriented, concentrically disposed standpipes having a piston member disposed between them that operates somewhat like a pressure-sensitive valve. In both embodiments, the cessation of the pressure differential that is normally created by the reactor pump causes the auxiliary heat exchanger to be immersed in liquid sodium from the hot pool. Additionally, the redan in both embodiments forms a circulation flow path between the hot and cold pools so that the decay heat from the nuclear core is uniformly distributed within the vessel.

  18. Condensate removal device for heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trusch, R. B.; Oconnor, E. W. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A set of perforated tubes disposed at the gas output side of a heat exchanger, in a position not to affect the rate of flow of the air or other gas is described. The tubes are connected to a common manifold which is connected to a sucking device. Where it is necessary to conserve and recirculate the air sucked through the tubes, the output of the manifold is run through a separator to remove the condensate from the gas. The perforations in the slurper tubes are small, lying in the range of 0.010 inch to 0.100 inch. The tubes are disposed in contact with the surfaces of the heat exchanger on which the condensate is precipitated, whether fins or plates, so that the water may be directed to the tube openings by means of surface effects, together with the assistance of the air flow. Only about 5 percent of the air output need be thus diverted, and it effectively removes virtually all of the condensate.

  19. Very high-vacuum heat treatment facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Moody, M. V.; Richard, J.-P.

    1987-01-01

    A vacuum heat treatment facility, with hot zone dimensions of 12 x 19 x 19 cm, has been designed and constructed at a cost substantially below that of a commercial unit. The design incorporates efficient water cooling and a resistive heating element. A vacuum pressure of 1.5 x 10 to the -8th torr at room temperature has been obtained after baking. The temperature limit is approximately 1900 C. This limit results from the choice of niobium as the hot zone material.

  20. Solution of heat removal from nuclear reactors by natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitek, Pavel; Valenta, Vaclav

    2014-03-01

    This paper summarizes the basis for the solution of heat removal by natural convection from both conventional nuclear reactors and reactors with fuel flowing coolant (such as reactors with molten fluoride salts MSR).The possibility of intensification of heat removal through gas lift is focused on. It might be used in an MSR (Molten Salt Reactor) for cleaning the salt mixture of degassed fission products and therefore eliminating problems with iodine pitting. Heat removal by natural convection and its intensification increases significantly the safety of nuclear reactors. Simultaneously the heat removal also solves problems with lifetime of pumps in the primary circuit of high-temperature reactors.

  1. Emergency heat removal system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Dunckel, Thomas L.

    1976-01-01

    A heat removal system for nuclear reactors serving as a supplement to an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) comprises a plurality of heat pipes having one end in heat transfer relationship with either the reactor pressure vessel, the core support grid structure or other in-core components and the opposite end located in heat transfer relationship with a heat exchanger having heat transfer fluid therein. The heat exchanger is located external to the pressure vessel whereby excessive core heat is transferred from the above reactor components and dissipated within the heat exchanger fluid.

  2. Aft Engine shop worker removes a heat shield on Columbia's main engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Doug Buford, with the Aft Engine shop, works at removing a heat shield on Columbia, in the Orbiter Processing Facility. After small cracks were discovered on the LH2 Main Propulsion System (MPS) flow liners in two other orbiters, program managers decided to move forward with inspections on Columbia before clearing it for flight on STS-107. After removal of the heat shields, the three main engines will be removed. Inspections of the flow liners will follow. The July 19 launch of Columbia on STS-107 has been delayed a few weeks

  3. Aft Engine shop worker removes a heat shield on Columbia's main engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Doug Buford, with the Aft Engine shop, works at removing a heat shield on Columbia, in the Orbiter Processing Facility. After small cracks were discovered on the LH2 Main Propulsion System (MPS) flow liners in two other orbiters, program managers decided to move forward with inspections on Columbia before clearing it for flight on STS-107. After removal of the heat shields, the three main engines will be removed. Inspections of the flow liners will follow. The July 19 launch of Columbia on STS-107 has been delayed a few weeks

  4. Algal-bacterial treatment facility removes selenium from drainage water

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Lundquist, Tryg J.; Green, F. Bailey; Zarate, Max A.; Oswald, William J.; Leighton, Terrance

    2000-01-25

    A demonstration algal-bacterial selenium removal (ABSR) facility has been treating agricultural drainage water in the Panoche Drainage District on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley since 1997. The project goals are to demonstrate the effectiveness of the ABSR technology for selenium removal, to investigate potential wildlife exposure to selenium at full-scale facilities, and to develop an operational plant configuration that will minimize the life-cycle cost for each pound of selenium removed. The facility consists of a series of ponds designed to promote native microorganisms that remove nitrate and selenium. Previous treatment research efforts sought to reduce selenium concentrations to less than 5 mu g/L, but the ABSR Facility demonstration focuses on providing affordable reduction of the selenium load that is discharged to the San Joaquin River. During 1997 and 1998, the best-performing ABSR plant configuration reduced nitrate by more than 95 percent and reduced total soluble selenium mass by 80 percent. Ongoing investigations focus on optimizing operational parameters and determining operational costs and scale-up engineering requirements. The preliminary total cost estimate for a 10-acre-foot per day ABSR facility is less than $200 per acre-foot of treated drainage water.

  5. Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, Jeffrey P

    2015-03-24

    Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

  6. Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2015-12-08

    Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

  7. Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, Jeffrey P

    2013-12-10

    Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

  8. Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2012-07-24

    Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

  9. Unsteady transonic heat transfer in a transient facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagraff, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    A facility for making heat transfer measurements on solid surfaces using transient techniques is constructed. The facility being constructed is a Ludweig tube with isentropic compression heating (LICH tube). The work completed is detailed as is the work remaining in order to complete the facility and make useful heat transfer measurements. The scope of the project is briefly discussed along with an overall appraisal of the progress.

  10. Decision Document for Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    WILLIS, W.L.

    2000-07-31

    This document establishes the combination of design and operational configurations that will be used to provide heat removal from high-level waste tanks during Phase 1 waste feed delivery to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding tank safety requirement limits. The chosen method--to use the primary and annulus ventilation systems to remove heat from the high-level waste tanks--is documented herein.

  11. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing

    SciTech Connect

    Jankura, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants - while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of a addressing the emission of SO{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase I and Phase II requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variable than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides the Final Test Plan for the first coal tested in the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

  12. A Heated Tube Facility for Rocket Coolant Channel Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.; Pease, Gary M.; Meyer, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    The capabilities of a heated tube facility used for testing rocket engine coolant channels at the NASA Lewis Research Center are presented. The facility uses high current, low voltage power supplies to resistively heat a test section to outer wall temperatures as high as 730 C (1350 F). Liquid or gaseous nitrogen, gaseous helium, or combustible liquids can be used as the test section coolant. The test section is enclosed in a vacuum chamber to minimize heat loss to the surrounding system. Test section geometry, size, and material; coolant properties; and heating levels can be varied to generate heat transfer and coolant performance data bases.

  13. Effects of one-sided heat input and removal on axially grooved heat pipe performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamotani, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of an axially grooved heat pipe with one-sided heat input and removal was investigated analytically. Under zero-g condition the maximum heat transport of the pipe may decrease as much as 30% depending on the liquid slug behavior in the condenser section. In one-g environment the performance depends mainly on the fluid charge. The maximum heat transport, if over-charged, is almost equal to the value for uniform heating and cooling due to puddling effect. However, for some heater-cooler combinations the temperature drop across the heat pipe becomes very large. Computed results for tilted heat pipes compare favorably with available experimental data.

  14. Confirmatory analysis of the AP1000 passive residual heat removal heat exchanger with 3-D computational fluid dynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schwall, James R.; Karim, Naeem U.; Thakkar, Jivan G.; Taylor, Creed; Schulz, Terry; Wright, Richard F.

    2006-07-01

    The AP1000 is an 1100 MWe advanced nuclear power plant that uses passive safety features to enhance plant safety and to provide significant and measurable improvements in plant simplification, reliability, investment protection and plant costs. The AP1000 received final design approval from the US-NRC in 2004. The AP1000 design is based on the AP600 design that received final design approval in 1999. Wherever possible, the AP1000 plant configuration and layout was kept the same as AP600 to take advantage of the maturity of the design and to minimize new design efforts. As a result, the two-loop configuration was maintained for AP1000, and the containment vessel diameter was kept the same. It was determined that this significant power up-rate was well within the capability of the passive safety features, and that the safety margins for AP1000 were greater than those of operating PWRs. A key feature of the passive core cooling system is the passive residual heat removal heat exchanger (PRHR HX) that provides decay heat removal for postulated LOCA and non-LOCA events. The PRHR HX is a C-tube heat exchanger located in the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) above the core promoting natural circulation heat removal between the reactor cooling system and the tank. Component testing was performed for the AP600 PRHR HX to determine the heat transfer characteristics and to develop correlations to be used for the AP1000 safety analysis codes. The data from these tests were confirmed by subsequent integral tests at three separate facilities including the ROSA facility in Japan. Owing to the importance of this component, an independent analysis has been performed using the ATHOS-based computational fluid dynamics computer code PRHRCFD. Two separate models of the PRHR HX and IRWST have been developed representing the ROSA test geometry and the AP1000 plant geometry. Confirmation of the ROSA test results were used to validate PRHRCFD, and the AP1000 plant model

  15. Device for removing heat of decomposition in a steam power plant heated by nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    Emsperger, W.; Werker, E.

    1980-12-02

    Device for removing heat of decomposition in a steam power plant heated by nuclear energy and having a steam generator with a water-steam separating tank connected downstream of the steam generator in travel direction of the steam generated thereby includes a start-up circulatory loop for the steam power plant connected to the steam generator and including the water-steam separating tank therein, the start-up circulatory loop being formed of a feed water line and an outlet line from the water-steam separating tank and further including an externally cooled heat exchanger connected therein for removing after-heat.

  16. Ames facility for simulating planetary probe heating environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stine, H. A.

    1974-01-01

    Progress is reported on the development of a giant-planet pilot facility which simulates the conditions expected at the peak heating point for a shallow entry into the atmosphere of Saturn, Jupiter, and Uranus.

  17. Alternative cooling resource for removing the residual heat of reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H. C.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, D. S.; Jung, C. Y.; Choi, K. Y.

    2012-07-01

    The Recirculated Cooling Water (RCW) system of a Candu reactor is a closed cooling system which delivers demineralized water to coolers and components in the Service Building, the Reactor Building, and the Turbine Building and the recirculated cooling water is designed to be cooled by the Raw Service Water (RSW). During the period of scheduled outage, the RCW system provides cooling water to the heat exchangers of the Shutdown Cooling System (SDCS) in order to remove the residual heat of the reactor, so the RCW heat exchangers have to operate at all times. This makes it very hard to replace the inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers because the replacement work requires the isolation of the RCW. A task force was formed to prepare a plan to substitute the recirculated water with the chilled water system in order to cool the SDCS heat exchangers. A verification test conducted in 2007 proved that alternative cooling was possible for the removal of the residual heat of the reactor and in 2008 the replacement of inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers for both Wolsong unit 3 and 4 were successfully completed. (authors)

  18. Decay heat removal systems: design criteria and options. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Design criteria and alternate decay heat removal system concepts which have evolved in several different countries throughout the world were compared. The conclusion was reached that the best way to improve the reliability of pressurized water reactor (PWR) decay heat removal is first to focus on improving the reliability of the auxiliary feedwater and high pressure injection systems to cope with certain loss of feedwater transients and small loss of coolant accidents and then to assess how well these systems can handle special emergencies (e.g., sabotage, earthquake, airplane crash). For boiling water reactors (BWRs), it was concluded that emphasis should be placed first on improving the reliability of the residual heat removal and high pressure service water systems to cope with a loss of suppression pool cooling following a loss of feedwater transient and then to assess how well these systems can handle special emergencies. It was found that, for both PWRs and BWRs, a design objective for alternate decay heat removal systems should be at least an order of magnitude reduction in core meltdown probability.

  19. Heat Deposition and Heat Removal in the UCLA Continuous Current Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael Lee

    1990-01-01

    Energy transfer processes in a steady-state tokamak are examined both theoretically and experimentally in order to determine the patterns of plasma heat deposition to material surfaces and the methods of heat removal. Heat transfer experiments involving actively cooled limiters and heat flux probes were performed in the UCLA Continuous Current Tokamak (CCT). The simple exponential model of plasma power deposition was extended to describe the global heat deposition to the first wall of a steady-state tokamak. The heat flux distribution in CCT was determined from measurements of heat flow to 32 large-area water-cooled Faraday shield panels. Significant toroidal and poloidal asymmetries were observed, with the maximum heat fluxes tending to fall on the lower outside panels. Heat deposition to the water-cooled guard limiters of an ion Bernstein wave antenna in CCT was measured during steady-state operation. Very strong asymmetries were observed. The heat distribution varied greatly with magnetic field. Copper heat flux sensors incorporating internal thermocouples were developed to measure plasma power deposition to exterior probe surfaces and heat removal from water -cooled interior surfaces. The resulting inverse heat conduction problem was solved using the function specification method. Cooling by an impinging liquid jet was investigated. One end of a cylindrical copper heat flux sensor was heated by a DC electrical arc and the other end was cooled by a low velocity water jet at 1 atm. Critical heat flux (CHF) values for the 55-80 ^circC sub-cooled free jets were typically 2.5 times published values for saturated free jets. For constrained jets, CHF values were about 20% lower. Heat deposition and heat removal in thick (3/4 inch diameter) cylindrical metal probes (SS304 or copper) inserted into a steady-state tokamak plasma were measured for a broad range of heat loads. The probes were cooled internally by a constrained jet of either air or water. Steady -state heat

  20. Solar water heating -- guidance for small facilities. Tech data sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, M.

    1996-05-01

    Water heating accounts for a substantial portion of energy use at many Federal facilities. Of the total energy used, approximately 18 percent in residential and 4 percent in commercial buildings is for water heating; that percentage may be much higher for buildings with laundries, kitchens, showers, or swimming pools. Nearly all hot water in the United States is heated directly or indirectly through the combustion of some fossil fuel. Because of these dwindling, nonrenewable resources and stricter air pollution standards, it is recommended that Federal facility managers investigate and take advantage of existing solar water heating technology. This TechData sheet is to help activity personnel determine the feasibility, reliability, and cost effectiveness of domestic solar water heating systems for small buildings. With this guide, an energy manager can evaluate the various system options available.

  1. Modeling of Material Removal by Solid State Heat Capacity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2002-04-17

    Pulsed lasers offer the capability of rapid material removal. Here we present simulations of steel coupon tests by two solid state heat capacity lasers built at LLNL. Operating at 1.05 pm, these deliver pulse energies of about 80 J at 10 Hz, and about 500 J at 20 Hz. Each is flashlamp-pumped. The first laser was tested at LLNL, while the second laser has been delivered to HELSTF, White Sands Missile Range. Liquid ejection appears to be an important removal mechanism. We have modeled these experiments via a time-dependent code called THALES, which describes heat transport, melting, vaporization, and the hydrodynamics of liquid, vapor, and air. It was previously used, in a less advanced form, to model drilling by copper vapor lasers [1] . It was also used to model vaporization in beam dumps for a high-power laser [2]. The basic model is in 1D, while the liquid hydrodynamics is handled in 2D.

  2. Horizontal Heat Exchanger Design and Analysis for Passive Heat Removal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vierow, Karen

    2005-08-29

    This report describes a three-year project to investigate the major factors of horizontal heat exchanger performance in passive containment heat removal from a light water reactor following a design basis accident LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident). The heat exchanger studied in this work may be used in advanced and innovative reactors, in which passive heat removal systems are adopted to improve safety and reliability The application of horizontal tube-bundle condensers to passive containment heat removal is new. In order to show the feasibility of horizontal heat exchangers for passive containment cooling, the following aspects were investigated: 1. the condensation heat transfer characteristics when the incoming fluid contains noncondensable gases 2. the effectiveness of condensate draining in the horizontal orientation 3. the conditions that may lead to unstable condenser operation or highly degraded performance 4. multi-tube behavior with the associated secondary-side effects This project consisted of two experimental investigations and analytical model development for incorporation into industry safety codes such as TRAC and RELAP. A physical understanding of the flow and heat transfer phenomena was obtained and reflected in the analysis models. Two gradute students (one funded by the program) and seven undergraduate students obtained research experience as a part of this program.

  3. Heating facilities: Klamath Lutheran Church, Klamath Falls, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Klamath Lutheran Church is a masonry structure with cathedral ceiling containing approximately 5800 sq ft of floor area. This building is currently heated by two duct furnaces and a unit heater all of which are gas fired. An Educational Wing of approximately 6300 sq ft was added in 1958. This building, containing 2 assembly rooms and a number of classrooms is of uninsulated frame construction, with extensive glass area. A gas-fired boiler supplying finned tube radiators currently heats this wing. Four specific options for displacing all or part of the heating duty with geothermal were examined. These options are: case 1 - drilling a production and injection well on the property and using the resultant hot water (180/sup 0/F) to heat the entire facility; case 3 - using effluent from the Klamath Union High School to heat the entire facility; no well drilling required; case 2 - using effluent from the Klamath Union High School to heat only the church building; the present gas boiler would heat the Educational Wing; and case 4 - drilling a production and injection well on the property and using the resulting water (70/sup 0/F) to supply a water-to-water heat pump. Of the four cases examined, case 3 (heating of both the church building and educational wing with effluent from the Klamath Union High School) seems to offer the greatest potential and earliest simple payback period. (MHR)

  4. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Jankura, B. J.; Kudlac, G. A.; Bailey, R. T.

    1998-06-01

    The Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) system is a new concept whereby a Teflon ® covered condensing heat exchanger is adapted to remove certain flue gas constituents, both particulate and gaseous, while recovering low level heat. The pollutant removal performance and durability of this device is the subject of a USDOE sponsored program to develop this technology. The program was conducted under contract to the United States Department of Energy's Fossil Energy Technology Center (DOE-FETC) and was supported by the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) within the Ohio Department of Development, the Electric Power Research Institute's Environmental Control Technology Center (EPRI-ECTC) and Babcock and Wilcox - a McDermott Company (B&W). This report covers the results of the first phase of this program. This Phase I project has been a two year effort. Phase I includes two experimental tasks. One task dealt principally with the pollutant removal capabilities of the IFGT at a scale of about 1.2MWt. The other task studied the durability of the Teflon ® covering to withstand the rigors of abrasive wear by fly ash emitted as a result of coal combustion. The pollutant removal characteristics of the IFGT system were measured over a wide range of operating conditions. The coals tested included high, medium and low-sulfur coals. The flue gas pollutants studied included ammonia, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, particulate, sulfur dioxide, gas phase and particle phase mercury and gas phase and particle phase trace elements. The particulate removal efficiency and size distribution was investigated. These test results demonstrated that the IFGT system is an effective device for both acid gas absorption and fine particulate collection. Although soda ash was shown to be the most effective reagent for acid gas absorption, comparative cost analyses suggested that magnesium enhanced lime was the most promising avenue for future study. The durability of the Teflon

  5. Suitability of oil bioremediation in an Artic soil using surplus heating from an incineration facility.

    PubMed

    Couto, Nazaré; Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Jensen, Pernille E; Højrup, Mads; Rodrigo, Ana P; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2014-05-01

    A 168-day period field study, carried out in Sisimiut, Greenland, assessed the potential to enhance soil remediation with the surplus heating from an incineration facility. This approach searches a feasible ex situ remediation process that could be extended throughout the year with low costs. Individual and synergistic effects of biostimulation were also tested, in parallel. An interim evaluation at the end of the first 42 days showed that biostimulation and active heating, as separate treatments, enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) removal compared to natural attenuation. The coupling of both technologies was even more effective, corroborating the benefits of both techniques in a remediation strategy. However, between day 42 and day 168, there was an opposite remediation trend with all treatments suggesting a stabilization except for natural attenuation, where PHC values continued to decrease. This enforces the "self-purification" capacity of the system, even at low temperatures. Coupling biostimulation with active heating was the best approach for PHC removal, namely for a short period of time (42 days). The proposed remediation scheme can be considered a reliable option for faster PHC removal with low maintenance and using "waste heating" from an incineration facility.

  6. Condensate removal mechanisms in a constrained vapor bubble heat exchanger.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ling; Wang, Yingxin; Wayner, Peter C; Plawsky, Joel L

    2002-10-01

    Microgravity experiments on the constrained vapor bubble heat exchanger (CVB) are being developed for the space station. Herein, ground-based experimental studies on condensate removal in the condenser region of the vertical CVB were conducted and the mechanism of condensate removal in microgravity was found to be the capillary force. The effects of curvature and contact angle on the driving forces for condensate removal is studied. The Nusselt correlations are derived for the film condensation and the flow from the drop to the meniscus at the moment of merging. These new correlations scale as forced convection with h proportional to L(1/2) or h proportional to L(1/2)(cd). For the partially wetting ethanol system studied, the heat transfer coefficient for film condensation was found to be 4.25 x 10(4) W/m(2)K; for dropwise condensation at moment of merging it was found to be 9.64 x 10(4) W/m(2)K; and for single drops it was found to be 1.33 x 10(5) W/m(2)K.

  7. Gradient Heating Facility. Experiment cartridges. Description and general specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breton, J.

    1982-01-01

    Specifications that define experiment cartridges that are compatible with the furnace of the gradient heating facility on board the Spacelab are presented. They establish a standard cartridge design independent of the type of experiment to be conducted. By using them, experimenters can design, construct, and test the hot section of the cartridge, known as the high temperature nacelle.

  8. Passive decay heat removal by natural air convection after severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Erbacher, F.J.; Neitzel, H.J.; Cheng, X.

    1995-09-01

    The composite containment proposed by the Research Center Karlsruhe and the Technical University Karlsruhe is to cope with severe accidents. It pursues the goal to restrict the consequences of core meltdown accidents to the reactor plant. One essential of this new containment concept is its potential to remove the decay heat by natural air convection and thermal radiation in a passive way. To investigate the coolability of such a passive cooling system and the physical phenomena involved, experimental investigations are carried out at the PASCO test facility. Additionally, numerical calculations are performed by using different codes. A satisfying agreement between experimental data and numerical results is obtained.

  9. PKL experiments on loss of residual heat removal under shutdown conditions in PWRS

    SciTech Connect

    Umminger, Klaus; Schoen, Bernhard; Mull, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    When a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is shutdown for refueling, the main coolant inventory is reduced so that the level is at mid-loop elevation. Removal of the decay heat from the core is maintained by the residual heat removal system (RHRS), which under these conditions represents the only heat sink. Loss of RHRS under shutdown conditions has occurred several times worldwide and still plays an important role in risk studies for PWRs. The experimental investigation on loss of RHRS is one mayor topic in the current PKL test program which is included in an international project set up by the OECD. PKL is an integral test facility simulating a typical western-type 1300 MW PWR and is used to investigate the thermal-hydraulic system behavior of PWRs under accident situations. The PKL test facility is operated in the Technical Center of Framatome ANP in Erlangen, Germany. The tests on loss of RHRS have been performed with borated water and special measurement techniques for the determination of the boron concentration (online measurements). The PKL tests demonstrate that, as long as the primary circuit is closed, a failure of the residual heat removal system can be compensated by one or more steam generators, which remain filled with water on the secondary side and stay ready for use during refueling and other outages. However, the tests showed also that accumulations of large condensate inventories (with low boron concentration) can occur in the cold leg piping during mid-loop operation after loss of the RHRS. This paper summarizes the most important results of a PKL experiment dealing with loss of RHRS during mid-loop operation with closed primary circuit. Issues still open and needs for further investigations are also discussed. (authors)

  10. System Study: Residual Heat Removal 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-02-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the residual heat removal (RHR) system in two modes of operation (low-pressure injection in response to a large loss-of-coolant accident and post-trip shutdown-cooling) at 104 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant trends were identified in the RHR results.

  11. 75 FR 54025 - Vessel and Facility Response Plans for Oil: 2003 Removal Equipment Requirements and Alternative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... Facility Response Plans for Oil: 2003 Removal Equipment Requirements and Alternative Technology Revisions'' (74 FR 45004). This final rule amended its requirements for oil-spill removal equipment associated... facility with appropriate equipment and resources located in each zone of operation; specific lists...

  12. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger: Preliminary test plan for Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing

    SciTech Connect

    Jankura, B.J.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants -- while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of addressing the emission of S0{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase 1 and Phase 2 requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The Task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variables than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The data from these tests greatly expands the IFGT performance database for coals and is needed for the technology to progress from the component engineering phase to system integration and commercialization. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides a preliminary test plan for all of the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

  13. Tritium Removal by Laser Heating and Its Application to Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile; G. Guttadora; A. Carpe; S. Langish; K.M. Young; M. Nishi; W. Shu

    2001-11-16

    A novel laser heating technique has recently been applied to removing tritium from carbon tiles that had been exposed to deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas in the Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor (TFTR). A continuous wave neodymium laser, of power up to 300 watts, was used to heat the surface of the tiles. The beam was focused to an intensity, typically 8 kW/cm{sup 2}, and rapidly scanned over the tile surface by galvanometer-driven scanning mirrors. Under the laser irradiation, the surface temperature increased dramatically, and temperatures up to 2,300 degrees C were recorded by an optical pyrometer. Tritium was released and circulated in a closed-loop system to an ionization chamber that measured the tritium concentration. Most of the tritium (up to 84%) could be released by the laser scan. This technique appears promising for tritium removal in a next-step DT device as it avoids oxidation, the associated deconditioning of the plasma facing surfaces, and the expense of processing large quantities of tritium oxide. Some engineering aspects of the implementation of this method in a next-step fusion device will be discussed.

  14. Oxy-Combustion Burner and Integrated Pollutant Removal Research and Development Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Schoenfield; Manny Menendez; Thomas Ochs; Rigel Woodside; Danylo Oryshchyn

    2012-09-30

    A high flame temperature oxy-combustion test facility consisting of a 5 MWe equivalent test boiler facility and 20 KWe equivalent IPR® was constructed at the Hammond, Indiana manufacturing site. The test facility was operated natural gas and coal fuels and parametric studies were performed to determine the optimal performance conditions and generated the necessary technical data required to demonstrate the technologies are viable for technical and economic scale-up. Flame temperatures between 4930-6120F were achieved with high flame temperature oxy-natural gas combustion depending on whether additional recirculated flue gases are added to balance the heat transfer. For high flame temperature oxy-coal combustion, flame temperatures in excess of 4500F were achieved and demonstrated to be consistent with computational fluid dynamic modeling of the burner system. The project demonstrated feasibility and effectiveness of the Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process with Integrated Pollutant Removal process for CCS and CCUS. With these technologies total parasitic power requirements for both oxygen production and carbon capture currently are in the range of 20% of the gross power output. The Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process has been demonstrated at a Technology Readiness Level of 6 and is ready for commencement of a demonstration project.

  15. Geothermal heating facilities for Frontier Inn, Susanville, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-03-01

    A 38 unit motel composed of six major sections (coffee shop, A frame units, apartments, back units, two story units and office) was built over a number of years and exhibits widely varying types of construction. Space heating is provided by primarily electric resistance equipment with some propane use. Domestic hot water is provided primarily by propane with some electric resistance. The coffee shop uses fuel oil for both space and domestic hot water heating. A geothermal district heating system is being installed. Although the motel site is not located in the area of construction activity, it is expected that the pipeline will be extended. The potential of retrofitting the existing heating facilities at the inn to geothermal is studied.

  16. [Heat resistance of Cladosporium isolated from laboratory animal facilities].

    PubMed

    Kawai, S; Takatori, K; Ohtaki, T

    1990-07-01

    Heat resistance tests for the saprophyte, Cladosporium, isolated from laboratory animal facilities were carried out. In testing the effects of moderate and high temperature conditions, C. sphaerospermum (C. s) and C. cladosporioides (C. c) were found to grow on media in temperatures less than 32 degrees C, but did not in temperature of 35 degrees C and over. The colony diameter of Cladosporium became smaller as temperature increased. The death time of C. s treated with moist heat was within 12 min at 48 degrees C and that of C. c was within 26 min at 43 degrees C. Both Cladosporium species could not survive for more than 1 min at 55 degrees C. On the other hand, Cladosporium treated with dry heat could not survive more than 69-12 min (C. s) and 39-9.5 min (C. c) at 70-100 degrees C. From these results, it can be seen that Cladosporium was definitely sensitive to heat treatment, and the authors assume that heat is a means of prevention in laboratory animal facilities.

  17. System Study: Residual Heat Removal 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the residual heat removal (RHR) system in two modes of operation (low-pressure injection in response to a large loss-of-coolant accident and post-trip shutdown-cooling) at 104 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing trends were identified in the RHR results. A highly statistically significant decreasing trend was observed for the RHR injection mode start-only unreliability. Statistically significant decreasing trends were observed for RHR shutdown cooling mode start-only unreliability and RHR shutdown cooling model 24-hour unreliability.

  18. Tritium emission reduction at Darlington tritium removal facility using a Bubbler System

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyanam, K.; Leilabadi, A.; El-Behairy, O.; Williams, G. I. D.; Vogt, H. K.

    2008-07-15

    Ontario Power Generation Nuclear (OPGN) has a 4 x 880 MWe CANDU nuclear station at its Darlington Nuclear Div. located in Bowmanville. The station operates a Tritium Removal Facility (TRF) to reduce and maintain low tritium levels in the Moderator and Heat Transport heavy water systems of Ontario's CANDU fleet by extracting, concentrating, immobilizing and storing as a metal tritide. Minimizing tritium releases to the environment is of paramount importance to ensure that dose to the public is as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) and to maintain credibility with the Public. Tritium is removed from the Cryogenic Distillation System to the Tritium Immobilization System (TIS) glove box via a transfer line that is protected by a rupture disc and relief valve. An overpressure event in 2003 had caused the rupture disc to blow, resulting in the release of a significant quantity of elemental tritium into the relief valve discharge line, which ties into the contaminated exhaust system. As a result of a few similar events occurring over a number of years of TRF operation, the released elemental tritium would have been converted to tritium oxide in the presence of a stagnant moist air environment in the stainless steel discharge line. A significant amount of tritium oxide hold-up in the discharge line was anticipated. To minimize any further releases to the environment, a Bubbler System was designed to remove and recover the tritium from the discharge line. This paper summarizes the results of several Bubbler recovery runs that were made over a period of a month. Approximately 3500 Ci of tritium oxide and 230 Ci of elemental tritium were removed and collected. The tritium contained in the water produced from the Bubbler system was later safely recovered in the station's downgraded D{sub 2}O clean-up and recovery system. (authors)

  19. 48 CFR 1322.101-4 - Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 1322.101-4 Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by...

  20. 48 CFR 1422.101-4 - Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 1422.101-4 Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by...

  1. 48 CFR 1422.101-4 - Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 1422.101-4 Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by...

  2. 48 CFR 1422.101-4 - Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 1422.101-4 Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by...

  3. 48 CFR 2922.101-4 - Removal of items from contractor facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 2922.101-4 Removal of items from contractor facilities affected by...

  4. 48 CFR 2922.101-4 - Removal of items from contractor facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 2922.101-4 Removal of items from contractor facilities affected by...

  5. 48 CFR 1322.101-4 - Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 1322.101-4 Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by...

  6. 48 CFR 1322.101-4 - Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 1322.101-4 Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by...

  7. 48 CFR 2922.101-4 - Removal of items from contractor facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 2922.101-4 Removal of items from contractor facilities affected by...

  8. 30 CFR 285.912 - After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline....912 After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit? Within 60 days after you remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, you must submit a written report to MMS that...

  9. 30 CFR 285.910 - What must I do when I remove my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I do when I remove my facility? 285.910 Section 285.910 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF...

  10. Measurement of frost characteristics on heat exchanger fins. Part 1: Test facility and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, L.; Chen, H.; Besant, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    A special test facility was developed to characterize frost growing on heat exchanger fins where the cold surfaces and the air supply conditions were similar to those experienced in freezers, i.e., cold surface temperatures ranging from {minus}35 C to {minus}40 C, air supply temperatures from {minus}10 C to {minus}20 C, and 80% to 100% relative humidity (RH). This test facility included a test section with removable fins to measure the frost height and mass concentration. Frost height on heat exchanger fins was measured using a new automated laser scanning system to measure the height of frost and its distribution on selected fins. The increase in air pressure loss resulting from frost growth on the fins was measured directly in the test loop. The frost mass accumulation distribution was measured for each test using special pre-etched fins that could be easily subdivided and weighed. The total heat rate was measured using a heat flux meter. These frost-measuring instruments were calibrated and the uncertainty of each is stated.

  11. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and full nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system (Bragg-Sitton, 2005). The current paper applies the same testing methodology to a direct drive gas cooled reactor system, demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. In each testing application, core power transients were controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. Although both system designs utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility.

  12. Heat Removal from Bipolar Transistor by Loop Heat Pipe with Nickel and Copper Porous Structures

    PubMed Central

    Smitka, Martin; Malcho, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) are used in many branches of industry, mainly for cooling of electrical elements and systems. The loop heat pipe is a vapour-liquid phase-change device that transfers heat from evaporator to condenser. One of the most important parts of the LHP is the porous wick structure. The wick structure provides capillary force to circulate the working fluid. To achieve good thermal performance of LHP, capillary wicks with high permeability and porosity and fine pore radius are expected. The aim of this work was to develop porous structures from copper and nickel powder with different grain sizes. For experiment copper powder with grain size of 50 and 100 μm and nickel powder with grain size of 10 and 25 μm were used. Analysis of these porous structures and LHP design are described in the paper. And the measurements' influences of porous structures in LHP on heat removal from the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) have been made. PMID:24959622

  13. Passive decay heat removal system for water-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    A passive decay-heat removal system for a water-cooled nuclear reactor employs a closed heat transfer loop having heat-exchanging coils inside an open-topped, insulated box located inside the reactor vessel, below its normal water level, in communication with a condenser located outside of containment and exposed to the atmosphere. The heat transfer loop is located such that the evaporator is in a position where, when the water level drops in the reactor, it will become exposed to steam. Vapor produced in the evaporator passes upward to the condenser above the normal water level. In operation, condensation in the condenser removes heat from the system, and the condensed liquid is returned to the evaporator. The system is disposed such that during normal reactor operations where the water level is at its usual position, very little heat will be removed from the system, but during emergency, low water level conditions, substantial amounts of decay heat will be removed.

  14. ALARA considerations for the whole body neutron irradiation facility source removal project at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Patrick T

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the activities that were involved with the safe removal of fourteen PuBe sources from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Whole Body Neutron Irradiation Facility (WBNIF). As part of a Department of Energy and BNL effort to reduce the radiological inventory, the WBNIF was identified as having no future use. In order to deactivate the facility and eliminate the need for nuclear safety management and long-term surveillance, it was decided to remove the neutron sources and dismantle the facility. In addition, the sources did not have DOT Special Form documentation so they would need to be encapsulated once removed for offsite storage or disposal. The planning and the administrative as well as engineering controls put in place enabled personnel to safely remove and encapsulate the sources while keeping exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). PMID:16404183

  15. Electrochemical Technology for Oxygen Removal and Measurement in the CELSS Test Facility, Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drews, Michael E.; Covington, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Life Support Flight Program is evaluating regenerative technologies, including those that utilize higher plants, as a means to reduce resupply over long duration space missions. Constructed to assist in the evaluation process is the CELSS Test Facility Engineering Development Unit (CTF-EDU) an environmentally closed (less than 1% mass and thermal leakage) technology test bed. This ground based fully functional prototype is currently configured to support crop growth, utilizing the power, volume and mass resources allocated for two space station racks. Sub-system technologies were selected considering their impact on available resources, their ability to minimize integration issues, and their degree of modularity. Gas specific mass handling is a key sub-system technology for both biological and physical/chemical life support technologies. The CTF-EDU requires such a system to accommodate non-linear oxygen production from crops, by enabling the control system to change and sustain partial pressure set points in the growth volume. Electrochemical cells are one of the technologies that were examined for oxygen handling in the CTF-EDU. They have been additionally considered to meet other regenerative life support functions, such as oxygen generation, the production of potable water from composite waste streams, and for having the potential to integrate life support functions with those of propulsion and energy storage. An oxygen removal system based on an electrochemical cell was chosen for the EDU due to it's low power, volume and mass requirements (10W, 0.000027 cu m, 4.5 kg) and because of the minimal number of integration considerations. Unlike it's competitors, the system doesn't require post treatments of its byproducts, or heat and power intensive regenerations, that also mandate system redundancy or cycling. The EDUs oxygen removal system only requires two resources, which are already essential to controlled plant growth: electricity and water. Additionally

  16. Boiling Experiment Facility for Heat Transfer Studies in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; McQuillen, John; Chao, David

    2008-01-01

    Pool boiling in microgravity is an area of both scientific and practical interest. By conducting tests in microgravity, it is possible to assess the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and assess the relative magnitude of effects with regards to other "forces" and phenomena such as Marangoni forces, liquid momentum forces, and microlayer evaporation. The Boiling eXperiment Facility is now being built for the Microgravity Science Glovebox that will use normal perfluorohexane as a test fluid to extend the range of test conditions to include longer test durations and less liquid subcooling. Two experiments, the Microheater Array Boiling Experiment and the Nucleate Pool Boiling eXperiment will use the Boiling eXperiment Facility. The objectives of these studies are to determine the differences in local boiling heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity and normal gravity from nucleate boiling, through critical heat flux and into the transition boiling regime and to examine the bubble nucleation, growth, departure and coalescence processes. Custom-designed heaters will be utilized to achieve these objectives.

  17. Removal and treatment of mercury contamination at gas processing facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, S.M.; McArthur, A.

    1995-12-01

    Processing of gas containing mercury invariably leads to contamination of equipment and can generate waste in the form of sludge and spent adsorbent materials. Occasional accidents can also lead to soil contamination. This paper reviews mercury contamination in the gas processing industry and discusses newly developed methods for clean-up and disposal of mercury waste. Research and development (sponsored by the Gas Research Institute) have produced new technology for mercury removal from complex matrices. Equipment decontamination is accomplished using chemical cleaning solutions that selectively oxidize and complex elemental mercury deposits. These cleaning formulations include aqueous base solutions containing iodine as the completing agent and organic (alcohol) base solutions using completing agents. Soil, sludge, and debris must be thermally processed to remove (recycle) mercury. Thermal systems use vacuum, inert gas, or air as the carder medium. If air is used, sulfur in the matrix is converted to SO{sub 2} and hydrocarbons are oxidized as well, depending upon design. Anaerobic thermal systems employ selective condensation and/or adsorption to separate sulfur and hydrocarbons from mercury. Spent adsorbent materials are also thermally processed using strictly anaerobic conditions to avoid exothermal reactions involving carbon. The regulatory climate relative to mercury is changing rapidly. Regulations covering treated debris and soils may require total mercury concentrations of less than 2 mg/kg for burial. Total mercury analysis rather than leaching procedure (TCLP) is becoming the norm in regulations and specifications. Sampling and analysis procedures for contaminated surfaces are under development.

  18. Grouping of light water reactors for evaluation of decay heat removal capability

    SciTech Connect

    Karol, R.; Fresco, A.; Perkins, K.R.

    1984-06-01

    This grouping report provides a compilation of decay heat removal systems (DHRS) data for operating commercial light water reactors. The reactors have been divided into 12 groups based on similarity of the DHRS and related systems as part of the NRC Task Action Plan on Shutdown Decay Heat Removal Requirements.

  19. Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    WILLIS, W.L.

    2000-06-15

    This document addresses the preferred combination of design and operational configurations to provide heat removal from high-level waste tanks during Phase 1 waste feed delivery to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding tank safety requirement limits. An interim decision for the preferred method to remove the heat from the high-level waste tanks during waste feed delivery operations is presented herein.

  20. Results from evaporation tests to support the MWTF heat removal system design

    SciTech Connect

    Crea, B.A.

    1994-12-22

    An experimental tests program was conducted to measure the evaporative heat removal from the surface of a tank of simulated waste. The results contained in this report constitute definition design data for the latest heat removal function of the MWTF primary ventilation system.

  1. Comparative Calibration of Heat Flux Sensors in Two Blackbody Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, A. V.; Tsai, B. K.; Saunders, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of heat flux sensor calibrations in two blackbody facilities: the 25 mm variable temperature blackbody (VTBB) primary facility and a recently developed 51 mm aperture spherical blackbody (SPBB) facility. Three Schmidt-Boelter gages and a Gardon gage were calibrated with reference to an electrical substitution radiometer in the VTBB. One of the Schmidt-Boelter gages thus calibrated was used as a reference standard to calibrate other gages in the SPBB. Comparison of the Schmidt-Boelter gages calibrations in the SPBB and the VTBB agreed within the measurement uncertainties. For the Gardon gage, the measured responsivity in the SPBB showed a gradual decrease with increasing distance from the aperture. When the gage was located close to the aperture, a distance less than the aperture radius, the responsivity in the SPBB agreed with VTBB measurements. At a distance of about three times the aperture radius, the responsivity showed a decrease of about 4 %. This is probably due to higher convection loss from the Gardon gage surface compared to the Schmidt-Boelter sensor.

  2. Final Removal Action Report of the CPP-603A Basin Facility

    SciTech Connect

    D. V. Croson

    2007-01-04

    This Final Removal Action Report describes the actions that were taken under the non-time-critical removal action recommended in the Action Memorandum for the Non-Time Critical Removal Action at the CPP-603A Basins, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as evaluated in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the CPP-603A Bason Non-Time Critical Removal Action, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The Removal Action implemented consolidation and recording the location of debris objects containing radioactive cobalt (cobalt-60), removal and management of a small high-activity debris object (SHADO 1), the removal, treatment, and disposal of the basin water at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) evaporation ponds, and filling the basins with grout/controlled low strength material.

  3. Heat barrier for use in a nuclear reactor facility

    DOEpatents

    Keegan, Charles P.

    1988-01-01

    A thermal barrier for use in a nuclear reactor facility is disclosed herein. Generally, the thermal barrier comprises a flexible, heat-resistant web mounted over the annular space between the reactor vessel and the guard vessel in order to prevent convection currents generated in the nitrogen atmosphere in this space from entering the relatively cooler atmosphere of the reactor cavity which surrounds these vessels. Preferably, the flexible web includes a blanket of heat-insulating material formed from fibers of a refractory material, such as alumina and silica, sandwiched between a heat-resistant, metallic cloth made from stainless steel wire. In use, the web is mounted between the upper edges of the guard vessel and the flange of a sealing ring which surrounds the reactor vessel with a sufficient enough slack to avoid being pulled taut as a result of thermal differential expansion between the two vessels. The flexible web replaces the rigid and relatively complicated structures employed in the prior art for insulating the reactor cavity from the convection currents generated between the reactor vessel and the guard vessel.

  4. Impact of the amount of working fluid in loop heat pipe to remove waste heat from electronic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smitka, Martin; Kolková, Z.; Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, M.

    2014-03-01

    One of the options on how to remove waste heat from electronic components is using loop heat pipe. The loop heat pipe (LHP) is a two-phase device with high effective thermal conductivity that utilizes change phase to transport heat. It was invented in Russia in the early 1980's. The main parts of LHP are an evaporator, a condenser, a compensation chamber and a vapor and liquid lines. Only the evaporator and part of the compensation chamber are equipped with a wick structure. Inside loop heat pipe is working fluid. As a working fluid can be used distilled water, acetone, ammonia, methanol etc. Amount of filling is important for the operation and performance of LHP. This work deals with the design of loop heat pipe and impact of filling ratio of working fluid to remove waste heat from insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT).

  5. Thermal control system. [removing waste heat from industrial process spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, D. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The temperature of an exothermic process plant carried aboard an Earth orbiting spacecraft is regulated using a number of curved radiator panels accurately positioned in a circular arrangement to form an open receptacle. A module containing the process is insertable into the receptacle. Heat exchangers having broad exterior surfaces extending axially above the circumference of the module fit within arcuate spacings between adjacent radiator panels. Banks of variable conductance heat pipes partially embedded within and thermally coupled to the radiator panels extend across the spacings and are thermally coupled to broad exterior surfaces of the heat exchangers by flanges. Temperature sensors monitor the temperature of process fluid flowing from the module through the heat exchanges. Thermal conduction between the heat exchangers and the radiator panels is regulated by heating a control fluid within the heat pipes to vary the effective thermal length of the heat pipes in inverse proportion to changes in the temperature of the process fluid.

  6. 30 CFR 585.912 - After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline... facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit? Within 60 days after you remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, you must submit a written report to BOEM that includes the following: (a) A...

  7. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe (HP) cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system. Reactivity feedback calculations were then based on a bulk reactivity feedback coefficient and measured average core temperature. This paper presents preliminary results from similar dynamic testing of a direct drive gas cooled reactor system (DDG), demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. Although the HP and DDG designs both utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility. Planned system upgrades to allow implementation of higher fidelity dynamic testing are also discussed. Proposed DDG

  8. Dry-heat Depyrogenation Ovens for Pharmaceutical Compounding Facilities.

    PubMed

    Weller, Tom; Kragseth, Rolf; Dullinger, Roger; Illum, Henrik; Perry, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Sterilization kills microorganisms in compounded preparations, on the implements used to prepare them, and on the vessels that contain them, but depyrogenation incinerates the remaining debris and renders the treated tool, container, or meditation pyrogen free. Depyrogenation is thus an essential step in the preparation of sterile compounds, and the pharmacist who dispenses those formulations is directly responsible for ensuring their safety, potency, and purity. Dry heat provided by a depyrogenation oven or tunnel is the pharmaceutical gold standard for ensuring the elimination of pyrogens. In this report, we describe several depyrogenation ovens that are compliant with Current Good Manufacturing Practice standards and are appropriate for use in aseptic-compounding facilities that meet the guidelines set forth in United States Pharmacopela Chapter <797>. PMID:26714359

  9. Removal of criticality accident alarm systems at the Y-12 Plant waste management facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, R.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses why criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs) were installed in certain waste management buildings at the Y-12 Plant, why the plant now wants to remove them, and what steps were taken to allow the US Department of Energy (DOE) to authorize the removal of the systems. To begin with, the systems in question were installed in the mid- to late-1980s. Some of the facilities were new, and there was no operating experience with the processes. A CAAS, although expensive, is an absolute necessity where criticality accidents are credible. But, they are a superfluous and unnecessary expense in those facilities where it has been determined that a criticality accident is incredible (defined as having a probability of <1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}/yr). The PRAs have been performed to evaluate six Y-12 Plant waste management facilities, five storage facilities, and a nondestructive analysis facility, with an additional study now being performed on the West End Treatment Facility. The results to date have shown that the probability of various criticality accident scenarios at these facilities is <1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}/yr and that the CAASs are not needed in these facilities.

  10. Experimental Breeder Reactor II inherent shutdown and heat removal tests - test results and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Planchon, H.P.; Singer, R.M.; Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Chang, L.K.; Betten, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    A test program is being conducted to demonstrate that a power producing Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) can passively remove shutdown heat by natural convection; passively reduce power in response to a loss of reactor flow and passively reduce power in response to a loss of the balance of plant heat sink. Measurements and pretest predictions confirm that natural convection is a reliable, predictable method of shutdown heat removal and suggest that safety-related pumps or pony motors are not necessary for safe, shutdown heat removal in a LMR. Measurements from tests in which reactor flow and heat rejection to the balance of plant were perturbed show that reactivity feedbacks can passively control power and temperature. This data is a basis for additional tests including a complete loss-of-flow without scram and a complete loss of heat sink without scram.

  11. 48 CFR 22.101-4 - Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 22.101-4 Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work... of items is in the Government's interest. Normally the determining factor is the critical needs of...

  12. 76 FR 74804 - Reopening the Comment Period for the Klamath Facilities Removal Draft Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report AGENCY: Office of Environmental Policy and Compliance... the content for the Klamath Facilities Removal Draft Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (Draft EIS/ EIR). We will accept comments until December 30, 2011. ] DATES: Submit...

  13. 48 CFR 22.101-4 - Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 22.101-4 Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work... appearance of force and prevent incidents that might detrimentally affect labor-management relations....

  14. 48 CFR 222.101-4 - Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 222.101-4 Removal of items from... items from the facility, shall— (i) Before initiating any action, contact the labor advisor to obtain... mediation agency regarding the effect movement of the items would have on labor negotiations....

  15. 48 CFR 222.101-4 - Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 222.101-4 Removal of items from... items from the facility, shall— (i) Before initiating any action, contact the labor advisor to obtain... mediation agency regarding the effect movement of the items would have on labor negotiations....

  16. 48 CFR 22.101-4 - Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 22.101-4 Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work... appearance of force and prevent incidents that might detrimentally affect labor-management relations....

  17. 48 CFR 222.101-4 - Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 222.101-4 Removal of items from... items from the facility, shall— (i) Before initiating any action, contact the labor advisor to obtain... mediation agency regarding the effect movement of the items would have on labor negotiations....

  18. 48 CFR 222.101-4 - Removal of items from contractors' facilities affected by work stoppages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 222.101-4 Removal of items from... items from the facility, shall— (i) Before initiating any action, contact the labor advisor to obtain... mediation agency regarding the effect movement of the items would have on labor negotiations....

  19. Removal site evaluation report for the Isotope Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This removal site evaluation (RmSE) report of the Isotope Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the Isotopes Facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment and if remedial site evaluations (RSEs) or removal actions are required. The scope of the project included: (1) a review of historical evidence regarding operations and use of the facility; (2) interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past operating practices; (3) a site inspection; and (4) identification of hazard areas requiring maintenance, removal, or remedial actions. The results of RmSE indicate that no substantial risks exist from contaminants present in the Isotope Facilities because adequate controls and practices exist to protect human health and the environment. The recommended correction from the RmSE are being conducted as maintenance actions; accordingly, this RmSE is considered complete and terminated.

  20. Methodology for characterizing heat removal mechanism in human skin during cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Pikkula, Brian M; Tunnell, James W; Anvari, Bahman

    2003-05-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) reduces epidermal damage during laser treatment of various dermatoses. The goal of this study was to determine the heat removal mechanism in skin and quantify the amount in response to CSC. Thermocouples were imbedded in four model substrates with a range of thermal diffusivities, greater than three orders of magnitude in difference, to measure the temperature profiles in response to CSC and sapphire contact cooling, which removes heat completely by conduction. An algorithm solving an inverse heat conduction problem was subsequently used to quantify the amount of heat removal from the substrates using the measured temperatures. The interface thermal conductance and internal temperatures within the substrates were computed by a finite difference algorithm that solved the heat conduction equation. Results verify a marked increase in heat removal and interface thermal conductance with increasing thermal diffusivity. By estimation from the model substrate results, heat removal and interface thermal conductance values for skin were obtained. Data demonstrate that during CSC, evaporation is the dominant heat transfer mechanism in materials with higher thermal diffusivities; however, conductive cooling dominates in substrates with lower thermal diffusivities such as skin. PMID:12757194

  1. Method of high heat flux removal by usage of liquid spray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smakulski, Przemysław

    2013-09-01

    High heat flux removal are important issue in many perspective applications such as computer chips, laser diode arrays, or boilers working on supercritical parameters. Electronic microchips constructed nowadays are model example of high heat flux removal, where the cooling system have to maintain the temperature below 358 K and take heat flux up to 300 W/cm2. One of the most efficient methods of microchips cooling turns out to be the spray cooling method. Review of installations has been accomplished for removal at high heat flux with liquid sprays. In the article are shown high flux removal characteristic and dependences, boiling critical parameters, as also the numerical method of spray cooling analysis.

  2. Shroud boundary condition characterization experiments at the Radiant Heat Facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Nakos, James Thomas; Gill, Walter

    2004-10-01

    A series of experiments was performed to better characterize the boundary conditions from an inconel heat source ('shroud') painted with Pyromark black paint. Quantifying uncertainties in this type of experimental setup is crucial to providing information for comparisons with code predictions. The characterization of this boundary condition has applications in many scenarios related to fire simulation experiments performed at Sandia National Laboratories Radiant Heat Facility (RHF). Four phases of experiments were performed. Phase 1 results showed that a nominal 1000 C shroud temperature is repeatable to about 2 C. Repeatability of temperatures at individual points on the shroud show that temperatures do not vary more than 10 C from experiment to experiment. This variation results in a 6% difference in heat flux to a target 4 inches away. IR camera images showed the shroud was not at a uniform temperature, although the control temperature was constant to about {+-}2 C during a test. These images showed that a circular shaped, flat shroud with its edges supported by an insulated plate has a temperature distribution with higher temperatures at the edges and lower temperatures in the center. Differences between the center and edge temperatures were up to 75 C. Phase 3 results showed that thermocouple (TC) bias errors are affected by coupling with the surrounding environment. The magnitude of TC error depends on the environment facing the TC. Phase 4 results were used to estimate correction factors for specific applications (40 and 63-mil diameter, ungrounded junction, mineral insulated, metal-sheathed TCs facing a cold surface). Correction factors of about 3.0-4.5% are recommended for 40 mil diameter TCs and 5.5-7.0% for 63 mil diameter TCs. When mounted on the cold side of the shroud, TCs read lower than the 'true' shroud temperature, and the TC reads high when on the hot side. An alternate method uses the average of a cold side and hot side TC of the same size to

  3. The Removal Action Work Plan for CPP-603A Basin Facility

    SciTech Connect

    B. T. Richards

    2006-06-05

    This revised Removal Action Work Plan describes the actions to be taken under the non-time-critical removal action recommended in the Action Memorandum for the Non-Time Critical Removal Action at the CPP-603A Basins, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as evaluated in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the CPP-603A Basin Non-Time Critical Removal Action, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The regulatory framework outlined in this Removal Action Work Plan has been modified from the description provided in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (DOE/NE-ID-11140, Rev. 1, August 2004). The modification affects regulation of sludge removal, treatment, and disposal, but the end state and technical approaches have not changed. Revision of this document had been delayed until the basin sludge was successfully managed. This revision (Rev. 1) has been prepared to provide information that was not previously identified in Rev. 0 to describe the removal, treatment, and disposal of the basin water at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) CERCLA Disposal Facility evaporation ponds and fill the basins with grout/controlled low strength material (CLSM) was developed. The Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the CPP-603A Basin Non-Time Critical Removal Action, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center - conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act - evaluated risks associated with deactivation of the basins and alternatives for addressing those risks. The decision to remove and dispose of the basin water debris not containing uranium grouted in place after the sludge has been removed and managed under the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act has been documented in the Act Memorandum for the Non-Time Critical Removal Action at the CPP-603A Basins, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center.

  4. A radiant heating test facility for space shuttle orbiter thermal protection system certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherborne, W. D.; Milhoan, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    A large scale radiant heating test facility was constructed so that thermal certification tests can be performed on the new generation of thermal protection systems developed for the space shuttle orbiter. This facility simulates surface thermal gradients, onorbit cold-soak temperatures down to 200 K, entry heating temperatures to 1710 K in an oxidizing environment, and the dynamic entry pressure environment. The capabilities of the facility and the development of new test equipment are presented.

  5. Cryogenic Heat-Exchanger Design for Freeze-out Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Landfill Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Chung, Myung Jin; Park, Seong Bum

    A cryogenic heat exchanger to remove carbon dioxide from landfill gas (LFG) is proposed and designed for applications to LNG production in distributed-scale. Since the major components of LFG are methane and carbon dioxide, CO2 removal is a significant pre-process in the liquefaction systems. A new and simple approach is proposed to directly remove carbon dioxide as frost on the surface wall along the cooling passage in a liquefying heat exchanger and to install two identical heat exchangers in parallel for alternative switching. As a first step of feasibility study, combined heat and mass transfer analysis is performed on the freeze-out process of CO2 in a counterflow heat exchanger, where CH4-CO2 mixture is cooled below its frost temperature in thermal contact with cold refrigerant. Engineering correlations for the analogy of heat and mass transfer are incorporated into numerical heat exchanger analysis with detailed fluid properties. The developed analytical model is used to estimate the distribution of CO2 accumulation and the required heat exchanger size with latent thermal load for the cryogenic CO2 removal in various operating conditions.

  6. 30 CFR 585.912 - After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline..., cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit? Within 60 days after you remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, you must submit a written report to BOEM that includes the following: (a) A summary...

  7. 30 CFR 285.912 - After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit? 285.912 Section 285.912 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... pipeline, what information must I submit? Within 60 days after you remove a facility, cable, or...

  8. 30 CFR 585.912 - After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline..., cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit? Within 60 days after you remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, you must submit a written report to BOEM that includes the following: (a) A summary...

  9. Device for the removal of heat from waste water

    SciTech Connect

    Kalberer, F.

    1983-12-27

    Waste water is led into a container (1) through a inlet (4) at the top. A connection (20) between the inlet (4) and an outlet (21) having a check valve (22) comprises adjacent to the inlet (4) two inverted frusto-conical hollow bodies (24, 25) which are directly connected to each other. The connecting surface between the two hollow bodies (24, 25) is formed as a coarse screen (26). A round fine screen (30), which diverges downwardly, surrounds the hollow bodies (24,25). Heat exchangers (31) are located in the space between the fine screen (30) and the wall (2) of the container (1). An outlet (5) terminates at the bottom of the container and connects with a riser (6) and via a bend (7) with the sewerage conduit (8). Through the coarse screen (26) the waste water reaches the container, and the heat can reach the heat exchangers (31) through the fine screen (30), so that practically uncontaminated water is present at the heat exchangers, and the need for cleansing is substantially diminished.

  10. Heat removal characteristics of a primary containment vessel external spray

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Fujii, Tadashi; Murase, Michio

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the heat release characteristics of a primary containment vessel (PCV) external spray (one of the PCV cooling systems utilizing the steel PCV wall as the heat transfer medium), the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the falling liquid film on the PCV surface have been investigated experimentally. Then, the performance of the PCV external spray cooling system was evaluated using the experimental findings. The following results were obtained: (1) Heat transfer coefficients of the falling liquid film under steady-state conditions were increased as the film flow rate per unit length of the liquid film width increased, and they agreed with Wilke`s correlation within about {+-}15%. (2) The PCV surface temperature, when preheated up to 150 C, which is the supposed PCV temperature under a severe accident, decreased below 100 C within a few seconds when the PCV external spray was initiated, and boiling on the PCV surface could not be maintained. (3) Heat transfer coefficients of the falling liquid film under transient conditions were higher initially due to the boiling effect; however, they decreased rapidly and approached those under steady-state conditions. (4) The PCV external spray for the conceptually designed PCV could suppress the PCV pressure below the design goal under a severe accident.

  11. Nuclear energy plant with improved device for removing after-heat and emergency heat

    SciTech Connect

    Buscher, E.; Vinzens, K.

    1980-01-29

    The nuclear energy installation includes a nuclear reactor core, a primary circulatory loop connected to the reactor core and a circulating liquid metal medium therein heated by the reactor core. A first heat exchanger has a primary side connected in the primary circulatory loop, and a secondary side, a secondary circulatory loop connected to the secondary side of the first heat exchanger and a circulating liquid metal medium therein heated by heat transfer in the first heat exchanger from the liquid metal medium of the primary circulatory loop. A second heat exchanger has a primary side connected in the secondary circulatory loop, and a secondary side, a tertiary circulatory loop connected to the secondary side of the second heat exchanger and a circulating water/steam medium therein heated by heat transfer in the second heat exchanger from the liquid metal medium of the secondary circulatory loop. A condenser has a vapor/condensate side thereof connected in the tertiary circulatory loop, and a coolant side thereof connectible to a heat sink outside the installation. A third heat exchanger has a primary side connected to the primary side of the first heat exchanger, and a secondary side, a quaternary coolant loop connected to the secondary side of the third heat exchanger and connectible through the condenser to the heat sink.

  12. Transient analysis of containment heat removal at Prairie Island with boiling in the fan coil tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Elicson, T.; Fraser, B.; Anderson, D.; Thomas, S.

    1996-12-31

    An analysis has been performed to determine the equilibrium cooling water flow rates and heat removal rates through the Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant containment fan coil units (CFCUs) under postulated accident conditions which leads to boiling in the CFCUs. Key components of the analysis include a detailed fan coil heat exchanger model, mass and energy conservation in the cooling tubes, two-phase flow effects on heat transfer and pressure drop, and pipe network modeling.

  13. Uncertainties of stormwater characteristics and removal rates of stormwater treatment facilities: implications for stormwater handling.

    PubMed

    Langeveld, J G; Liefting, H J; Boogaard, F C

    2012-12-15

    Stormwater runoff is a major contributor to the pollution of receiving waters. This study focuses at characterising stormwater in order to be able to determine the impact of stormwater on receiving waters and to be able to select the most appropriate stormwater handling strategy. The stormwater characterisation is based on determining site mean concentrations (SMCs) and their uncertainties as well as the treatability of stormwater by monitoring specific pollutants concentration levels (TSS, COD, BOD, TKN, TP, Pb, Cu, Zn, E.coli) at three full scale stormwater treatment facilities in Arnhem, the Netherlands. This has resulted in 106 storm events being monitored at the lamella settler, 59 at the high rate sand filter and 132 at the soil filter during the 2 year monitoring period. The stormwater characteristics in Arnhem in terms of SMCs for main pollutants TSS and COD and settling velocities differ from international data. This implies that decisions for stormwater handling made on international literature data will very likely be wrong due to assuming too high concentrations of pollutants and misjudgement of the treatability of stormwater. The removal rates monitored at the full scale treatment facilities are within the expected range, with the soil filter and the sand filter having higher removal rates than the lamella settler. The full scale pilots revealed the importance of incorporating gross solids removal in the design of stormwater treatment facilities, as the gross solids determine operation and maintenance requirements.

  14. Jet pump-drive system for heat removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, James R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The invention does away with the necessity of moving parts such as a check valve in a nuclear reactor cooling system. Instead, a jet pump, in combination with a TEMP, is employed to assure safe cooling of a nuclear reactor after shutdown. A main flow exists for a reactor coolant. A point of withdrawal is provided for a secondary flow. A TEMP, responsive to the heat from said coolant in the secondary flow path, automatically pumps said withdrawn coolant to a higher pressure and thus higher velocity compared to the main flow. The high velocity coolant is applied as a driver flow for the jet pump which has a main flow chamber located in the main flow circulation pump. Upon nuclear shutdown and loss of power for the main reactor pumping system, the TEMP/jet pump combination continues to boost the coolant flow in the direction it is already circulating. During the decay time for the nuclear reactor, the jet pump keeps running until the coolant temperature drops to a lower and safe temperature where the heat is no longer a problem. At this lower temperature, the TEMP/jet pump combination ceases its circulation boosting operation. When the nuclear reactor is restarted and the coolant again exceeds the lower temperature setting, the TEMP/jet pump automatically resumes operation. The TEMP/jet pump combination is thus automatic, self-regulating and provides an emergency pumping system free of moving parts.

  15. Nitrogen Removal from Water Resource Recovery Facility Secondary Effluent Using a Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenping

    2016-03-01

    Solid-phase denitrification technology can potentially be used to remove nitrogen compounds, such as total nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-)-N), from wastewater. In this study, the authors made use of an internal-circulation baffled biofilm reactor in which filamentous bamboo acted as a biocarrier for the removal of nitrogen (N) from water resource recovery facility (WRRF) secondary effluent. A laboratory-scale experiment was conducted to assess the efficacy and mechanisms of N removal from the WRRF secondary effluent operated in continuous-flow mode. Results indicated that total nitrogen and NO3(-)-N removal rates reached 66.58 to 75.23% and 75.6 to 85.6%, respectively. Infrared spectrum analysis indicated biodegradation in the filamentous bamboo. A comparison of this method with the use of filamentous plastics as biocarriers indicated that higher NO3(-)-N removal (as volumetric loading) and lower nitrite nitrogen accumulation rates were obtained when filamentous bamboo was used as a biocarrier. A NO3(-)-N removal volumetric loading of 2.09 mg/L·h was reached when using bamboo as a single solid carbon source. These results confirm that filamentous bamboo can be used as an alternative to inert biocarriers in WRRF secondary effluent treatment systems.

  16. Nitrogen Removal from Water Resource Recovery Facility Secondary Effluent Using a Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenping

    2016-03-01

    Solid-phase denitrification technology can potentially be used to remove nitrogen compounds, such as total nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-)-N), from wastewater. In this study, the authors made use of an internal-circulation baffled biofilm reactor in which filamentous bamboo acted as a biocarrier for the removal of nitrogen (N) from water resource recovery facility (WRRF) secondary effluent. A laboratory-scale experiment was conducted to assess the efficacy and mechanisms of N removal from the WRRF secondary effluent operated in continuous-flow mode. Results indicated that total nitrogen and NO3(-)-N removal rates reached 66.58 to 75.23% and 75.6 to 85.6%, respectively. Infrared spectrum analysis indicated biodegradation in the filamentous bamboo. A comparison of this method with the use of filamentous plastics as biocarriers indicated that higher NO3(-)-N removal (as volumetric loading) and lower nitrite nitrogen accumulation rates were obtained when filamentous bamboo was used as a biocarrier. A NO3(-)-N removal volumetric loading of 2.09 mg/L·h was reached when using bamboo as a single solid carbon source. These results confirm that filamentous bamboo can be used as an alternative to inert biocarriers in WRRF secondary effluent treatment systems. PMID:26931533

  17. Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system

    DOEpatents

    Corletti, M.M.; Schulz, T.L.

    1993-12-07

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path. 2 figures.

  18. Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system

    DOEpatents

    Corletti, Michael M.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path.

  19. Radiant Heat Test Facility (RHTF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelPapa, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the RHTF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  20. High temperature superconducting current lead test facility with heat pipe intercepts

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfeld, P.E.; Prenger, C.; Roth, E.W.; Stewart, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) current lead test facility using heat pipe thermal intercepts is under development at the Superconducting Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility can be configured for tests at currents up to 1,000 A. Mechanical cryocoolers provide refrigeration to the leads. Electrical isolation is maintained by intercepting thermal energy from the leads through cryogenic heat pipes. HST lead warm end temperature is variable from 65 K to over 90 K by controlling heat pipe evaporator temperature. Cold end temperature is variable up to 30 K. Performance predictions in terms of heat pipe evaporator temperature as a function of lead current are presented for the initial facility configuration, which supports testing up to 200 A. Measurements are to include temperature and voltage gradient in the conventional and HTS lead sections, temperature and heat transfer rate in the heat pipes. as well as optimum and off-optimum performance of the conventional lead sections.

  1. Effects of droplet velocity, diameter, and film height on heat removal during cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Pikkula, Brian M; Tunnell, James W; Chang, David W; Anvari, Bahman

    2004-08-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is an effective method to reduce or eliminate epidermal damage during laser treatment of various dermatoses. This study sought to determine the effects of specific cryogen properties on heat removal. Heat removal was quantified using an algorithm that solved an inverse heat conduction problem from internal temperature measurements made within a skin phantom. A nondimensional parameter, the Weber number, characterized the combined effects of droplet velocity, diameter, and surface tension. CSC experiments with laser irradiation were conducted on ex vivo human skin samples to assess the effect of Weber number on epidermal protection. An empirical relationship between heat removal and the difference in droplet temperature and the substrate, droplet velocity, and diameter was obtained. Histological sections of irradiated ex vivo human skin demonstrated that sprays with higher Weber numbers increased epidermal protection. Results indicate that the cryogen film acts as an impediment to heat transfer between the impinging droplets and the substrate. This study offers the importance of Weber number in heat removal and epidermal protection. PMID:15446509

  2. Analysis of heat generation using ultrasonic vibration for post removal.

    PubMed

    Dominici, John T; Clark, Stephen; Scheetz, James; Eleazer, Paul D

    2005-04-01

    This study measured the temperature of the root surface and post during the application of ultrasonic vibration to cemented posts to simulate post removal procedure. Root canal therapy was performed on ten extracted maxillary incisors. A stainless steel Parapost was cemented into each prepared post space. Ultrasonic vibration was applied to the post and temperatures were recorded at the coronal post and the cervical root surface. Data were analyzed with ANOVA using the independent variables of (a) time of ultrasonic application (15, 30, 45 and 60 s) and 2) location (post and root surface). Greater temperature increase was observed at the post (52.6 degrees C, SD 11.1; 82.6 degrees C, SD 20.1; 111.0 degrees C, SD 29.1; 125.3 degrees C, SD 33.2) compared to the root surface (9.5 degrees C, SD 4.6; 17.5 degrees C, SD 4.8; 25.4 degrees C, SD 7.3; 32.2 degrees C, SD 8.1) for each time period, P < 0.001. Ultrasonic application to the post for longer than 15 s generates high temperature on the root surface.

  3. Jet pump-drive system for heat removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, J. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A jet pump, in combination with a TEMP, is employed to assure safe cooling of a nuclear reactor after shutdown. A TEMP, responsive to the heat from the coolant in the secondary flow path, automatically pumps the withdrawn coolant to a higher pressure and thus higher velocity compared to the main flow. The high velocity coolant is applied as a driver flow for the jet pump which has a main flow chamber located in the main flow circulation pump. Upon nuclear shutdown and loss of power for the main reactor pumping system, the TEMP/jet pump combination continues to boost the coolant flow in the direction it is already circulating. During the decay time for the nuclear reactor, the jet pump keeps running until the coolant temperature drops to a lower and safe temperature. At this lower temperature, the TEMP/jet jump combination ceases its circulation boosting operation. The TEMP/jet pump combination is automatic, self-regulating and provides an emergency pumping system free of moving parts.

  4. The Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor: Report on Safety System Design for Decay Heat Removal

    SciTech Connect

    K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Y. C. Wei; E. E. Feldman; M. J. Driscoll; H. Ludewig

    2003-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radiotoxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. This report addresses/discusses the decay heat removal options available to the GFR, and the current solutions. While it is possible to design a GFR with complete passive safety (i.e., reliance solely on conductive and radiative heat transfer for decay heat removal), it has been shown that the low power density results in unacceptable fuel cycle costs for the GFR. However, increasing power density results in higher decay heat rates, and the attendant temperature increase in the fuel and core. Use of active movers, or blowers/fans, is possible during accident conditions, which only requires 3% of nominal flow to remove the decay heat. Unfortunately, this requires reliance on active systems. In order to incorporate passive systems, innovative designs have been studied, and a mix of passive and active systems appears to meet the requirements for decay heat removal during accident conditions.

  5. Emergency Decay Heat Removal in a GEN-IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Ludewig, Hans; Jo, Jae

    2006-07-01

    A series of transient analyses using the system code RELAP5-3d has been performed to confirm the efficacy of a proposed hybrid active/passive combination approach to the decay heat removal for an advanced 2400 MWt GEN-IV gas-cooled fast reactor. The accident sequence of interest is a station blackout simultaneous with a small break (10 sq.inch/0.645 m{sup 2}) in the reactor vessel. The analyses cover the three phases of decay heat removal in a depressurization accident: (1) forced flow cooling by the power conversion unit (PCU) coast down, (2) active forced flow cooling by a battery powered blower, and (3) passive cooling by natural circulation. The blower is part of an emergency cooling system (ECS) that by design is to sustain passive decay heat removal via natural circulation cooling 24 hours after shutdown. The RELAP5 model includes the helium-cooled reactor, the ECS (primary and secondary side), the PCU with all the rotating machinery (turbine and compressors) and the heat transfer components (recuperator, pre-cooler and inter-cooler), and the guard containment that surrounds the reactor and the PCU. The transient analysis has demonstrated the effectiveness of passive decay heat removal by natural circulation cooling when the guard containment pressure is maintained at or above 800 kPa. (authors)

  6. Institute for High Heat Flux Removal (IHHFR). Phases I, II, and III

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Ronald D.

    2014-08-31

    The IHHFR focused on interdisciplinary applications as it relates to high heat flux engineering issues and problems which arise due to engineering systems being miniaturized, optimized, or requiring increased high heat flux performance. The work in the IHHFR focused on water as a coolant and includes: (1) the development, design, and construction of the high heat flux flow loop and facility; (2) test section development, design, and fabrication; and, (3) single-side heat flux experiments to produce 2-D boiling curves and 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements for single-side heated test sections. This work provides data for comparisons with previously developed and new single-side heated correlations and approaches that address the single-side heated effect on heat transfer. In addition, this work includes the addition of single-side heated circular TS and a monoblock test section with a helical wire insert. Finally, the present work includes: (1) data base expansion for the monoblock with a helical wire insert (only for the latter geometry), (2) prediction and verification using finite element, (3) monoblock model and methodology development analyses, and (4) an alternate model development for a hypervapotron and related conjugate heat transfer controlling parameters.

  7. Method and apparatus for removing heat from electronic devices using synthetic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rajdeep; Weaver, Jr., Stanton Earl; Seeley, Charles Erklin; Arik, Mehmet; Icoz, Tunc; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Utturkar, Yogen Vishwas

    2014-04-15

    An apparatus for removing heat comprises a heat sink having a cavity, and a synthetic jet stack comprising at least one synthetic jet mounted within the cavity. At least one rod and at least one engaging structure to provide a rigid positioning of the at least one synthetic jet with respect to the at least one rod. The synthetic jet comprises at least one orifice through which a fluid is ejected.

  8. Method and apparatus for removing heat from electronic devices using synthetic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rajdeep; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Seeley, Charles Erklin; Arik, Mehmet; Icoz, Tunc; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Utturkar, Yogen Vishwas

    2015-11-24

    An apparatus for removing heat comprises a heat sink having a cavity, and a synthetic jet stack comprising at least one synthetic jet mounted within the cavity. At least one rod and at least one engaging structure to provide a rigid positioning of the at least one synthetic jet with respect to the at least one rod. The synthetic jet comprises at least one orifice through which a fluid is ejected.

  9. Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaobing

    2014-06-01

    High initial cost and lack of public awareness of ground source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This paper highlights findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects, which is a heating only central GSHP system using shallow aquifer as heat source and installed at a warehouse and truck bay at Kalispell, MT. This case study is based on the analysis of measured performance data, utility bills, and calculations of energy consumptions of conventional central heating systems for providing the same heat outputs as the central GSHP system did. The evaluated performance metrics include energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GSHP system, pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of GSHP system compared with conventional heating systems. This case study also identified areas for reducing uncertainties in performance evaluation, improving operational efficiency, and reducing installed cost of similar GSHP systems in the future. Publication of ASHRAE at the annual conference in Seattle.

  10. Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System Upgrade.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaobing

    2014-06-01

    High initial cost and lack of public awareness of ground source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This paper highlights findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects, which is a heating only central GSHP system using shallow aquifer as heat source and installed at a warehouse and truck bay at Kalispell, MT. This case study is based on the analysis of measured performance data, utility bills, and calculations of energy consumptions of conventional central heating systems for providing the same heat outputs as the central GSHP system did. The evaluated performance metrics include energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GSHP system, pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of GSHP system compared with conventional heating systems. This case study also identified areas for reducing uncertainties in performance evaluation, improving operational efficiency, and reducing installed cost of similar GSHP systems in the future. Publication of ASHRAE at the annual conference in Seattle June 2014.

  11. Renewable energy technologies for federal facilities: Solar water heating

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This sheet presents information on solar water heaters (passive and active), solar collectors (flat plate, evacuated tube, parabolic trough), lists opportunities for use of solar water heating, and describes what is required and the costs. Important terms are defined.

  12. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 3, Long term testing at the ECTC

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, K.H.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this task is to demonstrate long term operation of a condensing heat exchanger for coal-fired conditions. A small condensing heat exchanger will be installed at the Environmental Control Technology Center in Barker, New York. It will be installed downstream of the flue gas particulate removal system. The test will determine the amount of wear, if any, on the Teflon{trademark} covered internals of the heat exchanger. Visual inspection and measurements will be obtained for the Teflon{trademark} covered tubes during the test. The material wear study will conducted over a one year calendar period, and the CHX equipment will be operated to the fullest extent allowable.

  13. Modeling of heat transfer in a rotary kiln thermal desorder for removal of petroleum from soils

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, Hsien-Tsung; Krasnoperov, L.V.; Bozzelli, J.W.

    1996-10-01

    A continuous feed rotary kiln thermal desorber was designed and constructed to study the heat transfer in removal of petroleum hydrocarbons from contaminated soils. A mathematical model of heat transfer that correlates temperatures of gas, soil, and kiln wall will purge gas flow, soil feed rate, kiln rotation speed and soil residence time in the kiln desorber is developed. A fourth order Runge-Kutta method was used to numerically integrate the heat transfer process along the kiln length and to calculate the temperature profiles. Comparison of predicted and measured gas and soil temperature profile is presented.

  14. Influence of wick properties in a vertical LHP on remove waste heat from electronic equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Smitka, Martin E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk Nemec, Patrik E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk Malcho, Milan E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk

    2014-08-06

    The loop heat pipe is a vapour-liquid phase-change device that transfers heat from evaporator to condenser. One of the most important parts of the LHP is the porous wick structure. The wick structure provides capillary force to circulate the working fluid. To achieve good thermal performance of LHP, capillary wicks with high permeability and porosity and fine pore radius are expected. The aim of this work is to develop porous wick of sintered nickel powder with different grain sizes. These porous wicks were used in LHP and there were performed a series of measurements to remove waste heat from the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT)

  15. Influence of wick properties in a vertical LHP on remove waste heat from electronic equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smitka, Martin; Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The loop heat pipe is a vapour-liquid phase-change device that transfers heat from evaporator to condenser. One of the most important parts of the LHP is the porous wick structure. The wick structure provides capillary force to circulate the working fluid. To achieve good thermal performance of LHP, capillary wicks with high permeability and porosity and fine pore radius are expected. The aim of this work is to develop porous wick of sintered nickel powder with different grain sizes. These porous wicks were used in LHP and there were performed a series of measurements to remove waste heat from the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT).

  16. Review of features of stimulated electromagnetic emission (see): Recent results obtained at the ``sura'' heating facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. L.; Kagan, L. M.; Sergeev, E. N.

    1999-07-01

    We present a short review of the features of the main components (DM, UM, NC, BC, BUM, and BUS) of stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE). We discuss variations of these components in the case where additional X-mode heating is used. The experiments were performed at the “Sura” heating facility (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) during the last few years.

  17. Heated stainless steel tube for ozone removal in the ambient air measurements of mono- and sesquiterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellén, H.; Kuronen, P.; Hakola, H.

    2012-09-01

    Heated stainless steel inlets were optimized for the ozone removal and for the measurements of mono- and sesquiterpenes in ambient air. Five different inlets were used with different flows, temperatures and ozone and biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) concentrations. Both ozone removal capacities and recoveries of BVOCs were determined. Ozone and BVOCs were flushed through the inlet and recoveries were measured by an ozone monitor and adsorbent tube sampling of BVOCs with subsequent analysis with thermal desorption - gas chromatograph (GC) - mass spectrometer (MS). Recovery tests of BVOCs were conducted both with zero air and with ozone rich air. Inlets were optimized especially for online-GC and adsorbent tube measurements of mono- and sesquiterpenes. The results of this study show that it was possible to remove ozone without removing most VOCs with this set-up. Setting the temperature, stainless steel grade and flow correctly for different inlet lengths was found to have a crucial role. The results show that the ozone removal capacity increases with increasing temperature and inlet length. Stainless steel grade 316 was found to be more efficient than grade 304 with respect to ozone removal. Based only on the ozone removal capacity, the longest possible stainless steel inlet with heating would be the optimum solution. However, the recoveries of studied compounds had to be considered too. Of the tested set-ups, a 3 m inlet (¼ in. grade 304) heated to 120 °C with a flow of 1 or 2 l min-1 was found to give the best results with respect to the ozone removal efficiency and compound recovery. This inlet was removing ozone efficiently for at least 4 months when used for ambient air sampling at a rural forested site with a flow of 1 l min-1 (˜170 m3 of air flushed through the tube). A heated (140 °C) 1 m inlet (¼ in. grade 304 or ⅛ in. grade 316) was able to remove ozone with a constant flow of 0.8-1 l min-1 for about two weeks (˜18 m3 of air) and had

  18. Proposed Design and Operation of a Heat Pipe Reactor using the Sandia National Laboratories Annular Core Test Facility and Existing UZrH Fuel Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Pandya, Tara; Peters, Curtis

    2005-02-01

    Heat Pipe Reactors (HPR) for space power conversion systems offer a number of advantages not easily provided by other systems. They require no pumping, their design easily deals with freezing and thawing of the liquid metal, and they can provide substantial levels of redundancy. Nevertheless, no reactor has ever been operated and cooled with heat pipes, and the startup and other operational characteristics of these systems remain largely unknown. Signification deviations from normal reactor heat removal mechanisms exist, because the heat pipes have fundamental heat removal limits due to sonic flow issues at low temperatures. This paper proposes an early prototypic test of a Heat Pipe Reactor (using existing 20% enriched nuclear fuel pins) to determine the operational characteristics of the HPR. The proposed design is similar in design to the HOMER and SAFE-300 HPR designs (Elliot, Lipinski, and Poston, 2003; Houts, et. al, 2003). However, this reactor uses existing UZrH fuel pins that are coupled to potassium heat pipes modules. The prototype reactor would be located in the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor Facility where the fuel pins currently reside. The proposed reactor would use the heat pipes to transport the heat from the UZrH fuel pins to a water pool above the core, and the heat transport to the water pool would be controlled by adjusting the pressure and gas type within a small annulus around each heat pipe. The reactor would operate as a self-critical assembly at power levels up to 200 kWth. Because the nuclear heated HPR test uses existing fuel and because it would be performed in an existing facility with the appropriate safety authorization basis, the test could be performed rapidly and inexpensively. This approach makes it possible to validate the operation of a HPR and also measure the feedback mechanisms for a typical HPR design. A test of this nature would be the world's first operating Heat Pipe Reactor. This reactor is therefore called "HPR-1".

  19. Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption for CO(sub 2) and Heat Removal/Rejection in a Martian PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacomini, Christine; Powers, Aaron; Bowers, Chad; Straub-Lopez, Katie; Anderson, Grant; MacCallum, Taber; Paul, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Two of the fundamental problems facing the development of a Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for use on Mars, are (i) heat rejection (because traditional technologies use sublimation of water, which wastes a scarce resource and contaminates the premises), and (ii) rejection of CO2 in an environment with a ppCO2 of 0.4-0.9 kPa. Patent-pending Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed to address both these challenges. The technology utilizes an adsorbent that when cooled with liquid CO2 to near sublimation temperatures (195K) removes metabolically-produced CO2 in the vent loop. Once fully loaded, the adsorbent is then warmed externally by the vent loop (approx. 300K), rejecting the captured CO2 to Mars ambient. Two beds are used to effect a continuous cycle of CO2 removal/rejection as well as facilitate heat exchange out of the vent loop. Any cryogenic fluid can be used in the application; however, since CO2 is readily available at Mars and can be easily produced and stored on the Martian surface, the solution is rather elegant and less complicated when employing liquid CO2. As some metabolic heat will need to be rejected anyway, finding a practical use for metabolic heat is also an overall benefit to the PLSS. To investigate the feasibility of the technology, a series of experiments was conducted which lead to the selection and partial characterization of an appropriate adsorbent. The adsorbent NaX successfully removed CO2 from a simulated vent loop at the prescribed temperature swing anticipated during PLSS operating conditions on Mars using a cryogenic fluid. Thermal conductivity of the adsorbent was also measured to eventually aid in a demonstrator design of the technology. These results provide no show stoppers to the development of MTSA technology and allow its development to focus on other design challenges as listed in the conclusions.

  20. Moisture removal characteristics of thin layer rough rice under sequenced infrared radiation heating and cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice drying with infrared (IR) radiation has been investigated during recent years and showed promising potential with improved quality and energy efficiency. The objective of this study was to further investigate the moisture removal characteristics of thin layer rough rice heated by IR and cooled ...

  1. A&M. Radioactive parts security storage area, heat removal storage casks. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Radioactive parts security storage area, heat removal storage casks. Plan, section, and details. Ralph M. Parsons 1480-7 ANP/GE-3-720-S-1. Date: November 1958. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index no. 034-0720-60-693-107459 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. High heat flux testing of divertor plasma facing materials and components using the HHF test facility at IPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yashashri; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Belsare, Sunil; Swamy, Rajamannar; Tripathi, Sudhir; Bhope, Kedar; Kanpara, Shailesh

    2016-02-01

    The High Heat Flux Test Facility (HHFTF) was designed and established recently at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) in India for testing heat removal capability and operational life time of plasma facing materials and components of the ITER-like tokamak. The HHFTF is equipped with various diagnostics such as IR cameras and IR-pyrometers for surface temperature measurements, coolant water calorimetry for absorbed power measurements and thermocouples for bulk temperature measurements. The HHFTF is capable of simulating steady state heat load of several MW m-2 as well as short transient heat loads of MJ m-2. This paper presents the current status of the HHFTF at IPR and high heat flux tests performed on the curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups as well as transient heat flux tests carried out on pure tungsten materials using the HHFTF. Curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups were fabricated using hot radial pressing (HRP) technique. Two curved tungsten monoblock type test mock-ups successfully sustained absorbed heat flux up to 14 MW m-2 with thermal cycles of 30 s ON and 30 s OFF duration. Transient high heat flux tests or thermal shock tests were carried out on pure tungsten hot-rolled plate material (Make:PLANSEE) with incident power density of 0.49 GW m-2 for 20 milliseconds ON and 1000 milliseconds OFF time. A total of 6000 thermal shock cycles were completed on pure tungsten material. Experimental results were compared with mathematical simulations carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics for transient high heat flux tests.

  3. Modes of mantle convection and the removal of heat from the earth's interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spohn, T.; Schubert, G.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal histories for two-layer and whole-mantle convection models are calculated and presented, based on a parameterization of convective heat transport. The model is composed of two concentric spherical shells surrounding a spherical core. The models were constrained to yield the observed present-day surface heat flow and mantle viscosity, in order to determine parameters. These parameters were varied to determine their effects on the results. Studies show that whole-mantle convection removes three times more primordial heat from the earth interior and six times more from the core than does two-layer convection (in 4.5 billion years). Mantle volumetric heat generation rates for both models are comparable to that of a potassium-depleted chondrite, and thus surface heat-flux balance does not require potassium in the core. Whole and two-layer mantle convection differences are primarily due to lower mantle thermal insulation and the lower heat removal efficiency of the upper mantle as compared with that of the whole mantle.

  4. Mercury Reduction and Removal from High Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 12511

    SciTech Connect

    Behrouzi, Aria; Zamecnik, Jack

    2012-07-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site during production of enriched uranium and plutonium required by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. One of the constituents in the nuclear waste is mercury, which is present because it served as a catalyst in the dissolution of uranium-aluminum alloy fuel rods. At high temperatures mercury is corrosive to off-gas equipment, this poses a major challenge to the overall vitrification process in separating mercury from the waste stream prior to feeding the high temperature melter. Mercury is currently removed during the chemical process via formic acid reduction followed by steam stripping, which allows elemental mercury to be evaporated with the water vapor generated during boiling. The vapors are then condensed and sent to a hold tank where mercury coalesces and is recovered in the tank's sump via gravity settling. Next, mercury is transferred from the tank sump to a purification cell where it is washed with water and nitric acid and removed from the facility. Throughout the chemical processing cell, compounds of mercury exist in the sludge, condensate, and off-gas; all of which present unique challenges. Mercury removal from sludge waste being fed to the DWPF melter is required to avoid exhausting it to the environment or any negative impacts to the Melter Off-Gas system. The mercury concentration must be reduced to a level of 0.8 wt% or less before being introduced to the melter. Even though this is being successfully accomplished, the material balances accounting for incoming and collected mercury are not equal. In addition, mercury has not been effectively

  5. GEOMETRY, HEAT REMOVAL AND KINETICS SCOPING MODELS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B

    2007-11-16

    It is recognized that detailed models of proposed hydrogen storage systems are essential to gain insight into the complex processes occurring during the charging and discharging processes. Such insight is an invaluable asset for both assessing the viability of a particular system and/or for improving its design. The detailed models, however, require time to develop and run. Clearly, it is much more efficient to begin a modeling effort with a good system design and to progress from that point. To facilitate this approach, it is useful to have simplified models that can quickly estimate optimal loading and discharge kinetics, effective hydrogen capacities, system dimensions and heat removal requirements. Parameters obtained from these models can then be input to the detailed models to obtain an accurate assessment of system performance that includes more complete integration of the physical processes. This report describes three scoping models that assess preliminary system design prior to invoking a more detailed finite element analysis. The three models address the kinetics, the scaling and heat removal parameters of the system, respectively. The kinetics model is used to evaluate the effect of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the loading and discharge kinetics. As part of the kinetics calculations, the model also determines the mass of stored hydrogen per mass of hydride (in a particular reference form). As such, the model can determine the optimal loading and discharge rates for a particular hydride and the maximum achievable loading (over an infinite period of time). The kinetics model developed with the Mathcad{reg_sign} solver, runs in a mater of seconds and can quickly be used to identify the optimal temperature and pressure for either the loading or discharge processes. The geometry scoping model is used to calculate the size of the system, the optimal placement of heat transfer elements, and the gravimetric and volumetric capacities for a particular

  6. Removal site evaluation report on the Tower Shielding Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This removal site evaluation report for the Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the Tower Shielding Facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment (i.e., a high probability of adverse effects) and if remedial site evaluations or removal actions are, therefore, required. The scope of the project included a review of historical evidence regarding operations and use of the facility; interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past operating practices; a site inspection; and identification of hazard areas requiring maintenance, removal, or remedial actions. Based an the findings of this removal site evaluation, adequate efforts are currently being made at the TSF to contain and control existing contamination and hazardous substances on site in order to protect human health and the environment No conditions requiring maintenance or removal actions to mitigate imminent or potential threats to human health and the environment were identified during this evaluation. Given the current conditions and status of the buildings associated with the TSF, this removal site evaluation is considered complete and terminated according to the requirements for removal site evaluation termination.

  7. Heat recovery at Army Materiel Command (AMC) facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, E.T.; Caron, R.N.; Fitzgerald, K.F.; Joncich, D.M.

    1988-06-01

    The objective of this work is to: Identify opportunities for using waste-energy-recovery technologies at AMC sites. Approach: Two AMC sites were selected for study based on a review of documents describing their energy-use patterns. A preliminary list of heat recovery applications suitable for more-detailed analyses was compiled for each site during initial visits. Next, more-comprehensive process-energy studies were conducted at the two plants to determine actual operating conditions of the processes showing most promise for successful heat recovery applications. Cost estimates were developed for all systems to ensure that the economics would be favorable enough to warrant installation; this analysis considered the first cost of all major components, installation, and annual operation and maintenance (OandM) costs.

  8. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger: Phase 1 final report, October 1995--July 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, R.T.; Jankura, B.J.; Kudlac, G.A.

    1998-06-01

    The Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) system is a new concept whereby a Teflon{reg_sign} covered condensing heat exchanger is adapted to remove certain flue gas constitutents, both particulate and gaseous, while recovering low level heat. Phase 1 includes two experimental tasks. One task dealt principally with the pollutant removal capabilities of the IFGT at a scale of about 1.2MW{sub t}. The other task studied the durability of the Teflon{reg_sign} covering to withstand the rigors of abrasive wear by fly ash emitted as a result of coal combustion. The pollutant removal characteristics of the IFGT system were measured over a wide range of operating conditions. The coals tested included high, medium and low-sulfur coals. The flue gas pollutants studied included ammonia, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, particulate, sulfur dioxide, gas phase and particle phase mercury and gas phase and particle phase trace elements. The particulate removal efficiency and size distribution was investigated. These test results demonstrated that the IFGT system is an effective device for both acid gas absorption and fine particulate collection. The durability of the Teflon{reg_sign} covered heat exchanger tubes was studied on a pilot-scale single-stage condensing heat exchanger (CHX{reg_sign}). Data from the test indicate that virtually no decrease in Teflon{reg_sign} thickness was observed for the coating on the first two rows of heat exchanger tubes, even at high inlet particulate loadings. Evidence of wear was present only at the microscopic level, and even then was very minor in severity.

  9. Resistively-Heated Microlith-based Adsorber for Carbon Dioxide and Trace Contaminant Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, S.; Walsh, D.; Perry, J.

    2005-01-01

    An integrated sorber-based Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) and Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) prototype was designed, fabricated and tested. It corresponds to a 7-person load. Performance over several adsorption/regeneration cycles was examined. Vacuum regenerations at effective time/temperature conditions, and estimated power requirements were experimentally verified for the combined CO2/trace contaminant removal prototype. The current paper details the design and performance of this prototype during initial testing at CO2 and trace contaminant concentrations in the existing CDRA, downstream of the drier. Additional long-term performance characterization is planned at NASA. Potential system design options permitting associated weight, volume savings and logistic benefits, especially as relevant for long-duration space flight, are reviewed. The technology consisted of a sorption bed with sorbent- coated metal meshes, trademarked and patented as Microlith by Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI). By contrast the current CO2 removal system on the International Space Station employs pellet beds. Preliminary bench scale performance data (without direct resistive heating) for simultaneous CO2 and trace contaminant removal was reviewed in SAE 2004-01-2442. In the prototype, the meshes were directly electrically heated for rapid response and accurate temperature control. This allowed regeneration via resistive heating with the potential for shorter regeneration times, reduced power requirement, and net energy savings vs. conventional systems. A novel flow arrangement, for removing both CO2 and trace contaminants within the same bed, was demonstrated. Thus, the need for a separate trace contaminant unit was eliminated resulting in an opportunity for significant weight savings. Unlike the current disposable charcoal bed, zeolites for trace contaminant removal are amenable to periodic regeneration.

  10. Natural circulation decay heat removal from an SP-100, 550 kWe power system for a lunar outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Xue, Huimin

    1992-01-01

    This research investigated the decay heat removal from the SP-100 reactor core of a 550-kWe power system for a lunar outpost by natural circulation of lithium coolant. A transient model that simulates the decay heat removal loop (DHRL) of the power system was developed and used to assess the system's decay heat removal capability. The effects of the surface area of the decay heat rejection radiator, the dimensions of the decay heat exchanger (DHE) flow duct, the elevation of the DHE, and the diameter of the rise and down pipes in the DHRL on the decay heat removal capability were examined. Also, to determine the applicability of test results at earth gravity to actual system performance on the lunar surface, the effect of the gravity constant (1 g and 1/6 g) on the thermal behavior of the system after shutdown was investigated.

  11. Cyclic process for producing methane from carbon monoxide with heat removal

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.; Yang, Chang-lee

    1982-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  12. Cyclic process for producing methane in a tubular reactor with effective heat removal

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.; Yang, Chang-Lee

    1986-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  13. Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption for CO2 and Heat Removal/Rejection in a Martian PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacomini, Christine; Powers, Aaron; Bower, Chad; Straub-Lopez, Kathrine; Anderson, Grant; MacCallum, Taber; Paul, Heather L.

    2007-01-01

    Two of the fundamental problems facing the development of a Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for use on Mars, are (i) heat rejection (because traditional technologies use sublimation of water, which wastes a scarce resource and contaminates the premises), and (ii) rejection of carbon dioxide (CO2) in an environment with a CO2 partial pressure (ppCO2) of 0.4-0.9 kPa. Patent-pending Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed to address both these challenges. The technology utilizes an adsorbent that when cooled with liquid CO2 to near sublimation temperatures (195K) removes metabolically-produced CO2 in the ventilation loop. Once fully loaded, the adsorbent is then warmed externally by the ventilation loop (300K), rejecting the captured CO2 to Mars ambient. Two beds are used to provide a continuous cycle of CO2 removal/rejection as well as facilitate heat exchange out of the ventilation loop. Any cryogenic fluid can be used in the application; however, since CO2 is readily available on Mars and can be easily produced and stored on the Martian surface, the solution is rather elegant and less complicated when employing liquid CO2. As some metabolic heat will need to be rejected anyway, finding a practical use for metabolic heat is also an overall benefit to the PLSS. To investigate the feasibility of the technology, a series of experiments were conducted which lead to the selection and partial characterization of an appropriate adsorbent. The Molsiv Adsorbents 13X 8x12 (also known as NaX zeolite) successfully removed CO2 from a simulated ventilation loop at the prescribed temperature swing anticipated during PLSS operating conditions on Mars using a cryogenic fluid. Thermal conductivity of the adsorbent was also measured to eventually aid in a demonstrator design of the technology. These results provide no show stoppers to the development of MTSA technology and allow its development to focus on other design

  14. Heat removal (wetting, heat transfer, T/H, secondary circuit, code validation etc.)

    SciTech Connect

    Dury, T.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1996-06-01

    This working group provided a comprehensive list of feasibility and uncertainty issues. Most of the issues seem to fall into the `needed but can be worked out` category. They feel these can be worked out as the project develops. A few issues can be considered critical or feasibility issues (that must be proven to be feasible). Those include: (1) Thermal shock and its mitigation (>1 MW); how to inject the He bubbles (if used) - back pressure into He lines - mercury traces in He lines; how to maintain proper bubble distribution and size (static and dynamic; if used); vibrations and fatigue (dynamic); possibility of cavitation from thermal shock. (2) Wetting and/or non-wetting of mercury on containment walls with or without gases and its effect on heat transfer (and materials). (3) Prediction capabilities in the CFD code; bubbles behavior in mercury (if used) - cross stream turbulence (ESS only) - wetting/non-wetting effects. (4) Cooling of beam `windows`; concentration of local heat deposition at center, especially if beam is of parabolic profile.

  15. Assessment of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal (VPCAR) Technology at the MSFC ECLS Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomes, Kristin; Long, David; Carter, Layne; Flynn, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia. Removal (VPCAR) technology has been previously discussed as a viable option for. the Exploration Water Recovery System. This technology integrates a phase change process with catalytic oxidation in the vapor phase to produce potable water from exploration mission wastewaters. A developmental prototype VPCAR was designed, built and tested under funding provided by a National Research. Announcement (NRA) project. The core technology, a Wiped Film Rotating Device (WFRD) was provided by Water Reuse Technologies under the NRA, whereas Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International performed the hardware integration and acceptance test. of the system. Personnel at the-Ames Research Center performed initial systems test of the VPCAR using ersatz solutions. To assess the viability of this hardware for Exploration. Life Support (ELS) applications, the hardware has been modified and tested at the MSFC ECLS Test facility. This paper summarizes the hardware modifications and test results and provides an assessment of this technology for the ELS application.

  16. Effectiveness of photocatalytic filter for removing volatile organic compounds in the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kuo-Pin; Lee, Grace Whei-May; Huang, Wei-Ming; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Lou, Chia-ling; Yang, Shinhao

    2006-05-01

    Nowadays, the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system has been an important facility for maintaining indoor air quality. However, the primary function of typical HVAC systems is to control the temperature and humidity of the supply air. Most indoor air pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), cannot be removed by typical HVAC systems. Thus, some air handling units for removing VOCs should be added in typical HVAC systems. Among all of the air cleaning techniques used to remove indoor VOCs, photocatalytic oxidation is an attractive alternative technique for indoor air purification and deodorization. The objective of this research is to investigate the VOC removal efficiency of the photocatalytic filter in a HVAC system. Toluene and formaldehyde were chosen as the target pollutants. The experiments were conducted in a stainless steel chamber equipped with a simplified HVAC system. A mechanical filter coated with Degussa P25 titania photocatalyst and two commercial photocatalytic filters were used as the photocatalytic filters in this simplified HVAC system. The total air change rates were controlled at 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 hr(-1), and the relative humidity (RH) was controlled at 30%, 50%, and 70%. The ultraviolet lamp used was a 4-W, ultraviolet-C (central wavelength at 254 nm) strip light bulb. The first-order decay constant of toluene and formaldehyde found in this study ranged from 0.381 to 1.01 hr(-1) under different total air change rates, from 0.34 to 0.433 hr(-1) under different RH, and from 0.381 to 0.433 hr(-1) for different photocatalytic filters.

  17. Shellfish mariculture facility which employs passive solar heating and heat pump systems. Performance and cost analysis study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zoto, G.A.; Krabach, M.H.

    1984-06-01

    This report incorporates operations data such as clam growth rates, clam biomass buildup, water volume, and algal food requirements compiled while developing a year-round production schedule for production of hard clam seed. The facility includes a passive solar hatchery and heat pump. Three major areas which affect development of energy-efficient mariculture are addressed: biological operation parameters, energy requirements, and system economics. (LEW)

  18. Facile biofunctionalization of silver nanoparticles for enhanced antibacterial properties, endotoxin removal, and biofilm control.

    PubMed

    Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Kumar, Piyush; Vasnani, Priyanka; Thalluri, Sitaramanjaneya Mouli; Bisht, Neha; Pathania, Ranjana; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases cause a huge burden on healthcare systems worldwide. Pathogenic bacteria establish infection by developing antibiotic resistance and modulating the host's immune system, whereas opportunistic pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapt to adverse conditions owing to their ability to form biofilms. In the present study, silver nanoparticles were biofunctionalized with polymyxin B, an antibacterial peptide using a facile method. The biofunctionalized nanoparticles (polymyxin B-capped silver nanoparticles, PBSNPs) were assessed for antibacterial activity against multiple drug-resistant clinical strain Vibrio fluvialis and nosocomial pathogen P. aeruginosa. The results of antibacterial assay revealed that PBSNPs had an approximately 3-fold higher effect than the citrate-capped nanoparticles (CSNPs). Morphological damage to the cell membrane was followed by scanning electron microscopy, testifying PBSNPs to be more potent in controlling the bacterial growth as compared with CSNPs. The bactericidal effect of PBSNPs was further confirmed by Live/Dead staining assays. Apart from the antibacterial activity, the biofunctionalized nanoparticles were found to resist biofilm formation. Electroplating of PBSNPs onto stainless steel surgical blades retained the antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. Further, the affinity of polymyxin for endotoxin was exploited for its removal using PBSNPs. It was found that the prepared nanoparticles removed 97% of the endotoxin from the solution. Such multifarious uses of metal nanoparticles are an attractive means of enhancing the potency of antimicrobial agents to control infections.

  19. Facile biofunctionalization of silver nanoparticles for enhanced antibacterial properties, endotoxin removal, and biofilm control

    PubMed Central

    Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Kumar, Piyush; Vasnani, Priyanka; Thalluri, Sitaramanjaneya Mouli; Bisht, Neha; Pathania, Ranjana; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases cause a huge burden on healthcare systems worldwide. Pathogenic bacteria establish infection by developing antibiotic resistance and modulating the host’s immune system, whereas opportunistic pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapt to adverse conditions owing to their ability to form biofilms. In the present study, silver nanoparticles were biofunctionalized with polymyxin B, an antibacterial peptide using a facile method. The biofunctionalized nanoparticles (polymyxin B-capped silver nanoparticles, PBSNPs) were assessed for antibacterial activity against multiple drug-resistant clinical strain Vibrio fluvialis and nosocomial pathogen P. aeruginosa. The results of antibacterial assay revealed that PBSNPs had an approximately 3-fold higher effect than the citrate-capped nanoparticles (CSNPs). Morphological damage to the cell membrane was followed by scanning electron microscopy, testifying PBSNPs to be more potent in controlling the bacterial growth as compared with CSNPs. The bactericidal effect of PBSNPs was further confirmed by Live/Dead staining assays. Apart from the antibacterial activity, the biofunctionalized nanoparticles were found to resist biofilm formation. Electroplating of PBSNPs onto stainless steel surgical blades retained the antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. Further, the affinity of polymyxin for endotoxin was exploited for its removal using PBSNPs. It was found that the prepared nanoparticles removed 97% of the endotoxin from the solution. Such multifarious uses of metal nanoparticles are an attractive means of enhancing the potency of antimicrobial agents to control infections. PMID:25834431

  20. Facile fabrication of magnetic carboxymethyl starch/poly(vinyl alcohol) composite gel for methylene blue removal.

    PubMed

    Gong, Guisheng; Zhang, Faai; Cheng, Zehong; Zhou, Li

    2015-11-01

    This study presents a simple method to fabricate magnetic carboxymethyl starch/poly(vinyl alcohol) (mCMS/PVA) composite gel. The obtained mCMS/PVA was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements. The application of mCMS/PVA as an adsorbent for removal of cationic methylene blue (MB) dye from water was investigated. Benefiting from the combined merits of carboxymethyl starch and magnetic gel, the mCMS/PVA simultaneously exhibited excellent adsorption property toward MB and convenient magnetic separation capability. The effects of initial dye concentration, contact time, pH and ionic strength on the adsorption performance of mCMS/PVA adsorbent were investigated systematically. The adsorption process of mCMS/PVA for MB fitted pseudo-second-order model and Freundlich isotherm. Moreover, desorption experiments revealed that the mCMS/PVA adsorbent could be well regenerated in ethanol solution without obvious compromise of removal efficiency even after eight cycles of desorption/adsorption. Considering the facile fabrication process and robust adsorption performance, the mCMS/PVA composite gel has great potential as a low cost adsorbent for environmental decontamination.

  1. Heat stress and inadequate sanitary facilities at workplaces – an occupational health concern for women?

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vidhya; Rekha, Shanmugam; Manikandan, Krishnamoorthy; Latha, Perumal Kamalakkannan; Vennila, Viswanathan; Ganesan, Nalini; Kumaravel, Perumal; Chinnadurai, Stephen Jeremiah

    2016-01-01

    Background Health concerns unique to women are growing with the large number of women venturing into different trades that expose them to hot working environments and inadequate sanitation facilities, common in many Indian workplaces. Objective The study was carried out to investigate the health implications of exposures to hot work environments and inadequate sanitation facilities at their workplaces for women workers. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted with 312 women workers in three occupational sectors in 2014–2015. Quantitative data on heat exposures and physiological heat strain indicators such as core body temperature (CBT), sweat rate (SwR), and urine specific gravity (USG) were collected. A structured questionnaire captured workers perceptions about health impacts of heat stress and inadequate sanitary facilities at the workplace. Results Workplace heat exposures exceeded the threshold limit value for safe manual work for 71% women (Avg. wet bulb globe temperature=30°C±2.3°C) during the study period. Eighty-seven percent of the 200 women who had inadequate/no toilets at their workplaces reported experiencing genitourinary problems periodically. Above normal CBT, SwR, and USG in about 10% women workers indicated heat strain and moderate dehydration that corroborated well with their perceptions. Observed significant associations between high-heat exposures and SwR (t=−2.3879, p=0.0192), inadequate toilet facilities and self-reported adverse heat-related health symptoms (χ2=4.03, p=0.0444), and prevalence of genitourinary issues (χ2=42.92, p=0.0005×10−7) reemphasize that heat is a risk and lack of sanitation facilities is a major health concern for women workers. Conclusions The preliminary evidence suggests that health of women workers is at risk due to occupational heat exposures and inadequate sanitation facilities at many Indian workplaces. Intervention through strong labor policies with gender sensitivity is the need of the hour to

  2. Geothermal greenhouse heating facilities for the Klamath County Nursing Home, Klamath Falls, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-02-01

    The Klamath County Nursing Home, located in Klamath Falls, Oregon, was constructed in 1976. The building of 55,654 square feet currently houses care facilities for approximately 120 persons. During the initial planning for the nursing home, the present site was selected primarily on the basis of its geothermal resource. This resource currently provides space and domestic hot water heating for the nursing home, Merle West Medical Center and the Oregon Institute of Technology. The feasibility of installing a geothermal heating system in a planned greenhouse for the nursing home is explored. The greenhouse system would be tied directly to the existing hot water heating system for the nursing home.

  3. Control of reactor coolant flow path during reactor decay heat removal

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein N.

    1988-01-01

    An improved reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system for a sodium cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The sodium cooled nuclear reactor is of the type having a reactor vessel liner separating the reactor hot pool on the upstream side of an intermediate heat exchanger and the reactor cold pool on the downstream side of the intermediate heat exchanger. The improvement includes a flow path across the reactor vessel liner flow gap which dissipates core heat across the reactor vessel and containment vessel responsive to a casualty including the loss of normal heat removal paths and associated shutdown of the main coolant liquid sodium pumps. In normal operation, the reactor vessel cold pool is inlet to the suction side of coolant liquid sodium pumps, these pumps being of the electromagnetic variety. The pumps discharge through the core into the reactor hot pool and then through an intermediate heat exchanger where the heat generated in the reactor core is discharged. Upon outlet from the heat exchanger, the sodium is returned to the reactor cold pool. The improvement includes placing a jet pump across the reactor vessel liner flow gap, pumping a small flow of liquid sodium from the lower pressure cold pool into the hot pool. The jet pump has a small high pressure driving stream diverted from the high pressure side of the reactor pumps. During normal operation, the jet pumps supplement the normal reactor pressure differential from the lower pressure cold pool to the hot pool. Upon the occurrence of a casualty involving loss of coolant pump pressure, and immediate cooling circuit is established by the back flow of sodium through the jet pumps from the reactor vessel hot pool to the reactor vessel cold pool. The cooling circuit includes flow into the reactor vessel liner flow gap immediate the reactor vessel wall and containment vessel where optimum and immediate discharge of residual reactor heat occurs.

  4. Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-08

    The transpired solar collector was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for the this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

  5. Brayton-Cycle Heat Recovery System Characterization Program. Glass-furnace facility test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-29

    The test plan for development of a system to recover waste heat and produce electricity and preheated combustion air from the exhaust gases of an industrial glass furnace is described. The approach is to use a subatmospheric turbocompressor in a Brayton-cycle system. The operational furnace test requirements, the operational furnace environment, and the facility design approach are discussed. (MCW)

  6. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger: Phase 1 final report, November 1995--May 1997. Addendum 1: Task 2 topical report -- Pollutant removal tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, R.T.; Jankura, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) uses two Condensing Heat Exchangers (CHXs{reg_sign}) in series to recover waste heat from the flue gas and remove a variety of pollutants from the flue gas. The Teflon{reg_sign}-covered internals of the condensing heat exchanger permit heat recovery at temperatures below the acid dew-point of the flue gas. The pollutant removal characteristics of the IFGT system were measured over a wide range of operating conditions in a pilot Integrated Flue Gas Treatment System rated at 1.2 MW{sub t} (4 million Btu/hr) using a wide range of coals. The coals tested included a high-sulfur coal, a medium-sulfur coal and a low-sulfur coal. The flue gas pollutants investigated included ammonia, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, particulate, sulfur dioxide, gas phase and particle phase mercury and gas phase and particle phase trace elements. The particulate removal efficiency and size distribution was also investigated. Soda ash, lime and magnesium-lime scrubbing reagents were investigated. The test results show that the IFGT system can remove greater than 95% removal of acid gases with a liquid-to-gas ratio less than 1.34 l/m{sup 3} (10 gal/1,000 ft{sup 3}), and that lime reagents show promise as a substitute for soda ash. Particulate and ammonia gas removal was also very high. Ionic mercury removal averaged 80%, while elemental mercury removal was very low. Trace metals were found to be concentrated in the fine particulate with removal efficiencies in the range of 50% to 80%. The data measured in this task provides the basis for predictions of the performance of an IFGT system for both utility and industrial applications.

  7. A feasible way to remove the heat during adsorptive methane storage.

    PubMed

    Gütlein, Stefan; Burkard, Christoph; Zeilinger, Johannes; Niedermaier, Matthias; Klumpp, Michael; Kolb, Veronika; Jess, Andreas; Etzold, Bastian J M

    2015-01-01

    Methane originating from biogas or natural gas is an attractive and environmentally friendly alternative to gasoline. Adsorption is seen as promising storage technology, but the heat released limits fast filling of these systems. Here a lab scale adsorptive methane storage tank, capable to study the temperature increase during fast filling, was realized. A variation of the filling time from 1 h to 31 s, showed a decrease of the storage capacity of 14% and temperature increase of 39.6 °C. The experimental data could be described in good accordance with a finite element simulation solving the transient mass, energy, and impulse balance. The simulation was further used to extrapolate temperature development in real sized car tanks and for different heat pipe scenarios, resulting in temperature rises of approximately 110 °C. It could be clearly shown, that with heat conductivity as solei mechanism the heat cannot be removed in acceptable time. By adding an outlet to the tank a feed flow cooling with methane as heat carrier was realized. This setup was proofed in simulation and lab scale experiments to be a promising technique for fast adsorbent cooling and can be crucial to leverage the full potential of adsorptive methane gas storage. PMID:25485691

  8. A feasible way to remove the heat during adsorptive methane storage.

    PubMed

    Gütlein, Stefan; Burkard, Christoph; Zeilinger, Johannes; Niedermaier, Matthias; Klumpp, Michael; Kolb, Veronika; Jess, Andreas; Etzold, Bastian J M

    2015-01-01

    Methane originating from biogas or natural gas is an attractive and environmentally friendly alternative to gasoline. Adsorption is seen as promising storage technology, but the heat released limits fast filling of these systems. Here a lab scale adsorptive methane storage tank, capable to study the temperature increase during fast filling, was realized. A variation of the filling time from 1 h to 31 s, showed a decrease of the storage capacity of 14% and temperature increase of 39.6 °C. The experimental data could be described in good accordance with a finite element simulation solving the transient mass, energy, and impulse balance. The simulation was further used to extrapolate temperature development in real sized car tanks and for different heat pipe scenarios, resulting in temperature rises of approximately 110 °C. It could be clearly shown, that with heat conductivity as solei mechanism the heat cannot be removed in acceptable time. By adding an outlet to the tank a feed flow cooling with methane as heat carrier was realized. This setup was proofed in simulation and lab scale experiments to be a promising technique for fast adsorbent cooling and can be crucial to leverage the full potential of adsorptive methane gas storage.

  9. Removal of histological sections from glass for electron microscopy - Use of Quetol 651 resin and heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, L. M.; Joyce, K.; Dantoni Damelio, E.

    1983-01-01

    A number of approaches have been used to separate stained conventional histological sections from glass slides in preparation for a study with the electron microscope. However, in each reported case some problems were encountered with respect to the separation process. The present investigation is concerned with the use of the epoxy resin Quetol 651 as an embedding medium for this procedure, taking into account the simple application of heat (62-64 C) for performing the separation step. After the tissue has been removed from the glass by the considered technique, it is thin sectioned, and stained with uranyl acetate-lead citrate.

  10. EFFECT OF SHORT-TERM HEAT ACCLIMATION TRAINING ON KINETICS OF LACTATE REMOVAL FOLLOWING MAXIMAL EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    DiLeo, T.D.; Powell, J.B.; Kang, H-K.; Roberge, R.J.; Coca, A.; Kim, J-H.

    2016-01-01

    AIM Heat acclimation (HA) evokes numerous physiological adaptations, improves heat tolerance and has also been shown to enhance lactate (LA) responses during exercise, similar to that seen with endurance training. The purpose of this study was to examine whether HA improves the body’s ability to remove LA during recovery following maximal exercise. METHODS Ten healthy men completed two trials of maximal treadmill exercise (PRE- and POST-HA) separated by 5 days of HA. Each day of HA consisted of two 45 minute periods of cycling at ~50% VO2max separated by a 15min rest period in an environmental chamber (Tdb 45°C, RH 20%). In PRE-/POST-HA trials, venous blood was collected during 60 minutes of recovery to determine LA concentrations and removal kinetics (A2: amplitude and y2: velocity constant) using bi-exponential curve fitting. RESULTS Physiological adaptation to heat was significantly developed during HA, as evidenced by end-exercise Tre (DAY 1 vs. 5) (38.89±0.56 vs. 38.66±0.44 °C), Tsk (38.07±.51 vs. 37.66±.48 °C), HR (175.0±9.9 vs. 165.0±18.5 beats·min−1), and sweat rate (1.24 ±.26 vs. 1.47 ±.27 L·min−1) (p<.05). However, there was no significant difference in either LA concentrations (LA0min: 8.78±1.08 vs. 8.69±1.23; LApeak: 10.97±1.77 vs. 10.95±1.46; and La60min; 2.88±.82 vs. 2.96±.93 mmol·L−1) or removal kinetics (A2: −13.05±7.05 vs −15.59±7.90 mmol.L−1 and y2: .02±.01 vs .03±.01 min−1). CONCLUSION The present study concluded that, while effective in inducing thermo-physiological adaptations to heat stress, short-term HA does not improve the body’s ability to remove LA following maximal exercise. Therefore, athletes and workers seeking faster LA recovery from intense physical activity may not benefit from short-term HA. PMID:25286892

  11. Cooling system for removing metabolic heat from an hermetically sealed spacesuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, B. W.; Vykukal, H. C.; Williams, B. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved cooling and ventilating system is described for removing metabolic heat, waste gases and water vapor generated by a wearer of an hermetically sealed spacesuit. The cooling system was characterized by a body suit, having a first circuit for simultaneously establishing a cooling flow of water through the thorax and head sections of the body suit. Circulation patches were included mounted in the thorax section and head section of the body suit. A second circuit for discharing a flow of gas throughout the spacesuit and a disconnect unit for coupling the circuits with a life support system externally related to the spacesuit were provided.

  12. Parametric Study to Characterize Low Activity Waste Tank Heat Removal Alternatives for Phase 1 Specification Development

    SciTech Connect

    GRENARD, C.E.

    2000-09-11

    Alternative for removing heat from Phase 1, low-activity waste feed double-shell tanks using the ventilation systems have been analyzed for Phase 1 waste feed delivery. The analysis was a parametric study using a model that predicted the waste temperatures for a range of primary and annulus ventilation system flow rates. The analysis was performed to determine the ventilation flow required to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding the Limiting Conditions for Operation limits during normal operation and the Safety Limits during off-normal events.

  13. Progress in the studies of passive heat removal in the next European torus under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Soria, A. ); Renda, V.; Papa, L. . Joint Research Centre); Fenoglio, F. )

    1989-12-01

    Within the framework of safety analysis for the next European torus, a decay heat hazards assessment is under way in Ispra. Undercooling accidents (loss-of-coolant and loss-of-flow accidents (LOCAs and LOFAs)) due to pump failure have been investigated assuming an automatic plasma shutdown in both cases. The passive heat removal mechanisms considered include radiation between components and residual cooling by the thermosyphon effect in the main cooling circuits. Conservative thermohydraulic calculations have been made to determine coolant velocity and temperature transients to avoid water boiling int he circuits. Results show that during a LOFA, water boiling can be avoided provided that the water inertia is large enough, and material melting temperatures are not reached during a LOCA.

  14. FACILITY UPGRADES FOR RECEIPT FROM ACTINIDE REMOVAL AND MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, T; Stephen Phillips, S; Benjamin Culbertson, B; Beverly02 Davis, B; Aaron Staub, A

    2007-02-13

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently on an aggressive program to empty its High Level Waste (HLW) tanks and immobilize its radioactive waste into a durable borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). As a part of that program, two new processes will be brought on-line to assist in emptying the HLW tanks. These processes are in addition to the current sludge removal process and are called the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Process. In order to accept and process the streams generated from these two new processes, several facility modifications are required and are broken down into several projects. These projects are handling the facility modifications required for the Tank Farm (241-96H), and DWPF vitrification facility (221-S), and DWPF ancillary facilities (511-S, and 512-S). Additional modifications to the 221-S building were required to address the flammability concern from the solvent carryover from the MCU process. This paper will describe a summary of the modifications impacting the 511-S, 512-S, and the 221-S facilities in order to receive the new streams from the ARP and MCU processes at the DWPF.

  15. 41 CFR 102-74.185 - What heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What heating and cooling... heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities? Within the limitations of the building systems, Federal agencies must— (a) Operate heating and cooling systems in the...

  16. 41 CFR 102-74.185 - What heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What heating and cooling... heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities? Within the limitations of the building systems, Federal agencies must— (a) Operate heating and cooling systems in the...

  17. 41 CFR 102-74.185 - What heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What heating and cooling... heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities? Within the limitations of the building systems, Federal agencies must— (a) Operate heating and cooling systems in the...

  18. 41 CFR 102-74.185 - What heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What heating and cooling... heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities? Within the limitations of the building systems, Federal agencies must— (a) Operate heating and cooling systems in the...

  19. BWR passive plant heat removal assessment (joint EPRI/CRIEPI advanced LWR studies)

    SciTech Connect

    Abdollahian, D.; Gillis, J.; Petrokas, R. , Inc., Campbell, CA )

    1991-03-01

    An independent assessment of the simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) passive heat removal systems was performed. Information concerning required characteristics of the 600 MWe SBWR was gathered to form a basis for this assessment. Computerized models were then formulated to predict the operation of the gravity driven cooling system (GDCS), passive containment cooling system (PCCS), and the isolation condenser system. Investigation of the GDCS resulted in prediction of GDCS performance for a range of LOCAs and single failures. The ability of the GDCS to keep the core covered with a two phase mixture was determined. It was concluded that for all conditions which formed a basis for this study, the GDCS will keep the core covered and cooled. The evaluation of the PCCS showed that the containment will be cooled and that the system can operate in the presence of a significant amount of non-condensible gases. However, the PCCS will not be capable of reducing the containment pressure below approximately 40 psia. This is still significantly below the containment design pressure of 55 psig. Calculations performed to determine isolation condenser performance during reactor isolation events show that the isolation condensers remove enough decay heat to prevent the safety/relief valves from lifting. A study of the test program for the SBWR concluded that additional large scale tests may be needed to verify GDCS and PCCS performance. Finally, an investigation of larger power ratings showed that the passive systems are technically feasible for plant sizes of up to 1,000 MWe. 2 refs.

  20. Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheng, Lap-Yan; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    2009-01-01

    The safety goal of the current designs of advanced high-temperature thermal gas-cooled reactors (HTRs) is that no core meltdown would occur in a depressurization event with a combination of concurrent safety system failures. This study focused on the analysis of passive decay heat removal (DHR) in a GEN IV direct-cycle gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) which is based on the technology developments of the HTRs. Given the different criteria and design characteristics of the GFR, an approach different from that taken for the HTRs for passive DHR would have to be explored. Different design options based on maintaining core flow weremore » evaluated by performing transient analysis of a depressurization accident using the system code RELAP5-3D. The study also reviewed the conceptual design of autonomous systems for shutdown decay heat removal and recommends that future work in this area should be focused on the potential for Brayton cycle DHRs.« less

  1. A modified heat leak test facility employing a closed-cycle helium refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Boroski, W.N.

    1996-01-01

    A Heat Leak Test Facility (HLTF) has been in use at Fermilab for many years. The apparatus has successfully measured the thermal performance of a variety of cryostat components under simulated operating conditions. While an effective tool in the cryostat design process, the HLTF has several limitations. Temperatures are normally fixed at cryogen boiling points and run times are limited to cryogen inventory. Moreover, close personnel attention is required to maintain system inventories and sustain system equilibrium. To provide longer measurement periods without perturbation and to minimize personnel interaction, a new heat leak measurement facility (HLTF-2) has been designed that incorporates a closed-cycle helium refrigerator. The two-stage refrigerator provides cooling to the various temperature stations of the HLTF while eliminating the need for cryogens. Eliminating cryogen inventories has resulted in a reduction of the amount of direct personnel attention required.

  2. Phosphorus removal mechanisms at the Yellow River Sweetwater Creek Water Reclamation Facility, Gwinnett County, Georgia. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Borowy, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    This research investigated the capabilities of the Yellow River Sweetwater Creek Water Reclamation Facility in Gwinnett County, GA. to remove phosphorus biologically. Phosphorus levels and removal locations were analyzed in plant operational units (sampling events), while in reactor experiments (pilot studies), waste was subjected to various conditions to promote-biological phosphorus release and uptake. Analysis of plant conditions at the time of experimentation indicates that one-half of the plant phosphorus removal is accomplished biologically through incorporation of phosphorus in microbial cells during growth. It does not appear, however, that enhanced biological phosphorus removal (BPR) is possible due to wastestream characteristics and/or microbial population. It was noted that the basic anaerobic-aerobic sequence associated with enhanced BPR appears to be occurring with the secondary clarifier sludge blanket and return to compartment A of the nitrification basin.

  3. Ultrafine particle removal by residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning filters.

    PubMed

    Stephens, B; Siegel, J A

    2013-12-01

    This work uses an in situ filter test method to measure the size-resolved removal efficiency of indoor-generated ultrafine particles (approximately 7-100 nm) for six new commercially available filters installed in a recirculating heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system in an unoccupied test house. The fibrous HVAC filters were previously rated by the manufacturers according to ASHRAE Standard 52.2 and ranged from shallow (2.5 cm) fiberglass panel filters (MERV 4) to deep-bed (12.7 cm) electrostatically charged synthetic media filters (MERV 16). Measured removal efficiency ranged from 0 to 10% for most ultrafine particles (UFP) sizes with the lowest rated filters (MERV 4 and 6) to 60-80% for most UFP sizes with the highest rated filter (MERV 16). The deeper bed filters generally achieved higher removal efficiencies than the panel filters, while maintaining a low pressure drop and higher airflow rate in the operating HVAC system. Assuming constant efficiency, a modeling effort using these measured values for new filters and other inputs from real buildings shows that MERV 13-16 filters could reduce the indoor proportion of outdoor UFPs (in the absence of indoor sources) by as much as a factor of 2-3 in a typical single-family residence relative to the lowest efficiency filters, depending in part on particle size. PMID:23590456

  4. Ultrafine particle removal by residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning filters.

    PubMed

    Stephens, B; Siegel, J A

    2013-12-01

    This work uses an in situ filter test method to measure the size-resolved removal efficiency of indoor-generated ultrafine particles (approximately 7-100 nm) for six new commercially available filters installed in a recirculating heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system in an unoccupied test house. The fibrous HVAC filters were previously rated by the manufacturers according to ASHRAE Standard 52.2 and ranged from shallow (2.5 cm) fiberglass panel filters (MERV 4) to deep-bed (12.7 cm) electrostatically charged synthetic media filters (MERV 16). Measured removal efficiency ranged from 0 to 10% for most ultrafine particles (UFP) sizes with the lowest rated filters (MERV 4 and 6) to 60-80% for most UFP sizes with the highest rated filter (MERV 16). The deeper bed filters generally achieved higher removal efficiencies than the panel filters, while maintaining a low pressure drop and higher airflow rate in the operating HVAC system. Assuming constant efficiency, a modeling effort using these measured values for new filters and other inputs from real buildings shows that MERV 13-16 filters could reduce the indoor proportion of outdoor UFPs (in the absence of indoor sources) by as much as a factor of 2-3 in a typical single-family residence relative to the lowest efficiency filters, depending in part on particle size.

  5. First observations of stimulated electromagnetic emission at the SPEAR heating facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurik, Roman; Tereshchenko, Evgeniy; Yeoman, Tim; Robinson, T. R.

    The results of the first stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) observations at the SPEAR (Space Plasma Exploration by Active Radar) heating facility are reported. The presented observations were recorded by the HF receiver during the February-March 2007 experimental campaign at the SPEAR heating facility. Due to low power of the SPEAR and the high polar ionosphere variability to estimate efficiency this heating facility the measurements of the SEE generated by the SPEAR was used. SEE observations are one of the key ground-based diagnostics of ionospheric plasma excitation by powerful radio frequency transmissions (RF) which significantly depend on the ionospheric condition, pumping parameters and the gyroharmonic frequency. In these observations the SPEAR transmitters were operated at 2kW, resulting in an Effective Radiated Power (ERP) for SPEAR of 13 - 15 MW and the beam direction was field-aligned (8 degrees south of vertical). During time periods when fo F2 was higher then pumping frequency (4.45 MHz, above the 3rd gyroharmonic) well developed steady state features of SEE were observed. As examples of these features, the down-shifted maximum (DM) and broad continuum (BC) of SEE spectra are registered. The observations of the SEE demonstrate clearly that the power of the SPEAR heating facility was enough for non-linear modification of the ionospheric plasma and can be used with the other diagnostic methods. The polar cap location of the SPEAR (78.2N, 16.1E) makes it a new and convenient tool for the investigation of nonlinear plasma processes in the very high latitude regions. SPEAR is operated under financial support from PPARC grant PP/E002544/1. The authors acknowledge Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Grant No. 06-05-64540) for financial support. The work was supported by program of Presidium of RAS No. 16.

  6. ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER TEST FACILITY, TRA666A. ELEVATIONS. ROOF FRAMING PLAN. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER TEST FACILITY, TRA-666A. ELEVATIONS. ROOF FRAMING PLAN. CONCRETE BLOCK SIDING. SLOPED ROOF. ROLL-UP DOOR. AIR INTAKE ENCLOSURE ON NORTH SIDE. F.C. TORKELSON 842-MTR-666-A5, 8/1966. INL INDEX NO. 531-0666-00-851-152258, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. Los Alamos PWR decay-heat-removal studies. Summary results and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, B E; Henninger, R J; Horley, E; Lime, J F; Nassersharif, B; Smith, R

    1986-03-01

    The adequacy of shutdown-decay-heat removal in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is currently under investigation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. One part of this effort is the review of feed-and-bleed procedures that could be used if the normal cooling mode through the steam generators were unavailable. Feed-and-bleed cooling is effected by manually activating the high-pressure injection (HPI) system and opening the power-operated relief valves (PORVs) to release the core decay energy. The feasibility of the feed-and-bleed concept as a diverse mode of heat removal has been evaluated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The TRAC-PF1 code has been used to predict the expected performance of the Oconee-1 and Calvert Cliffs-1 reactors of Bobcock and Wilcox and Combustion Engineering, respectively, and the Zion-1 and H.B. Robinson-2 plants of Westinghouse. Feed and bleed was successfully applied in each of the four plants studied, provided it was initiated no later than the time of loss of secondary heat sink. Feed and bleed was successfully applied in two of the plants, Oconee-1 and Zion-1, provided it was initiated no later than the time of primary system saturation. Feed and bleed in Calvert Cliffs-1 when initiated at the time of primary system saturation did result in core dryout; however, the core heatup was eventually terminated by coolant injection. Feed-and-bleed initiation at primary system saturation was not studied for H.B. Robinson-2. Insights developed during the analyses of specific plant transients have been identified and documented. 33 refs., 107 figs., 26 tabs.

  8. Mitigation Measures Following a Loss-of-Residual-Heat-Removal Event During Shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Seul, Kwang Won; Bang, Young Seok; Kim, Hho Jung

    2000-10-15

    The transient following a loss-of-residual-heat-removal event during shutdown was analyzed to determine the containment closure time (CCT) to prevent uncontrolled release of fission products and the gravity-injection path and rate (GIPR) for effective core cooling using the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code. The plant conditions of Yonggwang Units 3 and 4, a pressurized water reactor (PWR) of 2815-MW(thermal) power in Korea, were reviewed, and possible event sequences were identified. From the CCT analysis for the five cases of typical plant configurations, it was estimated for the earliest CCT to be 40 min after the event in a case with a large cold-leg opening and emptied steam generators (SGs). However, the case with water-filled SGs significantly delayed the CCT through the heat removal to the secondary side. From the GIPR analysis for the six possible gravity-injection paths from the refueling water storage tank (RWST), the case with the injection point and opening on the other leg side was estimated to be the most suitable path to avoid core boiling. In addition, from the sensitivity study, it was evaluated for the plant to be capable of providing the core cooling for the long-term transient if nominal RWST water is available. As a result, these analysis methods and results will provide useful information in understanding the plant behavior and preparing the mitigation measures after the event, especially for Combustion Engineering-type PWR plants. However, to directly apply the analysis results to the emergency procedure for such an event, additional case studies are needed for a wide range of operating conditions such as reactor coolant inventory, RWST water temperature, and core decay heat rate.

  9. 18 CFR 1304.406 - Removal of unauthorized, unsafe, and derelict structures or facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... derelict structures or facilities. If, at any time, any dock, wharf, boathouse (fixed or floating), nonnavigable houseboat, outfall, aerial cable, or other fixed or floating structure or facility (including any... Procurement, 1101 Market Street, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37402-2801....

  10. Passive solar-heating retrofit of a maintenance facility: First-year performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, D. R.; Callahan, J. M.

    1982-09-01

    A 12,000 sf maintenance facility in Connecticut was retrofitted with a 1,500 sf passive solar Trombe wall, 2 in. of foam roof insulation and a new control system that allows night/weekend temperature setback. A new separate boiler was installed to heat an office/locker wing of the facility. An energy-consumption monitoring system was installed and collected data for 11/2 years before the retrofit and one complete year after the retrofit. Actual energy consumption for the facility was very close to that predicted using simple analytic methods. After the solar wall was installed and other energy-conservation measures implemented the yearly oil consumption was reduced to 2744 gallons/year.

  11. Study on natural convection capability of liquid gallium for passive decay heat removal system (PDHRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Ha, K. S.; Lee, S. W.; Park, S. D.; Kim, S. M.; Seo, H.; Kim, J. H.; Bang, I. C.

    2012-07-01

    The safety issues of the SFRs are important due to the fact that it uses sodium as a nuclear coolant, reacting vigorously with water and air. For that reason, there are efforts to seek for alternative candidates of liquid metal coolants having excellent heat transfer property and to adopt improved safety features to the SFR concepts. This study considers gallium as alternative liquid metal coolant applicable to safety features in terms of chemical activity issue of the sodium and aims to experimentally investigate the natural convection capability of gallium as a feasibility study for the development of gallium-based passive safety features in SFRs. In this paper, the design and construction of the liquid gallium natural convection loop were carried out. The experimental results of heat transfer coefficient of liquid gallium resulting in heat removal {approx}2.53 kW were compared with existing correlations and they were much lower than the correlations. To comparison of the experimental data with computer code analysis, gallium property code was developed for employing MARS-LMR (Korea version of RELAP) based on liquid gallium as working fluid. (authors)

  12. Design and construction of the NMSU Geothermally Heated Greenhouse Research Facility: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenmackers, R.

    1988-11-01

    This report describes the design, construction, and performance of the New Mexico State University (NMSU) Geothermal Greenhouse Research Facility. Two 6000-square-foot greenhouses were built on the NMSU campus and supplied with geothermal energy for heating. The geothermal water is pumped from one of three wells producing water at temperatures from 141/degree/F to 148/degree/F. Heat is delivered to the greenhouse space by means of overhead fan-coil unit heaters. The two greenhouses are double-glazed on roof and wall surfaces employing a total of four different film materials: Tedlar/Reg Sign/, Melinex/Reg Sign/, Softglass/Reg Sign/, and Agrifilm/Reg Sign/. One greenhouse is cooled using a traditional fan and pad cooling system. The second greenhouse is cooled with a high-pressure fog system and natural ventilation through roof and side vents. A 2400-square-foot metal building next to the greenhouses provides office, work, and storage space for the facility. The greenhouse facility was leased to two commerical tenants who produced a variety of crops. The performance of the greenhouses was monitored and reported both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results from the tenant's pilot-scale studies in the NMSU greenhouse facility were transferred and applied to two commercial greenhouse ranges that were built in southern New Mexico during 1986/87. 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Cold test plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tank contents removal project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) Tanks Contents Removal Project Cold Test Plan describes the activities to be conducted during the cold test of the OHF sluicing and pumping system at the Tank Technology Cold Test Facility (TTCTF). The TTCTF is located at the Robotics and Process Systems Complex at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The cold test will demonstrate performance of the pumping and sluicing system, fine-tune operating instructions, and train the personnel in the actual work to be performed. After completion of the cold test a Technical Memorandum will be prepared documenting completion of the cold test, and the equipment will be relocated to the OHF site.

  14. Modeling and Simulation of Radiative Compressible Flows in Aerodynamic Heating Arc-Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensassi, Khalil; Laguna, Alejandro A.; Lani, Andrea; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of an arc heated flow inside NASA's 20 [MW] Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF) are performed in order to investigate the three-dimensional swirling flow and the current distribution inside the wind tunnel. The plasma is considered in Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium(LTE) and is composed of Air-Argon gas mixture. The governing equations are the Navier-Stokes equations that include source terms corresponding to Joule heating and radiative cooling. The former is obtained by solving an electric potential equation, while the latter is calculated using an innovative massively parallel ray-tracing algorithm. The fully coupled system is closed by the thermodynamics relations and transport properties which are obtained from Chapman-Enskog method. A novel strategy was developed in order to enable the flow solver and the radiation calculation to be preformed independently and simultaneously using a different number of processors. Drastic reduction in the computational cost was achieved using this strategy. Details on the numerical methods used for space discretization, time integration and ray-tracing algorithm will be presented. The effect of the radiative cooling on the dynamics of the flow will be investigated. The complete set of equations were implemented within the COOLFluiD Framework. Fig. 1 shows the geometry of the Anode and part of the constrictor of the Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF). Fig. 2 shows the velocity field distribution along (x-y) plane and the streamline in (z-y) plane.

  15. Modification of hot cells for general purpose heat source assembly at the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carteret, B. A.

    1991-09-01

    Eight existing, unused hot cells currently are being modified for use in the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) to assemble Pu-238 fueled heat sources for radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Four air atmosphere cells will be used for storage, decanning, and decontamination of the iridium-clad radioisotope fuel. The remaining four argon atmosphere cells will be used to assemble fuel and graphite components for production and packaging of general purpose heat source (GPHS) assembly modules, which provide heat to drive the thermoelectric conversion process in the generators. The hot cells will be equipped to perform remote and glovebox-type operations. They will provide shielding and contamination control measures to reduce worker radiation exposure to levels within current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Designs emphasize the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) radiation protection policy.

  16. Modification of hot cells for general purpose heat source assembly at the radioisotope power systems facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carteret, Betty A.

    1992-01-01

    Eight existing, unused hot cells currently are being modified for use in the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) to assemble 238Pu-fueled heat sources for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Four air atmosphere cells will be used for storage, decanning, and decontamination of the iridium-clad radioisotope fuel. The remaining four argon atmosphere cells will be used to assemble fuel and graphite components for production and packaging of general purpose heat source (GPHS) assembly modules, which provide heat to drive the thermoelectric conversion process in the generators. The hot cells will be equipped to perform remote and glovebox-type operations. They will provide shielding and contamination control measures to reduce worker radiation exposure to levels within current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Designs emphasize the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) radiation protection policy.

  17. Geothermal greenhouse-heating facilities for the Klamath County Nursing Home, Klamath Falls, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    The Klamath County Nursing Home, located in Klamath Falls, Oregon, was constructed in 1976. The building of 55,654 square feet currently houses care facilities for approximately 120 persons. During the initial planning for the Nursing Home, the present site was selected primarily on the basis of its geothermal resource. This resource (approx. 190/sup 0/F) currently provides space and domestic hot water heating for the Nursing Home, Merle West Medical Center and the Oregon Institute of Technology. The feasibility of installing a geothermal heating system in a planned greenhouse for the Nursing Home is explored. The greenhouse system would be tied directly to the existing hot water heating system for the Nursing Home.

  18. High Enthalpy Studies of Capsule Heating in an Expansion Tunnel Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrene, Aaron; MacLean, Matthew; Holden, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Measurements were made on an Orion heat shield model to demonstrate the capability of the new LENS-XX expansion tunnel facility to make high quality measurements of heat transfer distributions at flow velocities from 3 km/s (h(sub 0) = 5 MJ/kg) to 8.4 km/s (h(sub 0) = 36 MJ/kg). Thirty-nine heat transfer gauges, including both thin-film and thermocouple instruments, as well as four pressure gauges, and high-speed Schlieren were used to assess the aerothermal environment on the capsule heat shield. Only results from laminar boundary layer runs are reported. A major finding of this test series is that the high enthalpy, low-density flows displayed surface heating behavior that is observed to be consistent with some finite-rate recombination process occurring on the surface of the model. It is too early to speculate on the nature of the mechanism, but the response of the gages on the surface seems generally repeatable and consistent for a range of conditions. This result is an important milestone in developing and proving a capability to make measurements in a ground test environment and extrapolate them to flight for conditions with extreme non-equilibrium effects. Additionally, no significant, isolated stagnation point augmentation ("bump") was observed in the tests in this facility. Cases at higher Reynolds number seemed to show the greatest amount of overall increase in heating on the windward side of the model, which may in part be due to small-scale particulate.

  19. Removal site evaluation report on the bulk shielding facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This removal site evaluation report on the Bulk Shielding Facility (BSF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around BSF buildings pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment (i.e., a high probability of adverse effects) and whether remedial site evaluations or removal actions are, therefore, required. A removal site evaluation was conducted at nine areas associated with the BSF. The scope of each evaluation included (1) a search for, and review of, readily available historical records regarding operations and use of the facility (including hazardous substance usage and existing contamination); (2) interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past practices; and (3) a brief walk-through to visually inspect the facility and identify existing hazard areas requiring maintenance actions or remedial evaluation. The results of the removal site evaluation indicate that no substantial risks exist from contaminants present because adequate efforts are being made to contain and control existing contamination and hazardous substances and to protect human health and the environment. At Building 3004, deteriorated and peeling exterior paint has a direct pathway to the storm water drainage system and can potentially impact local surface water during periods of storm water runoff. The paint is assumed to be lead based, thus posing a potential problem. The paint should be sampled and analyzed to determine its lead content and to assess whether a hazard exists. If so, a maintenance action will be necessary to prevent further deterioration and dislodging of the paint. In addition, if the paint contains lead, then a remedial site evaluation should be conducted to determine whether lead from fallen chips has impacted soils in the immediate area of the building.

  20. Enhancement of heat removal using concave liquid metal targets for high-power accelerators.

    SciTech Connect

    Konkashbaev, I.; Fischer, P.; Hassanein, A.; Mokhov, N. V.; Mathematics and Computer Science; FNAL

    2007-01-01

    The need is increasing for development of high-power targets and beam dump areas for the production of intense beams of secondary particles. The severe constraints arising from a megawatt beam deposited on targets and absorbers call for nontrivial procedures to dilute the beam. This study describes the development of targets and absorbers and the advantages of using flowing liquid metal in concave channels first proposed by IFMIF to raise the liquid metal boiling point by increasing the pressure in liquid supported by a centrifugal force. Such flow with a back-wall is subject to Taylor-Couette instability. The instability can play a positive role of increasing the heat transfer from the hottest region in the target/absorber to the back-wall cooled by water. Results of theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of both targets and dump areas for the IFMIF, ILC, and RIA facilities are presented.

  1. Thermal-hydraulic processes involved in loss of residual heat removal during reduced inventory operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, C.D.; McHugh, P.R.; Naff, S.A.; Johnsen, G.W.

    1991-02-01

    This paper identifies the topics needed to understand pressurized water reactor response to an extended loss of residual heat removal event during refueling and maintenance outages. By identifying the possible plant conditions and cooling methods that would be used for each cooling mode, the controlling thermal-hydraulic processes and phenomena were identified. Controlling processes and phenomena include: gravity drain, core water boil-off, and reflux cooling processes. Important subcategories of the reflux cooling processes include: the initiation of reflux cooling from various plant conditions, the effects of air on reflux cooling, core level depression effects, issues regarding the steam generator secondaries, and the special case of boiler-condenser cooling with once-through steam generators. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. 41 CFR 102-74.185 - What heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... heating and cooling policy must Federal agencies follow in Federal facilities? Within the limitations of...-conditioning during non-working hours, except as necessary to return space temperatures to a suitable level...

  3. Thioether-Based Fluorescent Covalent Organic Framework for Selective Detection and Facile Removal of Mercury(II).

    PubMed

    Ding, San-Yuan; Dong, Ming; Wang, Ya-Wen; Chen, Yan-Tao; Wang, Huai-Zhen; Su, Cheng-Yong; Wang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Heavy metal ions are highly toxic and widely spread as environmental pollutants. New strategies are being developed to simultaneously detect and remove these toxic ions. Herein, we take the intrinsic advantage of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) and develop fluorescent COFs for sensing applications. As a proof-of-concept, a thioether-functionalized COF material, COF-LZU8, was "bottom-up" integrated with multifunctionality for the selective detection and facile removal of mercury(II): the π-conjugated framework as the signal transducer, the evenly and densely distributed thioether groups as the Hg(2+) receptor, the regular pores facilitating the real-time detection and mass transfer, together with the robust COF structure for recycle use. The excellent sensing performance of COF-LZU8 was achieved in terms of high sensitivity, excellent selectivity, easy visibility, and real-time response. Meanwhile, the efficient removal of Hg(2+) from water and the recycling of COF-LZU8 offers the possibility for practical applications. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and solid-state NMR investigations verified the strong and selective interaction between Hg(2+) and the thioether groups of COF-LZU8. This research not only demonstrates the utilization of fluorescent COFs for both sensing and removal of metal ions but also highlights the facile construction of functionalized COFs for environmental applications. PMID:26878337

  4. In-situ surface debris inspection and removal system for upward-facing transport mirrors of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W H; Dzenitis, E; Martin, D; Listiyo, K; Sherman, G; Kent, W; Butlin, R; Stolz, C J; Pryatel, J

    2004-11-10

    We describe a system to inspect and remove surface debris in-situ from the surfaces of upward-facing mirrors that transport 1053 nm laser light to the target chamber of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Grazing angle (2-5{sup o}) illumination with a bar light highlights debris {approx}10 {micro}m in size and larger, which is then viewed through windows in the enclosures of selected mirrors. Debris is removed with 1-second bursts of high velocity (76 m/s) clean air delivered across the optic surfaces by a commercially available linear nozzle (''gas knife''). Experiments with aluminum, stainless steel, glass and polystyrene particles of various sizes >30 {micro}m show that particle removal efficiency is near 100% over most of the mirror surfaces for all sizes tested.

  5. Potential soil contaminant levels of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans at industrial facilities employing heat transfer operations

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, N.E.; Muhr, C.A.; Greene, D.W.

    1992-04-01

    Certain manufacturing facilities formerly used large quantities of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) fluids in heat transfer operations. At many of these locations, operations have also involved PCB-containing electrical equipment. Commonly, over many years of plant operations, spills and leaks have resulted in PCB soil contamination. Dioxins and furans have been associated with PCB contamination in both the technical and popular press. Consequently, the need for analyses for dioxins and furans must be evaluated at locations where soils are contaminated with PCBs. This report presents an evaluation of potential dioxin and furan soil contamination based on heat transfer operations and spills from electrical equipment. The following five scenarios were examined for dioxin and furan contamination: (1) impurities in heat transfer fluids, (2) formation during heat transfer operations, (3) pyrolysis of heat transfer fluids, (4) impurities in dielectric fluids, and (5) pyrolysis of dielectric fluids. The potential contamination with dioxins and furans was calculated and compared with a 20 ppb guideline that has been used by the Centers for Disease Control for dioxin in subsoil. The results demonstrated that dioxins are formed only under pyrolytic conditions and only from the trichlorobenzenes present in dielectric fluids. Furans are found as impurities in PCB fluids but, as with dioxins, are not formed in significant quantities except during pyrolysis. Fortunately, pyrolytic conditions involving PCB fluids and soil contamination are unlikely; therefore, analyses for dioxin and furan contamination in soils will rarely be needed.

  6. Thermophysiological responses induced by a body heat removal system with Peltier devices in a hot environment.

    PubMed

    Suzurikawa, Jun; Fujimoto, Sho; Mikami, Kousei; Jonai, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takenobu

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injuries often experience thermoregulation disorders as well as sensory and motor disabilities. In order to prevent such individuals from becoming hyperthermic, we developed a body heat removal system (BHRS) with thermoelectric devices. Our BHRS comprises four Peltier devices mounted on a wheelchair backrest and continuously transfers body heat through the contacting interface to the external environment. Here, we characterized thermophysiological responses induced by this novel contact-type cooling system. A cooling experiment in a hot environment with five able-bodied subjects demonstrated that sweating and systolic blood pressure in the back-cooling (BC) trial were significantly suppressed compared with those in no-cooling (NC) trial, while no difference was found in oral and skin temperatures. A correlation was observed between chest skin temperature and blood flow in the NC trial; this was not observed in the BC trial. These results suggest that BHRS modulates normal thermoregulatory responses, including sweating and vascular dilation and has the capability to partly replace these functions.

  7. Optimization of residual heat removal pump axial thrust and axial bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, F.

    1996-12-01

    The residual heat removal (RHR) pumps of German 1300 megawatt pressurized-water reactor (PWR) power plants are of the single stage end suction type with volute casing or with diffuser and forged circular casing. Due to the service conditions the pumps have to cover the full capacity range as well as a big variation in suction static pressure. This results in a big difference in the axial thrust that has to be borne by the axial bearing. Because these pumps are designed to operate without auxiliary systems (things that do not exist can not fail), they are equipped with antifriction bearings and sump oil lubrication. To minimize the heat production within the bearing casing, a number of PWR plants have pumps with combined axial/radial bearings of the ball type. Due to the fact that the maximum axial thrust caused by static pressure and hydrodynamic forces on the impeller is too big to be borne by that type of axial bearing, the impellers were designed to produce a hydrodynamic axial force that counteracts the static axial force. Thus, the resulting axial thrust may change direction when the static pressure varies.

  8. Removal of ethylene and bioaerosol by chlorine dioxide using a chemical scrubbing system in a fruit and vegetable storage facility.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsu-Hua; Wu, Li-Chun; You, Ya-Ting; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2009-02-15

    Ethylene (C2H4) and bioaerosol are commonly present in the inside atmosphere of postharvest fruit and vegetable storage facilities, which may affect the aging of postharvest fruit and human health. We have assessed the feasibility of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as the scrubbing solution in a chemical scrubbing tower for simultaneously removing C2H4 and bioaerosol emissions from a gas stream. Parameters such as the ClO2concentration, contact time, and liquid-to-gas (L/G) ratio were examined with the aim of determining the optimal operating conditions. Using the system reported here, the optimal C2H4 removal efficiency was 99.5% when 500 ppm ClO2 was used at a reaction time of 30-60 s under a continuous non-recycle ClO2 flow mode. In terms of C2H4 removal, a greater L/G resulted in a higher C2H4 removal efficiency up to the optimal ratio of 12.5. In terms of the simultaneous removal of C2H4 and bioaerosol, the removal efficiency of C2H4 was 99.2% and those for the bioaersols of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were 99.92 and 99.10%, respectively, under a continuous non-recycle flow mode. Our results also indicate that oxidation reduction potential (ORP) can be a valuable indicator for the timing of the replacement of the scrubbing solution in the system under a continuous recycle flow mode. Additional confirmation of the feasibility of the ORP as an indicator of C2H4 and bioaerosol removal in situ was obtained in a 3-month test of our system in continuous recycle flow mode with the periodical replacement of scrubbing solution, ClO2. The removal efficiencies for C2H4, bacterial and fungus aerosol, and total hydrocarbon compounds (THC) were 83.4, 96.8, 96.1, and 76.5%, respectively. Our results prove that ClO2 is an excellent scrubbing solution in the chemical scrubbing tower for the removal of C2H4 emissions and bioaerosol. We demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of this system in a fruit and vegetable storage facility. PMID:19132588

  9. Enthalpy By Energy Balance for Aerodynamic Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center Arc Jet Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, T. Mark; MacDonald, Christine L.; Martinez, Edward R.; Balboni, John A.; Anderson, Karl F.; Arnold, Jim O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Arc Jet Facilities' Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) has been instrumented for the Enthalpy By Energy Balance (EB2) method. Diagnostic EB2 data is routinely taken for all AHF runs. This paper provides an overview of the EB2 method implemented in the AHF. The chief advantage of the AHF implementation over earlier versions is the non-intrusiveness of the instruments used. For example, to measure the change in cooling water temperature, thin film 1000 ohm Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) are used with an Anderson Current Loop (ACL) as the signal conditioner. The ACL with 1000 ohm RTDs allows for very sensitive measurement of the increase in temperature (Delta T) of the cooling water to the arc heater, which is a critical element of the EB2 method. Cooling water flow rates are measured with non-intrusive ultrasonic flow meters.

  10. Phase 1 development of an aquifer heat storage facility. Part 1: Summary and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harasim, A.; Weissenbach, B.

    1982-03-01

    A surface aquifer pilot plan was defined. Several versions of construction were drafted and the costs were calculated for variable site conditions. Aquifer heat storage facilities larger than 5,000 cu m (water equivalent) are cheaper than any known storage concept. Simultaneous with technical and economic studies, problems of chemical mass transport in two typical soil materials (calcareous gravel water and red marl water) were investigated in lab tests. Special attention was paid to the biological behavior of a wet gravel bed in view of the possibility of clogging by slime. Recommendations are given to ensure safe operation of the storage plant. Corrosion in the storage facility was considered for various materials. Results show that cement structures are preferred.

  11. Conceptual design of two-phase fluid mechanics and heat transfer facility for spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, B. F.; Hill, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Five specific experiments were analyzed to provide definition of experiments designed to evaluate two phase fluid behavior in low gravity. The conceptual design represents a fluid mechanics and heat transfer facility for a double rack in Spacelab. The five experiments are two phase flow patterns and pressure drop, flow boiling, liquid reorientation, and interface bubble dynamics. Hardware was sized, instrumentation and data recording requirements defined, and the five experiments were installed as an integrated experimental package. Applicable available hardware was selected in the experiment design and total experiment program costs were defined.

  12. Online calculation of the decay heat of assemblies at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.A.; Carter, L.L.; Schmittroth, F.A.; Brown, L.B.

    1991-12-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is utilized by the US Department of Energy and the international community as a fast reactor research tool. Its use includes, among other things, the irradiation testing of nuclear reactor fuels and materials required for the development of commercial liquid metal reactors. The decay heat rate of assemblies irradiated in the FFTF is an important parameter in establishing the transportation, examination, and storage of irradiated assemblies. The decay heat program which is maintained on a Cray super computer along with a Symphony speadsheet program running on a personal computer (PC) were created to accommodate this need. This unique synthesis provides a method of combing the capabilities of a mainframe computer with those of a PC.

  13. Calorimeter probes for measuring high thermal flux. [in electric-arc jet facilities for planetary entry heating simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes expendable, slug-type calorimeter probes developed for measuring high heat-flux levels of 10-30 kW/sq cm in electric-arc jet facilities. The probes are constructed with thin tungsten caps mounted on Teflon bodies; the temperature of the back surface of the tungsten cap is measured, and its rate of change gives the steady-state, absorbed heat flux as the calorimeter probe heats to destruction when inserted into the arc jet. It is concluded that the simple construction of these probes allows them to be expendable and heated to destruction to obtain a measurable temperature slope at high heating rates.

  14. Feasibility Study of SSTO Base Heating Simulation in Pulsed-Type Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chung Sik; Sharma, Surendra; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A laboratory simulation of the base heating environment of the proposed reusable Single-Stage-To-Orbit vehicle during its ascent flight was proposed. The rocket engine produces CO2 and H2, which are the main combustible components of the exhaust effluent. The burning of these species, known as afterburning, enhances the base region gas temperature as well as the base heating. To determine the heat flux on the SSTO vehicle, current simulation focuses on the thermochemistry of the afterburning, thermophysical properties of the base region gas, and ensuing radiation from the gas. By extrapolating from the Saturn flight data, the Damkohler number for the afterburning of SSTO vehicle is estimated to be of the order of 10. The limitations on the material strengths limit the laboratory simulation of the flight Damkohler number as well as other flow parameters. A plan is presented in impulse facilities using miniature rocket engines which generate the simulated rocket plume by electric ally-heating a H2/CO2 mixture.

  15. Facile removal of oils from water surfaces through highly hydrophobic and magnetic polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Junjun; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Fenghe; Chen, Mudan; Mao, Jianyu; Xie, Tan

    2014-05-01

    In this study, magnetic polymer nanocomposites were investigated as highly selective absorbent materials for removing oils from water surfaces. The nanocomposites with highly hydrophobic and superoleophilic surface were synthesized through a low-cost emulsion polymerization, and exhibited some practical properties including unsinkability, thermal stability and corrosive-resistance for real applications. These as-prepared nanoparticles could effectively absorb three kinds of oils up to above 3.63 times of the particles' weight while completely repelling water. It is very easy to collect the oil-absorbed nanoparticles by applying an external magnetic field. Besides, the oil could be readily removed from the surfaces of nanoparticles by a simple ultrasonic treatment, and the nanocomposites still kept highly hydrophobic and oleophilic characteristics after repeatedly removing oils from water surface for many cycles. The findings of this study might provide a convenient method for fast and selective removal of oils from the surface of water.

  16. Facile and Scalable Preparation of Graphene Oxide-Based Magnetic Hybrids for Fast and Highly Efficient Removal of Organic Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Tifeng; Liu, Yazhou; Wu, Yitian; Zhang, Qingrui; Yan, Xuehai; Gao, Faming; Bauer, Adam J. P.; Liu, Jianzhao; Zeng, Tingying; Li, Bingbing

    2015-07-01

    This study reports the facile preparation and the dye removal efficiency of nanohybrids composed of graphene oxide (GO) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles with various geometrical structures. In comparison to previously reported GO/Fe3O4 composites prepared through the one-pot, in situ deposition of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, the GO/Fe3O4 nanohybrids reported here were obtained by taking advantage of the physical affinities between sulfonated GO and Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which allows tuning the dimensions and geometries of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in order to decrease their contact area with GO, while still maintaining the magnetic properties of the nanohybrids for easy separation and adsorbent recycling. Both the as-prepared and regenerated nanohybrids demonstrate a nearly 100% removal rate for methylene blue and an impressively high removal rate for Rhodamine B. This study provides new insights into the facile and controllable industrial scale fabrication of safe and highly efficient GO-based adsorbents for dye or other organic pollutants in a wide range of environmental-related applications.

  17. Facile and Scalable Preparation of Graphene Oxide-Based Magnetic Hybrids for Fast and Highly Efficient Removal of Organic Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Tifeng; Liu, Yazhou; Wu, Yitian; Zhang, Qingrui; Yan, Xuehai; Gao, Faming; Bauer, Adam J. P.; Liu, Jianzhao; Zeng, Tingying; Li, Bingbing

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the facile preparation and the dye removal efficiency of nanohybrids composed of graphene oxide (GO) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles with various geometrical structures. In comparison to previously reported GO/Fe3O4 composites prepared through the one-pot, in situ deposition of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, the GO/Fe3O4 nanohybrids reported here were obtained by taking advantage of the physical affinities between sulfonated GO and Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which allows tuning the dimensions and geometries of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in order to decrease their contact area with GO, while still maintaining the magnetic properties of the nanohybrids for easy separation and adsorbent recycling. Both the as-prepared and regenerated nanohybrids demonstrate a nearly 100% removal rate for methylene blue and an impressively high removal rate for Rhodamine B. This study provides new insights into the facile and controllable industrial scale fabrication of safe and highly efficient GO-based adsorbents for dye or other organic pollutants in a wide range of environmental-related applications. PMID:26220847

  18. Implementation of remove monitoring in facilities under safeguards with unattended systems

    SciTech Connect

    Beddingfield, David H; Nordquist, Heather A; Umebayaashi, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    Remote monitoring is being applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at nuclear facilities around the world. At the Monju Reactor in Japan we have designed, developed and implemented a remote monitoring approach that can serve as a model for applying remote monitoring to facilities that are already under full-scope safeguards using unattended instrumentation. Remote monitoring implementations have historically relied upon the use of specialized data collection hardware and system design features that integrate remote monitoring into the safeguards data collection system. The integration of remote monitoring and unattended data collection increases the complexity of safeguards data collection systems. This increase in complexity necessarily produces a corresponding reduction of system reliability compared to less-complex unattended monitoring systems. At the Monju facility we have implemented a remote monitoring system that is decoupled from the activity of safeguards data collection. In the completed system the function of remote data transfer is separated from the function of safeguards data collection. As such, a failure of the remote monitoring function cannot produce an associated loss of safeguards data, as is possible with integrated remote-monitoring implementations. Currently, all safeguards data from this facility is available to the IAEA on a 24/7 basis. This facility employs five radiation-based unattended systems, video surveillance and numerous optical seal systems. The implementation of remote monitoring at this facility, while increasing the complexity of the safeguards system, is designed to avoid any corresponding reduction in reliability of the safeguards data collection systems by having decoupled these functions. This design and implementation can serve as a model for implementation of remote monitoring at nuclear facilities that currently employ unattended safeguards systems.

  19. A ternary TiO2/WO3/graphene nanocomposite adsorbent: facile preparation and efficient removal of Rhodamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-qiang; Li, Xiao-hui; Lü, Jie; Si, Chong-dian; Liu, Guang-jun; Gao, Hong-tao; Wang, Pi-bo

    2014-08-01

    Ternary TiO2/WO3/graphene (TWG) nanocomposites were prepared by a facile salt-ultrasonic assisted hydrothermal method. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption. Both anatase TiO2 and orthorhombic WO3 formed in the nanocomposites, along with a highly disordered overlay of individual graphene nanosheets. Polyhedral and spherical TiO2 and WO3 nanoparticles of uniform size 10-30 nm were densely anchored to the graphene sheets. The maximum specific surface area of the products was 144.59 m2·g-1. The products showed clear abilities for the removal of Rhodamine B in the absence of illumination. Furthermore, the adsorption activity of the products exhibited only a slight decrease after three successive cycles. The results demonstrate that the ternary nanocomposites could be used as a high-efficiency adsorbent for the removal of environmental contaminants.

  20. A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE`s Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford`s MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford`s calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

  1. A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

  2. New methods to detect particle velocity and mass flux in arc-heated ablation/erosion facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brayton, D. B.; Bomar, B. W.; Seibel, B. L.; Elrod, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    Arc-heated flow facilities with injected particles are used to simulate the erosive and ablative/erosive environments encountered by spacecraft re-entry through fog, clouds, thermo-nuclear explosions, etc. Two newly developed particle diagnostic techniques used to calibrate these facilities are discussed. One technique measures particle velocity and is based on the detection of thermal radiation and/or chemiluminescence from the hot seed particles in a model ablation/erosion facility. The second technique measures a local particle rate, which is proportional to local particle mass flux, in a dust erosion facility by photodetecting and counting the interruptions of a focused laser beam by individual particles.

  3. TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR ION-EXCHANGE WASTE REMOVAL PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2010-07-12

    The small column ion exchange (SCIX) process treats low curie salt (LCS) waste before feeding it to the saltstone facility to be made into grout. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is absorbed into the CST bed. A CST column loaded with radioactive cesium will generate significant heat from radiolytic decay. If engineering designs of the CST sorption column can not handle this thermal load, hot spots may develop locally within the column and degrade the performance of the ion-exchange process. The CST starts to degrade at about 80 to 85 C, and the CST completely changes to another material above 120 C. In addition, the process solution will boil around 130 C. If the column boiled dry, the sorbent could plug the column and require replacement of the column module. The objective of the present work is to compute temperature distributions across the column as a function of transit time after the initiation of accidents when there is loss of the salt solution flow in the CST column under abnormal conditions of the process operations. In this situation, the customer requested that the calculations should be conservative in that the model results would show the maximum centerline temperatures achievable by the CST design configurations. The thermal analysis results will be used to evaluate the fluid temperature distributions and the process component temperatures within the ion exchange system. This information will also assist in the system design and maintenance.

  4. Facile synthesis of graphene nano zero-valent iron composites and their efficient removal of trichloronitromethane from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haifeng; Cao, Yu; Wei, Enze; Gong, Tingting; Xian, Qiming

    2016-03-01

    Halonitromethanes (HNMs), as an emerging class of disinfection by-products containing nitrogen (N-DBPs) in drinking water, have possessed public health concerns. Two most studied materials, graphene and nanometer-sized zero-valent iron, have been successfully combined into binary nanocomposites (G-nZVI) via facile carbonization and calcinations of glucose and ferric chloride, which was used in the removal of HNMs from drinking water in this study. When the Fe/C mass ratio was 1:5, the as-prepared G-nZVI hybrids comprised numerous dispersed Fe(0) nanoparticles with a range of 5-10 nm in diameter. Batch experimental results indicated that the as-prepared G-nZVI could effectively remove trichloronitromethane (TCNM), a dominant in the group of HNMs from drinking water. About 99% of initial TCNM could be adsorbed and degraded under 60 mg/L G-nZVI dosage within 120 min. Kinetic studies indicated that the removal of TCNM by G-nZVI followed a pseudo first order rate (R(2) > 0.9). The degradation pathways of TCNM by G-nZVI nanocomposites might include dechlorination and denitration of TCNM. The Fe was in the form of iron oxides in the graphene material shape which was then restored to Fe(0) again via calcinations. These results indicated that the synthesized G-nZVI nanocomposites could be a powerful material to remove HNMs from drinking water.

  5. Thrust Removal Scheme for the FAST-MAC Circulation Control Model Tested in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Milholen, William E., II; Jones, Gregory S.; Goodliff, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    A second wind tunnel test of the FAST-MAC circulation control semi-span model was recently completed in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The model allowed independent control of four circulation control plenums producing a high momentum jet from a blowing slot near the wing trailing edge that was directed over a 15% chord simple-hinged flap. The model was configured for transonic testing of the cruise configuration with 0deg flap deflection to determine the potential for drag reduction with the circulation control blowing. Encouraging results from analysis of wing surface pressures suggested that the circulation control blowing was effective in reducing the transonic drag on the configuration, however this could not be quantified until the thrust generated by the blowing slot was correctly removed from the force and moment balance data. This paper will present the thrust removal methodology used for the FAST-MAC circulation control model and describe the experimental measurements and techniques used to develop the methodology. A discussion on the impact to the force and moment data as a result of removing the thrust from the blowing slot will also be presented for the cruise configuration, where at some Mach and Reynolds number conditions, the thrust-removed corrected data showed that a drag reduction was realized as a consequence of the blowing.

  6. Facile synthesis of copper(II)-decorated magnetic particles for selective removal of hemoglobin from blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun; Ma, Xiangdong; Yao, Xin; Jia, Li

    2015-12-11

    In this report, the Cu(2+)-immobilized magnetic particles were prepared by a facile route and they were used as adsorbents for removal of high abundance of hemoglobin in blood based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid modified magnetic particles (EDTA-Fe3O4) were first synthesized through a one-pot solvothermal method and then charged with copper ions. The as-prepared Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry and zeta potential. Factors affecting the adsorption of bovine hemoglobin on Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles (including contact time, solution pH, ionic strength and initial concentration of protein) were investigated. The adsorption process followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the adsorption equilibrium could be achieved in 60min. The adsorption isotherm data could be well described by a Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity was 1250mgg(-1). The as-prepared particles showed high efficiency and excellent selectivity for removal of hemoglobin from bovine and human blood. The removal process integrated the selectivity of immobilized metal affinity chromatography and the convenience of magnetic separation. The results demonstrated that Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles had potential application in removal of abundant histidine-rich proteins in biomedical diagnosis analysis.

  7. Facile synthesis of copper(II)-decorated magnetic particles for selective removal of hemoglobin from blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun; Ma, Xiangdong; Yao, Xin; Jia, Li

    2015-12-11

    In this report, the Cu(2+)-immobilized magnetic particles were prepared by a facile route and they were used as adsorbents for removal of high abundance of hemoglobin in blood based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid modified magnetic particles (EDTA-Fe3O4) were first synthesized through a one-pot solvothermal method and then charged with copper ions. The as-prepared Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry and zeta potential. Factors affecting the adsorption of bovine hemoglobin on Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles (including contact time, solution pH, ionic strength and initial concentration of protein) were investigated. The adsorption process followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the adsorption equilibrium could be achieved in 60min. The adsorption isotherm data could be well described by a Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity was 1250mgg(-1). The as-prepared particles showed high efficiency and excellent selectivity for removal of hemoglobin from bovine and human blood. The removal process integrated the selectivity of immobilized metal affinity chromatography and the convenience of magnetic separation. The results demonstrated that Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles had potential application in removal of abundant histidine-rich proteins in biomedical diagnosis analysis. PMID:26596870

  8. Initial operation of a solar heating and cooling system in a full-scale solar building test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, R. H.; Miao, D.; Hamlet, I. L.; Jensen, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    The Solar Building Test Facility (SBTF) located at Hampton, Virginia became operational in early summer of 1976. This facility is a joint effort by NASA-Lewis and NASA-Langley to advance the technology for heating and cooling of office buildings with solar energy. Its purposes are to (1) test system components which include high-performing collectors, (2) test performance of complete solar heating and cooling system, (3) investigate component interactions and (4) investigate durability, maintenance and reliability of components. The SBTF consists of a 50,000 square foot office building modified to accept solar heated water for operation of an absorption air conditioner and for the baseboard heating system. A 12,666 square foot solar collector field with a 30,000 gallon storage tank provides the solar heated water. A description of the system and the collectors selected is given here, along with the objectives, test approach, expected system performance and some preliminary results.

  9. 30 CFR 250.1725 - When do I have to remove platforms and other facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... conduct other activities. Platforms include production platforms, well jackets, single-well caissons, and pipeline accessory platforms. Other activities include those supporting OCS oil and gas production and... other facility according to the approved application. (d) You must flush all production risers...

  10. 30 CFR 250.1725 - When do I have to remove platforms and other facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... conduct other activities. Platforms include production platforms, well jackets, single-well caissons, and pipeline accessory platforms. Other activities include those supporting OCS oil and gas production and... other facility according to the approved application. (d) You must flush all production risers...

  11. 30 CFR 250.1725 - When do I have to remove platforms and other facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... activities. Platforms include production platforms, well jackets, single-well caissons, and pipeline accessory platforms. Other activities include those supporting OCS oil and gas production and transportation... other facility according to the approved application. (d) You must flush all production risers...

  12. 30 CFR 250.1725 - When do I have to remove platforms and other facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... conduct other activities. Platforms include production platforms, well jackets, single-well caissons, and pipeline accessory platforms. Other activities include those supporting OCS oil and gas production and... other facility according to the approved application. (d) You must flush all production risers...

  13. Waterfall technique for removing settled coal solids from a storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bickham, K.L.

    1982-10-19

    This invention pertains to a method and apparatus for removing compacted, slurriable solids from a vessel by water erosion. The water erosion is effected by a waterfall created through the use of a travelling bridge which traverses the compacted solids and coacts with a movable gate which allows a nearly vertical face of the compacted solids to be exposed to the waterfall.

  14. Removal and fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon pollutants in an urban stormwater bioretention facility.

    PubMed

    DiBlasi, Catherine J; Li, Houng; Davis, Allen P; Ghosh, Upal

    2009-01-15

    This research investigated the removal and fate of 16 USEPA priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from urban stormwater runoff through a bioretention cell. Bioretention is an infiltration/filtration practice containing a mixed layer of about 90 cm of soil, sand, and organic matter, planted with appropriate vegetation. Field water quality monitoring and bioretention media core analyses were performed. The results indicate that bioretention is a promising management practice to control runoff PAH pollutants. The PAH event mean concentration (EMC) reduction ranged from 31 to 99%, with a mean discharge EMC of 0.22 microg/L. The mass load decreased from a mean value of 0.0180 kg/ha yr to 0.0025 kg/ha yr, suggesting an average PAH mass load reduction of 87% to the discharging watershed. The most dominant PAH species monitored were fluoranthene and pyrene. Influent PAHs indicated strong affiliation with runoff total suspended solids (TSS). As such, PAH removal positively correlated with TSS removal. Low rainfall depth was associated with high influent PAH concentration and resulted in favorable PAH removal. Source investigation suggested that the PAHs measured in the monitored cell were from pyrogenic sources, likely resulting from vehicle combustion processes. Sealers used in parking lots and driveway coatings were also a possible source of PAHs. Media core analyses indicated that the intercepted PAH compounds transported only a few centimeters vertically in the soil media near the runoff entrance location, suggesting that a shallow cell design may be adequate for systems focusing on PAH removal.

  15. Access to Vocational Education. A Planning System for Local Secondary and Post-Secondary Program and Facility Accessibility. Step 5: Removing Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Eric; And Others

    This guidebook focuses on the final step included in a five-step planning system for improving local secondary and postsecondary programs and facilities accessibility: removing barriers. The guidebook is comprised of self-instructional discussions of three techniques that can be used in planning for implementation of barrier-removal strategies:…

  16. Experimental evaluation of a breadboard heat and product-water removal system for a space-power fuel cell designed with static water removal and evaporative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.; Prokipius, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    A test program was conducted to evaluate the design of a heat and product-water removal system to be used with fuel cell having static water removal and evaporative cooling. The program, which was conducted on a breadboard version of the system, provided a general assessment of the design in terms of operational integrity and transient stability. This assessment showed that, on the whole, the concept appears to be inherently sound but that in refining this design, several facets will require additional study. These involve interactions between pressure regulators in the pumping loop that occur when they are not correctly matched and the question of whether an ejector is necessary in the system.

  17. ALARA plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) Tanks Contents Removal Project is to remove the liquid low-level waste from the five underground storage tanks located at OHF and transfer the resulting slurry to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks facility for treatment and disposal. Among the technical objectives for the OHF Project, there is a specific provision to maintain personnel exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) during each activity of the project and to protect human health and the environment. The estimated doses and anticipated conditions for accomplishing this project are such that an ALARA Plan is necessary to facilitate formal radiological review of the campaign. This ALARA Plan describes the operational steps necessary for accomplishing the job together with the associated radiological impacts and planned controls. Individual and collective dose estimates are also provided for the various tasks. Any significant changes to this plan (i.e., planned exposures that are greater than 10% of original dose estimates) will require formal revision and concurrence from all parties listed on the approval page. Deviations from this plan (i.e., work outside the scope covered by this plan) also require the preparation of a task-specific ALARA Review that will be amended to this plan with concurrence from all parties listed on the approval page.

  18. Hot particulate removal and desulfurization results from the METC integrated gasification and hot gas cleanup facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rockey, J.M.

    1995-06-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is conducting experimental testing using a 10-inch diameter fluid-bed gasifier (FBG) and modular hot gas cleanup rig (MGCR) to develop advanced methods for removing contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas streams for commercial development of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The program focus is on hot gas particulate removal and desulfurization technologies that match the temperatures and pressures of the gasifier, cleanup system, and power generator. The purpose of this poster is to present the program objectives and results of the work conducted in cooperation with industrial users and vendors to meet the vision for IGCC of reducing the capital cost per kilowatt to $1050 and increasing the plant efficiency to 52% by the year 2010.

  19. Facile preparation of ion-imprinted composite film for selective electrochemical removal of nickel(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao; Zhang, Hao; Hao, Xiaogang; Guan, Guoqing; Abudula, Abuliti

    2014-06-25

    A facile unipolar pulse electropolymerization (UPEP) technique is successfully applied for the preparation of ion-imprinted composite film composed of ferricyanide-embedded conductive polypyrrole (FCN/PPy) for the selective electrochemical removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater. The imprinted heavy metal ions are found to be easily removed in situ from the growing film only by tactfully applying potential oscillation due to the unstable coordination of FCN to the imprinted ions. The obtained Ni(2+) ion-imprinted FCN/PPy composite film shows fast uptake/release ability for the removal of Ni(2+) ions from aqueous solution, and the adsorption equilibrium time is less than 50 s. The ion exchange capacity reaches 1.298 mmol g(-1) and retains 93.5% of its initial value even after 1000 uptake/release cycles. Separation factors of 6.3, 5.6, and 6.2 for Ni(2+)/Ca(2+), Ni(2+)/K(+), and Ni(2+)/Na(+), respectively, are obtained. These characteristics are attributed to the high identification capability of the ion-imprinted composite film for the target ions and the dual driving forces resulting from both PPy and FCN during the redox process. It is expected that the present method can be used for simple preparation of other ion-imprinted composite films for the separation and recovery of target heavy metal ions as well.

  20. Flow Property Measurement Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay Henderson; Porter, Barry J.; Carballo, Julio Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species has been applied to single-point measurements of velocity and static temperature in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jet. Excitation spectra of atomic oxygen and nitrogen were recorded while scanning a tunable dye laser over the absorption feature. Thirty excitation spectra were acquired during 8 arc jet runs at two facility operating conditions; the number of scans per run varied between 2 and 6. Curve fits to the spectra were analyzed to recover their Doppler shifts and widths, from which the flow velocities and static temperatures, respectively, were determined. An increase in the number of independent flow property pairs from each as-measured scan was obtained by extracting multiple lower-resolution scans. The larger population sample size enabled the mean property values and their uncertainties for each run to be characterized with greater confidence. The average plus or minus 2 sigma uncertainties in the mean velocities and temperatures for all 8 runs were plus or minus 1.4% and plus or minus 11%, respectively.

  1. Facility for high heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Kiggans, Jim; Harper, David C; Snead, Lance Lewis; Schaich, Charles Ross

    2014-01-01

    A new high-heat flux testing facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can handle irradiated plasma facing component materials and mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at ORNL can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over a heated area of 9x12 and 1x10 cm2, respectively, which are fusion-prototypical steady state heat flux conditions. The facility will be described and the main differences between the photon-based high-heat flux testing facilities, such as PALs, and the e-beam and particle beam facilities more commonly used for fusion HHF testing are discussed. The components of the test chamber were designed to accommodate radiation safety and materials compatibility requirements posed by high-temperature exposure of low levels irradiated tungsten articles. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing are presented and discussed.

  2. DCH-1: The first direct containment heating experiment in the SURTSEY Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.; Pilch, M.

    1986-01-01

    The DCH-1 test was the first experiment performed in the SURTSEY Direct Heating Test Facility. It was designed to provide the experimental data required to understand the phenomena associated with pressurized melt ejection and direct containment heating. The results will be to develop phenomenological models for large containment response codes. The test involved 20 kg of molten core debris simulant ejected into a 1:10 scale mockup of the Zion reactor cavity. The melt was produced by a metallothermitic reaction of iron oxide and aluminum powders to yield molten iron and alumina. The cavity model was placed so that the emerging debris would propagate directly upwards along the vertical centerline of the chamber. Results from the experiment showed that the dispersed debris caused a rapid pressurization of the chamber atmosphere. Peak pressure from the six transducers ranged from 0.9 to 0.13 MPa (13.4 to 19.4 psig). The time interval from the start of debris ejection to pressure peak was two to three seconds. Post-test debris collection yielded 11.6 kg of material outside the cavity, of which approximately 1.6 kg was attributed to the uptake of oxygen by the iron particles. Mechanical sieving of the recovered debris showed a log-normal size distribution with a mass mean size of 0.55 mm. Aerosol measurements indicated a substantial portion (approx. 5 to 29%) of the displaced mass was in the size range less than 10 ..mu..m.

  3. Initial high-power testing of the ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility) ECH (electron cyclotron heating) system

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a moderate aspect ratio torsatron that will utilize 53.2 GHz 200 kW Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) to produce nearly current-free target plasmas suitable for subsequent heating by strong neutral beam injection. The initial configuration of the ECH system from the gyrotron to ATF consists of an optical arc detector, three bellows, a waveguide mode analyzer, two TiO/sub 2/ mode absorbers, two 90/sup 0/ miter bends, two waveguide pumpouts, an insulating break, a gate valve, and miscellaneous straight waveguide sections feeding a launcher radiating in the TE/sub 02/ mode. Later, a focusing Vlasov launcher will be added to beam the ECH power to the saddle point in ATF magnetic geometry for optimum power deposition. The ECH system has several unique features; namely, the entire ECH system is evacuated, the ECH system is broadband, forward power is monitored by a newly developed waveguide mode analyzer, phase correcting miter bends will be employed, and the ECH system will be capable of operating short pulse to cw. Initial high-power tests show that the overall system efficiency is 87%. The waveguide mode analyzer shows that the gyrotron mode output consists of 13% TE/sub 01/, 82.6% TE/sub 02/, 2.5% TE/sub 03/, and 1.9% TE/sub 04/. 4 refs.

  4. Diagnostic development in precise opacity measurement of radiatively heated Al plasma on Shenguang II laser facility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Yang, Jiamin; Zhang, Jiyan; Liu, Jinsong; Yuan, Xiao; Jin, Fengtao

    2009-04-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the self-emission spectrum, the backlighting source spectrum, and the transmission spectrum in one shot, which reduce the experimental uncertainties from shot-to-shot fluctuation, are essential for precise opacity experiments. In order to achieve precise absorption spectrum of Al plasmas, a special half sample sandwich target was designed and short backlighter was used to provide time- and space-resolving diagnostics on the Shenguang II high power laser facility. In the measurement, a cylindrical cavity with CH foam baffles was used to provide a clean x-ray radiation environment for sample heating. The x-ray source spectrum, the transmission spectrum, and the self-emission spectrum of the soft x-ray heated Al sample were recorded in one shot with a penta-erythritol tetrakis (hydroxymethy) methane C(CH(2)OH)(4) (PET) crystal spectrometer by using the point-projection method. Experimental results have been compared with the calculation results of a detailed level accounting opacity code. PMID:19405658

  5. Diagnostic development in precise opacity measurement of radiatively heated Al plasma on Shenguang II laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Yang, Jiamin; Zhang, Jiyan; Liu, Jinsong; Yuan, Xiao; Jin, Fengtao

    2009-04-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the self-emission spectrum, the backlighting source spectrum, and the transmission spectrum in one shot, which reduce the experimental uncertainties from shot-to-shot fluctuation, are essential for precise opacity experiments. In order to achieve precise absorption spectrum of Al plasmas, a special half sample sandwich target was designed and short backlighter was used to provide time- and space-resolving diagnostics on the Shenguang II high power laser facility. In the measurement, a cylindrical cavity with CH foam baffles was used to provide a clean x-ray radiation environment for sample heating. The x-ray source spectrum, the transmission spectrum, and the self-emission spectrum of the soft x-ray heated Al sample were recorded in one shot with a penta-erythritol tetrakis (hydroxymethy) methane C(CH2OH)4 (PET) crystal spectrometer by using the point-projection method. Experimental results have been compared with the calculation results of a detailed level accounting opacity code.

  6. Diagnostic development in precise opacity measurement of radiatively heated Al plasma on Shenguang II laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yang; Yang Jiamin; Zhang Jiyan; Liu Jinsong; Yuan Xiao; Jin Fengtao

    2009-04-15

    Simultaneous measurements of the self-emission spectrum, the backlighting source spectrum, and the transmission spectrum in one shot, which reduce the experimental uncertainties from shot-to-shot fluctuation, are essential for precise opacity experiments. In order to achieve precise absorption spectrum of Al plasmas, a special half sample sandwich target was designed and short backlighter was used to provide time- and space-resolving diagnostics on the Shenguang II high power laser facility. In the measurement, a cylindrical cavity with CH foam baffles was used to provide a clean x-ray radiation environment for sample heating. The x-ray source spectrum, the transmission spectrum, and the self-emission spectrum of the soft x-ray heated Al sample were recorded in one shot with a penta-erythritol tetrakis (hydroxymethy) methane C(CH{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (PET) crystal spectrometer by using the point-projection method. Experimental results have been compared with the calculation results of a detailed level accounting opacity code.

  7. The 0.040-scale space shuttle orbiter base heating model tests in the Lewis Research Center space power facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezelick, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Space shuttle base heating tests were conducted using a 0.040-scale model in the Plum Brook Space Power Facility of The NASA Lewis Research Center. The tests measured heat transfer rates, pressure distributions, and gas recovery temperatures on the orbiter vehicle 2A base configuration resulting from engine plume impingement. One hundred and sixty-eight hydrogen-oxygen engine firings were made at simulated flight altitudes ranging from 120,000 to 360,000 feet.

  8. Development of a tritium recovery system from CANDU tritium removal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Draghia, M.; Pasca, G.; Porcariu, F.

    2015-03-15

    The main purpose of the Tritium Recovery System (TRS) is to reduce to a maximum possible extent the release of tritium from the facility following a tritium release in confinement boundaries and also to have provisions to recover both elemental and vapors tritium from the purging gases during maintenance and components replacement from various systems processing tritium. This work/paper proposes a configuration of Tritium Recovery System wherein elemental tritium and water vapors are recovered in a separated, parallel manner. The proposed TRS configuration is a combination of permeators, a platinum microreactor (MR) and a trickle bed reactor (TBR) and consists of two branches: one branch for elemental tritium recovery from tritiated deuterium gas and the second one for tritium recovery from streams containing a significant amount of water vapours but a low amount, below 5%, of tritiated gas. The two branches shall work in a complementary manner in such a way that the bleed stream from the permeators shall be further processed in the MR and TBR in view of achieving the required decontamination level. A preliminary evaluation of the proposed TRS in comparison with state of the art tritium recovery system from tritium processing facilities is also discussed. (authors)

  9. Mercury removal at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's New Waste Calcining Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. C. Ashworth

    2000-02-27

    Technologies were investigated to determine viable processes for removing mercury from the calciner (NWCF) offgas system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Technologies for gas phase and aqueous phase treatment were evaluated. The technologies determined are intended to meet EPA Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements under the Clean Air Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Currently, mercury accumulation in the calciner off-gas scrubbing system is transferred to the tank farm. These transfers lead to accumulation in the liquid heels of the tanks. The principal objective for aqueous phase mercury removal is heel mercury reduction. The system presents a challenge to traditional methods because of the presence of nitrogen oxides in the gas phase and high nitric acid in the aqueous scrubbing solution. Many old and new technologies were evaluated including sorbents and absorption in the gas phase and ion exchange, membranes/sorption, galvanic methods, and UV reduction in the aqueous phase. Process modifications and feed pre-treatment were also evaluated. Various properties of mercury and its compounds were summarized and speciation was predicted based on thermodynamics. Three systems (process modification, NOxidizer combustor, and electrochemical aqueous phase treatment) and additional technology testing were recommended.

  10. Mercury Removal at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's New Waste Calcining Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ashworth, Samuel Clay; Wood, R. A.; Taylor, D. D.; Sieme, D. D.

    2000-03-01

    Technologies were investigated to determine viable processes for removing mercury from the calciner (NWCF) offgas system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Technologies for gas phase and aqueous phase treatment were evaluated. The technologies determined are intended to meet EPA Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements under the Clean Air Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Currently, mercury accumulation in the calciner off-gas scrubbing system is transferred to the tank farm. These transfers lead to accumulation in the liquid heels of the tanks. The principal objective for aqueous phase mercury removal is heel mercury reduction. The system presents a challenge to traditional methods because of the presence of nitrogen oxides in the gas phase and high nitric acid in the aqueous scrubbing solution. Many old and new technologies were evaluated including sorbents and absorption in the gas phase and ion exchange, membranes/sorption, galvanic methods, and UV reduction in the aqueous phase. Process modifications and feed pre-treatment were also evaluated. Various properties of mercury and its compounds were summarized and speciation was predicted based on thermodynamics. Three systems (process modification, NOxidizer combustor, and electrochemical aqueous phase treatment) and additional technology testing were recommended.

  11. Removing user fees for facility-based delivery services: a difference-in-differences evaluation from ten sub-Saharan African countries

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Britt; Harper, Sam; Kaufman, Jay S; Bergevin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Background Several countries in sub-Saharan Africa have recently adopted policies that remove user fees for facility-based delivery services. There is little rigorous evidence of the impact of these policies on utilization of delivery services and no evaluations have examined effects on neonatal mortality rates (NMR). In this article, we estimate the causal effect of removing user fees on the proportion of births delivered in facilities, the proportion of births delivered by Caesarean section, and NMR. Methods We used data from Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in 10 African countries between 1997 and 2012. Kenya, Ghana and Senegal adopted policies removing user fees for facility-based deliveries between 2003 and 2007, while seven other countries not changing user fee policies were used as controls. We used a difference-in-differences (DD) regression approach to control for secular trends in the outcomes that are common across countries and for time invariant differences between countries. Results According to covariate-adjusted DD models, the policy change was consistent with an increase of 3.1 facility-based deliveries per 100 live births (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9, 5.2) and an estimated reduction of 2.9 neonatal deaths per 1000 births (95% CI: −6.8, 1.0). In relative terms, this corresponds to a 5% increase in facility deliveries and a 9% reduction in NMR. There was no evidence of an increase in Caesarean deliveries. We examined lead and lag-time effects, finding evidence that facility deliveries continued to increase following fee removal. Conclusions Our findings suggest removing user fees increased facility-based deliveries and possibly contributed to a reduction in NMR. Evidence from this evaluation may be useful to governments weighing the potential benefits of removing user fees. PMID:24816570

  12. Coolability of stratified UO/sub 2/ debris in sodium with downward heat removal: The D13 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, C.A.; Mitchell, G.W.; Reed, A.W.; Meister, H.

    1987-03-01

    The LMFBR Debris Coolability Program at Sandia National Laboratories investigates the coolability of particle beds that may form following a severe accident involving core disassembly in a nuclear reactor. The D series experiments utilize fission heating of fully enriched UO/sub 2/ particles submerged in sodium to realistically simulate decay heating. The D13 experiment is the first in the series to study the effects of bottom cooling of stratified debris, which could be provided in an actual accident condition by structural materials onto which the debris might settle. Additionally, the D13 experiment was designed to achieve maximum temperatures in the debris approaching the melting point of UO/sub 2/. The experiment was operated for over 40 hours and investigated downward heat removal at specific powers of 0.22 to 2.58 W/g. Channeled dryout in the debris was achieved at powers from 0.94 to 2.58 W/g. Maximum temperatures approaching 2700/sup 0/C were attained. Bottom heat removal was up to 750 kW/m/sup 2/ as compared to 450 kW/m/sup 2/ in the D10 experiment.

  13. Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    The transpired solar collector was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for the this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

  14. Initial operation of a solar heating and cooling system in a full-scale solar building test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, R. H.; Miao, D.; Hamlet, I. L.; Jensen, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    The Solar Building Test Facility (SBTF) was constructed to advance the technology for heating and cooling of office buildings with solar energy. Its purposes are to (1) test system components which include high-performing collectors, (2) test the performance of a complete solar heating and cooling system, (3) investigate component interactions, and (4) investigate durability, maintenance and reliability of components. The SBTF consists of a 50,000 square foot office building modified to accept solar heated water for operation of an absorption air conditioner and for the baseboard heating system. A 12,666 square foot solar collector field with a 30,000 gallon storage tank provides the solar heated water. A description of the system and the collectors selected is printed along with the objectives, test approach, expected system performance, and some preliminary results.

  15. A facile heating cell for in situ transmittance and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigations.

    PubMed

    An, Pengfei; Hong, Caihao; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wei; Hu, Tiandou

    2014-01-01

    A facile heating cell has been designed for in situ transmittance and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements up to 1273 K under vacuum or an inert atmosphere. These high temperatures are achieved using a tantalum heating element by ohmic heating. Because of the small specific heat capacity, the temperature can be changed in a matter of minutes from room temperature to high temperature. Furthermore, a commercial power controller was adapted to provide stable temperature control. The construction of the heat shielding system provides a novel approach to reducing the beam's path length and the cell's size. The cell is inexpensive and easy to build. Its performance was evaluated by in situ XAS measurements of the temperature-dependent structure of ceria nanocrystals. Some preliminary results for the structural mechanism in ceria nanocrystal redox applications are given.

  16. Dismantlement and removal of Old Hydrofracture Facility bulk storage bins and water tank, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF), located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was constructed in 1963 to allow experimentation and operations with an integrated solid storage, mixing, and grout injection facility. During its operation, OHF blended liquid low-level waste with grout and used a hydrofracture process to pump the waste into a deep low-permeable shale formation. Since the OHF Facility was taken out of service in 1980, the four bulk storage bins located adjacent to Building 7852 had deteriorated to the point that they were a serious safety hazard. The ORNL Surveillance and Maintenance Program requested and received permission from the US Department of Energy to dismantle the bins as a maintenance action and send the free-released metal to an approved scrap metal vendor. A 25,000-gal stainless steel water tank located at the OHF site was included in the scope. A fixed-price subcontract was signed with Allied Technology Group, Inc., to remove the four bulk storage bins and water tank to a staging area where certified Health Physics personnel could survey, segregate, package, and send the radiologically clean scrap metal to an approved scrap metal vendor. All radiologically contaminated metal and metal that could not be surveyed was packaged and staged for later disposal. Permissible personnel exposure limits were not exceeded, no injuries were incurred, and no health and safety violations occurred throughout the duration of the project. Upon completion of the dismantlement, the project had generated 53,660 lb of clean scrap metal (see Appendix D). This resulted in $3,410 of revenue generated and a cost avoidance of an estimated $100,000 in waste disposal fees.

  17. DCH-2: Results from the second experiment performed in the Surtsey Direct Heating Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tarbell, W.W.; Nichols, R.T.; Brockmann, J.E.; Ross, J.W.; Oliver, M.S.; Lucero, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    This test involved 80 kg of molten core debris simulant ejected under pressure into a 1:10 linear scale model of a reactor cavity. The apparatus was placed in the Surtsey Direct Heating Test Facility to allow direct measurement of the temperature and pressure rise of the contained atmosphere. The molten material was ejected from the cavity as a dense cloud of particles and gas. The dispersed debris caused a rapid pressurization of the 103-m/sup 3/ atmosphere. Peak pressures ranged from 0.22 to 0.31 MPa above the ambient level. Peak temperatures were from 759/sup 0/C to 1335/sup 0/C, with the highest values recorded near the top of the chamber. Much of the debris (approx.70%) was found adhered to the top and sides of the steel chamber. The pattern of the retained material suggested that the debris field propagated around the chamber following the contour of the vessel. Aerosol measurements indicated that approx.1% to approx.6.6% of the ejected mass was in the size range less than 10..mu..m aerodynamic diameter. 8 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. HEPP - A low temperature Heat Pipe Experiment Package developed for flight on-board the Long Duration Exposure Facility /LDEF/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suelau, H. J.; Brennan, P. J.; Mcintosh, R.

    1978-01-01

    The Heat Pipe Experiment Package (HEPP) is designed to provide a flight evaluation system for low temperature heat pipes. The HEPP will be flown aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility which will be launched and retrieved as part of the Space Shuttle program. The experiment contains two heat pipes: an axially grooved fixed conductance heat pipe and a liquid blockage thermal diode. A phase change material canister is also integrated with a radiant cooler system. Additional hardware consists of supporting electrical equipment, including electronics for signal conditioning and command functions, a data recorder, and a hermetically sealed battery which powers the experiment. A thermal model was developed to simulate the behavior of the HEPP and a ground test program was conducted to verify the predicted performance of the equipment.

  19. Characterization of the NASA Langley Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility Using NO PLIF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidd, F. Gray, III; Narayanaswamy, Venkateswaran; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Bathel, Brett F.; Cabell, Karen F.; Hass, Neal E.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Drozda, Tomasz G.; Johansen, Criag T.

    2014-01-01

    The nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) imaging was used to characterize the air flow of the NASA Langley Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF) configured with a Mach 6 nozzle. The arc raises the enthalpy of the test gas in AHSTF, producing nitric oxide. Nitric oxide persists as the temperature drops through the nozzle into the test section. NO PLIF was used to qualitatively visualize the flowfield at different experimental conditions, measure the temperature of the gas flow exiting the facility nozzle, and visualize the wave structure downstream of the nozzle at different operating conditions. Uniformity and repeatability of the nozzle flow were assessed. Expansion and compression waves on the free-jet shear layer as the nozzle flow expands into the test section were visualized. The main purpose of these experiments was to assess the uniformity of the NO in the freestream gas for planned experiments, in which NO PLIF will be used for qualitative fuel-mole-fraction sensitive imaging. The shot-to-shot fluctuations in the PLIF signal, caused by variations in the overall laser intensity as well as NO concentration and temperature variations in the flow was 20-25% of the mean signal, as determined by taking the standard deviation of a set of images obtained at constant conditions and dividing by the mean. The fluctuations within individual images, caused by laser sheet spatial variations as well as NO concentration and temperature variations in the flow, were about 28% of the mean in images, determined by taking standard deviation within individual images, dividing by the mean in the same image and averaged over the set of images. Applying an averaged laser sheet intensity correction reduced the within-image intensity fluctuations to about 10% suggesting that the NO concentration is uniform to within 10%. There was no significant difference in flow uniformity between the low and high enthalpy settings. While not strictly quantitative, the

  20. Geothermal heating retrofit at the Utah State Prison Minimum Security Facility. Final report, March 1979-January 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This report is a summary of progress and results of the Utah State Prison Geothermal Space Heating Project. Initiated in 1978 by the Utah State Energy Office and developed with assistance from DOE's Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies PON program, final construction was completed in 1984. The completed system provides space and water heating for the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. It consists of an artesian flowing geothermal well, plate heat exchangers, and underground distribution pipeline that connects to the existing hydronic heating system in the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. Geothermal water disposal consists of a gravity drain line carrying spent geothermal water to a cooling pond which discharges into the Jordan River, approximately one mile from the well site. The system has been in operation for two years with mixed results. Continuing operation and maintenance problems have reduced the expected seasonal operation from 9 months per year to 3 months. Problems with the Minimum Security heating system have reduced the expected energy contribution by approximately 60%. To date the system has saved the prison approximately $18,060. The total expenditure including resource assessment and development, design, construction, performance verification, and reporting is approximately $827,558.

  1. Comparison of Tobacco Host Cell Protein Removal Methods by Blanching Intact Plants or by Heat Treatment of Extracts.

    PubMed

    Buyel, Johannes F; Hubbuch, Jürgen; Fischer, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Plants not only provide food, feed and raw materials for humans, but have also been developed as an economical production system for biopharmaceutical proteins, such as antibodies, vaccine candidates and enzymes. These must be purified from the plant biomass but chromatography steps are hindered by the high concentrations of host cell proteins (HCPs) in plant extracts. However, most HCPs irreversibly aggregate at temperatures above 60 °C facilitating subsequent purification of the target protein. Here, three methods are presented to achieve the heat precipitation of tobacco HCPs in either intact leaves or extracts. The blanching of intact leaves can easily be incorporated into existing processes but may have a negative impact on subsequent filtration steps. The opposite is true for heat precipitation of leaf extracts in a stirred vessel, which can improve the performance of downstream operations albeit with major changes in process equipment design, such as homogenizer geometry. Finally, a heat exchanger setup is well characterized in terms of heat transfer conditions and easy to scale, but cleaning can be difficult and there may be a negative impact on filter capacity. The design-of-experiments approach can be used to identify the most relevant process parameters affecting HCP removal and product recovery. This facilitates the application of each method in other expression platforms and the identification of the most suitable method for a given purification strategy. PMID:27584939

  2. Comparison of Tobacco Host Cell Protein Removal Methods by Blanching Intact Plants or by Heat Treatment of Extracts.

    PubMed

    Buyel, Johannes F; Hubbuch, Jürgen; Fischer, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Plants not only provide food, feed and raw materials for humans, but have also been developed as an economical production system for biopharmaceutical proteins, such as antibodies, vaccine candidates and enzymes. These must be purified from the plant biomass but chromatography steps are hindered by the high concentrations of host cell proteins (HCPs) in plant extracts. However, most HCPs irreversibly aggregate at temperatures above 60 °C facilitating subsequent purification of the target protein. Here, three methods are presented to achieve the heat precipitation of tobacco HCPs in either intact leaves or extracts. The blanching of intact leaves can easily be incorporated into existing processes but may have a negative impact on subsequent filtration steps. The opposite is true for heat precipitation of leaf extracts in a stirred vessel, which can improve the performance of downstream operations albeit with major changes in process equipment design, such as homogenizer geometry. Finally, a heat exchanger setup is well characterized in terms of heat transfer conditions and easy to scale, but cleaning can be difficult and there may be a negative impact on filter capacity. The design-of-experiments approach can be used to identify the most relevant process parameters affecting HCP removal and product recovery. This facilitates the application of each method in other expression platforms and the identification of the most suitable method for a given purification strategy.

  3. COMBINED ACTIVE/PASSIVE DECAY HEAT REMOVAL APPROACH FOR THE 24 MWt GAS-COOLED FAST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    CHENG,L.Y.; LUDEWIG, H.

    2007-06-01

    Decay heat removal at depressurized shutdown conditions has been regarded as one of the key areas where significant improvement in passive response was targeted for the GEN IV GFR over the GCFR designs of thirty years ago. It has been recognized that the poor heat transfer characteristics of gas coolant at lower pressures needed to be accommodated in the GEN IV design. The design envelope has therefore been extended to include a station blackout sequence simultaneous with a small break/leak. After an exploratory phase of scoping analysis in this project, together with CEA of France, it was decided that natural convection would be selected as the passive decay heat removal approach of preference. Furthermore, a double vessel/containment option, similar to the double vessel/guard vessel approach of the SFR, was selected as the means of design implementation to reduce the PRA risks of the depressurization accident. However additional calculations in conjunction with CEA showed that there was an economic penalty in terms of decay heat removal system heat exchanger size, elevation heights for thermal centers, and most of all in guard containment back pressure for complete reliance on natural convection only. The back pressure ranges complicated the design requirements for the guard containment. Recognizing that the definition of a loss-of-coolant-accident in the GFR is a misnomer, since gas coolant will always be present, and the availability of some driven blower would reduce fuel temperature transients significantly; it was decided instead to aim for a hybrid active/passive combination approach to the selected BDBA. Complete natural convection only would still be relied on for decay heat removal but only after the first twenty four hours after the initiation of the accident. During the first twenty four hour period an actively powered blower would be relied on to provide the emergency decay power removal. However the power requirements of the active blower

  4. Heat removal from high temperature tubular solid oxide fuel cells utilizing product gas from coal gasifiers.

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, W. J. ,

    2003-01-01

    In this work we describe the results of a computer study used to investigate the practicality of several heat exchanger configurations that could be used to extract heat from tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . Two SOFC feed gas compositions were used in this study. They represent product gases from two different coal gasifier designs from the Zero Emission Coal study at Los Alamos National Laboratory . Both plant designs rely on the efficient use of the heat produced by the SOFCs . Both feed streams are relatively rich in hydrogen with a very small hydrocarbon content . One feed stream has a significant carbon monoxide content with a bit less hydrogen . Since neither stream has a significant hydrocarbon content, the common use of the endothermic reforming reaction to reduce the process heat is not possible for these feed streams . The process, the method, the computer code, and the results are presented as well as a discussion of the pros and cons of each configuration for each process .

  5. Evaluation of Cooling Conditions for a High Heat Flux Testing Facility Based on Plasma-Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Charry, Carlos H.; Abdel-khalik, Said I.; Yoda, Minami; Sabau, Adrian S.; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-31

    The new Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS) facility for fusion materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses an infrared plasma-arc lamp (PAL) to deliver incident heat fluxes as high as 27 MW/m2. The facility is being used to test irradiated plasma-facing component materials as part of the joint US-Japan PHENIX program. The irradiated samples are to be mounted on molybdenum sample holders attached to a water-cooled copper rod. Depending on the size and geometry of samples, several sample holders and copper rod configurations have been fabricated and tested. As a part of the effort to design sample holders compatible with the high heat flux (HHF) testing to be conducted at the IMTS facility, numerical simulations have been performed for two different water-cooled sample holder designs using the ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package. The primary objective of this work is to evaluate the cooling capability of different sample holder designs, i.e. to estimate their maximum allowable incident heat flux values. 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations are performed using the realizable k-ε turbulence model and the RPI nucleate boiling model within ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. The results of the numerical model were compared against the experimental data for two sample holder designs tested in the IMTS facility. The model has been used to parametrically evaluate the effect of various operational parameters on the predicted temperature distributions. The results were used to identify the limiting parameter for safe operation of the two sample holders and the associated peak heat flux limits. The results of this investigation will help guide the development of new sample holder designs.

  6. Evaluation of Cooling Conditions for a High Heat Flux Testing Facility Based on Plasma-Arc Lamps

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Charry, Carlos H.; Abdel-khalik, Said I.; Yoda, Minami; Sabau, Adrian S.; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-31

    The new Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS) facility for fusion materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses an infrared plasma-arc lamp (PAL) to deliver incident heat fluxes as high as 27 MW/m2. The facility is being used to test irradiated plasma-facing component materials as part of the joint US-Japan PHENIX program. The irradiated samples are to be mounted on molybdenum sample holders attached to a water-cooled copper rod. Depending on the size and geometry of samples, several sample holders and copper rod configurations have been fabricated and tested. As a part of the effort to design sample holders compatiblemore » with the high heat flux (HHF) testing to be conducted at the IMTS facility, numerical simulations have been performed for two different water-cooled sample holder designs using the ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package. The primary objective of this work is to evaluate the cooling capability of different sample holder designs, i.e. to estimate their maximum allowable incident heat flux values. 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations are performed using the realizable k-ε turbulence model and the RPI nucleate boiling model within ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. The results of the numerical model were compared against the experimental data for two sample holder designs tested in the IMTS facility. The model has been used to parametrically evaluate the effect of various operational parameters on the predicted temperature distributions. The results were used to identify the limiting parameter for safe operation of the two sample holders and the associated peak heat flux limits. The results of this investigation will help guide the development of new sample holder designs.« less

  7. Investigations on natural circulation in reactor models and shutdown heat removal systems for LMFBRs (liquid metal fast breeder reactors)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, H.; Weinberg, D.; Marten, K. ); Ieda, Yoshiaki )

    1989-11-01

    For sodium-cooled pool-type reactors, studies have been undertaken to remove the decay heat by natural convection alone, as in the case of failure of all power supplies. For this purpose, four immersion coolers (ICs), two each installed at a 180-deg circumferential position with respect to the others, are arranged within the reactor tank. They are connected with natural-drift air coolers through independent intermediate circuits. The primary sodium in the tank as well as the secondary sodium in the intermediate loop circulate by natural convection. The general functioning of this passive shutdown decay heat removal (DHR) system is demonstrated in 1:20 and 1:5 scale test models using water as a simulant fluid for sodium. The model design is based on the thermohydraulics similarity criteria. In the RAMONA three-dimensional 1:20 scale model, experiments were carried out to clarify the steady-state in-vessel thermohydraulics for different parameter combinations (core power, radial power distribution across the core, DHR by 2 or 4 ICs in operation, above-core structure geometry and position, different IC designs). For all mentioned parameters, temperatures and their fluctuations were measured and used to indicate isotherms and lines of identical temperature fluctuations. The flow patterns were observed visually. The experiments were recalculated by an updated version of the single-phase three-dimensional thermohydraulics code COMMIX.

  8. Preliminary engineering report waste area grouping 5, Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks content removal project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA is January 1, 1992. One objective of the FFA is to ensure that liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that are removed from service are evaluated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Five inactive LLLW tanks, designated T-1, T-2, T-3, T-4, and T-9, located at the Old Hydrofracture (OHF) Facility in the Melton Valley area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been evaluated and are now entering the remediation phase. As a precursor to final remediation, this project will remove the current liquid and sludge contents of each of the five tanks (System Requirements Document, Appendix A). It was concluded in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis [EE/CA] for the Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks (DOE 1996) that sluicing and pumping the contaminated liquid and sludge from the five OHF tanks was the preferred removal action. Evaluation indicated that this alternative meets the removal action objective and can be effective, implementable, and cost-effective. Sluicing and removing the tank contents was selected because this action uses (1) applicable experience, (2) the latest information about technologies and techniques for removing the wastes from the tanks, and (3) activities that are currently acceptable for storage of transuranic (TRU) mixed waste.

  9. Removal of Pb(II) from water by the activated carbon modified by nitric acid under microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shuheng; Zhang, Jiajun; Shen, Dekui; Xiao, Rui; Gu, Sai; Zhao, Ming; Liang, Junyu

    2016-02-01

    The rice husk based activated carbon (RH-AC) was treated by nitric acid under microwave heating, in order to improve its capability for the removal of heavy metal ions from water. The optimal conditions for the modification of RH-AC (M-RH-AC) were determined by means of orthogonal array experimental design, giving those as the concentration of nitric acid of 8mol/L, modification time of 15min, modification temperature of 130°C and microwave power of 800W. The characteristics of the M-RH-AC and RH-AC were examined by BET, XRD, Raman spectrum, pH titration, zeta potential, Boehm titration and FTIR analysis. The M-RH-AC has lower pore surface area, smaller crystallite, lower pHIEP and more oxygen-containing functional groups than the RH-AC. Removal capacity of Pb(II) ions by the M-RH-AC and RH-AC from water solution was estimated concerning the influence of contact time, pH value, and initial concentration. The equilibrium time of Pb(II) removal was found to be around 90min after modification process. Two kinetic models are adopted to describe the possible Pb(II) adsorption mechanism, finding that the adsorption rate of Pb(II) ions by the M-RH-AC is larger than that of RH-AC. PMID:26520818

  10. Experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in heated Al and Ge on the Iskra-5 laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, S. V.; Garanin, Sergey G.; Zhidkov, N. V.; Pinegin, A. V.; Suslov, N. A.

    2012-01-01

    We set forth the data of experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in the 1.1 — 1.6 keV photon energy range for Al and Ge specimens bulk heated by soft X-ray radiation. Two experimental techniques are described: with the use of one facility channel and the heating of specimens by the X-ray radiation from a plane burnthrough target, as well as with the use of four channels and the heating by the radiation from two cylindrical targets with internal input of laser radiation. The X-ray radiation absorption coefficients were studied by way of transmission absorption spectroscopy using backlighting X-ray radiation from a point source. The results of investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients on the 1s — 2p transitions in Al atoms and the 2p — 3d transitions in Ge atoms are presented.

  11. Removal of PCDDs/DFs and dl-PCBs in MWI fly ash by heating under vacuum.

    PubMed

    Misaka, Youhei; Yamanaka, Kazushi; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko; Sawabe, Kyoichi; Shobatake, Kosuke

    2006-07-01

    Temperature dependence of PCDD/DF and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (dl-PCB) concentrations in fly ash from a municipal waste incinerator (MWI) heated under vacuum has been investigated as a function of sample temperature ranging from T(s)=425 to 800 K to find out if PCDDs/DFs in fly ash evaporate and are trapped in a liquid nitrogen-cooled trap. The results show that more than 99.98% of PCDDs/DFs in TEQ is removed from fly ash by vacuum heat treatment at T(s)>650 K for 4 h. Almost no PCDDs/DFs were detected in the liquid nitrogen-cooled trap. Homologue distributions indicate that dechlorination/hydrogenation (DCH) reactions proceed in fly ash at T(s)>450 K. Arrhenius rate parameters for the DCH reactions have been determined for each homologue assuming that only DCH reactions occur. The fly ash heated under vacuum at 650 or 800 K was reheated at 573 K (300 degrees C) in a stream of dry or humid air to see how much PCDDs/DFs and dl-PCBs are regenerated. We have found that (1) PCDDs/DFs are regenerated in both 650 K and 800 K treated fly ash, whereas dl-PCBs are regenerated in 650 K treated fly ash, (2) formation of PCDFs predominates over that of PCDDs or dl-PCBs, and (3) less chlorinated homologues are abundant for PCDDs/DFs and dl-PCBs. PMID:16384596

  12. D10 experiment: coolability of UO/sub 2/ debris in sodium with downward heat removal. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.W.; Ottinger, C.A.; Meister, H.

    1984-12-01

    The LMFBR Debris Coolability Program at Sandia National Laboratories investigates the coolability of particle beds which may form following a severe accident involving core disassembly in a nuclear reactor. The D series experiments utilize fission heating of fully enriched UO/sub 2/ particles submerged in sodium to realistically simulate decay heating. The D10 experiment is the first in the series to study the effects of bottom cooling of the debris that could be provided in an actual accident condition by structural materials onto which the debris might settle. Additionally, the D10 experiment was designed to achieve maximum temperatures in the debris approaching the melting point of UO/sub 2/. The experiment was successfully operated for over 50 hours and investigated downward heat removal in a packed bed at specific powers of 0.16 to 0.58 W/g. Dryout in the debris was achieved at powers from 0.42 to 0.58 W/g. Channels were induced in the bed and channeled bed dryout was achieved at powers of 1.06 to 1.77 W/g. Maximum temperatures in excess of 2500/sup 0/C were attained.

  13. Artificial Aurora and Irregularity Generation at Low- and Mid-Latitude HF Heating Facilities: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Paul

    From the 1970's to the present, artificial aurora and field aligned irregularities have been produced at the mid-latitude HF facilities in Platteville, Colorado; Arecibo, Puerto Rico; and SURA, Russia. The artificial optical displays were produced by high power HF radio waves with effective radiated powers in the 80 to 250 Megawatt range. The high power electromagnetic waves excite Langmuir cavitons near the HF wave reflection altitude. Suprathermal electrons are released during the caviton collapse and collisions with atomic oxygen and other neutral atoms produce the artificial aurora. Ground based images of the optical emissions have been used to (1) show artificial and natural irregularities in the E- and F-region, (2) provide remote sensing of neutral winds and plasma drifts, and (3) yield estimates of the composition of the upper atmosphere in the HF interaction region. Currently, the Arecibo HF facility which was destroyed in 1999 by Hurricane Floyd is being reconstituted over the Arecibo dish using crossed-dipoles coupled to a secondary reflector. This new facility should be completed by 2011 for operation near 5 and 8 MHz. In addition, the feasibility of putting a heating facility near the equator is being studied. Numerical simulations using high power electromagnetic waves coupled to the NRL SAMI3 physics based ionosphere model is providing insight to use of these new facilities. Using the Arecibo HF facility, the geomagnetic conjugate region in Argentina should be able to measure artificial aurora as well as both electron density and electron temperature perturbations. A suite of ionospheric sensors comprised of a low-light-level imager, an incoherent scatter radar, and a digital ionosonde would be needed for these observations. An equatorial HF facility would be able to produce symmetric patches of artificial aurora as well as trigger equatorial bubbles by seeding localized density reductions in the plasma.

  14. Thermal-hydraulic processes involved in loss of residual heat removal during reduced inventory operation. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, C.D.; McHugh, P.R.; Naff, S.A.; Johnsen, G.W.

    1991-02-01

    This paper identifies the topics needed to understand pressurized water reactor response to an extended loss of residual heat removal event during refueling and maintenance outages. By identifying the possible plant conditions and cooling methods that would be used for each cooling mode, the controlling thermal-hydraulic processes and phenomena were identified. Controlling processes and phenomena include: gravity drain, core water boil-off, and reflux cooling processes. Important subcategories of the reflux cooling processes include: the initiation of reflux cooling from various plant conditions, the effects of air on reflux cooling, core level depression effects, issues regarding the steam generator secondaries, and the special case of boiler-condenser cooling with once-through steam generators. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Application of an electron beam facility for heat transfer measurements in capillary tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunde, A. R.; Kramer, T.

    1977-01-01

    A unique method was developed for the determination of heat transfer coefficients for water flowing through capillary tubes using a rastered electron beam heater. Heat flux levels of 150 and 500 watts/sq cm were provided on the top surface of four square tubes. Temperature gradient along the tube length and mass flow rates versus pressure drop were measured.

  16. RADIOLOGICAL CONTROLS FOR PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FROM 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINSHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect

    MINETTE, M.J.

    2007-05-30

    The 232-Z facility at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant operated as a plutonium scrap incinerator for 11 years. Its mission was to recover residual plutonium through incinerating and/or leaching contaminated wastes and scrap material. Equipment failures, as well as spills, resulted in the release of radionuclides and other contamination to the building, along with small amounts to external soil. Based on the potential threat posed by the residual plutonium, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued an Action Memorandum to demolish Building 232-2, Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERC1.A) Non-Time Critical Removal Action Memorandum for Removal of the 232-2 Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (04-AMCP-0486).

  17. CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FOR THE D&D OF THE 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect

    HOPKINS, A.M.; MINETTE, M.J.; KLOS, D.B.

    2007-01-25

    This paper describes the unique challenges encountered and subsequent resolutions to accomplish the deactivation and decontamination of a plutonium ash contaminated building. The 232-Z Contaminated Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant was used to recover plutonium from process wastes such as rags, gloves, containers and other items by incinerating the items and dissolving the resulting ash. The incineration process resulted in a light-weight plutonium ash residue that was highly mobile in air. This light-weight ash coated the incinerator's process equipment, which included gloveboxes, blowers, filters, furnaces, ducts, and filter boxes. Significant airborne contamination (over 1 million derived air concentration hours [DAC]) was found in the scrubber cell of the facility. Over 1300 grams of plutonium held up in the process equipment and attached to the walls had to be removed, packaged and disposed. This ash had to be removed before demolition of the building could take place.

  18. Who benefits from removing user fees for facility-based delivery services? Evidence on socioeconomic differences from Ghana, Senegal and Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Britt; Harper, Sam; Kaufman, Jay S

    2015-06-01

    Coverage of skilled delivery care has been increasing across most low-income countries; however, it remains far from universal and is very unequally distributed according to socioeconomic position. In an effort to increase coverage of skilled delivery care and reduce socioeconomic inequalities, governments of several countries in sub-Saharan Africa have recently adopted policies that remove user fees for facility-based delivery services. There is little rigorous evidence of the impact of these policies and few studies have examined effects on socioeconomic inequalities. This study investigates the impact of recent delivery fee exemption policies in Ghana, Senegal, and Sierra Leone on socioeconomic differences in the use of facility-based delivery services. Using Demographic and Health Survey data from nine sub-Saharan African countries, we evaluated the user fee policy changes using a difference-in-differences approach that accounts for underlying common secular trends and time invariant differences among countries, and allows for differential effects of the policy by socioeconomic position. Removing user fees was consistent with meaningful increases in facility deliveries across all categories of household wealth and maternal education. We found little evidence of differential effects of removing user fees across quartiles of household wealth, with increases of 5.4 facility deliveries per hundred live births (95% CI: 2.1, 8.8) among women in the poorest quartile and 6.8 per hundred live births (95% CI: 4.0, 9.7) for women in the richest quartile. However, our results suggest that educated women benefited more from removing user fees compared to women with no education. For women with at least some secondary education, the estimated effect was 8.6 facility deliveries per hundred live births (95% CI: 5.4, 11.9), but only 4.6 per hundred live births (95% CI: 2.2, 7.0) for women with no education (heterogeneity p-value = 0.04). Thus, while removing fees at the point

  19. Who benefits from removing user fees for facility-based delivery services? Evidence on socioeconomic differences from Ghana, Senegal and Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Britt; Harper, Sam; Kaufman, Jay S

    2015-06-01

    Coverage of skilled delivery care has been increasing across most low-income countries; however, it remains far from universal and is very unequally distributed according to socioeconomic position. In an effort to increase coverage of skilled delivery care and reduce socioeconomic inequalities, governments of several countries in sub-Saharan Africa have recently adopted policies that remove user fees for facility-based delivery services. There is little rigorous evidence of the impact of these policies and few studies have examined effects on socioeconomic inequalities. This study investigates the impact of recent delivery fee exemption policies in Ghana, Senegal, and Sierra Leone on socioeconomic differences in the use of facility-based delivery services. Using Demographic and Health Survey data from nine sub-Saharan African countries, we evaluated the user fee policy changes using a difference-in-differences approach that accounts for underlying common secular trends and time invariant differences among countries, and allows for differential effects of the policy by socioeconomic position. Removing user fees was consistent with meaningful increases in facility deliveries across all categories of household wealth and maternal education. We found little evidence of differential effects of removing user fees across quartiles of household wealth, with increases of 5.4 facility deliveries per hundred live births (95% CI: 2.1, 8.8) among women in the poorest quartile and 6.8 per hundred live births (95% CI: 4.0, 9.7) for women in the richest quartile. However, our results suggest that educated women benefited more from removing user fees compared to women with no education. For women with at least some secondary education, the estimated effect was 8.6 facility deliveries per hundred live births (95% CI: 5.4, 11.9), but only 4.6 per hundred live births (95% CI: 2.2, 7.0) for women with no education (heterogeneity p-value = 0.04). Thus, while removing fees at the point

  20. Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) low-temperature Heat Pipe Experiment Package (HEPP) flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, Roy; Mccreight, Craig; Brennan, Patrick J.

    1992-01-01

    The Low Temperature Heat Pipe Flight Experiment (HEPP) is a fairly complicated thermal control experiment that was designed to evaluate the performance of two different low temperature ethane heat pipes and a n-Heptane Phase Change Material (PCM) canister. A total of 388 days of continuous operation with an axially grooved aluminum fixed conductance heat pipe of axially grooved stainless steel heat pipe diode was demonstrated before the EDS batteries lost power. The inability of the HEPP's radiator to cool below 190 K in flight prevented freezing of the PCM and the opportunity to conduct transport tests with the heat pipes. Post flight tests showed that the heat pipes and the PCM are still functioning. This paper presents a summary of the flight data analysis for the HEPP and its related support systems. Pre and post-flight thermal vacuum tests results are presented for the HEPP thermal control system along with individual heat pipe performance and PCM behavior. Appropriate SIG related systems data will also be included along with a 'lessons learned' summary.

  1. Federal Technology Alert: Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Federal Facilities--Second Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Donald L.

    2001-03-01

    This Federal Technology Alert, which was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs, provides the detailed information and procedures that a Federal energy manager needs to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. This report updates an earlier report on ground-source heat pumps that was published in September 1995. In the current report, general benefits of this technology to the Federal sector are described, as are ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits. In addition, information on current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are provided.

  2. Chromatographic removal and heat inactivation of hepatitis A virus during manufacture of human albumin.

    PubMed

    Adcock, W L; MacGregor, A; Davies, J R; Hattarki, M; Anderson, D A; Goss, N H

    1998-08-01

    CSL Limited, an Australian biopharmaceutical company, has recently converted its method of manufacture for human albumin from a traditional Cohn-ethanol fractionation method to a method employing chromatographic techniques. Studies were undertaken to determine the efficiency of the chromatographic and pasteurization steps used in the manufacture of Albumex(R) (CSL's trade name for albumin) in removing and inactivating the potential viral contaminant, hepatitis A virus (HAV). The manufacturing process for Albumex(R) includes three chromatographic steps, two of which are ion-exchange steps (DEAE-Sepharose(R) Fast Flow and CM-Sepharose(R) Fast Flow) and the third is a gel-filtration step (Sephacryl(R) S200 HR). The final stage of the Albumex(R) process involves a bulk pasteurization step where product is held at 60 degrees C for 10 h. HAV partitioning experiments on the DEAE-Sepharose(R) FF and CM-Sepharose(R) FF ion-exchange and Sephacryl(R) S200 HR gel-filtration columns were performed with scaled-down models of the production-scale chromatographic Albumex(R) process. Production samples collected before each of the chromatographic steps were spiked with HAV and processed through each of the scaled-down chromatographic columns. Samples collected during processing were assayed and the log10 reduction factors calculated. Inactivation kinetics of HAV were examined during the pasteurization of Albumex(R) 5 and 20 [5% and 20% (w/v) albumin solutions] held at 60 degrees C for 10 h. Log10 reductions for HAV through the DEAE-Sepharose(R) FF, CM-Sepharose(R) FF and Sephacryl(R) S200 HR chromatographic columns were 5.3, 1.5 and 4.2 respectively, whereas a 4.4 and a greater than 3.9 log10 reduction in HAV in Albumex(R) 5 and 20 respectively were achieved during pasteurization.

  3. Oil removal of spent hydrotreating catalyst CoMo/Al2O3 via a facile method with enhanced metal recovery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Xu, Shengming; Li, Zhen; Wang, Jianlong; Zhao, Zhongwei; Xu, Zhenghe

    2016-11-15

    Deoiling process is a key issue for recovering metal values from spent hydrotreating catalysts. The oils can be removed with organic solvents, but the industrialized application of this method is greatly hampered by the high cost and complex processes. Despite the roasting method is simple and low-cost, it generates hardest-to-recycle impurities (CoMoO4 or NiMoO4) and enormous toxic gases. In this study, a novel and facile approach to remove oils from the spent hydrotreating catalysts is developed. Firstly, surface properties of spent catalysts are characterized to reveal the possibility of oil removal. And then, oils are removed with water solution under the conditions of 90°C, 0.1wt% SDS, 2.0wt% NaOH and 10ml/gL/S ratio for 4h. Finally, thermal treatment and leaching tests are carried out to further explore the advantages of oil removal. The results show that no hardest-to-recycle impurity CoMoO4 is found in XPS spectra of thermally treated samples after deoiling and molybdenum is leached completely with sodium carbonate solution. It means that the proposed deoiling method can not only remove oils simply and without enormous harmful gases generating, but also avoid the generation of detrimental impurity and promote recycling of valuable metals from spent hydrotreating catalysts.

  4. Oil removal of spent hydrotreating catalyst CoMo/Al2O3 via a facile method with enhanced metal recovery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Xu, Shengming; Li, Zhen; Wang, Jianlong; Zhao, Zhongwei; Xu, Zhenghe

    2016-11-15

    Deoiling process is a key issue for recovering metal values from spent hydrotreating catalysts. The oils can be removed with organic solvents, but the industrialized application of this method is greatly hampered by the high cost and complex processes. Despite the roasting method is simple and low-cost, it generates hardest-to-recycle impurities (CoMoO4 or NiMoO4) and enormous toxic gases. In this study, a novel and facile approach to remove oils from the spent hydrotreating catalysts is developed. Firstly, surface properties of spent catalysts are characterized to reveal the possibility of oil removal. And then, oils are removed with water solution under the conditions of 90°C, 0.1wt% SDS, 2.0wt% NaOH and 10ml/gL/S ratio for 4h. Finally, thermal treatment and leaching tests are carried out to further explore the advantages of oil removal. The results show that no hardest-to-recycle impurity CoMoO4 is found in XPS spectra of thermally treated samples after deoiling and molybdenum is leached completely with sodium carbonate solution. It means that the proposed deoiling method can not only remove oils simply and without enormous harmful gases generating, but also avoid the generation of detrimental impurity and promote recycling of valuable metals from spent hydrotreating catalysts. PMID:27484947

  5. An interpretation of the results of some recent direct containment heating (DCH) experiments in the Surtsey facility

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Direct containment heating (DCH) has recently been studied at Sandia National Laboratory's Surtsey facility in a number of experiments in which high-temperature thermite melts are ejected by pressurized steam from a melt generator into scaled reactor cavities. Steam blowdown from the melt generator disperses at least part of the melt into the Surtsey vessel. Efficient team-metal chemical reaction was observed in many of the experiments. Analysis of the results suggests that hydrogen generation occurs primarily in the cavity can actually reduce hydrogen generation by separating the debris from the blowdown steam. Debris-gas heat transfer appears to include both a component that takes place in the cavity in proportion to the hydrogen generation, and a second component that takes place in the Surtsey vessel itself. The magnitude of the latter depends upon the amount of debris dispersed and the length of the unobstructed flight path in the Surtsey vessel. Some possible implications of these results are discussed.

  6. Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) low temperature Heat Pipe Experiment Package (HEPP) flight results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Roy; McCreight, Craig; Brennan, Patrick J.

    1993-04-01

    The Low Temperature Heat Pipe Flight Experiment (HEPP) is a fairly complicated thermal control experiment that was designed to evaluate the performance of two different low temperature ethane heat pipes and a low-temperature (182 K) phase change material. A total of 390 days of continuous operation with an axially grooved aluminum fixed conductance heat pipe and an axially grooved stainless steel heat pipe diode was demonstrated before the data acquisition system's batteries lost power. Each heat pipe had approximately 1 watt applied throughout this period. The HEPP was not able to cool below 188.6 K during the mission. As a result, the preprogrammed transport test sequence which initiates when the PCM temperature drops below 180 K was never exercised, and transport tests with both pipes and the diode reverse mode test could not be run in flight. Also, because the melt temperature of the n-heptane PCM is 182 K, its freeze/thaw behavior could not be tested. Post-flight thermal vacuum tests and thermal analyses have indicated that there was an apparent error in the original thermal analyses that led to this unfortunate result. Post-flight tests have demonstrated that the performance of both heat pipes and the PCM has not changed since being fabricated more than 14 years ago. A summary of HEPP's flight data and post-flight test results are presented.

  7. Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) low temperature Heat Pipe Experiment Package (HEPP) flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, Roy; Mccreight, Craig; Brennan, Patrick J.

    1993-01-01

    The Low Temperature Heat Pipe Flight Experiment (HEPP) is a fairly complicated thermal control experiment that was designed to evaluate the performance of two different low temperature ethane heat pipes and a low-temperature (182 K) phase change material. A total of 390 days of continuous operation with an axially grooved aluminum fixed conductance heat pipe and an axially grooved stainless steel heat pipe diode was demonstrated before the data acquisition system's batteries lost power. Each heat pipe had approximately 1 watt applied throughout this period. The HEPP was not able to cool below 188.6 K during the mission. As a result, the preprogrammed transport test sequence which initiates when the PCM temperature drops below 180 K was never exercised, and transport tests with both pipes and the diode reverse mode test could not be run in flight. Also, because the melt temperature of the n-heptane PCM is 182 K, its freeze/thaw behavior could not be tested. Post-flight thermal vacuum tests and thermal analyses have indicated that there was an apparent error in the original thermal analyses that led to this unfortunate result. Post-flight tests have demonstrated that the performance of both heat pipes and the PCM has not changed since being fabricated more than 14 years ago. A summary of HEPP's flight data and post-flight test results are presented.

  8. A study of the heat-removal process at the semiconductor-ceramics interface in solar cells by the laser thermal-wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazov, A. L.; Kalinovskii, V. S.; Kontrosh, E. V.; Muratikov, K. L.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of the solder layer between a semiconductor solar cell and heat-removing ceramics on the nonstationary heat-transfer processes has been investigated by the laser thermal-wave method. A theoretical model taking into account the presence of additional thermal resistance and thermal capacitance at the soldered junction is proposed. Different soldering modes are considered. It is shown that the laser thermal- wave methods within the developed model allow one to correctly estimate the thermophysical properties of multilayer structures.

  9. Research and demonstration facilities for energy conservation and solar heating in the home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. O.; Godbey, L. C.; Davis, M. A.; Ezell, D. O.; Allen, W. H.

    1981-10-01

    The design, testing and evaluation of two prototype solar holes are discussed. The first prototype is a greenhouse-residence designed with 6-in. wall cavities (to increase insulation thickness), a 381 sq. ft. solar collector used primarily for space heating, and a greenhouse that was utilized as a solar collector for growing vegetables. The house does feature a domestic hot water preheating system and an electrical resistance back-up heating system. The second prototype is an earth-insulated house designed primarily to study the physical features of the house in relation to the soil around it and the thermal interaction between the soil and the house environment. This house features a high temperature air collector that is used for domestic water heating. A special effort was made to have adequate daylight in the solar-earth house. A special study was conducted on the geometric configuration of the rock storage and the methods of admitting air to the rock storage.

  10. High latitude artificial periodic irregularity observations with the upgraded EISCAT heating facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierinen, Juha; Kero, Antti; Rietveld, Michael T.

    2013-12-01

    We present a recently developed ionospheric modification experiment that produces artificial periodic irregularities in the ionosphere and uses them to make observations of the spatiotemporal behaviour of the irregularities. In addition, the method can be used to measure Faraday rotation and vertical velocities. We also introduce a novel experiment that allows monitoring the formation of the irregularities during heating, in addition to observing their decay after heating. The first measurements indicate, contrary to existing theory, that the amplitude of the radar echoes from the periodic irregularities grows faster than they decay. We focus on the API effects in the D- and E-region of the ionosphere.

  11. Radiotomography and HF ray tracing of the artificially disturbed ionosphere above the Sura heating facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, E. S.; Frolov, V. L.; Kunitsyn, V. E.; Kryukovskii, A. S.; Lukin, D. S.; Nazarenko, M. O.; Padokhin, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of the radiotomographic imaging of the artificial ionospheric disturbances obtained in the recent experiments on the modification of the midlatitude ionosphere by powerful HF radiowaves carried out at the Sura heater. Radio transmissions from low orbital PARUS beacon satellites recorded at the specially installed network of three receiving sites were used for the remote sensing of the heated ionosphere. We discuss the possibility to generate acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) with special regimes of ionospheric heating (with the square wave modulation of the effective radiated power at the frequency lower than or of the order of the Brunt-Vaisala frequency of the neutral atmosphere at ionospheric heights during several hours) and present radiotomographic images of the spatial structure of the disturbed volume of the ionosphere corresponding to the directivity pattern of the heater, as well as the spatial structure of the wave-like disturbances, which are possibly heating-induced AGWs, diverging from the heated area of the ionosphere. We also studied the HF propagation of the pumping wave through the reconstructed disturbed ionosphere above the Sura heater, showing the presence of heater-created, field-aligned irregularities that effectively serve as "artificial radio windows."

  12. Geothermal potential for heating and cooling facilities, San Bernardino Valley College, San Bernardino, California

    SciTech Connect

    Gemeinhardt, M.A.; Tharaldson, L.C.

    1981-07-01

    The potential for converting to geothermal heating at the campus of San Bernardino Valley College is considered. Also considered is the possibility of using well water for water cooled condenser cooling of air conditioning equipment. To provide water supply a production well, water distribution system and an injection well would be installed for each system.

  13. Conceptual design of a solar cogeneration facility industrial process heat, category A. Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, P.; Brzeczek, M.; Seilestad, H.; Silverman, C.; Yenetchi, G.

    1981-07-01

    The conceptual design of a central receiver solar cogeneration facility at a California oil field is described. The process of selecting the final cogeneration system configuration is described and the various system level and subsystem level tradeoff studies are presented, including the system configuration study, technology options, and system sizing. The facility is described, and the functional aspects, requirements operational characteristics, and performance are discussed. Capital and operating costs, safety, environmental, regulatory issues and potential limiting considerations for the design are included. Each subsystem is described in detail including a discussion of the functional requirements, design, operating characteristics performance estimates and a top level cost estimate. An economic assessment is performed to determine the near-term economic viability of the project and to examine the impact of variations in major economic parameters such as capital and operating and maintenance costs on economic viability. Two measures of economic viability used are levelized energy cost and net present value.

  14. Rain Garden Research at EPA’s Urban Watershed Research Facility: Promoting Nitrate Removal through Rain Garden Design

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rain gardens are designed to infiltrate stormwater, capture suspended solids, sorb heavy metals and phosphorus, and transform nutrients through biological processes. Most studies have found a low capacity for stormwater nitrate removal. Research at the Urban Watershed Managemen...

  15. Thermal hydraulic performance testing of printed circuit heat exchangers in a high-temperature helium test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sai K. Mylavarapu; Xiaodong Sun; Richard E. Glosup; Richard N. Christensen; Michael W. Patterson

    2014-04-01

    In high-temperature gas-cooled reactors, such as a very high temperature reactor (VHTR), an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) is required to efficiently transfer the core thermal output to a secondary fluid for electricity generation with an indirect power cycle and/or process heat applications. Currently, there is no proven high-temperature (750–800 °C or higher) compact heat exchanger technology for high-temperature reactor design concepts. In this study, printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE), a potential IHX concept for high-temperature applications, has been investigated for their heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics under high operating temperatures and pressures. Two PCHEs, each having 10 hot and 10 cold plates with 12 channels (semicircular cross-section) in each plate are fabricated using Alloy 617 plates and tested for their performance in a high-temperature helium test facility (HTHF). The PCHE inlet temperature and pressure were varied from 85 to 390 °C/1.0–2.7 MPa for the cold side and 208–790 °C/1.0–2.7 MPa for the hot side, respectively, while the mass flow rate of helium was varied from 15 to 49 kg/h. This range of mass flow rates corresponds to PCHE channel Reynolds numbers of 950 to 4100 for the cold side and 900 to 3900 for the hot side (corresponding to the laminar and laminar-to-turbulent transition flow regimes). The obtained experimental data have been analyzed for the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of the heat transfer surface of the PCHEs and compared with the available models and correlations in the literature. In addition, a numerical treatment of hydrodynamically developing and hydrodynamically fully-developed laminar flow through a semicircular duct is presented. Relations developed for determining the hydrodynamic entrance length in a semicircular duct and the friction factor (or pressure drop) in the hydrodynamic entry length region for laminar flow through a semicircular duct are given. Various

  16. Generation of a homozygous fertilization-defective gcs1 mutant by heat-inducible removal of a rescue gene.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Shiori; Takeuchi, Hidenori; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2015-03-01

    Key message: New gametic homozygous mutants. In angiosperms, a haploid male gamete (sperm cell) fuses with a haploid female gamete (egg cell) during fertilization to form a zygote carrying paternally and maternally derived chromosomes. Several fertilization-defective mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana, including a generative cell-specific 1 (gcs1)/hapless 2 mutant, the sperm cells of which are unable to fuse with female gametes, can only be maintained as heterozygous lines due to the infertile male or female gametes. Here, we report successful generation of a gcs1 homozygous mutant by heat-inducible removal of the GCS1 transgene. Using the gcs1 homozygous mutant as male, the defect in gamete fusion was observed with great frequency; in our direct observation by semi-in vivo fertilization assay using ovules, 100 % of discharged sperm cells in culture failed to show gamete fusion. More than 70 % of ovules in the pistil received a second pollen tube as attempted fertilization recovery. Moreover, gcs1 mutant sperm cells could fertilize female gametes at a low frequency in the pistil. This strategy to generate homozygous fertilization-defective mutants will facilitate novel approaches in plant reproduction research.

  17. Heat treatment of nuclear reactor pump part in integrated furnace facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    A flexible heat treating system is meeting strict work specifications while accommodating the production flow pattern requirements and floor space needs of Advanced Metal Treating, Inc., Butler, Wis. Modular design and appropriate furnace configurations allow realization of the most efficient heat treat processing and energy use in a relatively small production area. The totally-integrated system (Pacemaker--manufactured by Lindberg, A Unit of General Signal, Chicago) consists of an electric integral-quench furnace with companion draw furnaces, washer unit and a material transfer car. With its one-side, inout configuration, the furnace operates with a minimum of drawing and washing equipment. The integral-quench furnace has a work chamber dimension of 30 by 48 by 30 inches (76.2 x 122 x 76.2 cm). The firm has two of these units, plus three in-out draw furnaces, one washer, one transfer car and two endothermic gas generators.

  18. Theoretical Design of a Thermosyphon for Efficient Process Heat Removal from Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) for Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Fred Gunnerson; Akira Tokuhiro; Vivek Utgiker; Kevan Weaver; Steven Sherman

    2007-10-01

    The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase Thermosyphon heat transfer performance with various alkali metals. Thermosyphon is a device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. Heat transport occurs via evaporation and condensation, and the heat transport fluid is re-circulated by gravitational force. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. For process heat, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) are required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant in the most efficient way possible. The production of power at higher efficiency using Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production requires both heat at higher temperatures (up to 1000oC) and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. The purpose for selecting a compact heat exchanger is to maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. The IHX design requirements are governed by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet of the NGNP (900oC, based on the current capabilities of NGNP), and the temperatures in the hydrogen production plant. Spiral Heat Exchangers (SHE’s) have superior heat transfer characteristics, and are less susceptible to fouling. Further, heat losses to surroundings are minimized because of its compact configuration. SHEs have never been examined for phase-change heat transfer applications. The research presented provides useful information for thermosyphon design and Spiral Heat Exchanger.

  19. Effectiveness of decanter modifications on organic removal

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.P.

    1992-08-20

    A series of runs were planned in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF) at the Savannah River Plant to determine the effectiveness of equipment and process modifications on the PHEF decanter organic removal efficiency. Runs 54-59 were planned to test the effectiveness of spray recirculation, a new decanter, heated organic recirculation and aqueous drawoff on organic removal efficiency in the revised HAN flowsheet. Runs 60-63 were planned to provide a comparison of the original and new decanter designs on organic removal efficiency in the late wash flowsheet without organic recirculation. Operational problems were experienced in both the PHEF and IDMS pilot facilities because of the production of high boiling organics and the low organic removal efficiency of the PHEF decanters. To prevent these problems in the DWPF Salt and Chemical Cells, modifications were proposed to the decanter and flowsheet to maximize the organic removal efficiency and minimize production of high boiling organics.

  20. Development of a pulsed cable test facility for superconducting ohmic heating coils

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Smith, R.P.; Kustom, R.L.; Praeg, W.F.; Krieger, C.I.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a Pulsed Cable Test Facility (PCTF) under development at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Its essential part is a pulsed superconducting split coil. The inner and outer diameters of the coil will be 45.1 cm and 88.3 cm, respectively, with an adjustable gap between the two halves of the coil. At a peak current of 11 kA, the coil will store an energy of 3.5 MJ and produce a magnetic field of 6.4 T. Using a 7 MW pulsed (2.9 MW rms) power supply, the PCTF coil will produce field change of 6 T/s. With the addition of a solid state switch to the system, dB/dt values of up to 24 T/s can be obtained. Pancake coils, wound with developmental cables, will be placed in the adjustable gap of the PCTF coil and be tested at up to 50 kA furnished by a separate power supply. The PCTF cryogenic facilities include a non-metallic cryostat and a helium liquefier.

  1. Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC) for the Solid Waste Treatment Facility (T Plant) Fuel Removal Project

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, R.E.

    2000-11-16

    This NOC describes the activities to remove all spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies from the spent fuel pool in the T Plant Complex 221-T canyon for interim storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimated for the public hypothetical maximally exposed individual (MEI) is 5.7 E-6 millirem (mrem) per year for this fuel removal NOC. The abated TEDE conservatively is estimated to account for 2.9 E-9 mrem per year to the MEI.

  2. The first experimental campaign on the Laser Megajoule Facility: characterization of plasma transparency in radiatively-heated slots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassin, Veronique; Dulieu, Andre; Courtois, Cedric; Casner, Alexis; Rosch, Rudolf; Caillaud, Tony; Trosseille, Clement; Henry, Olivier; Seguineau, Frederic; Durut, Frederic

    2015-11-01

    The Laser Megajoule Facility has been commissioned in October 2014 with performing the first experimental campaign. The goal of this first experimental campaign was to study the evolution of the plasma transparency in slots machined within radiatively-heated samples. The plasma was produced using a radiation hohlraum drive. The evolution of the plasma transparency was radiographed with a 2D time-resolved imager consisting in grazing incidence X-ray microscopes and pinholes coupled to an X-ray framing camera. We have conducted a series of experiments to study the effect of the slot width, the material thickness and the material nature (either tantalum-oxide aerogel or gold). Experimental results will be compared with 2D and 3D radiation hydrodynamics codes.

  3. 76 FR 18347 - Removal of the List of Ports of Embarkation and Export Inspection Facilities From the Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... rulemaking, those ports and facilities will be listed on the Internet rather than in the regulations, thus... conditions for exporting animals from the United States. The regulations state, among other things, that all... Register (75 FR 56914-56916, Docket No. APHIS-2009-0078) a proposal\\1\\ to amend the live animal...

  4. A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Grit Removal Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Gerald A.; Montgomery, James A.

    This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the grit removal process of wastewater treatment plants. Step-by-step instructions are given for pre-start up inspection, start-up, continuous operation, and shut-down procedures. A description of the equipment used in the process is given. Some theoretical material is presented. (BB)

  5. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C.

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natural draught air cooled heat exchangers through intermediate sodium circuits. During decay heat removal, flow through the core, immersion cooler primary side and in the intermediate sodium circuits are also through natural convection. In order to establish the viability and validate computer codes used in making predictions, a 1:20 scale experimental model called RAMONA with water as coolant has been built and experimental simulation of decay heat removal situation has been performed at KfK Karlsruhe. Results of two such experiments have been compiled and published as benchmarks. This paper brings out the results of the numerical simulation of one of the benchmark case through a 1D/2D coupled code system, DHDYN-1D/THYC-2D and the salient features of the comparisons. Brief description of the formulations of the codes are also included.

  6. Marine microfouling on aluminum and titanium heat exchanger surfaces at the CEER OTEC Puerto Rico facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tosteson, T.R.; Axtmayer, R.W.; Ballantine, D.L.; Imam, S.; Morgon, T.; Revuelta, R.; Sasscer, D.S.; Zaidi, B.R.

    1980-12-01

    Since 30 January, 1980, an OTEC biofouling experiment has been in progress off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. The initiation and accumulation of microfouling on aluminum and titanium surfaces has been analyzed over a period of 143 days. Microfouling was assessed by determining the surface residue weight, organic carbon and nitrogen contents of this residue, the wet film thickness and the ATP content of this film. The development of biofouling on the aluminum and titanium surfaces appears to be different with respect to the relationship seen between biomass cycle and the bulk growth of the wet film on the respective surfaces. The increase in thermal resistance (R /SUB f/ ) of the aluminum and titanium heat exchanger tubes during the period of this experiment is correlated with the increase in the wet film volume associated with these test surfaces.

  7. An interpretation of the results of some recent direct containment heating (DCH) experiments in the Surtsey facility

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.C.

    1992-04-01

    Direct containment heating (DCH) has recently been studied at Sandia National Laboratory`s Surtsey facility in a number of experiments in which high-temperature thermite melts are ejected by pressurized steam from a melt generator into scaled reactor cavities. Steam blowdown from the melt generator disperses at least part of the melt into the Surtsey vessel. Efficient team-metal chemical reaction was observed in many of the experiments. Analysis of the results suggests that hydrogen generation occurs primarily in the cavity can actually reduce hydrogen generation by separating the debris from the blowdown steam. Debris-gas heat transfer appears to include both a component that takes place in the cavity in proportion to the hydrogen generation, and a second component that takes place in the Surtsey vessel itself. The magnitude of the latter depends upon the amount of debris dispersed and the length of the unobstructed flight path in the Surtsey vessel. Some possible implications of these results are discussed.

  8. Facile and highly efficient removal of trace Gd(III) by adsorption of colloidal graphene oxide suspensions sealed in dialysis bag.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weifan; Wang, Linlin; Zhuo, Mingpeng; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yiping; Li, Yongxiu

    2014-08-30

    A facile, highly efficient and second-pollution-free strategy to remove trace Gd(III) from aqueous solutions by adsorption of colloidal graphene oxide (GO) suspensions in dialysis bag has been developed. The effects of pH, ionic strength and temperature on Gd(III) adsorption, and the pH-dependent desorption were investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity of Gd(III)on GO at pH=5.9±0.1 and T=303K was 286.86mgg(-1), higher than any other currently reported. The Gd(III)-saturated GO suspension could resume colloidal state in 0.1M HNO3 with desorption rate of 85.00% in the fifth adsorption-desorption cycle. Gd(III) adsorption rate on GO was dependent more on pH and ionic strength than on temperature. The abundant oxygen-containing functional groups such as carboxyl and hydroxyl played a vital role on adsorption. The thermodynamics and kinetics investigations revealed that the adsorption of Gd(III) on GO was an endothermic, spontaneous and monolayer absorption process, which well fitted the pseudo-second-order model. GO could be a promising adsorbent applied in the enrichment and removal of lanthanides from aqueous solutions. More significantly, the combination of colloidal GO suspension with dialysis membrane facilely solves the re-pollution of the treated solutions due to the great difficulties in separation and recovery of GO.

  9. Facile and highly efficient removal of trace Gd(III) by adsorption of colloidal graphene oxide suspensions sealed in dialysis bag.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weifan; Wang, Linlin; Zhuo, Mingpeng; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yiping; Li, Yongxiu

    2014-08-30

    A facile, highly efficient and second-pollution-free strategy to remove trace Gd(III) from aqueous solutions by adsorption of colloidal graphene oxide (GO) suspensions in dialysis bag has been developed. The effects of pH, ionic strength and temperature on Gd(III) adsorption, and the pH-dependent desorption were investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity of Gd(III)on GO at pH=5.9±0.1 and T=303K was 286.86mgg(-1), higher than any other currently reported. The Gd(III)-saturated GO suspension could resume colloidal state in 0.1M HNO3 with desorption rate of 85.00% in the fifth adsorption-desorption cycle. Gd(III) adsorption rate on GO was dependent more on pH and ionic strength than on temperature. The abundant oxygen-containing functional groups such as carboxyl and hydroxyl played a vital role on adsorption. The thermodynamics and kinetics investigations revealed that the adsorption of Gd(III) on GO was an endothermic, spontaneous and monolayer absorption process, which well fitted the pseudo-second-order model. GO could be a promising adsorbent applied in the enrichment and removal of lanthanides from aqueous solutions. More significantly, the combination of colloidal GO suspension with dialysis membrane facilely solves the re-pollution of the treated solutions due to the great difficulties in separation and recovery of GO. PMID:25108829

  10. Facile cellulose dissolution without heating in [C₄mim][CH ₃COO]/DMF solvent.

    PubMed

    Xu, Airong; Cao, Lili; Wang, Bingjun

    2015-07-10

    Novel cellulose solvents, [C4mim][CH3COO]/DMF, were designed by adding an aprotic polar solvent N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C4mim][CH3COO]). The solubilities of cellulose in [C4mim][CH3COO]/DMF solvents were determined at 25°C. The effects of molar ratio of DMF to [C4mim][CH3COO] on cellulose solubility and the possible dissolution mechanism of cellulose in [C4mim][CH3COO]/DMF solvent have been studied. Moreover, the regenerated cellulose from [C4mim][CH3COO]/DMF solvent were characterized by scanning electron micrograph (SEM) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the degree of polymerization (DP) of regenerated cellulose was determined. The findings reveal that the facile dissolution of cellulose in such solvents is mainly attributed to the increased "free" [CH3COO](-) anions and [C4mim](+) cations which result from the dissociation of [C4mim][CH3COO] by DMF. Moreover, the macromolecular chain of the cellulose is hardly broken during the dissolution and precipitation processes.

  11. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger: Phase 1 final report, November 1995--June 1997. Addendum 2: Task 3 topical report -- Long term wear test

    SciTech Connect

    Kudlac, G.A.

    1998-06-01

    Long-term operation of a condensing heat exchanger under typical coal-fired flue gas conditions was investigated in Phase 1, Task 3 of the Multiple Pollutant Removal Using the Condensing Heat Exchanger test program. The specific goal of this task was to determine the amount of wear, if any, on the Teflon{reg_sign}-covered heat transfer tubes in a condensing heat exchanger. A pilot-scale single-stage condensing heat exchanger (CHX{reg_sign}) was operated under typical coal-fired flue gas conditions on a continuous basis for a period of approximately 10 months. Operating conditions and particulate loadings for the test unit were monitored, Teflon{reg_sign} film thickness measurements were conducted, and surface replications (which duplicate the surface finish at the microscopic level) were taken at various times during the test. Data from the test indicate that virtually no decrease in Teflon{reg_sign} thickness was observed for the coating on the first two rows of heat exchanger tubes, even at high inlet particulate loadings (400 mg/dscm [0.35 lb/10{sup 6} Btu]). Evidence of wear was present only at the microscopic level, and even then was very minor in severity. Operation at high inlet particulate loadings resulted in accumulated ash deposits within the heat exchanger. Installation of a modified (higher flow rate) wash nozzle manifold substantially reduced subsequent deposit formation.

  12. Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Preliminary Safety Information Document, Amendment 10. GCFR residual heat removal system criteria, design, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This report presents a comprehensive set of safety design bases to support the conceptual design of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) residual heat removal (RHR) systems. The report is structured to enable the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to review and comment in the licensability of these design bases. This report also presents information concerning a specific plant design and its performance as an auxiliary part to assist the NRC in evaluating the safety design bases.

  13. Facile fabrication of visible light induced Bi2O3 nanorod using conventional heat treatment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Waseem; Khan, Azam; Alam, Umair; Muneer, M.; Bahnemann, D.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a new Bi2O3 based photocatalyst doped with varying concentration of Nb and Mn metal ion was fabricated by conventional heat treatment method and their photocatalytic activity was investigated. The prepared material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Visible Spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) techniques. The XRD analysis of synthesized photocatalyst was found to exhibit characteristic peaks of well crystallized monoclinic α-Bi2O3. The XRD pattern of pure and metal doped Bi2O3 were found to more or less similar. The crystallite size of doped materials were smaller than pure Bi2O3 and size decreases with increasing dopant concentration from 0.5 to 2.0% for Nb & 1.0-3.0% for Mn and remains almost constant at higher dopant concentration. The SEM analysis clearly indicate the formation of nanorod like morphologies. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of synthesized nanorods revealed that the absorption edge shift towards longer wavelength on doping with Nb and Mn metal ions which is beneficial for absorbing more visible light in the solar spectrum. The prepared doped Bi2O3 nanorod showed the excellent photocatalytic activity for degradation of selected organic pollutants, such as Methylene Blue (MB) and Rodaamime B (RhB) under visible light source. The higher activity of doped Bi2O3 nanorod may be attributed to absorption of more visible light leading to generation of higher photogenerated electron hole pairs and efficient separation of photoinduced charge carrier to inhibit the recombination rate.

  14. Evaluation of catalyzed and electrically heated filters for removal of particulate emissions from diesel-A- and JP-8-fueled engines.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kerry E; Wagner, David A; Lighty, JoAnn S; Sarofim, Adel F; Bretecher, Brad; Holden, Bruce; Helgeson, Norm; Sahay, Keshav; Nardi, Zack

    2004-01-01

    In-service diesel engines are a significant source of particulate matter (PM) emissions, and they have been subjected to increasingly strict emissions standards. Consequently, the wide-scale use of some type of particulate filter is expected. This study evaluated the effect of an Engelhard catalyzed soot filter (CSF) and a Rypos electrically heated soot filter on the emissions from in-service diesel engines in terms of PM mass, black carbon concentration, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentration, and size distribution. Both filters capture PM. The CSF relies on the engine's exhaust to reach the catalyst regeneration temperature and oxidize soot, whereas the electrically heated filter contains a heating element to oxidize soot. The filters were installed on several military diesel engines. Particle concentrations and compositions were measured before and after installation of the filter and again after several months of operation. Generally, the CSF removed at least 90% of total PM, and the removal efficiency improved or remained constant after several months of operation. In contrast, the electrical filters removed 44-69% of PM mass. In addition to evaluating the soot filters, the sampling team also compared the results of several real-time particle measurement instruments to traditional filter measurements of total mass.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-LOOP FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER FACILITY FOR ADVANCED NUCLEAR REACTOR THERMAL HYDRAULIC AND HYBRID ENERGY SYSTEM STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    James E. O'Brien; Piyush Sabharwall; SuJong Yoon

    2001-09-01

    A new high-temperature multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility for advanced nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. The facility will include three flow loops: high-temperature helium, molten salt, and steam/water. Molten salts have been identified as excellent candidate heat transport fluids for primary or secondary coolant loops, supporting advanced high temperature and small modular reactors (SMRs). Details of some of the design aspects and challenges of this facility, which is currently in the conceptual design phase, are discussed. A preliminary design configuration will be presented, with the required characteristics of the various components. The loop will utilize advanced high-temperature compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) operating at prototypic intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) conditions. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750°C), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa) at a temperature of ~450°C. Experiment design challenges include identification of suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. Corrosion and high temperature creep behavior are major considerations. The facility will include a thermal energy storage capability designed to support scaled process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will also provide important data for code ve

  16. A Facile Method for in Situ Preparation of the MnO2/LaMnO3 Catalyst for the Removal of Toluene.

    PubMed

    Si, Wenzhe; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Shen; Hu, Fangyun; Li, Junhua

    2016-04-19

    MOx/ABO3 is a promising catalyst for the high-efficiency removal of volatile organic compounds. However, this catalyst is limited on practical applications due to its complex synthesis procedure and high cost. In this work, the MnO2/LaMnO3 catalyst was prepared in situ using a facile one-step method for the first time, in which partial La cations were selectively removed from three dimensionally chain-like ordered macroporous (3DOM) LaMnO3 material. After selective removal, the obtained MnO2/LaMnO3 sample expressed an excellent catalytic performance on toluene oxidation. Toluene could be completely oxidized into CO2 and H2O at 290 °C over the MnO2/LaMnO3 catalyst with a toluene/oxygen molar ratio of 1/100 and a space velocity of 120 000 mL/(g h). In addition, the apparent activation energy value of MnO2/LaMnO3 was 57 kJ/mol, which was lower than those of other metal oxides catalysts. According to O2-TPD and XPS results, it is concluded that the high catalytic performance of MnO2/LaMnO3 was mainly associated with the large amount of oxygen species and the excellent lattice oxygen mobility. MnO2/LaMnO3 is a promising catalyst for the practical removal of volatile organic compounds due to its high efficiency, good stability, low cost, and convenient preparation.

  17. Natural Circulation in the Blanket Heat Removal System During a Loss-of-Pumping Accident (LOFA) Based on Initial Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    A transient natural convection model of the APT blanket primary heat removal (HR) system was developed to demonstrate that the blanket could be cooled for a sufficient period of time for long term cooling to be established following a loss-of-flow accident (LOFA). The particular case of interest in this report is a complete loss-of-pumping accident. For the accident scenario in which pumps are lost in both the target and blanket HR systems, natural convection provides effective cooling of the blanket for approximately 68 hours, and, if only the blanket HR systems are involved, natural convection is effective for approximately 210 hours. The heat sink for both of these accident scenarios is the assumed stagnant fluid and metal on the secondary sides of the heat exchangers.

  18. Heat generated by Er:YAG laser in the pulp chamber of teeth submitted to removal of dental tissue and composite resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pecora, Jesus D.; Pinheiro, Antonio; Spano, Julio; Barbin, Eduardo; Marchesan, Melissa A.

    2004-05-01

    The knowledge about and control of thermal energy produced by Er:YAG laser after irradiating hard dental tissues and compound resin is important because the pulp, like all vital biological tissue, has a certain capacity for supporting stimulus. The objective of this study was to analyze the thermal variation generated by Er:YAG laser (λ=2.94μm) during the preparation of a Class I cavity in the dental structure and in the removal of microhybrid Z100 (3M) compound resin. An evaluation was made of 30 maxillary human pre-molar teeth from the bank of the Endodontic Laboratory Center of Ribeirao Preto Dental School, Brasil. The sample was divided into 6 groups of 5 teeth each: Group 1, preparation of Class I cavity with Er:YAG laser (350mJ, 3Hz, 343 impulses, 120J, 113 seconds); Group 2, preparation of Class I cavity with Er:YAG laser (350mJ, 4Hz, 343 impulses, 120J, 81 seconds); Group 3, preparation of Class I cavity with Er:YAG laser (350mJ, 6Hz, 343 impulses, 120J, 58 seconds); Group 4, removal of compound resin from Class I preparation with Er:YAG laser (350mJ, 3Hz, 258 impulses, 90J, 85 seconds); Group 5, removal of compound resin from Class I preparation with Er:YAG laser (350mJ, 4Hz, 258 impulses, 90J, 67 seconds); Group 6, removal of compound resin from Class I preparation with Er:YAG laser (350mJ, 6Hz, 258 impulses, 42 seconds). The laser used was KaVo Key 2 (Biberach, Germany), λ=2,94μm, P=3 Watts, pulse duration of 250μs, with air-water cooling. The increase in temperature during dental preparation and the removal of the compound resin was evaluated by means of a Tektronix DMM916 Thermocouple (Consitec, Brasil). The results showed that the application of laser for the removal of the hard dental tissues and for the removal of compound resins with the pulse frequencies 3, 4 and 6 Hz did not generate heating greater than 3.1°C and remained within the histopathological limits permitted for pulp tissue (5.5°C) and there was a significant statistical

  19. Inertial Confinement Fusion alpha-heating signatures in prompt gamma-ray measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Jennifer; Herrmann, Hans; Cerjan, Charlie; Sayre, Daniel; Carpenter, Arthur; Liebman, Judy; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Kim, Yongho

    2015-11-01

    Prompt gamma-rays measured at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with the Gamma-ray Reaction History detector (GRH) supply vital diagnostic information, such as the peak burn time, burn width, and total neutron yield, from prompt DT-fusion gamma-ray emission during high convergence implosion experiments. Additionally, the stagnated cold shell density distribution may be inferred from the time-integrated, calibrated 12C (n,n' γ) signal, thus providing estimates of remaining ablator carbon areal density. Furthermore, simulations suggest that alpha heating signatures might be accessible using more highly resolved temporal gamma-ray emission. Correlation of these signatures with time-dependent neutron emission will constrain the implosion dynamics immediately prior to thermonuclear burn. Measurement of these gamma-ray signatures will be discussed along with updates on our work toward inferred total DT yield and 12C areal density. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07-NA27344, LLNL-ABS-670282.

  20. High-frequency Propagation through the Ionosphere from the Sura Heating Facility to the Orbiting CASSIOPE/e-POP Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.; Frolov, V. L.; Padokhin, A. M.; Siefring, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    High-frequency pump waves have been transmitted from the Russian heating facility Sura to the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) in the e-POP payload on the Canadian small satellite CASSIOPE. This experiment has been carried out 24 times, under a variety of circumstances. In some cases, the ePOP VHF-UHF beacon CERTO was on, and ground receivers near Sura recorded total electron content. Subsequent tomographic processing has allowed the two-dimensional electron density distribution to be determined in the altitude-latitude space between Sura and CASSIOPE. We present some details from a night-time pass on 9 Sept. 2014 when the fixed pump frequency 4.3 MHz was slightly smaller than foF2 above Sura. This was an instance in which conversion between the O and Z cold plasma modes may have been required to achieve transmission. Explanation could be elaborated in terms of underdense, heater-created, field-aligned irregularities that are "artificial radio windows". The Sura heater radiation pattern maximum was tilted 12° south of the vertical, toward the terrestrial magnetic field axis, potentially enhancing the power transmitted through radio windows. The observations are interpreted in the light of competing concepts of transmission.

  1. Facile preparation of highly hydrophilic, recyclable high-performance polyimide adsorbents for the removal of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jieyang; Zheng, Yaxin; Luo, Longbo; Feng, Yan; Zhang, Chaoliang; Wang, Xu; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-04-01

    To obtain high-performance adsorbents that combine excellent adsorption ability, thermal stability, service life and recycling ability, polyimide (PI)/silica powders were prepared via a facile one-pot coprecipitation process. A benzimidazole unit was introduced into the PI backbone as the adsorption site. The benzimidazole unit induced more hydroxyls onto the silica, which provided hydrophilic sites for access by heavy metal ions. By comprehensively analyzing the effect of hydrophilcity, agglomeration, silica polycondensation, specific surface area and PI crystallinity, 10% was demonstrated to be the most proper feed silica content. The equilibrium adsorption amount (Qe) for Cu(2+) of PI/silica adsorbents was 77 times higher than that of pure PI. Hydrogen chloride (HCl) was used as a desorbent for heavy metal ions and could be decomplexed with benzimidazole unit at around 300°C, which was lower than the glass transition temperature of PI. The complexation and decomplexation process of HCl made PI/silica adsorbents recyclable, and the adsorption ability remained steady for more than 50 recycling processes. As PI/silica adsorbents possess excellent thermal stability, chemical resistance and radiation resistance and hydrophilicity, they have potential as superior recyclable adsorbents for collecting heavy metal ions from waste water in extreme environments. PMID:26736172

  2. Facile synthesis of pectin-stabilized magnetic graphene oxide Prussian blue nanocomposites for selective cesium removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Avinash A; Jang, Jiseon; Lee, Dae Sung

    2016-09-01

    This work focused on the development of pectin-stabilized magnetic graphene oxide Prussian blue (PSMGPB) nanocomposites for removal of cesium from wastewater. The PSMGPB nanocomposite showed an improved adsorption capacity of 1.609mmol/g for cesium, compared with magnetic graphene oxide Prussian blue, magnetic pectin Prussian blue, and magnetic Prussian blue nanocomposites, which exhibited adsorption capacities of 1.230, 0.901, and 0.330mmol/g, respectively. Increased adsorption capacity of PSMGPB nanocomposites was attributed to the pectin-stabilized separation of graphene oxide sheets and enhanced distribution of magnetites on the graphene oxide surface. Scanning electron microscopy images showed the effective separation of graphene oxide sheets due to the incorporation of pectin. The optimum temperature and pH for adsorption were 30°C and 7.0, respectively. A thermodynamic study indicated the spontaneous and the exothermic nature of cesium adsorption. Based on non-linear regression, the Langmuir isotherm fitted the experimental data better than the Freundlich and Tempkin models. PMID:27262093

  3. Spinel type CoFe oxide porous nanosheets as magnetic adsorbents with fast removal ability and facile separation.

    PubMed

    Ge, X; Gu, C D; Wang, X L; Tu, J P

    2015-09-15

    Adsorption is often time consuming due to slow diffusion kinetic. Sizing he adsorbent down might help to accelerate adsorption. For CoFe spinel oxide, a magnetically separable adsorbent, the preparation of nanosheets faces many challenges including phase separation, grain growth and difficulty in preparing two-dimensional materials. In this work, we prepared porous CoFe oxide nanosheet with chemical formula of Co2.698Fe0.302O4 through topochemical transformation of a CoFe precursor, which has a layered double hydroxide (LDH) analogue structure and a large interlayer spacing. The LDH precursor was synthesized from a cheap deep eutectic solvent (DES) system. The calcined Co2.698Fe0.302O4 has small grain size (10-20nm), nanosheet morphology, and porous structure, which contribute to a large specific surface area of 79.5m(2)g(-1). The Co2.698Fe0.302O4 nanosheets show fast removal ability and good adsorption capacity for both organic waste (305mgg(-1) in 5min for Congo red) and toxic heavy metal ion (5.27mgg(-1) in 30min for Cr (VI)). Furthermore, the Co2.698Fe0.302O4 can be separated magnetically. Considering the precursor can be prepared through a fast, simple, surfactant-free and high-yield synthetic strategy, this work should have practical significance in fabricating adsorbents.

  4. Determination of Fissile Loadings onto Monosodium Titanate (MST) under Conditions Relevant to the Actinide Removal Process Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T

    2005-11-15

    This report describes the results of an experimental study to measure the sorption of fissile actinides on monosodium titanate (MST) at conditions relevant to operation of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP). The study examined the effect of a single contact of a large volume of radionuclide-spiked simulant solution with a small mass of MST. The volume of simulant to MST (8.5 L to 0.2 g of MST solids) was designed to mimic the maximum phase ratio that occurs between the multiple contacts of MST and waste solution and washing of the accumulated solids cycle of ARP. This work provides the following results. (1) After a contact time of {approx}2 weeks, we measured the following actinide loadings on the MST (average of solution and solids data), Pu: 2.79 {+-} 0.197 wt %, U: 14.0 {+-} 1.04 wt %, and Np: 0.839 {+-} 0.0178 wt %. (2) The plutonium and uranium loadings reported above are considerably higher than previously reported values. The higher loading result from the very high phase ratio and the high initial mass concentrations of uranium and plutonium. A separate upcoming document details the predicted values for this system versus the results. (3) The strontium DF values measured in these tests proved much lower than those reported previously with simulants having the same bulk chemical composition. The low strontium DF values reflect the very low initial mass concentration of strontium in this simulant (<100 {micro}g/L) compared to that in previous testing (> 600 {micro}g/L).

  5. Data Sharing Report for the Quantification of Removable Activity in Various Surveillance and Maintenance Facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN

    SciTech Connect

    King, David A

    2013-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OR-EM) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. Specifically, DOE OR-EM requested that ORAU plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign targeting potential removable radiological contamination that may be transferrable to future personal protective equipment (PPE) and contamination control materials—collectively referred to as PPE throughout the remainder of this report—used in certain URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Project facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Routine surveys in Bldgs. 3001, 3005, 3010, 3028, 3029, 3038, 3042, 3517, 4507, and 7500 continuously generate PPE. The waste is comprised of Tyvek coveralls, gloves, booties, Herculite, and other materials used to prevent worker exposure or the spread of contamination during routine maintenance and monitoring activities. This report describes the effort to collect and quantify removable activity that may be used by the ORNL S&M Project team to develop radiation instrumentation “screening criteria.” Material potentially containing removable activity was collected on smears, including both masselin large-area wipes (LAWs) and standard paper smears, and analyzed for site-related constituents (SRCs) in an analytical laboratory. The screening criteria, if approved, may be used to expedite waste disposition of relatively clean PPE. The ultimate objectives of this effort were to: 1) determine whether screening criteria can be developed for these facilities, and 2) provide process knowledge information for future site planners. The screening criteria, if calculated, must be formally approved by Federal Facility Agreement parties prior to use for

  6. Characterization of ash deposition and heat transfer behavior of coals during combustion in a pilot-scale facility and full-scale utility

    SciTech Connect

    Sushil Gupta; Rajender Gupta; Gary Bryant; Terry Wall; Shinji Watanabe; Takashi Kiga; Kimihito Narukawa

    2009-05-15

    Experimental measurements as well as theoretical models were used to investigate the impact of mineral matter of three coals on ash deposition and heat transfer for pulverized coal fired boilers. The ash deposition experiments were conducted in a pulverized fuel combustion pilot-scale facility and a full-scale unit. A mathematical model with input from computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy analysis of coal minerals was used to predict the effect of ash deposition on heat transfer. The predicted deposit thickness and heat flux from the model are shown to be consistent with the measurements in the test facility. The model differentiates the coals according to the deposits they form and their effect on heat transfer. The heat transfer predictions in the full-scale unit were found to be most suitable for the water wall under the furnace nose. The study demonstrates that the measurements in a full-scale unit can differ significantly from those in pilot-scale furnaces due to soot-blowing operations. 9 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  8. Enhancement of n-butanol production by in situ butanol removal using permeating-heating-gas stripping in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Ren, Hengfei; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Ting; Shi, Xinchi; Cheng, Hao; Zhao, Nan; Li, Zhenjian; Li, Bingbing; Niu, Huanqing; Zhuang, Wei; Xie, Jingjing; Chen, Xiaochun; Wu, Jinglan; Ying, Hanjie

    2014-07-01

    Butanol recovery from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fed-batch fermentation using permeating-heating-gas was determined in this study. Fermentation was performed with Clostridium acetobutylicum B3 in a fibrous bed bioreactor and permeating-heating-gas stripping was used to eliminate substrate and product inhibition, which normally restrict ABE production and sugar utilization to below 20 g/L and 60 g/L, respectively. In batch fermentation (without permeating-heating-gas stripping), C. acetobutylicum B3 utilized 60 g/L glucose and produced 19.9 g/L ABE and 12 g/L butanol, while in the integrated process 290 g/L glucose was utilized and 106.27 g/L ABE and 66.09 g/L butanol were produced. The intermittent gas stripping process generated a highly concentrated condensate containing approximately 15% (w/v) butanol, 4% (w/v) acetone, a small amount of ethanol (<1%), and almost no acids, resulting in a highly concentrated butanol solution [∼ 70% (w/v)] after phase separation. Butanol removal by permeating-heating-gas stripping has potential for commercial ABE production.

  9. Heating with waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Beabout, R.W.

    1986-09-02

    Most of the power consumed in the gaseous diffusion process is converted into heat of compression, which is removed from the process gas and rejected into the atmosphere by recirculating cooling water over cooling towers. The water being handled through the X-333 and X-330 Process Buildings can be heated to 140 to 150/sup 0/F for heating use. The Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant is provided with a recirculating heating water (RHW) system which uses X-330 water and wasted heat. The RHW flow is diagrammed. (DLC)

  10. Use of Sandia's Central Receiver Test Facility as a high-intensity heat source for testing missile nose-cone (Radome) radar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, D.R.

    1981-09-01

    A series of tests at Sandia's Central Receiver Test Facility in support of the US Navy's SM-2 Blk 2 Radome Improvement Program is described. The CRTF was the source of high-intensity solar radiation for testing onboard radar-tracking systems under heating conditions intended to simulate those that occur in supersonic flight. Also discussed are the hardware used and the software developed at the CRTF.

  11. The effects of urea modification and heat treatment on the process of NO2 removal by wood-based activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Bashkova, Svetlana; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2009-05-01

    The removal of NO(2) on urea-modified and heat-treated wood-based activated carbons was studied. From the obtained results it was found that these modifications, especially when done at 950 degrees C, have a positive effect on NO(2) adsorption and on the retention of NO (the product of NO(2) reduction by carbon). The presence of moisture in the system enhances the removal of NO(2) but negatively affects the retention of NO. It is possible that the formation of active centers on the carbon surface and some increase in the volume of supermicropores during the high temperature treatment play a significant role in these removal processes. The surface of the carbons was analyzed in terms of the pK(a) distributions. The qualitative and quantitative analyses of the NO(2) adsorption products were carried out by means of FTIR and TA techniques, respectively. The main products found on the carbon surface were the NO(3) and NO(2) species.

  12. Facile synthesis of Fe3O4-graphene@mesoporous SiO2 nanocomposites for efficient removal of Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xi-Lin; Shi, Yanpeng; Zhong, Shuxian; Lin, Hongjun; Chen, Jian-Rong

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we have developed a facile and low-cost method for the synthesis of novel graphene based nanosorbents. Firstly, well-defined Fe3O4 nanoparticles were decorated onto graphene sheets, and then a layer of mesoporous SiO2 were deposited on the surface of the Fe3O4-graphene composites. The obtained Fe3O4-graphene@mesoporous SiO2 nanocomposites (denoted as MG@m-SiO2) were characterized by scanning electron microscopic (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The adsorptive property was investigated by using MG@m-SiO2 as sorbents and Methylene Blue (MB), a common dye, as model of the organic pollutants. Adsorption kinetics, isotherms, thermodynamics as well as effects of pH and adsorbent dose on the adsorption were studied. The adsorption isotherms and kinetics are better described by Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, respectively. Thermodynamic studies suggest that the adsorption of MB onto the MG@m-SiO2 is endothermic and spontaneous process. The results imply that the MG@m-SiO2 can be served as a cost-effective adsorbent for the removal of organic pollutants from aqueous solutions.

  13. Facile preparation of magnetic C/TiO2/Ni composites and their photocatalytic performance for removal of a dye from water under UV light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gondal, Mohammed A; Li, Chunli; Chang, Xiaofeng; Sikong, Lek; Yamani, Zain H; Zhou, Qin; Yang, Fan; Lin, Qin

    2012-01-01

    Development of a photocatalyst with high efficiency and separability is still a challenging task in the field of wastewater treatment. In this study, new magnetic separable C/TiO(2)/Ni composite as a photocatalyst was prepared by a facile pyrolysis reaction, using powdered activated carbon (PAC), TiO(2) and Ni(Ac)(2) as precursors. The results proved that the photocatalyst (C/TiO(2)/Ni) synthesized in this work exhibited greater removal activity for Methyl Orange (MO) dye from water as compared with the commercially available well reported TiO(2) nanoparticles (P25). This significant enhancement in the photocatalytic activity for wastewater treatment due to the combination of PAC and TiO(2) could be presumed as the synergetic effect on the contacting interface of TiO(2) and PAC, and such effect was initially demonstrated by electrochemical impedance measurements. Furthermore, the trait that it consists of magnetic properties and therefore is easy to be recycled, which could be harnessed by an external magnet and may have many advantages over pure metal oxides (like TiO(2)) especially in the industrial procedures. PMID:22375540

  14. Lotus-like effect for metal filings recovery and particle removal on heated metal surfaces using Leidenfrost water droplets.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cher Lin Clara; Sapiha, Kostantyn; Leong, Yoke Fun Hannah; Choi, Siwon; Anariba, Franklin; Thio, Beng Joo Reginald

    2015-07-21

    A "lotus-like" effect is applied to demonstrate the ability of the Leidenfrost water droplets to recover Cu particles on a heated Al substrate. Cu particles on the heated surface adhere to the rim of the Leidenfrost droplets and eventually coat the droplets' surface to form an aggregation. When Fe filings are added to the Cu particles, the aggregated mixture can then be collected using a strong rare earth magnet (NdFeB) upon evaporation of the water. We also show that the Leidenfrost effect can be effectively utilized to recover both hydrophobic (dust and activated carbon) and hydrophilic (SiO2 and MgO) particles from heated Al surfaces without any topographical modification or surfactant addition. Our results show that hydrophobic and hydrophilic materials can be collected with >92% and >96% effectiveness on grooved and smooth Al surfaces, respectively. Furthermore, we observed no significant differences in the amount of material collected above the Leidenfrost point within the tested temperature range (240 °C vs. 340 °C) as well as when the Al sheet was replaced with a Cu sheet as the substrate. However, we did observe that the Leidenfrost droplets were able to collect a greater amount of material when the working liquid was water than when it was ethanol. Our findings show promise in the development of an effective precious coinage metal filings recovery technology for application in the mint industry, as well as the self-cleaning of metallic and semiconductor surfaces where manual cleaning is not amenable. PMID:26053932

  15. Full scale calcium bromide injection with subsequent mercury oxidation and removal within wet flue gas desulphurization system: Experience at a 700 MW coal-fired power facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Mark Simpson

    The Environmental Protection Agency promulgated the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule, which requires that existing power plants reduce mercury emissions to meet an emission rate of 1.2 lb/TBtu on a 30-day rolling average and that new plants meet a 0.0002 lb/GWHr emission rate. This translates to mercury removals greater than 90% for existing units and greater than 99% for new units. Current state-of-the-art technology for the control of mercury emissions uses activated carbon injected upstream of a fabric filter, a costly proposition. For example, a fabric filter, if not already available, would require a 200M capital investment for a 700 MW size unit. A lower-cost option involves the injection of activated carbon into an existing cold-side electrostatic precipitator. Both options would incur the cost of activated carbon, upwards of 3M per year. The combination of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactors and wet flue gas desulphurization (wet FGD) systems have demonstrated the ability to substantially reduce mercury emissions, especially at units that burn coals containing sufficient halogens. Halogens are necessary for transforming elemental mercury to oxidized mercury, which is water-soluble. Plants burning halogen-deficient coals such as Power River Basin (PRB) coals currently have no alternative but to install activated carbon-based approaches to control mercury emissions. This research consisted of investigating calcium bromide addition onto PRB coal as a method of increasing flue gas halogen concentration. The treated coal was combusted in a 700 MW boiler and the subsequent treated flue gas was introduced into a wet FGD. Short-term parametric and an 83-day longer-term tests were completed to determine the ability of calcium bromine to oxidize mercury and to study the removal of the mercury in a wet FGD. The research goal was to show that calcium bromine addition to PRB coal was a viable approach for meeting the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule

  16. Thermal-hydraulic simulation of natural convection decay heat removal in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using RELAP5 and TEMPEST: Part 1, Models and simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.; Chen, N.C.J.; Ruggles, A.E.; Cook, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine decay heat removal requirements in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) following shutdown from 85 MW. The objective of the study was to determine when forced flow through the core could be terminated without causing the fuel to melt. This question is particularly relevant when a station blackout caused by an external event is considered. Analysis of natural circulation in the core, vessel upper plenum, and reactor pool indicates that 12 h of forced flow will permit a safe shutdown with some margin. However, uncertainties in the analysis preclude conclusive proof that 12 h is sufficient. As a result of the study, two seismically qualified diesel generators were installed in HFIR. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Old hydrofracture facility tanks contents removal action operations plan at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Text. Volume 2: Checklists and work instructions

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This Operations Plan summarizes the operating activities for transferring contents of five low-level (radioactive) liquid waste storage tanks associated with the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) for secure storage. The transfer will be accomplished through sluicing and pumping operations which are designed to pump the slurry in a closed circuit system using a sluicing nozzle to resuspend the sludge. Once resuspended, the slurry will be transferred to the MVST. The report documenting the material transfer will be prepared after transfer of the tank materials has been completed. The OBF tanks contain approximately 52,600 gal (199,000 L) of low-level radioactive waste consisting of both sludge and supernatant. This material is residual from the now-abandoned grout injection operations conducted from 1964 to 1980. Total curie content is approximately 30,000 Ci. A sluicing and pumping system has been specifically designed for the OHF tanks contents transfer operations. This system is remotely operated and incorporates a sluicing nozzle and arm (Borehole Miner) originally designed for use in the mining industry. The Borehole Miner is an in-tank device designed to deliver a high pressure jet spray via an extendable nozzle. In addition to removing the waste from the tanks, the use of this equipment will demonstrate applicability for additional underground storage tank cleaning throughout the U.S. Department of Energy complex. Additional components of the complete sluicing and pumping system consist of a high pressure pumping system for transfer to the MVST, a low pressure pumping system for transfer to the recycle tank, a ventilation system for providing negative pressure on tanks, and instrumentation and control systems for remote operation and monitoring.

  18. Heat as a Tracer to Examine Hydraulic Conductance Near the RussianRiver Bank Filtration Facility, Sonoma County, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Constantz, Jim; Su, Grace; Hatch, Christine

    2004-08-01

    Both the measurement of temperature and the simulation of heat and water transport have benefited from significant recent advances in data acquisition and computer resources. This has afforded the opportunity for routine use of heat as a tracer in a variety of hydrological regimes. Heat is particularly well suited for investigations of stream/groundwater exchanges. Dynamic temperature patterns between the stream and underlying sediments are typical, due to large stream surface area to volume ratios relative to other surface water bodies. Heat is a naturally occurring tracer, free from (real or perceived) issues of contamination associated with use of chemical tracers in stream environments. The use of heat as a tracer relies on the measurement of temperature gradients, and temperature is an extremely robust parameter to monitor. Temperature data is immediately available as opposed to chemical tracers, which often require significant laboratory analysis. In this work, we report on the progress in the use of heat as a tracer to determine the hydraulic conductance of the streambed along the middle reaches of the Russian River, located west of Santa Rosa, CA. The general hydrological setting is described and the unique matter in which the water resources are managed in an environment of increasing population, a rapid shift to agricultural crops requiring more irrigation, and a series of fishery related mandates.

  19. Experimental investigation of egg ovalbumin scaling on heated stainless steel surface and scale-removal compared with that of whey protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Lv, Hui Ting; Deng, Ren Pan; Liao, Zhen Kai; Wu, Xue E; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2013-07-01

    Fouling and cleaning on a heat exchanger surface during milk processing have been studied extensively in the past due to their great importance in energy, product quality, and safety. However, little information is available for egg ovalbumin (OVA) fouling and cleaning behavior. In the present work, fouling and cleaning behaviors of OVA were investigated using a real-time monitoring system for heat transfer coefficient. A comparison was made between the behavior of whey protein concentrate (WPC) and that of OVA. WPC has been well studied which can be used as a benchmark. Ultrasonic cleaning was also applied to investigate the cleaning behavior of OVA fouling. Results have shown that OVA created more thermal resistance than WPC in the 2 h fouling process. It was also much more difficult to remove the OVA deposit than the WPC fouling. Different from what were observed from WPC deposit, there was no optimal cleaning rate for OVA deposit in the NaOH concentration range tested (0-2.0 wt%), while WPC fouling is known to have the highest cleaning rate around 0.5 wt% NaOH concentration at moderate temperatures.

  20. One-dimensional modeling of radial heat removal during depressurized heatup transients in modular pebble-bed and prismatic high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, M.G.

    1984-07-01

    A one-dimensional computational model was developed to evaluate the heat removal capabilities of both prismatic-core and pebble-bed modular HTGRs during depressurized heatup transients. A correlation was incorporated to calculate the temperature- and neutron-fluence-dependent thermal conductivity of graphite. The modified Zehner-Schluender model was used to determine the effective thermal conductivity of a pebble bed, accounting for both conduction and radiation. Studies were performed for prismatic-core and pebble-bed modular HTGRs, and the results were compared to analyses performed by GA and GR, respectively. For the particular modular reactor design studied, the prismatic HTGR peak temperature was 2152.2/sup 0/C at 38 hours following the transient initiation, and the pebble-bed peak temperature was 1647.8/sup 0/C at 26 hours. These results compared favorably with those of GA and GE, with only slight differences caused by neglecting axial heat transfer in a one-dimensional radial model. This study found that the magnitude of the initial power density had a greater effect on the temperature excursion than did the initial temperature.

  1. Validation/Uncertainty Quantification for Large Eddy Simulations of the heat flux in the Tangentially Fired Oxy-Coal Alstom Boiler Simulation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.; Eddings, E.G.; Ring, T.; Thornock, J.; Draper, T.; Isaac, B.; Rezeai, D.; Toth, P.; Wu, Y.; Kelly, K.

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this task is to produce predictive capability with quantified uncertainty bounds for the heat flux in commercial-scale, tangentially fired, oxy-coal boilers. Validation data came from the Alstom Boiler Simulation Facility (BSF) for tangentially fired, oxy-coal operation. This task brings together experimental data collected under Alstom’s DOE project for measuring oxy-firing performance parameters in the BSF with this University of Utah project for large eddy simulation (LES) and validation/uncertainty quantification (V/UQ). The Utah work includes V/UQ with measurements in the single-burner facility where advanced strategies for O2 injection can be more easily controlled and data more easily obtained. Highlights of the work include: • Simulations of Alstom’s 15 megawatt (MW) BSF, exploring the uncertainty in thermal boundary conditions. A V/UQ analysis showed consistency between experimental results and simulation results, identifying uncertainty bounds on the quantities of interest for this system (Subtask 9.1) • A simulation study of the University of Utah’s oxy-fuel combustor (OFC) focused on heat flux (Subtask 9.2). A V/UQ analysis was used to show consistency between experimental and simulation results. • Measurement of heat flux and temperature with new optical diagnostic techniques and comparison with conventional measurements (Subtask 9.3). Various optical diagnostics systems were created to provide experimental data to the simulation team. The final configuration utilized a mid-wave infrared (MWIR) camera to measure heat flux and temperature, which was synchronized with a high-speed, visible camera to utilize two-color pyrometry to measure temperature and soot concentration. • Collection of heat flux and temperature measurements in the University of Utah’s OFC for use is subtasks 9.2 and 9.3 (Subtask 9.4). Several replicates were carried to better assess the experimental error. Experiments were specifically designed for the

  2. Uncertainty analysis of thermocouple measurements used in normal and abnormal thermal environment experiments at Sandia's Radiant Heat Facility and Lurance Canyon Burn Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2004-04-01

    It would not be possible to confidently qualify weapon systems performance or validate computer codes without knowing the uncertainty of the experimental data used. This report provides uncertainty estimates associated with thermocouple data for temperature measurements from two of Sandia's large-scale thermal facilities. These two facilities (the Radiant Heat Facility (RHF) and the Lurance Canyon Burn Site (LCBS)) routinely gather data from normal and abnormal thermal environment experiments. They are managed by Fire Science & Technology Department 09132. Uncertainty analyses were performed for several thermocouple (TC) data acquisition systems (DASs) used at the RHF and LCBS. These analyses apply to Type K, chromel-alumel thermocouples of various types: fiberglass sheathed TC wire, mineral-insulated, metal-sheathed (MIMS) TC assemblies, and are easily extended to other TC materials (e.g., copper-constantan). Several DASs were analyzed: (1) A Hewlett-Packard (HP) 3852A system, and (2) several National Instrument (NI) systems. The uncertainty analyses were performed on the entire system from the TC to the DAS output file. Uncertainty sources include TC mounting errors, ANSI standard calibration uncertainty for Type K TC wire, potential errors due to temperature gradients inside connectors, extension wire uncertainty, DAS hardware uncertainties including noise, common mode rejection ratio, digital voltmeter accuracy, mV to temperature conversion, analog to digital conversion, and other possible sources. Typical results for 'normal' environments (e.g., maximum of 300-400 K) showed the total uncertainty to be about {+-}1% of the reading in absolute temperature. In high temperature or high heat flux ('abnormal') thermal environments, total uncertainties range up to {+-}2-3% of the reading (maximum of 1300 K). The higher uncertainties in abnormal thermal environments are caused by increased errors due to the effects of imperfect TC attachment to the test item. 'Best

  3. Summary of channel catfish and rainbow trout production at the Gallatin Waste Heat Aquaculture Facility, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, C.M.; Schweinforth, R.L.; Burton, G.L.

    1984-02-01

    These studies have indicated that channel catfish and rainbow trout can be intensively cultured in concrete raceways using waste heat effluent water from the Gallatin Steam Plant. Optimum production was attained, especially with channel catfish, when desirable water temperatures and proper environmental conditions occurred. High density culture is possible during the winter and early spring months.

  4. Heat pipe methanator

    DOEpatents

    Ranken, William A.; Kemme, Joseph E.

    1976-07-27

    A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

  5. Facile synthesis of ternary Ag/AgBr-Ag2CO3 hybrids with enhanced photocatalytic removal of elemental mercury driven by visible light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Anchao; Zhang, Lixiang; Lu, Hao; Chen, Guoyan; Liu, Zhichao; Xiang, Jun; Sun, Lushi

    2016-08-15

    A novel technique for photocatalytic removal of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) using visible-light-driven Ag/AgBr-Ag2CO3 hybrids was proposed. The ternary Ag/AgBr-Ag2CO3 hybrids were synthesized by a simple modified co-precipitation method and characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron spin resonance (ESR) techniques. The effects of AgBr content, fluorescent lamp (FSL) irradiation, solution temperature, SO2 and NO on Hg(0) removal were investigated in detail. Furthermore, a possible reaction mechanism for higher Hg(0) removal was proposed, and the simultaneous removal of Hg(0), SO2 and NO was studied. The results showed that a high efficiency of Hg(0) removal was obtained by using Ag/AgBr-Ag2CO3 hybrids under fluorescent lamp irradiation. The AgBr content, FSL irradiation, solution temperature, and SO2 all exhibited significant effects on Hg(0) removal, while NO had slight effect on Hg(0) removal. The addition of Ca(OH)2 demonstrated a little impact on Hg(0) removal and could significantly improve the SO2-resistance performance of Ag/AgBr(0.7)-Ag2CO3 hybrid. The characterization results exhibited that hydroxyl radical (OH), superoxide radical (O2(-)), hole (h(+)), and Br(0), were reactive species responsible for removing Hg(0), and the h(+) played a key role in Hg(0) removal. PMID:27135702

  6. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  7. Validation of the integration of CFD and SAS4A/SASSYS-1: Analysis of EBR-II shutdown heat removal test 17

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J. W.; Fanning, T. H.; Vilim, R.; Briggs, L. L.

    2012-07-01

    Recent analyses have demonstrated the need to model multidimensional phenomena, particularly thermal stratification in outlet plena, during safety analyses of loss-of-flow transients of certain liquid-metal cooled reactor designs. Therefore, Argonne's reactor systems safety code SAS4A/SASSYS-1 is being enhanced by integrating 3D computational fluid dynamics models of the plena. A validation exercise of the new tool is being performed by analyzing the protected loss-of-flow event demonstrated by the EBR-II Shutdown Heat Removal Test 17. In this analysis, the behavior of the coolant in the cold pool is modeled using the CFD code STAR-CCM+, while the remainder of the cooling system and the reactor core are modeled with SAS4A/SASSYS-1. This paper summarizes the code integration strategy and provides the predicted 3D temperature and velocity distributions inside the cold pool during SHRT-17. The results of the coupled analysis should be considered preliminary at this stage, as the exercise pointed to the need to improve the CFD model of the cold pool tank. (authors)

  8. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... focused on a very small area. The laser heats the cells in the area being treated until they "burst." There are several types of lasers. Each laser has specific uses. Laser excision can remove: Benign or pre- ...

  9. 30 CFR 250.1727 - What information must I include in my final application to remove a platform or other facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... devices to conduct a pre-removal survey to detect the presence of turtles and marine mammals, a... recent biological surveys conducted in the vicinity of the structure and recent observations of...

  10. 10. VIEW OF CALCINER IN ROOM 146148. THE CALCINER HEATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF CALCINER IN ROOM 146-148. THE CALCINER HEATED PLUTONIUM PEROXIDE TO CONVERT IT TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE. THE PROCESS REMOVED RESIDUAL WATER AND NITRIC ACID LEAVING A DRY, POWDERED PRODUCT. (4/29/65) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery & Fabrication Facility, North-central section of plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  11. Thermal Response of Whipox-Type All-Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites during Reentry Simulation in the Dlr-Lbk Arc-Heated Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechnich, P.; Braue, W.; Schneider, H.; Koch, U.; Esser, B.; Gülhan, A.

    2005-02-01

    All-oxide ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) such as WHIPOXTM (wound highly porous oxide) exhibit excellent damage tolerance and thermal stability up to 1400°C. Due to their low density and thermal conductivity these new ceramic materials are considered promising candidates for thermal protection systems (TPS) of spacecrafts. The performance of WHIPOX-type CMCs was evaluated during reentry simulations in the L2K leg of the arc-heated LBK facility of DLR, Cologne. The application of reaction-bonded alumina (RBAO) coatings provides significant CMC surface protection and decreased gas permeability, which are key issues for reentry applications. Since emittance and catalycity of the RBAO-coatings limit the performance of CMCs in a reentry environment, binary SiC/RBAO coatings providing higher emittance and/or lower catalycity proved to be a promising approach.

  12. Experiments to investigate the effect of flight path on direct containment heating (DCH) in the Surtsey test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.; Griffith, R.O. ); Nichols, R.T. )

    1991-10-01

    The goal of the Limited Flight Path (LFP) test series was to investigate the effect of reactor subcompartment flight path length on direct containment heating (DCH). The test series consisted of eight experiments with nominal flight paths of 1, 2, or 8 m. A thermitically generated mixture of iron, chromium, and alumina simulated the corium melt of a severe reactor accident. After thermite ignition, superheated steam forcibly ejected the molten debris into a 1:10 linear scale the model of a dry reactor cavity. The blowdown steam entrained the molten debris and dispersed it into the Surtsey vessel. The vessel pressure, gas temperature, debris temperature, hydrogen produced by steam/metal reactions, debris velocity, mass dispersed into the Surtsey vessel, and debris particle size were measured for each experiment. The measured peak pressure for each experiment was normalized by the total amount of energy introduced into the Surtsey vessel; the normalized pressures increased with lengthened flight path. The debris temperature at the cavity exit was about 2320 K. Gas grab samples indicated that steam in the cavity reacted rapidly to form hydrogen, so the driving gas was a mixture of steam and hydrogen. These experiments indicate that debris may be trapped in reactor subcompartments and thus will not efficiently transfer heat to gas in the upper dome of a containment building. The effect of deentrainment by reactor subcompartments may significantly reduce the peak containment load in a severe reactor accident. 8 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Nuclear Heating Measurement in Critical Facilities and Experimental Validation of Code and Libraries - An Application to Prompt and Delayed γ Nuclear Data Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaise, P.; Di Salvo, J.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Bernard, D.; Amharrak, H.; Lemaire, M.; Ravaux, S.

    Energy from prompt and delayed gammas in actual and future nuclear systems are more and more taken into account into design studies as they play an important role in the assessment of performance and safety concerns. Their incomplete knowledge (both prompt and delayed) require to take conservative design margins on local dimensioning parameters, thus reducing the awaited performances or flexibility of these facilities, with costs that are far from being negligible. The local energy photon deposit must be accurately known for Generation-III (Gen-III), Generation-IV (Gen-IV) or the new MTR Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR). The last 2 decades has seen the realization, in Zero Power Reactors (ZPR), of several programs partially devoted to γ-heating measurements. Experimental programs were and are still conducted in different Cadarache facilities such as MASURCA (for SFR), and later in MINERVE and EOLE (for JHR and Gen-III reactors). The adequacy of the γ-heating calculation was compared to experimental data using thermo-luminescent (TL) detectors and γ-fission chambers. Inconsistencies in C/E and associated uncertainties led to improvement of both libraries and experimental techniques. For these last one, characterization for TL and optically stimulated (OSL) detectors (calibration, individual response), and Monte Carlo calculation of charge repartition in those detectors and their environment were carefully checked and optimized. This step enabled to reduce the associated experimental uncertainty by a factor of 2 (8% at 2σ). Nevertheless, interpretation of integral experiment with updated calculation schemes and improved experimental techniques still tend to prove that there are some nuclei for which there are missing or erroneous data, mainly in structural and absorbing materials. New integral and differential measurements are needed to guide new evaluation efforts, which could benefit from consolidated theoretical and experimental modeling techniques.

  14. Nonlinear sensitivity and uncertainty analysis in support of the blowdown heat transfer program. [Test 177 at Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ronen, Y.; Bjerke, M.A.; Cacuci, D.G.; Barhen, J.

    1980-11-01

    A nonlinear uncertainty analysis methodology based on the use of first and second order sensitivity coefficients is presented. As a practical demonstration, an uncertainty analysis of several responses of interest is performed for Test 177, which is part of a series of tests conducted at the Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) of the ORNL Engineering Technology Division Pressurized Water Reactor-Blowdown Heat Transfer (PWR-BDHT) program. These space- and time-dependent responses are: mass flow rate, temperature, pressure, density, enthalpy, and water qualtiy - in several volumetric regions of the experimental facility. The analysis shows that, over parts of the transient, the responses behave as linear functions of the input parameters; in these cases, their standard deviations are of the same order of magnitude as those of the input parameters. Otherwise, the responses exhibit nonlinearities and their standard deviations are considerably larger. The analysis also shows that the degree of nonlinearity of the responses is highly dependent on their volumetric locations.

  15. THE PERFORMANCE OF THE 8.4 MW MODULATOR/REGULATOR POWE SYSTEMS FOR THE ELECTRON CYCLOTRON HEATING FACILITY UPGRADE AT DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    S.G.E. PRONKO; S.W. DELAWARE; T.E. HARRIS; D. HOYT; D.H. KELLMAN; R.A. LEGG; M. LONTOC; A. NEREM; J.R. VALENTINE

    2000-11-01

    The DIII-D National Fusion Facility at General Atomics is completing the upgrade of its electron cyclotron heating (ECH) capability from the previous 3 MW at 110 GHz to 6 MW of generated microwave power. An 8.4 MW modulator/regulator (M/R) power system has been designed and constructed. Surplus hardware that was acquired from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF program) was used as part of the design foundation. The power system, with a nominal output of -80 kV and 80 A, can supply a pair of gyrotrons with up to 10 second long pulses that may or may not be modulated. The modulator/regulator was designed about the BBC CKQ200-4 tetrode, which was the key component acquired from the LLNL program. In order to meet the performance goals of the program, substantial design modifications were needed to be made on the grid driver amplifier and the closed-loop feedback regulator circuits. Also, a newly designed crowbar switch system, featuring a high speed, thyratron-like triggered gas switch, was implemented. The modulator/regulator performance to date has been demonstrated as having <0.06% peak-to-peak ripple and square wave modulation of 50% amplitude at 2 kHz. The key features of the design of the power system and its performance will be presented in this paper.

  16. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Phoenix Refrigeration Systems, Inc.'s heat pipe addition to the Phoenix 2000, a supermarket rooftop refrigeration/air conditioning system, resulted from the company's participation in a field test of heat pipes. Originally developed by NASA to control temperatures in space electronic systems, the heat pipe is a simple, effective, heat transfer system. It has been used successfully in candy storage facilities where it has provided significant energy savings. Additional data is expected to fully quantify the impact of the heat pipes on supermarket air conditioning systems.

  17. REMOVAL OF TECHNETIUM 99 FROM THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) BASIN 44 USING PUROLITE A-530E & REILLEX HPQ & SYBRON IONAC SR-7 ION EXCHANGE RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB

    2004-10-29

    This report documents the laboratory testing and analyses as directed under the test plan, RPP-20407. The overall goal of this task was to evaluate and compare candidate anion exchange resins for their capacity to remove Technetium-99 from Basin 44 Reverse Osmosis reject stream. The candidate resins evaluated were Purolite A-530E, Reillex HPQ, and Sybron IONAC SR-7.

  18. Honey Lake Power Facility under construction

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    Geothermal energy and wood waste are primary energy sources for the 30 megawatt, net, Honey Lake Power Facility, a cogeneration power plant. The facility 60% completed in January 1989, will use 1,300 tons per day of fuel obtained from selective forest thinnings and from logging residue combined with mill wastes. The power plant will be the largest industrial facility to use some of Lassen County's geothermal resources. The facility will produce 236 million kilowatt-hours of electricity annually. The plant consists of a wood-fired traveling grate furnace with a utility-type high pressure boiler. Fluids from a geothermal well will pass through a heat exchange to preheat boiler feedwater. Used geothermal fluid will be disposed of in an injection well. Steam will be converted to electrical power through a 35.5-megawatt turbine generator and transmitted 22 miles to Susanville over company-owned and maintained transmission lines. The plant includes pollution control for particulate removal, ammonia injection for removal of nitrogen oxides, and computer-controlled combustion systems to control carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons. The highly automated wood yard consists of systems to remove metal, handle oversized material, receive up to six truck loads of wood products per hour, and continuously deliver 58 tons per hour of fuel through redundant systems to ensure maximum on-line performance. The plant is scheduled to become operational in mid-1989.

  19. Thulium-170 heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, C.E.; Van Konynenburg, R.; Van Sant, J.H.

    1992-01-21

    This patent describes an isotopic heat source. It comprises; at least one isotopic fuel stack, comprising alternating layers of: thulium oxide; and a low atomic weight diluent for thulium oxide; a heat block defining holes into which the fuel stacks can be placed; at least one heat pipe for heat removal, with the heat pipe being positioned in the heat block in thermal connection with the fuel stack; and a structural container surrounding the heat block.

  20. HIFiRE Direct-Connect Rig (HDCR) Phase I Scramjet Test Results from the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Karen; Hass, Neal; Storch, Andrea; Gruber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A series of hydrocarbon-fueled direct-connect scramjet ground tests has been completed in the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF) at simulated Mach 8 flight conditions. These experiments were part of an initial test phase to support Flight 2 of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) Program. In this flight experiment, a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet is intended to demonstrate transition from dual-mode to scramjet-mode operation and verify the scramjet performance prediction and design tools A performance goal is the achievement of a combusted fuel equivalence ratio greater than 0.7 while in scramjet mode. The ground test rig, designated the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR), is a full-scale, heat sink test article that duplicates both the flowpath lines and a majority of the instrumentation layout of the isolator and combustor portion of the flight test hardware. The primary objectives of the HDCR Phase I tests were to verify the operability of the HIFiRE isolator/combustor across the simulated Mach 6-8 flight regime and to establish a fuel distribution schedule to ensure a successful mode transition. Both of these objectives were achieved prior to the HiFIRE Flight 2 payload Critical Design Review. Mach 8 ground test results are presented in this report, including flowpath surface pressure distributions that demonstrate the operation of the flowpath in scramjet-mode over a small range of test conditions around the nominal Mach 8 simulation, as well as over a range of fuel equivalence ratios. Flowpath analysis using ground test data is presented elsewhere; however, limited comparisons with analytical predictions suggest that both scramjet-mode operation and the combustion performance objective are achieved at Mach 8 conditions.

  1. An Experimental Test Facility to Support Development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Aaron, Adam M; Cunningham, Richard Burns; Fugate, David L; Holcomb, David Eugene; Kisner, Roger A; Peretz, Fred J; Robb, Kevin R; Wilgen, John B; Wilson, Dane F

    2014-01-01

    The need for high-temperature (greater than 600 C) energy exchange and delivery systems is significantly increasing as the world strives to improve energy efficiency and develop alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. Liquid fluoride salts are one of the few energy transport fluids that have the capability of operating at high temperatures in combination with low system pressures. The Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor design uses fluoride salt to remove core heat and interface with a power conversion system. Although a significant amount of experimentation has been performed with these salts, specific aspects of this reactor concept will require experimental confirmation during the development process. The experimental facility described here has been constructed to support the development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor concept. The facility is capable of operating at up to 700 C and incorporates a centrifugal pump to circulate FLiNaK salt through a removable test section. A unique inductive heating technique is used to apply heat to the test section, allowing heat transfer testing to be performed. An air-cooled heat exchanger removes added heat. Supporting loop infrastructure includes a pressure control system; trace heating system; and a complement of instrumentation to measure salt flow, temperatures, and pressures around the loop. The initial experiment is aimed at measuring fluoride salt heat transfer inside a heated pebble bed similar to that used for the core of the pebble bed advanced high-temperature reactor. This document describes the details of the loop design, auxiliary systems used to support the facility, the inductive heating system, and facility capabilities.

  2. HIFiRE Direct-Connect Rig (HDCR) Phase I Ground Test Results from the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, Neal E.; Cabell, Karen F.; Storch, Andrea M.

    2010-01-01

    The initial phase of hydrocarbon-fueled ground tests supporting Flight 2 of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experiment (HIFiRE) Program has been conducted in the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF). The HIFiRE Program, an Air Force-lead international cooperative program includes eight different flight test experiments designed to target specific challenges of hypersonic flight. The second of the eight planned flight experiments is a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet flight test intended to demonstrate dual-mode to scramjet-mode operation and verify the scramjet performance prediction and design tools. A performance goal is the achievement of a combusted fuel equivalence ratio greater than 0.7 while in scramjet mode. The ground test rig, designated the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR), is a full-scale, heat sink, direct-connect ground test article that duplicates both the flowpath lines and the instrumentation layout of the isolator and combustor portion of the flight test hardware. The primary objectives of the HDCR Phase I tests are to verify the operability of the HIFiRE isolator/combustor across the Mach 6.0-8.0 flight regime and to establish a fuel distribution schedule to ensure a successful mode transition prior to the HiFIRE payload Critical Design Review. Although the phase I test plans include testing over the Mach 6 to 8 flight simulation range, only Mach 6 testing will be reported in this paper. Experimental results presented here include flowpath surface pressure, temperature, and heat flux distributions that demonstrate the operation of the flowpath over a small range of test conditions around the nominal Mach 6 simulation, as well as a range of fuel equivalence ratios and fuel injection distributions. Both ethylene and a mixture of ethylene and methane (planned for flight) were tested. Maximum back pressure and flameholding limits, as well as a baseline fuel schedule, that covers the Mach 5.84-6.5 test space have been

  3. Preparation of AgInS2 nanoparticles by a facile microwave heating technique; study of effective parameters, optical and photovoltaic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadjarodi, Azadeh; Cheshmekhavar, Amir Hossein; Imani, Mina

    2012-12-01

    In this work, AgInS2 (AIS) semiconductor nanoparticles were synthesized by an efficient and facile microwave heating technique using several sulfur sources and solvents in the different reaction times. The SEM images presented the particle morphology for all of the obtained products in the arranged reaction conditions. The particle size of 70 nm was obtained using thioacetamide (TAA), ethylene glycol (EG) as the sulfur source and solvent, respectively at the reaction time of 5 min. It was found that the change of the mentioned parameters lead to alter on the particle size of the resulting products. The average particle size was estimated using a microstructure measurement program and Minitab statistical software. The optical band gap energy of 1.96 eV for the synthesized AIS nanoparticles was determined by the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). AgInS2/CdS/CuInSe2 heterojunction solar cell was constructed and photovoltaic parameters, i.e., open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current (Jsc) and fill factor (FF) were estimated by photocurrent-voltage (I-V) curve. The calculated fill factor of 30% and energy conversion efficiency of 1.58% revealed the capability of AIS nanoparticles to use in the solar cell devices.

  4. Results of the first joint observations of EISCAT ionospheric heating facility signals at pumping frequency, observed at St.Petersburg and Irkutsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berngardt, Oleg; Abramov, Vladimir; Blagoveshchenskaya, Natalja; Kurkin, Vladimir

    The purpose of the work is to present the results of the first joint analysis of the spectral and amplitude characteristics of the signals, observed simultaneously at pumping frequency in St.Petersburg and Irkutsk during functioning of the EISCAT ionospheric heating facility (Tromso). The experiment was organized from October, 29 to November 6, 2009. ESICAT heater was operating mostly at 4040kHz in ordinary polarization mode. During the experiment November 3, 2009, which was used for more detailed analysis, the heater worked in power step-ping mode at 4912.8kHz. The specifics of the experiment is nearly orthogonal propagation in Tromso-St.Petersburg direction and in Tromso-Irkutsk direction, that allows us to diagnose the variations of the received signal characteristics over nearly orthogonal pathes. Long propaga-tion path Tromso-Irkutsk allows us to neglect direct signal from sidelobes of the heater during analysis of Irkutsk data. As a result of the joint observations an empirical dependence was found between amplitudes of maximum of the spectral power of the received signal at pumping frequency, measured in St.Petersburg and Irkutsk. It was shown that the dependence differs from the linear one and is close to the power low with exponent 0.5.

  5. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in the Surtsey Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.; Blanchat, T.K.; Griffith, R.O.; Nichols, R.T.

    1994-05-01

    The Surtsey Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is used to perform scaled experiments that simulate hypothetical high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effect of specific phenomena associated with direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load, such as the effect of physical scale, prototypic subcompartment structures, water in the cavity, and hydrogen generation and combustion. In the Integral Effects Test (IET) series, 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion NPP structures were constructed in the Surtsey vessel. The RPV was modeled with a steel pressure vessel that had a hemispherical bottom head, which had a 4-cm hole in the bottom head that simulated the final ablated hole that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe NPP accident. Iron/alumina/chromium thermite was used to simulate molten corium that would accumulate on the bottom head of an actual RPV. The chemically reactive melt simulant was ejected by high-pressure steam from the RPV model into the scaled reactor cavity. Debris was then entrained through the instrument tunnel into the subcompartment structures and the upper dome of the simulated reactor containment building. The results of the IET experiments are given in this report.

  6. An Integral Effects Test to investigate the effects of condensate levels of water and preexisting hydrogen on direct containment heating in the Surtsey Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M. ); Nichols, R.T. )

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses the seventh experiment of the Integral Effects Test (IET-7) series. The experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of preexisting hydrogen in the Surtsey vessel on direct containment heating. Scale models of the Zion reactor pressure vessel (RPV), cavity, instrument tunnel, and subcompartment structures were constructed in the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The RPV was modeled with a melt generator that consisted of a steel pressure barrier, a cast MgO crucible, and a thin steel inner liner. The melt generator/crucible had a hemispherical bottom head containing a graphite limitor plate with a 4-cm exit hole to simulate the ablated hole in the RPV bottom head that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe nuclear power plant accident. The cavity contained 3.48 kg of water, and the containment basement floor inside the cranewall contained 71 kg of water, which corresponds to scaled condensate levels in the Zion plant. A 43-kg initial charge of iron oxide/aluminum/chromium thermite was used to simulate corium debris on the bottom head of the RPV. Molten thermite was ejected by steam at an initial pressure of 5.9 MPa into the reactor cavity.

  7. Facile preparation of magnetic separable powdered-activated-carbon/Ni adsorbent and its application in removal of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xuanqi; Gondal, Mohammed A; Chang, Xiaofeng; Yamani, Zain H; Li, Nianwu; Lu, Hongling; Ji, Guangbin

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to synthesize magnetic separable Nickel/powdered activated carbon (Ni/PAC) and its application as an adsorbent for removal of PFOS from aqueous solution. In this work, the synthesized adsorbent using simple method was characterized by using X-ray diffractionometer (XRD), surface area and pore size analyzer, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The surface area, pore volume and pore size of synthesized PAC was 1521.8 m(2)g(-1), 0.96 cm(3)g(-1), 2.54 nm, respectively. Different kinetic models: the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, and three adsorption isotherms--Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin--were applied to study the sorption kinetics and isothermal behavior of PFOS onto the surface of an as-prepared adsorbent. The rate constant using the pseudo-second-order model for removal of 150 ppm PFOS was estimated as 8.82×10(-5) and 1.64×10(-4) for PAC and 40% Ni/PAC, respectively. Our results demonstrated that the composite adsorbents exhibited a clear magnetic hysteretic behavior, indicating the potential practical application in magnetic separation of adsorbents from aqueous solution phase as well. PMID:21961696

  8. Heat flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    A new automated, computer controlled heat flux measurement facility is described. Continuous transient and steady-state surface heat flux values varying from about 0.3 to 6 MW/sq m over a temperature range of 100 to 1200 K can be obtained in the facility. An application of this facility is the development of heat flux gauges for continuous fast transient surface heat flux measurement on turbine blades operating in space shuttle main engine turbopumps. The facility is useful for durability testing at fast temperature transients.

  9. Mercury control challenge for industrial boiler MACT affected facilities

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-15

    An industrial coal-fired boiler facility conducted a test program to evaluate the effectiveness of sorbent injection on mercury removal ahead of a fabric filter with an inlet flue gas temperature of 375{sup o}F. The results of the sorbent injection testing are essentially inconclusive relative to providing the facility with enough data upon which to base the design and implementation of permanent sorbent injection system(s). The mercury removal performance of the sorbents was significantly less than expected. The data suggests that 50 percent mercury removal across a baghouse with flue gas temperatures at or above 375{sup o}F and containing moderate levels of SO{sub 3} may be very difficult to achieve with activated carbon sorbent injection alone. The challenge many coal-fired industrial facilities may face is the implementation of additional measures beyond sorbent injection to achieve high levels of mercury removal that will likely be required by the upcoming new Industrial Boiler MACT rule. To counter the negative effects of high flue gas temperature on mercury removal with sorbents, it may be necessary to retrofit additional boiler heat transfer surface or spray cooling of the flue gas upstream of the baghouse. Furthermore, to counter the negative effect of moderate or high SO{sub 3} levels in the flue gas on mercury removal, it may be necessary to also inject sorbents, such as trona or hydrated lime, to reduce the SO{sub 3} concentrations in the flue gas. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Removal performance of elemental mercury by low-cost adsorbents prepared through facile methods of carbonisation and activation of coconut husk.

    PubMed

    Johari, Khairiraihanna; Alias, Afidatul Shazwani; Saman, Norasikin; Song, Shiow Tien; Mat, Hanapi

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of chars and activated carbon as low-cost elemental mercury adsorbents was carried out through the carbonisation of coconut husk (pith and fibre) and the activation of chars with potassium hydroxide (KOH), respectively. The synthesised adsorbents were characterised by using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. The elemental mercury removal performance was measured using a conventional flow type packed-bed adsorber. The physical and chemical properties of the adsorbents changed as a result of the carbonisation and activation process, hence affecting on the extent of elemental mercury adsorption. The highest elemental mercury (Hg°) adsorption capacity was obtained for the CP-CHAR (3142.57 µg g(-1)), which significantly outperformed the pristine and activated carbon adsorbents, as well as higher than some adsorbents reported in the literature.

  11. Removal performance of elemental mercury by low-cost adsorbents prepared through facile methods of carbonisation and activation of coconut husk.

    PubMed

    Johari, Khairiraihanna; Alias, Afidatul Shazwani; Saman, Norasikin; Song, Shiow Tien; Mat, Hanapi

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of chars and activated carbon as low-cost elemental mercury adsorbents was carried out through the carbonisation of coconut husk (pith and fibre) and the activation of chars with potassium hydroxide (KOH), respectively. The synthesised adsorbents were characterised by using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. The elemental mercury removal performance was measured using a conventional flow type packed-bed adsorber. The physical and chemical properties of the adsorbents changed as a result of the carbonisation and activation process, hence affecting on the extent of elemental mercury adsorption. The highest elemental mercury (Hg°) adsorption capacity was obtained for the CP-CHAR (3142.57 µg g(-1)), which significantly outperformed the pristine and activated carbon adsorbents, as well as higher than some adsorbents reported in the literature. PMID:25492720

  12. Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This section of the publication includes papers entitled: (1) Coupled growth in hypermonotectics; (2) Directional solidification of refined Al-4 wt.% Cu alloys; (3) Effects of convection on interface curvature during growth of concentrated ternary compounds; (4) Directional solidification of Al-1.5 wt.% Ni alloys; (5) Interactive response of advancing phase boundaries to particles; (6) INTeractive Response of Advancing Phase boundaries to Particles-INTRAPP; and (7) Particle engulfment and pushing by solidifying interfaces.

  13. Facile synthesis of BiOI in hierarchical nanostructure preparation and its photocatalytic application to organic dye removal and biocidal effect of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Long, Yang; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Dun; Ju, Peng; Sun, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Novel BiOI hierarchical nanostructures with porous architecture was prepared at room temperature by an economical, facile and rapid route. The coupling adsorption and degradation efficiency of rhodamine B (RhB), methylene blue (MB), and methyl orange (MO) could achieve 98.7%, 43.2%, 76.9% within 180min in the presence of BiOI, respectively. BiOI hierarchical nanostructures also exhibit excellent effective biocidal performances, and the disinfection rate of the typical biofouling bacteria Bacillus sp. and Pseudoalteromonas sp. could reach 99.9% and 99.8% in 60min, respectively. The circulate photocatalytic degradation of RhB experiment verified the good stability and reusability of BiOI hierarchical nanostructures. Based on active specie trapping experiments, the superoxide radicals (O2(-)) and holes (h(+)) were proved to be the main reactive species in the BiOI-based system. The obviously enhanced coupling adsorption and photocatalytic degradation performance of BiOI hierarchical nanostructures could be mainly attributed to the large surface area (64.5m(2)/g), negatively charged surface and the intrinsic electron structure. This study provides a new strategy to develop novel photocatalysts for water treatment and marine antifouling. PMID:27451034

  14. Facile water-stability evaluation of metal-organic frameworks and the property of selective removal of dyes from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhao-Peng; Yang, Ji-Min; Kang, Yan-Shang; Guo, Fan; Sun, Wei-Yin

    2016-06-01

    A facile and universal method was developed to evaluate the relative water stability of porous MOFs and morphological evolution was achieved by controlling the volume ratio of DMF and H2O. The relative water stability of the studied MOFs is in the order HKUST-1 > MOF-505 ∼ UMCM-150 > NOTT-101 > DUT-23(Cu) > [Zn2(BPnDC)2(DABCO)] ∼ [Cu3(TPTrC)2(DABCO)] > MOF-5. In addition, DUT-23(Cu) [Cu6(BTB)4(BPY)3] (H3BTB = 4,4',4''-benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tribenzoic acid, BPY = 4,4'-bipyridine) nanoparticles obtained with a volume ratio of DMF and H2O of 18 : 2 show excellent adsorption capacity for methylene blue (MB) (814 mg g(-1)) with high selectivity compared with methyl orange, rhodamine B, and acid chrome blue K dyes due to the size and the electrostatic repulsion effects in aqueous solution. PMID:27139895

  15. Facile synthesis of BiOI in hierarchical nanostructure preparation and its photocatalytic application to organic dye removal and biocidal effect of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Long, Yang; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Dun; Ju, Peng; Sun, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Novel BiOI hierarchical nanostructures with porous architecture was prepared at room temperature by an economical, facile and rapid route. The coupling adsorption and degradation efficiency of rhodamine B (RhB), methylene blue (MB), and methyl orange (MO) could achieve 98.7%, 43.2%, 76.9% within 180min in the presence of BiOI, respectively. BiOI hierarchical nanostructures also exhibit excellent effective biocidal performances, and the disinfection rate of the typical biofouling bacteria Bacillus sp. and Pseudoalteromonas sp. could reach 99.9% and 99.8% in 60min, respectively. The circulate photocatalytic degradation of RhB experiment verified the good stability and reusability of BiOI hierarchical nanostructures. Based on active specie trapping experiments, the superoxide radicals (O2(-)) and holes (h(+)) were proved to be the main reactive species in the BiOI-based system. The obviously enhanced coupling adsorption and photocatalytic degradation performance of BiOI hierarchical nanostructures could be mainly attributed to the large surface area (64.5m(2)/g), negatively charged surface and the intrinsic electron structure. This study provides a new strategy to develop novel photocatalysts for water treatment and marine antifouling.

  16. Investigations into the sources and removal of taste and odor compounds at two treatment facilities on Eastern Lake Erie and Niagara River

    SciTech Connect

    Wittmeyer, S.; Cap, R.; Lange, C.; Carder, S.

    1996-11-01

    Taste and odor problems in drinking water supplies have been a topic of research since the early 1900`s. Studies have identified various taste and odor compounds, including methyl-iso-borneol (MIB), geosmin, trichloranisole, and their potential sources, to include the phytoplankton genera Aphanizomenon, Anabaena, Microcystis, and Dinobryon. Many methods of treatment have been investigated to mitigate taste and odors, including the addition of copper sulfate and various chemical oxidants, as well as the introduction of bacteria capable of metabolizing oil-like organic compounds. Taste and odor problems associated with drinking water supplies have become increasingly important, in part because public awareness of water quality issues such as chlorine and associated disinfection byproducts, and the perception that malodorous water may be associated with pathogens such as the infectious Cryptosporidium parvum. Due to marked increases in customer complaints beginning in 1993, and elevated levels of the taste and odor compounds. MIB and geosmin, in eastern Lake Erie and the Niagara River, the Erie County Water Authority (ECWA) initiated an investigation into the impact of MIB and geosmin on water quality, assessment of various means of effective removal, and potential sources.

  17. Facile synthesis of efficient visible active C-doped TiO{sub 2} nanomaterials with high surface area for the simultaneous removal of phenol and Cr(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, A.Daya; Reddy, P.Manoj Kumar; Srinivaas, M.; Ghosal, P.; Xanthopoulos, N.; Subrahmanyam, Ch.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Facile synthesis of C-doped TiO{sub 2} nanomaterials with high surface area. • Utilization of citric acid and ascorbic acid as fuels based on evolution of gases. • Enhanced visible activity for the oxidation of phenol and reduction of Cr(VI). • Study of simultaneous oxidation of phenol and reduction of Cr(VI) for the first time. • Proposed plausible mechanism for the simultaneous removal of phenol and Cr(VI). - Abstract: A single step synthesis of carbon doped TiO{sub 2} (anatase) nanomaterials have been reported by using combustion synthesis using ascorbic acid and citric acid fuels. X-ray diffraction studies indicated the formation of nanosized anatase titania, whereas, transmission electron microscopy confirmed the formation of nanosized TiO{sub 2} anatase. The carbon doping into TiO{sub 2} matrix was identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, whereas, thermogravimetric study quantified the carbon doping. Diffuse reflectance UV–vis spectra indicated the band gap of less than 3 eV, a prerequisite for the photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation. The N{sub 2} adsorption studies revealed the high surface area (upto 290 m{sup 2}/g) of the synthesized photocatalysts. Typical photocatalytic activity data indicated that the simultaneous removal of Cr(VI) and phenol is advantageous than degradation of the individual pollutants.

  18. Facile method for the synthesis of a magnetic CNTs-C@Fe-chitosan composite and its application in tetracycline removal from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Zhuang, Yuan; Yu, Fei

    2015-06-28

    A magnetic CNTs-C@Fe-chitosan composite (CNTs-C@Fe-CS) was prepared based on as-prepared carbon nanotubes (APCNTs). The metal nanoparticles in APCNTs could be utilized directly without any purification treatment, and the carbon shells provide an effective barrier against oxidation, acid dissolution, and movement of the MNPs, thus ensuring the long-term stability of CNTs-C@Fe-CS. The results showed that CNTs-C@Fe-CS contained more abundant oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups after chitosan modification and the composite had good magnetization characteristics, even in acidic solutions. Then CNTs-C@Fe-CS was used as an adsorbent for the removal of tetracycline from aqueous solutions. Adsorption experiments indicated that CNTs-C@Fe-CS have a good adsorption capacity (qe) of tetracycline (104 mg g(-1)). The Freundlich isotherm model fitted the experimental data better than the Langmuir isotherm model. Kinetic regression results showed that the adsorption kinetics was more accurately represented by a pseudo second-order model. Intra-particle diffusion was involved in the adsorption, but it was not the only rate-controlling step. Cu(2+) and humic acid could promote the adsorption of tetracycline on CNTs-C@Fe-CS. The CNTs-C@Fe-CS adsorbents could be effectively and quickly separated by applying an external magnetic field and the adsorption capacity was still maintained at 99.3 mg g(-1) after being used 10 times. Therefore, CNTs-C@Fe-CS is a promising magnetic nanomaterial for preconcentration and separation of organic pollutants for environmental remediation. PMID:26023730

  19. National RF Test Facility as a multipurpose development tool

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, T.J.; Becraft, W.R.; Berry, L.A.; Blue, C.W.; Gardner, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Loring, C.M. Jr.; Moeller, F.A.; Ponte, N.S.

    1983-01-01

    Additions and modifications to the National RF Test Facility design have been made that (1) focus its use for technology development for future large systems in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), (2) expand its applicability to technology development in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies (ECRF) at 60 GHz, (3) provide a facility for ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) 60-GHz ring physics studies, and (4) permit engineering studies of steady-state plasma systems, including superconducting magnet performance, vacuum vessel heat flux removal, and microwave protection. The facility will continue to function as a test bed for generic technology developments for ICRF and the lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF). The upgraded facility is also suitable for mirror halo physics experiments.

  20. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. An Integral Effects Test in a zion-like geometry to investigate the effects of pre-existing hydrogen on direct containment heating in the Surtsey Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M. ); Nichols, R.T. )

    1993-01-01

    The sixth experiment of the Integral Effects Test (IET-6) series was conducted to investigate the effects of high pressure melt ejection on direct containment heating. Scale models of the Zion reactor pressure vessel (RPV), cavity, instrument tunnel, and subcompartment structures were constructed in the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The RPV was modeled with a melt generator that consisted of a steel pressure barrier, a cast MgO crucible, and a thin steel inner liner. The melt generator/crucible had a hemispherical bottom head containing a graphite limitor plate with a 4-cm exit hole to simulate the ablated hole in the RPV bottom head that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe nuclear power plant accident. The cavity contained 3.48 kg of water, which corresponds to condensate levels in the Zion plant, and the containment basement floor was dry. A 43-kg initial charge of iron oxide/aluminum/chromium thermite was used to simulate corium debris on the bottom head of the RPV. Molten thermite was ejected by steam at an initial pressure of 6.3 MPa into the reactor cavity. The Surtsey vessel atmosphere contained pre-existing hydrogen to represent partial oxidation of the zirconium in the Zion core. The initial composition of the vessel atmosphere was 87.1 mol.% N[sub 2], 9.79 mol.% O[sub 2], and 2.59 mol.% H[sub 2], and the initial absolute pressure was 198 kPa. A partial hydrogen burn occurred in the Surtsey vessel. The peak vessel pressure increase was 279 kPa in IET-6, compared to 246 kPa in the IET-3 test. The total debris mass ejected into the Surtsey vessel in IET-6 was 42.5 kg. The gas grab sample analysis indicated that there were 180 g[center dot] moles of pre-existing hydrogen, and that 308[center dot]moles of hydrogen were produced by steam/metal reactions. About 335 g[center dot]moles of hydrogen burned, and 153 g[center dot]moles remained unreacted.

  2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of the oxide removal mechanism of GaAs /100/ molecular beam epitaxial substrates in in situ heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Lewis, B. F.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    A standard cleaning procedure for GaAs (100) molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) substrates is a chemical treatment with a solution of H2SO4/H2O2/H2O, followed by in situ heating prior to MBE growth. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) studies of the surface following the chemical treatment show that the oxidized As is primarily As(+ 5). Upon heating to low temperatures (less than (350 C) the As(+ 5) oxidizes the substrate to form Ga2O3 and elemental As, and the As(+ 5) is reduced to As(+ 3) in the process. At higher temperatures (500 C), the As(+ 3) and elemental As desorb, while the Ga(+ 3) begins desorbing at about 600 C.

  3. Thermal-hydraulic simulation of natural convection decay heat removal in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using RELAP5 and TEMPEST: Part 2, Interpretation and validation of results

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, A.E.; Morris, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    The RELAP5/MOD2 code was used to predict the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the HFIR core during decay heat removal through boiling natural circulation. The low system pressure and low mass flux values associated with boiling natural circulation are far from conditions for which RELAP5 is well exercised. Therefore, some simple hand calculations are used herein to establish the physics of the results. The interpretation and validation effort is divided between the time average flow conditions and the time varying flow conditions. The time average flow conditions are evaluated using a lumped parameter model and heat balance. The Martinelli-Nelson correlations are used to model the two-phase pressure drop and void fraction vs flow quality relationship within the core region. Systems of parallel channels are susceptible to both density wave oscillations and pressure drop oscillations. Periodic variations in the mass flux and exit flow quality of individual core channels are predicted by RELAP5. These oscillations are consistent with those observed experimentally and are of the density wave type. The impact of the time varying flow properties on local wall superheat is bounded herein. The conditions necessary for Ledinegg flow excursions are identified. These conditions do not fall within the envelope of decay heat levels relevant to HFIR in boiling natural circulation. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Thermal energy storage test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ternes, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal behavior of prototype thermal energy storage units (TES) in both heating and cooling modes is determined. Improved and advanced storage systems are developed and performance standards are proposed. The design and construction of a thermal cycling facility for determining the thermal behavior of full scale TES units is described. The facility has the capability for testing with both liquid and air heat transport, at variable heat input/extraction rates, over a temperature range of 0 to 280 F.

  5. New electron beam facility for irradiated plasma facing materials testing in hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, N.; Kawamura, H.; Akiba, M.

    1995-09-01

    Since plasma facing components such as the first wall and the divertor for the next step fusion reactors are exposed to high heat loads and high energy neutron flux generated by the plasma, it is urgent to develop of plasma facing components which can resist these. Then, we have established electron beam heat facility ({open_quotes}OHBIS{close_quotes}, Oarai Hot-cell electron Beam Irradiating System) at a hot cell in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) hot laboratory in order to estimate thermal shock resistivity of plasma facing materials and heat removal capabilities of divertor elements under steady state heating. In this facility, irradiated plasma facing materials (beryllium, carbon based materials and so on) and divertor elements can be treated. This facility consists of an electron beam unit with the maximum beam power of 50kW and the vacuum vessel. The acceleration voltage and the maximum beam current are 30kV (constant) and 1.7A, respectively. The loading time of electron beam is more than 0.1ms. The shape of vacuum vessel is cylindrical, and the mainly dimensions are 500mm in inner diameter, 1000mm in height. The ultimate vacuum of this vessel is 1 x 10{sup -4}Pa. At present, the facility for thermal shock test has been established in a hot cell. And performance estimation on the electron beam is being conducted. Presently, the devices for heat loading tests under steady state will be added to this facility.

  6. 9 CFR 3.26 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.26 Facilities, indoor. (a) Heating. Indoor housing facilities for guinea pigs or hamsters shall be sufficiently heated when necessary to protect the... pigs or hamsters shall be adequately ventilated to provide for the health and comfort of the animals...

  7. 9 CFR 3.26 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.26 Facilities, indoor. (a) Heating. Indoor housing facilities for guinea pigs or hamsters shall be sufficiently heated when necessary to protect the... pigs or hamsters shall be adequately ventilated to provide for the health and comfort of the animals...

  8. 9 CFR 3.26 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.26 Facilities, indoor. (a) Heating. Indoor housing facilities for guinea pigs or hamsters shall be sufficiently heated when necessary to protect the... pigs or hamsters shall be adequately ventilated to provide for the health and comfort of the animals...

  9. 9 CFR 3.26 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.26 Facilities, indoor. (a) Heating. Indoor housing facilities for guinea pigs or hamsters shall be sufficiently heated when necessary to protect the... pigs or hamsters shall be adequately ventilated to provide for the health and comfort of the animals...

  10. Effect of steam generator configuration in a loss of the RHR during mid-loop operation at PKL facility

    SciTech Connect

    Villanueva, J. F.; Carlos, S.; Martorell, S.; Sanchez, F.

    2012-07-01

    The loss of the residual heat removal system in mid-loop conditions may occur with a non-negligible contribution to the plant risk, so the analysis of the accidental sequences and the actions to mitigate the accident are of great interest in shutdown conditions. In order to plan the appropriate measures to mitigate the accident is necessary to understand the thermal-hydraulic processes following the loss of the residual heat removal system during shutdown. Thus, transients of this kind have been simulated using best-estimate codes in different integral test facilities and compared with experimental data obtained in different facilities. In PKL (Primaerkreislauf-Versuchsanlage, primary coolant loop test facility) test facility different series of experiments have been undertaken to analyze the plant response in shutdown. In this context, the E3 and F2 series consist of analyzing the loss of the residual heat removal system with a reduced inventory in the primary system. In particular, the experiments were developed to investigate the influence of the steam generators secondary side configuration on the plant response, what involves the consideration of different number of steam generators filled with water and ready for activation, on the heat transfer mechanisms inside the steam generators U-tubes. This work presents the results of such experiments calculated using, RELAP5/Mod 3.3. (authors)

  11. ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 7. Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility experimental data report for test series 3. 07. 9 - steady-state film boiling in upflow

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.

    1982-05-01

    Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) test series 3.07.9 was conducted by members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pressurized-Water Reactor (ORNL-PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer (BDHT) Separate-Effects Program on September 11, September 18, and October 1, 1980. The objective of the program is to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWRs during accidents, including small- and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test series 3.07.9 was designed to provide steady-state film boiling data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. This report presents the reduced instrument responses for THTF test series 3.07.9. Also included are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

  12. An assessment of RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 condensation heat transfer modeling with GIRAFFE heat transfer tests

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, B.D.; Parlatan, Y.; Slovik, G.C.

    1995-09-01

    RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 is being used to simulate Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) for the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) being proposed by General Electric (GE). One of the major components associated with the SBWR is the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) which provides the long-term heat sink to reject decay heat. The RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 code is being assessed for its ability to represent accurately the PCCS. Data from the Phase 1, Step 1 Heat Transfer Tests performed at Toshiba`s Gravity-Driven Integral Full-Height Test for Passive Heat Removal (GIRAFFE) facility will be used for assessing the ability of RELAP5 to model condensation in the presence of noncondensables. The RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 condensation model uses the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) correlation developed by Vierow and Schrock. The RELAP5 code uses this heat transfer coefficient with the gas velocity effect multiplier being limited to 2. This heat transfer option was used to analyze the condensation heat transfer in the GIRAFFE PCCS heat exchanger tubes in the Phase 1, Step 1 Heat Transfer Tests which were at a pressure of 3 bar and had a range of nitrogen partial pressure fractions from 0.0 to 0.10. The results of a set of RELAP5 calculations at these conditions were compared with the GIRAFFE data. The effects of PCCS cell noding on the heat transfer process were also studied. The UCB correlation, as implemented in RELAP5, predicted the heat transfer to {plus_minus}5% of the data with a three--node model. The three-node model has a large cell in the entrance region which smeared out the entrance effects on the heat transfer, which tend to overpredict the condensation. Hence, the UCB correlation predicts condensation heat transfer correlation implemented in the code must be removed to allow for accurate calculations with smaller cell sizes.

  13. Geothermal heating

    SciTech Connect

    Aureille, M.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of the study is to demonstrate the viability of geothermal heating projects in energy and economic terms and to provide nomograms from which an initial estimate may be made without having to use data-processing facilities. The effect of flow rate and temperature of the geothermal water on drilling and on the network, and the effect of climate on the type of housing are considered.

  14. Condensation in horizontal heat exchanger tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Leyer, S.; Zacharias, T.; Maisberger, F.; Lamm, M.; Vallee, C.; Beyer, M.; Hampel, U.

    2012-07-01

    Many innovative reactor concepts for Generation III nuclear power plants use passive safety equipment for residual heat removal. These systems use two phase natural circulation. Heat transfer to the coolant results in a density difference providing the driving head for the required mass flow. By balancing the pressure drop the system finds its operational mode. Therefore the systems depend on a strong link between heat transfer and pressure drop determining the mass flow through the system. In order to be able to analyze these kind of systems with the help of state of the art computer codes the implemented numerical models for heat transfer, pressure drop or two phase flow structure must be able to predict the system performance in a wide parameter range. Goal of the program is to optimize the numerical models and therefore the performance of computer codes analyzing passive systems. Within the project the heat transfer capacity of a heat exchanger tube will be investigated. Therefore the tube will be equipped with detectors, both temperature and pressure, in several directions perpendicular to the tube axis to be able to resolve the angular heat transfer. In parallel the flow structure of a two phase flow inside and along the tube will be detected with the help of x-ray tomography. The water cooling outside of the tube will be realized by forced convection. It will be possible to combine the flow structure measurement with an angular resolved heat transfer for a wide parameter range. The test rig is set up at the TOPLFOW facility at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), so that it will be possible to vary the pressure between 5 and 70 bar. The steam mass content will be varied between 0 and 100 percent. The results will be compared to the large scaled Emergency Condenser Tests performed at the INKA test facility in Karlstein (Germany). The paper will explain the test setup and the status of the project will be presented. (authors)

  15. Tick removal.

    PubMed

    Roupakias, S; Mitsakou, P; Nimer, A Al

    2011-03-01

    Ticks are blood feeding external parasites which can cause local and systemic complications to human body. A lot of tick-borne human diseases include Lyme disease and virus encephalitis, can be transmitted by a tick bite. Also secondary bacterial skin infection, reactive manifestations against tick allergens, and granuloma's formation can be occurred. Tick paralysis is a relatively rare complication but it can be fatal. Except the general rules for tick bite prevention, any tick found should be immediately and completely removed alive. Furthermore, the tick removal technique should not allow or provoke the escape of infective body fluids through the tick into the wound site, and disclose any local complication. Many methods of tick removal (a lot of them are unsatisfactory and/or dangerous) have been reported in the literature, but there is very limited experimental evidence to support these methods. No technique will remove completely every tick. So, there is not an appropriate and absolutely effective and/or safe tick removal technique. Regardless of the used tick removal technique, clinicians should be aware of the clinical signs of tick-transmitted diseases, the public should be informed about the risks and the prevention of tick borne diseases, and persons who have undergone tick removal should be monitored up to 30 days for signs and symptoms. PMID:21710824

  16. KKG Group Paraffin Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Ralph

    2001-12-01

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of a paraffin removal system developed by the KKG Group utilizing the technology of two Russian scientists, Gennady Katzyn and Boris Koggi. The system consisting of chemical ''sticks'' that generate heat in-situ to melt the paraffin deposits in oilfield tubing. The melted paraffin is then brought to the surface utilizing the naturally flowing energy of the well.

  17. Steam turbine: Alternative emergency drive for the secure removal of residual heat from the core of light water reactors in ultimate emergency situation

    SciTech Connect

    Souza Dos Santos, R.

    2012-07-01

    In 2011 the nuclear power generation has suffered an extreme probation. That could be the meaning of what happened in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants. In those plants, an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale was recorded. The quake intensity was above the trip point of shutting down the plants. Since heat still continued to be generated, the procedure to cooling the reactor was started. One hour after the earthquake, a tsunami rocked the Fukushima shore, degrading all cooling system of plants. Since the earthquake time, the plant had lost external electricity, impacting the pumping working, drive by electric engine. When operable, the BWR plants responded the management of steam. However, the lack of electricity had degraded the plant maneuvers. In this paper we have presented a scheme to use the steam as an alternative drive to maintain operable the cooling system of nuclear power plant. This scheme adds more reliability and robustness to the cooling systems. Additionally, we purposed a solution to the cooling in case of lacking water for the condenser system. In our approach, steam driven turbines substitute electric engines in the ultimate emergency cooling system. (authors)

  18. The small heat shock protein B8 (HSPB8) confers resistance to bortezomib by promoting autophagic removal of misfolded proteins in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Mohamed-Amine; Belhacene, Nathalie; Puissant, Alexandre; Colosetti, Pascal; Robert, Guillaume; Jacquel, Arnaud; Mari, Bernard; Auberger, Patrick; Luciano, Frederic

    2014-08-15

    Velcade is one of the inescapable drug to treat patient suffering from multiple myeloma (MM) and resistance to this drug represents a major drawback for patients. However, the mechanisms underlying velcade resistance remain incompletely understood. We derived several U266 MM cell clones that resist to velcade. U266-resistant cells were resistant to velcade-induced cell death but exhibited a similar sensitivity to various proapoptotic stimuli. Careful analysis of proteosomal subunits and proteasome enzymatic activities showed that neither the composition nor the activity of the proteasome was affected in velcade-resistant cells. Elimination of velcade-induced poly-ubiquitinated proteins and protein aggregates was drastically stimulated in the resistant cells and correlated with increased cell survival. Inhibition of the lysosomal activity in velcade-resistant cells resulted in an increase of cell aggregates and decrease survival, indicating that aggregates are eliminated through lysosomal degradation. In addition, pangenomic profiling of velcade-sensitive and resistant cells showed that the small heat shock protein HSPB8 was overexpressed in resistant cells. Finally, gain and loss of function experiment demonstrated that HSPB8 is a key factor for velcade resistance. In conclusion, HSPB8 plays an important role for the elimination of aggregates in velcade-resistant cells that contributes to their enhanced survival.

  19. Radiation detector system having heat pipe based cooling

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Saveliev, Valeri D.; Barkan, Shaul

    2006-10-31

    A radiation detector system having a heat pipe based cooling. The radiation detector system includes a radiation detector thermally coupled to a thermo electric cooler (TEC). The TEC cools down the radiation detector, whereby heat is generated by the TEC. A heat removal device dissipates the heat generated by the TEC to surrounding environment. A heat pipe has a first end thermally coupled to the TEC to receive the heat generated by the TEC, and a second end thermally coupled to the heat removal device. The heat pipe transfers the heat generated by the TEC from the first end to the second end to be removed by the heat removal device.

  20. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Joseph C.

    1982-01-01

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  1. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  2. 9 CFR 3.51 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Facilities, indoor. 3.51 Section 3.51 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.51 Facilities, indoor. (a) Heating. Indoor housing facilities...

  3. 9 CFR 3.102 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... changes in air and water temperatures shall be avoided. (b) Ventilation. Indoor housing facilities shall... Marine Mammals Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.102 Facilities, indoor. (a) Ambient temperature. The air and water temperatures in indoor facilities shall be sufficiently regulated by heating...

  4. Tick removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... are small, insect-like creatures that live in woods and fields. They attach to you as you ... your clothes and skin often while in the woods. After returning home: Remove your clothes. Look closely ...

  5. Tattoo removal.

    PubMed

    Adatto, Maurice A; Halachmi, Shlomit; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Over 50,000 new tattoos are placed each year in the United States. Studies estimate that 24% of American college students have tattoos and 10% of male American adults have a tattoo. The rising popularity of tattoos has spurred a corresponding increase in tattoo removal. Not all tattoos are placed intentionally or for aesthetic reasons though. Traumatic tattoos due to unintentional penetration of exogenous pigments can also occur, as well as the placement of medical tattoos to mark treatment boundaries, for example in radiation therapy. Protocols for tattoo removal have evolved over history. The first evidence of tattoo removal attempts was found in Egyptian mummies, dated to have lived 4,000 years BC. Ancient Greek writings describe tattoo removal with salt abrasion or with a paste containing cloves of white garlic mixed with Alexandrian cantharidin. With the advent of Q-switched lasers in the late 1960s, the outcomes of tattoo removal changed radically. In addition to their selective absorption by the pigment, the extremely short pulse duration of Q-switched lasers has made them the gold standard for tattoo removal.

  6. Tattoo removal.

    PubMed

    Adatto, Maurice A; Halachmi, Shlomit; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Over 50,000 new tattoos are placed each year in the United States. Studies estimate that 24% of American college students have tattoos and 10% of male American adults have a tattoo. The rising popularity of tattoos has spurred a corresponding increase in tattoo removal. Not all tattoos are placed intentionally or for aesthetic reasons though. Traumatic tattoos due to unintentional penetration of exogenous pigments can also occur, as well as the placement of medical tattoos to mark treatment boundaries, for example in radiation therapy. Protocols for tattoo removal have evolved over history. The first evidence of tattoo removal attempts was found in Egyptian mummies, dated to have lived 4,000 years BC. Ancient Greek writings describe tattoo removal with salt abrasion or with a paste containing cloves of white garlic mixed with Alexandrian cantharidin. With the advent of Q-switched lasers in the late 1960s, the outcomes of tattoo removal changed radically. In addition to their selective absorption by the pigment, the extremely short pulse duration of Q-switched lasers has made them the gold standard for tattoo removal. PMID:21865802

  7. The Maintenance of Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning Systems and Indoor Air Quality in Schools: A Guide for School Facility Managers. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Arthur E.

    To help maintain good indoor air quality (IAQ) in schools, guidance for the development and implementation of an effective program for maintenance and operation of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are discussed. Frequently, a building's occupants will complain about IAQ when the temperature or humidity are at uncomfortable…

  8. 30 CFR 75.1712-3 - Minimum requirements of surface bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities. 75.1712-3 Section 75.1712-3 Mineral Resources MINE... facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities. (a) All bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities shall be provided with adequate light, heat, and ventilation so as to maintain...

  9. Advanced Coating Removal Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Jon

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the repair and protection against corrosion damage is the safe removal of the oxidation and protective coatings without further damaging the integrity of the substrate. Two such methods that are proving to be safe and effective in this task are liquid nitrogen and laser removal operations. Laser technology used for the removal of protective coatings is currently being researched and implemented in various areas of the aerospace industry. Delivering thousands of focused energy pulses, the laser ablates the coating surface by heating and dissolving the material applied to the substrate. The metal substrate will reflect the laser and redirect the energy to any remaining protective coating, thus preventing any collateral damage the substrate may suffer throughout the process. Liquid nitrogen jets are comparable to blasting with an ultra high-pressure water jet but without the residual liquid that requires collection and removal .As the liquid nitrogen reaches the surface it is transformed into gaseous nitrogen and reenters the atmosphere without any contamination to surrounding hardware. These innovative technologies simplify corrosion repair by eliminating hazardous chemicals and repetitive manual labor from the coating removal process. One very significant advantage is the reduction of particulate contamination exposure to personnel. With the removal of coatings adjacent to sensitive flight hardware, a benefit of each technique for the space program is that no contamination such as beads, water, or sanding residue is left behind when the job is finished. One primary concern is the safe removal of coatings from thin aluminum honeycomb face sheet. NASA recently conducted thermal testing on liquid nitrogen systems and found that no damage occurred on 1/6", aluminum substrates. Wright Patterson Air Force Base in conjunction with Boeing and NASA is currently testing the laser remOval technique for process qualification. Other applications of liquid

  10. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, C.P.

    1989-12-31

    This is a brief report about a Sandia National Laboratory facility which can provide high-thermal flux for simulation of nuclear thermal flash, measurements of the effects of aerodynamic heating on radar transmission, etc

  11. Preliminary conceptual design for geothermal space heating conversion of school district 50 joint facilities at Pagosa Springs, Colorado. GTA report no. 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engen, I. A.

    1981-11-01

    This feasibility study and preliminary conceptual design effect assesses the conversion of a high school and gym, and a middle school building to geothermal space heating is assessed. A preliminary cost benefit assessment made on the basis of estimated costs for conversion, system maintenance, debt service, resource development, electricity to power pumps, and savings from from reduced natural gas consumption concluded that an economic conversion depended on development of an adequate geothermal resource (approximately 1500F, 400 gpm). Material selection assumed that the geothermal water to the main supply system was isolated to minimize effects of corrosion and deposition, and that system compatible components are used for the building modifications. Asbestos cement distribution pipe, a stainless steel heat exchanger, and stainless steel lined valves were recommended for the supply, heat transfer, and disposal mechanisms, respectively. A comparison of the calculated average gas consumption cost, escalated at 10% per year, with conversion project cost, both in 1977 dollars, showed that the project could be amortized over less than 20 years at current interest rates.

  12. Enhanced coagulation for arsenic removal

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.C.; Liang, S.; Wang, H.C.; Beuhler, M.D. )

    1994-09-01

    The possible use of enhanced coagulation for arsenic removal was examined at the facilities of a California utility in 1992 and 1993. The tests were conducted at bench, pilot, and demonstration scales, with two source waters. Alum and ferric chloride, with cationic polymer, were investigated at various influence arsenic concentrations. The investigators concluded that for the source waters tested, enhanced coagulation could be effective for arsenic removal and that less ferric chloride than alum, on a weight basis, is needed to achieve the same removal.

  13. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  14. Features of the Electromagnetic and Plasma Disturbances Induced at the Altitudes of the Earth's Outer Ionosphere by Modification of the Ionospheric F 2 Region Using High-Power Radio Waves Radiated by the SURA Heating Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. L.; Rapoport, V. O.; Schorokhova, E. A.; Belov, A. S.; Parrot, M.; Rauch, J.-L.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we systematize the results of studying the characteristics of the plasma-density ducts, which was conducted in 2005-2010 during the DEMETER-satellite operation. The ducts are formed at altitudes of about 700 km as a result of the ionospheric F 2 region modification by high-power high-frequency radio waves radiated by the midlatitude SURA heating facility. All the performed measurements are used as the basis for determining the formation conditions for such ducts, the duct characteristics are studied, and the opportunities for the duct influence on the ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling and propagation of radio waves of various frequency ranges are demonstrated. The results of numerical simulation of the formation of such ducts are presented.

  15. STAR facility tritium accountancy

    SciTech Connect

    Pawelko, R. J.; Sharpe, J. P.; Denny, B. J.

    2008-07-15

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5 g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed. (authors)

  16. STAR Facility Tritium Accountancy

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Pawelko; J. P. Sharpe; B. J. Denny

    2007-09-01

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed.

  17. Method of making thermally removable polymeric encapsulants

    DOEpatents

    Small, James H.; Loy, Douglas A.; Wheeler, David R.; McElhanon, James R.; Saunders, Randall S.

    2001-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable encapsulant by heating a mixture of at least one bis(maleimide) compound and at least one monomeric tris(furan) or tetrakis(furan) compound at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a gel and cooling the gel to form the thermally-removable encapsulant. The encapsulant can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C., preferably in a polar solvent. The encapsulant can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the encapsulant for component repair, modification or quality control.

  18. Investigations in gallium removal

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, C.V.; Pitt, W.W.; Beard, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    Gallium present in weapons plutonium must be removed before it can be used for the production of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear reactor fuel. The main goal of the preliminary studies conducted at Texas A and M University was to assist in the development of a thermal process to remove gallium from a gallium oxide/plutonium oxide matrix. This effort is being conducted in close consultation with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel involved in the development of this process for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Simple experiments were performed on gallium oxide, and cerium-oxide/gallium-oxide mixtures, heated to temperatures ranging from 700--900 C in a reducing environment, and a method for collecting the gallium vapors under these conditions was demonstrated.

  19. Assessing the potential for increased capacity of combined heat and power facilities based on available corn stover and forest logging residue in Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Selvarani

    The amount of available biomass feedstock and associated cost components were analyzed to determine the potential increase in energy capacity of two existing combined heat and power plants in Mississippi. The amount of corn stover and forest logging residue within a 10-mile radius can satisfy the existing requirements of CHP plants in Scott (1 MW) and Washington counties (5 MW). Transporting feedstock within a smaller source area had lower transportation costs, but higher total unit cost than the two other source buffer scenarios. However, capital costs associated with higher plant capacities were significantly higher and plant expansion may not be economically advantageous. Increasing the CHP capacity from 1 MW to 2 MW in Scott county and 5 MW to 10 MW in Washington county might be a sustainable approach by drawing feedstock from a smaller area and at lower utilization rates, while keeping transportation costs low.

  20. Condensate-removal device for heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trusch, R. B.; Oconnor, E. W.

    1973-01-01

    Device comprises array of perforated tubes manifolded together and connected to a vacuum suction device. Vacuum applied to these tubes pulls mixture of condensate and effluent gas through perforations and along length of tubes to discharge device. Discharge device may be a separator which separates water vapor from effluent air and allows recirculation of both of them.

  1. Hot Oil Removes Wax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzstock, James J.

    1991-01-01

    Mineral oil heated to temperature of 250 degrees F (121 degrees C) found effective in removing wax from workpieces after fabrication. Depending upon size and shape of part to be cleaned of wax, part immersed in tank of hot oil, and/or interior of part flushed with hot oil. Pump, fittings, and ancillary tooling built easily for this purpose. After cleaning, innocuous oil residue washed off part by alkaline aqueous degreasing process. Serves as relatively safe alternative to carcinogenic and environmentally hazardous solvent perchloroethylene.

  2. Economically dispatching cogeneration facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, E.

    1996-05-01

    Economic dispatching has been used by utilities to meet the energy demands of their customers for decades. The objective was to first load those units which cost the least to run and slowly increase the loading of more expensive units as the incremental energy price increased. Although this concept worked well for utility based systems where incremental costs rose with peak demand, the independent power producers(IPPs) and the power purchase agreements (PPAs) have drastically changed this notion. Most PPAs structured for the IPP environment have negotiated rates which remain the same during peak periods and base their electrical generation on specific process steam requirements. They also must maintain the required production balance of process steam and electrical load in order to qualify as a Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) facility. Consequently, economically dispatching Cogeneration facilities becomes an exercise in adhering to contractual guidelines while operating the equipment in the most efficient manner possible for the given condition. How then is it possible to dispatch a Cogeneration facility that maintains the electrical load demand of JFK Airport while satisfying all of its heating and cooling needs? Contractually, Kennedy International Airport Cogen (KIAC) has specific obligations concerning electrical and thermal energy exported to JFK Airport. The facility`s impressive array of heating and cooling apparatuses together with the newly installed cogen fulfilled the airport`s needs by utilizing an endless combination of new and previously installed equipment. Moreover, in order to economically operate the plant a well structured operating curriculum was necessary.

  3. Removing Solids From Supercritical Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Glenn T.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus removes precipitated inorganic salts and other solids in water-recycling process. Designed for use with oxidation in supercritical water which treats wastes and yields nearly pure water. Heating coils and insulation around vessel keep it hot. Locking bracket seals vessel but allows it to be easily opened for replacement of filled canisters.

  4. Use of heat pipes in electronic hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A modular, multiple output power converter was developed in order to reduce costs of space hardware in future missions. The converter is of reduced size and weight, and utilizes advanced heat removal techniques, in the form of heat pipes which remove internally generated heat more effectively than conventional methods.

  5. Experiments to investigate the effect of water in the cavity on direct containment heating (DCH) in the Surtsey Test Facility: The WC-1 and WC-2 tests

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.; Griffith, R.O.; Nichols, R.T.

    1992-03-01

    The goal of the wet cavity (WC) test series was to investigate the effect of water in a reactor cavity on direct containment heating (DCH). The WC-1 experiment was performed with a dry cavity to obtain baseline data for comparison to the WC-2 experiment. WC-2 was conducted with water 3 cm deep (11.76 kg) in a 1:10 linear scale model of the Zion reactor cavity. The initial conditions for the experiments were similar. For both experiments the molten core debris was simulated by a thermitically generated melt formed from 50 kg of iron oxide/aluminum/chromium powders. After the charge was ignited, the debris was melted by the chemical reaction and was forcibly ejected through a nominal 3.5 cm hole into the scaled reactor cavity by superheated steam at an initial driving pressure of 4.58 MPa. The peak pressure increase in the containment due to the high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) was 0.272 MPa in WC-1 and 0.286 MPa in WC-2. The total amount of hydrogen generated in the experiments was 145 moles of H{sub 2} in WC-1 and 179 moles of H{sub 2} in WC-2. The total mass of debris ejected into the containment was identical for both experiments. These results suggest that water in the cavity slightly enhanced DCH.

  6. A facile solid-state heating method for preparation of poly(3,4-ethelenedioxythiophene)/ZnO nanocomposite and photocatalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/zinc oxide (PEDOT/ZnO) nanocomposites were prepared by a simple solid-state heating method, in which the content of ZnO was varied from 10 to 20 wt%. The structure and morphology of the composites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The photocatalytic activities of the composites were investigated by the degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye in aqueous medium under UV light and natural sunlight irradiation. The FTIR, UV-vis, and XRD results showed that the composites were successfully synthesized, and there was a strong interaction between PEDOT and nano-ZnO. The TEM results suggested that the composites were a mixture of shale-like PEDOT and less aggregated nano-ZnO. The photocatalytic activity results indicated that the incorporation of ZnO nanoparticles in composites can enhance the photocatalytic efficiency of the composites under both UV light and natural sunlight irradiation, and the highest photocatalytic efficiency under UV light (98.7%) and natural sunlight (96.6%) after 5 h occurred in the PEDOT/15wt%ZnO nanocomposite. PMID:24555419

  7. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  8. Removable preheater elements improve oxide induction furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1964-01-01

    Heat and corrosion resistant preheater elements are used in oxide induction furnaces to raise the temperature to the level for conducting electricity. These preheater elements are then removed and the induction coil energized.

  9. Vacuum powered heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffolo, R.F.

    1986-06-24

    In an internal combustion engine including an oil lubrication system, a liquid cooling system, and an improved air intake system is described. The improved air intake system comprises: a housing including a first opening in one end, which opening is open to the atmosphere and a second opening comprising an air outlet opening in the other end open to the air intake manifold of the engine, a heat exchanger positioned in the first opening. The heat exchanger consists of a series of coils positioned in the flow path of the atmospheric air as it enters the housing, the heat exchanger being fluidly connected to either the engine lubrication system or the cooling system to provide a warm heat source for the incoming air to the housing, acceleration means positioned in the housing downstream of the heat exchanger, the acceleration means comprising a honeycomb structure positioned across the air intake flow path. The honey-comb structure includes a multitude of honey combed mini-venturi cells through which the heated air flows in an accelerated mode, a removable air filter positioned between the heat exchanger and the acceleration means and a single opening provided in the housing through which the air filter can be passed and removed, and additional openings in the housing positioned downstream of the heat exchanger and upstream of the air filter, the additional openings including removable flaps for opening and closing the openings to control the temperature of the air flowing through the housing.

  10. Waterjet processes for coating removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Fletcher; Cosby, Steve; Hoppe, David

    1995-01-01

    USBI and NASA have been testing and investigating the use of high pressure water for coating removal for approximately the past 12 years at the Automated TPS (Thermal Protection System - ablative materials used for thermal protection during ascent and descent of the solid rocket boosters) Removal Facility located in the Productivity Enhancement Complex at Marshall Space Flight Center. Originally the task was to develop and automate the removal process and transfer the technology to a production facility at Kennedy Space Center. Since that time more and more applications and support roles for the waterjet technology have been realized. The facility has become a vital part of development activities ongoing at MSFC. It supports the development of environmentally compliant insulations, sealants, and coatings. It also supports bonding programs, test motors, and pressure vessels. The most recent role of the cell is supporting Thiokol Corporation's solid rocket motor program in the development of waterjet degreasing and paint stripping methods. Currently vapor degreasing methods use 500,000 lbs. of ozone depleting chemicals per year. This paper describes the major cell equipment, test methods practiced, and coatings that have been removed.

  11. Method of making thermally removable epoxies

    DOEpatents

    Loy, Douglas A.; Wheeler, David R.; Russick, Edward M.; McElhanon, James R.; Saunders, Randall S.

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable epoxy by mixing a bis(maleimide) compound to a monomeric furan compound containing an oxirane group to form a di-epoxy mixture and then adding a curing agent at temperatures from approximately room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a thermally-removable epoxy. The thermally-removable epoxy can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The epoxy material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

  12. Radionuclide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Sorg, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed new and revised regulations on radionuclide contaminants in drinking water in June 1991. During the 1980's, the Drinking Water Research Division, USEPA conducted a research program to evaluate various technologies to remove radium, uranium and radon from drinking water. The research consisted of laboratory and field studies conducted by USEPA, universities and consultants. The paper summarizes the results of the most significant projects completed. General information is also presented on the general chemistry of the three radionuclides. The information presented indicates that the most practical treatment methods for radium are ion exchange and lime-soda softening and reverse osmosis. The methods tested for radon are aeration and granular activated carbon and the methods for uranium are anion exchange and reverse osmosis.

  13. Heat exchange apparatus utilizing thermal siphon pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Daman, E.L.; Kunsagi, L.

    1980-10-07

    A heat exchange apparatus is descirbed in which each of a plurality of thermal siphon pipes has an upper portion extending in an upper heat exchange section and a lower portion extending in a lower heat exchange section. Each pipe is closed at its ends and contains a heat transfer fluid so that when a hot fluid is passed through the lower heat exchange section, the heat is transferred from the hot fluid to the heat exchange fluid. A cool fluid is passed through the upper heat exchange section to remove the heat from the heat exchange fluid.

  14. Hybrid joule heating/electro-osmosis process for extracting contaminants from soil layers

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    2003-06-10

    Joule (ohmic) heating and electro-osmosis are combined in a hybrid process for removal of both water-soluble contaminants and non-aqueous phase liquids from contaminated, low-permeability soil formations that are saturated. Central to this hybrid process is the partial desaturation of the formation or layer using electro-osmosis to remove a portion of the pore fluids by induction of a ground water flow to extraction wells. Joule heating is then performed on a partially desaturated formation. The joule heating and electro-osmosis operations can be carried out simultaneously or sequentially if the desaturation by electro-osmosis occurs initially. Joule heating of the desaturated formation results in a very effective transfer or partitioning of liquid state contaminants to the vapor phase. The heating also substantially increases the vapor phase pressure in the porous formation. As a result, the contaminant laden vapor phase is forced out into soil layers of a higher permeability where other conventional removal processes, such as steam stripping or ground water extraction can be used to capture the contaminants. This hybrid process is more energy efficient than joule heating or steam stripping for cleaning low permeability formations and can share electrodes to minimize facility costs.

  15. Removing Bonded Integrated Circuits From Boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, John T.

    1989-01-01

    Small resistance heater makes it easier, faster, and cheaper to remove integrated circuit from hybrid-circuit board, package, or other substrate for rework. Heater, located directly in polymeric bond interface or on substrate under integrated-circuit chip, energized when necessary to remove chip. Heat generated softens adhesive or solder that bonds chip to substrate. Chip then lifted easily from substrate.

  16. Thermal removal of asbestos pipeline coating

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, W.H.

    1997-03-01

    A heat (thermal) technique, not previously used in the US for removing external pipe coating was used to remove asbestos-wrapped coating from 17 miles of 24-inch-diameter pipe. The process was conducted in compliance with all asbestos and air quality regulations, and produced asbestos-free pipe at timely and cost-effective rates.

  17. CO2 heat pumps for commercial building applications with simultaneous heating and cooling demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharkar, Supriya

    Many commercial buildings, including data centers, hotels and hospitals, have a simultaneous heating and cooling demand depending on the season, occupation and auxiliary equipment. A data center on the Purdue University, West Lafayette campus is used as a case study. The electrical equipment in data centers produce heat, which must be removed to prevent the equipment temperature from rising to a certain level. With proper integration, this heat has the potential to be used as a cost-effective energy source for heating the building in which the data center resides or the near-by buildings. The proposed heat pump system utilizes carbon dioxide with global warming potential of 1, as the refrigerant. System simulations are carried out to determine the feasibility of the system for a 12-month period. In addition, energy, environmental and economic analyses are carried out to show the benefits of this alternative technology when compared to the conventional system currently installed in the facility. Primary energy savings of ~28% to ~61%, a payback period of 3 to 4.5 years and a decrease in the environmental impact value by ~36% makes this system an attractive option. The results are then extended to other commercial buildings.

  18. 9 CFR 3.5 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.5 Mobile or traveling housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Mobile or traveling housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature...

  19. 9 CFR 3.2 - Indoor housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.2 Indoor housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Indoor housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature or humidity extremes and to...

  20. 9 CFR 3.5 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.5 Mobile or traveling housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Mobile or traveling housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature...

  1. 9 CFR 3.2 - Indoor housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.2 Indoor housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Indoor housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature or humidity extremes and to...

  2. 9 CFR 3.2 - Indoor housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.2 Indoor housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Indoor housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature or humidity extremes and to...

  3. 9 CFR 3.5 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.5 Mobile or traveling housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Mobile or traveling housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature...

  4. 9 CFR 3.5 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.5 Mobile or traveling housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Mobile or traveling housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature...

  5. 9 CFR 3.2 - Indoor housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.2 Indoor housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Indoor housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature or humidity extremes and to...

  6. 9 CFR 3.3 - Sheltered housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.3 Sheltered housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. The sheltered part of sheltered housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature...

  7. 9 CFR 3.3 - Sheltered housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.3 Sheltered housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. The sheltered part of sheltered housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature...

  8. 9 CFR 3.2 - Indoor housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.2 Indoor housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Indoor housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature or humidity extremes and to...

  9. 9 CFR 3.5 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.5 Mobile or traveling housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Mobile or traveling housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature...

  10. The Magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    In this report the primary experimental results are derived from a 263 hour coal-fired proof-of-concept (POC) test conducted during the quarter. For the last 50 hours of the test the K{sub 2}/S ratio was increased to 1.3 to examine the fouling characteristics and the efficiency of the baghouse and electrostatic precipitator in removing this potassium carbonate rich solids. In this particular test, little difficulty was encountered in removing the deposits from the heat transfer tubes to permit continued operation of the flow train. However, difficulty is reported in removal of particulate with the electrostatic precipitator whose efficiency degraded seriously during the high carbonate period. Slag deposit thickness and chemical composition throughout the flow train is reported. The performance of downstream flow train components is discussed along with deposition and corrosion probe performance. A summary is included on the corrosion evaluation of the tubes which were removed after having completed 500 hours of coal fired testing. The performance of the baghouse and electrostatic precipitator throughout the test is discussed. Performance of advanced measurement systems provided by both UTSI and Mississippi State University is summarized. The modifications to the facility including the addition of a storage warehouse and work on providing an automatic ash/seed handling system and capability to process Western coal are reported. A brief study of the desirability of drying Western coal is included. Finally, the status of the environmental program and particulate measurements made during the test are reported. The State of Tennessee compliance testing results are reported.

  11. Preliminary design of a Tandem-Mirror-Next-Step facility

    SciTech Connect

    Damm, C.C.; Doggett, J.N.; Bulmer, R.H.

    1980-12-18

    The Tandem-Mirror-Next-Step (TMNS) facility is designed to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of a tandem-mirror reactor. The facility is based on a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning, tandem-mirror device with a fusion power output of 245 MW. The fusion power density in the central cell is 2.1 MW/m/sup 3/, with a resultant neutron wall loading of 0.5 MW/m/sup 2/. Overall machine length is 116 m, and the effective central-cell length is 50.9 m. The magnet system includes end cells with yin-yang magnets to provide magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and thermal-barrier cells to help achieve a plasma Q of 4.7 (where Q = fusion power/injected power). Neutral beams at energies up to 200 keV are used for plasma heating, fueling, and barrier pumping. Electron cyclotron resonant heating at 50 and 100 GHz is used to control the electron temperature in the barriers. Based on the resulting engineering design, the overall cost of the facility is estimated to be just under $1 billion. Unresolved physics issues include central-cell ..beta..-limits against MHD ballooning modes (the assumed reference value of ..beta.. exceeds the current theory-derived limit), and the removal of thermalized ..cap alpha..-particles from the plasma.

  12. Results of initial operation of the Jupiter Oxygen Corporation oxy-fuel 15 MWth burner test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Ochs, Danylo Oryshchyn, Rigel Woodside, Cathy Summers, Brian Patrick, Dietrich Gross, Mark Schoenfield, Thomas Weber and Dan O'Brien

    2009-04-01

    Jupiter Oxygen Corporation (JOC), in cooperation with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), constructed a 15 MWth oxy-fuel burner test facility with Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPRTM) to test high flame temperature oxy-fuel combustion and advanced carbon capture. Combustion protocols include baseline air firing with natural gas, oxygen and natural gas firing with and without flue gas recirculation, and oxygen and pulverized coal firing with flue gas recirculation. Testing focuses on characterizing burner performance, determining heat transfer characteristics, optimizing CO2 capture, and maximizing heat recovery, with an emphasis on data traceability to address retrofit of existing boilers by directly transforming burner systems to oxy-fuel firing.

  13. Heat management in aluminum/air batteries: Sources of heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaik, R. S. M.; Ganesh, S.; Ashok, G.; Ganesan, M.; Kapali, V.

    1994-07-01

    One of the problems with the aluminum/air battery is the generation of heat, during both idle and discharge periods. The main sources of heat are: (1) corrosion of the aluminum anode during the idle period; (2) inefficient, or less efficient, dissolution of anode during discharge; (3) Joule heat during discharge, and (4) non-uniform mass transfer during both discharge and idle periods. These components of heat act in a cumulative way because they are all interconnected. This paper addresses the basic reasons for the origin of these sources of heat. Suitable and practical remedial measures for the effective removal of such heat in the aluminum/air battery are suggested.

  14. Detroit Edison's Fermi 1 - Preparation for Reactor Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Swindle, Danny

    2008-01-15

    This paper is intended to provide information about the ongoing decommissioning tasks at Detroit Edison's Fermi 1 plant, and in particular, the work being performed to prepare the reactor for removal and disposal. In 1972 Fermi 1 was shutdown and the fuel returned to the Atomic Energy Commission. By the end of 1975, a retirement plan was prepared, the bulk sodium removed, and the plant placed in a safe store condition. The plant systems were left isolated with the sodium containing systems inert with carbon dioxide in an attempt to form a carbonate layer, thus passivating the underlying reactive sodium. In 1996, Detroit Edison determined to evaluate the condition of the plant and to make recommendations in relation to the Fermi 1 future plans. At the end of 1997 approval was obtained to remove the bulk asbestos and residual alkali-metals (i.e., sodium and sodium potassium (NaK)). In 2000, full nuclear decommissioning of the plant was approved. To date, the bulk asbestos insulation has been removed, and the only NaK remaining is located in six capillary instrument tubes. The remaining sodium is contained within the reactor, two of the three primary loops, and miscellaneous removed pipes and equipment to be processed. The preferred method for removing or reacting sodium at Fermi 1 is by injecting superheated steam into a heated, nitrogen inert system. The byproducts of this reaction are caustic sodium hydroxide, hydrogen gas, and heat. The decision was made to separate the three primary loops from the reactor for better control prior to processing each loop and the reactor separately. The first loop has already been processed. The main focus is now to process the reactor to allow removal and disposal of the Class C waste prior to the anticipated June 2008 closure of the Barnwell radioactive waste disposal facility located in South Carolina. Lessons learnt are summarized and concern: the realistic schedule and adherence to the schedule, time estimates, personnel

  15. Direct shaft torque measurements in a transient turbine facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Paul F.; Povey, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a shaft torque measurement system for the Oxford Turbine Research Facility (formerly the Turbine Test Facility (TTF) at QinetiQ, Farnborough), or OTRF. As part of the recent EU TATEF II programme, the facility was upgraded to allow turbine efficiency measurements to be performed. A shaft torque measurement system was developed as part of this upgrade. The system is unique in that, to the authors' knowledge, it provided the first direct measurement of shaft torque in a transient turbine facility although the system has wider applicability to rotating test facilities in which power measurement is a requirement. The adopted approach removes the requirement to quantify bearing friction, which can be difficult to accurately calibrate under representative operating conditions. The OTRF is a short duration (approximately 0.4 s run time) isentropic light-piston facility capable of matching all of the non-dimensional parameters important for aerodynamic and heat studies, namely Mach number, Reynolds number, non-dimensional speed, stage pressure ratio and gas-to-wall temperature ratio. The single-stage MT1 turbine used for this study is a highly loaded unshrouded design, and as such is relevant to modern military, or future civil aero-engine design. Shaft torque was measured directly using a custom-built strain gauge-based torque measurement system in the rotating frame of reference. This paper describes the development of this measurement system. The system was calibrated, including the effects of temperature, to a traceable primary standard using a purpose-built facility. The bias and precision uncertainties of the measured torque were ±0.117% and ±0.183%, respectively. To accurately determine the shaft torque developed by a turbine in the OTRF, small corrections due to inertial torque (associated with changes in the rotational speed) and aerodynamic drag (windage) are required. The methods for performing these

  16. An Integral Effects Test to investigate the effects of condensate levels of water and preexisting hydrogen on direct containment heating in the Surtsey Test Facility. The IET-7 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M.; Nichols, R.T.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses the seventh experiment of the Integral Effects Test (IET-7) series. The experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of preexisting hydrogen in the Surtsey vessel on direct containment heating. Scale models of the Zion reactor pressure vessel (RPV), cavity, instrument tunnel, and subcompartment structures were constructed in the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The RPV was modeled with a melt generator that consisted of a steel pressure barrier, a cast MgO crucible, and a thin steel inner liner. The melt generator/crucible had a hemispherical bottom head containing a graphite limitor plate with a 4-cm exit hole to simulate the ablated hole in the RPV bottom head that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe nuclear power plant accident. The cavity contained 3.48 kg of water, and the containment basement floor inside the cranewall contained 71 kg of water, which corresponds to scaled condensate levels in the Zion plant. A 43-kg initial charge of iron oxide/aluminum/chromium thermite was used to simulate corium debris on the bottom head of the RPV. Molten thermite was ejected by steam at an initial pressure of 5.9 MPa into the reactor cavity.

  17. An assessment of RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 condensation heat transfer modeling with GIRAFFE heat transfer tests

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, B.D.; Parlatan, Y.; Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1995-09-01

    RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 is being used to simulate Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) for the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) being proposed by General Electric (GE). One of the major components associated with the SBWR is the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) which provides the long-term heat sink to reject decay heat. The RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 code is being assessed for its ability to represent accurately the PCCS. Data from the Phase 1, Step 1 Heat Transfer Tests performed at Toshiba`s Gravity-Driven Integral Full-Height Test for Passive Heat Removal (GIRAFFE) facility will be used for assessing the ability of RELAP5 to model condensation in the presence of noncondensables. The RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 condensation model uses the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) correlation developed by Vierow and Schrock. The RELAP5 code uses this heat transfer coefficient with the gas velocity effect multiplier being limited to 2. This heat transfer option was used to analyze the condensation heat transfer in the GIRAFFE PCCS heat exchanger tubes in the Phase 1, Step 1 Heat Transfer Tests which were at a pressure of 3 bar and had a range of nitrogen partial pressure fractions from 0.0 to 0.10. The results of a set of RELAP5 calculations al these conditions were compared with the GIRAFFE data. The effects of PCCS cell nodings on the heat transfer process were also studied. The UCB correlation, as implemented in RELAP5, predicted the heat transfer to {+-}5% of the data with a three-node model. The three-node model has a large cell in the entrance region which smeared out the entrance effects on the heat transfer, which tend to overpredict the condensation. Hence, the UCB correlation predicts condensation heat transfer in the presence of noncondensable gases with only a coarse mesh. The cell length term in the condensation heat transfer correlation implemented in the code must be removed to allow for accurate calculations with smaller cell sizes.

  18. Starch removal from potato tuber sections.

    PubMed

    Fronda, A; Jona, R

    1991-01-01

    Heating plant sections at 90 C with 0.5% aqueous ammonium oxalate is required to remove pectins. When applied to tissues rich in starch such as potato, this step produces heavy dextrinization of the starch which hinders subsequent evaluation of the extinction values of the cell walls. To overcome this a method has been devised to brush away the starch granules from the sections with a thin paint brush, just after paraffin removal by xylene. The slide is then processed as usual: pectins are removed by heat treatment, cell walls are stained with PAS and the stain intensity can be evaluated by photometry. PMID:1790235

  19. Temperature dependent BRDF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airola, Marc B.; Brown, Andrea M.; Hahn, Daniel V.; Thomas, Michael E.; Congdon, Elizabeth A.; Mehoke, Douglas S.

    2014-09-01

    Applications involving space based instrumentation and aerodynamically heated surfaces often require knowledge of the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of an exposed surface at high temperature. Addressing this need, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) developed a BRDF facility that features a multiple-port vacuum chamber, multiple laser sources covering the spectral range from the longwave infrared to the ultraviolet, imaging pyrometry and laser heated samples. Laser heating eliminates stray light that would otherwise be seen from a furnace and requires minimal sample support structure, allowing low thermal conduction loss to be obtained, which is especially important at high temperatures. The goal is to measure the BRDF of ceramic-coated surfaces at temperatures in excess of 1000°C in a low background environment. Most ceramic samples are near blackbody in the longwave infrared, thus pyrometry using a LWIR camera can be very effective and accurate.

  20. A Unique Facility For Metabolic and Thermoregulatory Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Rebecca C.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    A unique exercise facility has been developed and used to perform tipper body ergometry tests for space applications. Originally designed to simulate the muscular, cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses to working in zero gravity, this facility may be used to conduct basic thermoregulatory investigations applicable to multiple sclerosis patients. An environmental chamber houses the tipper body ergometer and permits control of temperature, air now and humidify. The chamber is a closed system and recirculate-s air after conditioning if. A Cybex Lipper body ergometer has been mounted horizontally on the wall of the environmental chamber. In this configuration, the subject lies underneath the arm crank on a supine seat in order to turn the crank. The supine seat can be removed in order to introduce other equipment into the chamber such as a stool to allow upright arm cranking, or a treadmill to allow walk-run experiments. Physiological and environmental signals are fed into a Strawberry Tree data acquisition system while being monitored and logged using the Workbench software program. Physiological monitoring capabilities include 3-lead EKG using an H-P patient monitor, 5 site skin temperature and core temperature using YSI thermistors, and O2 consumption and CO2 production using AMFTFK Applied Electrochemistry analyzers and sensors. This comprehensive data acquisition set tip allows for calculation of various thermoregulatory indices including heat storage, evaporative heat loss, latent heat loss, and metabolic rate. The current system is capable of adding more data acquisition channels if needed. Some potential studies that could be carried out using the facility include: 1) An investigation into the efficiency of cooling various segments of the body to lower Tc 1-2 F. 2) A series of heat and mass balance studies comparing various LCG configurations.

  1. APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Pak, D.

    2011-08-10

    Vacuum distillation of chloride salts from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) and simulant PuO{sub 2} has been previously demonstrated at Department of Energy (DOE) sites using kilogram quantities of chloride salt. The apparatus for vacuum distillation contains a zone heated using a furnace and a zone actively cooled using either recirculated water or compressed air. During a vacuum distillation operation, a sample boat containing the feed material is placed into the apparatus while it is cool, and the system is sealed. The system is evacuated using a vacuum pump. Once a sufficient vacuum is attained, heating begins. Volatile salts distill from the heated zone to the cooled zone where they condense, leaving behind the non-volatile materials in the feed boat. The application of vacuum salt distillation (VSD) is of interest to the HB-Line Facility and the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Both facilities are involved in efforts to disposition excess fissile materials. Many of these materials contain chloride and fluoride salt concentrations which make them unsuitable for dissolution without prior removal of the chloride and fluoride salts. Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and HB-Line designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a system for the distillation of chloride salts. Subsequent efforts are attempting to adapt the technology for the removal of fluoride. Fluoride salts of interest are less-volatile than the corresponding chloride salts. Consequently, an alternate approach is required for the removal of fluoride without significantly increasing the operating temperature. HB-Line Engineering requested SRNL to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of an alternate approach using both non-radioactive simulants and plutonium-bearing materials. Whereas the earlier developments targeted the removal of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl), the current

  2. Recommendations and Justifications To Remove Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Birney, Cathleen; Krauss, Mark J

    2013-09-01

    This document is part of an effort to reevaluate 37 FFACO and Administrative URs against the current Soils Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process. After reviewing 37 existing FFACO and Administrative URs, 3 URs addressed in this document have sufficient information to determine that these current URs may be removed, based on the RBCA criteria. This document presents recommendations on modifications to existing URs that will be consistent with the RBCA criteria.

  3. Design of a Facility to Test the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Oriti, Salvatore M.; Meer, David W.; Brace, Michael H.; Dugala, Gina

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) is being considered to power deep space missions. An engineering unit, the ASRG-EU, was designed and fabricated by Lockheed Martin under contract to the Department of Energy. This unit is currently on an extended operation test at NASA Glenn Research Center to generate performance data and validate the life and reliability predictions for the generator and the Stirling convertors. A special test facility was designed and built for testing the ASRG-EU. Details of the test facility design are discussed. The facility can operate the convertors under AC bus control or with the ASRG-EU controller. It can regulate input thermal power in either a fixed temperature or fixed power mode. An enclosure circulates cooled air around the ASRG-EU to remove heat rejected from the ASRG-EU by convection. A custom monitoring and data acquisition system supports the test. Various safety features, which allow 2417 unattended operation, are discussed.

  4. In situ nitrogen generation removes wax from flowlines

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, C.N.

    1996-07-01

    Formation of paraffin (wax) in cold deepwater flowlines is a major problem for offshore operators of such facilities. Petrobras faces this problem continuously in its deepwater operations in the Campos basin, offshore Brazil. Since 1990, through its Petrobras Research Center (CENPES), the company has developed, extensively field tested, and recently commercialized, a novel technique for chemically removing such wax depositions. The process involves mixing and introducing to the line, two inorganic salts and organic solvents. The ensuing chemical reaction--which both generates nitrogen and heats the inside of the blocked flowline--allows the solvent to dissolve and dislodge the buildup, which is then flushed from the line. The process is called the Nitrogen Generation System (SGN). Petrobras/CENPES has recently formed a joint venture with the Brazilian service company Maritima Navegacao e Engenharia Ltda. to offer SGN services worldwide.

  5. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  6. Facility Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Ben E.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews recommendations on policies for leasing surplus school space made during the Council of Educational Facility Planners/International conference. A case study presentation of a Seattle district's use of lease agreements is summarized. (MJL)

  7. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  8. 9 CFR 3.79 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mobile or traveling housing facilities... Transportation of Nonhuman Primates 2 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.79 Mobile or traveling housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Mobile or traveling housing facilities must...

  9. Production facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a cross section of different solutions to the many unique production problems operators face. Sections address benefit vs. cost options for production facility designs, oil and gas separation processes and equipment, oil treating and desalting systems, and water treating methods and equipment. Papers were selected to give an overall view of factors involved in optimizing the design of cost-effective production facilities.

  10. The Magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    Progress continued at MHD coal-fired flow facility. UTSI reports on progress in developing the technology for the steam bottoming portion of the MHD Steam Combined Cycle Power Plant. No Proof-of-Concept (POC) testing was conducted during the quarter but data analyses are reported from the test conducted during the prior quarter. Major results include corrosion data from the first 500 hours of testing on candidate tube materials in the superheater test module (SHTM). Solids mass balance data, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and baghouse (BH) performance data, diagnostic systems and environmental data results from previous POC tests are included. The major activities this quarter were in facility modifications required to complete the scheduled POC test program. Activities reported include the installation of an automatic ash/seed removal system on the SHTM, the BH, and ESP hoppers. Also, a higher pressure compressor (350 psi) is being installed to provide additional blowing pressure to remove solids deposits on the convective heat transfer tubes in the high temperature zone where the deposits are molten. These activities are scheduled to be completed and ready for the next test, which is scheduled for late May 1990. Also, experiments on drying western coal are reported. The recommended system for modifying the CFFF coal system to permit processing of western coal is described. Finally, a new effort to test portions of the TRW combustor during tests in the CFFF is described. The status of system analyses being conducted under subcontract by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation is also described. 2 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Transonic turbine blade cascade testing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoff, Vincent G.; Camperchioli, William P.; Lopez, Isaac

    1992-01-01

    NASA LeRC has designed and constructed a new state-of-the-art test facility. This facility, the Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade, is used to evaluate the aerodynamics and heat transfer characteristics of blade geometries for future turbine applications. The facility's capabilities make it unique: no other facility of its kind can combine the high degree of airflow turning, infinitely adjustable incidence angle, and high transonic flow rates. The facility air supply and exhaust pressures are controllable to 16.5 psia and 2 psia, respectively. The inlet air temperatures are at ambient conditions. The facility is equipped with a programmable logic controller with a capacity of 128 input/output channels. The data acquisition system is capable of scanning up to 1750 channels per sec. This paper discusses in detail the capabilities of the facility, overall facility design, instrumentation used in the facility, and the data acquisition system. Actual research data is not discussed.

  12. Lunar base heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Jeffrey H.; Tetreault, R.; Fischbach, D.; Walker, D.

    1994-01-01

    A heat pump is a device which elevates the temperature of a heat flow by a means of an energy input. By doing this, the heat pump can cause heat to transfer faster from a warm region to a cool region, or it can cause heat to flow from a cool region to a warmer region. The second case is the one which finds vast commercial applications such as air conditioning, heating, and refrigeration. Aerospace applications of heat pumps include both cases. The NASA Johnson Space Center is currently developing a Life Support Systems Integration Facility (LSSIF, previously SIRF) to provide system-level integration, operational test experience, and performance data that will enable NASA to develop flight-certified hardware for future planetary missions. A high lift heat pump is a significant part of the TCS hardware development associated with the LSSIF. The high lift heat pump program discussed here is being performed in three phases. In Phase 1, the objective is to develop heat pump concepts for a lunar base, a lunar lander, and for a ground development unit for the SIRF. In Phase 2, the design of the SIRF ground test unit is being performed, including identification and evaluation of safety and reliability issues. In Phase 3, the SIRF unit will be manufactured, tested, and delivered to the NASA Johnson Space Center.

  13. RADIATION FACILITY FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1961-12-12

    A radiation facility is designed for irradiating samples in close proximity to the core of a nuclear reactor. The facility comprises essentially a tubular member extending through the biological shield of the reactor and containing a manipulatable rod having the sample carrier at its inner end, the carrier being longitudinally movable from a position in close proximity to the reactor core to a position between the inner and outer faces of the shield. Shield plugs are provided within the tubular member to prevent direct radiation from the core emanating therethrough. In this device, samples may be inserted or removed during normal operation of the reactor without exposing personnel to direct radiation from the reactor core. A storage chamber is also provided within the radiation facility to contain an irradiated sample during the period of time required to reduce the radioactivity enough to permit removal of the sample for external handling. (AEC)

  14. 310 Facility chemical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Hagerty, K.J.

    1997-05-21

    The 300 area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) was designed and built to treat the waste water from the 300 area process sewer system. Several treatment technologies are employed to remove the trace quantities of contaminants in the stream, including iron coprecipitation, clarification, filtration, ion exchange, and ultra violet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation of organics. The chemicals that will be utilized in the treatment process are hydrogen peroxide, sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, and ferric chloride. This document annotates the required chemical characteristics of TEDF bulk chemicals as well as the criteria that were used to establish these criteria. The chemical specifications in appendix B are generated from this information.

  15. Geothermal energy conversion facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    With the termination of favorable electricity generation pricing policies, the geothermal industry is exploring ways to improve the efficiency of existing plants and make them more cost-competitive with natural gas. The Geothermal Energy Conversion Facility (GECF) at NREL will allow researchers to study various means for increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of binary cycle geothermal plants. This work has received considerable support from the US geothermal industry and will be done in collaboration with industry members and utilities. The GECF is being constructed on NREL property at the top of South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado. As shown in Figure 1, it consists of an electrically heated hot water loop that provides heating to a heater/vaporizer in which the working fluid vaporizes at supercritical or subcritical pressures as high as 700 psia. Both an air-cooled and water-cooled condenser will be available for condensing the working fluid. In order to minimize construction costs, available equipment from the similar INEL Heat Cycle Research Facility is being utilized.

  16. Experiments to investigate the effects of 1:10 scale Zion structures on direct containment heating (DCH) in the Surtsey Test Facility: The IET-1 and IET-1R tests

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.; Griffith, R.O.; Blanchat, T.K. ); Nichols, R.T. )

    1992-07-01

    The Integral Effects Test (IET) series was designed to investigate the effects of subcompartment structures on direct containment heating (DCH). Scale models of the Zion reactor pressure vessel (RPV), cavity, instrument tunnel, and subcompartment structures were constructed in the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The RPV was modelled with a melt generator that consisted of a steel pressure barrier, a cast MgO crucible, and a thin steel inner liner. The melt generator/crucible had a hemispherical bottom head containing a graphite limiter plate with a 4 cm exit hole to simulate the ablated hole in the RPV bottom head that would be formed by tube ejection in a high pressure melt ejection (HPME) accident. The reactor cavity model contained an amount of water (3.48 kg) that was scaled to condensate levels in the Zion plant. Iron oxide, aluminum, chromium thermite (43 kg) was used to simulate molten corium. The driving gas was 440 g{center dot}moles of steam at an initial absolute pressure of 7.1 MPa in IET-1 and 477 g{center dot}moles of steam at an initial pressure of 6.3 MPa in IET-1R. Steam blowdown entrained debris into the Sorts vessel resulting in a peak pressure increase in Sorts of 98 kPa in IET-1 and 110 kPa in IET-1R. The total debris mass ejected into the Sorts vessel was 43.0 kg in IET-1, compared to 36.2 kg in IET-1R. The Sorts vessel had been previously inerted with N{sub 2}. The total quantity of hydrogen produced by steam/metal reactions was 223 g{center dot}moles in IET-1 and 252 g{center dot}moles in IET-1R.

  17. Experiments to investigate the effects of 1:10 scale Zion structures on direct containment heating (DCH) in the Surtsey Test Facility: The IET-1 and IET-1R tests

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.; Griffith, R.O.; Blanchat, T.K.; Nichols, R.T.

    1992-07-01

    The Integral Effects Test (IET) series was designed to investigate the effects of subcompartment structures on direct containment heating (DCH). Scale models of the Zion reactor pressure vessel (RPV), cavity, instrument tunnel, and subcompartment structures were constructed in the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The RPV was modelled with a melt generator that consisted of a steel pressure barrier, a cast MgO crucible, and a thin steel inner liner. The melt generator/crucible had a hemispherical bottom head containing a graphite limiter plate with a 4 cm exit hole to simulate the ablated hole in the RPV bottom head that would be formed by tube ejection in a high pressure melt ejection (HPME) accident. The reactor cavity model contained an amount of water (3.48 kg) that was scaled to condensate levels in the Zion plant. Iron oxide, aluminum, chromium thermite (43 kg) was used to simulate molten corium. The driving gas was 440 g{center_dot}moles of steam at an initial absolute pressure of 7.1 MPa in IET-1 and 477 g{center_dot}moles of steam at an initial pressure of 6.3 MPa in IET-1R. Steam blowdown entrained debris into the Sorts vessel resulting in a peak pressure increase in Sorts of 98 kPa in IET-1 and 110 kPa in IET-1R. The total debris mass ejected into the Sorts vessel was 43.0 kg in IET-1, compared to 36.2 kg in IET-1R. The Sorts vessel had been previously inerted with N{sub 2}. The total quantity of hydrogen produced by steam/metal reactions was 223 g{center_dot}moles in IET-1 and 252 g{center_dot}moles in IET-1R.

  18. Results of an experiment in a Zion-like geometry to investigate the effect of water on the containment basement floor on direct containment heating (DCH) in the Surtsey Test Facility: The IET-4 test

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M.; Nichols, R.T.

    1992-09-01

    This document discusses the fourth experiment of the Integral Effects Test (IET-4) series which was conducted to investigate the effects of high pressure melt ejection on direct containment heating. Scale models (1:10) of the Zion reactor pressure vessel (RPV), cavity, instrument tunnel, and subcompartment structures were constructed in the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The RPV was modeled with a melt generator that consisted of a steel pressure barrier, a cast MgO crucible, and a thin steel inner liner. The melt generator/crucible had a hemispherical bottom head containing a graphite limitor plate with a 3.5-cm exit hole to simulate the ablated hole in the RPV bottom head that would be tonned by tube ejection in a severe nuclear power plant accident. The reactor cavity model contained 3.48 kg of water with a depth of 0.9 cm that corresponded to condensate levels in the Zion plant. A 43-kg initial charge of iron oxide/aluminum/chromium thermite was used to simulate corium debris on the bottom head of the RPV. Molten thermite was ejected into the scaled reactor cavity by 6.7 MPa steam. IET-4 replicated the third experiment in the IET series (IET-3), except the Surtsey vessel contained slightly more preexisting oxygen (9.6 mol.% vs. 9.0 mol.%), and water was placed on the basement floor inside the crane wall. The cavity pressure measurements showed that a small steam explosion occurred in the cavity at about the same time as the steam explosion in IET-1. The oxygen in the Surtsey vessel in IET-4 resulted in a vigorous hydrogen bum, which caused a significant increase in the peak pressure, 262 kPa compared to 98 kPa in the IET-1 test. EET-3, with similar pre-existing oxygen concentrations, also had a large peak pressure of 246 kPa.

  19. Space Simulation, 7th. [facilities and testing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Space simulation facilities and techniques are outlined that encompass thermal scale modeling, computerized simulations, reentry materials, spacecraft contamination, solar simulation, vacuum tests, and heat transfer studies.

  20. Electric heating for high-temperature heat transport fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, J. T.

    1985-12-01

    Recent experiences with electric resistance heaters at the solar Central Receiver Test Facility are described. These heaters are used to preheat or maintain equipment used with molten nitrate salt or liquid sodium heat transfer fluids. Results of extensive testing performed to improve the reliability of similar heating systems used in the development program for the sodium-cooled liquid metal fast breeder nuclear reactor are also reviewed. Recommendations are made for increasing the reliability of trace heating systems for high-melting-point heat transfer fluids including thermal design, heating element selection, installation, insulation, and controls.

  1. Analysis of panthers full-scale heat transfer tests with RELAP5

    SciTech Connect

    Parlatan, Y.; Boyer, B.D.; Jo, J.; Rohatgi, S.

    1996-01-01

    The RELAP5 code is being assessed on the full-scale Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) in the Performance ANalysis and Testing of HEat Removal Systems (PANTHERS) facility at Societa Informazioni Termoidrauliche (SIET) in Italy. PANTHERS is a test facility with fall-size prototype beat exchangers for the PCCS in support of the General Electric`s (GE) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) program. PANTHERS tests with a low noncondensable gas concentration and with a high noncondensable gas concentration were analyzed with RELAP5. The results showed that beat transfer rate decreases significantly along the PCCS tubes. In the test case with a higher inlet noncondensable gas fraction, the PCCS removed 35% less heat than in the test case with the lower noncondensable gas fraction. The dominant resistance to the overall heat transfer is the condensation beat transfer resistance inside the tubes. This resistance increased by about 5-fold between the inlet and exit of the tube due to the build up of noncondensable gases along the tube. The RELAP5 calculations also predicted that 4% to 5% of the heat removed to the PCCS pool occurs in the inlet steam piping and PCCS upper and lower headers. These piping needs to be modeled for other tests systems. The full-scale PANTHERS predictions are also compared against 1/400 scale GIRAFFE tests. GIRAFFE has 33% larger heat surface area, but its efficiency is only 15% and 23% higher than PANTHERS for the two cases analyzed This was explained by the high heat transfer resistance inside the tubes near the exit.

  2. Heat Pipe Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The heat pipe was developed to alternately cool and heat without using energy or any moving parts. It enables non-rotating spacecraft to maintain a constant temperature when the surface exposed to the Sun is excessively hot and the non Sun-facing side is very cold. Several organizations, such as Tropic-Kool Engineering Corporation, joined NASA in a subsequent program to refine and commercialize the technology. Heat pipes have been installed in fast food restaurants in areas where humid conditions cause materials to deteriorate quickly. Moisture removal was increased by 30 percent in a Clearwater, FL Burger King after heat pipes were installed. Relative humidity and power consumption were also reduced significantly. Similar results were recorded by Taco Bell, which now specifies heat pipe systems in new restaurants in the Southeast.

  3. Heat accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, A.

    1981-09-29

    A heat accumulator comprises a thermally-insulated reservoir full of paraffin wax mixture or other flowable or meltable heat storage mass, heat-exchangers immersed in the mass, a heat-trap connected to one of the heat-exchangers, and a heat user connected to the other heat-exchanger. Pumps circulate fluids through the heat-trap and the heat-using means and the respective heat-exchangers, and a stirrer agitates and circulates the mass, and the pumps and the stirrer and electric motors driving these devices are all immersed in the mass.

  4. Large Component Removal/Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D. M.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

  5. Cleaning of boiler heating surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Maidanik, M. N.; Vasil'ev, V. V.

    2006-09-15

    Basic methods and facilities for the external cleaning of the heating surfaces of boilers designed for the combustion of low-grade solid fuels are discussed. Water and steam blastings, which are the basic means of cleaning furnace shields, and semi-radiative and convective heating surfaces have the greatest range of application.

  6. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summarized.

  7. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summary herein.

  8. Pumped, Two-Phase Heat-Transfer Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1986-01-01

    Two-phase heat-transfer system delivers coolant to equipment as liquid and removes it as vapor. Alternatively, system heats equipment by delivering vapor and removing condensed liquid. Two-phase scheme effective for heat transfer over long distances. Heat-transfer plates remove heat from or supply heat to equipment. If temperature of plate is high, valve opens liquid-supply line to plate, and cooling results. If plate temperature is low, valve opens liquid-suction line to plate, and heating ensues.

  9. Heat reclaiming method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jardine, Douglas M.

    1984-01-01

    Method and apparatus to extract heat by transferring heat from hot compressed refrigerant to a coolant, such as water, without exceeding preselected temperatures in the coolant and avoiding boiling in a water system by removing the coolant from direct or indirect contact with the hot refrigerant.

  10. Consolidated incineration facility technical support

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.; Looper, M.G.

    1993-12-31

    In 1996, the Savannah River Site plans to begin operation of the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) leads an extensive technical support program designed to obtain incinerator and air pollution control equipment performance data to support facility start-up and operation. Key components of this technical support program include recently completed waste burn tests at both EPA`s Incineration Research Facility and at Energy and Environmental Research Corporation`s Solid Waste Incineration Test Facility. The main objectives for these tests were determining the fate of heavy metals, measuring organics destruction and removal efficiencies, and quantifying incinerator offgas particulate loading and size distribution as a function of waste feed characteristics and incineration conditions. In addition to these waste burning tests, the SRTC has recently completed installations of the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a 1/10 scale CIF offgas system pilot plant. This pilot facility will be used to demonstrate system operability and maintainability, evaluate and optimize equipment and instrument performance, and provide direct CIF start-up support. Technical support programs of this type are needed to resolve technical issues related with treatment and disposal of combustible hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive waste. Implementation of this program will minimize facility start-up problems and help insure compliance with all facility performance requirements.

  11. Enhanced condensation heat transfer with wettability patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ghosh, Aritra; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2015-11-01

    Condensation of water vapor on metal surfaces is useful for many engineering applications. A facile and scalable method is proposed for removing condensate from a vertical plate during dropwise condensation (DWC) in the presence of non-condensable gases (NCG). We use wettability-patterned superhydrophilic tracks (filmwise condensing domains) on a mirror-finish (hydrophilic) aluminum surface that promotes DWC. Tapered, horizontal ``collection'' tracks are laid to create a Laplace pressure driven flow, which collects condensate from the mirror-finish domains and sends it to vertical ``drainage tracks'' for gravity-induced shedding. An optimal design is achieved by changing the fractional area of superhydrophilic tracks with respect to the overall plate surface, and augmenting capillary-driven condensate-drainage by adjusting the track spatial layout. The design facilitates pump-less condensate drainage and enhances DWC heat transfer on the mirror-finish regions. The study highlights the relative influences of the promoting and retarding effects of dropwise and filmwise condensation zones on the overall heat transfer improvement on the substrate. The study demonstrated ~ 34% heat transfer improvement on Aluminum surface for the optimized design.

  12. Absorption-heat-pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1983-06-16

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  13. An in vitro study into the effect of a limited range of denture cleaners on surface roughness and removal of Candida albicans from conventional heat-cured acrylic resin denture base material.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Z; Johnson, A; Douglas, C W I

    2004-05-01

    This study evaluated the abrasiveness of four denture cleaners on the surface of denture base material and assessed their ability to remove Candida albicans. Acrylic resin discs 20 mm diameter and 2 mm thick were identically produced and polished. Four cleaners were evaluated: conventional toothpaste; toothpaste with stain remover; denture cleaning paste and an immersion type cleaner, and water were used as control. These were used at dilutions of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 with water. An electric toothbrush was used, and the discs cleaned to simulate 1 years' cleaning. The surface roughness of the discs were then measured, before and after cleaning, using a stylus profilometer, then inoculated with 1.2 x 10(6)C. albicans cells. The effectiveness of the denture cleaners to remove C. albicans cells was assessed following a single cleaning event. The immersion cleaner was significantly less abrasive than paste cleaners (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences between any dilutions for any cleaner used (P > 0.05). Immersion and paste cleaners removed almost all recoverable C. albicans from the discs, as cleaning with water alone was less effective (P < 0.05). An immersion type cleaner was found to be the most suitable cleaner because of its low abrasivity and effective removal of organic debris. PMID:15140172

  14. SERAPH facility capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, J.; Su, W.

    1980-06-01

    The SERAPH (Solar Energy Research and Applications in Process Heat) facility addresses technical issues concerning solar thermal energy implementation in industry. Work will include computer predictive modeling (refinement and validation), system control and evaluation, and the accumulation of operation and maintenance experience. Procedures will be consistent (to the extent possible) with those of industry. SERAPH has four major components: the solar energy delivery system (SEDS); control and data acquisition (including sequencing and emergency supervision); energy distribution system (EDS); and areas allocated for storage development and load devices.

  15. Heat Without Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubkin, Elihu

    1997-04-01

    Logic of the Second Law of Thermodynamics demands acquisition of naked entropy. Accordingly, the leanest liaison between systems is not a diathermic membrane, it is a purely informational tickler, leaking no appreciable energy. The subsystem here is a thermodynamic universe, which gets `heated' entropically, yet without gaining calories. Quantum Mechanics graciously supports that(Lubkin, E. and Lubkin, T., International Journal of Theoretical Physics,32), 933-943 (1993) (at a cost of about 1 bit) through entanglement---across this least permeable of membranes---with what is beyond that universe. Heat without heat(Also v. forthcoming Proceedings of the 4th Drexel University Conference of September 1994) is the aspirin for Boltzmann's headache, conserving entropy in mechanical isolation, even while increasing entropy in thermodynamic isolation.

  16. Simplified Heat-Source/Thermionic Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation coupling of heat from heat-source cylinder to converter cylinder through vacuum gap eliminates need for high-temperature electrical insulators between reactor heat pipes and thermionic converters. In addition no radiatior heat pipe is necessary because collectors of thermionic converters from which excess heat must be removed radiate directly to space. New design concept is also applicable to terrestrial and non-nuclear thermionic power supplies.

  17. Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents responses from Matt McGovern, "School Planning and Management's" Maintenance and Operations columnist, on the issue of school facility maintenance. McGovern does not believe schools will ever likely meet acceptable levels of maintenance, nor use infrared thermography for assessing roofs, outsource all maintenance work, nor find a pressing…

  18. 9 CFR 3.51 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment and Transportation of Rabbits... rabbits need not be heated. (b) Ventilation. Indoor housing facilities for rabbits shall be adequately.... (c) Lighting. Indoor housing facilities for rabbits shall have ample light, by natural or...

  19. 9 CFR 3.51 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment and Transportation of Rabbits... rabbits need not be heated. (b) Ventilation. Indoor housing facilities for rabbits shall be adequately.... (c) Lighting. Indoor housing facilities for rabbits shall have ample light, by natural or...

  20. 9 CFR 3.51 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment and Transportation of Rabbits... rabbits need not be heated. (b) Ventilation. Indoor housing facilities for rabbits shall be adequately.... (c) Lighting. Indoor housing facilities for rabbits shall have ample light, by natural or...