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Sample records for heat resistant austenitic

  1. Interpretation of high-temperature tensile properties by thermodynamically calculated equilibrium phase diagrams of heat-resistant austenitic cast steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seungmun; Sohn, Seok Su; Choi, Won-Mi; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Oh, Yong-Jun; Jang, Seongsik; Lee, Sunghak

    2017-01-01

    High-temperature tensile properties of three heat-resistant austenitic cast steels fabricated by varying W, Mo, and Al contents were interpreted by thermodynamically calculated equilibrium phase diagrams of austenite, ferrite, and carbides as well as microstructural analyses. A two-step calculation method was adopted to cast steel microstructures below the liquid dissolution temperature because the casting route was not an equilibrium state. Thermodynamically calculated fractions of equilibrium phases were well matched with experimentally measured fractions. Ferrites existed at room and high temperatures in both equilibrium phase diagrams and actual microstructures, which has not been reported in previous researches on austenitic cast steels. In the W2Mo1Al1 steel, 38% and 12% of ferrite existed in the equilibrium phase diagram and actual microstructure, respectively, and led to the void initiation and coalescence at ferrites and consequently to the serious deterioration of high-temperature strengths. The present equilibrium phase diagrams, besides detailed microstructural analyses, effectively evaluated the high-temperature performance by estimating high-temperature equilibrium phases, and provided an important idea on whether ferrite were formed or not in the heat-resistant austenitic cast steels.

  2. Alumina-Forming Austenitics: A New Class of Heat-Resistant Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao Ping; Maziasz, Philip J; Liu, Chain T; Pint, Bruce A; Santella, Michael L

    2008-01-01

    A family of alumina (Al2O3)-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels is under development. These alloys offer the potential for significantly higher operating temperature and environmental durability than conventional chromia (Cr2O3)-forming stainless steels, without sacrificing other critical characteristics such as cost, creep resistance, and weldability. An overview of the alloy development approach and details of the oxidation and creep resistance properties achieved to date are presented.

  3. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2010-07-06

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  4. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2011-08-23

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  5. Effects of N/C Ratio on Solidification Behaviors of Novel Nb-Bearing Austenitic Heat-Resistant Cast Steels for Exhaust Components of Gasoline Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Mei; Godlewski, Larry A.; Zindel, Jacob W.; Feng, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    In order to comply with more stringent environmental and fuel consumption regulations, novel Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant cast steels that withstand exhaust temperatures as high as 1,323 K (1,050 °C) is urgently demanded from automotive industries. In the current research, the solidification behavior of these alloys with variations of N/C ratio is investigated. Directional solidification methods were carried out to examine the microstructural development in mushy zones. Computational thermodynamic calculations under partial equilibrium conditions were performed to predict the solidification sequence of different phases. Microstructural characterization of the mushy zones indicates that N/C ratio significantly influenced the stability of γ-austenite and the precipitation temperature of NbC/Nb(C,N), thereby altering the solidification path, as well as the morphology and distribution of NbC/Nb(C,N) and γ-ferrite. The solidification sequence of different phases predicted by thermodynamic software agreed well with the experimental results, except the specific precipitation temperatures. The generated data and fundamental understanding will be helpful for the application of computational thermodynamic methods to predict the as-cast microstructure of Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant steels.

  6. Effects of N/C Ratio on Solidification Behaviors of Novel Nb-Bearing Austenitic Heat-Resistant Cast Steels for Exhaust Components of Gasoline Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Mei; Godlewski, Larry A.; Zindel, Jacob W.; Feng, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    In order to comply with more stringent environmental and fuel consumption regulations, novel Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant cast steels that withstand exhaust temperatures as high as 1,323 K (1,050 °C) is urgently demanded from automotive industries. In the current research, the solidification behavior of these alloys with variations of N/C ratio is investigated. Directional solidification methods were carried out to examine the microstructural development in mushy zones. Computational thermodynamic calculations under partial equilibrium conditions were performed to predict the solidification sequence of different phases. Microstructural characterization of the mushy zones indicates that N/C ratio significantly influenced the stability of γ-austenite and the precipitation temperature of NbC/Nb(C,N), thereby altering the solidification path, as well as the morphology and distribution of NbC/Nb(C,N) and γ-ferrite. The solidification sequence of different phases predicted by thermodynamic software agreed well with the experimental results, except the specific precipitation temperatures. The generated data and fundamental understanding will be helpful for the application of computational thermodynamic methods to predict the as-cast microstructure of Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant steels.

  7. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Abudaia, F. B. Khalil, E. O. Esehiri, A. F. Daw, K. E.

    2015-03-30

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe{sub 2}C{sub 5}. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  8. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudaia, F. B.; Khalil, E. O.; Esehiri, A. F.; Daw, K. E.

    2015-03-01

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe2C5. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  9. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  10. Coarsening behavior of MX carbonitrides in type 347H heat-resistant austenitic steel during thermal aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying-hui; Liu, Chen-xi; Liu, Yong-chang; Guo, Qian-ying; Li, Hui-jun

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the growth kinetics of MX (M = metal, X = C/N) nanoprecipitates in type 347H austenitic steel was systematically studied. To investigate the coarsening behavior and the growth mechanism of MX carbonitrides during long-term aging, experiments were performed at 700, 800, 850, and 900°C for different periods (1, 24, 70, and 100 h). The precipitation behavior of carbonitrides in specimens subjected to various aging conditions was explored using carbon replicas and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. The corresponding sizes of MX carbonitrides were measured. The results demonstrates that MX carbonitrides precipitate in type 347H austenitic steel as Nb(C,N). The coarsening rate constant is time-independent; however, an increase in aging temperature results in an increase in coarsening rate of Nb(C,N). The coarsening process was analyzed according to the calculated diffusion activation energy of Nb(C,N). When the aging temperature was 800-900°C, the mean activation energy was 294 kJ·mol-1, and the coarsening behavior was controlled primarily by the diffusion of Nb atoms.

  11. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1987-02-11

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

  12. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Braski, David N.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.

    1989-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01% to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties.

  13. Improved high temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1988-05-13

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt% 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150-1200/degree/C and then cold deforming 5-15%. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700/degree/C. 2 figs.

  14. High temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Swindeman, Robert W.; Goodwin, Gene M.

    1989-01-01

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt % 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150.degree.-1200.degree. C. and then cold deforming 5-15 %. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700.degree. C.

  15. Cast heat-resistant austenitic steel with improved temperature creep properties and balanced alloying element additions and methodology for development of the same

    DOEpatents

    Pankiw, Roman I; Muralidharan, Govindrarajan; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Maziasz, Philip J

    2012-11-27

    The present invention addresses the need for new austenitic steel compositions with higher creep strength and higher upper temperatures. The new austenitic steel compositions retain desirable phases, such as austenite, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and MC in its microstructure to higher temperatures. The present invention also discloses a methodology for the development of new austenitic steel compositions with higher creep strength and higher upper temperatures.

  16. Numerical simulation on austenitization of cast steel during heating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, B.; Han, Z. Q.; Liu, B. C.; Zhao, Y. R.; Shen, B. Z.; Zhang, L. Z.

    2012-07-01

    A cellular automaton model has been developed to simulate the austenitization process of ASTM A216 WCA cast steel during heating process. The dissolution of pearlite and the transformation of ferrite into austenite were simulated. The calculation domain was divided into square cells, which are characterized by certain attributes that represent the status of each cell: pearlite (P), ferrite (α), austenite (γ) or γ /α interface. The dissolution of pearlite was described by nucleation and growth of austenite. A mixed-mode model in multicomponent system was employed to calculate the growth velocity of the γ /α interface. According to Burke and Turnbull's theory, austenite grain coarsening induced by γ /γ grain boundary migration was simulated. To validate the model, dilatometric and quenching experiments were carried out. The dilatometric experiment was conducted using a Gleeble1500D with a sample 8 mm in diameter. The temperature of the sample was measured using thermocouples welded on the sample surface. In the quenching experiments, steel samples were heated to different temperatures then dropped into a water tank immediately, and the microstructure of the samples was examined to determine the fraction of the austenite. The simulated results were compared with the experimental results and the capability of the model for quantitatively predicting the microstructure evolution of the steel in heating process was assessed.

  17. Plastic deformation effect of the corrosion resistance in case of austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraszti, F.; Kovacs, T.

    2017-02-01

    The corrosion forms are different in case of the austenitic steel than in case of carbon steels. Corrosion is very dangerous process, because that corrosion form is the intergranular corrosion. The austenitic stainless steel shows high corrosion resistance level. It knows that plastic deformation and the heat treating decrease it’s resistance. The corrosion form in case of this steel is very special and the corrosion tests are difficult. We tested the selected steel about its corrosion behaviour after high rate deformation. We wanted to find a relationship between the corrosion resistance decreasing and the rate of the plastic deformation. We wanted to show this behaviour from mechanical and electrical changing.

  18. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  19. Microstructural evolution of metastable austenitic steel during high-pressure torsion and subsequent heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Shibata, A.; Zhao, L. J.; Gao, S.; Tian, Y. Z.; Tsuji, N.

    2014-08-01

    Metastable austenite in a Fe-24Ni-0.3C (wt.%) alloy was processed by high-pressure torsion and subsequently heat-treated. The HPT-processed material had lamellae structures composed of highly deformed austenite and deformation-induced martensite. The reverse transformation of the deformation-induced martensite and recovery/recrystallization of the retained austenite completed above 500 °C and resulted in fully annealed and single-phase austenite with different grain sizes. The ultrafine-grained and nanocrystalline austenite showed high yield strength and large ductility due to transformation-induced plasticity.

  20. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Anton, Donald L.; Lemkey, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  1. Austenite Formation Kinetics During Rapid Heating in a Microalloyed Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BURNETT,M.E.; DYKHUIZEN,RONALD C.; KELLEY,J. BRUCE; PUSKAR,JOSEPH D.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.

    1999-09-07

    The model parameters for the normalized 1054V1 material were compared to parameters previously generated for 1026 steel, and the transformation behavior was relatively consistent. Validation of the model predictions by heating into the austenite plus undissolved ferrite phase field and rapidly quenching resulted in reasonable predictions when compared to the measured volume fractions from optical metallography. The hot rolled 1054V1 material, which had a much coarser grain size and a non-equilibrium volume fraction of pearlite, had significantly different model parameters and the on heating transformation behavior of this material was less predictable with the established model. The differences in behavior is consistent with conventional wisdom that normalized micro-structure produce a more consistent response to processing, and it reinforces the need for additional work in this area.

  2. Effect of material heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2005-07-31

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the design of Class 1 components of nuclear power plants. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify design curves for applicable structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. The existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. Under certain environmental and loading conditions, fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) can be a factor of 20 lower in water than in air. This report presents experimental data on the effect of heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic Type 304 SS in LWR coolant environments. A detailed metallographic examination of fatigue test specimens was performed to characterize the crack morphology and fracture morphology. The key material, loading, and environmental parameters and their effect on the fatigue life of these steels are also described. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic SSs as a function of material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented.

  3. The microstructural dependence of wear resistance in austenite containing plate steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfram, Preston Charles

    The purpose of this project was to examine the microstructural dependence of wear resistance of various plate steels, with interests in exploring the influence of retained austenite (RA). Materials resistant to abrasive wear are desirable in the industrial areas of agriculture, earth moving, excavation, mining, mineral processing, and transportation. Abrasive wear contributes to significant financial cost associated with wear to the industry. The motivation for the current study was to determine whether it would be beneficial from a wear resistance perspective to produce plate steels with increased amounts of retained austenite. This thesis investigates this motivation through a material matrix containing AR400F, Abrasive (0.21 wt pct C, 1.26 wt pct Mn, 0.21 wt pct Si, 0.15 wt pct Ni, 0.18 wt pct Mo), Armor (0.46 wt pct C, 0.54 wt pct Mn, 0.36 wt pct Si, 1.74 wt pct Ni, 0.31 wt pct Mo), 9260, 301SS, Hadfield, and SAE 4325 steels. The Abrasive, Armor and 9260 steels were heat treated using different methods such as quench and temper, isothermal bainitic hold, and quench and partitioning (Q&P). These heat treatments yielded various microstructures and the test matrix allowed for investigation of steels with similar hardness and varying levels of RA. The wear test methods used consisted of dry sand rubber wheel (DSRW), impeller-tumbler impact-abrasion (impeller), and Bond abrasion wear testing. DSRW and impeller wear resistance was found to increase with hardness and retained austenite levels at certain hardness levels. Some Q&P samples exhibited similar or less wear than the Hadfield steels in DSRW and impeller tests. Scanning electron microscopy investigation of wear surfaces revealed different wear mechanisms for the different wear test methods ranging from micro-plowing, to micro-cutting and to fragmentation.

  4. Enhancing Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance of Lath Martensite by Introducing Nano-Films of Interlath Austenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meimei; Tasan, C. Cem; Koyama, Motomichi; Ponge, Dirk; Raabe, Dierk

    2015-09-01

    Partial reversion of interlath austenite nano-films is investigated as a potential remedy for hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of martensitic steels. We conducted uniaxial tensile tests on hydrogen-free and pre-charged medium-Mn transformation-induced plasticity-maraging steels with different austenite film thicknesses. Mechanisms of crack propagation and microstructure interaction are quantitatively analyzed using electron channelling contrast imaging and electron backscatter diffraction, revealing a promising strategy to utilize austenite reversion for hydrogen-resistant martensitic steel design.

  5. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  6. Role of the Bogachev - Mints Concept of Metastability of Austenite in Choosing Wear-Resistant Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Filippov, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    The significance of the Bogachev - Mints concept of metastability of austenite for the choice of strain-hardenable steel, cast iron, and facing alloys resisting mechanical kinds of wear (cavitation-, erosion-, and abrasion-induced) is discussed.

  7. Retained Austenite in SAE 52100 Steel Post Magnetic Processing and Heat Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Nathaniel R; Watkins, Thomas R; Cavin, Odis Burl; Jaramillo, Roger A; Ludtka, Gerard Michael

    2007-01-01

    Steel is an iron-carbon alloy that contains up to 2% carbon by weight. Understanding which phases of iron and carbon form as a function of temperature and percent carbon is important in order to process/manufacture steel with desired properties. Austenite is the face center cubic (fcc) phase of iron that exists between 912 and 1394 C. When hot steel is rapidly quenched in a medium (typically oil or water), austenite transforms into martensite. The goal of the study is to determine the effect of applying a magnetic field on the amount of retained austenite present at room temperature after quenching. Samples of SAE 52100 steel were heat treated then subjected to a magnetic field of varying strength and time, while samples of SAE 1045 steel were heat treated then subjected to a magnetic field of varying strength for a fixed time while being tempered. X-ray diffraction was used to collect quantitative data corresponding to the amount of each phase present post processing. The percentage of retained austenite was then calculated using the American Society of Testing and Materials standard for determining the amount of retained austenite for randomly oriented samples and was plotted as a function of magnetic field intensity, magnetic field apply time, and magnetic field wait time after quenching to determine what relationships exist with the amount of retained austenite present. In the SAE 52100 steel samples, stronger field strengths resulted in lower percentages of retained austenite for fixed apply times. The results were inconclusive when applying a fixed magnetic field strength for varying amounts of time. When applying a magnetic field after waiting a specific amount of time after quenching, the analyses indicate that shorter wait times result in less retained austenite. The SAE 1045 results were inconclusive. The samples showed no retained austenite regardless of magnetic field strength, indicating that tempering removed the retained austenite. It is apparent

  8. Corrosion behavior in high heat input welded heat-affected zone of Ni-free high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Joonoh Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2013-08-15

    The pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion behaviors in high heat input welded heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a metastable high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel were explored through electrochemical tests. The HAZs were simulated using Gleeble simulator with high heat input welding condition of 300 kJ/cm and the peak temperature of the HAZs was changed from 1200 °C to 1350 °C, aiming to examine the effect of δ-ferrite formation on corrosion behavior. The electrochemical test results show that both pitting corrosion resistance and interphase corrosion resistance were seriously deteriorated by δ-ferrite formation in the HAZ and their aspects were different with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The pitting corrosion resistance was decreased by the formation of Cr-depleted zone along δ-ferrite/austenite (γ) interphase resulting from δ-ferrite formation; however it didn't depend on δ-ferrite fraction. The interphase corrosion resistance depends on the total amount of Cr-depleted zone as well as ferrite area and thus continuously decreased with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The different effects of δ-ferrite fraction on pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion were carefully discussed in terms of alloying elements partitioning in the HAZ based on thermodynamic consideration. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior in the weld HAZ of high-nitrogen austenitic alloy was studied. • Cr{sub 2}N particle was not precipitated in high heat input welded HAZ of tested alloy. • Pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion show a different behavior. • Pitting corrosion resistance was affected by whether or not δ-ferrite forms. • Interphase corrosion resistance was affected by the total amount of δ-ferrite.

  9. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  10. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  11. Copper modified austenitic stainless steel alloys with improved high temperature creep resistance

    DOEpatents

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1987-04-28

    An improved austenitic stainless steel that incorporates copper into a base Fe-Ni-Cr alloy having minor alloying substituents of Mo, Mn, Si, T, Nb, V, C, N, P, B which exhibits significant improvement in high temperature creep resistance over previous steels. 3 figs.

  12. Long term corrosion resistance of alumina forming austenitic stainless steels in liquid lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejenstam, Jesper; Szakálos, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Alumina forming austenitic steels (AFA) and commercial stainless steels have been exposed in liquid lead with 10-7 wt.% oxygen at 550 °C for up to one year. It is known that chromia forming austenitic stainless steels, such as 316L and 15-15 Ti, have difficulties forming protective oxides in liquid lead at temperatures above 500 °C, which is confirmed in this study. By adding Al to austenitic steels, it is in general terms possible to increase the corrosion resistance. However this study shows that the high Ni containing AFA alloys are attacked by the liquid lead, i.e. dissolution attack occurs. By lowering the Ni content in AFA alloys, it is possible to achieve excellent oxidation properties in liquid lead. Following further optimization of the microstructural properties, low Ni AFA alloys may represent a promising future structural steel for lead cooled reactors.

  13. Investigation of the effect of cyclic laser heating for creating dispersed structures in the austenitic-martensitic alloys based on Fe-Cr-Ni system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. O.; Mironov, V. D.; Petrovskii, V. N.; Orlov, A. V.; Libman, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of cyclic laser heating on the formation of the austenite structure in the austenitic-martensitic alloys based on Fe-Cr-Ni system is investigated. It is shown that under the influence of ultra-fast laser heating on the martensite, which was formed during plastic deformation, the reverse martensitic transformation occurs, and austenite with high strength characteristics is formed. Repeated and multiple laser heating effectively grinds areas of austenite to a size close to the large nanoparticles. There is an additional increase in the strength characteristics of austenite as a result of this fragmentation.

  14. The Effects of Austenitizing Conditions on the Microstructure and Wear Resistance of a Centrifugally Cast High-Speed Steel Roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Minwoo; Lee, Young-Kook

    2016-07-01

    The influences of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and wear resistance of a centrifugally cast high-speed steel roll were investigated through thermodynamic calculation, microstructural analysis, and high-temperature wear tests. When the austenitizing temperature was between 1323 K and 1423 K (1050 °C and 1150 °C), coarse eutectic M2C plates were decomposed into a mixture of MC and M6C particles. However, at 1473 K (1200 °C), the M2C plates were first replaced by both new austenite grains and MC particles without M6C particles, and then remaining M2C particles were dissolved during the growth of MC particles. The wear resistance of the HSS roll was improved with increasing austenitizing temperature up to 1473 K (1200 °C) because the coarse eutectic M2C plates, which are vulnerable to crack propagation, changed to disconnected hard M6C and MC particles.

  15. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. An advanced cavitation resistant austenitic stainless steel for pumps

    SciTech Connect

    McCaul, C.

    1996-10-01

    Cavitation damage is a chronic problem leading to impaired pump performance, and eventual failure in a wide range of industrial applications. Pump manufacturers recognize that cavitation damage can be minimized by utilizing advanced hydraulic designs and employing new state-of-the-art materials. The materials solution is particularly attractive because it does not involve detailed engineering studies, new pattern equipment, or long lead times. This paper traces the development, over the past decade, of a new class of cavitation resistant stainless steels. The properties and engineering characteristics of these alloys are described, and several initial field applications are discussed.

  17. Formation of laves phase in a refractory austenitic steel due to long-term heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, L. V.; Shal'kevich, A. B.

    2011-07-01

    Steels of the Fe - Cr - Ni -Mo - Nb - Al - C system are studied by methods of phase physicochemical analysis and electron microscopy with the aim to determine the causes of changes in mechanical properties after long-term heating at a temperature of 600 - 700°C. Grain-boundary formation of particles of a Laves phase is shown to cause decrease in the impact toughness and transformation of particles of γ'-phase under conditions of creep. The effect of alloying elements on the chemical composition of the multicomponent Laves phase is studied depending on the temperatures of hardening, aging, and subsequent heating. Concentration correspondence between the chemical composition of the austenite and the intermetallic tcp phase formed in aging is discovered. A computational scheme for predicting the possibility of formation of Laves phases in multicomponent alloys is suggested.

  18. Heat Resistant Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The racing car shown is one of many coated with an inorganic paint that protects "hot parts" of automotive vehicles. Developed and manufactured by Sperex Corporation, Gardena, California, the durable, heat-resistant paint is used on car and truck exhaust systems, firewalls, brake drums and engine manifolds. NASA technology contributed to development of the paint. Sperex was provided a technical support packa'ge detailing the research of Goddard Space Flight Center on long-life inorganic coatings. The information helped Sperex perfect its own formulations.

  19. Importance of Thermokinetic Diagrams of Transformation of Supercooled Austenite for Development of Heat Treatment Modes for Critical Steel Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadi, G. P.; Kondrat'ev, S. Yu.; Malyshevskii, V. A.; Sil'nikov, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    The role of plotting of diagrams of isothermal and thermokinetic transformations of supercooled austenite in the development of heat treatment processes of steels is discussed. Specific examples of the necessity of plotting of thermokinetic diagrams of transformations in steels for solving critical production problems are considered.

  20. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.S.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.

    1997-04-15

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, {<=}1% Cr and either {>=}0.05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or {>=}0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1% rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, {<=}3% Cu, balance Fe. 64 figs.

  1. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  2. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  3. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  4. Investigation of Austenitization in Low Carbon Microalloyed Steel During Continuous Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunabalapandian, Kavitha; Samanta, Santigopal; Ranjan, Ravi; Singh, Shiv Brat

    2017-02-01

    Dilatation associated with the formation of austenite from ferrite-pearlite was calculated from equilibrium phase fraction and composition. Linear thermal expansion coefficient of ferrite required for the calculation was determined by iteration of dilatation data. A good match was obtained between the calculated and experimental dilatation curves. The calculated dilatation data were used to identify the stages of austenite formation: pearlite dissolution followed by ferrite to austenite transformation which is gradual at first before becoming rapid.

  5. Upset Resistance Welding of Carbon Steel to Austenitic Stainless Steel Narrow Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozlati, Ashkaan; Movahedi, Mojtaba; Mohammadkamal, Helia

    2016-11-01

    Effects of welding current (at the range of 2-4 kA) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of upset resistance welds of AISI-1035 carbon steel to AISI-304L austenitic stainless steel rods were investigated. The results showed that the joint strength first increased by raising the welding current up to 3 kA and then decreased beyond it. Increasing trend was related to more plastic deformation, accelerated diffusion, reduction of defects and formation of mechanical locks at the joint interface. For currents more than 3 kA, decrease in the joint strength was mainly caused by formation of hot spots. Using the optimum welding current of 3 kA, tensile strength of the joint reached to 76% of the carbon steel base metal strength. Microstructural observations and microhardness results confirmed that there was no hard phase, i.e., martensite or bainite, at the weld zone. Moreover, a fully austenitic transition layer related to carbon diffusion from carbon steel was observed at the weld interface.

  6. Heat resistant protective hand covering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschirch, R. P.; Sidman, K. R.; Arons, I. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A heat-resistant aromatic polyamide fiber is described. The outer surface of the shell is coated with a fire-resistant elastomer and liner. Generally conforming and secured to the shell and disposed inwardly of the shell, the liner is made of a felt fabric of temperature-resistant aromatic polymide fiber.

  7. Improving intergranular corrosion resistance of sensitized type 316 austenitic stainless steel by laser surface melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudali, U. K.; Dayal, R. K.

    1992-06-01

    An attempt was made to modify the surface microstructure of a sensitized austenitic stainless steel, without affecting the bulk properties, using laser surface melting techniques. AISI type 316 stainless steel specimens sensitized at 923 K for 20 hr were laser surface melted using a pulsed ruby laser at 6 J energy. Two successive pulses were given to ensure uniform melting and homogenization. The melted layers were characterized by small angle X- ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Intergranular corrosion tests were carried out on the melted region as per ASTM A262 practice A (etch test) and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test. The results indicated an improvement in the intergranular corrosion resistance after laser surface melting. The results are explained on the basis of homogeneous and nonsensitized microstructure obtained at the surface after laser surface melting. It is concluded that laser surface melting can be used as an in situ method to increase the life of a sensitized component by modifying the surface microstructure.

  8. Impact of the nanostructuration on the corrosion resistance and hardness of irradiated 316 austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hug, E.; Prasath Babu, R.; Monnet, I.; Etienne, A.; Moisy, F.; Pralong, V.; Enikeev, N.; Abramova, M.; Sauvage, X.; Radiguet, B.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of grain size and irradiation defects on the mechanical behavior and the corrosion resistance of a 316 stainless steel have been investigated. Nanostructured samples were obtained by severe plastic deformation using high pressure torsion. Both coarse grain and nanostructured samples were irradiated with 10 MeV 56Fe5+ ions. Microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Surface mechanical properties were evaluated thanks to hardness measurements and the corrosion resistance was studied in chloride environment. Nanostructuration by high pressure torsion followed by annealing leads to enrichment in chromium at grain boundaries. However, irradiation of nanostructured samples implies a chromium depletion of the same order than depicted in coarse grain specimens but without metallurgical damage like segregated dislocation loops or clusters. Potentiodynamic polarization tests highlight a definitive deterioration of the corrosion resistance of coarse grain steel with irradiation. Downsizing the grain to a few hundred of nanometers enhances the corrosion resistance of irradiated samples, despite the fact that the hardness of nanocrystalline austenitic steel is only weakly affected by irradiation. These new experimental results are discussed in the basis of couplings between mechanical and electrical properties of the passivated layer thanks to impedance spectroscopy measurements, hardness properties of the surfaces and local microstructure evolutions.

  9. Effect of Heat Treatment on Residual Stresses in the Zone of Fusion of Austenitic and Vessel Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlybov, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the structure and physical and mechanical properties of flat specimens cut from a massive billet from steel 15Kh2MFA with an austenitic facing on one side is studied. The hardness and the microhardness of the specimens are determined. Acoustic and x-ray studies are performed. The causes of residual stresses giving rise to deformation and formation of cracks in the faced steel are established. Ways to solve the problem are suggested.

  10. Development of Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Cr-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloy with Improved High-Temperature Strength and Creep-Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2001-06-15

    In February of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Special Metals Corporation - Huntington Alloys (formerly INCO Alloys International, Inc.) to develop a modified wrought austenitic stainless alloy with considerably more strength and corrosion resistance than alloy 800H or 800HT, but with otherwise similar engineering and application characteristics. Alloy 800H and related alloys have extensive use in coal flue gas environments, as well as for tubing or structural components in chemical and petrochemical applications. The main concept of the project was make small, deliberate elemental microalloying additions to this Fe-based alloy to produce, with proper processing, fine stable carbide dispersions for enhanced high temperature creep-strength and rupture resistance, with similar or better oxidation/corrosion resistance. The project began with alloy 803, a Fe-25Cr-35NiTi,Nb alloy recently developed by INCO, as the base alloy for modification. Smaller commercial developmental alloy heats were produced by Special Metal. At the end of the project, three rounds of alloy development had produced a modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance above 815 C (1500 C) than standard alloy 803 in the solution-annealed (SA) condition. The new upgraded 803 alloy also had the potential for a processing boost in that creep resistance for certain kinds of manufactured components that was not found in the standard alloy. The upgraded 803 alloy showed similar or slightly better oxidation and corrosion resistance relative to standard 803. Creep strength and oxidation/corrosion resistance of the upgraded 803 alloy were significantly better than found in alloy 800 H, as originally intended. The CRADA was terminated in February 2003. A contributing factor was Special Metals Corporation being in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy. Additional testing, further commercial scale-up, and any potential

  11. Crack growth rates of irradiated austenitic stainless steel weld heat affected zone in BWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Gruber, E. E.; Daum, R. S.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of reactor pressure vessels because of their superior fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods can exacerbate the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these steels by affecting the material microchemistry, material microstructure, and water chemistry. Experimental data are presented on crack growth rates of the heat affected zone (HAZ) in Types 304L and 304 SS weld specimens before and after they were irradiated to a fluence of 5.0 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 0.75 dpa) at {approx}288 C. Crack growth tests were conducted under cycling loading and long hold time trapezoidal loading in simulated boiling water reactor environments on Type 304L SS HAZ of the H5 weld from the Grand Gulf reactor core shroud and on Type 304 SS HAZ of a laboratory-prepared weld. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed.

  12. The influence of heat treatment on the high-stress abrasion resistance and fracture toughness of alloy white cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sare, I. R.; Arnold, B. K.

    1995-07-01

    The influence of a range of austenitizing and subcritical (tempering) heat treatments on the high-stress abrasion resistance and fracture toughness of four commercially significant grades of alloy white cast iron was investigated. Complementing an earlier study[1] on the influence of a more limited range of heat treatments on the gouging abrasion performance of the same alloys, the results showed that the effect of austenitizing temperature on high-stress abrasion pin test weight loss differed for each alloy. With increasing austenitizing temperature, these results ranged from a substantial improvement in wear performance and retention of hardness through to vir-tually no change in wear performance and substantial falls in hardness. Fracture toughness, however, increased markedly in all alloys with increasing austenitizing temperature. Tempering treatments in the range 400 °C to 600 °C, following hardening at the austenitizing temperature used commonly in industrial practice for each alloy, produced significant changes in both hard-ness and wear performance, but negligible changes in fracture toughness. Most importantly, the data showed that selection of the correct temperature for subcritical heat treatment to reduce the retained austenite content for applications involving repeated impact loading is critical if abrasion resistance is not to suffer.

  13. Development of Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Cr-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloy with Improved High Temperature Strenth and Creep-Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, PJ

    2004-09-30

    In February of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Special Metals Corporation-Huntington Alloys (formerly INCO Alloys International, Inc.) to develop a modified wrought austenitic stainless alloy with considerably more strength and corrosion resistance than alloy 800H or 800HT, but with otherwise similar engineering and application characteristics. Alloy 800H and related alloys have extensive use in coal flue gas environments, as well as for tubing or structural components in chemical and petrochemical applications. The main concept of the project was make small, deliberate elemental microalloying additions to this Fe-based alloy to produce, with proper processing, fine stable carbide dispersions for enhanced high temperature creep-strength and rupture resistance, with similar or better oxidation/corrosion resistance. The project began with alloy 803, a Fe-25Cr-35NiTi,Nb alloy recently developed by INCO, as the base alloy for modification. Smaller commercial developmental alloy heats were produced by Special Metals. At the end of the project, three rounds of alloy development had produced a modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance above 815EC (1500EC) than standard alloy 803 in the solution-annealed (SA) condition. The new upgraded 803 alloy also had the potential for a processing boost in that creep resistance for certain kinds of manufactured components that was not found in the standard alloy. The upgraded 803 alloy showed similar or slightly better oxidation and corrosion resistance relative to standard 803. Creep strength and oxidation/corrosion resistance of the upgraded 803 alloy were significantly better than found in alloy 800H, as originally intended. The CRADA was terminated in February 2003. A contributing factor was Special Metals Corporation being in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy. Additional testing, further commercial scale-up, and any potential

  14. Resistive Heating in Saturn's Thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vriesema, Jess W.; Koskinen, Tommi; Yelle, Roger V.

    2016-10-01

    The thermospheres of the jovian planets are several times hotter than solar heating alone can account for. On Saturn, resistive heating appears sufficient to explain these temperatures in auroral regions, but the particular mechanism(s) responsible for heating the lower latitudes remains unclear. Smith et al. (2005) suggested that electrodynamics of the equatorial region—particularly resistive heating caused by strong electrojet currents—might explain the observed temperatures at low latitudes. Müller-Wodarg et al. (2006) found that their circulation model could reproduce low-latitude temperatures only when they included resistive heating at the poles and applied a uniform, generic heating source globally. Smith et al. (2007) concluded that heating at the poles leads to meridional circulation that cools low latitudes and argued that in-situ heating is required to explain the temperatures at low latitudes.Resistive heating at low latitudes, arising from enhanced current generation driven by thermospheric winds, is a potentially important in-situ heating mechanism. Ion drag caused by low-latitude electrodynamics can modify global circulation and meridional transport of energy. We present an axisymmetric, steady-state formulation of wind-driven electrodynamics to investigate these possibilities throughout Saturn's thermosphere. At present, we assume a dipole magnetic field and neglect any contributions from the magnetosphere. We use ion mixing ratios from the model of Kim et al. (2014) and the observed temperature-pressure profile from Koskinen et al. (2015) to calculate the generalized conductivity tensor as described by Koskinen et al. (2014). Our model solves the coupled equations for charge continuity and Ohm's law with tensor conductivity while enforcing zero current across the boundaries. The resulting partial differential equation is solved for the current density throughout the domain and used to calculate the net resistive heating rate. We demonstrate

  15. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M₂₃C₆ precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  16. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; ...

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size ofmore » ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M₂₃C₆ precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.« less

  17. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M23C6 precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  18. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments.

    PubMed

    Sun, C; Zheng, S; Wei, C C; Wu, Y; Shao, L; Yang, Y; Hartwig, K T; Maloy, S A; Zinkle, S J; Allen, T R; Wang, H; Zhang, X

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304 L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500 °C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M(23)C(6) precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  19. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    PubMed Central

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M23C6 precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments. PMID:25588326

  20. Overview of strategies for high-temperature creep and oxidation resistance of alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Santella, Michael L; Bei, Hongbin; Maziasz, Philip J; Pint, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    A family of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys is under development for structural use in fossil energy conversion and combustion system applications. The AFA alloys developed to date exhibit comparable creep-rupture lives to state-of-the-art advanced austenitic alloys, and superior oxidation resistance in the {approx}923 K to 1173 K (650 C to 900 C) temperature range due to the formation of a protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale rather than the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales that form on conventional stainless steel alloys. This article overviews the alloy design approaches used to obtain high-temperature creep strength in AFA alloys via considerations of phase equilibrium from thermodynamic calculations as well as microstructure characterization. Strengthening precipitates under evaluation include MC-type carbides or intermetallic phases such as NiAl-B2, Fe{sub 2}(Mo,Nb)-Laves, Ni{sub 3}Al-L1{sub 2}, etc. in the austenitic single-phase matrix. Creep, tensile, and oxidation properties of the AFA alloys are discussed relative to compositional and microstructural factors.

  1. Overview of Strategies for High-Temperature Creep and Oxidation Resistance of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Santella, M. L.; Bei, H.; Maziasz, P. J.; Pint, B. A.

    2011-04-01

    A family of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys is under development for structural use in fossil energy conversion and combustion system applications. The AFA alloys developed to date exhibit comparable creep-rupture lives to state-of-the-art advanced austenitic alloys, and superior oxidation resistance in the ~923 K to 1173 K (650 °C to 900 °C) temperature range due to the formation of a protective Al2O3 scale rather than the Cr2O3 scales that form on conventional stainless steel alloys. This article overviews the alloy design approaches used to obtain high-temperature creep strength in AFA alloys via considerations of phase equilibrium from thermodynamic calculations as well as microstructure characterization. Strengthening precipitates under evaluation include MC-type carbides or intermetallic phases such as NiAl-B2, Fe2(Mo,Nb)-Laves, Ni3Al-L12, etc. in the austenitic single-phase matrix. Creep, tensile, and oxidation properties of the AFA alloys are discussed relative to compositional and microstructural factors.

  2. Heat resistant protective hand covering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidman, K. R.; Arons, I. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    The heat resistant, protective glove is made up of first and second shell sections which define a palm side and a backside, respectively. The first shell section is made of a twill wave fabric of a temperature-resistant aromatic polyamide fiber. The second shell section is made of a knitted fabric of a temperature-resistant aromatic polyamide fiber. The first and second shell sections are secured to one another, e.g., by sewing, to provide the desired glove configuration and an opening for insertion of the wearer's hand. The protective glove also includes a first liner section which is secured to and overlies the inner surface of the first shell section and is made of a felt fabric of a temperature-resistant aromatic polyamide fiber and has a flame resistant, elastomenic coating on the surface facing and overlying the inner surface of the first shell section.

  3. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  4. The effect of cooling speed on the structure and properties of the heat affected zone in welded compounds of ferrite-austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonik, I. L.; Gurulev, D. N.; Bondareva, O. P.

    2017-02-01

    Such parameters as the maximum heating temperature, duration of stay at high temperatures, the rate of cooling influence greatly the structure and properties of the heat-affected zone of welded joints of steels and alloys. In the present work, the effect of different cooling speed upon the impact of the thermal cycle of welding on the structure, the fine structure and toughness of ferrite-austenitic steels is investigated. It is established that the cooling speed after welding has a great influence on the shock impact toughness, the phase composition and the structure of the zone of ferrite-austenitic steels.

  5. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1995-08-01

    Alloys for design and construction of structural components needed to contain process streams and provide internal structures in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems were examined. Emphasis was placed on high-strength, corrosion-resistant alloys for service at temperatures above 1000 {degrees}F (540{degrees}C). Data were collected that related to fabrication, joining, corrosion protection, and failure criteria. Alloys systems include modified type 310 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb steels and sulfidation-resistance alloys HR120 and HR160. Types of testing include creep, stress-rupture, creep crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for high temperature service, a modified type 310 stainless steel was developed with a target strength of twice that for standard type 310 stainless steel.

  6. Turbulent resistivity, diffusion and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, B. D.; Kennel, C. F.; Mackenzie, K.; Coroniti, F. V.; Kindel, J. M.; Stenzel, R.; Taylor, R. J.; White, R.; Wong, A. Y.; Bernstein, W.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are reported on ion acoustic and ion cyclotron turbulence and their roles in anomalous resistivity, viscosity, diffusion and heating and in the structure of collisionless electrostatic shocks. Resistance due to ion acoustic turbulence has been observed in experiments with a streaming cesium plasma in which electron current, potential rise due to turbulent resistivity, spectrum of unstable ion acoustic waves, and associated electron heating were all measured directly. Kinetic theory calculations for an expanding, unstable plasma, give results in agreement with the experiment. In a strong magnetic field, with T sub e/T sub i approximately 1 and current densities typical for present Tokomaks, the plasma is stable to ion acoustic but unstable to current driven electrostatic ion cyclotron waves. Relevant characteristics of these waves are calculated and it is shown that for ion, beta greater than m sub e/m sub i, the electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave has a lower instability threshold than the electrostatic one. However, when ion acoustic turbulence is present experiments with double plasma devices show rapid anomalous heating of an ion beam streaming through a plasma.

  7. Austenitic stainless steel alloys having improved resistance to fast neutron-induced swelling

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Everett E.; Stiegler, James O.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.; Leitnaker, James M.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention is based on the discovery that radiation-induced voids which occur during fast neutron irradiation can be controlled by small but effective additions of titanium and silicon. The void-suppressing effect of these metals in combination is demonstrated and particularly apparent in austenitic stainless steels.

  8. Austenitic stainless steel alloys having improved resistance to fast neutron-induced swelling

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Everett E.; Stiegler, James O.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.; Leitnaker, James M.

    1977-03-08

    The present invention is based on the discovery that radiation-induced voids which occur during fast neutron irradiation can be controlled by small but effective additions of titanium and silicon. The void-suppressing effect of these metals in combination is demonstrated and particularly apparent in austenitic stainless steels.

  9. In Situ Observation of Austenite Growth During Continuous Heating in Very-Low-Carbon Fe-Mn and Ni Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, M.; Wan, X. L.

    2017-02-01

    The growth of austenite during continuous heating was observed in situ under a confocal scanning laser microscope in Fe-Mn and Ni alloys containing less than 0.01 mass pct C. The advancements of the α/γ boundary were measured in the temperature range of ca. 40 K, which encompassed the Ae3 line of the alloys. Below Ae3, the growth rates were of the same order of magnitude as those predicted from the carbon diffusion-controlled negligible partition local equilibrium in the (α + γ) two-phase region, whereas those observed near and above the Ae3 were ca. two orders of magnitude greater. The α/γ boundary mobilities evaluated therefrom were somewhat smaller than those obtained previously in massive ferrite transformation during continuous cooling in the same alloys, albeit the experimental scatter was large and fell near the mobilities proposed in the literature. The α/γ boundary migrated probably with a carbon diffusion spike ahead of the boundary and the solute drag of the carbon or alloy element is unlikely to be operative during the growth of austenite.

  10. In Situ Observation of Austenite Growth During Continuous Heating in Very-Low-Carbon Fe-Mn and Ni Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, M.; Wan, X. L.

    2017-04-01

    The growth of austenite during continuous heating was observed in situ under a confocal scanning laser microscope in Fe-Mn and Ni alloys containing less than 0.01 mass pct C. The advancements of the α/ γ boundary were measured in the temperature range of ca. 40 K, which encompassed the Ae3 line of the alloys. Below Ae3, the growth rates were of the same order of magnitude as those predicted from the carbon diffusion-controlled negligible partition local equilibrium in the ( α + γ) two-phase region, whereas those observed near and above the Ae3 were ca. two orders of magnitude greater. The α/ γ boundary mobilities evaluated therefrom were somewhat smaller than those obtained previously in massive ferrite transformation during continuous cooling in the same alloys, albeit the experimental scatter was large and fell near the mobilities proposed in the literature. The α/ γ boundary migrated probably with a carbon diffusion spike ahead of the boundary and the solute drag of the carbon or alloy element is unlikely to be operative during the growth of austenite.

  11. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1996-08-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, modified alloy 800, and two sulfidation resistant alloys: HR160 and HR120. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700{degrees}C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925{degrees}C with good weldability and ductility.

  12. Static and cyclic strength of austenitic corrosion-resistant cast Cr-Ni-Mn-Mo-N steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostina, M. V.; Muradyan, S. O.; Terent'ev, V. F.; Blinov, E. V.; Prosvirin, D. V.

    2015-05-01

    The resistance to cyclic loading of high-nitrogen corrosion-resistant cast austenitic 05Kh22AG15N8M2FL (˜0.5% N) steel is studied for the first time (high-cycle tests of plane specimens at 20°C in air upon repeated tension). The structure of the steel, its static strength, and the fracture in regions of high- and low-cycle fatigues are investigated. It is shown that the structural state of the steel (solid-solution treatment of the as-cast and deformed steel, hot plastic deformation, and aging) and the test conditions influence the fatigue life. The results are compared with the high-cycle fatigue life of austenitic steels with 0.1-1.1% N treated for solid solution, and the fatigue limit is compared to the ultimate strength, the grain size, and the total content of nitrogen and carbon in the steels. Fractographic studies are performed for the fracture surfaces of cast 05Kh22AG15N8M2FL steel after fatigue tests.

  13. Kinetics of Formation of Austenite and Effect of Heating in the Intercritical Temperature Range on the Structure of Steel 08G2B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farber, V. M.; Khotinov, V. A.; Selivanova, O. V.; Polukhina, O. N.; Yurovskikh, A. S.; Panov, D. O.

    2017-03-01

    The kinetics of formation of austenite in steel 08G2B under continuous heating at a rate of 0.3 and 90 K/sec to the intercritical temperature range is studied with the help of x-ray diffraction, dilatometric and calorimetric methods of analysis. The tests are performed for specimens in two initial conditions, i.e., after recrystallization-free controlled rolling with accelerated cooling and after water quenching from 1000°C. It is shown that the α - γ transformation under the conditions studied may be treated as a diffusion-controlled isokinetic reaction occurring in two stages with rapid formation of austenite nuclei primarily over the boundaries of initial austenite grains.

  14. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015 to 0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  15. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  16. High Nb, Ta, and Al creep- and oxidation-resistant austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel HTUPS alloy includes, in weight percent: 15 to 30 Ni; 10 to 15 Cr; 2 to 5 Al; 0.6 to 5 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1 W; up to 0.5 Cu; up to 4 Mn; up to 1 Si; 0.05 to 0.15 C; up to 0.15 B; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni wherein said alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, said particles comprising at least one composition selected from the group consisting of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure, said austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  17. Corrosion resistance of multilayer hybrid sol-gel coatings deposited on the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Y. T.; Rondón, E. A.; Rueda, L.; Hernández Barrios, C. A.; Coy, A.; Viejo, F.

    2016-02-01

    In the present work multilayer hybrid sol-gel coatings were synthesized on the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel employed in the fabrication of orthopaedic implants. Hybrid sols were obtained from a mixture of inorganic precursor, TEOS, and organic, GPTMS, using ethanol as solvent, and acetic acid as catalyst. The characterization of the sols was performed using pH measurements, rheological tests and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for different ageing times. On the other hand, the coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the corrosion resistance was evaluated using anodic potentiodynamic polarization in SBF solution at 37±2°C. The results confirmed that sol-gel synthesis employing TEOS-GPTMS systems produces uniform and homogeneous coatings, which enhanced the corrosion resistance with regard to the parent alloy. Moreover, corrosion performance was retained after applying more than one layer (multilayer coatings).

  18. Gas-Solid Interactions During Nonisothermal Heat Treatment of a High-Strength CrMnCN Austenitic Steel Powder: Influence of Atmospheric Conditions and Heating Rate on the Densification Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasokha, Nikolaj; Weber, Sebastian; Huth, Stephan; Zumsande, Kathrin; Theisen, Werner

    2012-11-01

    This work deals with gas-solid interactions between a high-alloyed steel powder and the surrounding atmosphere during continuous heating. It is motivated by the recently developed corrosion-resistant CrMnCN austenitic cast steels. Here, powder metallurgical processing would be desirable to manufacture highly homogeneous parts and/or novel corrosion-resistant metal-matrix composites. However, the successful use of this new production route calls for a comprehensive investigation of interactions between the sintering atmosphere and the metallic powder to prevent undesirable changes to the chemical composition, e.g., degassing of nitrogen or evaporation of manganese. In this study, dilatometric measurements combined with residual gas analysis, high-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations provided detailed information about the influence of different atmospheric conditions on the microstructure, constitution, and densification behavior of a gas-atomized CrMnCN steel powder during continuous heating. Intensive desorption of nitrogen led to the conclusion that a vacuum atmosphere is not suitable for powder metallurgical (PM) processing. Exposure to an N2-containing atmosphere resulted in the formation of nitrides and lattice expansion. Experimental findings have shown that the N content can be controlled by the nitrogen partial pressure. Furthermore, the reduction of surface oxides because of a carbothermal reaction at elevated temperatures and the resulting enhancement of the powder's densification behavior are discussed in this work.

  19. Effect of Alloying Additions on Phase Equilibria and Creep Resistance of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Santella, M. L.; Brady, M. P.; Bei, H.; Maziasz, P. J.

    2009-08-01

    The high-temperature creep properties of a series of alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels based on Fe-20Ni-(12-14)Cr-(2.5-4)Al-(0.2-3.3)Nb-0.1C (weight percent) were studied. Computational thermodynamics were used to aid in the interpretation of data on microstructural stability, phase equilibria, and creep resistance. Phases of MC (M: mainly Nb), M23C6 (M: mainly Cr), B2 [ β-(Ni,Fe)Al], and Laves [Fe2(Mo,Nb)] were observed after creep-rupture testing at 750 °C and 170 MPa; this was generally consistent with the thermodynamic calculations. The creep resistance increased with increasing Nb additions up to 1 wt pct in the 2.5 and 3 Al wt pct alloy series, due to the stabilization of nanoscale MC particles relative to M23C6. Additions of Nb greater than 1 wt pct decreased creep resistance in the alloy series due to stabilization of the Laves phase and increased amounts of undissolved, coarse MC, which effectively reduced the precipitation of nanoscale MC particles. The additions of Al also increased the creep resistance moderately due to the increase in the volume fraction of B2 phase precipitates. Calculations suggested that optimum creep resistance would be achieved at approximately 1.5 wt pct Nb in the 4 wt pct Al alloy series.

  20. Effect of alloying additions on phase equilibria and creep resistance of alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Santella, Michael L; Brady, Michael P; Bei, Hongbin; Maziasz, Philip J

    2009-01-01

    The high-temperature creep properties of a series of alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels based on Fe-20Ni-(12-14)Cr-(2.5-4)Al-(0.2-3.3)Nb-0.1C (weight percent) were studied. Computational thermodynamics were used to aid in the interpretation of data on microstructural stability, phase equilibria, and creep resistance. Phases of MC (M: mainly Nb), M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (M: mainly Cr), B2 [{beta}-(Ni,Fe)Al], and Laves [Fe{sub 2}(Mo,Nb)] were observed after creep-rupture testing at 750 C and 170 MPa; this was generally consistent with the thermodynamic calculations. The creep resistance increased with increasing Nb additions up to 1 wt pct in the 2.5 and 3 Al wt pct alloy series, due to the stabilization of nanoscale MC particles relative to M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. Additions of Nb greater than 1 wt pct decreased creep resistance in the alloy series due to stabilization of the Laves phase and increased amounts of undissolved, coarse MC, which effectively reduced the precipitation of nanoscale MC particles. The additions of Al also increased the creep resistance moderately due to the increase in the volume fraction of B2 phase precipitates. Calculations suggested that optimum creep resistance would be achieved at approximately 1.5 wt pct Nb in the 4 wt pct Al alloy series.

  1. Simulation of the elastic deformation of laser-welded joints of an austenitic corrosion-resistant steel and a titanium alloy with an intermediate copper insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, N. B.; Myasnikova, M. V.; Michurov, N. S.

    2016-02-01

    The macro- and microstructures and the distribution of elements and of the values of the microhardness and contact modulus of elasticity along the height and width of the weld metal and heat-affected zone of austenitic corrosion-resistant 12Kh18N10T steel (Russian analog of AISI 321) and titanium alloy VT1-0 (Grade 2) with an intermediate copper insert have been studied after laser welding under different conditions. The structural inhomogeneity of the joint obtained according to one of the regimes selected has been shown: the material of the welded joint represents a supersaturated solid solution of Fe, Ni, Cr, and Ti in the crystal lattice of copper with a uniformly distributed particles of intermetallic compounds Ti(Fe,Cr) and TiCu3. At the boundaries with steel and with the titanium alloy, diffusion zones with thicknesses of 0.1-0.2 mm are formed that represent supersaturated solid solutions based on iron and titanium. The strength of such a joint was 474 MPa, which corresponds to the level of strength of the titanium alloy. A numerical simulation of the mechanical behavior of welded joints upon the elastic tension-compression has been performed taking into account their structural state, which makes it possible to determine the amplitude values of the deformations of the material of the weld.

  2. Gas chromatography using resistive heating technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anzi; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Milton L

    2012-10-26

    Air bath ovens are standard in conventional gas chromatography (GC) instruments because of their simplicity and reliability for column temperature control. However, their low heating rates, high power consumption and bulky size are in conflict with the increasing demands for fast separation and portable instrumentation. The deficiencies of air bath ovens can be eliminated using resistive heating technology, as the column is conductively heated by compact resistive heaters with low thermal mass. Resistive heating methods were employed in the early years of GC history, and they are emerging again as instrumentation is becoming more compact and sophisticated. Numerous designs have been tested and some have been successfully commercialized. Development of portable GC systems, including lab-on-a-chip devices, greatly benefits from the use of small, low-power resistive heating hardware. High speed GC separations using conventional instruments also can be best achieved with resistive heating modules. Despite some of its own inherent disadvantages, including efficiency loss, complex manufacturing and inconvenient column maintenance, resistive heating is expected to rapidly become a mature technology and even replace oven heating in the not-to-distant future.

  3. Identification of heat resistant Escherichia coli by qPCR for the locus of heat resistance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Angela; Chui, Linda

    2017-02-01

    Three qPCR assays targeting the locus of heat resistance to identify heat resistant clinical Escherichia coli isolates are described. Of 613 isolates, 3 (0.5%) possessed the locus. The assays are a rapid, highly sensitive and specific alternative to screening by heat shock and can be used in food safety surveillance.

  4. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of the research is to provide databases and design criteria to assist in the selection of optimum alloys for construction of components needed to contain process streams in advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems. Typical components include: steam line piping and superheater tubing for low emission boilers (600 to 700{degrees}C), heat exchanger tubing for advanced steam cycles and topping cycle systems (650 to 800{degrees}C), foil materials for recuperators, on advanced turbine systems (700 to 750{degrees}C), and tubesheets for barrier filters, liners for piping, cyclones, and blowback system tubing for hot-gas cleanup systems (850 to 1000{degrees}C). The materials being examined fall into several classes, depending on which of the advanced heat recovery concepts is of concern. These classes include martensitic steels for service to 650{degrees}C, lean stainless steels and modified 25Cr-30Ni steels for service to 700{degrees}C, modified 25Cr-20Ni steels for service to 900{degrees}C, and high Ni-Cr-Fe or Ni-Cr-Co-Fe alloys for service to 1000{degrees}C.

  5. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1997-12-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, and modified alloy 800. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700 C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925 C with good weldability and ductility.

  6. Improving the corrosion resistance of power metallurgy austenitic stainless steels through infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, F.; Ibars, J.R.; Ruiz-Roman, J.M.; Torralba, J.M.; Ruiz-Prieto, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Types 316L (UNS S31603) and 304L (UNS S30403) sintered stainless steels (SS) were produced in a laboratory furnace at 1,330 C and infiltrated with copper and bronze in different percentages to determine their effect on the corrosion resistance of the presintered SS. Corrosion resistance was studied by immersion in sulfuric, hydrochloric and nitric acids and by electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) tests. Both copper and bronze improved corrosion resistance highly in HCl and boiling H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Results of EPR and boiling H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} immersion tests showed good concordance.

  7. Effect of Welding Current on the Structure and Properties of Resistance Spot Welded Dissimilar (Austenitic Stainless Steel and Low Carbon Steel) Metal Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawon, M. R. A.; Gulshan, F.; Kurny, A. S. W.

    2015-04-01

    1.5 mm thick sheet metal coupons of austenitic stainless steel and plain low carbon steel were welded by resistance spot welding technique. The effects of welding current in the range 3-9 kA on the structure and mechanical properties of welded joint were investigated. The structure was studied by macroscopic, microscopic and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical properties were determined by tensile testing and microhardness measurements. Asymmetrical shape weld nugget was found to have formed in the welded joint which increased in size with an increase in welding current. The fusion zone showed cast structure with coarse columnar grain and dendritic with excess delta ferrite in austenitic matrix. Microhardness of the weld nugget was maximum because of martensite formation. An increase in welding current also increased tensile strength of the weld coupon. An attempt has also been made to relate the mode of fracture with the welding current.

  8. Improved heat-resistant garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. S.

    1970-01-01

    Fabrication method for protective clothing eliminates the common heat-short by avoiding the stitch which is common to all layers, and preventing external exposure of any stitch to the outer environment. A unique overlap arrangement is described and additional protective methods are discussed.

  9. Strength of "Light" Ferritic and Austenitic Steels Based on the Fe - Mn - Al - C System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaputkina, L. M.; Svyazhin, A. G.; Smarygina, I. V.; Kindop, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The phase composition, the hardness, the mechanical properties at room temperature, and the resistance to hot (950 - 1000°C) and warm (550°C) deformation are studied for cast deformable "light" ferritic and austenitic steels of the Fe - (12 - 25)% Mn - (0 - 15)% Al - (0 - 2)% C system alloyed additionally with about 5% Ni. The high-aluminum high-manganese low-carbon and carbonless ferritic steels at a temperature of about 0.5 T melt have a specific strength close to that of the austenitic steels and may be used as weldable scale-resistant and wear-resistant materials. The high-carbon Fe - (20 - 24)% Mn - (5 - 9)% Al - 5% Ni - 1.5% C austenitic steels may be applied as light high-strength materials operating at cryogenic temperatures after a solution treatment and as scale- and heat-resistant materials in an aged condition.

  10. Turbulent resistive heating of solar coronal arches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, G.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility that coronal heating occurs by means of anomalous Joule heating by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is examined, with consideration given to currents running from foot of a loop to the other. It is assumed that self-fields generated by the currents are absent and currents follow the direction of the magnetic field, allowing the plasma cylinder to expand radially. Ion and electron heating rates are defined within the cylinder, together with longitudinal conduction and convection, radiation and cross-field transport, all in terms of Coulomb and turbulent effects. The dominant force is identified as electrostatic ion cyclotron instability, while ion acoustic modes remain stable. Rapid heating from an initial temperature of 10 eV to 100-1000 eV levels is calculated, with plasma reaching and maintaining a temperature in the 100 eV range. Strong heating is also possible according to the turbulent Ohm's law and by resistive heating.

  11. A Feasibility Study on Low Temperature Thermochemical Treatments of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Fluidized Bed Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruman, Esa; Sun, Yong; Triwiyanto, Askar; Manurung, Yupiter H. P.; Adesta, Erry Y.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the feasibility of using an industrial fluidized bed furnace to perform low temperature thermochemical treatments of austenitic stainless steels has been studied, with the aim to produce expanded austenite layers with combined wear and corrosion resistance, similar to those achievable by plasma and gaseous processes. Several low temperature thermochemical treatments were studied, including nitriding, carburizing, combined nitridingcarburizing (hybrid treatment), and sequential carburizing and nitriding. The results demonstrate that it is feasible to produce expanded austenite layers on the investigated austenitic stainless steel by the fluidized bed heat treatment technique, thus widening the application window for the novel low temperature processes. The results also demonstrate that the fluidized bed furnace is the most effective for performing the hybrid treatment, which involves the simultaneous incorporation of nitrogen and carbon together into the surface region of the component in nitrogen and carbon containing atmospheres. Such hybrid treatment produces a thicker and harder layer than the other three processes investigated.

  12. Dry-heat resistance of selected psychrophiles.

    PubMed

    Winans, L; Pflug, I J; Foster, T L

    1977-08-01

    The dry-heat resistance characteristics of spores of psychrophilic organisms isolated from soil samples from the Viking spacecraft assembly areas at Cape Kennedy Space Flight Center, Cape Canaveral, Fla., were studied. Spore suspensions were produced, and dry-heat D values were determined for the microorganisms that demonstrated growth or survival under a simulated Martian environment. The dry-heat tests were carried out by using the planchet-boat-hot plate system at 110 and 125 degrees C with an ambient relative humidity of 50% at 22 degrees C. The spores evaluated had a relatively low resistance to dry heat. D(110 degrees C) values ranged from 7.5 to 122 min, whereas the D(123 degrees C) values ranged from less than 1.0 to 9.8 min.

  13. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y. T.; Zhang, B.; Zheng, S. J.; Wang, J.; San, X. Y.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu2+-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu2−δS layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner. PMID:24398863

  14. The development of alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels for high-temperature structural use

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Santella, Michael L; Maziasz, Philip J; Pint, Bruce A; Lu, Zhao Ping; Liu, Chain T; Bei, Hongbin

    2008-01-01

    Efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to developAl2O3-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels for high-temperature (600-900 aC) structural use under aggressive oxidizing conditions are overviewed. Data obtained to date indicate the potential to achieve superior oxidation resistance to conventional Cr2O3-forming Fe- and Ni-base heat-resistant alloys, with creep strength comparable to state-of-the-art advanced austenitic stainless steels. Preliminary assessment also indicates the developed alloys are amenable to welding. Details of the alloy design approach and composition-microstructure-property relationships are presented.

  15. High post-irradiation ductility thermomechanical treatment for precipitation strengthened austenitic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Laidler, James J.; Borisch, Ronald R.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1982-01-01

    A method for improving the post-irradiation ductility is described which prises a solution heat treatment following which the materials are cold worked. They are included to demonstrate the beneficial effect of this treatment on the swelling resistance and the ductility of these austenitic precipitation hardenable alloys.

  16. Effect of post weld heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ITER-grade 316LN austenitic stainless steel weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Jijun; Fang, Chao; Song, Yuntao; Wei, Jing; Xu, Shen; Wu, Jiefeng

    2017-04-01

    The effect of postweld heat treatment (PWHT) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ITER-grade 316LN austenitic stainless steel joints with ER316LMn filler material was investigated. PWHT aging was performed for 1 h at four different temperatures of 600 °C, 760 °C, 870 °C and 920 °C, respectively. The microstructure revealed the sigma phase precipitation occurred in the weld metals heat-treated at the temperature of 870 °C and 920 °C. The PWHT temperatures have the less effect on the tensile strength, and the maximum tensile strength of the joints is about 630 MPa, reaching the 95% of the base metal, whereas the elongation is enhanced with the rise of PWHT temperatures. Meanwhile, the sigma phase precipitation in the weld metals reduces the impact toughness.

  17. Assessment of Retained Austenite in AISI D2 Tool Steel Using Magnetic Hysteresis and Barkhausen Noise Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahrobaee, Saeed; Kashefi, Mehrdad

    2015-03-01

    Inaccurate heat treatment process could result in excessive amount of retained austenite, which degrades the mechanical properties, like strength, wear resistance, and hardness of cold work tool steel parts. Thus, to control the mechanical properties, quantitative measurement of the retained austenite is a critical step in optimizing the heat-treating parameters. X-ray diffraction method is the most frequently used technique for this purpose. This technique is, however, destructive and time consuming. Furthermore, it is not applicable to 100% quality inspection of industrial parts. In the present paper, the influence of austenitizing temperature on the retained austenite content and hardness of AISI D2 tool steel has been studied. Additionally, nondestructive magnetic hysteresis parameters of the samples including coercivity, magnetic saturation, and maximum differential permeability as well as their magnetic Barkhausen noise features (RMS peak voltage and peak position) have been investigated. The results revealed direct relations between magnetic saturation, differential permeability, and MBN peak amplitude with increasing austenitizing temperature due to the retained austenite formation. Besides, both parameters of coercivity and peak position had an inverse correlation with the retained austenite fraction.

  18. Resistively heated shape memory polymer device

    DOEpatents

    Marion, III, John E.; Bearinger, Jane P.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2016-10-25

    A resistively heated shape memory polymer device is made by providing a rod, sheet or substrate that includes a resistive medium. The rod, sheet or substrate is coated with a first shape memory polymer providing a coated intermediate unit. The coated intermediate unit is in turn coated with a conductive material providing a second intermediate unit. The second coated intermediate unit is in turn coated with an outer shape memory polymer. The rod, sheet or substrate is exposed and an electrical lead is attached to the rod, sheet or substrate. The conductive material is exposed and an electrical lead is attached to the conductive material.

  19. Method for producing heat-resistant semi-inorganic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yajima, S.; Okamura, K.; Shishido, T.; Hasegawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The method for producing a heat resistant, semi-inorganic compound is discussed. Five examples in which various alcohols, phenols, and aromatic carbonic acids are used to test heat resistance and solubility are provided.

  20. Effect of Friction-Induced Deformation on the Structure, Microhardness, and Wear Resistance of Austenitic Chromium—Nickel Stainless Steel Subjected to Subsequent Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, L. G.; Chernenko, N. L.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of plastic deformation that occurs in the zone of the sliding friction contact on structural transformations in the 12Kh18N9T austenitic steel subjected to subsequent 1-h oxidation in air at temperatures of 300-800°C, as well as on its wear resistance, has been studied. It has been shown that severe deformation induced by dry sliding friction produces the two-phase nanocrystalline γ + α structure in the surface layer of the steel ~10 μm thick. This structure has the microhardness of 5.2 GPa. Subsequent oxidation of steel at temperatures of 300-500°C leads to an additional increase in the microhardness of its deformed surface layer to the value of 7.0 GPa. This is due to the active saturation of the austenite and the strain-assisted martensite (α') with the oxygen atoms, which diffuse deep into the metal over the boundaries of the γ and α' nanocrystals with an increased rate. The concentration of oxygen in the surface layer of the steel and in wear products reaches 8 wt %. The atoms of the dissolved oxygen efficiently pin dislocations in the γ and α' phases, which enhances the strength and wear resistance of the surface of the 12Kh18N9T steel. The oxidation of steel at temperatures of 550-800°C under a light normal load (98 N) results in the formation of a large number of Fe3O4 (magnetite) nanoparticles, which increase the resistance of the steel to thermal softening and its wear resistance during dry sliding friction in a pair with 40Kh13 steel. Under a heavy normal load (196 N), the toughness of 12Kh18N9T steel and, therefore, the wear resistance of its surface layer decrease due to the presence of the brittle oxide phase.

  1. On the Loss of Protective Scale Formation in Creep-Resistant, Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels at 900?aC in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Pint, Bruce A; Santella, Michael L; Maziasz, Philip J; Walker, Larry R

    2008-01-01

    A family of creep-resistant, Al2O3-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels was recently developed. The alloys exhibit excellent oxidation resistance up to 800 aC, but are susceptible to internal attack of Al at higher temperatures. In the present work, higher levels of Ni, Cr, Al, and Nb additions were found to correlate with improved oxidation behavior at 900 aC in air. The alloys generally appeared to be initially capable of external Al2O3 scale formation, with a subsequent transition to internal attack of Al (internal oxidation and internal nitridation) that is dependent on alloy composition. Compositional profiles at the alloy/scale interface suggest that the transition to internal oxidation is preceded by subsurface depletion of Al. Alloy design directions to increase the upper-temperature limit of protective Al2O3 scale formation in these alloys are discussed

  2. Effect of Lipid Materials on Heat Resistance of Bacterial Spores

    PubMed Central

    Molin, N.; Snygg, B. G.

    1967-01-01

    The apparent heat resistance of spores of Bacillus megaterium, B. subtilis, B. cereus, B. stearothermophilus, and Clostridium botulinum type E in lipids was investigated and compared with the resistance of the spores in phosphate buffer solution. The most pronounced increase in heat resistance was noted for B. subtilis and C. botulinum type E, the increase varying with the type of lipid used. A high water content of the lipids used as heating menstruum lowered the heat resistance of the spores. Possible explanations for the high heat resistance of spores in lipids are discussed. PMID:16349757

  3. Genetic determinants of heat resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Ryan G.; Zheng, Jinshui; Garcia-Hernandez, Rigoberto; Ruan, Lifang; Gänzle, Michael G.; McMullen, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli AW1.7 is a heat resistant food isolate and the occurrence of pathogenic strains with comparable heat resistance may pose a risk to food safety. To identify the genetic determinants of heat resistance, 29 strains of E. coli that differed in their of heat resistance were analyzed by comparative genomics. Strains were classified as highly heat resistant strains, exhibiting a D60-value of more than 6 min; moderately heat resistant strains, exhibiting a D60-value of more than 1 min; or as heat sensitive. A ~14 kb genomic island containing 16 predicted open reading frames encoding putative heat shock proteins and proteases was identified only in highly heat resistant strains. The genomic island was termed the locus of heat resistance (LHR). This putative operon is flanked by mobile elements and possesses >99% sequence identity to genomic islands contributing to heat resistance in Cronobacter sakazakii and Klebsiella pneumoniae. An additional 41 LHR sequences with >87% sequence identity were identified in 11 different species of β- and γ-proteobacteria. Cloning of the full length LHR conferred high heat resistance to the heat sensitive E. coli AW1.7ΔpHR1 and DH5α. The presence of the LHR correlates perfectly to heat resistance in several species of Enterobacteriaceae and occurs at a frequency of 2% of all E. coli genomes, including pathogenic strains. This study suggests the LHR has been laterally exchanged among the β- and γ-proteobacteria and is a reliable indicator of high heat resistance in E. coli. PMID:26441869

  4. Joule Heating Resistance Can Differ from Ohmic Resistance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saslow, Wayne M.

    1998-03-01

    For slow, steady discharge of a voltaic cell with more than one active charge-carrier, the cell's Joule heating resistance RJ differs from its Ohmic resistance R. Here RJ is determined by volume integration over the local rate of heating, J_1^2/σ1 + J_2^2/σ2 +dots (J1 is the part of the electric current due to carrier #1, σ1 is its conductivity). RJ involves only the current-carrying ions, whereas R=Δ V/I involves all of the ions because all ions contribute to the electric field and voltage Δ V across the cell. We explicitly study a well-charged lead-acid cell(W.M.Saslow, Phys.Rev.Lett. 76), 4849 (1996) and a Zn-Cu cell.(See Sect.8.1 of manuscript at http://physics.tamu.edu/ )saslow R/RJ can be greater than or less than unity.

  5. In-vitro long term and electrochemical corrosion resistance of cold deformed nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2014-07-01

    This work was focused on the evaluation of the corrosion behavior of deformed (10% and 20% cold work) and annealed (at 1050 °C for 15 min followed by water quenching) Ni-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels (HNSs) in simulated body fluid at 37°C using weight loss method (long term), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to understand the surface morphology of the alloys after polarization test. It has been observed that cold working had a significant influence on the corrosion resistant properties of these alloys. The weight loss and corrosion rates were observed to decrease with increasing degree of cold working and nitrogen content in the alloy. The corrosion resistance of the material is directly related to the resistance of the passive oxide film formed on its surface which was enhanced with cold working and nitrogen content. It was also observed that corrosion current densities were decreased and corrosion potentials were shifted to more positive values. By seeing pit morphology under SEM, shallower and smaller pits were associated with HNSs and cold worked samples, indicating that corrosion resistance increases with increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold deformation. X-ray diffraction profiles of annealed as well as deformed alloys were revealed and there is no evidence for formation of martensite or any other secondary phases.

  6. Hypersonic Composites Resist Extreme Heat and Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Through research contracts with NASA, Materials and Electrochemical Research Corporation (MER), of Tucson, Arizona, contributed a number of technologies to record-breaking hypersonic flights. Through this research, MER developed a coating that successfully passed testing to simulate Mach 10 conditions, as well as provide several additional carbon-carbon (C-C) composite components for the flights. MER created all of the leading edges for the X-43A test vehicles at Dryden-considered the most critical parts of this experimental craft. In addition to being very heat resistant, the coating had to be very lightweight and thin, as the aircraft was designed to very precise specifications and could not afford to have a bulky coating. MER patented its carbon-carbon (C-C) composite process and then formed a spinoff company, Frontier Materials Corporation (FMC), also based in Tucson. FMC is using the patent in conjunction with low-cost PAN (polyacrylonitrile)-based fibers to introduce these materials to the commercial markets. The C-C composites are very lightweight and exceptionally strong and stiff, even at very high temperatures. The composites have been used in industrial heating applications, the automotive and aerospace industries, as well as in glass manufacturing and on semiconductors. Applications also include transfer components for glass manufacturing and structural members for carrier support in semiconductor processing.

  7. Development of Heat-resistant XLPE Cable and Accessories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Murata, Yoshinao; Kishi, Kouji; Katakai, Shoshi

    We have developed heat-resistant XLPE cable and accessories that can be operated at 105°C as the maximum permissible conductor temperature in normal operation. Through this cable system, greater transmission capacity can be achieved using existing cable ducts and without increasing the conductor size of the cable. We have developed heat-resistant XLPE insulation material which has a higher melting point than that of conventional XLPE. The breakdown strength of heat-resistant XLPE cable at 105°C is almost the same as that of conventional XLPE cable at 90°C. The heat deformation of the new cable at 105°C is almost the same as that of conventional XLPE cable at 90°C. Conventional self-pressurized rubber joints can be applied to heat-resistant cable lines with the new waterproof joint compound with low heat resistivity.

  8. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-12-31

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors.

  9. Microstructure and its effect on toughness and wear resistance of laser surface melted and post heat treated high speed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åhman, Leif

    1984-10-01

    High speed steel hacksaw blade blanks were laser surface melted and rapidly solidified along one edge. The laser melting resulted in complete carbide dissolution. By subsequent machining and heat treatments saw teeth were manufactured with a refined internal structure of the edges and corners. The structure was fully martensitic with a uniform and dense dispersion of small primary carbides. Sawing tests in quenched and tempered steel showed that blade life was somewhat improved, as compared to conventionally heat treated blades. The increased wear resistance is believed to be due to improved toughness along with high hardness caused by the refined carbide structure. Sawing tests in austenitic stainless steel did not give any significant improvement in performance. The effect of the altered microstructure on performance is likely to be more or less pronounced depending on application, tool and work material.

  10. Effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry.

    PubMed

    Goldratt, E; Yeshurun, Y; Greenfield, A J

    1980-03-01

    The effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry is analyzed. An experimental method is proposed for estimating the magnitude of this effect. Results are reported for the measurement of the temperature of a hot, solid body under different heat-leak configurations. Design criteria for thermometers are presented which minimize the effect of such heat leaks.

  11. Effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldratt, E.; Yeshurun, Y.; Greenfield, A. J.

    1980-03-01

    The effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry is analyzed. An experimental method is proposed for estimating the magnitude of this effect. Results are reported for the measurement of the temperature of a hot, solid body under different heat-leak configurations. Design criteria for thermometers are presented which minimize the effect of such heat leaks.

  12. Alumina-Forming Austenitics: A New Approach to Thermal and Degradation Resistant Stainless Steels for Industrial Use

    SciTech Connect

    David A Helmick; John H Magee; Michael P Brady

    2012-05-31

    A series of developmental AFA alloys was selected for study based on: 25 Ni wt.% (alloys A-F), 20 wt% Ni (alloys G-H), and 12 Ni wt.% (alloys I-L). An emphasis in this work was placed on the lower alloy content direction for AFA alloys to reduce alloy raw material cost, rather than more highly alloyed and costly AFA alloys for higher temperature performance. Alloys A-D explored the effects of Al (3-4 wt.%) and C (0.05-0.2 wt.%) in the Fe-25Ni-14Cr-2Mn-2Mo-1W-1Nb wt.% base range; alloys E and F explored the effects of removing costly Mo and W additions in a Fe-25Ni-14Cr-4Al-2.5Nb-2Mn-0.2C base, alloys G and H examined Nb (1-2.5wt.%) and removal of Mo, W in a Fe-20Ni-14Cr-3Al-2Mn-0.2 C wt.% base; and alloys I-L examined effects of C (0.1-0.2 wt.%) and Mn (5-10 wt.%) on a low cost Fe-14Cr-12Ni-3Cu-2.5Al wt.% base (no Mo, W additions). Creep testing resulted in elemental trends that included the beneficial effect of higher carbon and lower niobium in 20-25%Ni AFA alloys and, the beneficial of lower Mn in 12%Ni AFA alloys. Corrosion tests in steam and sulfidation-oxidation environments showed, in general, these alloys were capable of a ten-fold improvement in performance when compared to conventional austenitic stainless steels. Also, corrosion test results in metal-dusting environments were promising and, warrant further investigation.

  13. Heat Flow Pattern and Thermal Resistance Modeling of Anisotropic Heat Spreaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falakzaadeh, F.; Mehryar, R.

    2017-01-01

    To ensure safe operating temperatures of the ever smaller heat generating electronic devices, drastic measures should be taken. Heat spreaders are used to increase surface area, by spreading the heat without necessarily transferring it to the ambient in the first place. The heat flow pattern is investigated in heat spreaders and the fundamental differences regarding how heat conducts in different materials is addressed. Isotropic materials are compared with anisotropic ones having a specifically higher in-plane thermal conductivity than through plane direction. Thermal resistance models are proposed for anisotropic and isotropic heat spreaders in compliance with the order of magnitude of dimensions used in electronics packaging. After establishing thermal resistance models for both the isotropic and anisotropic cases, numerical results are used to find a correlation for predicting thermal resistance in anisotropic heat spreaders with high anisotropy ratios.

  14. Applications of resistive heating in gas chromatography: a review.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Matthew R; Hilder, Emily F; Shellie, Robert A

    2013-11-25

    Gas chromatography is widely applied to separate, identify, and quantify components of samples in a timely manner. Increasing demand for analytical throughput, instrument portability, environmental sustainability, and more economical analysis necessitates the development of new gas chromatography instrumentation. The applications of resistive column heating technologies have been espoused for nearly thirty years and resistively heated gas chromatography has been commercially available for the last ten years. Despite this lengthy period of existence, resistively heated gas chromatography has not been universally adopted. This low rate of adoption may be partially ascribed to the saturation of the market with older convection oven technology, coupled with other analytical challenges such as sampling, injection, detection and data processing occupying research. This article assesses the advantages and applications of resistive heating in gas chromatography and discusses practical considerations associated with adoption of this technology.

  15. Vapor-Resistant Heat-Pipe Artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dussinger, Peter M.; Shaubach, Robert M.; Buchko, Matt

    1991-01-01

    Vapor lock in heat pipe delayed or prevented. Modifications of wick prevent flow of vapor into, or formation of vapor in, liquid-return artery. Small pores of fine-grained sintered wick help to prevent formation of large bubbles. Slotted tube offers few nucleation sites for bubbles. Improves return of liquid in heat pipe.

  16. Reduction of Intergranular Cracking Susceptibility by Precipitation Control in 2.25Cr Heat-Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyun Je; Heo, Nam Hoe; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2017-01-01

    This research is performed to decrease reheat cracking susceptibility in the T/P23 heat-resistant steels (2.25Cr1.5WVNbTi), in other words, to reduce phosphorus and sulfur segregation concentration at the prior austenite grain boundary/carbide interfaces (GCIs) and the carbide-free prior austenite grain boundaries (carbide-free PAGBs) causing intergranular cracking. The increase of bulk vanadium content reduces the amount of M23C6 carbides consuming carbon atoms which can repulse phosphorus and sulfur from interfaces, but promotes the precipitation reaction of V-rich MX carbo-nitrides. Such a precipitation reaction results in the lower segregation concentration of phosphorus or no sulfur at the GCIs and the carbide-free PAGBs. This is because the carbon atoms remaining after precipitation reaction segregates to the interfaces and repels phosphorus and sulfur. Also, tungsten segregation can increase the cohesive grain boundary strength as one of the grain boundary strengtheners. Consequently, the lower segregation concentration of the impurities and the segregation of tungsten atoms lower the intergranular cracking susceptibility.

  17. Reduction of Intergranular Cracking Susceptibility by Precipitation Control in 2.25Cr Heat-Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyun Je; Heo, Nam Hoe; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2017-03-01

    This research is performed to decrease reheat cracking susceptibility in the T/P23 heat-resistant steels (2.25Cr1.5WVNbTi), in other words, to reduce phosphorus and sulfur segregation concentration at the prior austenite grain boundary/carbide interfaces (GCIs) and the carbide-free prior austenite grain boundaries (carbide-free PAGBs) causing intergranular cracking. The increase of bulk vanadium content reduces the amount of M23C6 carbides consuming carbon atoms which can repulse phosphorus and sulfur from interfaces, but promotes the precipitation reaction of V-rich MX carbo-nitrides. Such a precipitation reaction results in the lower segregation concentration of phosphorus or no sulfur at the GCIs and the carbide-free PAGBs. This is because the carbon atoms remaining after precipitation reaction segregates to the interfaces and repels phosphorus and sulfur. Also, tungsten segregation can increase the cohesive grain boundary strength as one of the grain boundary strengtheners. Consequently, the lower segregation concentration of the impurities and the segregation of tungsten atoms lower the intergranular cracking susceptibility.

  18. Nanostructured nickel-free austenitic stainless steel/hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Tulinski, Maciej; Jurczyk, Mieczyslaw

    2012-11-01

    In this work Ni-free austenitic stainless steels with nanostructure and their nanocomposites with hydroxyapatite are presented and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and optical profiling. The samples were synthesized by mechanical alloying, heat treatment and nitriding of elemental microcrystalline powders with addition of hydroxyapatite (HA). In our work we wanted to introduce into stainless steel hydroxyapatite ceramics that have been intensively studied for bone repair and replacement applications. Such applications were chosen because of their high biocompatibility and ability to bond to bone. Since nickel-free austenitic stainless steels seem to have better mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility compared to 316L stainless steels, it is possible that composite made of this steel and HA could improve properties, as well. Mechanical alloying and nitriding are very effective technologies to improve the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. Similar process in case of nanocomposites of stainless steel with hydroxyapatite helps achieve even better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Hence nanocrystalline nickel-free stainless steels and nickel-free stainless steel/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites could be promising bionanomaterials for use as a hard tissue replacement implants, e.g., orthopedic implants. In such application, the surface roughness and more specifically the surface topography influences the proliferation of cells (e.g., osteoblasts).

  19. Evaluation of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Foil for Advanced Recuperators

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Brady, Michael P; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Santella, Michael L; Maziasz, Philip J; Matthews, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    A corrosion- and creep-resistant austenitic stainless steel has been developed for advanced recuperator applications. By optimizing the Al and Cr contents, the alloy is fully austenitic for creep strength while allowing the formation of a chemically stable external alumina scale at temperatures up to 900 C. An alumina scale eliminates long-term problems with the formation of volatile Cr oxy-hydroxides in the presence of water vapor in exhaust gas. As a first step in producing foil for primary surface recuperators, three commercially cast heats have been rolled to 100 m thick foil in the laboratory to evaluate performance in creep and oxidation testing. Results from initial creep testing are presented at 675 C and 750 C, showing excellent creep strength compared with other candidate foil materials. Laboratory exposures in humid air at 650 800 C have shown acceptable oxidation resistance. A similar oxidation behavior was observed for sheet specimens of these alloys exposed in a modified 65 kW microturbine for 2871 h. One composition that showed superior creep and oxidation resistance has been selected for the preparation of a commercial batch of foil. DOI: 10.1115/1.4002827

  20. Development of a high strength, hydrogen-resistant austenitic alloy. [Fe-36 Ni-3 Ti-3 Ta-1. 3 Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K.M.; Klahn, D.H.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Research toward high-strength, high toughness nonmagnetic steels for use in the retaining rings of large electrical generators led to the development of a Ta-modified iron-based superalloy (Fe-36 Ni-3 Ti-3 Ta-0.5 Al-1.3 Mo-0.3 V-0.01 B) which combines high strength with good toughness after suitable aging. The alloy did, however, show some degradation in fatigue resistance in gaseous hydrogen. This sensitivity was associated with a deformation-induced martensitic transformation near the fracture surface. The addition of a small amount of chromium to the alloy suppressed the martensite transformation and led to a marked improvement in hydrogen resistance.

  1. Radiation and Heat Resistance of Moraxella-Acinetobacter in Meats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-23

    growth 7 Vacuum packaging and impact on growth of resistant isolates .... 7 Effect of fat content of meat on radiation and heat resistance of...approximately 10 cells per ml. Storage for culture main- tenance after growth was at 3-5*C. Vacuum packaging and impact on growth of resistant isolates...sensitive to reduced oxygen occur- ring with vacuum packaging of foods (Maxcy et al., 1976). Furthermore, most of the radiation-resiscant M-A were

  2. Heat- And Oxidation-Resistant Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Alloys coated with electrically conductive ceramics used to make strong, oxidation-resistant electrodes for electrochemical cells operating at temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 degrees C. Fe3Al or Ni3Al coated with strontium-doped lanthanum manganite more resistant to chemical attack than all-metal electrode, less brittle than all-ceramic electrode, and less costly than either alternative.

  3. An Investigation on Low-Temperature Thermochemical Treatments of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Fluidized Bed Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruman, E.; Sun, Y.; Triwiyanto, A.; Manurung, Y. H. P.; Adesta, E. Y.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, the feasibility of using an industrial fluidized bed furnace to perform low-temperature thermochemical treatments of austenitic stainless steels has been studied, with the aim to produce expanded austenite layers with combined wear and corrosion resistance, similar to those achievable by plasma and gaseous processes. Several low-temperature thermochemical treatments were studied, including nitriding, carburizing, combined nitriding-carburizing (hybrid treatment), and sequential carburizing and nitriding. The results demonstrate that it is feasible to produce expanded austenite layers on the investigated austenitic stainless steel by the fluidized bed heat treatment technique, thus widening the application window for the novel low-temperature processes. The results also demonstrate that the fluidized bed furnace is the most effective for performing the hybrid treatment, which involves the simultaneous incorporation of nitrogen and carbon together into the surface region of the component in nitrogen- and carbon-containing atmospheres. Such hybrid treatment produces a thicker and harder layer than the other three processes investigated.

  4. Bonding Heat-Resistant Fabric to Tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Smiser, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Acid etching, densification, and silica cement ensure strong bond. Key step in preparation for bonding to glazed tile is etching quartz fabric and tile with acid. This increases adhesion of silica cement used to form bond. Procedures use high-temperature materials exclusively and therefore suitable for securing flexible seals and heat barriers around doors and viewing ports in furnaces and kilns.

  5. Joule heating and anomalous resistivity in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, S. R.

    2009-06-01

    Recent radioastronomical observations of Faraday rotation in the solar corona can be interpreted as evidence for coronal currents, with values as large as 2.5×109 Amperes (Spangler, 2007). These estimates of currents are used to develop a model for Joule heating in the corona. It is assumed that the currents are concentrated in thin current sheets, as suggested by theories of two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The Spitzer result for the resistivity is adopted as a lower limit to the true resistivity. The calculated volumetric heating rate is compared with an independent theoretical estimate by Cranmer et al. (2007). This latter estimate accounts for the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of the corona at a heliocentric distance of several solar radii. Our calculated Joule heating rate is less than the Cranmer et al estimate by at least a factor of 3×105. The currents inferred from the observations of Spangler (2007) are not relevant to coronal heating unless the true resistivity is enormously increased relative to the Spitzer value. However, the same model for turbulent current sheets used to calculate the heating rate also gives an electron drift speed which can be comparable to the electron thermal speed, and larger than the ion acoustic speed. It is therefore possible that the coronal current sheets are unstable to current-driven instabilities which produce high levels of waves, enhance the resistivity and thus the heating rate.

  6. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld metal.

  7. Effects of heat treatment on wear resistance and fracture toughness of duo-cast materials composed of high-chromium white cast iron and low-chromium steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Lee, Sunghak; Jung, Jae-Young

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate effects of heat treatment on wear resistance and fracture toughness in duo-cast materials composed of a high-chromium white cast iron and a low-chromium steel as a wear-resistant part and a ductile part, respectively. Different size, volume fraction, and distribution of M7C3 carbides were employed in the wear-resistant part by changing the amount of chromium, and the volume fraction of martensite in the austenitic matrix was varied by the heat treatment. In the alloys containing a small amount of chromium, an interdendritic structure of eutectic M7C3 carbides was formed, and led to the improvement of wear resistance and fracture toughness. After the heat treatment, the selective wear of the matrix and the cracking or spalled-off carbides were considerably reduced since the hardness difference between carbides and matrix decreased by the increase in the matrix hardness, thereby leading to the improvement of the wear resistance. However, the fracture toughness of the heat-treated alloys was lower than that of the as-cast alloys because the matrix containing a considerable amount of martensite did not effectively prevent the crack propagation.

  8. Heat stress in chemical protective clothing: porosity and vapour resistance.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; den Hartog, Emiel; Martini, Svein

    2011-05-01

    Heat strain in chemical protective clothing is an important factor in industrial and military practice. Various improvements to the clothing to alleviate strain while maintaining protection have been attempted. More recently, selectively permeable membranes have been introduced to improve protection, but questions are raised regarding their effect on heat strain. In this paper the use of selectively permeable membranes with low vapour resistance was compared to textile-based outer layers with similar ensemble vapour resistance. For textile-based outer layers, the effect of increasing air permeability was investigated. When comparing ensembles with a textile vs. a membrane outer layer that have similar heat and vapour resistances measured for the sum of fabric samples, a higher heat strain is observed in the membrane ensemble, as in actual wear, and the air permeability of the textile version improves ventilation and allows better cooling by sweat evaporation. For garments with identical thickness and static dry heat resistance, but differing levels of air permeability, a strong correlation of microclimate ventilation due to wind and movement with air permeability was observed. This was reflected in lower values of core and skin temperatures and heart rate for garments with higher air permeability. For heart rate and core temperature the two lowest and the two highest air permeabilities formed two distinct groups, but they did not differ within these groups. Based on protection requirements, it is concluded that air permeability increases can reduce heat strain levels allowing optimisation of chemical protective clothing. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: In this study on chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) protective clothing, heat strain is shown to be significantly higher with selectively permeable membranes compared to air permeable ensembles. Optimisation of CBRN personal protective equipment needs to balance sufficient protection with reduced heat

  9. Performance of a Heating Block System Designed for Studying the Heat Resistance of Bacteria in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Xiao-xi; Li, Rui; Hou, Li-xia; Huang, Zhi; Ling, Bo; Wang, Shao-jin

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of bacteria’s heat resistance is essential for developing effective thermal treatments. Choosing an appropriate test method is important to accurately determine bacteria’s heat resistances. Although being a major factor to influence the thermo-tolerance of bacteria, the heating rate in samples cannot be controlled in water or oil bath methods due to main dependence on sample’s thermal properties. A heating block system (HBS) was designed to regulate the heating rates in liquid, semi-solid and solid foods using a temperature controller. Distilled water, apple juice, mashed potato, almond powder and beef were selected to evaluate the HBS’s performance by experiment and computer simulation. The results showed that the heating rates of 1, 5 and 10 °C/min with final set-point temperatures and holding times could be easily and precisely achieved in five selected food materials. A good agreement in sample central temperature profiles was obtained under various heating rates between experiment and simulation. The experimental and simulated results showed that the HBS could provide a sufficiently uniform heating environment in food samples. The effect of heating rate on bacterial thermal resistance was evaluated with the HBS. The system may hold potential applications for rapid and accurate assessments of bacteria’s thermo-tolerances. PMID:27465120

  10. Performance of a Heating Block System Designed for Studying the Heat Resistance of Bacteria in Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Xiao-Xi; Li, Rui; Hou, Li-Xia; Huang, Zhi; Ling, Bo; Wang, Shao-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of bacteria’s heat resistance is essential for developing effective thermal treatments. Choosing an appropriate test method is important to accurately determine bacteria’s heat resistances. Although being a major factor to influence the thermo-tolerance of bacteria, the heating rate in samples cannot be controlled in water or oil bath methods due to main dependence on sample’s thermal properties. A heating block system (HBS) was designed to regulate the heating rates in liquid, semi-solid and solid foods using a temperature controller. Distilled water, apple juice, mashed potato, almond powder and beef were selected to evaluate the HBS’s performance by experiment and computer simulation. The results showed that the heating rates of 1, 5 and 10 °C/min with final set-point temperatures and holding times could be easily and precisely achieved in five selected food materials. A good agreement in sample central temperature profiles was obtained under various heating rates between experiment and simulation. The experimental and simulated results showed that the HBS could provide a sufficiently uniform heating environment in food samples. The effect of heating rate on bacterial thermal resistance was evaluated with the HBS. The system may hold potential applications for rapid and accurate assessments of bacteria’s thermo-tolerances.

  11. Performance of a Heating Block System Designed for Studying the Heat Resistance of Bacteria in Foods.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xiao-Xi; Li, Rui; Hou, Li-Xia; Huang, Zhi; Ling, Bo; Wang, Shao-Jin

    2016-07-28

    Knowledge of bacteria's heat resistance is essential for developing effective thermal treatments. Choosing an appropriate test method is important to accurately determine bacteria's heat resistances. Although being a major factor to influence the thermo-tolerance of bacteria, the heating rate in samples cannot be controlled in water or oil bath methods due to main dependence on sample's thermal properties. A heating block system (HBS) was designed to regulate the heating rates in liquid, semi-solid and solid foods using a temperature controller. Distilled water, apple juice, mashed potato, almond powder and beef were selected to evaluate the HBS's performance by experiment and computer simulation. The results showed that the heating rates of 1, 5 and 10 °C/min with final set-point temperatures and holding times could be easily and precisely achieved in five selected food materials. A good agreement in sample central temperature profiles was obtained under various heating rates between experiment and simulation. The experimental and simulated results showed that the HBS could provide a sufficiently uniform heating environment in food samples. The effect of heating rate on bacterial thermal resistance was evaluated with the HBS. The system may hold potential applications for rapid and accurate assessments of bacteria's thermo-tolerances.

  12. Heat resistant polymers of oxidized styrylphosphine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. J. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Homopolymers, copolymers and terpolymers of a styrene based monomer are prepared by polymerizing at least one oxidized styrylphosphine monomer or by polymerizing p-diphenylphosphinestyrene and then oxidizing the polymerized monomer with an organoazide. Copolymers can also be prepared by copolymerizing styrene with at least one oxidized styrylphosphine monomer. Flame resistant vinyl based polymers whose degradation products are non toxic and non corrosive are obtained.

  13. Evaluation of Heat Checking and Washout of Heat Resistant Superalloys and Coatings for Die inserts

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Edward Courtright; Harold Adkins

    2005-01-30

    This project had two main objectives: (1) To design, fabricate and run a full size test for evaluating soldering and washout in die insert materials. This test utilizes the unique capabilities of the 350 Ton Squeeze Casting machine available in the Case Meal Casting Laboratory. Apply the test to evaluate resistance of die materials and coating, including heat resistant alloys to soldering and washout damage. (2) To evaluate materials and coatings, including heat resistant superalloys, for use as inserts in die casting of aluminum alloys.

  14. Theory of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance of oil radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariamov, N B

    1942-01-01

    In the present report the coefficients of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance are theoretically obtained for the case of laminar flow of a heated viscous liquid in a narrow rectangular channel. The results obtained are applied to the computation of oil radiators, which to a first approximation may be considered as made up of a system of such channels. In conclusion, a comparison is given of the theoretical with the experimental results obtained from tests on airplane oil radiators.

  15. Parallel resistivity and ohmic heating of laboratory dipole plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.

    2012-08-01

    The parallel resistivity is calculated in the long-mean-free-path regime for the dipole plasma geometry; this is shown to be a neoclassical transport problem in the limit of a small number of circulating electrons. In this regime, the resistivity is substantially higher than the Spitzer resistivity due to the magnetic trapping of a majority of the electrons. This suggests that heating the outer flux surfaces of the plasma with low-frequency parallel electric fields can be substantially more efficient than might be naively estimated. Such a skin-current heating scheme is analyzed by deriving an equation for diffusion of skin currents into the plasma, from which quantities such as the resistive skin-depth, lumped-circuit impedance, and power deposited in the plasma can be estimated. Numerical estimates indicate that this may be a simple and efficient way to couple power into experiments in this geometry.

  16. Parallel resistivity and ohmic heating of laboratory dipole plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, W.

    2012-08-15

    The parallel resistivity is calculated in the long-mean-free-path regime for the dipole plasma geometry; this is shown to be a neoclassical transport problem in the limit of a small number of circulating electrons. In this regime, the resistivity is substantially higher than the Spitzer resistivity due to the magnetic trapping of a majority of the electrons. This suggests that heating the outer flux surfaces of the plasma with low-frequency parallel electric fields can be substantially more efficient than might be naively estimated. Such a skin-current heating scheme is analyzed by deriving an equation for diffusion of skin currents into the plasma, from which quantities such as the resistive skin-depth, lumped-circuit impedance, and power deposited in the plasma can be estimated. Numerical estimates indicate that this may be a simple and efficient way to couple power into experiments in this geometry.

  17. Systematic Assessment of Nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum Spores for Heat Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Sandra C.; Barker, Gary C.; Peck, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heat treatment is an important controlling factor that, in combination with other hurdles (e.g., pH, aw), is used to reduce numbers and prevent the growth of and associated neurotoxin formation by nonproteolytic C. botulinum in chilled foods. It is generally agreed that a heating process that reduces the spore concentration by a factor of 106 is an acceptable barrier in relation to this hazard. The purposes of the present study were to review the available data relating to heat resistance properties of nonproteolytic C. botulinum spores and to obtain an appropriate representation of parameter values suitable for use in quantitative microbial risk assessment. In total, 753 D values and 436 z values were extracted from the literature and reveal significant differences in spore heat resistance properties, particularly those corresponding to recovery in the presence or absence of lysozyme. A total of 503 D and 338 z values collected for heating temperatures at or below 83°C were used to obtain a probability distribution representing variability in spore heat resistance for strains recovered in media that did not contain lysozyme. IMPORTANCE In total, 753 D values and 436 z values extracted from literature sources reveal significant differences in spore heat resistance properties. On the basis of collected data, two z values have been identified, z = 7°C and z = 9°C, for spores recovered without and with lysozyme, respectively. The findings support the use of heat treatment at 90°C for 10 min to reduce the spore concentration by a factor of 106, providing that lysozyme is not present during recovery. This study indicates that greater heat treatment is required for food products containing lysozyme, and this might require consideration of alternative recommendation/guidance. In addition, the data set has been used to test hypotheses regarding the dependence of spore heat resistance on the toxin type and strain, on the heating technique used, and on the

  18. Reverse Austenite Transformation and Grain Growth in a Low-Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Thomas; Ueda, Keiji; Militzer, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    The mechanisms controlling the reverse austenite transformation and the subsequent grain growth are examined in a low-carbon steel during slow continuous heating. The ex-situ metallographic analysis of quenched samples is complemented by in-situ dilatometry of the phase transformation and real-time laser ultrasonic measurements of the austenite grain size. Although the initial state of the microstructure (bainite or martensite) has only limited impact on the austenite transformation temperature, it has significant influence on the mean austenite grain size and the rate of grain growth. The coarsening of austenite islands during reverse transformation occurring from the martensitic microstructure is responsible for a large austenite grain structure at the completion of the austenite formation. On the other hand, a much finer austenite grain size is obtained when the austenite transforms from the bainite microstructure. Upon further heating, the rate of austenite grain growth is limited by the presence of nanometric precipitates present in the bainite microstructure leading to a significantly finer austenite grain size. These results give important guidance for the design of thermomechanical-controlled processing of heavy-gage steel plates.

  19. Heat resistant polymers of oxidized styrylphosphine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. J. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A flame resistant, nontoxic polymer which may be used safely in confined locations where there is inadequate ventilation is prepared either by polymerizing compounds having the formula R-N=P(C6H5)2(C6H4)CH=CH2 where R is an organic moeity selected from the group of (C6H5)2P(O)-, (C6H5O)2P(O)-, (C6H5)2 C3N3-, or their mixtures, or by reacting a polymer with an organic azide such as diphenylphosphinylazide, diphenyl-phosphorylazide, 2-azido-4,6-diphenly-5-triazine, 2,4-diazido-6-phenyl-s-triazine, trimethylsilyoazide, triphenylsilylazine, and phenylazine. The reaction of the styrylphosphine with the organozaide results in the oxidation of the trivalent phosphorus atom to the pentavalent state in the form of an unsaturated P=N linkage known as a phosphazene group.

  20. Structural Transformations in heat resistant coatings containing rare earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, N. I.; Lepakova, O. K.; Kosova, N. I.

    2016-01-01

    Degradation of two-layered coatings and ZhS6U alloy microstructure were studied during long-term processes of high temperature annealing and creeping. It was shown that yttrium and zirconium oxides are promising as protective coatings for heat resistant nickel based alloy.

  1. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  2. SIGNAL MEDIATORS AT INDUCTION OF HEAT RESISTANCE OF WHEAT PLANTLETS BY SHORT-TERM HEATING.

    PubMed

    Karpets, Yu V; Kolupaev, Yu E; Yastreb, T O

    2015-01-01

    The effects of functional interplay of calcium ions, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in the cells of wheat plantlets roots (Triticum aestivum L.) at the induction of their heat resistance by a short-term influence of hyperthermia (heating at the temperature of 42 degrees C during 1 minute) have been investigated. The transitional increase of NO and H2O2 content, invoked by heating, was suppressed by the treatment of plantlets with the antagonists of calcium EGTA (chelator of exocellular calcium), lanthanum chloride (blocker of calcium channels of various types) and neomycin (inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-dependent phospholipase C). The rise of hydrogen peroxide content, caused by hardening, was partially suppressed by the action of inhibitors of nitrate reductase (sodium wolframate) and NO-synthase (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester--L-NAME), and the increasing of nitric oxide content was suppressed by the treatment of plants with the antioxidant ionol and with the scavenger of hydrogen peroxide (dimethylthiourea). These compounds and antagonists of calcium also partially removed the effect of the rise of plantlets' heat resistance, invoked by hardening heating. The conclusion on calcium's role in the activation of enzymatic systems, generating reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, and on the functional interplay of these signal mediators at the induction of heat resistance of plantlets by hardening heating is made.

  3. Testing Method for Heat Resistance Under Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, K.; Kawasaki, A.; Itoh, Y.; Harada, Y.; Ono, F.

    2007-12-01

    “Testing Method for Heat Resistance under Temperature Gradient” is a Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) newly established by the Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry, after deliberations by the Japanese Industrial Standards Committee, in accordance with the Industrial Standardization Law. This standard specified the testing method for heat resistance under temperature gradient of materials and coated members of equipment exposed to high temperature, such as aircraft engines, gas turbines, and so on. This paper introduces the principle and overview of the established standard. In addition, taking the heat cycle test using the burner rig for instance, we specifically illustrate the acquirable data and their analysis in the standard. Monitoring of the effective thermal conductivity and acoustic emission particularly enables to the non-destructive evaluation of failure cycle.

  4. Influence of matrix structure on the abrasion wear resistance and toughness of a hot isostatic pressed white iron matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagounis, E.; Lindroos, V. K.; Talvitie, M.

    1996-12-01

    The influence of the matrix structure on the mechanical properties of a hot isostatic pressed (hipped) white iron matrix composite containing 10 vol pct TiC is investigated. The matrix structure was systematically varied by heat treating at different austenitizing temperatures. Various subsequent treatments were also employed. It was found that an austenitizing treatment at higher temperatures increases the hardness, wear resistance, and impact toughness of the composite. Although after every different heat treatment procedure the matrix structure of the composite was predominantly martensitic, with very low contents of retained austenite, some other microstructural features affected the mechanical properties to a great extent. Abrasion resistance and hardness increased with the austenitizing temperature because of the higher carbon content in martensite in the structure of the composite. Optimum impact energy values were obtained with structures containing a low amount of M (M7C3+M23C6) carbides in combination with a decreased carbon content martensite. Structure austenitized at higher temperatures showed the best tempering response. A refrigerating treatment was proven beneficial after austenitizing the composite at the lower temperature. The greatest portion in the increased martensitic transformation in comparison to the unreinforced alloy, which was observed particularly after austenitizing the composite at higher temperatures,[1] was confirmed to be mechanically induced. The tempering cycle might have caused some additional chemically induced transformation. The newly examined iron-based composite was found to have higher wear resistance than the most abrasion-resistant ferroalloy material (white cast iron).

  5. Replacing Resistance Heating with Mini-Split Heat Pumps, Sharon, Connecticut (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    Mini-split heat pumps can provide space heating and cooling in many climates and are relatively affordable. These and other features make them potentially suitable for retrofitting into multifamily buildings in cold climates to replace electric resistance heating or other outmoded heating systems. This report investigates the suitability of mini-split heat pumps for multifamily retrofits. Various technical and regulatory barriers are discussed and modeling was performed to compare long-term costs of substituting mini-splits for a variety of other heating and cooling options. A number of utility programs have retrofit mini-splits in both single family and multifamily residences. Two such multifamily programs are discussed in detail.

  6. ASM specialty handbook{reg_sign}: Heat-resistant materials

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    This latest handbook brings together in one volume a comprehensive reference source of information on engineering metallic and nonmetallic heat-resistant materials. The volume covers the complete spectrum of technology dealing with heat-resistant materials, including high-temperature characteristics, effects of processing and microstructure on high-temperature properties, materials-selection guidelines for industrial applications and life-assessment methods. Materials covered include carbon, alloy and stainless steels; alloy cast irons; high-alloy cast steels; superalloys; titanium and titanium alloys; refractory metals and alloys; nickel-chromium and nickel-thoria alloys; structural intermetallics; structural ceramics, cermets, and cemented carbides; and carbon-carbon composites. Also included is information on property comparisons that allows ranking of alloy performance, effects of processing and microstructure on high-temperature properties, high-temperature oxidation and corrosion resistant coatings for superalloys, life-assessment methodology and design guidelines for applications involving creep and/or oxidation.

  7. Effect of mechanical surface and heat treatments on erosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of mechanical surface treatments as well as heat treatments on the erosion resistance of 6061 aluminum alloy and 1045 steel were studied. Mechanical surface treatments were found to have little or no effect on the erosion resistance. This is due to the formation by particle impact of a work hardened surface layer regardless of the initial surface condition. The erosion resistance of Al single crystals is found to be independent of orientation. This is due to destruction of the surface microstructure and formation of a polycrystalline surface layer by the impact of erodant particles as observed by X-ray diffraction. While upon solution treatment of annealed 6061 aluminum the increase in hardness is accompanied by an increase in erosion resistance, precipitation treatment which causes a further increase in hardness results in slightly lower erosion resistance. Using two types of erodant particles, glass beads and crushed glass, the erosion rate is found to be strongly dependent on erodant particle shape, being an order of magnitude higher for erosion with crushed glass as compared to glass beads. While for erosion with glass beads heat treatment of 1045 steel had a profound effect on its erosion resistance, little or no such effect was observed for erosion with crushed glass.

  8. The locus of heat resistance (LHR) mediates heat resistance in Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Ryan G; Walker, Brian D; Yang, Xianqin; McMullen, Lynn M; Gänzle, Michael G

    2017-06-01

    Enterobacteriaceae comprise food spoilage organisms as well as food-borne pathogens including Escherichia coli. Heat resistance in E. coli was attributed to a genomic island called the locus of heat resistance (LHR). This genomic island is also present in several other genera of Enterobacteriaceae, but its function in the enteric pathogens Salmonella enterica and Enterobacter cloacae is unknown. This study aimed to determine the frequency of the LHR in food isolates of E. coli, and its influence on heat resistance in S. enterica and Enterobacter spp. Cell counts of LHR-positive strains of E. coli, S. enterica and E. cloacae were reduced by less than 1, 1, and 4 log (cfu/mL), respectively, after exposure to 60 °C for 5 min, while cell counts of LHR-negative strains of the same species were reduced by more than 7 log (cfu/mL). Introducing an exogenous copy of the LHR into heat-sensitive enteropathogenic E. coli and S. enterica increased heat resistance to a level that was comparable to LHR-positive wild type strains. Cell counts of LHR-positive S. enterica were reduced by less than 1 log(cfu/mL) after heating to 60 °C for 5 min. Survival of LHR-positive strains was improved by increasing the NaCl concentration from 0 to 4%. Cell counts of LHR-positive strains of E. coli and S. enterica were reduced by less than 2 log (cfu/g) in ground beef patties cooked to an internal core temperature of 71 °C. This study indicates that LHR-positive Enterobacteriaceae pose a risk to food safety.

  9. Modeling of Austenite Grain Growth During Austenitization in a Low Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Dingqian; Chen, Fei; Cui, Zhenshan

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to develop a pragmatic model to predict austenite grain growth in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel. Austenite grain growth kinetics has been investigated under different heating conditions, involving heating temperature, holding time, as well as heating rate. Based on the experimental results, the mathematical model was established by regression analysis. The model predictions present a good agreement with the experimental data. Meanwhile, grain boundary precipitates and pinning effects on grain growth were studied by transmission electron microscopy. It is found that with the increasing of the temperature, the second-phase particles tend to be dissolved and the pinning effects become smaller, which results in a rapid growth of certain large grains with favorable orientation. The results from this study provide the basis for the establishment of large-sized ingot heating specification for SA508-III steel.

  10. Leather Coated with Mixtures of Humectant and Antioxidants to Improve UV and Heat Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ultraviolet (UV) and heat resistance are very important qualities for leather products. We recently developed an environmentally friendly finishing process for improving the UV- and heat resistance of automobile upholstery leather. We previously reported and demonstrated some promising results fro...

  11. Low, medium, and high heat tolerant strains of Listeria monocytogenes and increased heat stress resistance after exposure to sublethal heat.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qian; Jangam, Priyanka M; Soni, Kamlesh A; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna; Schilling, Wes; Silva, Juan L

    2014-08-01

    A group of 37 strains representing all 13 serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes with an initial cell density of 10(7) CFU/ml were analyzed for their heat tolerance at 60°C for 10 min. These L. monocytogenes strains were categorized into three heat tolerance groups: low (<2 log CFU/ml survival), medium (2 to 4 log CFU/ml survival), and high (4 to 6 log CFU/ml survival). Serotype 1/2a strains had relatively low heat tolerance; seven of the eight tested strains were classified as low heat tolerant. Of the two serotype 1/2b strains tested, one was very heat sensitive (not detectable) and the other was very heat resistant (5.4 log CFU/ml survival). Among the 16 serotype 4b strains, survival ranged from not detectable to 4 log CFU/ml. When one L. monocytogenes strain from each heat tolerance group was subjected to sublethal heat stress at 48°C for 30 or 60 min, the survival of heat-stressed cells at 60°C for 10 min increased by 5 log CFU/ml (D60°C-values nearly doubled) compared with the nonstressed control cells. Sublethal heat stress at 48°C for 60 or 90 min increased the lag phase of L. monocytogenes in tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract at room temperature by 3 to 5 h compared with nonstressed control cells. The heat stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes was reversed after 2 h at room temperature but was maintained for up to 24 h at 4°C. Our results indicate a high diversity in heat tolerance among strains of L. monocytogenes, and once acquired this heat stress adaptation persists after cooling, which should be taken into account while conducting risk analyses for this pathogen.

  12. Thermal Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Spores Using Rapid Resistive Heating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    microbiological study sought to obtain a correlation between exposure time, temperature , and spore viability. This information is invaluable when...of the spores were found using rapid resistive heating at short duration exposure times from 0.26 to 7 seconds at temperatures ranging from 73.5 to...ranging from 0.1 to 10 seconds. Higher temperatures were needed to thermally inactivate the B.a. spores as exposure times decreased. vi

  13. Diesel particulate filter regeneration via resistive surface heating

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V; Ament, Frank

    2013-10-08

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine; and a grid of electrically resistive material that is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF and that selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF.

  14. Steerable Catheter Microcoils for Interventional MRI: Reducing Resistive Heating

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Anthony; Wilson, Mark W.; Settecase, Fabio; Evans, Leland; Malba, Vincent; Martin, Alastair J.; Saeed, Maythem; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess resistive heating of microwires used for remote catheter steering in interventional magnetic resonance imaging. To investigate the use of alumina to facilitate heat transfer to saline flowing in the catheter lumen. MATERIALS AND METHODS A microcoil was fabricated using a laser lathe onto polyimide-tipped or alumina-tipped endovascular catheters. In vitro testing was performed in a 1.5 T MR system using a vessel phantom, body RF coil, and steady state pulse sequence. Resistive heating was measured with water flowing over a polyimide tip catheter, or saline flowing through the lumen of an alumina-tip catheter. Preliminary in vivo testing in porcine common carotid arteries was conducted with normal blood flow or after arterial ligation when current was applied to an alumnia-tip catheter for up to 5 minutes. RESULTS After application of up to 1 W of DC power, clinically significant temperature increases were noted with the polyimide-tip catheter: 23°C/W at zero flow, 13°C/W at 0.28 cc/s, and 7.9°C/W at 1 cc/s. Using the alumina-tip catheter, the effluent temperature rise using the lowest flow rate (0.12 cc/s) was 2.3°C/W. In vivo testing demonstrated no thermal injury to vessel walls at normal and zero arterial flow. CONCLUSION Resistive heating in current carrying wire pairs can be dissipated by saline coolant flowing within the lumen of a catheter tip composed of material that facilitates heat transfer. PMID:21075017

  15. Development of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Santella, Michael L; Bei, Hongbin; Maziasz, Philip J; Pint, Bruce A

    2008-01-01

    Work in fiscal year 2008 focused on the development of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys, which exhibit a unique combination of an excellent oxidation resistance via protective alumina (Al2O3) scale formation and high-temperature creep strength through the formation of stable nano-scale MC carbides [1-8]. High levels of Nb additions (> 1 wt.% Nb) and/or Ni additions (25-30 wt.%), at Al levels of 2.5-4 wt.%, were found to correlate with increased upper-temperature limit for Al2O3 scale formation in air ( 900 aC) and air with 10% water vapor ( 800 aC). Creep resistance also showed a strong dependence on the level of Nb additions, and was correlated with volume fraction of MC-type carbides using thermodynamic computational tools. A trial heat of a 50 lb AFA alloy ingot was made using conventional single-melt vacuum techniques, and the alloy was successfully hot-rolled without any cracking [2]. This heat showed good weldability, using filler material of the same alloy.

  16. Heat-resistance of psychrotolerant Bacillus cereus vegetative cells.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Alizée; Dargaignaratz, Claire; Clavel, Thierry; Broussolle, Véronique; Nguyen-The, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    Spores of psychrotolerant strains of the foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus can multiply during storage of cooked or pasteurized, refrigerated foods and can represent a risk if these cells are not eliminated during reheating of food product before consumption. We determined the heat-resistance of psychrotolerant B. cereus vegetative cells at different heating temperatures in laboratory medium and compared it with that of thermotolerant B. cereus vegetative cells. The z values, based on times for a 3 log10 reduction, of the vegetative cells of the three psychrotolerant phylogenetic groups of B. cereus varied between 3.02 °C and 4.84 °C. The temperature at which a 3 log10 reduction was achieved in 10 min varied between 47.6 °C and 49.2 °C for psychrotolerant vegetative cells and it was around 54.8 °C for thermotolerant vegetative cells. Moreover, 0.4 min at 60 °C would be sufficient for a 6 log10 CFU/ml reduction of the most heat resistant psychrotolerant B. cereus vegetative cells. These data clearly showed that psychrotolerant B. cereus vegetative cells can be rapidly eliminated by a mild heat treatment such as food reheating.

  17. Heat Resistance of Native and Demineralized Spores of Bacillus subtilis Sporulated at Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Palop, Alfredo; Sala, Francisco J.; Condón, Santiago

    1999-01-01

    Demineralization reduced heat resistance of B. subtilis spores, but the pattern and magnitude of the reduction depended on sporulation temperature and on heating menstruum pH. The differences in heat resistance of native spores caused by sporulation temperature almost disappeared after demineralization. Demineralized spores were still susceptible to the heat-sensitizing effect of acidic pH. PMID:10049900

  18. Studies of Resistive Wall Heating at JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rui; Benson, Stephen V.

    2013-06-01

    When the JLAB FEL is under CW operation, it had been observed that temperature rises over the wiggler vacuum chamber, presumably as the result of the power deposition on the resistive wall of the wiggler chamber. Previous analyses have been done on the resistive wall impedance for various cases, such as DC, AC, and anomalous skin effects*. Here we report an investigation on the beam kinetic energy losses for each of these cases. This study includes the non-ultrarelativistic effect on resistive wall loss, for both round pipe and parallel plates. We will present the comparison of our results with the measured data obtained during CW operation of the JLAB FEL. Other possible factors contributing to the measured heating will also be discussed.

  19. Precipitation hardening austenitic superalloys

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation hardening, austenitic type superalloys are described. These alloys contain 0.5 to 1.5 weight percent silicon in combination with about 0.05 to 0.5 weight percent of a post irradiation ductility enhancing agent selected from the group of hafnium, yttrium, lanthanum and scandium, alone or in combination with each other. In addition, when hafnium or yttrium are selected, reductions in irradiation induced swelling have been noted.

  20. Effect of heating rate on highly heat-resistant spore-forming microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Jódar, Isabel; Ros-Chumillas, María; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Highly heat-resistant spore-forming Bacillus cause nonsterility problems in canned food and reduce the shelf life of many processed foods. The aim of this research was to evaluate the thermal inactivation of Bacillus sporothermodurans IIC65, Bacillus subtilis IC9, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus T26 under isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. The data obtained showed that B. sporothermodurans and B. subtilis were more heat resistant than G. stearothermophilus. The survival curves of B. sporothermodurans and B. subtilis showed shoulders, while the survival curves of G. stearothermophilus showed tails. Under nonisothermal treatment, at heating rates of 1 and 20 ℃/min, time needed to completely inactivate G. stearothermophilus was shorter than that required for B. sporothermodurans and B. subtilis. In complex heat treatments (heating-holding-cooling), the survival curves of B. sporothermodurans and B. subtilis showed the same activation shoulders than those obtained under isothermal treatments and the activation shoulders were again absent in the case of G. stearothermophilus. Predictions fitted quite well the data obtained for B. sporothermodurans. In contrast, the data for B. subtilis showed half a log cycle more survival than expected and in the case of G. stearothermophilus, the survival curve obtained showed much higher inactivation than expected.

  1. Resistance non-uniformity correction method using bias heating for resistive type uncooled microbolometer FPAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepegoz, Murat; Akin, Tayfun

    2007-04-01

    This paper proposes a new resistance non-uniformity correction method for microbolometer-type uncooled thermal detector focal plane arrays (FPAs) that suffer from pixel-to-pixel resistance variation, which is conventionally corrected by applying a specific bias voltage to each detector by the use on-chip DACs. The proposed method uses the heating of the detector with electrical bias, where the detector is heated-up for a pre-determined period of time before the read-out phase. The proposed method uses only a heat-up signal source and simple digital blocks for each column, eliminating the need for DACs that occupy large area, contribute to the noise floor of the system, and dissipate extra power. The proposed method provides a detector current resolution of 14.5 nA with 9-bit digital data, which corresponds to the resolution of 12-bit DAC used in conventional methods.

  2. Formation Mechanism of Type IV Failure in High Cr Ferritic Heat-Resistant Steel-Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Tsukamoto, S.; Shirane, T.; Abe, F.

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism of type IV failure has been investigated by using a conventional 9Cr ferritic heat-resistant steel Gr.92. In order to clarify the main cause of type IV failure, different heat treatments were performed on the base metal in order to change the prior austenite grain (PAG) size and precipitate distribution after applying the heat-affected zone (HAZ) simulated thermal cycle at the peak temperature of around A c3 ( A c3 HAZ thermal cycle) and postweld heat treatment (PWHT). The microstructural evolution during the A c3 HAZ thermal cycle and PWHT was investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It was found that M23C6 carbides were scarcely precipitated at the newly formed fine PAG, block, and lath boundaries in A c3 HAZ-simulated Gr.92, because the carbide forming elements such as Cr and C were segregated at the former PAG and block boundaries of the base metal. On the other hand, if all the boundaries were covered by sufficient M23C6 carbides by homogenization of the alloying elements prior to applying the HAZ thermal cycle, the creep strength was much improved even if the fine PAG was formed. From these results, it is concluded that fine-grained microstructure cannot account for the occurrence of type IV failure, and it only has a small effect during long-term creep. The most important factor is the precipitate formation behavior at various boundaries. Without sufficient boundary strengthening by precipitates, the microstructure of A c3 HAZ undergoes severe changes even during PWHT and causes premature failure during creep.

  3. A resistively heated CeB6 emissive probe.

    PubMed

    Martin, M J; Bonde, J; Gekelman, W; Pribyl, P

    2015-05-01

    The plasma potential, V(p), is a key quantity in experimental plasma physics. Its spatial gradients directly yield the electrostatic field present. Emissive probes operating under space-charge limited emission conditions float close to V(p) even under time-varying conditions. Throughout their long history in plasma physics, they have mostly been constructed with resistively heated tungsten wire filaments. In high density plasmas (>10(12) cm(-3)), hexaboride emitters are required because tungsten filaments cannot be heated to sufficient emission without component failure. A resistively heated emissive probe with a cerium hexaboride, CeB6, emitter has been developed to work in plasma densities up to 10(13) cm(-3). To show functionality, three spatial profiles of V(p) are compared using the emissive probe, a cold floating probe, and a swept probe inside a plasma containing regions with and without current. The swept probe and emissive probe agree well across the profile while the floating cold probe fails in the current carrying region.

  4. A resistively heated CeB{sub 6} emissive probe

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M. J. Bonde, J.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.

    2015-05-15

    The plasma potential, V{sub p}, is a key quantity in experimental plasma physics. Its spatial gradients directly yield the electrostatic field present. Emissive probes operating under space-charge limited emission conditions float close to V{sub p} even under time-varying conditions. Throughout their long history in plasma physics, they have mostly been constructed with resistively heated tungsten wire filaments. In high density plasmas (>10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}), hexaboride emitters are required because tungsten filaments cannot be heated to sufficient emission without component failure. A resistively heated emissive probe with a cerium hexaboride, CeB{sub 6}, emitter has been developed to work in plasma densities up to 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}. To show functionality, three spatial profiles of V{sub p} are compared using the emissive probe, a cold floating probe, and a swept probe inside a plasma containing regions with and without current. The swept probe and emissive probe agree well across the profile while the floating cold probe fails in the current carrying region.

  5. Heat-resistant coatings for the high-pressure turbine blades of promising GTEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablov, E. N.; Muboyadzhyan, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Heat-resistant coatings are considered for the external surface of high-pressure turbine (HPT) single-crystal blades for promising gas turbine engines (GTEs) made from carbon-free nickel superalloys with rhenium or rhenium plus ruthenium. Nickel superalloys covered with heat-resistant coatings consisting of heat-resistant connecting layers and an external ZrO2-(7-8 wt %)Y2O3 ceramic layer are subjected to heat resistance and high-temperature tests. The test results are used to choose the heat-resistant layer that ensures the highest properties of a composition heat-resistant coating. The use of sequential chemical and physical deposition methods for coating layers is shown to be required to protect HPT blades in promising GTEs. Medium-frequency magnetron plasmachemical deposition of ceramic layers in heat-resistant coatings with a low thermal conductivity is found to be promising.

  6. Viability and heat resistance of murine norovirus on bread.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Michiko; Takahashi, Hajime; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2016-01-04

    Contaminated bread was the cause of a large-scale outbreak of norovirus disease in Japan in 2014. Contamination of seafood and uncooked food products by norovirus has been reported several times in the past; however the outbreak resulting from the contamination of bread products was unusual. A few reports on the presence of norovirus on bread products are available; however there have been no studies on the viability and heat resistance of norovirus on breads, which were investigated in this study. ce:italic>/ce:italic> strain 1 (MNV-1), a surrogate for human norovirus, was inoculated directly on 3 types of bread, but the infectivity of MNV-1 on bread samples was almost unchanged after 5days at 20°C. MNV-1 was inoculated on white bread that was subsequently heated in a toaster for a maximum of 2min. The results showed that MNV-1 remained viable if the heating period was insufficient to inactivate. In addition, bread dough contaminated with MNV-1 was baked in the oven. Our results indicated that MNV-1 may remain viable on breads if the heating duration or temperature is insufficient.

  7. Hardness analysis of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in the modern world. The continuous increase in the use of stainless steels is caused by getting greater requirements relating the corrosion resistance of all types of devices. The main property of these steels is the ability to overlap a passive layer of an oxide on their surface. This layer causes that they become resistant to oxidation. One of types of corrosion-resistant steels is ferritic-austenitic steel of the duplex type, which has good strength properties. It is easily formable and weldable as well as resistant to erosion and abrasive wear. It has a low susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking, to stress corrosion, to intercrystalline one, to pitting one and to crevice one. For these reasons they are used, among others, in the construction of devices and facilities designed for chemicals transportation and for petroleum and natural gas extraction. The paper presents the results which shows that the particular specimens of the ][joint representing both heat affected zones (from the side of the 2205 steel and the 316L one) and the weld are characterized by higher hardness values than in the case of the same specimens for the 2Y joint. Probably this is caused by machining of edges of the sections of metal sheets before the welding process, which came to better mixing of native materials and the filler metal. After submerged arc welding the 2205 steel still retains the diphase, austenitic-ferritic structure and the 316L steel retains the austenitic structure with sparse bands of ferrite σ.

  8. Fast plasma heating by anomalous and inertial resistivity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duijveman, A.; Hoyng, P.; Ionson, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Fast plasma heating by anomalous and inertial resistivity effects is described. A small fraction of the plasma contains strong currents that run parallel to the magnetic field and are driven by an exponentiating electric field. The anomalous character of the current dissipation is caused by the excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron and/or ion acoustic waves. The role of resistivity due to geometrical effects is considered. Through the use of a marginal stability analysis, equations for the average electron and ion temperatures are derived and numerically solved. The evolution of the plasma is described as a path in the drift velocity diagram, in which the drift velocity is plotted as a function of the electron to ion temperature ratio.

  9. Heat sealable, flame and abrasion resistant coated fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschirch, R. P.; Sidman, K. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Flame retardant, abrasion resistant elastomeric compositions are disclosed which are comprised of thermoplastic polyurethane polymer and flame retarding amounts of a filler selected from decabromodiphenyloxide and antimony oxide in a 3:1 weight ratio, and decabromodiphenyloxide, antimony oxide, and ammonium polyphosphate in a 3:1:3 weight ratio respectively. Heat sealable coated fabrics employing such elastomeric compositions as coating film are produced by dissolving the elastomeric composition to form a solution, casting the solution onto a release paper and drying it to form an elastomeric film. The film is then bonded to a woven, knitted, or felted fabric.

  10. A Characterization Study of Several Heat Resistant Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-04

    explosives appear to be performing as expected. The velocities are of the same magnitude as other heat-resistant explosives such as HNS . They are lower than...the same shock sensitivity as HNS . UNCLASSIFIED 11 NOLTR 74-177 10- 10- 6 o CI1- w 0 10- 7 AH s (MOLAR) = 43.9 kCal/mole AH s (SPECIFIC) 61.5Cal/gm 10...BURNING, AND/OR EXPLOSION. [2 25 NOLTR 74 -177 TABLE I11 ELECTROSTATIC SPARK SENSITIVITY TEST RESULTS HNS -TEFLON 7C Y (ID11)TT(D182 N (D103 CAP. 90/10

  11. Reversed austenite for enhancing ductility of martensitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieck, S.; Rosemann, P.; Kromm, A.; Halle, T.

    2017-03-01

    The novel heat treatment concept, “quenching and partitioning” (Q&P) has been developed for high strength steels with enhanced formability. This heat treatment involves quenching of austenite to a temperature between martensite start and finish, to receive a several amount of retained austenite. During the subsequent annealing treatment, the so called partitioning, the retained austenite is stabilized due to carbon diffusion, which results in enhanced formability and strength regarding strain induced austenite to martensite transformation. In this study a Q&P heat treatment was applied to a Fe-0.45C-0.65Mn-0.34Si-13.95Cr stainless martensite. Thereby the initial quench end temperature and the partitioning time were varied to characterize their influence on microstructural evolution. The microstructural changes were analysed by dilatometer measurements, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, including electron back-scatter diffraction. Compression testing was made to examine the mechanical behaviour. It was found that an increasing partitioning time up to 30 min leads to an enhanced formability without loss in strength due to a higher amount of stabilized retained and reversed austenite as well as precipitation hardening.

  12. Study of rigid cross-linked PVC foams with heat resistance.

    PubMed

    Shi, Aihua; Zhang, Guangcheng; Zhao, Chenhui

    2012-12-13

    Three heat resistant cross-linked PVC foam plastics were prepared and their performances were compared with universal cross-linked PVC structural foam. The results show that these three heat resistant foams have higher glass transition temperatures (close to 100 °C) than universal structural foam (83.2 °C). Compared with the universal structural foam, the three heat resistant foams show much higher decomposition temperature and better chemical stability due to the crosslinking of PVC macromolecular chains. The heat distortion temperature (HDT) values of the three heat resistant foam plastics are just a little higher than that of universal structural foam. The three heat resistant foam plastics have good dimensional stability at 140 °C, and when used as core material can closely adhere to the face plates in medium temperature curing processes. Compared with universal structural foam, the three heat resistant foam plastics have slightly better mechanical properties.

  13. Heat shock applied early in sporulation affects heat resistance of Bacillus megaterium spores.

    PubMed

    Sedlák, M; Vinter, V; Adamec, J; Vohradský, J; Voburka, Z; Chaloupka, J

    1993-12-01

    Cells of Bacillus megaterium 27 were challenged by a 30-min heat shock at 45 degrees C during various sporulation stages and then shifted back to a temperature permissive for sporulation (27 degrees C), at which they developed spores. Heat shock applied at 120 min after the end of the exponential phase induced synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in the sporangia and delayed the inactivation of spores at 85 degrees C. Several HSPs, mainly HSP 70, could be detected in the cytoplasm of these spores. An analogous HSP, the main HSP induced by increased temperature during growth, belongs to the GroEL group according to its N-terminal sequence. The identity of this protein was confirmed by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with polyclonal antibodies against B. subtilis GroEL. Sporangia treated by heat shock immediately or 240 min after exponential phase also synthesized HSPs, but none of them could be detected in the spores in an appreciable amount. These spores showed only a slightly increased heat resistance.

  14. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  15. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  16. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  17. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  18. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  19. Integrated Thermal Protection Systems and Heat Resistant Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pichon, Thierry; Lacoste, Marc; Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    In the early stages of NASA's Exploration Initiative, Snecma Propulsion Solide was funded under the Exploration Systems Research & Technology program to develop integrated thermal protection systems and heat resistant structures for reentry vehicles. Due to changes within NASA's Exploration Initiative, this task was cancelled early. This presentation provides an overview of the work that was accomplished prior to cancellation. The Snecma team chose an Apollo-type capsule as the reference vehicle for the work. They began with the design of a ceramic aft heatshield (CAS) utilizing C/SiC panels as the capsule heatshield, a C/SiC deployable decelerator and several ablators. They additionally developed a health monitoring system, high temperature structures testing, and the insulation characterization. Though the task was pre-maturely cancelled, a significant quantity of work was accomplished.

  20. The 1,2,4-oxadiazole elastomers. [heat resistant polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Shalhoub, I. M.; Kwong, H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Crosslinked 1,2,4-oxadiazole elastomers were prepared either by thermally condensing a monomer having the formula HwN(HON)C-R-Q, wherein Q is a triazine ring forming group such as nitrile or amidine, or by a mixture of said monomer with RC(NOH)NH22, with R in these formulas standing for a bivalent organic radical containing fluorine, hydrogen, or trifluoromethyl. In the monomer charge, the overall proportions of amidoxime groups to triazine ring forming groups varies depending on the extent of crosslinking desired in the final polymer. The heat and chemical resistant elastomers disclosed can serve, for instance, as adhesives, caulking compounds, channel sealants, fuel tank liners.

  1. Spin-dependent heat transport and thermal boundary resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Taehee

    In this thesis, thermal conductivity change depending on the magnetic configurations has been studied. In order to make different magnetic configurations, we developed a spin valve structure, which has high MR ratio and low saturation field. The high MR ratio was achieved using Co/Cu multilayer and 21A or 34A thick Cu layer. The low saturation field was obtained by implementing different coercivities of the successive ferromagnetic layers. For this purpose, Co/Cu/Cu tri-layered structure was used with the thicknesses of the Co layers; 15 A and 30 A. For the thermal conductivity measurement, a three-omega method was employed with a thermally isolated microscale rod. We fabricated the microscale rod using optical lithography and MEMS process. Then the rod was wire-bonded to a chip-carver for further electrical measurement. For the thermal conductivity measurement, we built the three-omega measurement system using two lock-in amplifiers and two differential amplifiers. A custom-made electromagnet was added to the system to investigate the impact of magnetic field. We observed titanic thermal conductivity change depending on the magnetic configurations of the Co/Cu/Co multilayer. The thermal conductivity change was closely correlated with that of the electric conductivity in terms of the spin orientation, but the thermal conductivity was much more sensitive than that of the electric conductivity. The relative thermal conductivity change was 50% meanwhile that of electric resistivity change was 8.0%. The difference between the two ratios suggests that the scattering mechanism for charge and heat transport in the Co/Cu/Co multilayer is different. The Lorentz number in Weidemann-Franz law is also spin-dependent. Thermal boundary resistance between metal and dielectrics was also studied in this thesis. The thermal boundary resistance becomes critical for heat transport in a nanoscale because the thermal boundary resistance can potentially determine overall heat transport

  2. Some Like It Hot: Heat Resistance of Escherichia coli in Food

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Gänzle, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Heat treatment and cooking are common interventions for reducing the numbers of vegetative cells and eliminating pathogenic microorganisms in food. Current cooking method requires the internal temperature of beef patties to reach 71°C. However, some pathogenic Escherichia coli such as the beef isolate E. coli AW 1.7 are extremely heat resistant, questioning its inactivation by current heat interventions in beef processing. To optimize the conditions of heat treatment for effective decontaminations of pathogenic E. coli strains, sufficient estimations, and explanations are necessary on mechanisms of heat resistance of target strains. The heat resistance of E. coli depends on the variability of strains and properties of food formulations including salt and water activity. Heat induces alterations of E. coli cells including membrane, cytoplasm, ribosome and DNA, particularly on proteins including protein misfolding and aggregations. Resistant systems of E. coli act against these alterations, mainly through gene regulations of heat response including EvgA, heat shock proteins, σE and σS, to re-fold of misfolded proteins, and achieve antagonism to heat stress. Heat resistance can also be increased by expression of key proteins of membrane and stabilization of membrane fluidity. In addition to the contributions of the outer membrane porin NmpC and overcome of osmotic stress from compatible solutes, the new identified genomic island locus of heat resistant performs a critical role to these highly heat resistant strains. This review aims to provide an overview of current knowledge on heat resistance of E. coli, to better understand its related mechanisms and explore more effective applications of heat interventions in food industry. PMID:27857712

  3. Heat Resistance of Salmonella in Various Egg Products

    PubMed Central

    Garibaldi, J. A.; Straka, R. P.; Ijichi, K.

    1969-01-01

    The heat-resistance characteristics of Salmonella typhimurium Tm-1, a reference strain in the stationary phase of growth, were determined at several temperatures in the major types of products produced by the egg industry. The time required to kill 90% of the population (D value) at a given temperature in specific egg products was as follows: at 60 C (140 F), D = 0.27 min for whole egg; D = 0.60 min for whole egg plus 10% sucrose; D = 1.0 min for fortified whole egg; D = 0.20 min for egg white (pH 7.3), stabilized with aluminum; D = 0.40 min for egg yolk; D = 4.0 min for egg yolk plus 10% sucrose; D = 5.1 min for egg yolk plus 10% NaCl; D = 1.0 min for scrambled egg mix; at 55 C (131 F), D = 0.55 min for egg white (pH 9.2); D = 1.2 min for egg white (pH 9.2) plus 10% sucrose. The average Z value (number of degrees, either centigrade or fahrenheit, for a thermal destruction time curve to traverse one logarithmic cycle) was 4.6 C (8.3 F) with a range from 4.2 to 5.3 C. Supplementation with 10% sucrose appeared to have a severalfold greater effect on the heat stabilization of egg white proteins than on S. typhimurium Tm-1. This information should be of value in the formulation of heat treatments to insure that all egg products be free of viable salmonellae. Images PMID:4890741

  4. Corrosion of austenitic alloys in aerated brines

    SciTech Connect

    Heidersbach, R.; Shi, A.; Sharp, S.

    1999-11-01

    This report discusses the results of corrosion exposures of three austenitic alloys--3l6L stainless steel, UNS N10276, and UNS N08367. Coupons of these alloys were suspended in a series of brines used for processing in the pharmaceutical industry. The effects of surface finish and welding processes on the corrosion behavior of these alloys were determined. The 316L coupons experienced corrosion in several environments, but the other alloys were unaffected during the one-month exposures of this investigation. Electropolishing the surfaces improved corrosion resistance.

  5. Examination of carbon partitioning into austenite during tempering of bainite

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J; Caballero, Francisca G; Miller, Michael K; Garcia - Mateo, C

    2010-01-01

    The redistribution of carbon after tempering of a novel nanocrystalline bainitic steel consisting of a mixture of supersaturated ferrite and retained austenite, has been analyzed by atom probe tomography. Direct supporting evidence of additional austenite carbon enrichment beyond that initially achieved during the bainite heat treatment was not obtained during subsequent tempering of this high carbon, high silicon steel. Evidence of competing reactions during tempering, such as the formation of carbon clusters in bainitic ferrite that signify the onset of the transitional carbides precipitation, was observed.

  6. Effect of the chemical composition and austenitizing conditions on the hardenability of 35GR steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, A. I.; Malikov, I. T.; Urazov, V. I.; Semin, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    The effect of the content of impurity elements (in particular, chromium), the heating temperature before rolling, and the austenitizing schedule on the hardenability of boron-containing 35 GR steel is studied. It is shown that a change in the heating temperature of the steel for rolling by 50-100°C does not influence the hardenability depth, which is mainly dependent on the austenitizing temperature and time and the chromium content.

  7. Influence of pH on heat resistance of Bacillus licheniformis in buffer and homogenised foods.

    PubMed

    Palop, A; Raso, J; Pagán, R; Condón, S; Sala, F J

    1996-02-01

    The influence of pH of heating menstruum (McIlvaine buffer) on the heat resistance of Bacillus licheniformis was investigated and compared with the heat resistance in homogenised tomato and asparagus at pH 7 and 4 in a wide range of temperatures. Heat resistance was in all mestrua smaller at acid pH. At 99 degrees C and pH 4, heat resistance was 1/20 lower than at pH 7. However, the magnitude of this effect decreased as heat treatment temperatures were increased almost disappearing at 120 degrees C. z values increased from 6.85 at pH 7, to 10.75 at pH 4. At 99 degrees C the effect of pH on heat resistance was constant along the range of pH's tested. The increase of one pH unit increased D99 by 180%. At pH 7 and 4, heat resistance was the same in buffer as in tomato and asparagus homogenates at all temperatures tested. The diminishing influence of the acidification of some foods on the heat resistance of B. licheniformis sterilisation temperatures should be taken into account when a raise in temperature is considered to shorten the duration of heat processes.

  8. Evaluation of Mn substitution for Ni in alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Santella, Michael L; Liu, Chain T; Evans, Neal D; Maziasz, Philip J; Brady, Michael P

    2009-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the substitution of low-cost Mn for Ni in austenitic stainless steels due to the rising price of Ni. This paper investigates the possibility of such a substitution approach for the recently developed alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})-forming austenitic (AFA) class of heat-resistant stainless steels. Computational thermodynamic tools were utilized to predict the alloy composition range to maintain an austenitic matrix microstructure when Mn is substituted for Ni in the presence of Al, which is a strong body-centered-cubic (BCC) phase stabilizer. Phase equilibria, oxidation behavior, and creep properties of Fe-(10-14)Cr-(5--15)Mn-(4-12)Ni-(2.5-3)Al-Cu-Nb-C-B (in weight percent) based alloys were studied. The alloys based on Fe-14Cr-2.5Al-(5-9)Mn-(10-12)Ni exhibited the best balance of oxidation and creep resistance, which represents approximately 50% reduction in Ni content compared to previously developed AFA alloys. These low-Ni, high-Mn AFA alloys formed protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales up to 973-1073 K in air and at 923 K in air with 10% water vapor. Creep-rupture lives of the alloys under a severe screening condition of 1023 K and 100 MPa were in the 7.2 x 10{sup 5}-1.8 x 10{sup 6} s (200-500 h) range, which is comparable to or somewhat improved over that of type 347 stainless steel (Fe-18Cr-11Ni base).

  9. Correlation between mechanical properties and retained austenite characteristics in a low-carbon medium manganese alloyed steel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jun; Lv, Mengyang; Tang, Shuai; Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Guodong

    2015-08-15

    The effects of retained austenite characteristics on tensile properties and low-temperature impact toughness have been investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was found that only part of austenite phase formed during heat treating was left at room temperature. Moreover, the film-like retained austenite is displayed between bcc-martensite laths after heat treating at 600 °C, while the block-form retained austenite with thin hcp-martensite laths is observed after heat treating at 650 °C. It has been demonstrated that the film-like retained austenite possesses relatively high thermal and mechanical stability, and it can greatly improve low-temperature impact toughness, but its contribution to strain hardening capacity is limited. However, the block-form retained austenite can greatly enhance ultimate tensile strength and strain hardening capacity, but its contribution to low-temperature impact toughness is poor. - Highlights: • Correlation between retained austenite and impact toughness was elucidated. • The impact toughness is related to mechanical stability of retained austenite. • The effect of retained austenite on tensile and impact properties is inconsistent.

  10. Retained Austenite Phase in (26.5%Cr, 2.6%C) White Cast Iron Studied by Means of CEMS and Eddy Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulaba-Bafubiandi, A. F.; Waanders, F. B.; Jones, C.

    High chrome white irons are specifically employed in the mining industry for their resistance to wear. More cost-effective materials are constantly being sought, due to the high wear rate of the drilling components, which is a high cost area for this industry. Optimum resistance to wear is often not the main criterion of material selection but parameters such as ease of fabrication; availability and low initial cost have also to be accounted for. A correctly heat-treated high chrome white iron of a right chemical composition presents the best hardness and toughness combination [1]. A (26.5 wt.% Cr, 2.6 wt.% C) white iron has been produced by casting and heat-treating. As the retained austenite phase has the ability to harden, the control of its content may result in tuning the applications of this material. Various heat-treatments were given to the above-mentioned material to achieve a spread of austenite values. The retained austenite phase amount was measured by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Conversion Electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and Eddy current techniques. A linear correlation between results from Eddy Current and CEMS, Eddy-current and XRD, and between those from CEMS and XRD was observed. As the nominal abundance values were ``technique dependent'', their conversion will be discussed. The present study results in the calibration of the Eddy current apparatus and suggests its application in the casting industry during mass production for the retained austenite content determination in high chrome white iron castings.

  11. Developmental acclimation to low or high humidity conditions affect starvation and heat resistance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-09-01

    Several Drosophila species originating from tropical humid localities are more resistant to starvation and heat stress than populations from high latitudes but mechanistic bases of such physiological changes are largely unknown. In order to test whether humidity levels affect starvation and heat resistance, we investigated developmental acclimation effects of low to high humidity conditions on the storage and utilization of energy resources, body mass, starvation survival, heat knockdown and heat survival of D. melanogaster. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity (85% RH) stored significantly higher level of lipids and showed greater starvation survival hours but smaller in body size. In contrast, lines reared at low humidity evidenced reduced levels of body lipids and starvation resistance. Starvation resistance and lipid storage level were higher in females than males. However, the rate of utilization of lipids under starvation stress was lower for lines reared under higher humidity. Adult flies of lines reared at 65% RH and acclimated under high or low humidity condition for 200 hours also showed changes in resistance to starvation and heat but such effects were significantly lower as compared with developmental acclimation. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity showed greater heat knockdown time and heat-shock survival. These laboratory observations on developmental and adult acclimation effects of low versus high humidity conditions have helped in explaining seasonal changes in resistance to starvation and heat of the wild-caught flies of D. melanogaster. Thus, we may suggest that wet versus drier conditions significantly affect starvation and heat resistance of D. melanogaster.

  12. Polymeric Coatings Containing Antioxidants to Improve UV- and Heat Resistance of Chrome-Free Leather

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For automotive upholstery leather, UV and heat resistance are very important qualities, particularly for non-chrome-tanned (chrome-free) leather. One of our research endeavors has focused on an environmentally friendly finishing process that will improve the UV and heat resistance of automobile uph...

  13. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ke; Ren, Yibin

    2010-01-01

    The adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have prompted the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel in medical stainless steels, the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steels, and emphatically, the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength and good plasticity, better corrosion and wear resistances, and superior biocompatibility compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel, the newly developed high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventional medical stainless steels. PMID:27877320

  14. High Energy Rate Forming Induced Phase Transition in Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, T.; Kuzsella, L.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the effects of explosion hardening on the microstructure and the hardness of austenitic stainless steel have been studied. The optimum explosion hardening technology of austenitic stainless steel was researched. In case of the explosive hardening used new idea means indirect hardening setup. Austenitic stainless steels have high plasticity and can be cold formed easily. However, during cold processing the hardening phenomena always occurs. Upon the explosion impact, the deformation mechanism indicates a plastic deformation and this deformation induces a phase transformation (martensite). The explosion hardening enhances the mechanical properties of the material, includes the wear resistance and hardness [1]. In case of indirect hardening as function of the setup parameters specifically the flayer plate position the hardening increased differently. It was find a relationship between the explosion hardening setup and the hardening level.

  15. Monitoring radio-frequency heating of contaminated soils using electrical resistance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1993-09-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a radio-frequency heating process for the insitu remediation of volatile organic compounds from subsurface water and soil at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. A dipole antenna located in a horizontal well in the unsaturated zone was used to heat a contaminated clay layer. The heat-induced changes were tomographically imaged by their effects on the formation electrical resistivity. The resistivity changes observed appear to be related to heating and vaporization of the pore water, formation of steam condensate, and infiltration of rainwater through the heated zones and adjacent areas. There is a clear asymmetry downward in the resistivity decreases associated with the heating process. The resistivity decreases observed in the vicinity of the heating well are believed to be caused by the heating and downward migration of warm water originally located within a radius of a few feet around the heating well; the magnitude of the change is between 10--20%. The decreasing resistivity implies an increasing rate of radio wave attenuation as heating progressed; therefore, the rate of energy deposition around the heating well increased while the penetration distance of the radio waves decreased. Saturation changes in the clay near the antenna during heating were estimated to be 50--55% based on the observed resistivity decreases. Resistivity changes observed at distances greater than 3 meters to one side of the antenna appear to be related to rainwater infiltration. We propose that gaps in near surface clay layers allow rainwater to migrate downward and reach the top of clay rich zone penetrated by the antenna borehole. The water may then accumulate along the top of the clay.

  16. Computational Evaluation of Cyclic Strength of Carburized Gears from Heat-Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, M. Yu.

    2014-11-01

    An advanced model for computing the fatigue bending strength of gears fabricated from a complexly alloyed heat-resistant steel 16Kh3NVFMB-Sh (VKS-5) subjected to vacuum carburizing in acetylene is suggested. The model matches experimental data satisfactorily and has been used to develop a mode for vacuum carburizing of gears from the heat-resistant steel to provide a high fatigue resistance.

  17. A new class of bio-heat resisted polymer blend.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Seongchan; Kashiwagi, Takashi; Koga, Tadanori; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2009-03-01

    Increasing in oil prices and environmental concerns is a driving force to seek out alternative materials. A completely biodegradable starch is a candidate for the alternative materials. Since the starch is brittle, it must be mixed with other polymers. In order to make a thermoplastic starch (TPS), we need a bio-compatiblizer to increase a degree of compatibilization. The biocompatibilzer can be a small molecules or nanoparticles with the small molecules, which leads to improved material properties. In order to demonstrate a possible biocompatibilzer, we first developed a corn-based starch impregnated with non-halogenated flame retardant formulations. The starch was blended with Ecoflex, a biodegradable polymer. Using SAXS and USAXS we characterized structures of the compounds with different amount of Ecoflex by weight. Furthermore, the addition of 5% nanoparticles in the compounds increased the Young's Modulus and impact toughness significantly. The compounds also did flame test. It is indicated that the compound with the addition of the nanopaticles would pass with a UL-94V0 rating. Therefore, the procedure for producing these TPS compounds can be applied to any biodegradable polymers, manufacturing a new bio-heat resisted compound.

  18. Role of HSF activation for resistance to heat, cold and high-temperature knock-down.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Overgaard, Johannes; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Holmstrup, Martin; Justesen, Just; Loeschcke, Volker

    2005-12-01

    Regulation of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by the heat shock factor (HSF) and the importance of these proteins for resistance to heat stress is well documented. Less characterized is the importance of Hsps for cold stress resistance although Hsp70 is known to be induced following long-term cold exposure in Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, a temperature-sensitive HSF mutant line was used to investigate the role of HSF activation following heat hardening, rapid cold hardening (RCH) and long-term cold acclimation (LTCA) on heat and cold resistance, and this was correlated with Hsp70 expression. In addition, the effect of HSF activation on high-temperature knock-down resistance was evaluated. We found a significantly decreased HSF activation in the mutant line as compared to a corresponding control line following heat hardening, and this was correlated with decreased heat resistance of the mutant line. However, we did not find this difference in HSF activity to be important for resistance to cold stress or high-temperature knock-down. The findings indicate that induction of stress genes regulated by HSF, such as Hsps, although occurring following LTCA, are not of major importance for cold stress resistance and neither for RCH nor high-temperature knock-down resistance in D. melanogaster.

  19. Microstructure Aspects of a Newly Developed, Low Cost, Corrosion-Resistant White Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, P. K.; Sharma, C. P.; Bhargava, A. K.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the influence of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of a newly developed white cast iron, basically suitable for corrosion- and wear-resistant applications, and to attain a microstructure that is most suitable from the corrosion resistance point of view. The composition was selected with an aim to have austenitic matrix both in as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The difference in electrochemical potential between austenite and carbide is less in comparison to that between austenite and graphite. Additionally, graphitic corrosion which is frequently encountered in gray cast irons is absent in white cast irons. These basic facts encouraged us to undertake this work. Optical metallography, hardness testing, X-ray diffractometry, and SEM-EDX techniques were employed to identify the phases present in the as-cast and heat-treated specimens of the investigated alloy and to correlate microstructure with corrosion resistance and hardness. Corrosion testing was carried out in 5 pct NaCl solution (approximate chloride content of sea water) using the weight loss method. In the investigated alloy, austenite was retained the in as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The same was confirmed by X-ray and EDX analysis. The stability and volume fraction of austenite increased with an increase of heat-treated temperature/time with a simultaneous decrease in the volume fraction of massive carbides. The decrease in volume fraction of massive carbides resulted in the availability of alloying elements. These alloying elements, on increasing the heat treatment temperature or increasing the soaking period at certain temperatures, get dissolved in austenite. As a consequence, austenite gets enriched as well as becomes more stable. On cooling from lower soaking period/temperature, enriched austenite decomposes to lesser enriched austenite and to a dispersed phase due to decreasing solid solubility of alloying elements with decreasing temperature

  20. Austenite Formation in a Cold-Rolled Semi-austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celada Casero, Carola; San Martín, David

    2014-04-01

    The progress of the martensite ( α') to austenite ( γ) phase transformation has been thoroughly investigated at different temperatures during the continuous heating of a cold-rolled precipitation hardening metastable stainless steel at a heating rate of 0.1 K/s. Heat-treated samples have been characterized using different experimental complementary techniques: high-resolution dilatometry, magnetization, and thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements, micro-hardness-Vickers testing, optical/scanning electron microscopy, and tensile testing. The two-step transformation behavior observed is thought to be related to the presence of a pronounced chemical banding in the initial microstructure. This banding has been characterized using electron probe microanalysis. Unexpectedly, dilatometry measurements seem unable to locate the end of the transformation accurately, as this technique does not detect the second step of this transformation (last 20 pct of it). It is shown that once the starting ( A S) and finishing ( A F) transformation temperatures have been estimated by magnetization measurements, the evolution of the volume fractions of austenite and martensite can be evaluated by TEP or micro-hardness measurement quite reliably as compared to magnetization measurements. The mechanical response of the material after being heated to temperatures close to A S, A F, and ( A F - A S)/2 is also discussed.

  1. Co-Optimization of Wrought Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Composition Ranges for High-Temperature Creep and Oxidation/Corrosion Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Magee, John H; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Helmick, David; Wang, Lu

    2014-01-01

    A seriesofcandidatealumina-formingaustenitic(AFA)stainlesssteelsdesignedtoevaluatetheeffectsof variationinAl,C,Cr,Mn,Nb,andNicontentonhigh-temperaturetensileproperties,creep,and oxidation/corrosionresistancewerestudied.ThecompositionsassessedwerebasedonmediumNi (20 25 wt%)andlowNi(12wt%)AFAvariationsstrengthenedprimarilybyMCand/orM23C6 carbide precipitates,andahighNi(32wt%)AFAsuperalloyvariationstrengthenedprimarilyby -Ni3Al intermetallic precipitates.Tensileandcreeppropertiesweremeasuredat650and750/760 1C, oxidation resistance from650to900 1C inairwithwatervaporandsteamenvironments,andsulfidation oxidation resistance inAr 20%H2 20%H2O 5% H2S at550and650 1C. Optimizedcompositionrangesfordifferent use temperaturesrangesbasedontheseevaluationsarepresented.

  2. The resistance to heat of thermo-resistant streptococci attached to stainless steel in the presence of milk.

    PubMed

    Flint, S; Brooks, J; Bremer, P; Walker, K; Hausman, E

    2002-03-01

    Skim milk residues had a significant impact on the sensitivity to heat of a dairy isolate of the thermo-resistant, Streptococcus thermophilus. Cells of S. thermophilus (H) suspended in water or in milk had D values at 60 degrees C of 2.0 and 14 min, respectively. Cells of S. thermophilus (H) attached to stainless steel in the presence of water or milk had D values at 60 degrees C of 2.2 and 8.1 min, respectively. The attached cells in both experiments were heat-treated in the presence of water. The increase in heat resistance could not be fully attributed to individual components (caseinate or whey) in the milk. The potential for thermo-resistant streptococci to survive heat treatment in a dairy manufacturing plant is therefore greater than may be expected for the organism in less complex environments.

  3. Heat-resistant protein expression during germination of maize seeds under water stress.

    PubMed

    Abreu, V M; Silva Neta, I C; Von Pinho, E V R; Naves, G M F; Guimarães, R M; Santos, H O; Von Pinho, R G

    2016-08-12

    Low water availability is one of the factors that limit agricultural crop development, and hence the development of genotypes with increased water stress tolerance is a challenge in plant breeding programs. Heat-resistant proteins have been widely studied, and are reported to participate in various developmental processes and to accumulate in response to stress. This study aimed to evaluate heat-resistant protein expression under water stress conditions during the germination of maize seed inbreed lines differing in their water stress tolerance. Maize seed lines 91 and 64 were soaked in 0, -0.3, -0.6, and -0.9 MPa water potential for 0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h. Line 91 is considered more water stress-tolerant than line 64. The analysis of heat-resistant protein expression was made by gel electrophoresis and spectrophotometry. In general, higher expression of heat-resistant proteins was observed in seeds from line 64 subjected to shorter soaking periods and lower water potentials. However, in the water stress-tolerant line 91, a higher expression was observed in seeds that were subjected to -0.3 and -0.6 MPa water potentials. In the absence of water stress, heat-resistant protein expression was reduced with increasing soaking period. Thus, there was a difference in heat-resistant protein expression among the seed lines differing in water stress tolerance. Increased heat-resistant protein expression was observed in seeds from line 91 when subjected to water stress conditions for longer soaking periods.

  4. Comparison and ranking of superelasticity of different austenite active nickel-titanium orthodontic archwires using mechanical tensile testing and correlating with its electrical resistivity

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, D.; Baskaranarayanan, Balashanmugam; Usha, K.; Jayanthi, M. S.; Vijjaykanth, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The application of light and continuous forces for optimum physiological response and the least damage to the tooth supporting structures should be the primary aim of an orthodontist. Nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys with their desirable properties are one of the natural choices of the clinicians. Aim: This study was aimed to compare and rank them based on its tensile strength and electrical resistivity. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of eight groups of 0.017 inch × 0.025 inch rectangular archwires from eight different manufacturers, and five samples from each group for tensile testing and nine samples for electrical resistivity tests were used. Data for stress at 10% strain and the initial slope were statistically analyzed with an analysis of variance and Scheffe tests with P < 0.05. The stress/strain plots of each product were ranked for superelastic behavior. The rankings of the wires tested were based primarily on the unloading curve's slope which is indicative of the magnitude of the deactivation force and secondarily on the length of the horizontal segment which is indicative of continuous forces during deactivation. For calculating the electric resistivity, the change in resistance after inducing strain in the wires was taken into account for the calculation of degree of martensite transformation and for ranking. Results: In tensile testing Ortho Organizers wires ranked first and GAC Lowland NiTi wires ranked last. For resistivity tests Ormco A wires were found superior and Morelli remained last. Conclusion: these rankings should be correlated clinically and need further studies. PMID:27829751

  5. A Protocol to Assess Insect Resistance to Heat Waves, Applied to Bumblebees (Bombus Latreille, 1802)

    PubMed Central

    Martinet, Baptiste; Lecocq, Thomas; Smet, Jérémy; Rasmont, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Insect decline results from numerous interacting factors including climate change. One of the major phenomena related to climate change is the increase of the frequency of extreme events such as heat waves. Since heat waves are suspected to dramatically increase insect mortality, there is an urgent need to assess their potential impact. Here, we determined and compared the resistance to heat waves of insects under hyperthermic stress through their time before heat stupor (THS) when they are exposed to an extreme temperature (40°C). For this, we used a new experimental standardised device available in the field or in locations close to the field collecting sites. We applied this approach on different Arctic, Boreo-Alpine and Widespread bumblebee species in order to predict consequences of heat waves. Our results show a heat resistance gradient: the heat stress resistance of species with a centred arctic distribution is weaker than the heat resistance of the Boreo-Alpine species with a larger distribution which is itself lower than the heat stress resistance of the ubiquitous species. PMID:25738862

  6. Nonisothermal Austenite Grain Growth Kinetics in a Microalloyed X80 Linepipe Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Kumkum; Militzer, Matthias; Perez, Michel; Wang, Xiang

    2010-12-01

    Nonisothermal austenite grain growth kinetics under the influence of several combinations of Nb, Ti, and Mo containing complex precipitates has been studied in a microalloyed linepipe steel. The goal of this study is the development of a grain growth model to predict the austenite grain size in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ). Electron microscopy investigations of the as-received steel proved the presence of Ti-rich, Nb-rich, and Mo-rich precipitates. The steel has then been subjected to austenitizing heat treatments to selected peak temperatures at various heating rates that are typical for thermal cycles in the HAZ. Thermal cycles have a strong effect on the final austenite grain size. Using a mean field approach, a model is proposed for the dissolution of Nb-rich precipitates. This model has been coupled to a Zener-type austenite grain growth model in the presence of pinning particles. This coupling leads to accurate prediction of the austenite grain size along the nonisothermal heating path simulating selected thermal profiles of the HAZ.

  7. Laser borided composite layer produced on austenitic 316L steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikołajczak, Daria; Kulka, Michał; Makuch, Natalia

    2016-12-01

    Abstract Austenitic 316L steel is well-known for its good resistance to corrosion and oxidation. Therefore, this material is often used wherever corrosive media or high temperatures are to be expected. The main drawback of this material is very low hardness and low resistance to mechanical wear. In this study, the laser boriding was used in order to improve the wear behavior of this material. As a consequence, a composite surface layer was produced. The microstructure of laser-borided steel was characterized by only two zones: re-melted zone and base material. In the re-melted zone, a composite microstructure, consisting of hard ceramic phases (borides) and a soft austenitic matrix, was observed. A significant increase in hardness and wear resistance of such a layer was obtained.

  8. Wear behavior of austenite containing plate steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Christina E.

    As a follow up to Wolfram's Master of Science thesis, samples from the prior work were further investigated. Samples from four steel alloys were selected for investigation, namely AR400F, 9260, Hadfield, and 301 Stainless steels. AR400F is martensitic while the Hadfield and 301 stainless steels are austenitic. The 9260 exhibited a variety of hardness levels and retained austenite contents, achieved by heat treatments, including quench and tempering (Q&T) and quench and partitioning (Q&P). Samples worn by three wear tests, namely Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel (DSRW), impeller tumbler impact abrasion, and Bond abrasion, were examined by optical profilometry. The wear behaviors observed in topography maps were compared to the same in scanning electron microscopy micrographs and both were used to characterize the wear surfaces. Optical profilometry showed that the scratching abrasion present on the wear surface transitioned to gouging abrasion as impact conditions increased (i.e. from DSRW to impeller to Bond abrasion). Optical profilometry roughness measurements were also compared to sample hardness as well as normalized volume loss (NVL) results for each of the three wear tests. The steels displayed a relationship between roughness measurements and observed wear rates for all three categories of wear testing. Nanoindentation was used to investigate local hardness changes adjacent to the wear surface. DSRW samples generally did not exhibit significant work hardening. The austenitic materials exhibited significant hardening under the high impact conditions of the Bond abrasion wear test. Hardening in the Q&P materials was less pronounced. The Q&T microstructures also demonstrated some hardening. Scratch testing was performed on samples at three different loads, as a more systematic approach to determining the scratching abrasion behavior. Wear rates and scratch hardness were calculated from scratch testing results. Certain similarities between wear behavior in scratch testing

  9. Effect of thymol in heating and recovery media on the isothermal and non-isothermal heat resistance of Bacillus spores.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Maria-Dolores; Conesa, Raquel; Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Palop, Alfredo

    2015-06-01

    Members of the genus Bacillus include important food-borne pathogen and spoilage microorganisms for food industry. Essential oils are natural products extracted from herbs and spices, which can be used as natural preservatives in many foods because of their antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic properties. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of the addition of different concentrations of thymol to the heating and recovery media on the thermal resistance of spores of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus subtilis at different temperatures. While the heat resistance was hardly reduced when thymol was present in the heating medium, the effect in the recovery medium was greater, reducing the D100 °C values down to one third for B. subtilis and B. cereus when 0.5 mM thymol was added. This effect was dose dependent and was also observed at other heating temperatures.

  10. Heat resistance of Salmonella enterica is increased by pre-adaptation to peanut oil or sub-lethal heat exposure.

    PubMed

    Fong, Karen; Wang, Siyun

    2016-09-01

    Cross-protection represents a considerable challenge in the food industry where hurdled interventions are often employed to reduce Salmonella contamination. The heat resistance of Salmonella strains from five serotypes (i.e., Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Tennessee, Thompson and Hartford) at 70 °C was determined by measurement of viable cell populations before and after adaptation to two common stresses employed in low-water activity food processing, desiccation and sub-lethal heat treatment. Survival of Salmonella at 70 °C significantly increased (p < 0.05) following the six-day incubation in peanut oil (aw 0.52 ± 0.00) and/or the exposure to a sub-lethal heat treatment at 45 °C for 3 min. Quantitative PCR revealed upregulation of two desiccation stress-related genes, fadA and otsB, following the peanut oil incubation, whereas heat treatment induced upregulation of a heat-resistance gene, dnaK. Invasion gene invA and alternative sigma factor rpoE were downregulated following either of the treatments. Interestingly, different Salmonella strains yielded different transcriptional profiles. The strain-specific resistance phenotypes and transcriptional profiles provided further insights into the mechanisms employed to tolerate desiccation and heat stresses in the food industry.

  11. Effect of austenite on mechanical properties in high manganese austenitic stainless steel with two phase of martensite and austenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Kim, J. H.; Hwang, T. H.; Lee, J. Y.; Kang, C. Y.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of the austenite phase on mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels was investigated using specimens with different volume fractions of retained and reversed austenite. Stainless steels with dual-phase coexisting martensite and austenite were successfully synthesized by deformation and reverse transformation treatment in the cold-rolled high manganese austenitic stainless steel and the ultrafine reverse austenite with less than 0.5 µm in size was formed by reverse transformation treatment in the temperature range of 500-750 °C for various times. With the increase of deformation degree, the volume fraction of retained austenite decreased, while that of the reversed austenite increased as the annealing time increased. From the results of the mechanical properties, it was obvious that as the volume fraction of retained and reversed austenite increased, hardness and strength rapidly decreased, while elongation increased. With regard to each austenite, reversed austenite indicated higher value of hardness and strength, while elongation suggested a lower value because of strengthening owing to grain refinement.

  12. Grain refinement of a nickel and manganese free austenitic stainless steel produced by pressurized solution nitriding

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh Akbari, Alireza

    2014-07-01

    Prolonged exposure at high temperatures during solution nitriding induces grain coarsening which deteriorates the mechanical properties of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels. In this study, grain refinement of nickel and manganese free Fe–22.75Cr–2.42Mo–1.17N high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel plates was investigated via a two-stage heat treatment procedure. Initially, the coarse-grained austenitic stainless steel samples were subjected to an isothermal heating at 700 °C to be decomposed into the ferrite + Cr{sub 2}N eutectoid structure and then re-austenitized at 1200 °C followed by water quenching. Microstructure and hardness of samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and micro-hardness testing. The results showed that the as-solution-nitrided steel decomposes non-uniformly to the colonies of ferrite and Cr{sub 2}N nitrides with strip like morphology after isothermal heat treatment at 700 °C. Additionally, the complete dissolution of the Cr{sub 2}N precipitates located in the sample edges during re-austenitizing requires longer times than 1 h. In order to avoid this problem an intermediate nitrogen homogenizing heat treatment cycle at 1200 °C for 10 h was applied before grain refinement process. As a result, the initial austenite was uniformly decomposed during the first stage, and a fine grained austenitic structure with average grain size of about 20 μm was successfully obtained by re-austenitizing for 10 min. - Highlights: • Successful grain refinement of Fe–22.75Cr–2.42Mo–1.17N steel by heat treatment • Using the γ → α + Cr{sub 2}N reaction for grain refinement of a Ni and Mn free HNASS • Obtaining a single phase austenitic structure with average grain size of ∼ 20 μm • Incomplete dissolution of Cr{sub 2}N during re-austenitizing at 1200 °C for long times • Reducing re-austenitizing time by homogenizing treatment before grain refinement.

  13. Ultrastructure and extreme heat resistance of spores from thermophilic Clostridium species.

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, H H; Zeikus, J G; Longin, R; Millet, J; Ryter, A

    1983-01-01

    The heat resistance and ultrastructural features of spore suspensions prepared from Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, Clostridium thermosulfurogenes 4B, and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E were compared as a function of decimal reduction time. The decimal reduction times at 121 degrees C for strains LQRI, 4B, and 39E were 0.5, 2.5, and 11 min. The higher degree of spore heat resistance was associated with a spore architecture displaying a thicker cortex layer. Heat resistance of these spores was proportional to the ratio of spore cortex volume to cytoplasmic volume. These ratios for spores of strains LQRI, 4B, and 39E were 1.4, 1.6, and 6.6, respectively. The extreme heat resistance and autoclavable nature of C. thermohydrosulfuricum spores under routine sterilization procedures is suggested as a common cause of laboratory contamination with pure cultures of thermophilic, saccharide-fermenting anaerobes. Images PMID:6643392

  14. A study of the dry heat resistance of naturally occurring organisms widely dispersed on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garst, D. M.; Lindell, K. F.

    1971-01-01

    Although Bacillus subtilis var. niger is the standard test organism for NASA planetary quarantine sterilization studies, it was found that some naturally occurring soil organisms are more heat resistant. The separation of these organisms from soil particles is described. Experiments are discussed which were designed to show that the heat resistance is a natural characteristic of the organisms, rather than a condition induced by the clumping effect of agglomerated particles and organisms.

  15. Influence of cyclopropane fatty acids on heat, high pressure, acid and oxidative resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan Yao; Gänzle, Michael G

    2016-04-02

    Heat and high pressure resistant strains of Escherichia coli are a challenge to food safety. This study investigated effects of cyclopropane fatty acids (CFAs) on stress tolerance in the heat- and pressure-resistant strain E. coli AW1.7 and the sensitive strain E. coli MG1655. The role of CFAs was explored by disruption of cfa coding for CFA synthase with an in-frame, unmarked deletion method. Both wild-type strains consumed all the unsaturated fatty acids (C16:1 and C18:1) that were mostly converted to CFAs and a low proportion to saturated fatty acid (C16:0). Moreover, E. coli AW1.7 contained a higher proportion of membrane C19:0 cyclopropane fatty acid than E. coli MG1655 (P<0.05). The Δcfa mutant strains did not produce CFAs, and the corresponding substrates C16:1 and C18:1 accumulated in membrane lipids. The deletion of cfa did not alter resistance to H2O2 but increased the lethality of heat, high pressure and acid treatments in E. coli AW1.7, and E. coli MG1655. E. coli AW1.7 and its Δcfa mutant were more resistant to pressure and heat but less resistant to acid stress than E. coli MG1655. Heat resistance of wild-type strains and their Δcfa mutant was also assessed in beef patties grilled to an internal temperature of 71 °C. After treatment, cell counts of wild type strains were higher than those of the Δcfa mutant strains. In conclusion, CFA synthesis in E. coli increases heat, high pressure and acid resistance, and increases heat resistance in food. This knowledge on mechanisms of stress resistance will facilitate the design of intervention methods for improved pathogen control in food production.

  16. Researches upon the cavitation erosion behaviour of austenite steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Mitelea, I.; Salcianu, L. C.; Bordeasu, D.; Duma, S. T.; Iosif, A.

    2016-02-01

    Paper analyzes the cavitation erosion behavior of two stainless steels with 100% austenitic structure but differing by the chemical composition and the values of mechanical properties. The research is based on the MDE(t) and MDER(t) characteristic curves. We studied supplementary the aspect of the eroded areas by other to different means: observations with performing optical microscopes and roughness measurements. The tests were done in the T2 vibratory facility in the Cavitation Laboratory of the Timisoara Polytechnic University. The principal purpose of the study is the identification of the elements influencing significantly the cavitation erosion resistance. It was established the effect of the principal chemical components (determining the proportion of the structural components in conformity the Schaffler diagram) upon the cavitation erosion resistance. The results of the researches present the influence of the proportion of unstable austenite upon cavitation erosion resistance. The stainless steel with the great proportion of unstable austenite has the best behavior. The obtained conclusion are important for the metallurgists which realizes the stainless steels used for manufacturing the runners of hydraulic machineries (turbines and pumps) with increased resistance to cavitation attack.

  17. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  18. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  19. Austenite grain growth simulation considering the solute-drag effect and pinning effect

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyama, Naoto; Nishibata, Toshinobu; Seki, Akira; Hirata, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The pinning effect is useful for restraining austenite grain growth in low alloy steel and improving heat affected zone toughness in welded joints. We propose a new calculation model for predicting austenite grain growth behavior. The model is mainly comprised of two theories: the solute-drag effect and the pinning effect of TiN precipitates. The calculation of the solute-drag effect is based on the hypothesis that the width of each austenite grain boundary is constant and that the element content maintains equilibrium segregation at the austenite grain boundaries. We used Hillert’s law under the assumption that the austenite grain boundary phase is a liquid so that we could estimate the equilibrium solute concentration at the austenite grain boundaries. The equilibrium solute concentration was calculated using the Thermo-Calc software. Pinning effect was estimated by Nishizawa’s equation. The calculated austenite grain growth at 1473–1673 K showed excellent correspondence with the experimental results. PMID:28179962

  20. Perturbation of the Heat Lateral Diffusion by Interface Resistance in Layered Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frétigny, C.; Duquesne, J.-Y.; Fournier, D.

    2015-06-01

    It is well established that interface resistances do usually exist in layered structures, and their values strongly depend on their origin. They may arise from different vibrational properties of the layers, nonharmonic processes at the interface, surface chemical contamination, interfacial defects, etc. Numerous studies have been published to evaluate their values, most of the time, in a perpendicular heat diffusion scheme. In this paper, the effect of interface resistances on the lateral modulated surface temperature of a layered structure for cylindrical symmetry heat diffusion is studied. The thermoreflectance microscope is a particularly convenient tool to record heat lateral diffusion from a surface modulated heated point and thus to evidence the presence of such resistance interfaces. In a first part, the theoretical model of heat diffusion in cylindrical symmetry, in a layered structure exhibiting an interface resistance between the layer and the substrate, is briefly described. In a second part, the C/I configuration (good conductive layer deposited on an insulating substrate, with an interface resistance) is investigated. Experimental results illustrate the theory. In the third part, the reverse case I/C (insulating layer deposited on a conductive substrate, with an interface resistance) is discussed. To conclude, all the cases and the ability of the lateral diffusion to recover interface thermal resistances are compared.

  1. Flash-Fire Propensity and Heat-Release Rate Studies of Improved Fire Resistant Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-six improved fire resistant materials were tested for flash-fire propensity and heat release rate properties. The tests were conducted to obtain a descriptive index based on the production of ignitable gases during the thermal degradation process and on the response of the materials under a specific heat load.

  2. Heat Transfer and Hydraulic Flow Resistance for Streams of High Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelchuk, V. L.

    1943-01-01

    Problems of hydraulic flow resistance and heat transfer for streams with velocities comparable with acoustic have present great importance for various fields of technical science. Especially, they have great importance for the field of heat transfer in designing and constructing boilers.of the "Velox" type. In this article a description of experiments and their results as regards definition of the laws of heat transfer in differential form for high velocity air streams inside smooth tubes are given.

  3. Porphyrin photosensitivity in cell lines expressing a heat-resistant phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomer, Charles J.; Rucker, Natalie; Wong, Sam

    1990-07-01

    In-vitro sensitivity to porphyrin mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been examined in cell lines resistant to hyperthermia. Parental (HA-i) and heat resistant (3012) Chinese hamster fibroblasts as well as parental (RIF-i) and temperature resistant (TR-4, TR-5 and TR-iO) mouse radiation-induced fibrosarcoma cells were evaluated for thermal and PDT sensitivity. Quantitative survival curves were generated and porphyrin uptake properties were obtained for all cell lines. Significant resistance to hyperthermia (450C for varying exposure periods) was documented for the 3012 and TR cell strains when compared to 'the parent lines. However, normal and heat resistant clones exhibited comparable levels of porphyrin uptake and photosensitivity. Our results indicate that cross resistance between hyperthermia and PDT is not observed and that members of the 70 kD heat shock protein family (which are elevated in the thermal resistant cells and may be associated with the heat resistant phenotype) do not play a significant role in modulating PDT sensitivity. Mechanisms of in-vitro cytotoxicity appear to be different for PDT and hyperthermia even though possible subcellular targets (such as the plasma membrane) and types of damage (protein denaturation) may be similar for the two modalities.

  4. Effect of heat treatment on fatigue resistance of spring steel 60Si2CrVAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiyong, Liu; Deyi, Liu; Shicheng, Liu

    2010-07-01

    Fatigue resistance of heat-treated spring steel 60Si2CrVAT due to three-point bending with step growth in the load is studied. The microstructure of the steel and fatigue fracture surfaces are analyzed by the method of scanning electron microscopy. The possibilities of raising the fatigue resistance of springs used in high-speed freight bogies are considered.

  5. Austenitic alloy and reactor components made thereof

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John F.; Brager, Howard R.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1986-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy is disclosed, having excellent fast neutron irradiation swelling resistance and good post irradiation ductility, making it especially useful for liquid metal fast breeder reactor applications. The alloy contains: about 0.04 to 0.09 wt. % carbon; about 1.5 to 2.5 wt. % manganese; about 0.5 to 1.6 wt. % silicon; about 0.030 to 0.08 wt. % phosphorus; about 13.3 to 16.5 wt. % chromium; about 13.7 to 16.0 wt. % nickel; about 1.0 to 3.0 wt. % molybdenum; and about 0.10 to 0.35 wt. % titanium.

  6. Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures

    DOEpatents

    Seager, Carleton H.; Evans, Jr., Joseph Tate

    1998-01-01

    A method for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100.degree. C. and 300.degree. C. for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer.

  7. Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures

    DOEpatents

    Seager, C.H.; Evans, J.T. Jr.

    1998-11-24

    A method is described for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100 C and 300 C for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer. 1 fig.

  8. Thin-Film Resistance Heat-Flux Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2005-01-01

    Thin-film heat-flux sensors of a proposed type would offer advantages over currently available thin-film heat flux sensors. Like a currently available thin-film heat-flux sensor, a sensor according to the proposal would be based on measurement of voltages related to the temperatures of thin metal films on the hotter and colder faces of a layer of an electrically insulating and moderately thermally conductive material. The heat flux through such a device is proportional to the difference between the temperatures and to the thermal conductivity of the layer. The advantages of the proposed sensors over the commercial ones would arise from the manner in which the temperature-related voltages would be generated and measured.

  9. Intermetallic strengthened alumina-forming austenitic steels for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 % for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, materials required are strong, corrosion-resistant at high temperatures (>700°C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase and Ni3Al precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The creep resistance of these alloys is significantly improved through intermetallic strengthening (Laves-Fe 2Nb + L12-Ni3Al precipitates) without harmful effects on oxidation resistance. This research starts with microstructural and microchemical analyses of these intermetallic strengthened alumina-forming austenitic steels in a scanning electron microscope. The microchemistry of precipitates, as determined by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscope, is also studied. Different thermo-mechanical treatments were carried out to these stainless steels in an attempt to further improve their mechanical properties. The microstructural and microchemical analyses were again performed after the thermo-mechanical processing. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to measure the lattice parameters of these steels after different thermo-mechanical treatments. Tensile tests at both room and elevated temperatures were performed to study mechanical behaviors of this novel alloy system; the deformation mechanisms were studied by strain rate jump tests at elevated temperatures. Failure analysis and post-mortem TEM analysis were performed to study the creep failure mechanisms of these alumina-forming austenitic steels after creep tests. Experiments were carried out to study the effects of boron and carbon additions in the aged alumina-forming austenitic steels.

  10. The effect of heat treatment on the resistivity of polycrystalline silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, A. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The resistivity of doped polycrystalline silicon films has been studied as a function of post deposition heat treatments in an oxidizing atmosphere. It was found that a short oxidation cycle may produce a resistivity increase as large as three orders of magnitude in the polycrystalline films. The extent of change was dependent on the initial resistivity and the films' doping level and was independent of the total oxidation time.

  11. Aluminum nitride bulk crystal growth in a resistively heated reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmau, Rafael Federico

    A resistively heated reactor capable of temperatures in excess of 2300°C was used to grow aluminum nitride (AlN) bulk single crystals from an AlN powder source by physical vapor transport (PVT) in nitrogen atmosphere. AlN crystals were grown at elevated temperatures by two different methods. Self-seeded crystals were obtained by spontaneous nucleation on the crucible walls, while seeded growth was performed on singular and vicinal (0001) surfaces of silicon carbide (SiC) seeds. During self-seeded growth experiments a variety of crucible materials, such as boron nitride, tungsten, tantalum, rhenium, tantalum nitride, and tantalum carbide, were evaluated. These studies showed that the morphology of crystals grown by spontaneous nucleation strongly depends on the growth temperature and contamination in the reactor. Crucible selection had a profound effect on contamination in the crystal growth environment, influencing nucleation, coalescence, and crystal morphology. In terms of high-temperature stability and compatibility with the growth process, the best results for AlN crystal growth were obtained in crucibles made of sintered tantalum carbide or tantalum nitride. In addition, contamination from the commercially purchased AlN powder source was reduced by presintering the powder prior to growth, which resulted in a drastic reduction of nearly all impurities. Spontaneously grown single crystals up to 15 mm in size were characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray topography, glow discharge mass spectrometry, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Average dislocation densities were on the order of 103 cm -3, with extended areas virtually free of dislocations. High resolution rocking curves routinely showed peak widths as narrow as 7 arcsec, indicating a high degree of crystalline perfection. Low-temperature partially polarized optical reflectance measurements were used to calculate the crystal-field splitting parameter of AlN, Deltacr = -230 meV, and a low-temperature (1

  12. Effect of residual austenite on the tendency of incompletely aged maraging steels to embrittlement during slow deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kardonskii, V.M.; Gorbunova, N.B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigate the high-strength maraging steels (HSMS) N17K10V10MT and N18V10V10MT by cyclic heat treatment and heating to temperatures of the dual-phase (alpha + gamma)-region. Embrittlement during the slow loading of incompletely aged HSMS with titanium can be reduced when approximately 20% of residual austenite is obtained in them. Maraging steel containing residual austenite in the initial state does not tend toward this type of embrittlement.

  13. The critical analysis of austenitic manganese steel T130Mn135 used for castings in the mining industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josan, A.; Pinca Bretotean, C.; Putan, V.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the critical analysis of making technology of austenitic manganese steel T130Mn135, used for castings of the type Mills hammer at a Romanian foundry. Are analyzed 11 charges of steel for castings and is determined the diagram of the heat treatment. After the applying of the heat treatment results a single-phase structure, consisting of homogeneous austenite. For all the 11 charges is presented the variation of chemical composition.

  14. Influence of variation potential on resistance of the photosynthetic machinery to heating in pea.

    PubMed

    Sukhov, Vladimir; Surova, Lyubov; Sherstneva, Oksana; Vodeneev, Vladimir

    2014-12-01

    Electrical signals [action potentials (APs) and variation potentials (VPs)] induced by local stimuli are a mechanism that underlies rapid plant response to environmental factors. Such signals induce a number of functional responses, including changes in photosynthesis. Ultimately, these responses are considered to increase plant resistance to stress factors, but this question has been poorly investigated. We studied the influence of VP on photosynthesis and resistance of the photosynthetic machinery to heating in leaves of pea (Pisum sativum). Localized burning induced a VP that decreased photosynthesis parameters [CO(2) assimilation rate and quantum yields of photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII)]. The photosynthetic response was initiated by a decrease in photosynthesis dark-stage activity, which in turn increased resistance of PSI to heating. Three results supported this hypothesized mechanism: (1) the magnitude of VP-induced decrease in CO(2) assimilation and enhanced PSI resistance to heating were highly correlated; (2) the VP influence on PSI resistance to heating was suppressed under a low external CO(2) concentration and (3) decreasing external CO(2) concentration imitated the VP-induced photosynthetic response and increased PSI resistance to heating.

  15. Design and performance of low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, R. C.; Gonczy, J. D.; Phelan, P. E.; Nicol, T. H.

    Electrical conductors often require the removal of heat produced by normal operation. The heat can be removed by mechanical connection of the conductor to a refrigeration source. Such connections require both effective heat removal (low thermal resistance) and effective electrical isolation (high electrical resistance and high dielectric strength). Fabrication of these connections should be straightforward, and performance must be reliable and independent of operating temperature. The connection method described here involves clamping (by thermal interference fit) an electrically insulating cylinder between an outer metallic ring and an inner metallic disc. Material candidates for insulating cylinders include composites, e.g. epoxy/fibreglass, and ceramics, e.g. alumina. Design factors, including geometry, materials and thermal contact resistance are discussed. The design, construction experience and performance measurements of a heat intercept connection in a high-temperature superconducting lead assembly is presented.

  16. Bark heat resistance of small trees in Californian mixed conifer forests: Testing some model assumptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Mantgem, Phillip J.; Schwartz, Mark

    2003-01-01

    An essential component to models of fire-caused tree mortality is an assessment of cambial damage. Cambial heat resistance has been traditionally measured in large overstory trees with thick bark, although small trees have thinner bark and thus are more sensitive to fire. We undertook this study to determine if current models of bark heat transfer are applicable to small trees (<20 cm diameter at breast height (dbh)). We performed this work in situ on four common species in the mixed conifer forests of the Sierra Nevada, California.The allometric relationship between bole diameter and bark thickness for each species was linear, even for very small trees (5 cm dbh). Heating experiments demonstrated that bark thickness was the primary determinant of cambial heat resistance. We found only slight, but statistically significant, among species differences in bark thermal properties. Our most significant finding was that small trees were more resistant to heating than expected from commonly used models of bark heat transfer. Our results may differ from those of existing models because we found smaller trees to have a greater proportion of inner bark, which appears to have superior insulating properties compared to outer bark. From a management perspective, growth projections suggest that a 50-year fire-free interval may allow some fire intolerant species to achieve at least some degree of cambial heat resistance in the Sierra Nevada.

  17. Development of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Bei, Hongbin; Santella, Michael L; Maziasz, Philip J

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the continued development of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys, which exhibit a unique combination of excellent oxidation resistance via protective alumina (Al2O3) scale formation and high-temperature creep strength through the formation of stable nano-scale MC carbides and intermetallic precipitates. Efforts in fiscal year 2009 focused on the characterization and understanding of long-term oxidation resistance and tensile properties as a function of alloy composition and microstructure. Computational thermodynamic calculations of the austenitic matrix phase composition and the volume fraction of MC, B2-NiAl, and Fe2(Mo,Nb) base Laves phase precipitates were used to interpret oxidation behavior. Of particular interest was the enrichment of Cr in the austenitic matrix phase by additions of Nb, which aided the establishment and maintenance of alumina. Higher levels of Nb additions also increased the volume fraction of B2-NiAl precipitates, which served as an Al reservoir during long-term oxidation. Ageing studies of AFA alloys were conducted at 750 C for times up to 2000 h. Ageing resulted in near doubling of yield strength at room temperature after only 50 h at 750 C, with little further increase in yield strength out to 2000 h of ageing. Elongation was reduced on ageing; however, levels of 15-25% were retained at room temperature after 2000 h of total ageing.

  18. Effect of Water Activities of Heating and Recovery Media on Apparent Heat Resistance of Bacillus cereus Spores

    PubMed Central

    Coroller, Louis; Leguérinel, Ivan; Mafart, Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus cereus were heated and recovered in order to investigate the effect of water activity of media on the estimated heat resistance (i.e., the D value) of spores. The water activity (ranging from 0.9 to 1) of the heating medium was first successively controlled with three solutes (glycerol, glucose, and sucrose), while the water activity of the recovery medium was kept near 1. Reciprocally, the water activity of the heating medium was then kept at 1, while the water activity of the recovery medium was controlled from 0.9 to 1 with the same depressors. Lastly, in a third set of experiments, the heating medium and the recovery medium were adjusted to the same activity. As expected, added depressors caused an increase of the heat resistance of spores with a greater efficiency of sucrose with respect to glycerol and glucose. In contrast, when solutes were added to the recovery medium, under an optimal water activity close to 0.98, a decrease of water activity caused a decrease in the estimated D values. This effect was more pronounced when sucrose was used as a depressor instead of glycerol or glucose. When the heating and the recovery media were adjusted to the same water activity, a balancing effect was observed between the protective influence of the solutes during heat treatment and their negative effect during the recovery of injured cells, so that the overall effect of water activity was reduced, with an optimal value near 0.96. The difference between the efficiency of depressors was also less pronounced. It may then be concluded that the overall protective effect of a decrease in water activity is generally overestimated. PMID:11133461

  19. Application of advanced austenitic alloys to fossil power system components

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    Most power and recovery boilers operating in the US produce steam at temperatures below 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) and pressures below 24 MPa (3500 psi). For these operating conditions, carbon steels and low alloy steels may be used for the construction of most of the boiler components. Austenitic stainless steels often are used for superheater/reheater tubing when these components are expected to experience temperatures above 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) or when the environment is too corrosive for low alloys steels. The austenitic stainless steels typically used are the 304H, 321H, and 347H grades. New ferritic steels such as T91 and T92 are now being introduced to replace austenitic: stainless steels in aging fossil power plants. Generally, these high-strength ferritic steels are more expensive to fabricate than austenitic stainless steels because the ferritic steels have more stringent heat treating requirements. Now, annealing requirements are being considered for the stabilized grades of austenitic stainless steels when they receive more than 5% cold work, and these requirements would increase significantly the cost of fabrication of boiler components where bending strains often exceed 15%. It has been shown, however, that advanced stainless steels developed at ORNL greatly benefit from cold work, and these steels could provide an alternative to either conventional stainless steels or high-strength ferritic steels. The purpose of the activities reported here is to examine the potential of advanced stainless steels for construction of tubular components in power boilers. The work is being carried out with collaboration of a commercial boiler manufacturer.

  20. Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J; Hsu, Julia

    2010-11-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

  1. Two distinct groups within the Bacillus subtilis group display significantly different spore heat resistance properties.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Erwin M; Zwietering, Marcel H; Kuipers, Oscar P; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J

    2015-02-01

    The survival of bacterial spores after heat treatment and the subsequent germination and outgrowth in a food product can lead to spoilage of the food product and economical losses. Prediction of time-temperature conditions that lead to sufficient inactivation requires access to detailed spore thermal inactivation kinetics of relevant model strains. In this study, the thermal inactivation kinetics of spores of fourteen strains belonging to the Bacillus subtilis group were determined in detail, using both batch heating in capillary tubes and continuous flow heating in a micro heater. The inactivation data were fitted using a log linear model. Based on the spore heat resistance data, two distinct groups (p < 0.001) within the B. subtilis group could be identified. One group of strains had spores with an average D120 °C of 0.33 s, while the spores of the other group displayed significantly higher heat resistances, with an average D120 °C of 45.7 s. When comparing spore inactivation data obtained using batch- and continuous flow heating, the z-values were significantly different, hence extrapolation from one system to the other was not justified. This study clearly shows that heat resistances of spores from different strains in the B. subtilis group can vary greatly. Strains can be separated into two groups, to which different spore heat inactivation kinetics apply.

  2. Thermal treatment of low permeability soils using electrical resistance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Udell, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    The acceleration of recovery rates of second phase liquid contaminants from the subsurface during gas or water pumping operations is realized by increasing the soil and ground water temperature. Electrical heating with AC current is one method of increasing the soil and groundwater temperature and has particular applicability to low permeability soils. Several mechanisms have been identified that account for the enhanced removal of the contaminants during electrical heating. These are vaporization of liquid contaminants with low boiling points, temperature-enhanced evaporation rates of semi-volatile components, and removal of residual contaminants by the boiling of residual water. Field scale studies of electrical heating and fluid extraction show the effectiveness of this technique and its applicability to contaminants found both above and below the water table and within low permeability soils. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  3. HEAT-RESISTANT MATERIAL WITH SILICON CARBIDE AS A BASE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A new high-temperature material, termed SG-60, is a silicon carbide -graphite composite in which the graphite is the thermostability carrier since it...is more heat-conducting and softer (heat conductivity of graphite is 0.57 cal/g-cm-sec compared with 0.02 cal/g-cm-sec for silicon carbide ) while... silicon carbide is the carrier of high-temperature strength and hardness. The high covalent bonding strength of the atoms of silicon carbide (283 kcal

  4. HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FRACTURE IN FORGED TYPE 304L AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan; Neidt, Ted; Hollenbeck, John; Knutson, J.; Everhart, Wes; Hanlin, R.; Bergen, R.; Balch, D. K.

    2012-09-06

    Austenitic stainless steels generally have good resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture; however, structural designs for high-pressure gaseous hydrogen are constrained by the low strength of this class of material. Forging is used to increase the low strength of austenitic stainless steels, thus improving the efficiency of structural designs. Hydrogen-assisted racture, however, depends on microstructural details associated with manufacturing. In this study, hydrogen-assisted fracture of forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is investigated. Microstructural variation in multi-step forged 304L was achieved by forging at different rates and temperatures, and by process annealing. High internal hydrogen content in forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is achieved by thermal precharging in gaseous hydrogen and results in as much as 50% reduction of tensile ductility.

  5. Effect of Austenitic and Austeno-Ferritic Electrodes on 2205 Duplex and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Dissimilar Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.

    2016-11-01

    This study addresses the effect of different types of austenitic and austeno-ferritic electrodes (E309L, E309LMo and E2209) on the relationship between weldability, microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of shielded metal arc welded duplex/austenitic (2205/316L) stainless steel dissimilar joints using the combined techniques of optical, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive spectrometer and electrochemical. The results indicated that the change in electrode composition led to microstructural variations in the welds with the development of different complex phases such as vermicular ferrite, lathy ferrite, widmanstatten and intragranular austenite. Mechanical properties of welded joints were diverged based on compositions and solidification modes; it was observed that ferritic mode solidified weld dominated property wise. However, the pitting corrosion resistance of all welds showed different behavior in chloride solution; moreover, weld with E2209 was superior, whereas E309L exhibited lower resistance. Higher degree of sensitization was observed in E2209 weld, while lesser in E309L weld. Optimum ferrite content was achieved in all welds.

  6. Effect of Welding Heat Input on the Corrosion Resistance of Carbon Steel Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongxin; Jing, Hongyang; Han, Yongdian; Xu, Lianyong

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of carbon steel weld metal with three different microstructures has been systematically evaluated using electrochemical techniques with the simulated produced water containing CO2 at 90 °C. Microstructures include acicular ferrite, polygonal ferrite, and a small amount of pearlite. With welding heat input increasing, weld metal microstructure becomes more uniform. Electrochemical techniques including potentiodynamic polarization curve, linear polarization resistance, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were utilized to characterize the corrosion properties on weld joint, indicating that the best corrosion resistance corresponded to the weld metal with a polygonal ferrite microstructure, whereas the weld metal with the acicular ferrite + polygonal ferrite microstructure showed the worst corrosion resistance. The samples with high welding heat input possessed better corrosion resistance. Results were discussed in terms of crystal plane orientation, grain size, and grain boundary type found in each weld metal by electron backscatter diffraction test.

  7. Heat resistant substrates and battery separators made therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, Alois (Inventor); Scala, Luciano C. (Inventor); Ruffing, Charles R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A flexible substrate having a caustic resistant support and at least one membrane comprising a solid polymeric matrix containing a network of interconnected pores and interdispersed inorganic filler particles with a ratio of filler: polymer in the polymeric matrix of between about 1:1 to 5:1, is made by coating at least one side of the support with a filler:coating formulation mixture of inorganic filler particles and a caustic resistant, water insoluble polymer dissolved in an organic solvent, and removing the solvent from the mixture to provide a porous network within the polymeric matrix.

  8. Variation in heat and pressure resistance of verotoxigenic and nontoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Gill, Alex; McMullen, Lynn; Gänzle, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the heat and pressure resistance of 112 strains of Escherichia coli, including 102 strains of verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) representing 23 serotypes and four phylogenetic groups. In an initial screening, the heat and pressure resistance of 100 strains, including 94 VTEC strains, were tested in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Treatment at 60°C for 5 min reduced cell counts by 2.0 to 5.5 log CFU/ml; treatment at 600 MPa for 3 min at 25°C reduced the cell counts by 1.1 to 5.5 log CFU/ml. Heat or pressure resistance did not correlate to the phylogenetic group or the serotype. A smaller group of E. coli strains was evaluated for heat and pressure resistance in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth. Generally, the levels of heat resistance of E. coli strains in LB and PBS were similar; however, the levels of pressure resistance observed for treatments in LB broth or PBS were variable. The cell counts of pressure-resistant strains of VTEC were reduced by less than 1.5 log CFU/ml after treatment at 600 MPa for 3 min. E. coli strains were also treated with 600 MPa for 3 min in ground beef or inoculated into beef patties and grilled to 63 or 71°C. The cell counts of the VTEC E. coli O26:H11 strain 05-6544 were reduced by 2 log CFU/g by pressure treatment in ground beef. The cell counts of the heat-resistant E. coli strain AW1.7 were reduced by 1.4 and 3.4 log CFU/g in beef patties grilled to internal temperatures of 63 and 71°C, respectively. The cell counts of E. coli 05-6544 were reduced by less than 3 and 6 log CFU/g in beef patties grilled to internal temperatures of 63 and 71°C, respectively. To study whether the composition of the beef patties influenced heat resistance, E. coli strains AW1.7, AW1.7 Δ pHR1, MG1655, and LMM1030 were mixed into beef patties containing 15 or 35% fat and 0 or 2% NaCl, and the patties were grilled to an internal temperature of 63°C. The highest heat resistance of E. coli was observed in patties containing 15% fat and 2% NaCl.

  9. Frictional and heat resistance characteristics of coconut husk particle filled automotive brake pad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahari, Shahril Anuar; Chik, Mohd Syahrizul; Kassim, Masitah Abu; Som Said, Che Mohamad; Misnon, Mohd Iqbal; Mohamed, Zulkifli; Othman, Eliasidi Abu

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the friction and heat resistance characteristics of automotive brake pad composed with different sizes and percentages of coconut husk particle. The materials used were phenolic resin (phenol formaldehyde) as binder, copper, graphite and brass as friction producer/modifiers, magnesium oxide as abrasive material, steel and barium sulfate as reinforcement while coconut husk particle as filler. To obtain particle, the coconut husk was ground and dried to 3% moisture content. Then the coconut husk particle was screened using 80 mesh (to obtain coarse dust) and 100 mesh (to obtain fine dust). Different percentages of particle, such as 10 and 30% were used in the mixture of brake pad materials. Then the mixture was hot-pressed to produce brake pad. Chase machine was used to determine the friction coefficient in friction resistance testing, while thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) machine was used to determine the heat decomposition values in heat resistance testing. Results showed that brake pad with 100 mesh and 10% composition of coconut husk particle showed the highest friction coefficient. For heat resistance, brake pad with 100 mesh and 30% composition of coconut husk dust showed the highest decomposition temperature, due to the high percentage of coconut husk particle in the composition, thus increased the thermal stability. As a comparison, brake pad composed with coconut husk particle showed better heat resistance results than commercial brake pad.

  10. Improving Heat Pump Water Heater Effeciency by Avoiding Electric Resistance Heater Use

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, Philip R.; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Gehl, Anthony C.; Parkison, April E.; Nutaro, James J.

    2014-09-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are a promising technology that can decrease the domestic hot water energy consumption over an electric resistance storage water heater by up to 50%. Heat pump water heaters are really two water heaters in one; they can heat water by using a heat pump or by using electric resistance elements. During large water draw events the HPWHs will use the resistance elements that decrease the overall efficiency of the units. ORNL proposed and tested an advanced control algorithm that anticipates the large water draw events and appropriately sets-up the temperature of the tank water using only the heat pump. With sufficient energy stored in the tank at the elevated temperature, the large water draw is provided for and electric resistance use is avoided. Simulations using a validated heat pump water heater model, and measured water draw data from 25 homes, show average yearly energy savings of 9% for the advanced control algorithm. If the advanced control algorithm perfectly predicts the large water draw events then the savings increase to 19%. This discrepancy could be due to a lack of predictability of water draw patterns in some homes, or the water draw forecasting algorithm could be improved.

  11. [The influence of oil heat treatment on wood decay resistance by Fourier infrared spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Ma, Shu-Ling; Feng, Li-Qun

    2014-03-01

    Wood preservative treatment can improve defects of plantation wood such as easy to corrupt and moth eaten. Among them heat-treatment is not only environmental and no pollution, also can improve the corrosion resistance and dimension stability of wood. In this test Poplar and Mongolian Seoteh Pine was treated by soybean oil as heat-conducting medium, and the heat treatment wood was studied for indoor decay resistance; wood chemical components before and after treatment, the effect of heat treatment on wood decay resistance performance and main mechanism of action were analysed by Fourier infrared spectrometric. Results showed that the mass loss rate of poplar fell from 19.37% to 5% and Mongolian Seoteh Pine's fell from 8.23% to 3.15%, so oil heat treatment can effectively improve the decay resistance. Infrared spectrum analysis shows that the heat treatment made wood's hydrophilic groups such as hydroxyl groups in largely reduced, absorbing capacity decreased and the moisture of wood rotting fungi necessary was reduced; during the heat treatment wood chemical components such as cellulose, hemicellu lose were degraded, and the nutrient source of wood rotting fungi growth necessary was reduced. Wood decay fungi can grow in the wood to discredit wood is because of that wood can provide better living conditions for wood decay fungi, such as nutrients, water, oxygen, and so on. The cellulose and hemicellulose in wood is the main nutrition source of wood decay fungi. So the oil heat-treatment can reduce the cellulose, hemicellulose nutrition source of wood decay fungi so as to improve the decay resistance of wood.

  12. Uniaxial Properties versus Temperature, Creep and Impact Energy of an Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brnic, Josip; Turkalj, Goran; Krscanski, Sanjin; Vukelic, Goran; Canadija, Marko

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, uniaxial material properties, creep resistance and impact energy of the austenitic heat-resistant steel (1.4841) are experimentally determined and analysed. Engineering stress-strain diagrams and uniaxial short-time creep curves are examined with computer-controlled testing machine. Impact energy has been determined and fracture toughness assessed. Investigated data are shown in the form of curves related to ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, modulus of elasticity and creep resistance. All of these experimentally obtained results are analysed and may be used in the design process of the structure where considered material is intended to be applied. Based on these results, considered material may be classified as material of high tensile strength (688 MPa/293 K; 326 MPa/923 K) and high yield strength (498 MPa/293 K; 283 MPa/923 K) as well as satisfactory creep resistance (temperature/stress → to strain (%) at 1,200 min: 823 K/167 MPa → to 0.25 %; 923 K/85 MPa → to 0.2 %).

  13. In-situ determination of austenite and martensite formation in 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P.F.; Sietsma, J.

    2012-09-15

    In-situ analysis of the phase transformations in a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) was carried out using a thermo-magnetic technique, dilatometry and high temperature X-ray diffractometry (HT-XRD). A combination of the results obtained by the three applied techniques gives a valuable insight in the phase transformations during the austenitization treatment, including subsequent cooling, of the 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel, where the magnetic technique offers a high accuracy in monitoring the austenite fraction. It was found by dilatometry that the austenite formation during heating takes place in two stages, most likely caused by partitioning of Ni into austenite. The in-situ evolution of the austenite fraction is monitored by high-temperature XRD and dilatometry. The progress of martensite formation during cooling was described with a Koistinen-Marburger relation for the results obtained from the magnetic and dilatometer experiments. Enhanced martensite formation at the sample surface was detected by X-ray diffraction, which is assumed to be due to relaxation of transformation stresses at the sample surface. Due to the high alloy content and high thermodynamic stability of austenite at room temperature, 4 vol.% of austenite was found to be stable at room temperature after the austenitization treatment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We in-situ analyzed phase transformations and fractions of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo SMSS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher accuracy of the austenite fraction was obtained from magnetic technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Austenite formation during heating takes place in two stages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced martensite formation at the sample surface detected by X-ray diffraction.

  14. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, William O.; Richardson, Richard L.; Goheen, Steven C.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants. Six electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a substantially equilateral hexagonal arrangement. Six phases of voltages are applied to corresponding electrodes. The voltages are adjusted within a first range of voltages to create multiple current paths between pairs of the electrodes. The current paths are evenly distributed throughout the region defined by the electrodes and therefore uniformly heat the region. The region of earthen material is heated to a temperature sufficient to substantially remove volatile and semi-volatile contaminants by promoting microbial action. This temperature is less than a melting temperature of the earthen material.

  15. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, W.O.; Richardson, R.L.; Goheen, S.C.

    1994-07-19

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants. Six electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a substantially equilateral hexagonal arrangement. Six phases of voltages are applied to corresponding electrodes. The voltages are adjusted within a first range of voltages to create multiple current paths between pairs of the electrodes. The current paths are evenly distributed throughout the region defined by the electrodes and therefore uniformly heat the region. The region of earthen material is heated to a temperature sufficient to substantially remove volatile and semi-volatile contaminants by promoting microbial action. This temperature is less than a melting temperature of the earthen material. 13 figs.

  16. Resistance of Navy Shipboard Work Clothing Materials to Extreme Heat.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    00 kok D% n n r ,L LnL c %0O m U" 𔃺 .0 0"- 4W - o 0 44 >4 L-’U .- 4 U) 0 4 ’.m-4 e n LAD% 1 L - 4 - 00L 0 00i 044 LAv> 00 -4(r-4 LAL 4 -4 0 r4U- -A4...term exposures to high heat fluxes in air. In our experimental set-up, diagrammed in Figure 10 and photographed in Figure 11, a pair of facing quartz...computed from heats of fusion of polyester (31 cal/g) and nylon 6,6 (45 cal/g)(8 ); the estimated delay in further temperature rise when the fabric has

  17. Effect of precipitated austenite on the fracture of a ferritic cryogenic steel. [Fe-8Ni-2Mn-0. 1Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Frear, D.R.

    1984-05-01

    The effect of precipitated austenite on the fracture of an Fe-8Ni-2Mn-0.1Ti steel was investigated. To understand the effect an attempt was made to correlate the microstructure, mechanical properties, and the fracture surface appearance of specimens heat treated to contain austenite or be austenite-free. The fracture surfaces were quantitatively studied using a 3D imaging technique in the SEM. It was found that the presence of austenite had a beneficial influence on mechanical properties by lowering the DBTT. Part of this decrease was found to be due to the austenite gettering deleterious elements off the grain boundaries. Specimens that contained precipitated austenite were also found to have a smaller median facet size, when fractured in a brittle transgranular mode, than specimens with no austenite. The decrease in DBTT and change in fracture surface appearance is related to the austenite transforming to martensite of a different variant than the matrix which effectively grain refines the steel and raises the cleavage stress.

  18. Development of Cast Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, G.; Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Walker, L. R.; Meyer, H. M., III; Leonard, D. N.

    2016-11-01

    Cast Fe-Ni-Cr chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels with Ni levels up to 45 wt.% are used at high temperatures in a wide range of industrial applications that demand microstructural stability, corrosion resistance, and creep strength. Although alumina scales offer better corrosion protection at these temperatures, designing cast austenitic alloys that form a stable alumina scale and achieve creep strength comparable to existing cast chromia-forming alloys is challenging. This work outlines the development of cast Fe-Ni-Cr-Al austenitic stainless steels containing about 25 wt.% Ni with good creep strength and the ability to form a protective alumina scale for use at temperatures up to 800-850°C in H2O-, S-, and C-containing environments. Creep properties of the best alloy were comparable to that of HK-type cast chromia-forming alloys along with improved oxidation resistance typical of alumina-forming alloys. Challenges in the design of cast alloys and a potential path to increasing the temperature capability are discussed.

  19. Comparison of Direct Solar Energy to Resistance Heating for Carbothermal Reduction of Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Gustafson, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    A comparison of two methods of delivering thermal energy to regolith for the carbo thermal reduction process has been performed. The comparison concludes that electrical resistance heating is superior to direct solar energy via solar concentrators for the following reasons: (1) the resistance heating method can process approximately 12 times as much regolith using the same amount of thermal energy as the direct solar energy method because of superior thermal insulation; (2) the resistance heating method is more adaptable to nearer-term robotic exploration precursor missions because it does not require a solar concentrator system; (3) crucible-based methods are more easily adapted to separation of iron metal and glass by-products than direct solar energy because the melt can be poured directly after processing instead of being remelted; and (4) even with projected improvements in the mass of solar concentrators, projected photovoltaic system masses are expected to be even lower.

  20. Effects of heat input on the pitting resistance of Inconel 625 welds by overlay welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Seok; Park, Young IL; Lee, Hae Woo

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the relationship between the dilution ratio of the weld zone and pitting resistance depending on the heat input to welding of the Inconel alloy. Each specimen was produced by electroslag welding using Inconel 625 as the filler metal. In the weld zone of each specimen, dendrite grains were observed near the fusion line and equiaxed grains were observed on the surface. It was also observed that a melted zone with a high Fe content was formed around the fusion line, which became wider as the welding heat input increased. In order to evaluate the pitting resistance, potentiodynamic polarization tests and CPT tests were conducted. The results of these tests confirmed that there is no difference between the pitting resistances of each specimen, as the structures of the surfaces were identical despite the effect of the differences in the welding heat input for each specimen and the minor dilution effect on the surface.

  1. Dry-heat resistance of selected psychrophiles. [Viking lander in spacecraft sterilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winans, L.; Pflug, I. J.; Foster, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The dry-heat resistance characteristics of spores of psychrophilic organisms isolated from soil samples from the Viking spacecraft assembly areas at Cape Kennedy Space Flight Center, Cape Canaveral, Fla., were studied. Spore suspensions were produced, and dry-heat D values were determined for the microorganisms that demonstrated growth or survival under a simulated Martian environment. The dry-heat tests were carried out by using the planchet-boat-hot plate system at 110 and 125 C with an ambient relative humidity of 50% at 22 C. The spores evaluated had a relatively low resistance to dry heat. D (110 C) values ranged from 7.5 to 122 min, whereas the D (125 C) values ranged from less than 1.0 to 9.8 min.

  2. Temperature minimum heating in solar flares by resistive dissipation of Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility that the strong heating produced at temperature-minimum levels during solar flares is due to resistive dissipation of Alfven waves generated by the primary energy release process in the corona is studied. It is shown how, for suitable parameters, these waves can carry their energy essentially undamped into the temperature-minimum layers and can then produce a degree of heating consistent with observations.

  3. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Bibb, Albert E.

    1984-01-01

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

  4. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy 600 to optimize resistance to intergranular stress corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, A.F.; Bibb, A.E.

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprises heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cooling the alloy body, and heating the cooled body to a temperature between 1100 to 1500/sup 0/F for about 1 to 30 hours.

  5. Heat treatment effect on microstructure, hardness and wear resistance of Cr26 white cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaoping; Shen, Yehui; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Dequan

    2015-01-01

    High chromium cast iron(HCCI) is taken as material of coal water slurry pump impeller, but it is susceptible to produce serious abrasive wear and erosion wear because of souring of hard coal particles. The research on optimization of heat treatments to improve abrasive wear properties of HCCI is insufficient, so effect of heat treatments on the microstructure, hardness, toughness, and wear resistance of Cr26 HCCI is investigated to determine the optimal heat treatment process for HCCI. A series of heat treatments are employed. The microstructures of HCCI specimens are examined by using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and impact fracture toughness of as-cast and heat treated specimens are measured. The wear tests are assessed by a Type M200 ring-on block wear tester. The results show the following: With increase of the quenching temperature from 950 °C to 1050 °C, the hardness of Cr26 HCCI increased to a certain value, kept for a time and then decreased. The optimal heat treatment process is 2 h quenching treatment at 1000 °C, followed by a subsequent 2 h tempering at 400 °C. The hardness of HCCI is related to the precipitation and redissolution of secondary carbides in the process of heat treatment. The subsequent tempering treatment would result in a slight decrease of hardness but increase of toughness. The wear resistance is much related to the "supporting" effect of the matrix and the "protective" effect of the hard carbide embedded in the matrix, and the wear resistance is further dependent on the hardness and the toughness of the matrix. This research can provide an important insight on developing an optimized heat treatment method to improve the wear resistance of HCCI.

  6. Synthesis of Polyheteroarylenes for Highly Heat-Resistant Materials,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-04

    conditions selected. Thus, fiber glass plastics based on the fabric TS-8/3-2500 and polymer POD-2 retained their ultimate strength during bending (d6S" at...oxolone, which is in the class of polybenzoxazoles . The most thermostable struc- .ure of oxolone is formed not in one stage, as that in POD-2, but in two...during the first stage, which transforms into polybenzoxazole during the second stage as a result of heat treatment under vacuum or in an inert medium

  7. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, William O.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Pillay, Gautam; Bergsman, Theresa M.; Eschbach, Eugene A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Richardson, Richard L.; Roberts, Janet S.; Schalla, Ronald

    1996-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants that utilizes electrical energy. A plurality of electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a selected geometric pattern. Varying phase and voltages configurations are applied to corresponding electrodes to achieve heating, physical phase changes, and the placement of substances within the treatment region. Additionally, treatment mediums can be added to either treat the contamination within the soil or to restrict their mobility.

  8. Heating of solid earthen material, measuring moisture and resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Heath, W.O.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Pillay, G.; Bergsman, T.M.; Eschbach, E.A.; Goheen, S.C.; Richardson, R.L.; Roberts, J.S.; Schalla, R.

    1996-08-13

    The present invention includes a method of treating solid earthen material having volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile contaminants that utilizes electrical energy. A plurality of electrodes are inserted into a region of earthen material to be treated in a selected geometric pattern. Varying phase and voltages configurations are applied to corresponding electrodes to achieve heating, physical phase changes, and the placement of substances within the treatment region. Additionally, treatment mediums can be added to either treat the contamination within the soil or to restrict their mobility. 29 figs.

  9. Fiber laser welding of austenitic steel and commercially pure copper butt joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuryntsev, S. V.; Morushkin, A. E.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2017-03-01

    The fiber laser welding of austenitic stainless steel and commercially pure copper in butt joint configuration without filler or intermediate material is presented. In order to melt stainless steel directly and melt copper via heat conduction a defocused laser beam was used with an offset to stainless steel. During mechanical tests the weld seam was more durable than heat affected zone of copper so samples without defects could be obtained. Three process variants of offset of the laser beam were applied. The following tests were conducted: tensile test of weldment, intermediate layer microhardness, optical metallography, study of the chemical composition of the intermediate layer, fractography. Measurements of electrical resistivity coefficients of stainless steel, copper and copper-stainless steel weldment were made, which can be interpreted or recalculated as the thermal conductivity coefficient. It shows that electrical resistivity coefficient of cooper-stainless steel weldment higher than that of stainless steel. The width of intermediate layer between stainless steel and commercially pure copper was 41-53 μm, microhardness was 128-170 HV0.01.

  10. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties. PMID:26423519

  11. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-10-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties.

  12. Isolation and characterisation of poliovirus mutants resistant to heating at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Hiroshi; Urasawa, Tomoko; Urasawa, Shozo; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Abe, Shibobu; Taniguchi, Koki

    2004-11-01

    Poliovirus is heat-labile; on heating at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min its infectivity decreases drastically and its antigenicity reverts from N to H. However, mutants resistant to heating at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min from the Sabin 1 and 2 viruses were isolated by repeating the process of incubation of the virus stock at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min and multiplication of the remaining virus in a cell culture. The isolated mutants were stable genetically, and maintained the rct and d markers of the parent virus. On electron microscopical examination, the mutants were observed to retain the intact morphology after being heated at 50 degrees Celsius for 30 min, while the parent virus was converted to empty particles devoid of RNA under the same conditions. On determination of the nucleotide sequence of the P1 region, a single nucleotide sequence substitution was detected at nucleotide no. 2741, resulting in an amino acid change from valine to alanine at the 87th position of VP1. This amino acid might be associated with the heat-resistance of the mutants. Furthermore, it was found that the thermostable mutants obtained in this study, which are resistant to "high" temperature (50 degrees Celsius) for a short time (30 min), were not stable against heating at the ambient temperature (37 degrees Celsius) for a long time (5 or 7 days). This suggests that the inactivation at high temperature for a short time and that at ambient temperature for a long time involve different mechanisms.

  13. Effect of pH on Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571 growth, spore heat resistance and recovery.

    PubMed

    Mtimet, Narjes; Guégan, Stéphanie; Durand, Lucile; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Venaille, Laurent; Leguérinel, Ivan; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Thermophilic spore-forming bacteria are potential contaminants in several industrial sectors involving high temperatures (40-65 °C) in the manufacturing process. Among those thermophilic spore-forming bacteria, Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum, called "the swelling canned food spoiler", has generated interest over the last decade in the food sector. The aim of this study was to investigate and to model pH effect on growth, heat resistance and recovery abilities after a heat-treatment of T. thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571. Growth and sporulation were conducted on reinforced clostridium media and liver broth respectively. The highest spore heat resistances and the greatest recovery ability after a heat-treatment were obtained at pH condition allowing maximal growth rate. Growth and sporulation boundaries were estimated, then models using growth limits as main parameters were extended to describe and quantify the effect of pH on recovery of injured spores after a heat-treatment. So, cardinal values were used as a single set of parameters to describe growth, sporulation and recovery abilities. Besides, this work suggests that T. thermosaccharolyticum preserve its ability for germination and outgrowth after a heat-treatment at a low pH where other high resistant spore-forming bacteria like Geobacillus stearothermophilus are unable to grow.

  14. Resistively Heated SiC Nozzle for Generating Molecular Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagiano, Steven; Abell, Robert; Patrick, Edward; Bendt, Miri; Gundersen, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    An improved nozzle has been developed to replace nozzles used previously in an apparatus that generates a substantially unidirectional beam of molecules passing through a vacuum at speeds of several kilometers per second. The basic principle of operation of the apparatus is the same for both the previous and the present nozzle designs. The main working part of the nozzle is essentially a cylinder that is closed except that there is an inlet for a pressurized gas and, at one end, the cylinder is closed by a disk that contains a narrow central hole that serves as an outlet. The cylinder is heated to increase the thermal speeds of the gas molecules into the desired high-speed range. Heated, pressurized gas escapes through the outlet into a portion of the vacuum chamber that is separated, by a wall, from the rest of the vacuum chamber. In this portion of the vacuum chamber, the gas undergoes a free jet expansion. Most of the expanded gas is evacuated and thus does not become part of the molecular beam. A small fraction of the expanded beam passes through a narrow central orifice in the wall and thereby becomes a needle- thin molecular beam in the portion of the vacuum on the downstream side of the wall.

  15. The Application of Heat and Corrosion Resistant Phosphate Coatings Under Steam Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-03-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NorEs 19. KEY ’WORDS (Continue on reverae aide if neceasary and Identify by block number) 1. Phosphate coatings 4 . Corrosion resistance 2...Manganese phosphate 5. Pressure Vessel 3 . Heat resistance 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reveae aide it necesary and Identify by bloch number) Processing...2 Manganese Phosphate Coatings Applied in a 15 Conventional Bath with and without Mangan- ese Citrate 3 Me ganese Phosphate Coatings Applied in a 18

  16. HNS/Teflon, a new heat resistant explosive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, H.; Bertram, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    HNS/Teflon (90/10) is a new pressed explosive developed for use in the Apollo program. The major advantages of HNS/Teflon are (1) excellent thermal stability at elevated temperatures, (2) superior resistance to sublimation at high temperatures and low pressures and (3) ease of molding powder preparation, pressing and machining. The impact sensitivity of HNS/Teflon is between that of Comp B and Comp A-3 while its explosive performance is about the same as TNT. Under the severe environmental conditions of the moon's surface, this explosive successfully performed its intended function of generating seismic waves in the Apollo ALSEP and LSPE experiments. (Modified author abstract)

  17. Monitoring six-phase ohmic heating of contaminated soils using electrical resistance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-09-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor six-phase ohmic heating used for the insitu remediation of volatile organic compounds from subsurface water and soil at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. The changes in electrical conductivity caused by six-phase ohmic-heating in a clay layer located in the vadose zone were monitored during a period of approximately 2 months, before, during and after heating. From an array of electrodes located in 4 boreholes, we collected electrical resistivity data between five pairs of adjacent holes pairs. This data was used to calculate tomographs which showed the electrical conductivity changes along five vertical planes. The difference tomographs show the combined effects of moisture redistribution and heating caused by six-phase heating and vapor extraction. The tomographs show that most of the clay layer increased in electrical conductivity during the first 3 weeks of the 4 week long heating phase. At this time, the electrical conductivities near the center of the heating array were twice as large as the pre-heat conductivities. Then the electrical conductivity started to decrease for portions of the clay layer closest to the vapor extraction well. We propose that the conductivity decreases are due to the removal of moisture by the heating and vacuum extraction. Parts of the clay layer near the extraction well reached electrical conductivities as low as 40% of the pre-heating values. We propose that these regions of lower than ambient electrical conductivities are indicators of regions where the vapor removal by vacuum extraction was most effective. At the end of the heating phase, our estimates suggest that the clay saturation may have dropped to as low as 10% based on the observed conductivity changes.

  18. Heat treatment in high Cr white cast iron Nb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, A. F.; Crnkovic, O. R.; Canale, L. C. F.

    2001-02-01

    Wear resistance of high Cr white cast irons can be improved by means of heat treatment. This type of cast iron alloy may present a microstructure with retained austenite. The amount of retained austenite changes with the applied heat treatment, which will have an influence on wear properties. The purpose of this work was to study the influence of several parameters such as quenching and tempering temperatures and subzero treatment in the wear performance of the high Cr white cast iron Nb alloy. In this way, the performance was evaluated using pin-on-disc abrasion test. The worn surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy, and the main wear mechanisms were identified. The microstructural characterization was also performed with carbide identification. This Fe alloy has proven to be good for applications in mining and alcohol-sugar industries.

  19. An Escherichia coli mutant resistant to phleomycin, bleomycin, and heat inactivation is defective in ubiquinone synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Collis, C M; Grigg, G W

    1989-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli, selected for resistance to the antibiotic and antitumor agent phleomycin, has been characterized, and the phleomycin resistance determinant has been identified. The mutant is equally resistant to bleomycins. The resistance to phleomycin is strongly dependent on the nature of the C-terminal amine of the drug, with the greatest resistance being shown to phleomycins and bleomycins with the most basic terminal amines. The mutation also confers resistance to the lethal effects of heating at 52 degrees C. Other characteristics of the phleomycin-resistant strain include a slow growth rate, an inability to grow on succinate as the sole carbon source (Suc- phenotype), cross resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics, and a slight sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, methyl methanesulfonate, and gamma-irradiation. Some of these characteristics, together with mapping data, suggested that the phleomycin resistance and Suc- determinant probably lies within the ubiF gene coding for an enzyme effecting a step in the biosynthesis of ubiquinone. The phenotypes of known mutants defective in this and other steps of the ubiquinone pathway were found to be closely similar to those of the original phleomycin-resistant strain. PMID:2475481

  20. Influence of pH on heat resistance of spores of Bacillus coagulans in buffer and homogenized foods.

    PubMed

    Palop, A; Raso, J; Pagán, R; Condón, S; Sala, F J

    1999-02-18

    The influence of pH of heating menstruum (McIlvaine buffer) on the heat resistance of Bacillus coagulans spores has been investigated and compared with the heat resistance in homogenized tomato and asparagus at pH 7 and 4 at a wide range of temperatures. Spores were less heat resistant in all menstrua at acid pH. The magnitude of this effect was greatest at the lowest heating temperatures tested. z values in buffer increased from 8.9 degrees C at pH 7 to 10.5 degrees C at pH 4. pH of menstrua was the main influencing factor, but media composition also influenced heat resistance: at pH 7 heat resistance was similar in all menstrua (D111 degrees C = 1.6 min) but at pH 4 the heat resistance in homogenized foods (D111 degrees C = 0.26 min in tomato and D111 degrees C = 0.28 min in asparagus) was lower than in buffer (D111 degrees C = 0.49 min). The reduced influence of the acidification of media on the heat resistance of B. coagulans at higher temperatures should be taken into account when a rise in the temperature of treatment for canned vegetables is considered to shorten duration of heat processes.

  1. Incidence and Diversity of Potentially Highly Heat-Resistant Spores Isolated at Dairy Farms

    PubMed Central

    Scheldeman, Patsy; Pil, Annelies; Herman, Lieve; De Vos, Paul; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2005-01-01

    The presence of highly heat-resistant spores of Bacillus sporothermodurans in ultrahigh-temperature or sterilized consumer milk has emerged as an important item in the dairy industry. Their presence is considered undesirable since they hamper the achievement of commercial sterility requirements. By using a selective 30-min heat treatment at 100°C, 17 Belgian dairy farms were screened to evaluate the presence, sources, and nature of potentially highly heat-resistant spores in raw milk. High numbers of these spores were detected in the filter cloth of the milking equipment and in green crop and fodder samples. About 700 strains were isolated after the selective heating, of which 635 could be screened by fatty acid methyl ester analysis. Representative strains were subjected to amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, percent G+C content, and DNA-DNA reassociations for further identification. The strain collection showed a remarkable diversity, with representatives of seven aerobic spore-forming genera. Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus pallidus were the most predominant species overall. Twenty-three percent of the 603 spore-forming isolates proved to belong to 18 separate novel species. These findings suggest that the selective heating revealed a pool of unknown organisms with a higher heat-resistant character. This study showed that high spore counts can occur at the dairy farm and that feed and milking equipment can act as reservoirs or entry points for potentially highly heat-resistant spores into raw milk. Lowering this spore load by good hygienic measures could probably further reduce the contamination level of raw milk, in this way minimizing the aerobic spore-forming bacteria that could lead to spoilage of milk and dairy products. Assessment and characterization of this particular flora are of great importance to allow the dairy or food industry to adequately deal with newly arising microbiological problems. PMID:15746351

  2. Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meric de Bellefon, G.; van Duysen, J. C.

    2016-07-01

    AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels were invented in the early 1900s and are still trusted by materials and mechanical engineers in numerous sectors because of their good combination of strength, ductility, and corrosion resistance, and thanks to decades of experience and data. This article is part of an effort focusing on tailoring the plasticity of both types of steels to nuclear applications. It provides a synthetic and comprehensive review of the plasticity mechanisms in austenitic steels during tensile tests below 400 °C. In particular, formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, as well as irradiation effects and grain rotation are discussed in details.

  3. New candidate genes for heat resistance in Drosophila melanogaster are regulated by HSF.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Louise Toft; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Loeschcke, Volker

    2008-01-01

    The cellular heat stress response is well studied in Drosophila in respect to the role of heat shock proteins (Hsp). Hsps are molecular chaperones, highly expressed during and after exposure to numerous stress types. Hsps are all regulated by a common transcription factor, the heat shock factor (HSF), and it is known that HSF is controlling other, so far uncharacterised, heat-responsive genes. In this study, we investigate whether novel candidate genes for heat resistance, identified by microarray experiments, are regulated by HSF. The microarray experiments recently identified several strongly upregulated genes in response to a short, non-lethal heat treatment in Drosophila melanogaster. To test whether or not a subset of these genes are HSF-induced, we studied 11 currently unannotated genes using quantitative polymerase chain reaction on HSF mutant flies with a non-functional HSF at elevated temperatures. We found indication of HSF regulation in most of the studied genes, suggesting a role of these unknown genes in heat tolerance. Surprisingly, some of the genes seemed to be upregulated independent of HSF function. The high induction in response to heat, which mimics the expression profile of Hsps, implies a role in the cellular heat response of these genes as well.

  4. Reduction of Ag-Si electrical contact resistance by selective RF heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wijs, W.-J. A.; Ljevar, S.; van de Sande, M. J.; de With, G.

    2016-06-01

    Fast and selective inductive heating of pre-sintered silver lines on silicon as present in solar cells using 27 MHz radio-frequency inductive fields is shown. IR measurements of silicon substrates show that above 450 °C the heating rate of the samples increases sharply, indicating that both the silver and the silicon are heated. By moving the substrate with respect to the RF antenna and modulation of the RF field, silicon wafers were heated reproducibly above 450 °C with heating rates in excess of 200 °C s-1. Furthermore, selective heating of lines of pre-sintered silver paste was shown below the 450 °C threshold on silicon substrates. The orientation of the silver tracks relative to the RF antenna appeared to be crucial for homogeneity of heating. Transmission line measurements show a clear effect on contact formation between the silver lines and the silicon substrate. To lower the contact resistance sufficiently for industrial feasibility, a high temperature difference between the Si substrate and the Ag tracks is required. The present RF heating process does not match the time scale needed for contact formation between silver and silicon sufficiently, but the significantly improved process control achieved shows promise for applications requiring fast heating and cooling rates.

  5. Surface modification of austenitic thermal-spray coatings by low-temperature nitrocarburizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, T.; Mehner, T.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    Thermal-spray coatings of austenitic materials are mainly used under corrosive conditions. The relatively poor wear resistance strongly limits their use. In comparative studies between nitrocarburized and untreated thermal-spray coatings, the influence of the nitrogen and carbon enrichment on the properties of the coatings and the microstructure was investigated. The cross-section micrograph of the nitrocarburized coating shows the S-phase formation in the surface layer region. The depth profile of the nitrogen and carbon concentration was determined by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOS) analysis. A selective enrichment of the surface layer region with nitrogen and carbon by means of thermochemical heat treatment increases the wear resistance. The interstitially dissolved nitrogen and carbon causes the formation of strong compressive residual stresses and high surface hardness. Increases in the service life of existing applications or new material combinations with face-centred cubic friction partners are possible. In the absence of dimensional change, uniform as well as partial nitrogen enrichment of the thermal spray coating is possible. Nitrocarburized coatings demonstrate a significant improvement in adhesive wear resistance and extremely high surface hardness.

  6. Retained austenite thermal stability in a nanostructured bainitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Avishan, Behzad; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Yazdani, Sasan; Caballero, Francisca G.

    2013-07-15

    The unique microstructure of nanostructured bainite consists of very slender bainitic ferrite plates and high carbon retained austenite films. As a consequence, the reported properties are opening a wide range of different commercial uses. However, bainitic transformation follows the T{sub 0} criteria, i.e. the incomplete reaction phenomena, which means that the microstructure is not thermodynamically stable because the bainitic transformation stops well before austenite reaches an equilibrium carbon level. This article aims to study the different microstructural changes taking place when nanostructured bainite is destabilized by austempering for times well in excess of that strictly necessary to end the transformation. Results indicate that while bainitic ferrite seems unaware of the extended heat treatment, retained austenite exhibits a more receptive behavior to it. - Highlights: • Nanostructured bainitic steel is not thermodynamically stable. • Extensive austempering in these microstructures has not been reported before. • Precipitation of cementite particles is unavoidable at longer austempering times. • TEM, FEG-SEM and XRD analysis were used for microstructural characterization.

  7. Development of Rapid Pipe Moulding Process for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics by Direct Resistance Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuto; Harada, Ryuki; Uemura, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutao; Kuwahara, Hideyuki

    To deal with environmental issues, the gasoline mileage of passenger cars can be improved by reduction of the car weight. The use of car components made of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) is increasing because of its superior mechanical properties and relatively low density. Many vehicle structural parts are pipe-shaped, such as suspension arms, torsion beams, door guard bars and impact beams. A reduction of the car weight is expected by using CFRP for these parts. Especially, when considering the recyclability and ease of production, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics are a prime candidate. On the other hand, the moulding process of CFRTP pipes for mass production has not been well established yet. For this pipe moulding process an induction heating method has been investigated already, however, this method requires a complicated coil system. To reduce the production cost, another system without such complicated equipment is to be developed. In this study, the pipe moulding process of CFRTP using direct resistance heating was developed. This heating method heats up the mould by Joule heating using skin effect of high-frequency current. The direct resistance heating method is desirable from a cost perspective, because this method can heat the mould directly without using any coils. Formerly developed Non-woven Stitched Multi-axial Cloth (NSMC) was used as semi-product material. NSMC is very suitable for the lamination process due to the fact that non-crimp stitched carbon fiber of [0°/+45°/90°/-45°] and polyamide 6 non-woven fabric are stitched to one sheet, resulting in a short production cycle time. The use of the pipe moulding process with the direct resistance heating method in combination with the NSMC, has resulted in the successful moulding of a CFRTP pipe of 300 mm in length, 40 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness.

  8. Comparison of pressure and heat resistance of Clostridium botulinum and other endospores in mashed carrots.

    PubMed

    Margosch, Dirk; Ehrmann, Matthias A; Gänzle, Michael G; Vogel, Rudi F

    2004-11-01

    Inactivation of bacterial endospores in food requires a combination of pressure and moderate heat. Endospore resistance of seven Clostridium botulinum strains was compared with those of Bacillus spp. (B. cereus, B. subtilis, B. licheniformis, B. smithii, B. amyloliquefaciens) and Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum with respect to pressure (600 to 800 MPa) and temperature (80 to 116 degrees C) treatments in mashed carrots. A large variation was observed in the pressure resistance of C. botulinum spores. Their reduction after treatments with 600 MPa at 80 degrees C for 1 s ranged from more than 5.5 log units to no reduction. Spores of the proteolytic C. botulinum TMW 2.357 exhibited a greater resistance to pressure than spores from all other bacteria examined, with the exception of B. amyloliquefaciens. Heat resistance of spores did not correlate with pressure resistance, either within strains of C. botulinum or when C. botulinum spores were compared with spores of T. thermosaccharolyticum. A quantitative release of dipicolinic acid was observed from C. botulinum spores on combined pressure and temperature treatments only after inactivation of more than 99.999% of the spores. Thus, dipicolinic acid is released by a physicochemical rather than a physiological process. The resistance of spores to combined pressure and temperature treatments correlated with their ability to retain dipicolinic acid. B. amyloliquefaciens, a mesophilic organism that forms highly pressure-resistant spores is proposed as a nonpathogenic target organism for high-pressure process development.

  9. Use of vacuum carbonitriding for raising the seizure resistance of gears from steel VKS-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashnev, M. M.; Smirnov, A. E.; Semenov, M. Yu.

    2013-05-01

    Saturation of heat-resistant steel VKS-10 with carbon and nitrogen in a low-pressure atmosphere is studied. The possibility of increasing the fineness of the carbonitride phase and the content of retained austenite in vacuum carbonitriding is shown as compared to vacuum carburizing. Subsequent aging results in segregation of a still finer excess phase. The factors controlling vacuum carbonitriding are determined. Comparative estimation of the seizure resistance of carbonitrided layers of steel VKS-10 and carburized layers obtained on traditional heat-resistant steels is performed.

  10. Analysis of methods of carburizing of gears from heat-resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, N. M.; Fakhurtdinov, R. S.; Smirnov, A. E.; Fomina, L. P.

    2010-11-01

    Four methods of carburizing are compared with respect to the most significant factor, i.e., stability of maintenance of the specified parameters of carburized layer in hardening of gears from heat-resistant steels. The process advantages of vacuum carburizing (at low pressure) are shown.

  11. Cost and Performance Review of Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) for Source Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    phase liquid ( DNAPL ) or high concentrations of volatile contaminants. ERH is a remediation technology that involves passing electrical current...Electrical resistant heating (ERH), Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC), remediation, nonaqueous-phase liquid ( DNAPL ) 16. SECURITY...Camp Lejeune. Performance data from these sites indicate that ERH treats dense nonaqueous-phase liquid ( DNAPL ) source zones through a variety of

  12. A summary of research on heat resistant fabrics for protective clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, E.P.; Barker, R.L.

    1983-02-01

    Reference is made to research on the performance of heat-resistant safety fabrics. General requirements for fabrics used for thermal protection are discussed, and laboratory methods of testing are summarized. A need is seen for a specific programme to evaluate the suitability of the variety of fabrics that might be used in industrial safety apparel.

  13. Integrated Thermal Protection Systems and Heat Resistant Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pichon, Thierry; Lacoste, Marc; Barreteau, R.; Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    In the early stages of NASA's Exploration Initiative, Snecma Propulsion Solide was funded under the Exploration Systems Research & Technology program to develop a CMC heatshield, a deployable decelerator, and an ablative heat shield for reentry vehicles. Due to changes within NASA's Exploration Initiative, this task was cancelled in early FY06. This paper will give an overview of the work that was accomplished prior to cancellation. The Snecma team consisted of MT Aerospace, Germany, and Materials Research & Design (MR&D), NASA Langley, NASA Dryden, and NASA Ames in the United States. An Apollo-type capsule was chosen as the reference vehicle for the work. NASA Langley generated the trajectory and aerothermal loads. Snecma and MT Aerospace began the design of a ceramic aft heatshield (CAS) utilizing C/SiC panels as the capsule heatshield. MR&D led the design of a C/SiC deployable decelerator, NASA Ames led the characterization of several ablators, NASA Dryden led the development of a heath management system and the high temperature structures testing, and NASA Langley led the insulation characterization. Though the task was pre-maturely cancelled, a significant quantity of work was accomplished.

  14. Increasing the heat resistance of vanadium by siliciding

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutyi, E.M.; Tsvikilevich, O.S.; Shirokov, V.V.; Stepanishin, V.I.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to evaluate the influence of modifier metals on the protective properties of silicide coatings in heating of vanadium in air and also on the mechanical properties of type VnM-2 unalloyed vanadium and VTsU alloy. Coatings were produced by diffusion impregnation from molten sodium with silicon or silicides of the modifying elements. The silicides of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, rhenium, and nickel were investigated using x-ray spectrometric and hardness investigations and x-ray diffractometric analysis. The protective properties of the coatings were determined from the relative change in weight of the samples with and without coatings during isothermal oxidation in air at 1073/sup 0/K and also by differential thermal analysis. The influence of the coating on the mechanical properties of the material was also investigated using a borosilicide coating. High-temperature vacuum annealing was assessed as a method for restoring the plastic properties and relieving the stresses of vanadium and VTsU alloy subsequent to coating.

  15. Heat Resistant Characteristics of Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) Oligomer.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Takanori; Ito, Aimi; Omote, Sumire; Miura, Yuri; Tsumoto, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Soluble royal jelly protein is a candidate factor responsible for mammiferous cell proliferation. Major royal jelly protein 1 (MRJP1), which consists of oligomeric and monomeric forms, is an abundant proliferative protein in royal jelly. We previously reported that MRJP1 oligomer has biochemical heat resistance. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effects of several heat treatments (56, 65 and 96°C) on the proliferative activity of MRJP1 oligomer. Heat resistance studies showed that the oligomer molecular forms were slightly maintained until 56℃, but the molecular forms were converted to macromolecular heat-aggregated MRJP1 oligomer at 65℃ and 96℃. But, the growth activity of MRJP1 oligomer treated with 96°C was slightly attenuated when compared to unheated MRJP1 oligomer. On the other hand, the cell proliferation activity was preserved until 96℃ by the cell culture analysis of Jurkat cells. In contrast, those of IEC-6 cells were not preserved even at 56°C. The present observations suggest that the bioactive heat-resistance properties were different by the origin of the cells. The cell proliferation analysis showed that MRJP1 oligomer, but not MRJP2 and MRJP3, significantly increased cell numbers, suggesting that MRJP1 oligomer is the predominant proliferation factor for mammiferous cells.

  16. Correction of the heat loss method for calculating clothing real evaporative resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Zhang, Chengjiao; Lu, Yehu

    2015-08-01

    In the so-called isothermal condition (i.e., Tair [air temperature]=Tmanikin [manikin temperature]=Tr [radiant temperature]), the actual energy used for moisture evaporation detected by most sweating manikins was underestimated due to the uncontrolled fabric 'skin' temperature Tsk,f (i.e., Tsk,fresistance. In this study, correction of the real evaporative heat loss from the wet fabric 'skin'-clothing system was proposed and experimentally validated on a 'Newton' sweating manikin. The real evaporative resistance of five clothing ensembles and the nude fabric 'skin' calculated by the corrected heat loss method was also reported and compared with that by the mass loss method. Results revealed that, depending on the types of tested clothing, different amounts of heat were drawn from the ambient environment. In general, a greater amount of heat was drawn from the ambient environment by the wet fabric 'skin'-clothing system in lower thermal insulation clothing than that in higher insulation clothing. There were no significant differences between clothing real evaporative resistances calculated by the corrected heat loss method and those by the mass loss method. It was therefore concluded that the correction method proposed in this study has been successfully validated.

  17. High Mn austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  18. Low, medium and high heat tolerant strains of Listeria monocytogenes and increased heat stress resistance after exposure to sublethal heat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes exhibits sophisticated adaptive mechanisms to counteract higher levels of lethal acid, heat, salt or oxidative stresses after pre-exposure to sublethal concentrations of homogenous stress. A group of 37 strains representing all 13 serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes with initi...

  19. Factors influencing fatigue crack propagation behavior of austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangshik; Kwon, Jaeki; Kim, Youngju; Jang, Wookil; Lee, Soongi; Choi, Jongkyo

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) behaviors of austenitic single phase steels, including STS304, Fe18Mn and Fe22Mn with different grain sizes ranging from 12 μm to 98 μm were investigated. The FCP tests were conducted in air at an R ratio of 0.1 using compact tension specimens and the crack paths and fracture surfaces were documented by using an SEM. The highest ΔKth value of 9.9MPa·m1/2 was observed for the Fe18Mn specimen, followed by 5.2MPa·m1/2 for the Fe22Mn specimen and 4.6MPa·m1/2 for the STS304 specimen, showing a substantial difference in the near-threshold FCP resistance for each microstructure. The crack path and fractographic analyses suggested that the near-threshold FCP behavior of these austenitic steels was largely influenced by the degree of slip planarity, as determined by stacking fault energy and grain size, rather than the tensile properties. In the Paris' regime, the slip planarity still played an important role while the tensile properties began to affect the FCP. The FCP behavior of austenitic steels with different microstructural features are discussed based on detailed fractographic and micrographic observations.

  20. Correction of resist heating effect on variable shaped beam mask writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayamada, Noriaki; Suganuma, Mizuna; Nomura, Haruyuki; Kato, Yasuo; Kamikubo, Takashi; Ogasawara, Munehiro; Zable, Harold; Masuda, Yukihiro; Fujimura, Aki

    2016-04-01

    The specifications for critical dimension (CD) accuracy and line edge roughness are getting tighter to promote every photomask manufacturer to choose electron beam resists of lower sensitivity. When the resist is exposed by too many electrons, it is excessively heated up to have higher sensitivity at a higher temperature, which results in degraded CD uniformity. This effect is called "resist heating effect" and is now the most critical error source in CD control on a variable shaped beam (VSB) mask writer. We have developed an on-tool, real-time correction system for the resist heating effect. The system is composed of correction software based on a simple thermal diffusion model and computational hardware equipped with more than 100 graphical processing unit chips. We have demonstrated that the designed correction accuracy was obtained and the runtime of correction was sufficiently shorter than the writing time. The system is ready to be deployed for our VSB mask writers to retain the writing time as short as possible for lower sensitivity resists by removing the need for increased pass count.

  1. Polypeptide composition of urea- and heat-resistant mutants of poliovirus types 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Fennell, R; Phillips, B A

    1974-10-01

    Five urea-resistant and two heat-resistant mutants of poliovirus types 1 and 2 were isolated and their structural and nonstructural polypeptides compared to those of their wild-type, parental strains in an attempt to correlate mutant phenotypes with alterations in specific capsid polypeptides. Four of the seven mutants were found to contain polypeptides which differed in molecular weight from their respective parental viruses. However, resistance of virions to heat- or urea-inactivation could not be attributed to changes in particular capsid polypeptides because alterations were detected in all but one of the capsid components. For two of the urea-resistant mutants and one heat-resistant mutant, no differences were found in the molecular weights of the capsid and noncapsid polypeptides. These results, and the fact that at least 12 selective treatments were required to obtain stable mutants, indicate that: (i) such phenotypes probably can be expressed by mutations affecting one or more of the larger capsid polypeptides, and (ii) such phenotypes reflect multiple mutational steps.

  2. Several allergens from Anisakis simplex are highly resistant to heat and pepsin treatments.

    PubMed

    Caballero, María Luisa; Moneo, Ignacio

    2004-06-01

    Ingestion of raw or undercooked fish can lead to infection with Anisakis simplex. Sensitized patients show specific IgE to proteins from this parasite. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of specific IgE recognition directed to heat and/or pepsin-resistant allergens from A. simplex among sensitized patients. Twenty-seven patients with positive specific IgE and immunoblotting with a crude parasite extract were included in the study. Specific IgE detection against allergens resistant to boiling for 30 min and/or a pepsin digestion of an A. simplex extract was performed by immunoblotting. A total of 81% of the patients showed specific IgE to pepsin-resistant allergens and 67% had specific IgE to heat-resistant allergens. Thirty percent of patients recognized allergens after both treatments, one being the allergen detected by 75% of the patients of this group. Heat- and/or pepsin-resistant allergens from A. simplex could explain reactions and symptoms after the ingestion of well-cooked or canned fish.

  3. Toward high performance thermoset/carbon nanotube sheet nanocomposites via resistive heating assisted infiltration and cure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Siochi, Emilie J; Smith, Joseph G; Wincheski, Russell A; Cano, Roberto J; Connell, John W; Wise, Kristopher E

    2014-11-12

    Thermoset/carbon nanotube (CNT) sheet nanocomposites were successfully fabricated by resistive heating assisted infiltration and cure (RHAIC) of the polymer matrix resin. Resistive heating takes advantage of the electrical and thermal conductivity of CNTs to rapidly and uniformly introduce heat into the CNT sheet. Heating the CNT sheet reduces the viscosity of the polymer resin due to localized temperature rise in close proximity to the resin, which enhances resin flow, penetration, and wetting of the CNT reinforcement. Once the resin infusion process is complete, the applied power is increased to raise the temperature of the CNT sheet, which rapidly cures the polymer matrix. Tensile tests were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the processed thermoset/CNT sheet nanocomposites. The improved wetting and adhesion of the polymer resin to the CNT reinforcement yield significant improvement of thermoset/CNT nanocomposite mechanical properties. The highest specific tensile strength of bismaleimide(BMI)/CNT sheet nanocomposites was obtained to date was 684 MPa/(g/cm(3)), using 4 V (2 A) for resin infiltration, followed by precure at 10 V (6 A) for 10 min and post curing at 240 °C for 6 h in an oven. The highest specific Young's modulus of BMI/CNT sheet nanocomposite was 71 GPa/(g/cm(3)) using resistive heating infiltration at 8.3 V (4.7 A) for 3 min followed by resistive heating cure at 12.5 V (7 A) for 30 min. In both cases, the CNT sheets were stretched and held in tension to prevent relaxation of the aligned CNTs during the course of RHAIC.

  4. Nanoemulsified D-Limonene Reduces the Heat Resistance of Salmonella Senftenberg over 50 Times

    PubMed Central

    Ros-Chumillas, María; Garre, Alberto; Maté, Javier; Palop, Alfredo; Periago, Paula M.

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella Senftenberg is a pathogen agent causative of foodborne disease and it is considered the most heat-resistant serovar within this genus. Food industries use heat treatment and chemical antimicrobials in order to eliminate this microorganism in food, but consumers prefer natural antimicrobials as essential oils and their components. This study evaluates the combined effect of thermal treatments and different concentrations of D-limonene nanoemulsion on the inactivation of Salmonella (S.) Senftenberg. The results showed an important effect of the nanoemulsified D-limonene on the heat resistance of S. Senftenberg. The δ50 °C value was reduced by 85%, 96% and 98% when 0.1, 0.5 and 1 mM of nanoemulsified D-limonene was added to the heating medium. The effect was kept along all the heating temperatures researched and the shape of the survival curves did not change with the addition of the antimicrobial. The results obtained in this research could be very useful for food industries for optimizing or improving heat treatments applied to food. PMID:28336899

  5. The effects of heat treatment and composition on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of inconel alloy X-750

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floreen, S.; Nelson, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of 24 heats of INCONEL* alloy X-750 was measured in high purity pH 10 water at 360 °C. An overaging heat treatment of 96 hours at 760 °C produced an improved combination of strength and cracking resistance because of the homogenization of slip in the matrix. Examination of residual elements showed that Zr additions further improved the cracking resistance by stabilizing theγ' precipitate in the grain boundary region. Combining the new heat treatment with the Zr addition produced approximately a 50 pct improvement in stress corrosion cracking resistance at a 10 pct lower yield strength.

  6. A review on nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2013-10-01

    The field of biomaterials has become a vital area, as these materials can enhance the quality and longevity of human life. Metallic materials are often used as biomaterials to replace structural components of the human body. Stainless steels, cobalt-chromium alloys, commercially pure titanium and its alloys are typical metallic biomaterials that are being used for implant devices. Stainless steels have been widely used as biomaterials because of their very low cost as compared to other metallic materials, good mechanical and corrosion resistant properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, the adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have promoted the development of "nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels" for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel and emphatically the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steel, as well as the development of nickel-free nitrogen containing stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength, better corrosion and wear resistance and superior biocompatibility in comparison to the currently used austenitic stainless steel (e.g. 316L), the newly developed nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventionally used medical stainless steels.

  7. Heat-resistance of Hamigera avellanea and Thermoascus crustaceus isolated from pasteurized acid products.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzza, Nicoletta; Berni, Elettra

    2014-01-03

    Products containing sugar or fruit derivatives are usually subjected to a pasteurization process that can anyway be ineffective to kill ascospores from heat-resistant molds. Although the most occurring and economically relevant heat-resistant species belong to Byssochlamys, Neosartorya, Talaromyces, and Eupenicillium genera, an increasing number of uncommon heat-resistant isolates have been recently detected as spoiling microorganisms in such products. Since Hamigera spp. and Thermoascus spp. were those more frequently isolated at SSICA, heat resistance of Hamigera avellanea and Thermoascus crustaceus strains from pasteurized acid products was studied in apple juice, in blueberry and grape juice and in a buffered glucose solution. Data obtained from thermal death curves and statistical elaboration of raw data showed that D values of H. avellanea may vary between 11.11 and 66.67 min at 87°C, between 4.67 and 13.51 at 90°C, and between 0.43 and 1.52 min at 95°C. Similarly, D values of T. crustaceus may vary between 18.52 and 90.91 min at 90°C, between 2.79 and 19.23 at 93°C, and between 1.11 and 2.53 min at 95°C. For both strains studied, the z-values calculated from the decimal reduction time curves did not prove to be significantly influenced by the heating medium, that being 4.35°C, 5.39°C or 5.27°C for H. avellanea and 4.42°C, 3.69°C or 3.37°C for T. crustaceus, respectively in apple juice, in blueberry and grape juice or in the buffered glucose solution. Considering the pasteurization treatments industrially applied to fruit-based foods, the variation of thermal parameters does not seem to be a possible way to avoid product spoilage by these two species and only good practices applied to reduce the original load of heat-resistant fungi can help producers to prevent losses in contaminated finished products, as usually happens for other heat resistant molds.

  8. Austenite Stability Effects on Tensile Behavior of Manganese-Enriched-Austenite Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, P. J.; de Moor, E.; Merwin, M. J.; Clausen, B.; Speer, J. G.; Matlock, D. K.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese enrichment of austenite during prolonged intercritical annealing was used to produce a family of transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels with varying retained austenite contents. Cold-rolled 0.1C-7.1Mn steel was annealed at incremental temperatures between 848 K and 948 K (575 °C and 675 °C) for 1 week to enrich austenite in manganese. The resulting microstructures are comprised of varying fractions of intercritical ferrite, martensite, and retained austenite. Tensile behavior is dependent on annealing temperature and ranged from a low strain-hardening "flat" curve to high strength and ductility conditions that display positive strain hardening over a range of strain levels. The mechanical stability of austenite was measured using in-situ neutron diffraction and was shown to depend significantly on annealing temperature. Variations in austenite stability between annealing conditions help explain the observed strain hardening behaviors.

  9. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi[sub 5-x]Al[sub x] (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  10. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x} (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  11. Influence of free forging conditions on austenitic grain growth in constructional steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagulyaeva, S. V.; Potanina, V. S.; Vinograd, M. I.

    1984-02-01

    The initial period of austenitic grain growth in heating of a hot forged billet of 50G-SSh steel and of forgings after free forging is characterized by the formation of a mixed grain structure of No. 8 fine grains and No. 3-0 coarse.

  12. Does increased heat resistance result in higher susceptibility to predation? A test using Drosophila melanogaster selection and hardening.

    PubMed

    Hangartner, Sandra; Dworkin, Ian; DeNieu, Michael; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2017-04-07

    Heat resistance of ectotherms can be increased both by plasticity and evolution, but these effects may have trade-offs resulting from biotic interactions. Here we test for predation costs in Drosophila melanogaster populations with altered heat resistance produced by adult hardening and directional selection for increased heat resistance. In addition, we also tested for genetic trade-offs by testing heat resistance in lines that have evolved under increased predation risk. We show that while 35/37°C hardening increases heat resistance as expected, it does not increase predation risk from jumping spiders or mantids; in fact there was an indication that survival may have increased under predation following a triple 37°C compared to a single 35°C hardening treatment. Flies that survived a 39°C selection cycle showed lower survival under predation, suggesting a predation cost of exposure to a more severe heat stress. There was however no correlated response to selection because survival did not differ between control and selected lines after selection was relaxed for one or two generations. In addition, lines selected for increased predation risk did not differ in heat resistance. Our findings suggest independent evolutionary responses to predation and heat as measured in laboratory assays, and no costs of heat hardening on susceptibility to predation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Welding duplex stainless steels for maximum corrosion resistance in chemical process industry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gooch, T.G.; Gunn, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    Fabrication of process plant, pipework etc in ferritic-austenitic steels commonly entails fusion welding. The weld thermal cycle can significantly influence material corrosion behavior and hence service performance. The paper reviews the situation, with emphasis on arc welding as most commonly employed by industry. An outline is given of the major metallurgical changes due to welding which take place in the heat affected zone in base steel and in the fused weld metal. The weld thermal cycle experienced alters the ferrite/austenite structure from that in the parent material, and can induce intermetallic precipitation. Nitrogen may also be lost from the weld metal. These changes affect corrosion resistance, and must be controlled to achieve optimum service properties. The consequences of surface oxidation in the weld area and of local residual stresses are also considered, and it is pointed out that resistance to stress corrosion cracking in chloride or sour, H{sub 2}S media is dependent on ferrite/austenite balance. The main factors in formulating a welding procedure are described. Depending on the material composition and joint heat sink, arc energy should be held between minimum and maximum levels to promote adequate austenite formation in the weld area without inducing intermetallic formation. Nitrogen loss should be minimized, and adequate filler should be added: slight overalloying of the consumable is preferred, provided that intermetallic precipitation is avoided.

  14. Surface Resistance of Jute Fibre/Polylactic Acid Biocomposite to Wet Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandvliet, Clio; Bandyopadhyay, N. R.; Ray, Dipa

    2016-04-01

    Jute fibre/polylactic acid (PLA) composite is of special interest because both resin and reinforcement come from renewable resources. Thus, it could be a more eco-friendly alternative to glass fibre composite [1] and to conventional wood-based panels made with phenol-formaldehyde resin which present many drawbacks for the workers and the environment [2]. Yet the water affinity of the natural fibres, the susceptibility of PLA towards hydrolysis and the low glass transition of the PLA raise a question about the surface resistance of such composites to wet heat in service condition for a furniture application [3]. In this work, the surface resistance of PLA/jute composite alone and with two different varnishes are investigated in regard to an interior application following the standard test method in accordance to BS EN 18721:2009: "Furniture: assessment of surface resistance to wet heat". It is compared to two common wood based panels, plywood and hardboard. After test, the composite material surface is found to be more affected than plywood and hardboard, but it becomes resistant to wet heat when a layer of biosourced varnish or petrol-based polyurethane varnish are applied on the surface.

  15. Estimating land surface heat flux using radiometric surface temperature without the need for an extra resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, H.; Yang, Y.; Liu, S.

    2015-12-01

    Remotely-sensed land surface temperature (LST) is a key variable in energy balance and is widely used for estimating regional heat flux. However, the inequality between LST and aerodynamic surface temperature (Taero) poses a great challenge for regional heat flux estimation in one -source energy balance models. In this study, a one-source model for land (OSML) was proposed to estimate regional surface heat flux without a need for an empirical extra resistance. The proposed OSML employs both a conceptual VFC/LST trapezoid model and the electrical analogue formula of sensible heat flux (H) to estimate the radiometric-convective resistance (rae) by using a quartic equation. To evaluate the performance of OSML, the model was applied to the Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX), using a remotely-sensed data set at a regional scale. Validated against tower observations, the root mean square deviation (RMSD) of H and latent heat flux (LE) from OSML was 47 W/m2 and 51 W/m2, which is comparable to other published studies. OSML and SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System) compared under the same available energy indicated that LE estimated by OSML is comparable to that derived from the SEBS model. In conducting further inter-comparisons of rae, the aerodynamic resistance derived from SEBS (ra_SEBS), and aerodynamic resistance (ra) derived from Brutsaert et al. (2005) in corn and soybean fields, we found that rae and ra_SEBS are comparable. Most importantly, our study indicates that the OSML method is applicable without having to acquire wind speed or to specify aerodynamic surface characteristics and that it is applicable to heterogeneous areas.

  16. Weldable, age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, J.A.; Krenzer, R.W.

    1975-07-22

    An age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel having superior weldability properties as well as resistance to degradation of properties in a hydrogen atmosphere is described. It has a composition of from about 24.0 to about 34.0 weight percent (w/o) nickel, from about 13.5 to about 16.0 w/o chromium, from about 1.9 to about 2.3 w/o titanium, from about 1.0 to about 1.5 w/ o molybdenum, from about 0.01 to about 0.05 w/o carbon, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o manganese, from about 0 to about 0.01 w/o phosphorous and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.010 w/o sulfur and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o silicon, from about 0.1 to about 0.35 w/o aluminum, from about 0.10 to about 0.50 w/o vanadium, from about 0 to about 0.0015 w/o boron, and the balance essentially iron. (auth)

  17. Evaluation of media for enumerating heat-stressed, benzoate-resistant Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Makdesi, A K; Beuchat, L R

    1996-12-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the efficacy of yeast malt extract agar (YMA), acidified YMA (YMAA), acidified tryptone glucose yeast extract agar (TGYA) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii agar (ZBA) for enumerating two strains of Z. bailii (FRR 2227 and FRR 3680) grown and heated in blueberry syrup containing 0, 300 and 600 micrograms/ml sodium benzoate. Cells were heated at 50, 51 or 52 degrees C for 0, 15, 30 or 45 min before spread plating diluted samples on enumeration media and incubating at 30 degrees C for 5 days. Strain FRR 3680 exhibited higher heat resistance than did strain FRR 2227. Regardless of the sodium benzoate concentration in growth and heating media, or the temperature and time of heating, non-selective YMA supported recovery of the highest number of viable cells, followed by TGYA for strain FRR 2227 and TGYA or ZBA for strain FRR 3680. YMAA supported the lowest recovery of heat-stressed cells. The concentration of sodium benzoate in the growth medium did not have a significant effect on tolerance of strain FRR 3680 to heat; however, tolerance of strain FRR 2227 to heat decreased when cells were grown in blueberry syrup containing increased concentrations of sodium benzoate. Regardless of the sodium benzoate concentration in the growth medium, both strains exhibited increased sensitivity when heated in blueberry syrup containing increased concentrations of sodium benzoate. Overall, TGYA was judged best among selective media for enumerating Z. bailii because of its ability to support colony development by heat-stressed cells and because of the ease of counting and differentiating colonies.

  18. Thermal resistance of naturally occurring airborne bacterial spores. [Viking spacecraft dry heat decontamination simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puleo, J. R.; Bergstrom, S. L.; Peeler, J. T.; Oxborrow, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    Simulation of a heat process used in the terminal dry-heat decontamination of the Viking spacecraft is reported. Naturally occurring airborne bacterial spores were collected on Teflon ribbons in selected spacecraft assembly areas and subsequently subjected to dry heat. Thermal inactivation experiments were conducted at 105, 111.7, 120, 125, 130, and 135 C with a moisture level of 1.2 mg of water per liter. Heat survivors were recovered at temperatures of 135 C when a 30-h heating cycle was employed. Survivors were recovered from all cycles studied and randomly selected for identification. The naturally occurring spore population was reduced an average of 2.2 to 4.4 log cycles from 105 to 135 C. Heating cycles of 5 and 15 h at temperature were compared with the standard 30-h cycle at 111.7, 120, and 125 C. No significant differences in inactivation (alpha = 0.05) were observed between 111.7 and 120 C. The 30-h cycle differs from the 5- and 15-h cycles at 125 C. Thus, the heating cycle can be reduced if a small fraction (about 0.001 to 0.0001) of very resistant spores can be tolerated.

  19. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. H. )

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  20. Development of Cast Alumina-forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys for use in High Temperature Process Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Pint, Bruce A; Pankiw, Roman; Voke, Don

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in the development of alumina-forming, creep resistant alloys for use in various industrial process environments. It is expected that these alloys can be fabricated into components for use in these environments through centrifugal casting and welding. Based on the successful earlier studies on the development of wrought versions of Alumina-Forming Austenitic (AFA) alloys, new alloy compositions have been developed for cast products. These alloys achieve good high-temperature oxidation resistance due to the formation of protective Al2O3 scales while multiple second-phase precipitation strengthening contributes to excellent creep resistance. This work will summarize the results on the development and properties of a centrifugally cast AFA alloy. This paper highlights the strength, oxidation resistance in air and water vapor containing environments, and creep properties in the as-cast condition over the temperature range of 750°C to 900°C in a centrifugally cast heat. Preliminary results for a laboratory cast AFA composition with good oxidation resistance at 1100°C are also presented.

  1. Genetic variation in resistance of the preimplantation bovine embryo to heat shock.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    Reproduction is among the physiological functions in mammals most susceptible to disruption by hyperthermia. Many of the effects of heat stress on function of the oocyte and embryo involve direct effects of elevated temperature (i.e. heat shock) on cellular function. Mammals limit the effects of heat shock by tightly regulating body temperature. This ability is genetically controlled: lines of domestic animals have been developed with superior ability to regulate body temperature during heat stress. Through experimentation in cattle, it is also evident that there is genetic variation in the resistance of cells to the deleterious effects of elevated temperature. Several breeds that were developed in hot climates, including Bos indicus (Brahman, Gir, Nelore and Sahiwal) and Bos taurus (Romosinuano and Senepol) are more resistant to the effects of elevated temperature on cellular function than breeds that evolved in cooler climates (Angus, Holstein and Jersey). Genetic differences are expressed in the preimplantation embryo by Day 4-5 of development (after embryonic genome activation). It is not clear whether genetic differences are expressed in cells in which transcription is repressed (oocytes >100 µm in diameter or embryos at stages before embryonic genome activation). The molecular basis for cellular thermotolerance has also not been established, although there is some suggestion for involvement of heat shock protein 90 and the insulin-like growth factor 1 system. Given the availability of genomic tools for genetic selection, identification of genes controlling cellular resistance to elevated temperature could be followed by progress in selection for those genes within the populations in which they exist. It could also be possible to introduce genes from thermotolerant breeds into thermally sensitive breeds. The ability to edit the genome makes it possible to design new genes that confer protection of cells from stresses like heat shock.

  2. Influence of heat treatments on microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance of weld alloy 625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortial, F.; Corrieu, J. M.; Vernot-Loier, C.

    1995-05-01

    The effects of heat treatments of the industrial type (eight-hour hold times at temperatures between 600 °C and 1000 °C) on the structural, mechanical, and corrosion resistance characteristics of weld alloy 625 have been studied. During the heat treatment, the mean concentration ratios of Nb, Mo, Si, Cr, Ni, and Fe elements between the interdendritic spaces and dendrite cores show little evolution up to 850 °C. Beyond that temperature, this ratio approximates 1, and the composition heterogeneity has practically disappeared at 1000 °C. An eight-hour heat treatment at temperatures between 650 °C and 750 °C results in increased mechanical strength values and reduced ductility and impact strength linked to the precipitation of body-centered tetragonal metastable intermetallic γ″ Ni3Nb phase in the interdendritic spaces. An eight-hour treatment in the temperature range between 750 °C and 950 °C has catastrophic effects on all mechanical characteristics in relation with the precipitation, in the interdendritic spaces, of the stable orthorhombic intermetallic δ Ni3(Nb, Mo, Cr, Fe, Ti) phase. At 1000 °C, the ductility and impact strength are restored. However, the higher the heat treatment temperature, the weaker the mechanical strength. Heat treatments have no effect on the pitting resistance of weld alloy 625 in sea water. The comparison of the results of this study on weld alloy 625 with those previously obtained on forged metal 625 shows that heat treatments below 650 °C and above 1000 °C are the sole treatments to avoid embrittlement and impairment of the corrosion resistance characteristics of alloy 625.

  3. Heat Treatment Development for a Rapidly Solidified Heat Resistant Cast Al-Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzak, W.; Chen, D. L.; Shaha, S. K.

    2013-07-01

    Existing heat treatment standards do not properly define tempers for thin-walled castings that solidified with high solidification rates. Recently emerged casting processes such as vacuum high pressure die casting should not require long solution treatment times due to the fine microstructures arising from rapid solidification rates. The heat treatment studies involving rapidly solidified samples with secondary dendrite arm spacing between 10 and 35 μm were conducted for solution times between 30 min and 9 h and temperatures of 510 and 525 °C and for various aging parameters. The metallurgical analysis revealed that an increase in microstructure refinement could enable a reduction of solution time up to 88%. Solution treatment resulted in the dissolution of Al2Cu and Al5Mg8Si6Cu2, while Fe- and TiZrV-based phases remained partially in the microstructure. The highest strength of approximately 351 ± 9.7 and 309 ± 3.4 MPa for the UTS and YS, respectively, was achieved for a 2-step solution treatment at 510 and 525 °C in the T6 peak aging conditions, i.e., 150 °C for 100 h. The T6 temper did not yield dimensionally stable microstructure since exceeding 250 °C during in-service operation could result in phase transformation corresponding to the over-aging reaction. The microstructure refinement had a statistically stronger effect on the alloy strength than the increase in solutionizing time. Additionally, thermal analysis and dilatometer results were presented to assess the dissolution of phases during solution treatment, aging kinetics as well as dimensional stability.

  4. DC-Resistive-Heating-Induced Step Bunching on Vicinal Si (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Yoshikazu; Mcclelland, Robert J.; Hibino, Hiroki

    1990-12-01

    Step bunching on a 1°-misoriented Si(111) surface induced by DC resistive heating is observed by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning electron microscopy. Step band regions of the DC-heating-induced bunching surface break up into finer step bands (subbands) and (111) facets below the (7× 7){≤ftrightarrow}(1× 1) phase transition temperature (Tc{=}830°C). The temperature dependence of bunching-inducing current direction on the vicinal surface is the same as that of nearly flat (111) surfaces previously reported, except that bunching is induced for the opposite current direction to nearly flat (111) surfaces below Tc.

  5. Heat dissipation due to ferromagnetic resonance in a ferromagnetic metal monitored by electrical resistance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanoi, Kazuto; Yokotani, Yuki; Kimura, Takashi

    2015-11-02

    The heat dissipation due to the resonant precessional motion of the magnetization in a ferromagnetic metal has been investigated. We demonstrated that the temperature during the ferromagnetic resonance can be simply detected by the electrical resistance measurement of the Cu strip line in contact with the ferromagnetic metal. The temperature change of the Cu strip due to the ferromagnetic resonance was found to exceed 10 K, which significantly affects the spin-current transport. The influence of the thermal conductivity of the substrate on the heating was also investigated.

  6. Austenitic stainless steels and high strength copper alloys for fusion components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowcliffe, A. F.; Zinkle, S. J.; Stubbins, J. F.; Edwards, D. J.; Alexander, D. J.

    1998-10-01

    An austenitic stainless steel (316LN), an oxide-dispersion-strengthened copper alloy (GlidCop Al25), and a precipitation-hardened copper alloy (Cu-Cr-Zr) are the primary structural materials for the ITER first wall/blanket and divertor systems. While there is a long experience of operating 316LN stainless steel in nuclear environments, there is no prior experience with the copper alloys in neutron environments. The ITER first wall (FW) consists of a stainless steel shield with a copper alloy heat sink bonded by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The introduction of bi-layer structural material represents a new materials engineering challenge; the behavior of the bi-layer is determined by the properties of the individual components and by the nature of the bond interface. The development of the radiation damage microstructure in both classes of materials is summarized and the effects of radiation on deformation and fracture behavior are considered. The initial data on the mechanical testing of bi-layers indicate that the effectiveness of GlidCop Al25 as a FW heat sink material is compromised by its strongly anisotropic fracture toughness and poor resistance to crack growth in a direction parallel to the bi-layer interface.

  7. Spores of Bacillus subtilis: their resistance to and killing by radiation, heat and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Setlow, P

    2006-09-01

    A number of mechanisms are responsible for the resistance of spores of Bacillus species to heat, radiation and chemicals and for spore killing by these agents. Spore resistance to wet heat is determined largely by the water content of spore core, which is much lower than that in the growing cell protoplast. A lower core water content generally gives more wet heat-resistant spores. The level and type of spore core mineral ions and the intrinsic stability of total spore proteins also play a role in spore wet heat resistance, and the saturation of spore DNA with alpha/beta-type small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) protects DNA against wet heat damage. However, how wet heat kills spores is not clear, although it is not through DNA damage. The alpha/beta-type SASP are also important in spore resistance to dry heat, as is DNA repair in spore outgrowth, as Bacillus subtilis spores are killed by dry heat via DNA damage. Both UV and gamma-radiation also kill spores via DNA damage. The mechanism of spore resistance to gamma-radiation is not well understood, although the alpha/beta-type SASP are not involved. In contrast, spore UV resistance is due largely to an alteration in spore DNA photochemistry caused by the binding of alpha/beta-type SASP to the DNA, and to a lesser extent to the photosensitizing action of the spore core's large pool of dipicolinic acid. UV irradiation of spores at 254 nm does not generate the cyclobutane dimers (CPDs) and (6-4)-photoproducts (64PPs) formed between adjacent pyrimidines in growing cells, but rather a thymidyl-thymidine adduct termed spore photoproduct (SP). While SP is formed in spores with approximately the same quantum efficiency as that for generation of CPDs and 64PPs in growing cells, SP is repaired rapidly and efficiently in spore outgrowth by a number of repair systems, at least one of which is specific for SP. Some chemicals (e.g. nitrous acid, formaldehyde) again kill spores by DNA damage, while others, in particular

  8. Investigation of coatings of austenitic steels produced by supersonic laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorunov, A. I.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2017-02-01

    The structure and properties of stainless austenitic steel coatings obtained by the supersonic laser deposition are studied in the paper. Implantation of the powder particles into the substrate surface and simultaneous plastic deformation at partial melting improved the mechanical properties of the coatings - tensile strength limit was 650 MPa and adhesion strength was 105 MPa. It was shown that insufficient laser power leads to disruption of the deposition process stability and coating cracking. Surface temperature increase caused by laser heating above 1300 °C resulted in coating melting. The X-ray analysis showed that radiation intensifies the cold spray process and does not cause changes in the austenitic base structure.

  9. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1987-01-01

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  10. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1985-04-03

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  11. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1987-09-22

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate. 2 figs.

  12. Investigation of thermal spray coatings on austenitic stainless steel substrate to enhance corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Daniel M.

    The research is aimed to evaluate thermal spray coatings to address material issues in supercritical and ultra-supercritical Rankine cycles. The primary purpose of the research is to test, evaluate, and eventually implement a coating to improve corrosion resistance and increase efficiency of coal fired power plants. The research is performed as part of a comprehensive project to evaluate the ability of titanium, titanium carbide, or titanium diboride powders to provide fireside corrosion resistance in supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam boilers, specifically, coal driven boilers in Illinois that must utilize high sulfur and high chlorine content coal. [1] The powder coatings that were tested are nano-sized titanium carbide (TiC) and titanium di-boride (TiB2) powders that were synthesized by a patented process at Southern Illinois University. The powders were then sent to Gas Technology Institute in Chicago to coat steel coupons by HVOF (High Velocity Oxy-Fuel) thermal spray technique. The powders were coated on an austenitic 304H stainless steel substrate which is commonly found in high temperature boilers, pipelines, and heat exchangers. The samples then went through various tests for various lengths of time under subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical conditions. The samples were examined using a scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction techniques to study microstructural changes and then determined which coating performed best.

  13. Development of Low-Cost Austenitic Stainless Gas-Turbine and Diesel Engine Components with Enhanced High-Temperature Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Browning, P.F.; Frary, M.E.; Pollard, M.J.; Siebenaler, C.W.; McGreevy, T.E.

    2004-06-01

    In July of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Solar Turbines, Inc. and Caterpillar, Inc. (Caterpillar Technical Center) to evaluate commercial cast stainless steels for gas turbine engine and diesel engine exhaust component applications relative to the materials currently being used. If appropriate, the goal was to develop cast stainless steels with improved performance and reliability rather than switch to more costly cast Ni-based superalloys for upgraded performance. The gas-turbine components considered for the Mercury-50 engine were the combustor housing and end-cover, and the center-frame hot-plate, both made from commercial CF8C cast austenitic stainless steel (Fe-l9Cr-12Ni-Nb,C), which is generally limited to use at below 650 C. The advanced diesel engine components considered for truck applications (C10, C12, 3300 and 3400) were the exhaust manifold and turbocharger housing made from commercial high SiMo ductile cast iron with uses limited to 700-750 C or below. Shortly after the start of the CRADA, the turbine materials emphasis changed to wrought 347H stainless steel (hot-plate) and after some initial baseline tensile and creep testing, it was confirmed that this material was typical of those comprising the abundant database; and by 2000, the emphasis of the CRADA was primarily on diesel engine materials. For the diesel applications, commercial SiMo cast iron and standard cast CN12 austenitic stainless steel (Fe-25Cr-13Ni-Nb,C,N,S) baseline materials were obtained commercially. Tensile and creep testing from room temperature to 900 C showed the CN12 austenitic stainless steel to have far superior strength compared to SiMo cast iron above 550 C, together with outstanding oxidation resistance. However, aging at 850 C reduced room-temperature ductility of the standard CN12, and creep-rupture resistance at 850 C was less than expected, which triggered a focused

  14. Control of Heat-Resistant Steel Carburized Layer Structure. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, M. Yu.

    2013-09-01

    In the first part of the article, published in the previous issue of this journal, on the basis of studying features of the process a physical and mathematical model is presented of carbide formation during heat-resistant steel vacuum carburizing based on the example of VKS-5. In the second part of this article on the basis of analyzing the calculation model physical features are presented for formation of cementite type carbide phase taking account of steel VKS-5 alloying with chromium and nickel, and also temperature. Simultaneously, features of special molybdenum, tungsten, vanadium and niobium carbide formation are considered. The expediency of increasing chromium content in a new generation of heat-resistant steels alloyed with nickel is substantiated.

  15. Effects of erodant particle shape and various heat treatments on erosion resistance of plain carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Erosion tests were conducted on 1045 steel samples which had been subjected to different heat treatments. The weight of material removed upon erosion with glass beads and crushed glass was measured. The data show that there is no correlation between hardness and erosion resistance. The erosion rate was strongly dependent on the shape of erodant particles, being an order of magnitude higher for erosion with crushed glass than with glass beads. Heat treatment had a profound effect on the erosion resistance when the erodant particles were glass beads but little or no effect when the particles were crushed glass. It is thus concluded that different mechanisms of material removal are involved with these two erodants. This conclusion is supported by the surface morphology of annealed 1045 steel samples which had been eroded by these two types of erodant particles. SEM micrographs of the eroded surfaces show that for erosion with glass beads it is deformation induced fracture of surface layers.

  16. Enhanced microwave absorbing properties and heat resistance of carbonyl iron by electroless plating Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyu; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhou, Wancheng; Luo, Fa

    2015-11-01

    Co coated carbonyl iron particles (Co (CI)) are fabricated through electroless plating method, and the electromagnetic microwave absorbing properties are investigated in the frequencies during 8.2-12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of CI particles after electroless plating Co is higher than that of raw CI particles due to improvment of the polarization process. Furthermore, according to the XRD and TG results, the Co layer can enhance the heat resistance of CI particles. The bandwidth below -10 dB can reach 3.9 GHz for the Co(CI) absorbent. The results indicate that the electroless plating Co not only enhances the absorbing properties but also improves the heat resistance of CI.

  17. [Possible pathways of heat resistance induction in plant cells by exogenous nitrogen oxide].

    PubMed

    Karpets, Iu V; Kolupaev, Iu E; Iastreb, T O; Dmitriev, A P

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of influence of exogenous nitrogen oxide (NO) on heat resistance of wheat coleoptiles have been studied. The treatment of plant cells with nitrogen oxide donor (sodium nitroprusside) resulted in the increase of superoxide anion-radical (O2*-) generation already after 10 minutes. The inhibitor of protein biosynthesis cycloheximide did not inhibit the O2*- generation by coleoptiles caused with the NO donor whereas the inhibitor of phosphatidic acid formation (butanol-1) partially inhibited it. The treatment of coleoptiles with the calcium ionophore (A23187) or activator of inositol cycle (inositol) compensated the suppression of butanol-1 effect on NO-dependent O2*- formation. Butanol-1 has also leveled the induction of coleoptiles heat resistance caused by the NO donor, whereas calcium ionophore and inositol almost completely removed the butanol-1 effect. The possible mechanisms of participation of reactive oxygen species, phosphatidic acid and calcium ions in the realization of NO physiological effects are discussed.

  18. Research on temperature control with numerical regulators in electric resistance furnaces with indirect heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniş, C. M.; Popa, G. N.; Iagăr, A.

    2016-02-01

    The paper is an analysis of two-positions (hysteresis) regulators, self-tuned PID controller and PID controller for temperature control used for indirect heat resistance furnaces. For PID controller was used three methods of tuning: Ziegler-Nichols step response model, Cohen-Coon tuning rules and Ziegler-Nichols tuning rules. In experiments it used an electric furnace with indirect heating with active power of resistance of 1 kW/230V AC and a numerical temperature regulator AT-503 type (ANLY). It got a much better temperature control when using the Cohen-Coon tuning rules method than those of Ziegler-Nichols step response method and Ziegler-Nichols tuning rules method.

  19. Residual resistance and Joule heat generation in bulk samples and nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, V. L.

    2008-08-15

    The Joule heat generation under residual resistance conditions in bulk samples of metals and degenerate semiconductors is discussed. We assume that the conductance of the system is determined by elastic scattering of conduction electrons and consider the Ohmic regime. We come to conclusion that the amount of Joule heat generated in such a system is determined by the residual resistance provided that the length of phase coherence of the electron wave functions is smaller than the dimensions of the sample. For a quantum well, this condition is imposed on its lateral dimensions and does not concern its width. It is indicated that this is only a suf-ficient condition that can be relaxed by further investigations.

  20. High temperature setup for measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity of thin films using inductive heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnane, L.; Williams, N.; Silva, H.; Gokirmak, A.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an automated setup for simultaneous measurement of Seebeck coefficient S(T) and electrical resistivity ρ(T) of thin film samples from room temperature to ˜650 °C. S and ρ are extracted from current-voltage (I-V) measurements obtained using a semiconductor parameter analyzer and temperature measurements obtained using commercial thermocouples. The slope and the x-axis intercept of the I-V characteristics represent the sample conductance G and the Seebeck voltage, respectively. The measured G(T) can be scaled to ρ(T) by the geometry factor obtained from the room temperature resistivity measurement of the film. The setup uses resistive or inductive heating to control the temperature and temperature gradient on the sample. Inductive heating is achieved with steel plates that surround the test area and a water cooled copper pipe coil underneath that generates an AC magnetic field. The measurements can be performed using resistive heating only or inductive heating only, or a combination of both depending on the desired heating ranges. Inductive heating provides a more uniform heating of the test area, does not require contacts to the sample holder, can be used up to the Curie temperature of the particular magnetic material, and the temperature gradients can be adjusted by the relative positions of the coil and sample. Example results obtained for low doped single-crystal silicon with inductive heating only and with resistive heating only are presented.

  1. Regularities pertinent to the cyclic heat resistance of the materials of gas-turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, V. I.

    2008-02-01

    Long-term tests of 20 industry-grade nickel alloys were carried out, and it is established from their results that three periods are typical for their cyclic oxidation. Regularities of the processes through which oxidation develops and films are destroyed during each period, the effect the doping of alloys has on their cyclic heat resistance, and features pertinent to cyclic longevity of alloys are described.

  2. Heat sealable, flame and abrasion resistant coated fabric. [clothing and containers for space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschirch, R. P.; Sidman, K. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Flame retardant, abrasion resistant elastomeric compositions are comprised of thermoplastic polyurethane polymer and flame retarding amounts of a filler selected from decabromodiphenyloxide and antimony oxide in a 3:1 weight ratio, and decabromodiphenyloxide, antimony oxide, and ammonium polyphosphate in a 3:1:3 weight ratio respectively. Coated fabrics employing such elastomeric compositions as coating film are flexible, lightweight, and air impermeable and can be made using heat or dielectric sealing procedures.

  3. Incidence of Heat-Resistant Molds in Eastern Orchards and Vineyards 1

    PubMed Central

    Splittstoesser, D. F.; Kuss, F. R.; Harrison, Wanda; Prest, Dorothy B.

    1971-01-01

    Over 70% of the samples of fruit, vegetation, and soil obtained in surveys of New York orchards and vineyards were contaminated with heat-resistant molds. The counts generally were low, under one per gram. Byssochlamys fulva was the most common isolate. Other isolates were identified as B. nivea, Paecilomyces varioti, Aspergillus fischeri, A. fischeri var. spinosus, A. fumigatus, Penicillium vermiculatum, and P. ochro-chloron. PMID:5544294

  4. Dynamic thermal characteristics of heat pipe via segmented thermal resistance model for electric vehicle battery cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feifei; Lan, Fengchong; Chen, Jiqing

    2016-07-01

    Heat pipe cooling for battery thermal management systems (BTMSs) in electric vehicles (EVs) is growing due to its advantages of high cooling efficiency, compact structure and flexible geometry. Considering the transient conduction, phase change and uncertain thermal conditions in a heat pipe, it is challenging to obtain the dynamic thermal characteristics accurately in such complex heat and mass transfer process. In this paper, a ;segmented; thermal resistance model of a heat pipe is proposed based on thermal circuit method. The equivalent conductivities of different segments, viz. the evaporator and condenser of pipe, are used to determine their own thermal parameters and conditions integrated into the thermal model of battery for a complete three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The proposed ;segmented; model shows more precise than the ;non-segmented; model by the comparison of simulated and experimental temperature distribution and variation of an ultra-thin micro heat pipe (UMHP) battery pack, and has less calculation error to obtain dynamic thermal behavior for exact thermal design, management and control of heat pipe BTMSs. Using the ;segmented; model, the cooling effect of the UMHP pack with different natural/forced convection and arrangements is predicted, and the results correspond well to the tests.

  5. Influence of heat treatments on microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance of weld alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Cortial, F.; Corrieu, J.M.; Vernot-Loier, C.

    1995-05-01

    The effects of heat treatments of the industrial type on the structural, mechanical, and corrosion resistance characteristics of weld alloy 625 have been studied. During the heat treatment, the mean concentration ratios of Nb, Mo, Si, Cr, Ni, and Fe elements between the interdendritic spaces and dendrite cores show little evolution up to 850 C. Beyond that temperature, this ratio approximates 1, and the composition heterogeneity has practically disappeared at 1,000 C. An eight-hour heat treatment at temperatures between 650 C and 750 C results in increased mechanical strength values and reduced ductility and impact strength linked to the precipitation of body-centered tetragonal metastable intermetallic {gamma}{double_prime} Ni{sub 3}Nb phase in the interdendritic spaces. An eight-hour treatment in the temperature range between 750 C and 950 C has catastrophic effects on all mechanical characteristics in relation with the precipitation, in the interdendritic spaces, of the stable orthorhombic intermetallic {delta} Ni{sub 3}(Nb, Mo, Cr, Fe, Ti) phase. At 1,000 C, the ductility and impact strength are restored. However, the higher the beat treatment temperature, the weaker the mechanical strength. Heat treatments have no effect on the pitting resistance of weld alloy 625 in sea water. The comparison of the results of this study on weld alloy 625 with those previously obtained on forged metal 625 shows that heat treatments below 650 C and above 1,000 C are the sole treatments to avoid embrittlement and impairment of the corrosion resistance characteristics of alloy 625.

  6. Phase transformation and stabilization of a high strength austenite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, S.; Huang, D.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation of the phase transformation and the austenite stabilization in a high strength austenite has been made. An Fe-29Ni-4.3Ti austenite age-hardened by gamma-prime (Ni3Ti) precipitates showed a further increase of strength after martensitic and reverse martensitic phase transformations. The stability of ausaged austenite as well as ausaged and transformation-strengthened austenite was improved significantly through an isothermal treatment at 500 C. The Ms temperature of the strengthened austenite was restored to nearly that of annealed austenite while the austenite was hardened to R(C) 41 through precipitation and phase transformations. The observed austenite stabilization is attributed to the formation of GP zones or short-range order of less than about 10A in size.

  7. Embedded resistance wire as a heating element for temperature control in microbioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazrul Hisham Zainal Alam, Muhd; Schäpper, Daniel; Gernaey, Krist V.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the technical realization of a low-cost heating element consisting of a resistance wire in a microbioreactor, as well as the implementation and performance assessment of an on/off controller for temperature control of the microbioreactor content based on this heating element. The microbioreactor (working volume of 100 µL) is designed to work bubble-free, and is fabricated out of the polymers poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The temperature is measured with a Pt 100 sensor, and the resistance wires are embedded in the polymer such that they either surround the reactor chamber or are placed underneath it. The latter can achieve an even temperature distribution across the reactor chamber and direct heating of the reactor content. We show that an integrated resistance wire coupled to a simple on/off controller results in accurate temperature control of the reactor (±0.1 °C of the set point value) and provides a good disturbance rejection capability (corrective action for a sudden temperature drop of 2.5 °C at an operating temperature of 50 °C takes less than 30 s). Finally, we also demonstrate the workability of the established temperature control in a batch Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivation in a microbioreactor.

  8. Surface treatment and corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel biomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oravcová, M.; Palček, P.; Zatkalíková, V.; Tański, T.; Król, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this article results from corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L after different surface treatments are published. “As received” surface and surface after grinding resulted in lower resistance to pitting corrosion in physiological solution than electrochemically polished in H3PO4+H2SO4+H2O. Electropolishing also improved the surface roughness in comparison with the “as received” surface. Deposition of Al2O3 nanometric ALD coating improves the corrosion resistance of stainless steel in chloride-containing environment by shifting the breakdown potential toward more positive values. This oxide coating not only improves the corrosion resistance but it also affects the wettability of the surface, resulting in hydrophobic surface.

  9. Dependence of heat resistance of Drosophila on ambient temperature and relationship of this property to mutation process

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirova, M.M.; Belyatskaya, O.Ya.

    1986-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that thermosensitvity of the gametes in Drosophila line T correlates with the heat resistance of the flies. This property of the gametes is determined during ontogenesis, depending on the temperature during development and not by genotypic preadaptation as such, i.e., affinity of the females to the heat resistance line T. The ability of females to acquire heat resistance during the adult phase (in the first three days after emergence), i.e., by acclimatization to a temperature different from the temperature during development does not change the response of the gametes to extreme temperature which had developed during ontogenesis under a particular temperature.

  10. Control of wire heating with resistively guided fast electrons through an inverse conical taper

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A. P. L. Schmitz, H.; Green, J. S.; Booth, N.; Ridgers, C. P.; Pasley, J.

    2015-04-15

    The heating of a solid wire embedded in a solid substrate (of lower Z material) with relativistic electrons generated by ultra-intense laser irradiation is considered. Previously, it has been noted that the initial angular distribution of the fast electrons is a highly important factor in the efficacy of the heating [Robinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122701 (2013)]. We show that, using 3D numerical simulations, the addition of an inverse conical taper at the front of wire can considerably improve the heating of the wire due to the reduction of angular spread of the fast electrons which is caused by transport through the inverse conical taper [Robinson et al., “Guiding of laser-generated fast electrons by exploiting the resistivity-gradients around a conical guide element,” Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion (to be published)].

  11. Resistance heating of Fe and W in diamond-anvil cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehler, R.; Nicol, M.; Zha, C. S.; Johnson, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    A new method for internally heating a diamond-anvil cell is described. Fine wires of iron or tungsten are resistively heated in a gasketed cell, thus providing a uniformly distributed pressure that can be measured in situ by employing the ruby scale. Temperatures of several thousand degrees have been measured by fitting a black body radiation function to the spectrum of the hot wire taken with an optical multichannel analyzer. Temperatures as high as the melting temperature of tungsten have been achieved. The alpha-gamma and alpha-epsilon phase transitions of iron have been studied, and the results show excellent agreement with previous data obtained with piston-cylinder or externally-heated diamond cells.

  12. Mn-Fe base and Mn-Cr-Fe base austenitic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brager, Howard R.; Garner, Francis A.

    1987-01-01

    Manganese-iron base and manganese-chromium-iron base austenitic alloys designed to have resistance to neutron irradiation induced swelling and low activation have the following compositions (in weight percent): 20 to 40 Mn; up to about 15 Cr; about 0.4 to about 3.0 Si; an austenite stabilizing element selected from C and N, alone or in combination with each other, and in an amount effective to substantially stabilize the austenite phase, but less than about 0.7 C, and less than about 0.3 N; up to about 2.5 V; up to about 0.1 P; up to about 0.01 B; up to about 3.0 Al; up to about 0.5 Ni; up to about 2.0 W; up to about 1.0 Ti; up to about 1.0 Ta; and with the remainder of the alloy being essentially iron.

  13. Mn-Fe base and Mn-Cr-Fe base austenitic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brager, Howard R.; Garner, Francis A.

    1987-09-01

    Manganese-iron base and manganese-chromium-iron base austenitic alloys designed to have resistance to neutron irradiation induced swelling and low activation have the following compositions (in weight percent): 20 to 40 Mn; up to about 15 Cr; about 0.4 to about 3.0 Si; an austenite stabilizing element selected from C and N, alone or in combination with each other, and in an amount effective to substantially stabilize the austenite phase, but less than about 0.7 C, and less than about 0.3 N; up to about 2.5 V; up to about 0.1 P; up to about 0.01 B; up to about 3.0 Al; up to about 0.5 Ni; up to about 2.0 W; up to about 1.0 Ti; up to about 1.0 Ta; and with the remainder of the alloy being essentially iron.

  14. Transcriptome profiling of heat-resistant strain Bacillus licheniformis CGMCC3962 producing Maotai flavor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun; Xu, Yan

    2012-02-29

    Although Maotai flavor liquor is exclusive due to its soy sauce flavor, knowledge of its key compound and production mechanism is still scarce until now. To gain insight into the production mechanism of soy sauce flavor, a soy sauce flavor producing strain with high efficiency and heat-resistant capability was obtained, and the metabolic mechanism of the strain was investigated with the technique of microarray profiling. Because high temperature was a key factor for soy sauce flavor production, the global gene expression of this heat-resistant strain fermented at 55 °C was analyzed. Except for the responsive increase of heat shock proteins, which maintained cell survival during heat stress, biosynthesis of cysteine was also up-regulated. In addition, some metabolites were significantly increased when cysteine was added to the fermentation medium, such as 2,3-butanediol, 3-hydroxy-2-butanone, and tetramethylpyrazine, which were important flavor compounds in soy sauce flavor liquor and might be related with soy sauce flavor. The results indicated that cysteine might play an important role in the formation of soy sauce flavor compound, and it might act as an indirect precursor or stimulator of soy sauce flavor formation. This was the first use of the microarray profiling tool to investigate the fermentative strains for Chinese traditional liquor, which would allow a deeper insight into the mechanism of the formation of soy sauce flavor compound.

  15. Elevated [CO2] magnifies isoprene emissions under heat and improves thermal resistance in hybrid aspen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhihong; Hüve, Katja; Vislap, Vivian; Niinemets, Ülo

    2013-12-01

    Isoprene emissions importantly protect plants from heat stress, but the emissions become inhibited by instantaneous increase of [CO2], and it is currently unclear how isoprene-emitting plants cope with future more frequent and severe heat episodes under high [CO2]. Hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x Populus tremuloides) saplings grown under ambient [CO2] of 380 μmol mol(-1) and elevated [CO2] of 780 μmol mol(-1) were used to test the hypothesis that acclimation to elevated [CO2] reduces the inhibitory effect of high [CO2] on emissions. Elevated-[CO2]-grown plants had greater isoprene emission capacity and a stronger increase of isoprene emissions with increasing temperature. High temperatures abolished the instantaneous [CO2] sensitivity of isoprene emission, possibly due to removing the substrate limitation resulting from curbed cycling of inorganic phosphate. As a result, isoprene emissions were highest in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants under high measurement [CO2]. Overall, elevated growth [CO2] improved heat resistance of photosynthesis, in particular, when assessed under high ambient [CO2] and the improved heat resistance was associated with greater cellular sugar and isoprene concentrations. Thus, contrary to expectations, these results suggest that isoprene emissions might increase in the future.

  16. Beam heat load due to geometrical and resistive wall impedance in COLDDIAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalbuoni, S.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Spataro, B.

    2012-11-01

    One of the still open issues for the development of superconductive insertion devices is the understanding of the heat intake from the electron beam. With the aim of measuring the beam heat load to a cold bore and the hope to gain a deeper understanding in the underlying mechanisms, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics (COLDDIAG) was built. It is equipped with the following instrumentation: retarding field analyzers to measure the electron flux, temperature sensors to measure the beam heat load, pressure gauges, and mass spectrometers to measure the gas content. Possible beam heat load sources are: synchrotron radiation, wakefield effects due to geometrical and resistive wall impedance and electron/ion bombardment. The flexibility of the engineering design will allow the installation of the cryostat in different synchrotron light sources. COLDDIAG was first installed in the Diamond Light Source (DLS) in 2011. Due to a mechanical failure of the thermal transition of the cold liner, the cryostat had to be removed after one week of operation. After having implemented design changes in the thermal liner transition, COLDDIAG has been reinstalled in the DLS at the end of August 2012. In order to understand the beam heat load mechanism it is important to compare the measured COLDDIAG parameters with theoretical expectations. In this paper we report on the analytical and numerical computation of the COLDDIAG beam heat load due to coupling impedances deriving from unavoidable step transitions, ports used for pumping and diagnostics, surface roughness, and resistive wall. The results might have an important impact on future technological solutions to be applied to cold bore devices.

  17. Mechanical properties of steels with a microstructure of bainite/martensite and austenite islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syammach, Sami M.

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are continually being developed in order to reduce weight and improve safety for automotive applications. There is need for economic steels with improved strength and ductility combinations. These demands have led to research and development of third generation AHSS. Third generation AHSS include steel grades with a bainitic and tempered martensitic matrix with retained austenite islands. These steels may provide improved mechanical properties compared to first generation AHSS and should be more economical than second generation AHSS. There is a need to investigate these newer types of steels to determine their strength and formability properties. Understanding these bainitic and tempered martensitic steels is important because they likely can be produced using currently available production systems. If viable, these steels could be a positive step in the evolution of AHSS. The present work investigates the effect of the microstructure on the mechanical properties of steels with a microstructure of bainite, martensite, and retained austenite, so called TRIP aided bainitic ferrite (TBF) steels. The first step in this project was creating the desired microstructure. To create a microstructure of bainite, martensite, and austenite an interrupted austempering heat treatment was used. Varying the heat treatment times and temperatures produced microstructures of varying amounts of bainite, martensite, and austenite. Mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, strain hardening, and hole-expansion ratios were then evaluated for each heat treatment. Correlations between mechanical properties and microstructure were then evaluated. It was found that samples after each of the heat treatments exhibited strengths between 1050 MPa and 1350 MPa with total elongations varying from 8 pct to 16 pct. By increasing the bainite and austenite volume fraction the strength of the steel was found to decrease, but the ductility increased. Larger

  18. A molecular dynamics study of tilt grain boundary resistance to slip and heat transfer in nanocrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Chen, Youping; Xiong, Liming; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr

    2014-12-28

    We present a molecular dynamics study of grain boundary (GB) resistance to dislocation-mediated slip transfer and phonon-mediated heat transfer in nanocrystalline silicon bicrystal. Three most stable 〈110〉 tilt GBs in silicon are investigated. Under mechanical loading, the nucleation and growth of hexagonal-shaped shuffle dislocation loops are reproduced. The resistances of different GBs to slip transfer are quantified through their constitutive responses. Results show that the Σ3 coherent twin boundary (CTB) in silicon exhibits significantly higher resistance to dislocation motion than the Σ9 GB in glide symmetry and the Σ19 GB in mirror symmetry. The distinct GB strengths are explained by the atomistic details of the dislocation-GB interaction. Under thermal loading, based on a thermostat-induced heat pulse model, the resistances of the GBs to transient heat conduction in ballistic-diffusive regime are characterized. In contrast to the trend found in the dislocation-GB interaction in bicrystal models with different GBs, the resistances of the same three GBs to heat transfer are strikingly different. The strongest dislocation barrier Σ3 CTB is almost transparent to heat conduction, while the dislocation-permeable Σ9 and Σ19 GBs exhibit larger resistance to heat transfer. In addition, simulation results suggest that the GB thermal resistance not only depends on the GB energy but also on the detailed atomic structure along the GBs.

  19. Quasi-steady state thermal resistance of a flexible copper-water heat pipe subjected to transient acceleration loading

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.K.; Yerkes, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    The thermal performance of a flexible copper-water heat pipe is investigated to determine its quasi-steady state characteristics under varying acceleration loadings. This was accomplished by attaching the heat pipe to a centrifuge table, where the imposed angular velocity was sinusoidal in nature. It was found that the thermal resistance of the heat pipe is a function of the acceleration frequency, heat input, condenser temperature, and dryout condition prior to changing the frequency. The objective of the present experimental study is to determine the potential performance characteristics of heat pipes used as heat sinks in transient acceleration environments typical of those seen in high-performance aircraft. In addition, this research will enable heat pipe designers to re-examine the effects of accelerations loading with respect to heat pipe wick and containment structures, so that new wicks and heat pipe shells can be developed and designed specifically for exploitation of the phenomena which occur in transient acceleration fields.

  20. The Transcriptional Heat Shock Response of Salmonella Typhimurium Shows Hysteresis and Heated Cells Show Increased Resistance to Heat and Acid Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pin, Carmen; Hansen, Trine; Muñoz-Cuevas, Marina; de Jonge, Rob; Rosenkrantz, Jesper T.; Löfström, Charlotta; Aarts, Henk; Olsen, John E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated if the transcriptional response of Salmonella Typhimurium to temperature and acid variations was hysteretic, i.e. whether the transcriptional regulation caused by environmental stimuli showed memory and remained after the stimuli ceased. The transcriptional activity of non-replicating stationary phase cells of S. Typhimurium caused by the exposure to 45°C and to pH 5 for 30 min was monitored by microarray hybridizations at the end of the treatment period as well as immediately and 30 minutes after conditions were set back to their initial values, 25°C and pH 7. One hundred and two out of 120 up-regulated genes during the heat shock remained up-regulated 30 minutes after the temperature was set back to 25°C, while only 86 out of 293 down regulated genes remained down regulated 30 minutes after the heat shock ceased. Thus, the majority of the induced genes exhibited hysteresis, i.e., they remained up-regulated after the environmental stress ceased. At 25°C the transcriptional regulation of genes encoding for heat shock proteins was determined by the previous environment. Gene networks constructed with up-regulated genes were significantly more modular than those of down-regulated genes, implying that down-regulation was significantly less synchronized than up-regulation. The hysteretic transcriptional response to heat shock was accompanied by higher resistance to inactivation at 50°C as well as cross-resistance to inactivation at pH 3; however, growth rates and lag times at 43°C and at pH 4.5 were not affected. The exposure to pH 5 only caused up-regulation of 12 genes and this response was neither hysteretic nor accompanied of increased resistance to inactivation conditions. Cellular memory at the transcriptional level may represent a mechanism of adaptation to the environment and a deterministic source of variability in gene regulation. PMID:23236453

  1. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  2. Dissolved gas exsolution to enhance gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2015-05-01

    Condensation of volatile organic compounds in colder zones can be detrimental to the performance of an in situ thermal treatment application for the remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones. A novel method to increase gas production and limit convective heat loss in more permeable, potentially colder, zones involves the injection and liberation of dissolved gas from solution during heating. Bench-scale electrical resistance heating experiments were performed with a dissolved carbon dioxide and sodium chloride solution to investigate exsolved gas saturations and transport regimes at elevated, but sub-boiling, temperatures. At sub-boiling temperatures, maximum exsolved gas saturations of Sg = 0.12 were attained, and could be sustained when the carbon dioxide solution was injected during heating rather than emplaced prior to heating. This gas saturation was estimated to decrease groundwater relative permeability to krw = 0.64. Discontinuous gas transport was observed above saturations of Sg = 0.07, demonstrating the potential of exsolved CO2 to bridge vertical gas transport through colder zones.

  3. Residual resistance of 2D and 3D structures and Joule heat release.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, V L; Kozub, V I

    2011-06-22

    We consider a residual resistance and Joule heat release in 2D nanostructures as well as in ordinary 3D conductors. We assume that elastic scattering of conduction electrons by lattice defects is predominant. Within a rather intricate situation in such systems we discuss in detail two cases. (1) The elastic scattering alone (i.e. without regard of inelastic mechanisms of scattering) leads to a transition of the mechanical energy (stored by the electrons under the action of an electric field) into heat in a traditional way. This process can be described by the Boltzmann equation where it is possible to do the configuration averaging over defect positions in the electron-impurity collision term. The corresponding conditions are usually met in metals. (2) The elastic scattering can be considered with the help of the standard electron-impurity collision integral only in combination with some additional averaging procedure (possibly including inelastic scattering or some mechanisms of electron wavefunction phase destruction). This situation is typical for degenerate semiconductors with a high concentration of dopants and conduction electrons. Quite often, heat release can be observed via transfer of heat to the lattice, i.e. via inelastic processes of electron-phonon collisions and can take place at distances much larger than the size of the device. However, a direct heating of the electron system can be registered too by, for instance, local measurements of the current noise or direct measurement of an electron distribution function.

  4. Effect of the medium characteristics and the heating and cooling rates on the nonisothermal heat resistance of Bacillus sporothermodurans IC4 spores.

    PubMed

    Esteban, María-Dolores; Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Fernández, Pablo S; Palop, Alfredo

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, highly thermo-resistant mesophilic spore-forming bacteria belonging to the species Bacillus sporothermodurans have caused non-sterility problems in industrial sterilization processes. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of the heating medium characteristics (pH and buffer/food) on the thermal inactivation of B. sporothermodurans spores when exposed to isothermal and non-isothermal heating and cooling treatments and the suitability of non-linear Weibull and Geeraaerd models to predict the survivors of these thermal treatments. Thermal treatments were carried out in pH 3, 5 and 7 McIlvaine buffer and in a courgette soup. Isothermal survival curves showed shoulders that were accurately characterized by means of both models. A clear effect of the pH of the heating medium was observed, decreasing the D120 value from pH 7 to pH 3 buffer down to one third. Differences in heat resistance were similar, regardless of the model used and were kept at all temperatures tested. The heat resistance in courgette soup was similar to that shown in pH 7 buffer. When the heat resistance values obtained under isothermal conditions were used to predict the survival in the non-isothermical experiments, the predictions estimated the experimental data quite accurately, both with Weibull and Geeraerd models.

  5. Guidelines for experimental design protocol and validation procedure for the measurement of heat resistance of microorganisms in milk.

    PubMed

    Condron, Robin; Farrokh, Choreh; Jordan, Kieran; McClure, Peter; Ross, Tom; Cerf, Olivier

    2015-01-02

    Studies on the heat resistance of dairy pathogens are a vital part of assessing the safety of dairy products. However, harmonized methodology for the study of heat resistance of food pathogens is lacking, even though there is a need for such harmonized experimental design protocols and for harmonized validation procedures for heat treatment studies. Such an approach is of particular importance to allow international agreement on appropriate risk management of emerging potential hazards for human and animal health. This paper is working toward establishment of a harmonized protocol for the study of the heat resistance of pathogens, identifying critical issues for establishment of internationally agreed protocols, including a harmonized framework for reporting and interpretation of heat inactivation studies of potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

  6. Fundamental Studies of Phase Transformations and Mechanical Properties in the Heat Affected Zone of 10 wt% Nickel Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrick, Erin J.

    United States naval applications require the use of steels with high strength and resistance to fracture at low temperatures to provide good ballistic properties. In recent years, 10 wt% Ni steel has been developed with strength and toughness values exceeding those of steels currently used, and is now being considered as a candidate material to replace existing high-strength, low alloy steels. This steel has excellent toughness from the mechanically induced transformation of interlath austenite films to martensite. These austenite films are formed via a carefully developed quenching, lamellarizing, and tempering heat treatment. However, before 10 wt% Ni steel can be implemented for full-scale applications, the effects of the rapid heating and cooling rates associated with welding thermal cycles on phase transformations and mechanical properties must be understood. In this research, a fundamental understanding of phase transformations and mechanical properties in the heat-affected zone of fusion welds in 10 wt% Ni steel was developed through heating and cooling rate dilatometry experiments, gas tungsten arc welding, and simulation of gas metal arc welding. First, an investigation into the effects of heating and cooling rate on the phase transformations in 10 wt% Ni steel was performed. The Ac1 and Ac3 temperatures during heating were determined as a function of heating rate, and sluggish transformation during fast heating rates manifested itself as a high Ac3 temperature of 1050°C as opposed to a temperature of 850°C at slow heating rates. A continuous cooling transformation diagram produced for 10 wt% Ni steel reveals that martensite will form over a very wide range of cooling rates, which reflects a very high hardenability of this alloy. This is significant because the range of cooling rates for which the diagram was constructed over easily covers the range associated with fusion welding, so there would not be the need for precise control over the weld

  7. Palm Cooling and Heating Delays Fatigue During Resistance Exercise in Women.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young S; Robergs, Robert A; Mermier, Christine M; Schneider, Suzanne M; Gurney, Alfred B

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that cold application to the palms between sets of high-intensity bench press exercise produces an ergogenic effect in men. In this study, we hypothesized that palm cooling (PC) or heating during rest intervals between high-intensity weight training sets will increase total repetitions and exercise volume load (kilograms) in resistance trained female subjects in a thermoneutral (TN) environment. Eight female subjects (mean ± SD, age = 25 ± 6 years, height = 160 ± 6 cm, body mass = 56 ± 7 kg, 1-repetition maximum [1RM] = 52 ± 6 kg, weight training experience = 6 ± 2 years) completed 4 sets of 85% 1RM bench press exercise to failure, with 3-minute rest intervals. Exercise trials were performed in a counterbalanced order on 3 days, separated by at least 3 days in TN, Palm heating (PH), and PC conditions. Heating and cooling were applied by placing both hands in a hand cooling device with the hand plate set to 45° C for heating and 10° C for cooling. Data were analyzed using a 2-factor repeated-measures analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests. Palm cooling repetitions were significantly higher than TN repetitions during the second set, and PH repetitions were significantly higher than those of TN during the fourth set. Total exercise volume load (kilograms) for both PC (1,387 ± 358) and PH (1,349 ± 267) were significantly higher than TN (1,187 ± 262). In women, both heating and cooling of the palms between sets of resistance exercise increased the total exercise volume load performed. This ergogenic response to a peripheral sensory input is consistent with the central governor theory of muscular fatigue.

  8. Phase relations in the system Fe-Si determined in an internally-resistive heated DAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komabayashi, T.; Antonangeli, D.; Morard, G.; Sinmyo, R.; Mezouar, N.

    2015-12-01

    It is believed that the iron-rich Earth's core contains some amounts of light elements on the basis of the density deficit of 7 % compared to pure iron. The identification of the kinds and amounts of the light elements in the core places constraints on the origin, formation, and evolution of the Earth because dissolution of light elements into an iron-rich core should place important constraints on the thermodynamic conditions (pressure (P), temperature (T), and oxygen fugacity) of the equilibration between liquid silicate and liquid iron during the core formation. Among potential light elements, silicon has been attracting attentions because it is abundant in the mantle, partitioned into both solid and liquid irons, and very sensitive to the oxygen fugacity. An important phase relation in iron alloy is a transition between the face-centred cubic (FCC) structure and hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structure. This boundary is a key to infer the stable structure in the inner core and is used to derive thermodynamic properties of the phases (Komabayashi, 2014). In the Fe-Si system, previous reports were based on experiments in laser-heated diamond anvil cells (DAC), which might have included large termperature uncertainties. We have revisited this boundary in the system Fe-Si using an internally resistive-heated DAC combined with synchrotron X-ray diffraction at the beamline ID27, ESRF. The internally-heated DAC (Komabayashi et al., 2009; 2012) provides much more stable heating than the laser-heated DAC and much higher temperature than externally resistive-heated DAC, which enables us to place tight constraints on the P-T locations of the boundaries. Also because the minimum measurable temperature is as low as 1000 K due to the stable electric heating, the internal heating is able to examine the low temperature phase stability which was not studied by the previous studies. We will report the P-T locations of the boundaries and evaluate the effect of Si on the phase

  9. Molecular characterization of heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) promoter in Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), and the association of Pohsp70 SNPs with heat-resistant trait.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jie; Liu, Xudong; Liu, Jinxiang; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Wenji; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Quanqi

    2014-08-01

    Ambient temperature is one of the major abiotic environmental factors determining the main parameters of fish vital activity. HSP70 plays an essential role in heat response. In this investigation, the promoter and structure of Paralichthys olivaceus hsp70 (Pohsp70) gene was cloned and predicted. 2558 bp upstream regulatory region of Pohsp70 was annotated with four potential promoter elements and four putative binding sites of transcription factors heat shock elements (HSE, nGAAn) in the upstream of the transcription start site. In addition, one intron with 454 bp in the 5'-noncoding region was found. Quantitative Real Time PCR analysis indicated that the transcript level of Pohsp70 was raised markedly after 1 h by heat shocked. Furthermore, 25 SNPs were identified in Pohsp70 by resequencing, seven of which was associated with heat resistance. In addition, two of the seven SNPs, namely SNP14 and SNP16, were observed in strong linkage disequilibrium. The haplotype with association analysis showed TAGGAG haplotype was more represented in heat susceptible group while (DEL/T) GAATA haplotype was more frequent in heat resistant group. The heat resistant SNPs and haplotype could be candidate markers potentially serving for selective breeding programs of Japanese flounder aimed at improving anti-stress and production.

  10. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by super duplex filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-15

    In the present paper, microstructural changes across an as-welded dissimilar austenitic/duplex stainless steel couple welded by a super duplex stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process is characterized with optical microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction techniques. Accordingly, variations of microstructure, texture, and grain boundary character distribution of base metals, heat affected zones, and weld metal were investigated. The results showed that the weld metal, which was composed of Widmanstätten austenite side-plates and allotriomorphic grain boundary austenite morphologies, had the weakest texture and was dominated by low angle boundaries. The welding process increased the ferrite content but decreased the texture intensity at the heat affected zone of the super duplex stainless steel base metal. In addition, through partial ferritization, it changed the morphology of elongated grains of the rolled microstructure to twinned partially transformed austenite plateaus scattered between ferrite textured colonies. However, the texture of the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone was strengthened via encouraging recrystallization and formation of annealing twins. At both interfaces, an increase in the special character coincident site lattice boundaries of the primary phase as well as a strong texture with <100> orientation, mainly of Goss component, was observed. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Weld metal showed local orientation at microscale but random texture at macroscale. • Intensification of <100> orientated grains was observed adjacent to the fusion lines. • The austenite texture was weaker than that of the ferrite in all duplex regions. • Welding caused twinned partially transformed austenites to form at SDSS HAZ. • At both interfaces, the ratio of special CSL boundaries of the primary phase increased.

  11. The influence of annealing in the ferrite-plus-austenite phase field on the stability of vanadium carbide precipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, I. E.; Michal, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of rapid excursions into the ferrite-plus-austenite two-phase field on V4C3 precipitates formed by tempering in the ferrite phases was investigated. Heat treatments were first performed to produce a starting microstructure of fine vanadium carbide particles precipitated in a ferrite matrix, and the microstructure was then subjected to various short-time heat treatment cycles that transformed part of the matrix to austenite. TEM was used to determine the effects of the matrix change on the size, morphology, and distribution of the vanadium carbide particles.

  12. Heat resistance of histamine-producing bacteria in irradiated tuna loins.

    PubMed

    Enache, Elena; Kataoka, Ai; Black, D Glenn; Weddig, Lisa; Hayman, Melinda; Bjornsdottir-Butler, Kristin

    2013-09-01

    Consumption of foods high in biogenic amines leads to an illness known as histamine, or scombrotoxin, poisoning. The illness is commonly associated with consumption of fish with high levels of histamine ( $ 500 ppm). The objective of this study was to determine and compare the heat resistance of five histamine-producing bacteria in irradiated albacore tuna loins. Heat-resistance parameters (D- and z-values) were determined for Morganella morganii, Raoultella planticola, Hafnia alvei, and Enterobacter aerogenes. D- or z-values were not determined for Photobacterium damselae, which was the most heat-sensitive organism in this study. P. damselae declined > 5.9 log CFU/g after a heat treatment of 50°C for 10 min, 54°C for 3 min, and 56°C for 0.5 min. M. morganii was the most heat-resistant histamine-producing bacteria in albacore tuna loins, followed by E. aerogenes, H. alvei, and R. planticola. M. morganii and E. aerogenes had the highest D(50°C), 49.7 ± 17.57 and 51.8 ± 17.38 min, respectively. In addition, M. morganii had the highest D-values for all other temperatures (54, 56, and 58°C) tested. D- and zvalues were also determined for M. morganii in skipjack tuna. While no significant (P > 0.05) difference was observed between D(54°C) and D(56°C) of M. morganii in either albacore or skipjack tuna, the D(58°C) (0.4 ± 0.17 min) was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in skipjack than in albacore (0.9 ± 0.24 min). The z-values for all organisms tested were in the range of 3.2 to 3.8°C. This study suggests that heat treatment designed to control M. morganii in tuna loins is sufficient for controlling histamine-producing bacteria in canned-tuna processing environments.

  13. Ultrafine-Grained Structure of Fe-Ni-C Austenitic Alloy Formed by Phase Hardening.

    PubMed

    Danilchenko, Vitalij

    2016-12-01

    The X-ray and magnetometry methods were used to study α-γ transformation mechanisms on heating quenched Fe-22.7 wt.% Ni-0.58 wt.% С alloy. Variation of heating rate within 0.03-80 K/min allowed one to switch from diffusive to non-diffusive mechanism of the α-γ transformation. Heating up primary austenitic single crystal specimen at a rate of less than 1.0-0.5 K/min has led to formation of aggregate of grains with different orientation and chemical composition in the reverted austenite. Significant fraction of these grains was determined to have sizes within nanoscale range.

  14. Influence of Martensite Fraction on the Stabilization of Austenite in Austenitic-Martensitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiuliang; De Cooman, Bruno C.; Biermann, Horst; Mola, Javad

    2016-05-01

    The influence of martensite fraction ( f α') on the stabilization of austenite was studied by quench interruption below M s temperature of an Fe-13Cr-0.31C (mass pct) stainless steel. The interval between the quench interruption temperature and the secondary martensite start temperature, denoted as θ, was used to quantify the extent of austenite stabilization. In experiments with and without a reheating step subsequent to quench interruption, the variation of θ with f α' showed a transition after transformation of almost half of the austenite. This trend was observed regardless of the solution annealing temperature which influenced the martensite start temperature. The transition in θ was ascribed to a change in the type of martensite nucleation sites from austenite grain and twin boundaries at low f α' to the faults near austenite-martensite (A-M) boundaries at high f α'. At low temperatures, the local carbon enrichment of such boundaries was responsible for the enhanced stabilization at high f α'. At high temperatures, relevant to the quenching and partitioning processing, on the other hand, the pronounced stabilization at high f α' was attributed to the uniform partitioning of the carbon stored at A-M boundaries into the austenite. Reduction in the fault density of austenite served as an auxiliary stabilization mechanism at high temperatures.

  15. Multiple pulse-heating experiments with different current to determine total emissivity, heat capacity, and electrical resistivity of electrically conductive materials at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Yamashita, Yuichiro

    2012-01-01

    A modified pulse-heating method is proposed to improve the accuracy of measurement of the hemispherical total emissivity, specific heat capacity, and electrical resistivity of electrically conductive materials at high temperatures. The proposed method is based on the analysis of a series of rapid resistive self-heating experiments on a sample heated at different temperature rates. The method is used to measure the three properties of the IG-110 grade of isotropic graphite at temperatures from 850 to 1800 K. The problem of the extrinsic heating-rate effect, which reduces the accuracy of the measurements, is successfully mitigated by compensating for the generally neglected experimental error associated with the electrical measurands (current and voltage). The results obtained by the proposed method can be validated by the linearity of measured quantities used in the property determinations. The results are in reasonably good agreement with previously published data, which demonstrate the suitability of the proposed method, in particular, to the resistivity and total emissivity measurements. An interesting result is the existence of a minimum in the emissivity of the isotropic graphite at around 1120 K, consistent with the electrical resistivity results.

  16. l-Arginine Enhances Resistance against Oxidative Stress and Heat Stress in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Heran; Ma, Yudan; Zhang, Zhixian; Zhao, Ziyuan; Lin, Ran; Zhu, Jinming; Guo, Yi; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidant properties of l-arginine (l-Arg) in vivo, and its effect on enhancing resistance to oxidative stress and heat stress in Caenorhabditis elegans were investigated. C. elegans, a worm model popularly used in molecular and developmental biology, was used in the present study. Here, we report that l-Arg, at a concentration of 1 mM, prolonged C. elegans life by 26.98% and 37.02% under oxidative and heat stress, respectively. Further experiments indicated that the longevity-extending effects of l-Arg may be exerted by its free radical scavenging capacity and the upregulation of aging-associated gene expression in worms. This work is important in the context of numerous recent studies that concluded that environment stresses are associated with an increased population death rate. PMID:27690079

  17. High-Temperature Experiments using a Resistively-Heated High-Pressure Membrane Diamond Anvil Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Jenei, Z; Visbeck, K; Cynn, H; Yoo, C; Evans, W

    2009-04-22

    A reliable high-performance heating method using resistive heaters and a membrane driven diamond anvil cell (mDAC) is presented. Two micro-heaters are mounted in a mDAC and use electrical power of less than 150 W to achieve sample temperatures up to 1200 K. For temperature measurement we use two K-type thermocouples mounted near the sample. The approach can be used for in-situ Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction at high pressures and temperatures. A W-Re alloy gasket material permits stable operation of mDAC at high temperature. Using this method, we made an isothermal compression at 900 K to pressures in excess of 100 GPa and isobaric heating at 95 GPa to temperatures in excess of 1000 K. As an example, we present high temperature Raman spectroscopy measurements of nitrogen at high pressures.

  18. Energetics and the resistive tearing mode - Effects of Joule heating and radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    The contribution of energy flux to the dynamics of magnetic field reconnection is analytically studied in order to determine the influence of Joule heating and radiation on the linear development of the tearing instability in slab geometry. A temperature-dependent Coulomb-like resistivity is used to provide the coupling between the dynamics and the energy equation. Analytical expressions are derived for the growth rates utilizing constant-psi and long-wavelength approximations. The solutions indicate the occurrence of several modes in addition to the usual tearing mode, several of which have relatively slow, complex growth rates. At large values of the magnetic Reynolds number, there are at least two modes with purely exponential growth when the radiative loss decreases with increasing temperature. If the radiation is neglected, the Joule heating alone also results in two modes with real, positive growth at large S. Below a particular value of S, all the modes are generally stabilized.

  19. Resistance heating of the gasket in a gem-anvil high pressure cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzaretti, N. M.; Gonzalez, E. J.; Piermarini, G. J.; Russell, T. P.

    1999-11-01

    Resistance heating of the gasket strip in a gem-anvil high pressure cell was successful in obtaining sample temperatures up to 1100 °C, under pressures up to 4.0 GPa. The heating capabilities, as well as the mechanical and chemical stability, of several different gasket strips (two Ni-based alloys, Ta, Pt/Rh, and a Re/Mo alloy) with different design shapes, and two different single-crystal anvil materials (diamond and cubic zirconia) were investigated. Two gasket-strip designs were found to provide optimum uniform heating conditions while decreasing the required current needed to achieve 1100 °C. Two anvil systems were investigated to reduce the temperature increase of the pressure cell body. Cubic zirconia anvils reduced the cell-body temperature to 100 °C at sample temperatures up to 1100 °C. However, zirconia anvils often failed during heating and almost always failed during cooling. Diamond anvils with cubic zirconia mounting plates also permitted temperatures up to 1100 °C to be reached without anvil failure. However, the cell-body temperature increased to 300 °C. A sealed vacuum-type chamber was employed to eliminate the problem with gasket and anvil oxidation. The optimized operating parameters reported here provide a routine method for high temperature-high pressure studies. The method was used to densify and sinter nanosize amorphous silicon nitride and γ-alumina powders at high temperatures and high pressures.

  20. Resistant starch improvement of rice starches under a combination of acid and heat-moisture treatments.

    PubMed

    Hung, Pham Van; Vien, Ngo Lam; Lan Phi, Nguyen Thi

    2016-01-15

    The effects of a combination of acid and heat-moisture treatment on formation of resistant starch (RS) and characteristics of high-amylose, normal and waxy rice starches were investigated in this study. The degrees of polymerization of the rice starches treated with citric acid, lactic acid or acetic acid were significantly reduced as compared to the native starches. The RS contents of acid and heat-moisture treated rice starches were in a range of 30.1-39.0%, significantly higher than those of native rice starches (6.3-10.2%) and those of heat-moisture treated rice starches (18.5-23.9%). The acid and heat-moisture treatments reduced swelling power and viscosity, but increased solubility of the starches, while the crystalline structure did not change. Among the organic acids used, citric acid had the most impact on starch characteristics and RS formation, followed by lactic acid and acetic acid. The results are useful in production of RS for functional food application.

  1. Influence of Spore Moisture Content on the Dry-Heat Resistance of Bacillus subtilis var. niger

    PubMed Central

    Angelotti, Robert; Maryanski, James H.; Butler, Thomas F.; Peeler, James T.; Campbell, Jeptha E.

    1968-01-01

    The dry-heat resistance of Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores located in or on various materials was determined as D and z values in the range of 105 through 160 C. The systems tested included spores located on steel and paper strips, spores located between stainless-steel washers mated together under 150 inch-lb and 12 inch-lb of torque, and spores encapsulated in methylmethacrylate and epoxy plastics. D values for a given temperature varied with the test system. High D values were observed for the systems in which spores were encapsulated or under heavy torque, whereas lower D values were observed for the steel and paper strip systems and the lightly torqued system. Similar z values were obtained for the plastic and steel strip systems (zD = 21 C), but an unusually low z for spores on paper (zD = 12.9 C) and an unusually high z for spores on steel washers mated at 150 inch-lb of torque (zD = 32 C) were observed. The effect of spore moisture content on the D value of spores encapsulated in water-impermeable plastic was determined, and maximal resistance was observed for spores with a water activity (aw) of 0.2 to 0.4. Significantly decreased D values were observed for spores with moisture contents below aw 0.2 or above aw 0.4. The data indicate that the important factors to be considered when measuring the dry heat resistance of spores are (i) the initial moisture content of the spore, (ii) the rate of spore desiccation during heating, (iii) the water retention capacity of the material in or on which spores are located, and (iv) the relative humidity of the system at the test temperature. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:4968962

  2. Effect of Heat Treatment on Wear Resistance of Nickel Aluminide Coatings Deposited by HVOF and PTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benegra, M.; Santana, A. L. B.; Maranho, O.; Pintaude, G.

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to compare the wear resistance of nickel aluminide coatings deposited using plasma transferred arc (PTA) and high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) processes. Wear resistance was measured in rubber wheel abrasion tests. In both deposition processes, the same raw material (nickel aluminide powder) was atomized and deposited on a 316L steel plate substrate. After deposition, specimens were subjected to thermal cycling, aiming solubilization and precipitation. Coatings deposited using PTA developed different microstructures as a result of the incorporation of substrate elements. However, despite the presence of these microstructures, they performed better than coatings processed using HVOF before the heat treatment. After thermal cycling, the superficial hardness after the wear tests for both processes was similar, resulting in similar mass losses.

  3. Direct observation of resistive heating at graphene wrinkles and grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Kyle L.; Dorgan, Vincent E.; Estrada, David; Wood, Joshua D.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Eres, Gyula; Lyding, Joseph W; King, William P.; Pop, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We directly measure the nanometer-scale temperature rise at wrinkles and grain boundaries (GBs) in functioning graphene devices by scanning Joule expansion microscopy with 50 nm spatial and 0.2K temperature resolution. We observe a small temperature increase at select wrinkles and a large (100 K) temperature increase at GBs between coalesced hexagonal grains. Comparisons of measurements with device simulations estimate the GB resistivity (8 150 X lm) among the lowest reported for graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. An analytical model is developed, showing that GBs can experience highly localized resistive heating and temperature rise, most likely affecting the reliability of graphene devices. Our studies provide an unprecedented view of thermal effects surrounding nanoscale defects in nanomaterials such as graphene.

  4. Production of Heat Resistant Composite based on Siloxane Elastomer and Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessonov, I. V.; Karelina, N. V.; Kopitsyna, M. N.; Morozov, A. S.; Reznik, S. V.; Skidchenko, V. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    Development of a new generation of composite with unique thermal properties is an important task in the fields of science and technology where material is operated at high temperatures and exposure to a short-wave radiation. Recent studies show that carbon nanomaterials (fullerenes and carbon nanotubes) could improve the thermal, radiation and thermal-oxidative stability of the polymer matrix. In this article the development of a new heat resistant composite based on elastomer and carbon nanotubes (CNT) was performed and physicochemical properties of final product were evaluated.

  5. Development of heat resistant polyphenol compounds applied to the spin-on carbon hardmask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makinoshima, Takashi; Satou, Takashi; Horiuchi, Junya; Okada, Kana; Shimizu, Yoko; Echigo, Masatoshi

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report the development of a new polyphenol, NF7177, applied to the Spin-On Carbon Hardmask and the thermosetting properties. The new polyphenol derivatives were easily synthesized by the condensation of aldehydes and dihydroxybiphenyl compounds. We found new polyphenol NF7177 was showed the good applicability to the raw material for the Spin-On Carbon Hardmask [1]. It was indicated that the heat resistance of NF7177 was due to cross-linking based on dehydration reaction. Furthermore the thermosetting properties seem to be depend on the number and position of OH group.

  6. Effect of aluminizing treatment on the oxidation properties of 12Cr heat resisting steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Wang, Jei-Pil; Kang, Chang-Yong

    2011-12-01

    In order to investigate the effect of aluminization on the oxidation properties of 12Cr martensitic heat resisting steel, a specimen was prepared by forging after centrifugal casting. After aluminizing treatment under various conditions, scanning electron microscopy observation, and hardness, line profile and x-ray diffraction analysis of the alloy layer were performed. The results confirmed that the thickness of the layer of Al13Fe4, with a Vickers hardness of over 880, increased with increasing aluminizing temperature and time. Moreover, it was concluded from the results of the oxidation experiment that the oxidation properties of the aluminized specimen were improved by up to approximately 30 %.

  7. The Further Development of Heat-Resistant Materials for Aircraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenrath, Franz

    1946-01-01

    The present report deals with the problems involved in the greater utilization and development of aircraft engine materials, and specifically; piston materials, cylinder heads, exhaust valves, and exhaust gas turbine blading. The blades of the exhaust gas turbine are likely to be the highest stressed components of modern power plants from a thermal-mechanical and chemical standpoint, even though the requirements on exhaust valves of engines with gasoline injection are in general no less stringent. For the fire plate in Diesel engines the specifications for mechanical strength and design are not so stringent, and the question of heat resistance, which under these circumstances is easier obtainable, predominates.

  8. Fire and heat resistant laminating resins based on maleimido substituted aromatic cyclotriphosphazene polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Devendra (Inventor); Fohlen, George M. (Inventor); Parker, John A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    4-Aminophenoxy cyclotriphosphazenes are reacted with maleic anhydride to produce maleamic acids which are converted to the maleimides. The maleimides are polymerized. By selection of starting materials (e.g., hexakis amino or trisaminophenoxy trisphenoxy cyclotriphosphazenes), selection of molar proportions of reactants, use of mixtures of anhydrides and use of dianhydrides as bridging groups a variety of maleimides and polymers are produced. The polymers have high limiting oxygen indices, high char yields and other useful heat and fire resistant properties making them useful as, for example, impregnants of fabrics.

  9. Boron and Zirconium from Crucible Refractories in a Complex Heat-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R F; Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W

    1958-01-01

    In a laboratory study of the factors involved in the influence of induction vacuum melting on 55ni-20cr-15co-4mo-3ti-3al heat resistant alloy, it was found that the major factor was the type of ceramic used as the crucible. The study concluded that trace amounts of boron or zirconium derived from reaction of the melt with the crucible refactories improved creep-rupture properties at 1,600 degrees F. Boron was most effective and, in addition, markedly improved hot-workability.

  10. Rapid embedded wire heating via resistive guiding of laser-generated fast electrons as a hydrodynamic driver

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H.; Pasley, J.

    2013-12-15

    Resistively guiding laser-generated fast electron beams in targets consisting of a resistive wire embedded in lower Z material should allow one to rapidly heat the wire to over 100 eV over a substantial distance without strongly heating the surrounding material. On the multi-ps timescale, this can drive hydrodynamic motion in the surrounding material. Thus, ultra-intense laser solid interactions have the potential as a controlled driver of radiation hydrodynamics in solid density material. In this paper, we assess the laser and target parameters needed to achieve such rapid and controlled heating of the embedded wire.

  11. RESULTS OF CHARACTERIZATION TESTS OF THE SURFACES OF A COMMERCIALLY CARBURIZED AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K

    2004-01-07

    A commercial surface carburization treatment that shows promise for hardening the surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the Spallation Neutron Source against cavitation erosion and pitting caused by the action of pulsed pressure waves in the liquid mercury target has been investigated. To verify promotional claims for the treatment and to uncover any factors that might be of concern for the integrity of a carburized target vessel, some characterization tests of the nature of the surface layers of carburized austenitic 316LN stainless steel were conducted. The findings support most of the claims. The carburized layer is about 35 {micro}m thick. Its indentation hardness is about five times larger than that of the substrate steel and declines rapidly with depth into the layer. The surface is distorted by the treatment, and the austenite lattice is enlarged. The corrosion resistance of the carburized layer in an acid medium is greater than that for untreated austenite. The layer is not brittle; it is plastically deformable and is quite resistant to cracking during straining. Contrary to the provider's assertations, the maximum carbon content of the layer is much less than 6-7 wt% carbon, and the carbon is not simply contained in supersaturated solid solution; some of it is present in a previously unreported iron carbide phase located at the very surface. Large variations were found in the thickness of the layer, and they signify that controls may be needed to ensure a uniform thickness for treatment of the SNS target vessel. Inclusion stringers and {delta}-ferrite phase embraced in the treated layer are less resistant to chemical attack than the treated austenite. From a cavitation pitting perspective under SNS bombardment, such non-austenitic phases may provide preferential sites for pitting. The shallow depth of the hardened layer will require use of protection measures to avoid mishandling damage to the layer during assembly and installation of a target

  12. QTL for the thermotolerance effect of heat hardening, knockdown resistance to heat and chill-coma recovery in an intercontinental set of recombinant inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Norry, Fabian M; Scannapieco, Alejandra C; Sambucetti, Pablo; Bertoli, Carlos I; Loeschcke, Volker

    2008-10-01

    The thermotolerance effect of heat hardening (also called short-term acclimation), knockdown resistance to high temperature (KRHT) with and without heat hardening and chill-coma recovery (CCR) are important phenotypes of thermal adaptation in insects and other organisms. Drosophila melanogaster from Denmark and Australia were previously selected for low and high KRHT, respectively. These flies were crossed to construct recombinant inbred lines (RIL). KRHT was higher in heat-hardened than in nonhardened RIL. We quantify the heat-hardening effect (HHE) as the ratio in KRHT between heat-hardened and nonhardened RIL. Composite interval mapping revealed a more complex genetic architecture for KRHT without heat-hardening than for KRHT in heat-hardened insects. Five quantitative trait loci (QTL) were found for KRHT, but only two of them were significant after heat hardening. KRHT and CCR showed trade-off associations for QTL both in the middle of chromosome 2 and the right arm of chromosome 3, which should be the result of either pleiotropy or linkage. The major QTL on chromosome 2 explained 18% and 27-33% of the phenotypic variance in CCR and KRHT in nonhardened flies, respectively, but its KRHT effects decreased by heat hardening. We discuss candidate loci for each QTL. One HHE-QTL was found in the region of small heat-shock protein genes. However, HHE-QTL explained only a small fraction of the phenotypic variance. Most heat-resistance QTL did not colocalize with CCR-QTL. Large-effect QTL for CCR and KRHT without hardening (basal thermotolerance) were consistent across continents, with apparent transgressive segregation for CCR. HHE (inducible thermotolerance) was not regulated by large-effect QTL.

  13. Mi-1-Mediated Nematode Resistance in Tomatoes is Broken by Short-Term Heat Stress but Recovers Over Time

    PubMed Central

    Marques de Carvalho, Luciana; Benda, Nicole D.; Vaughan, Martha M.; Cabrera, Ana R.; Hung, Kaddie; Cox, Thomas; Abdo, Zaid; Allen, L. Hartwell; Teal, Peter E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is among the most valuable agricultural products, but Meloidogyne spp. (root-knot nematode) infestations result in serious crop losses. In tomato, resistance to root-knot nematodes is controlled by the gene Mi-1, but heat stress interferes with Mi-1-associated resistance. Inconsistent results in published field and greenhouse experiments led us to test the effect of short-term midday heat stress on tomato susceptibility to Meloidogyne incognita race 1. Under controlled day/night temperatures of 25°C/21°C, ‘Amelia’, which was verified as possessing the Mi-1 gene, was deemed resistant (4.1 ± 0.4 galls/plant) and Rutgers, which does not possess the Mi-1 gene, was susceptible (132 ± 9.9 galls/plant) to M. incognita infection. Exposure to a single 3 hr heat spike of 35°C was sufficient to increase the susceptibility of ‘Amelia’ but did not affect Rutgers. Despite this change in resistance, Mi-1 gene expression was not affected by heat treatment, or nematode infection. The heat-induced breakdown of Mi-1 resistance in ‘Amelia’ did recover with time regardless of additional heat exposures and M. incognita infection. These findings would aid in the development of management strategies to protect the tomato crop at times of heightened M. incognita susceptibility. PMID:26170475

  14. Heat treated 9 Cr-1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-08-21

    The invention relates to a composition and heat treatment for a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The novel combination of composition and heat treatment produces a heat treated material containing both large primary titanium carbides and small secondary titanium carbides. The primary titanium carbides contribute to creep strength while the secondary titanium carbides act to maintain a higher level of chromium in the finished steel for increased oxidation resistance, and strengthen the steel by impeding the movement of dislocations through the crystal structure. The heat treated material provides improved performance at comparable cost to commonly used high-temperature steels such as ASTM P91 and ASTM P92, and requires heat treatment consisting solely of austenization, rapid cooling, tempering, and final cooling, avoiding the need for any hot-working in the austenite temperature range.

  15. Laser beam surface melting of high alloy austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Woollin, P.

    1996-12-31

    The welding of high alloy austenitic stainless steels is generally accompanied by a substantial reduction in pitting corrosion resistance relative to the parent, due to microsegregation of Mo and Cr. This prevents the exploitation of the full potential of these steels. Processing to achieve remelting and rapid solidification offers a means of reducing microsegregation levels and improving corrosion resistance. Surface melting of parent UNS S31254 steel by laser beam has been demonstrated as a successful means of producing fine, as-solidified structures with pitting resistance similar to that of the parent, provided that an appropriate minimum beam travel speed is exceeded. The use of N{sub 2} laser trail gas increased the pitting resistance of the surface melted layer. Application of the technique to gas tungsten arc (GTA) melt runs has shown the ability to raise the pitting resistance significantly. Indeed, the use of optimized beam conditions, N{sub 2} trail gas and appropriate surface preparation prior to laser treatment increased the pitting resistance of GTA melt runs to a level approaching that of the parent material.

  16. Factors affecting gas migration and contaminant redistribution in heterogeneous porous media subject to electrical resistance heating.

    PubMed

    Munholland, Jonah L; Mumford, Kevin G; Kueper, Bernard H

    2016-01-01

    A series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments were completed in a two-dimensional flow cell to investigate gas production and migration during the application of electrical resistance heating (ERH) for the removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Experiments consisted of heating water in homogeneous silica sand and heating 270 mL of trichloroethene (TCE) and chloroform (CF) DNAPL pools in heterogeneous silica sands, both under flowing groundwater conditions. Spatial and temporal distributions of temperature were measured using thermocouples and observations of gas production and migration were collected using front-face image capture throughout the experiments. Post-treatment soil samples were collected and analyzed to assess DNAPL removal. Results of experiments performed in homogeneous sand subject to different groundwater flow rates showed that high groundwater velocities can limit subsurface heating rates. In the DNAPL pool experiments, temperatures increased to achieve DNAPL-water co-boiling, creating estimated gas volumes of 131 and 114 L that originated from the TCE and CF pools, respectively. Produced gas migrated vertically, entered a coarse sand lens and subsequently migrated laterally beneath an overlying capillary barrier to outside the heated treatment zone where 31-56% of the original DNAPL condensed back into a DNAPL phase. These findings demonstrate that layered heterogeneity can potentially facilitate the transport of contaminants outside the treatment zone by mobilization and condensation of gas phases during ERH applications. This underscores the need for vapor phase recovery and/or control mechanisms below the water table during application of ERH in heterogeneous porous media during the co-boiling stage, which occurs prior to reaching the boiling point of water.

  17. Factors affecting gas migration and contaminant redistribution in heterogeneous porous media subject to electrical resistance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munholland, Jonah L.; Mumford, Kevin G.; Kueper, Bernard H.

    2016-01-01

    A series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments were completed in a two-dimensional flow cell to investigate gas production and migration during the application of electrical resistance heating (ERH) for the removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Experiments consisted of heating water in homogeneous silica sand and heating 270 mL of trichloroethene (TCE) and chloroform (CF) DNAPL pools in heterogeneous silica sands, both under flowing groundwater conditions. Spatial and temporal distributions of temperature were measured using thermocouples and observations of gas production and migration were collected using front-face image capture throughout the experiments. Post-treatment soil samples were collected and analyzed to assess DNAPL removal. Results of experiments performed in homogeneous sand subject to different groundwater flow rates showed that high groundwater velocities can limit subsurface heating rates. In the DNAPL pool experiments, temperatures increased to achieve DNAPL-water co-boiling, creating estimated gas volumes of 131 and 114 L that originated from the TCE and CF pools, respectively. Produced gas migrated vertically, entered a coarse sand lens and subsequently migrated laterally beneath an overlying capillary barrier to outside the heated treatment zone where 31-56% of the original DNAPL condensed back into a DNAPL phase. These findings demonstrate that layered heterogeneity can potentially facilitate the transport of contaminants outside the treatment zone by mobilization and condensation of gas phases during ERH applications. This underscores the need for vapor phase recovery and/or control mechanisms below the water table during application of ERH in heterogeneous porous media during the co-boiling stage, which occurs prior to reaching the boiling point of water.

  18. The heat resistance of a polyurethane coating filled with modified nano-CaCO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Li, Song-Mei; Liu, Jian-Hua; Yu, Mei

    2014-10-01

    The modification of polyurethane coating by adding surface-modified CaCO3 nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) was investigated in this paper. To improve interfacial interaction between the nano-CaCO3 and the polyurethane (PU) matrix, a silane coupling agent (KH560) was used to modify the nano-CaCO3. The grafting of KH560 on the nano-CaCO3 surfaces was characterized by the TEM, FTIR and TGA techniques. The modification of the nano-CaCO3 surfaces with KH560 was demonstrated to improve the dispersity of nano-CaCO3. FTIR, SEM and AFM were used to characterize the polyurethane coating. The FTIR spectrum indicated that the modification of nano-CaCO3 does not influence the chemical structure of the PU matrix. The roughness and gloss of the nanocomposite coatings containing various amount of nano-CaCO3 were evaluated using a roughness tester and a brightness meter. The heat resistance of the polyurethane coating containing various amounts of nano-CaCO3 was evaluated using the TGA technique. The results revealed that nano-CaCO3 treatment with KH560 improves the nanoparticle dispersion and heat-resistance of polyurethane coating.

  19. Influence of Processing and Heat Treatment on Corrosion Resistance and Properties of High Alloyed Steel Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Horst; Weber, Sebastian; Raab, Ulrich; Theisen, Werner; Wagner, Lothar

    2012-09-01

    Corrosion and abrasive wear are two important aspects to be considered in numerous engineering applications. Looking at steels, high-chromium high-carbon tool steels are proper and cost-efficient materials. They can either be put into service as bulk materials or used as comparatively thin coatings to protect lower alloyed construction or heat treatable steels from wear and corrosion. In this study, two different corrosion resistant tool steels were used for the production of coatings and bulk material. They were processed by thermal spraying and super solidus liquid phase sintering as both processes can generally be applied to produce coatings on low alloyed substrates. Thermally sprayed (high velocity oxygen fuel) coatings were investigated in the as-processed state, which is the most commonly used condition for technical applications, and after a quenching and tempering treatment. In comparison, sintered steels were analyzed in the quenched and tempered condition only. Significant influence of alloy chemistry, processing route, and heat treatment on tribological properties was found. Experimental investigations were supported by computational thermodynamics aiming at an improvement of tribological and corrosive resistance.

  20. Phase composition of heat-resisting alloy modified by ageing and alloyed by rhenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneva, Nina; Nikonenko, Elena; Popova, Natalya; Gibert, Ivan; Kozlov, Eduard

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the transmission electron microscope (TEM) investigations of the structure of Ni-Al-Cr-based superalloy which is obtained by directional crystallization technique. The structural TEM investigations are carried out in two stages: 1) annealing at 1150°C for 1 h and 2) annealing at 1100°C for 480 h. The qualitative and quantitative analysis is given for the structure, phase composition and morphology of heat-resisting alloy additionally alloyed by rhenium Re both in the original state and after thermal treatment. The heat-resisting alloy comprises ˜70 at % Ni, ˜17 at % Al and ˜5 at % Cr. The total amount of the primary alloying elements of Mo, W, Ta, Ti, Co, La was ˜7 at % and 0.4 at % Re. It is shown that the structure of the superalloy is represented by (γ + γ')-phase mixture which has a morphologically correct crystallographic orientation and quasi-monocrystalline structure. σ-phase is formed in this superalloy due to rhenium. Since Re distribution in the alloy is not uniform, only a part of (γ + γ')-phase quasi-cuboids is distorted. It is shown that Re modification distorts the ideal structure of (γ + γ')-phase quasi-cuboids and results in the formation of β-, χ-and σ-phases.

  1. Analysis Of Post-Wet-Chemistry Heat Treatment Effects On Nb SRF Surface Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter K.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2014-02-01

    Most of the current research in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is focused on ways to reduce the construction and operating cost of SRF-based accelerators as well as on the development of new or improved cavity processing techniques. The increase in quality factors is the result of the reduction of the surface resistance of the materials. A recent test on a 1.5 GHz single cell cavity made from ingot niobium of medium purity and heat treated at 1400 deg C in a ultra-high vacuum induction furnace resulted in a residual resistance of ~ 1n{Omega} and a quality factor at 2.0 K increasing with field up to ~ 5×10{sup 10} at a peak magnetic field of 90 mT. In this contribution, we present some results on the investigation of the origin of the extended Q{sub 0}-increase, obtained by multiple HF rinses, oxypolishing and heat treatment of all Nb cavities.

  2. Heat-resistant organic molecular layer as a joint interface for metal reduction on plastics surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Jing; Aisawa, Sumio; Hirahara, Hidetoshi; Kudo, Takahiro; Mori, Kunio

    2016-04-01

    Heat-resistant organic molecular layers have been fabricated by triazine-based silane coupling agent for metal reduction on plastic surfaces using adsorption method. These molecular layers were used as an interfacial layer between polyamide (PA6) and metal solution to reduce Ag+ ion to Ag0. The interfacial behaviors of triazine molecular layer at the interfaces between PA6 and Ag solution were investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The kinetics of molecular adsorption on PA6 was investigated by using triazine-based silane coupling agent solutions at different pH and concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and local nano thermal analysis were employed to characterize the surfaces and interfaces. The nano thermal analysis results show that molecular layers of triazine-based silane coupling agent greatly improved heat resistance of PA6 resin from 170 °C up to 230 °C. This research developed an in-depth insight for molecular behaviors of triazine-based silane coupling agent at the PA6 and Ag solution interfaces and should be of significant value for interfacial research between plastics and metal solution in plating industry.

  3. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappa, Sebastián; Svoboda, Hernán; Surian, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels have good weldability and adequate tensile property, toughness and corrosion resistance. They have been developed as an alternative technology, mainly for oil and gas industries. The final properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit depend on its chemical composition and microstructure: martensite, tempered martensite, ferrite, retained austenite and carbides and/or nitrides. In these steels, the post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) are usually double tempering ones, to ensure both complete tempering of martensite and high austenite content, to increase toughness and decrease hardness. The aim of this work was to study the effect of post-weld heat treatments (solution treatment with single and double tempering) on the mechanical properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit. An all-weld metal test coupon was welded according to standard ANSI/AWS A5.22-95 using a GMAW supermartensitic stainless steel metal cored wire, under gas shielding. PWHTs were carried out varying the temperature of the first tempering treatment with and without a second tempering one, after solution treatment. All-weld metal chemical composition analysis, metallurgical characterization, hardness and tensile property measurements and Charpy-V tests were carried out. There are several factors which can be affected by the PWHTs, among them austenite content is a significant one. Different austenite contents (0-42%) were found. Microhardness, tensile property and toughness were affected with up to 15% of austenite content, by martensite tempering and carbide precipitation. The second tempering treatment seemed not to have had an important effect on the mechanical properties measured in this work.

  4. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappa, Sebastián; Svoboda, Hernán; Surian, Estela

    2016-12-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels have good weldability and adequate tensile property, toughness and corrosion resistance. They have been developed as an alternative technology, mainly for oil and gas industries. The final properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit depend on its chemical composition and microstructure: martensite, tempered martensite, ferrite, retained austenite and carbides and/or nitrides. In these steels, the post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) are usually double tempering ones, to ensure both complete tempering of martensite and high austenite content, to increase toughness and decrease hardness. The aim of this work was to study the effect of post-weld heat treatments (solution treatment with single and double tempering) on the mechanical properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit. An all-weld metal test coupon was welded according to standard ANSI/AWS A5.22-95 using a GMAW supermartensitic stainless steel metal cored wire, under gas shielding. PWHTs were carried out varying the temperature of the first tempering treatment with and without a second tempering one, after solution treatment. All-weld metal chemical composition analysis, metallurgical characterization, hardness and tensile property measurements and Charpy-V tests were carried out. There are several factors which can be affected by the PWHTs, among them austenite content is a significant one. Different austenite contents (0-42%) were found. Microhardness, tensile property and toughness were affected with up to 15% of austenite content, by martensite tempering and carbide precipitation. The second tempering treatment seemed not to have had an important effect on the mechanical properties measured in this work.

  5. Effect on pH heating medium on the thermal resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores.

    PubMed

    López, M; González, I; Condón, S; Bernardo, A

    1996-01-01

    The influence of the pH of heating medium on heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores (ATCC 7953, 12980, 15951 and 15952) were studied. The pH values tested were: 4.0, 5.0, 6.0 and 7.0 at temperatures of 115, 120, 125, 130 and 135 degrees C. It was found that at low treatment temperatures (115 degrees C) D-values decreased between 7- and 10-fold with 7953, 12980 and 15951 strains and about 23-fold with 15952 strain when pH dropped from 7.0 to 4.0. At highest treatment temperatures (135 degrees C) D-values obtained with pH 6.0 and 7.0 did not show any significant statistical differences (p > 0.05). z-Values appeared to be higher when the medium was acidified, ranging from 7.58 to 8.20 and 9.43 10.0 for spores suspended in McIlvaine buffer pH 7.0 and pH 4.0, respectively, although the difference was not statistically significant. Heat resistance of strain ATCC 7953 at 120, 128, and 135 degrees C in asparagus purée and tomato purée at pH 5.0 under continuous monitoring of pH was also determined. D-values obtained in asparagus purée were similar to those obtained in buffer at the same pH, whereas those observed in tomato purée were found to be lower.

  6. Arabidopsis HEAT SHOCK TRANSCRIPTION FACTORA1b overexpression enhances water productivity, resistance to drought, and infection

    PubMed Central

    Richard, François; Bowden, Laura; Morison, James I.L.; Mullineaux, Philip M.

    2013-01-01

    Heat-stressed crops suffer dehydration, depressed growth, and a consequent decline in water productivity, which is the yield of harvestable product as a function of lifetime water consumption and is a trait associated with plant growth and development. Heat shock transcription factor (HSF) genes have been implicated not only in thermotolerance but also in plant growth and development, and therefore could influence water productivity. Here it is demonstrated that Arabidopsis thaliana plants with increased HSFA1b expression showed increased water productivity and harvest index under water-replete and water-limiting conditions. In non-stressed HSFA1b-overexpressing (HSFA1bOx) plants, 509 genes showed altered expression, and these genes were not over-represented for development-associated genes but were for response to biotic stress. This confirmed an additional role for HSFA1b in maintaining basal disease resistance, which was stress hormone independent but involved H2O2 signalling. Fifty-five of the 509 genes harbour a variant of the heat shock element (HSE) in their promoters, here named HSE1b. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR confirmed binding of HSFA1b to HSE1b in vivo, including in seven transcription factor genes. One of these is MULTIPROTEIN BRIDGING FACTOR1c (MBF1c). Plants overexpressing MBF1c showed enhanced basal resistance but not water productivity, thus partially phenocopying HSFA1bOx plants. A comparison of genes responsive to HSFA1b and MBF1c overexpression revealed a common group, none of which harbours a HSE1b motif. From this example, it is suggested that HSFA1b directly regulates 55 HSE1b-containing genes, which control the remaining 454 genes, collectively accounting for the stress defence and developmental phenotypes of HSFA1bOx. PMID:23828547

  7. Resistively-Heated Microlith-based Adsorber for Carbon Dioxide and Trace Contaminant Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, S.; Walsh, D.; Perry, J.

    2005-01-01

    An integrated sorber-based Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) and Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) prototype was designed, fabricated and tested. It corresponds to a 7-person load. Performance over several adsorption/regeneration cycles was examined. Vacuum regenerations at effective time/temperature conditions, and estimated power requirements were experimentally verified for the combined CO2/trace contaminant removal prototype. The current paper details the design and performance of this prototype during initial testing at CO2 and trace contaminant concentrations in the existing CDRA, downstream of the drier. Additional long-term performance characterization is planned at NASA. Potential system design options permitting associated weight, volume savings and logistic benefits, especially as relevant for long-duration space flight, are reviewed. The technology consisted of a sorption bed with sorbent- coated metal meshes, trademarked and patented as Microlith by Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI). By contrast the current CO2 removal system on the International Space Station employs pellet beds. Preliminary bench scale performance data (without direct resistive heating) for simultaneous CO2 and trace contaminant removal was reviewed in SAE 2004-01-2442. In the prototype, the meshes were directly electrically heated for rapid response and accurate temperature control. This allowed regeneration via resistive heating with the potential for shorter regeneration times, reduced power requirement, and net energy savings vs. conventional systems. A novel flow arrangement, for removing both CO2 and trace contaminants within the same bed, was demonstrated. Thus, the need for a separate trace contaminant unit was eliminated resulting in an opportunity for significant weight savings. Unlike the current disposable charcoal bed, zeolites for trace contaminant removal are amenable to periodic regeneration.

  8. Continuous enzymatic cooking and liquefaction of starch using the technique of direct resistive heating.

    PubMed

    Varella, V L; Concone, B R; Senise, J T; Doin, P A

    1984-07-01

    Continuous cooker prototypes of very simple design, using electricity as a primary energy source, were developed for the process of cooking and liquefaction of starch suspensions. Previous work on equipment using microwave dielectric heating has already been reported. Results of energy consumption as low as 330 kcal/kg based on starch content were achieved. Considering these results and looking for new solutions or engineering concepts, the authors have been investigating the possibility of using electric energy at 60 Hz for direct resistive heating, in which the starch suspension is the proper "resistor."The most important results of energetic yield obtained until now, working in a continuous process of cooking-liquefaction, are not larger than 235 kcal (272 Wh)/kg based on starch content. These results were obtained using a commercial grade alpha-amylase from B. subtillis, working with temperatures ranging from 70 to 75 degrees C, and with residence times in the reactor not greater than 1.5 min. The experiments of saccharification and fermentation accomplished as a test for the efficiency of this heating technique gave good results (as with a conventional technique) and thus enabled us to proceed with the studies.

  9. Heat transfer resistances in the measurements of cold helium vapour temperature in a subatmospheric process line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, A.; Pietrowicz, S.; Fydrych, J.

    2017-02-01

    The superfluid helium technology, which is essentially used in particle accelerators, requires complex cryogenic systems that include long lines transferring cold helium vapours at a subathmospheric pressure below 50 mbar. Usually in large systems the subatmospheric pressure is generated by a set of warm and cold compressors. In consequence, the heat loads to the line and especially the helium temperature in the inlet to the cold compressors are crucial parameters. In order to measure the helium temperature the temperature sensors are usually fixed to the external surface of the process lines. However, this technique can lead to unwanted measurement errors and affect the temperature measurement dynamics mainly due to low thermal conductivity of the pipe wall material, large pipe diameters and low helium density. Assembling a temperature sensor in a well (cold finger) reaching the centerline of the flowing helium is a technique that can improve the measurement quality and dynamics (response time). The paper presents the numerical simulations of heat transfers occurring in the both measurement techniques and discusses the impacts of the heat transfer resistances on the temperature measurement dynamics.

  10. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  11. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  12. Modeling the combined effect of pH and temperature on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores heated in a multicomponent food extract.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, W; Rodrigo, M; Martínez, A

    2001-10-01

    The combined effect of pH and temperature on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores heated in an extract of complex food was studied. The results showed that, in general, reducing the pH reduced the heat resistance of the spores. Similarly, the value for the D parameter in the nonacidified extract was between 30 and 70% lower than the one obtained with double-distilled water. This result once again shows the importance of the substrate in inactivation studies of microorganisms. The experimental data were used to carry out a comparison of two predictive mathematical models of inactivation, one based on a multiparametric regression obtained in this study and the other obtained from the bibliography and based on a linear-Bigelow equation. Both models predict reasonably well, although the multiparametric model presented a slightly better accuracy factor (1.11) than the one obtained with the linear-Bigelow equation (1.13).

  13. Severely Heat Injured Survivors of E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43888 Display Variable and Heterogeneous Stress Resistance Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gayán, Elisa; Govers, Sander K.; Michiels, Chris W.; Aertsen, Abram

    2016-01-01

    Although minimal food processing strategies aim to eliminate foodborne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms through a combination of mild preservation techniques, little is actually known on the resistance behavior of the small fraction of microorganisms surviving an inimical treatment. In this study, the conduct of severely heat stressed survivors of E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43888, as an indicator for the low infectious dose foodborne enterohemorrhagic strains, was examined throughout their resuscitation and outgrowth. Despite the fact that these survivors were initially sublethally injured, they were only marginally more sensitive to a subsequent heat treatment and actually much more resistant to a subsequent high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) shock in comparison with unstressed control cells. Throughout further resuscitation, however, their initial HHP resistance rapidly faded out, while their heat resistance increased and surpassed the initial heat resistance of unstressed control cells. Results also indicated that the population eventually emerging from the severely heat stressed survivors heterogeneously consisted of both growing and non-growing cells. Together, these observations provide deeper insights into the particular behavior and heterogeneity of stressed foodborne pathogens in the context of food preservation. PMID:27917163

  14. Empirical analysis of contributing factors to heating in lithium-ion cells: Anode entropy versus internal resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Rengaswamy; Carkhuff, Bliss G.

    2013-11-01

    Charging a battery beyond its maximum capacity can lead both to cell overheating and to the venting of gasses. A fundamental understanding of cell heating could lead to the development of real-time sensors that anticipate and avert catastrophic battery failure. Joule heating (also called ohmic or resistive heating) from cell internal resistance (Rint) dominates the overall thermal energy (ΔQ) generated during charging. Contrary to prior hypotheses, though, Joule heating does not appear to contribute to venting observed during overcharging. In this manuscript, we examine an alternate hypothesis, that heat released by the entropy change in the anode (ΔSanode) and the concomitant increase in the anode temperature (Tanode) triggers the venting. Using our recently developed non-invasive battery internal temperature (BIT) sensor to monitor Tanode, we separated the contributions of ΔSanode, Rint and the anode resistance (Ranode) to ΔQ. These quantities were tracked during constant current charging of a 18650 Lithium-ion cell, from zero state of charge (SoC) to overcharge. The resulting analysis suggests that anode entropy change is more important than resistive heating resulting from Ranode to the overall thermal energy. Anode entropy measurements, enabled by the BIT sensor, might serve as an alternative or adjunct method for anticipating and avoiding cell venting events.

  15. Crack growth rates and fracture toughness of irradiated austenitic stainless steels in BWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-01-21

    In light water reactors, austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor core internal components because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods degrades the fracture properties of these steels by changing the material microstructure (e.g., radiation hardening) and microchemistry (e.g., radiation-induced segregation). Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness and crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast austenitic SSs, including weld heat-affected-zone materials, that were irradiated to fluence levels as high as {approx} 2x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 3 dpa) in a light water reactor at 288-300 C. The results are compared with the data available in the literature. The effects of material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on CGRs under cyclic and stress corrosion cracking conditions were determined. A superposition model was used to represent the cyclic CGRs of austenitic SSs. The effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of these steels, as well as the effects of material and irradiation conditions and test temperature, have been evaluated. A fracture toughness trend curve that bounds the existing data has been defined. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components have also been evaluated.

  16. Corrosion resistant coatings for silicon carbide heat exchanger tubes -- Volume 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, D.E.

    1996-06-07

    The development of a silicon carbide (SiC) heat exchanger is a critical step in the development of the Externally-Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) power system. SiC is the only material that provides the necessary combination of resistance to creep, thermal shock, and oxidation. While the SiC structure materials provide the thermomechanical and thermophysical properties needed for an efficient system, the mechanical properties of the SiC tubes are severely degraded through corrosion by the coal combustion products. To obtain the necessary service life of thousands of hours at temperature, a protective coating is needed that is stable with both the SiC tube and the coal combustion products, resists erosion from the particle laden gas stream, is thermal shock resistant, adheres to SiC during repeated thermal shocks (start-up, process upsets, shut-down), and allows the EFCC system to be cost competitive. This demanding set of technical performance and cost drivers was used in reviewing and selecting candidate protective materials. After a review of open literature, discussion with leading researchers in materials for coal combustion environments, and preliminary thermodynamic studies, a total of ten materials were identified for future study that were grouped into three categories: alumina-based materials, materials stable with SiO{sub 2}, and low expansion materials.

  17. High-Temperature Low-Cycle Fatigue Property of Heat-Resistant Ductile-Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Jang, Ho; Oh, Yong-Jun

    2009-09-01

    This study examined the high-temperature degradation behavior of two types of heat-resistant Si-Mo ductile cast iron (Fe-3.4C-3.7Si-0.4Mo and Fe-3.1C-4.5Si-1.0Mo) with particular attention paid to the mechanical properties and overall oxidation resistance. Tension and low-cycle fatigue properties were examined at 600 °C and 800 °C. The mechanical tests and metallographic and fractographic analyses showed that cast iron containing higher Si and Mo contents had a higher tensile strength and longer fatigue life at both temperatures than cast iron with lower levels due to the phase transformations of pearlite and carbide. The Coffin-Manson type equation was used to assess the fatigue mechanism suggesting that the higher Si-Mo alloy was stronger but less ductile than the lower Si-Mo alloy at 600 °C. However, similar properties for both alloys were observed at 800 °C because of softening and oxidation effects. Analysis of the isothermal oxidation behavior at those temperatures showed that mixed Fe2SiO4 layers were formed and the resulting scaling kinetics was much faster for low Si-Mo containing iron. With increasing temperature, subsurface degradation such as decarburization, voids, and cracks played a significant role in the overall oxidation resistance.

  18. Sterol Biosynthesis Is Required for Heat Resistance but Not Extracellular Survival in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Baykal, Eda; Huang, Juyang; Zhang, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Sterol biosynthesis is a crucial pathway in eukaryotes leading to the production of cholesterol in animals and various C24-alkyl sterols (ergostane-based sterols) in fungi, plants, and trypanosomatid protozoa. Sterols are important membrane components and precursors for the synthesis of powerful bioactive molecules, including steroid hormones in mammals. Their functions in pathogenic protozoa are not well characterized, which limits the development of sterol synthesis inhibitors as drugs. Here we investigated the role of sterol C14α-demethylase (C14DM) in Leishmania parasites. C14DM is a cytochrome P450 enzyme and the primary target of azole drugs. In Leishmania, genetic or chemical inactivation of C14DM led to a complete loss of ergostane-based sterols and accumulation of 14-methylated sterols. Despite the drastic change in lipid composition, C14DM-null mutants (c14dm−) were surprisingly viable and replicative in culture. They did exhibit remarkable defects including increased membrane fluidity, failure to maintain detergent resistant membrane fraction, and hypersensitivity to heat stress. These c14dm− mutants showed severely reduced virulence in mice but were highly resistant to itraconazole and amphotericin B, two drugs targeting sterol synthesis. Our findings suggest that the accumulation of toxic sterol intermediates in c14dm− causes strong membrane perturbation and significant vulnerability to stress. The new knowledge may help improve the efficacy of current drugs against pathogenic protozoa by exploiting the fitness loss associated with drug resistance. PMID:25340392

  19. High-temperature corrosion observed in austenitic coils and tubes in a direct reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Campillo, B.; Gonzalez, C.; Hernandez-Duque, G.; Juarez-Islas, J.A.

    2000-02-01

    The subject of this study is related to the performance of austenitic steel coils and tubes, in a range of temperatures between 425 and 870 C for the transport of reducing gas, in an installation involving the direct reduction of iron-ore by reforming natural gas. Evidence is presented that metal dusting is not the only unique high-temperature corrosion mechanism that caused catastrophic failures of austenitic 304 (UNS S30400) coils and HK-40 (UNS J94204) tubes. Sensitization as well as stress corrosion cracking occurred in 304 stainless steel coils and metal dusting took place in HK-40 tubes, a high resistance alloy. The role of continuous injection of H{sub 2}S into the process is suggested to avoid the high resistance metal dusting corrosion mechanism found in this kind of installation.

  20. Corrosion properties of S-phase layers formed on medical grade austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Buhagiar, Joseph; Dong, Hanshan

    2012-02-01

    The corrosion properties of S-phase surface layers formed in AISI 316LVM (ASTM F138) and High-N (ASTM F1586) medical grade austenitic stainless steels by plasma surface alloying with nitrogen (at 430°C), carbon (at 500°C) and both carbon and nitrogen (at 430°C) has been investigated. The corrosion behaviour of the S-phase layers in Ringer's solutions was evaluated using potentiodynamic and immersion corrosion tests. The corrosion damage was evaluated using microscopy, hardness testing, inductive coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The experimental results have demonstrated that low-temperature nitriding, carburising and carbonitriding can improve the localised corrosion resistance of both industrial and medical grade austenitic stainless steels as long as the threshold sensitisation temperature is not reached. Carburising at 500°C has proved to be the best hardening treatment with the least effect on the corrosion resistance of the parent alloy.

  1. Poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) separator for improving the heat resistance and power density of lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yin; Xu, Tiange; John, Angelin Ebanezar; Li, Yang; Li, Weishan; Zhu, Baoku

    2016-10-01

    A microporous poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) (PMIA) separator with high safety (high-heat resistance and self extinguishing), high porosity and excellent liquid electrolyte wettability was prepared by the traditional nonsolvent introduced phase separation process. Due to the high-heat resistance of PMIA material, the as-prepared separator exhibited a negligible thermal shrank ratio at 160 °C for 1 h. Meanwhile, benefiting from its high porosity and excellent wettability in liquid electrolyte, the liquid electrolyte uptake and the ionic conductivity of the separator were higher than that of the commercial PP-based separators. Furthermore, the cell assembled with this separator showed better cycling performance and superior rate capacity compared to those with PP-based separators. These results suggested that the PMIA separator is very attractive for high-heat resistance and high-power density lithium-ion batteries.

  2. Heat and corrosion resistant cast CN-12 type stainless steel with improved high temperature strength and ductility

    DOEpatents

    Mazias, Philip J.; McGreevy, Tim; Pollard,Michael James; Siebenaler, Chad W.; Swindeman, Robert W.

    2007-08-14

    A cast stainless steel alloy and articles formed therefrom containing about 0.5 wt. % to about 10 wt. % manganese, 0.02 wt. % to 0.50 wt. % N, and less than 0.15 wt. % sulfur provides high temperature strength both in the matrix and at the grain boundaries without reducing ductility due to cracking along boundaries with continuous or nearly-continuous carbides. Alloys of the present invention also have increased nitrogen solubility thereby enhancing strength at all temperatures because nitride precipitates or nitrogen porosity during casting are not observed. The solubility of nitrogen is dramatically enhanced by the presence of manganese, which also retains or improves the solubility of carbon thereby providing additional solid solution strengthening due to the presence of manganese and nitrogen, and combined carbon. Such solution strengthening enhances the high temperature precipitation-strengthening benefits of fine dispersions of NbC. Such solid solution effects also enhance the stability of the austenite matrix from resistance to excess sigma phase or chrome carbide formation at higher service temperatures. The presence of sulfides is substantially eliminated.

  3. Mechanical properties of a nitrogen-bearing austenitic steel during static and cycle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, E. V.; Terent'ev, V. F.; Prosvirnin, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    The mechanical properties of a nitrogen-bearing corrosion-resistant austenitic steel containing 0.311% nitrogen have been studied during static and cyclic deformation. It is found that the steel having an ultimate strength of 930 MPa exhibits a plasticity of 33%. The endurance limit under repeated tension at 106 loading cycles is 400 MPa. The propagation of a fatigue crack at low and high amplitudes of cyclic deformation follows a ductile fracture mechanism with the presence of fatigue grooves.

  4. Wrought stainless steel compositions having engineered microstructures for improved heat resistance

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Swindeman, Robert W [Oak Ridge, TN; Pint, Bruce A [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; More, Karren L [Knoxville, TN

    2007-08-21

    A wrought stainless steel alloy composition includes 12% to 25% Cr, 8% to 25% Ni, 0.05% to 1% Nb, 0.05% to 10% Mn, 0.02% to 0.15% C, 0.02% to 0.5% N, with the balance iron, the composition having the capability of developing an engineered microstructure at a temperature above 550.degree. C. The engineered microstructure includes an austenite matrix having therein a dispersion of intragranular NbC precipitates in a concentration in the range of 10.sup.10 to 10.sup.17 precipitates per cm.sup.3.

  5. Manufacture of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steel Alloys by Conventional Casting and Hot-Working Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Yamamoto, Y.; Magee, J.H.

    2009-03-10

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Carpenter Technology Corporation (CarTech) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation Program to explore the feasibility for scale up of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels by conventional casting and rolling techniques. CarTech successfully vacuum melted 301b heats of four AFA alloy compositions in the range of Fe-(20-25)Ni-(12-14)Cr-(3-4)Al-(l-2.5)Nb wt.% base. Conventional hot/cold rolling was used to produce 0.5-inch thick plate and 0.1-inch thick sheet product. ORNL subsequently successfully rolled the 0.1-inch sheet to 4 mil thick foil. Long-term oxidation studies of the plate form material were initiated at 650, 700, and 800 C in air with 10 volume percent water vapor. Preliminary results indicated that the alloys exhibit comparable (good) oxidation resistance to ORNL laboratory scale AFA alloy arc casting previously evaluated. The sheet and foil material will be used in ongoing evaluation efforts for oxidation and creep resistance under related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers. This work will be directed to evaluation of AFA alloys for use in gas turbine recuperators to permit higher-temperature operating conditions for improved efficiencies and reduced environmental emissions. AFA alloy properties to date have been obtained from small laboratory scale arc-castings made at ORNL. The goal of the ORNL-CarTech CRADA was to establish the viability for producing plate, sheet and foil of the AFA alloys by conventional casting and hot working approaches as a first step towards scale up and commercialization of the AFA alloys. The AFA alloy produced under this effort will then be evaluated in related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers for gas turbine recuperator applications.

  6. The SpmA/B and DacF proteins of Clostridium perfringens play important roles in spore heat resistance.

    PubMed

    Orsburn, Benjamin; Sucre, Katie; Popham, David L; Melville, Stephen B

    2009-02-01

    Strains of Clostridium perfringens that cause acute food poisoning have been shown to produce spores that are significantly more heat resistant than those of other strains. Previous studies demonstrated that the spore core density and the ratio of spore cortex peptidoglycan relative to the germ cell wall were factors that correlated with the heat resistance of a C. perfringens spore. To further evaluate these relationships, mutant strains of C. perfringens SM101 were constructed with null mutations in dacF, encoding a D,D-carboxypeptidase, and in the spmA-spmB operon, which is involved in spore core dehydration. The dacF mutant was shown to produce less spore cortex peptidoglycan and had a corresponding decrease in spore heat resistance. The spmA-spmB strain produced highly unstable spores with significantly lower core densities and increased heat sensitivity, which were easily destroyed during treatments affecting the spore coat layers. These results support the previous assertion that a threshold core density as well as a high ratio of cortex peptidoglycan relative to the germ cell wall contribute to the formation of a more heat-resistant spore in this species.

  7. Evaluation of an EMITEC resistively heated metal monolith catalytic converter on two M100 neat methanol-fueled vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Gregory K.; Schaefer, Ronald M.

    1992-12-01

    The report describes the evaluation of a resistively heated catalyst system on two different methanol fueled vehicles. The EMITEC catalyst consisted of a compact resistively heated metal monolith in front of a larger conventional main converter. The EMITEC catalyst was evaluated on two neat methanol-fueled vehicles, a 1981 Volkswagen Rabbit and a 1988 Toyota Corolla. Emission testing was conducted over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) CVS-75 test cycle. The emissions of primary interest were cold start methanol (unburned fuel), carbon monoxide, and formaldehyde.

  8. Liquid Inclusions in Heat-Resistant Steel Containing Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yandong; Liu, Chengjun; Zhang, Tongsheng; Jiang, Maofa; Peng, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Abundant thermodynamic data of pure substances were incorporated in the coupled thermodynamic model of inclusion precipitation and solute micro-segregation during the solidification of heat-resistant steel containing rare earth elements. The liquid inclusions Ce2 x Al2 y Si1- x-y O z (0 < x < 1, 0 < y < x and z = 1 - x - y) were first introduced to ensure the model more accurately. And the computational method for generation Gibbs free energy of liquid inclusions in molten steel was given. The accuracy of accomplished model was validated through plant trials, lab-scale experiments, and the data published in the literature. The comparisons of results calculated by FactSage with the model were also discussed. Finally, the stable area of liquid inclusions was predicted and the liquid inclusions with larger size were found in the preliminary experiments.

  9. Heat-resistant fiber and/or fire retardant synthetic fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurada, I.; Kaji, K.; Okada, T.

    1984-08-21

    A heat resistant and/or fire retardant synthetic fiber is obtained by a process comprising immersing a polyethylene fiber into a solution of acrylic acid or impregnating a polyethylene fiber with a solution of acrylic acid and irradiating the polyethylene fiber with an ionizing radiation to graft polymerize the polyethylene fiber with at least 15%, based on the weight of the polyethylene fiber, of acrylic acid, or a process comprising irradiating a polyethylene fiber with an ionizing radiation and then immersing the polyethylene fiber into a solution of acrylic acid or impregnating the polyethylene fiber with a solution of acrylic acid to graft polymerize the polyethylene fiber with at least 15%, based on the weight of the polyethylene fiber, of acrylic acid.

  10. Simple evaporation controller for thin-film deposition from a resistively heated boat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scofield, John H.; Bajuk, Lou; Mohler, William

    1990-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive circuit is described for switching the current through a resistively heated evaporation boat during thin-film deposition. The circuit uses a silicon-controlled rectifier (SCR) to switch the 0-15-A current in the primary of a 2-kV A step-down transformer that supplies the 0-200-A current to an evaporation boat. The circuit is controlled by a 0-10 V-dc signal similar to that furnished by an Inficon XTC deposition-rate controller. This circuit may be assembled from a handful of parts for a cost of about $400, nearly one-tenth the cost of similar commercial units. Minimum construction is required, since the circuit is built around an off-the-shelf, self-contained SCR unit.

  11. Dry-heat resistance of Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores on mated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Simko, G J; Devlin, J D; Wardle, M D

    1971-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores were placed on the surfaces of test coupons manufactured from typical spacecraft materials (stainless steel, magnesium, titanium, and aluminum). These coupons were then juxtaposed at the inoculated surfaces and subjected to test pressures of 0, 1,000, 5,000, and 10,000 psi. Tests were conducted in ambient, nitrogen, and helium atmospheres. While under the test pressure condition, the spores were exposed to 125 C for intervals of 5, 10, 20, 50, or 80 min, with survivor data being subjected to a linear regression analysis that calculated decimal reduction times. Differences in the dry-heat resistance of the test organism resulting from pressure, atmosphere, and material were observed.

  12. Water soluble and heat resistant polymers by free radical polymerization of lactic acid-based monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hitoshi; Kibayashi, Tatsuya; Niwa, Miki

    2013-08-01

    Tactic heat resistant polymer was prepared by free radical polymerization of lactic acid-based monomers, i.e. chiral 2-isopropyl-5-methylene-1,3-dioxolan-4-ones (1). The polymerization of 1 proceeded smoothly without ring-opening to give a polymer with high isotacticity (mm) of 29.7~100% and glass transition temperature (Tg) of 172~213°C. 1 also showed high reactivity in the copolymerization with styrene and methyl methacrylate, and the incorporation of 1 unit in the copolymer structure increased Tg of each polymer. In addition, hydrolysis of poly(1) produced a new type of water soluble poly(lactic acid), i.e. poly(α-hydroxy acrylate), and poly(α-hydroxy acrylate-co-divinyl benzene) hydrogel absorbed water as high as 1000 times of the original polymer weight.

  13. Heat-resistant coatings for niobium and niobium-base alloys (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyadykevich, Y.V.

    1986-06-01

    The author shows that it is possible to formulate the directions in developments whose purpose is to increase the heat resistance of niobium and niobium-base alloys. These include the creation of a barrier layer for retarding undesirable diffusion processes at the coating-base interface, the formation on niobium alloy parts of alloy silicide layers, the obtaining on parts operating at temperatures above 1300 C of a coating of molybdenum disilicide, the application to previously siliconized niobium alloys of a barrier layer of heterophase coatings, the matrix of which is a low-melting component and the filler refractory compounds, and the addition to the oxidizing gaseous medium of various additions increasing the service life of the protective coating.

  14. Scorpion Venom Heat-Resistant Peptide Protects Transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans from β-Amyloid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Xi; Zhou, Ting-Ting; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Li, Shao; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Our previous studies found SVHRP could enhance neurogenesis and inhibit microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in vivo. Here, we use the transgenic CL4176, CL2006, and CL2355 strains of Caenorhabditis elegans which express the human Aβ1-42 to investigate the effects and the possible mechanisms of SVHRP mediated protection against Aβ toxicity in vivo. The results showed that SVHRP-fed worms displayed remarkably decreased paralysis, less abundant toxic Aβ oligomers, reduced Aβ plaque deposition with respect to untreated animals. SVHRP also suppressed neuronal Aβ expression-induced defects in chemotaxis behavior and attenuated levels of ROS in the transgenic C. elegans. Taken together, these results suggest SVHRP could protect against Aβ-induced toxicity in C. elegans. Further studies need to be conducted in murine models and humans to analyze the effectiveness of the peptide. PMID:27507947

  15. Heat, Moisture and Chemical Resistant Polyimide Compositions and Methods for Making and Using Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Polyimides having a desired combination of high thermo-oxidative stability, low moisture absorption and excellent chemical and corrosion resistance are prepared by reacting a mixture of compounds including (a) 3,3',4,4'- benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA), (b) 3,4'- oxydianiline (3,4'-ODA), and (c) 5-norbornene-2,3- dicarboxylic anhydride (NA) in a high boiling, aprotic solvent to give 5 to 35% by weight of polyamic acid solution. The ratio of (a), (b), and (c) is selected to afford a family of polyimides having different molecular weights and properties. The mixture first forms a polyamic acid precursor. Upon heating at or above 300 C, the polyamic acids form polyimides, which are particularly suitable for use as a high temperature coating, adhesive, thin film, or composite matrix resin.

  16. Effect of welding thermal cycles on the oxidation resistance of 9 wt.% Cr heat resistant steels in 550 °C lead-bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Rong, Lijian; Li, Dianzhong; Lu, Shanping

    2016-12-01

    The oxidation resistance for the heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal of 9 wt.% Cr heat resistant steel in 550 °C lead-bismuth eutectic has been investigated. The oxide film presents a three-layer structure. The outer layer is Fe3O4 while the inner layer is mainly FeCr2O4. The oxide film thickness becomes thinner and thinner in turns of the coarse grained HAZ, fine grained HAZ, inter-critical HAZ and base metal. The oxygen diffusion is the rate determining step during the oxidation process. The Cr-enriched M23C6 plays a significant role on the oxidation rate at the initial stage of oxidation. Increasing the carbon content is a useful method to improve the oxidation resistance.

  17. Maturation of Released Spores Is Necessary for Acquisition of Full Spore Heat Resistance during Bacillus subtilis Sporulation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Salas, Jose-Luis; Setlow, Barbara; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Yong-qing; Setlow, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The first ∼10% of spores released from sporangia (early spores) during Bacillus subtilis sporulation were isolated, and their properties were compared to those of the total spores produced from the same culture. The early spores had significantly lower resistance to wet heat and hypochlorite than the total spores but identical resistance to dry heat and UV radiation. Early and total spores also had the same levels of core water, dipicolinic acid, and Ca and germinated similarly with several nutrient germinants. The wet heat resistance of the early spores could be increased to that of total spores if early spores were incubated in conditioned sporulation medium for ∼24 h at 37°C (maturation), and some hypochlorite resistance was also restored. The maturation of early spores took place in pH 8 buffer with Ca2+ but was blocked by EDTA; maturation was also seen with early spores of strains lacking the CotE protein or the coat-associated transglutaminase, both of which are needed for normal coat structure. Nonetheless, it appears to be most likely that it is changes in coat structure that are responsible for the increased resistance to wet heat and hypochlorite upon early spore maturation. PMID:21821751

  18. Manufacture of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys by Conventional Casting and Hot-Working Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Yamamoto, Y.; Magee, J.H.

    2009-03-23

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Carpenter Technology Corporation (CarTech) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation program to explore the feasibility for scale up of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels by conventional casting and rolling techniques. CarTech successfully vacuum melted 30lb heats of four AFA alloy compositions in the range of Fe-(20-25)Ni-(12-14)Cr-(3-4)Al-(1-2.5)Nb wt.% base. Conventional hot/cold rolling was used to produce 0.5-inch thick plate and 0.1-inch thick sheet product. ORNL subsequently successfully rolled the 0.1-inch sheet to 4 mil thick foil. Long-term oxidation studies of the plate form material were initiated at 650, 700, and 800 C in air with 10 volume percent water vapor. Preliminary results indicated that the alloys exhibit comparable (good) oxidation resistance to ORNL laboratory scale AFA alloy arc casting previously evaluated. The sheet and foil material will be used in ongoing evaluation efforts for oxidation and creep resistance under related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers. This work will be directed to evaluation of AFA alloys for use in gas turbine recuperators to permit higher-temperature operating conditions for improved efficiencies and reduced environmental emissions.

  19. Diagnosis of the heating effect on the electrical resistivity of Ouargla (Algeria) dunes sand using XRD patterns and FTIR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechri, Mohammed Laïd; Chihi, Smaïl; Mahdadi, Naouia; Beddiaf, Samiha

    2017-01-01

    XRD patterns and FTIR spectra have shown that dunes sand of Ouargla's region, in its natural state, is formed of a high percentage of quartz, gypsum and very low percentage of kaolinite and hematite, in addition to some organic compounds. The electrical resistivity of the natural sand has been measured, it was 6 × 1014 Ω cm. Six samples of the sand were heated separately at 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000 and 1200 °C. The XRD patterns and FTIR spectra of these samples were carried out. On the other hand, the electrical resistivities of these samples have been measured. The change of the electrical resistivity with heat shows a nonlinear behavior. The heated sample of sand at 200 °C has lost some water. Most of the gypsum in the 200 °C heated sample has transformed into anhydrite, and the rest has transformed into bassanite, and its electrical resistivity has fallen down to 3.5 × 1014 Ω cm. By heating at 400 °C, the gypsum has lost all its water and it has transformed entirely to anhydrite, and its electrical resistivity became 6.75 × 1012 Ω cm, it has the lowest measured resistivity. At 600 °C and 800 °C, in addition to anhydrite, the kaolinite transformed to meta-kaolin due to the continuous breaking of OH bond and formation of water vapor, and the electrical resistivity increased to (1.5-1.9) × 1014 Ω cm. Heating at 1000 °C leads to the initiation of the interaction between anhydrite and quartz, the wollastonite appears, and the meta-kaolin transforms to aluminum-silicon and cristobalite. The wollastonite is a good electrical insulator. It raises the electrical resistivity of sand to 2.6 × 1014 Ω cm. The heating at 1200 °C makes all anhydrite to interact with quartz due to the increasing of volume of wollastonite, the anhydrite disappears completely, the quartz transforms into cristobalite. The cristobalite increases due to the dissociation of aluminium-silicon into mullite and cristobalite, as well as the transformation of quartz into cristobalite at

  20. Development and Exploratory Scale-Up of Alumina-Forming Austenitic (AFA) Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Magee, John H; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maziasz, Philip J; Santella, Michael L; Pint, Bruce A; Bei, Hongbin

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the continued development of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys, which exhibit a unique combination of excellent oxidation resistance via protective alumina (Al2O3) scale formation and high-temperature creep strength through the formation of stable nano-scale MC carbides and intermetallic precipitates. Efforts in fiscal year 2009 focused on the characterization and understanding of long-term oxidation resistance and tensile properties as a function of alloy composition and microstructure. Computational thermodynamic calculations of the austenitic matrix phase composition and the volume fraction of MC, B2-NiAl, and Fe2(Mo,Nb) base Laves phase precipitates were used to interpret oxidation behavior. Of particular interest was the enrichment of Cr in the austenitic matrix phase by additions of Nb, which aided the establishment and maintenance of alumina. Higher levels of Nb additions also increased the volume fraction of B2-NiAl precipitates, which served as an Al reservoir during long-term oxidation. Ageing studies of AFA alloys were conducted at 750C for times up to 2000 h. Ageing resulted in near doubling of yield strength at room temperature after only 50 h at 750C, with little further increase in yield strength out to 2000 h of ageing. Elongation was reduced on ageing; however, levels of 15-25% were retained at room temperature after 2000 h of total ageing.

  1. Design of a Resistively Heated Thermal Hydraulic Simulator for Nuclear Rocket Reactor Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Wang, Ten-See; Anghaie, Samim

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary design study is presented for a non-nuclear test facility which uses ohmic heating to replicate the thermal hydraulic characteristics of solid core nuclear reactor fuel element passages. The basis for this testing capability is a recently commissioned nuclear thermal rocket environments simulator, which uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects. Initially, the baseline test fixture for this non-nuclear environments simulator was configured for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of small cylindrical material specimens as a low cost means of evaluating material compatibility. It became evident, however, that additional functionality enhancements were needed to permit a critical examination of thermal hydraulic effects in fuel element passages. Thus, a design configuration was conceived whereby a short tubular material specimen, representing a fuel element passage segment, is surrounded by a backside resistive tungsten heater element and mounted within a self-contained module that inserts directly into the baseline test fixture assembly. With this configuration, it becomes possible to create an inward directed radial thermal gradient within the tubular material specimen such that the wall-to-gas heat flux characteristics of a typical fuel element passage are effectively simulated. The results of a preliminary engineering study for this innovative concept are fully summarized, including high-fidelity multi-physics thermal hydraulic simulations and detailed design features.

  2. High-temperature experiments using a resistively heated high-pressure membrane diamond anvil cell.

    PubMed

    Jenei, Zsolt; Cynn, Hyunchae; Visbeck, Ken; Evans, William J

    2013-09-01

    We describe a reliable high performance resistive heating method developed for the membrane diamond anvil cell. This method generates homogenous high temperatures at high pressure in the whole sample for extended operation period. It relies on two mini coil heaters made of Pt-Rh alloy wire mounted around the diamond anvils and gasket, while temperature is monitored by two K-type thermocouples mounted near the sample. The sample, diamonds, and tungsten-carbide seats are thermally insulated from the piston and cylinder keeping the cell temperature below 750 K while the sample temperature is 1200 K. The cell with the heaters is placed in a vacuum oven to prevent oxidation and unnecessary heat loss. This assembly allows complete remote operation, ideally suited for experiments at synchrotron facilities. Capabilities of the setup are demonstrated for in situ Raman and synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements. We show experimental measurements from isothermal compression at 900 K and 580 K to 100 GPa and 185 GPa, respectively, and quasi-isobaric compression at 95 GPa over 1000 K.

  3. Phase composition and hardening of steels of the Fe-Cr-Ni-Co-Mo system with martensite-austenite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, L. V.; Shal'kevich, A. B.

    2007-03-01

    The phase composition and mechanical properties of maraging steels of the Fe-Cr-Ni-Co-Mo system are studied as a function of the alloying and of the temperatures of quenching and aging. The intermetallic phases strengthening martensite in different aging stages are determined. The degree of the hardening and the variation of the impact toughness at cryogenic temperatures are compared for steels with different structures (martensite and martensite-austenite) in the stages of maximum hardening and overaging. The effect of retained and reverted austenite on the resistance to crack propagation under impact loading is determined for steels with martensite of a different nature and amount of hardening phases.

  4. TEM microscopical examination of the magnetic domain boundaries in a super duplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fourlaris, G.; Gladman, T.; Maylin, M.

    1996-12-31

    It has been demonstrated in an earlier publication that significant improvements in the coercivity, maximum induction and remanence values can be achieved, by using a 2205 type Duplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel (DSS) instead of the low alloy medium carbon steels currently being used. These improvements are achieved in the as received 2205 material, and after small amounts of cold rolling have been applied, to increase the strength. In addition, the modification of the duplex austenitic-ferritic microstructure, via a heat treatment route, results in a finer austenite `island` dispersion in a ferritic matrix and provides an attractive option for further modification of the magnetic characteristics of the material. However, the 2205 type DSS exhibits {open_quotes}marginal{close_quotes} corrosion protection in a marine environment, so that a study has been undertaken to examine whether the beneficial effects exhibited by the 2205 DSS, are also present in a 2507 type super-DSS.

  5. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Hegele, P R; Mumford, K G

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc=0.233±0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development.

  6. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc = 0.233 ± 0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development.

  7. Efficacy of Traditional Almond Decontamination Treatments and Electron Beam Irradiation against Heat-Resistant Salmonella Strains.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, Mary P; Lucia, Lisa M; Castillo, Alejandro

    2016-03-01

    Two outbreaks of salmonellosis were linked to the consumption of raw almonds from California in 2001 and 2004. As a result, federal regulations were developed, which mandate that all almonds grown in California must be treated with a process that results in a 4-log reduction of Salmonella. Because most of the technologies approved to treat almonds rely on the application of heat to control Salmonella, an evaluation of alternative technologies for inactivating heat-resistant Salmonella Enteritidis PT30 and Salmonella Senftenberg 775W was needed. In this study, almonds were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis PT30 and Salmonella Senftenberg 775W and then treated with an electron beam (e-beam) or by blanching or oil roasting. The irradiation D10-values for Salmonella Enteritidis PT30 and Salmonella Senftenberg 775W treated with e-beam were 0.90 and 0.72 kGy, respectively. For heat treatments, thermal D10-values for Salmonella Enteritidis PT30 and Salmonella Senftenberg 775W strains were 15.6 and 12.4 s, respectively, when subjected to blanching at 88°C and 13.2 and 10.9 s, respectively, when roasted in oil at 127 ± 2°C. No significant differences in irradiation and thermal treatment results were observed between Salmonella Enteritidis PT30 and Salmonella Senftenberg 775W (P > 0.05), indicating that e-beam irradiation may be a feasible technology for reducing Salmonella in almonds. However, the sensory changes resulting from irradiating at the doses used in this study must be evaluated before e-beam irradiation can be used as a nonthermal alternative for decontamination of almonds.

  8. Multilocus adaptation associated with heat resistance in reef-building corals.

    PubMed

    Bay, Rachael A; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2014-12-15

    The evolution of tolerance to future climate change depends on the standing stock of genetic variation for resistance to climate-related impacts, but genes contributing to climate tolerance in wild populations are poorly described in number and effect. Physiology and gene expression patterns have shown that corals living in naturally high-temperature microclimates are more resistant to bleaching because of both acclimation and fixed effects, including adaptation. To search for potential genetic correlates of these fixed effects, we genotyped 15,399 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 23 individual tabletop corals, Acropora hyacinthus, within a natural temperature mosaic in backreef lagoons on Ofu Island, American Samoa. Despite overall lack of population substructure, we identified 114 highly divergent SNPs as candidates for environmental selection, via multiple stringent outlier tests, and correlations with temperature. Corals from the warmest reef location had higher minor allele frequencies across these candidate SNPs, a pattern not seen for noncandidate loci. Furthermore, within backreef pools, colonies in the warmest microclimates had a higher number and frequency of alternative alleles at candidate loci. These data suggest mild selection for alternate alleles at many loci in these corals during high heat episodes and possible maintenance of extensive polymorphism through multilocus balancing selection in a heterogeneous environment. In this case, a natural population harbors a reservoir of alleles preadapted to high temperatures, suggesting potential for future evolutionary response to climate change.

  9. An MRI-Compatible High Frequency AC Resistive Heating System for Homeothermic Maintenance in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ana L.; Kinchesh, Paul; Kersemans, Veerle; Allen, Philip D.; Smart, Sean C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop an MRI-compatible resistive heater, using high frequency alternating current (AC), for temperature maintenance of anaesthetised animals. Materials and Methods An MRI-compatible resistive electrical heater was formed from narrow gauge wire connected to a high frequency (10–100 kHz) AC power source. Multiple gradient echo images covering a range of echo times, and pulse-acquire spectra were acquired with the wire heater powered using high frequency AC or DC power sources and without any current flowing in order to assess the sensitivity of the MRI acquisitions to the presence of current flow through the heater wire. The efficacy of temperature maintenance using the AC heater was assessed by measuring rectal temperature immediately following induction of general anaesthesia for a period of 30 minutes in three different mice. Results Images and spectra acquired in the presence and absence of 50–100 kHz AC through the wire heater were indistinguishable, whereas DC power created field shifts and lineshape distortions. Temperature lost during induction of anaesthesia was recovered within approximately 20 minutes and a stable temperature was reached as the mouse’s temperature approached the set target. Conclusion The AC-powered wire heater maintains adequate heat input to the animal to maintain body temperature, and does not compromise image quality. PMID:27806062

  10. Variation in Resistance of Natural Isolates of Escherichia coli O157 to High Hydrostatic Pressure, Mild Heat, and Other Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Amparo; Ventoura, Georgia; Casadei, Maria; Robinson, Tobin; Mackey, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    Strains of Escherichia coli O157 isolated from patients with clinical cases of food-borne illness and other sources exhibited wide differences in resistance to high hydrostatic pressure. The most pressure-resistant strains were also more resistant to mild heat than other strains. Strain C9490, a representative pressure-resistant strain, was also more resistant to acid, oxidative, and osmotic stresses than the pressure-sensitive strain NCTC 12079. Most of these differences in resistance were observed only in stationary-phase cells, the only exception being acid resistance, where differences were also apparent in the exponential phase. Membrane damage in pressure-treated cells was revealed by increased uptake of the fluorescent dyes ethidium bromide and propidium iodide. When strains were exposed to the same pressure for different lengths of time, the pressure-sensitive strains took up stain sooner than the more resistant strain, which suggested that the differences in resistance may be related to susceptibility to membrane damage. Our results emphasize the importance of including stress-resistant strains of E. coli O157 when the efficacy of a novel or mild food preservation treatment is tested. PMID:10103251

  11. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Nano/Ultrafine-Grained N-Bearing, Low-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedipour, S.; Kermanpur, A.; Najafizadeh, A.; Abbasi, M.

    2015-02-01

    The nitrogen (N)-bearing austenitic stainless steels are new materials with interesting mechanical properties such as high strength and ductility, desirable toughness and work hardening, and good corrosion resistance. This work attempted to investigate the effect of N addition from 0.08 to 0.35 wt.% on grain refinement of the 201L austenitic stainless steel using the martensite thermomechanical process. This process was composed of cold rolling up to the thickness reduction of 90 % followed by reversion annealing at 800 °C for 60 and 1800 s. It was found that increasing N content resulted in an increase in the austenite grain size for short annealing duration (e.g. 60 s), but caused a decrease in the austenite grain size for long annealing duration (e.g. 1800 s). The smallest austenite grain size of about 150 nm was achieved for the 201L steel containing 0.08 wt.% N after reversion annealing at 800 °C for 60 s. The mechanical properties of the reversion-annealed N-bearing steels were enhanced due to both N alloying and grain refinement.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  13. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands.

  14. Stress-Induced Evolution of Heat Resistance and Resuscitation Speed in Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43888.

    PubMed

    Gayán, Elisa; Cambré, Alexander; Michiels, Chris W; Aertsen, Abram

    2016-11-15

    The development of resistance in foodborne pathogens to food preservation techniques is an issue of increasing concern, especially in minimally processed foods where safety relies on hurdle technology. In this context, mild heat can be used in combination with so-called nonthermal processes, such as high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), at lower individual intensities to better retain the quality of the food. However, mild stresses may increase the risk of (cross-)resistance development in the surviving population, which in turn might compromise food safety. In this investigation, we examined the evolution of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain ATCC 43888 after recurrent exposure to progressively intensifying mild heat shocks (from 54.0°C to 60.0°C in 0.5°C increments) with intermittent resuscitation and growth of survivors. As such, mutant strains were obtained after 10 cycles of selection with ca. 10(6)-fold higher heat resistance than that for the parental strain at 58.0°C, although this resistance did not extend to temperatures exceeding 60.0°C. Moreover, these mutant strains typically displayed cross-resistance against HHP shock and displayed signs of enhanced RpoS and RpoH activity. Interestingly, additional cycles of selection maintaining the intensity of the heat shock constant (58.5°C) selected for mutant strains in which resuscitation speed, rather than resistance, appeared to be increased. Therefore, it seems that resistance and resuscitation speed are rapidly evolvable traits in E. coli ATCC 43888 that can compromise food safety.

  15. Development of Stronger and More Reliable Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) Based on Scientific Design Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, G.; Sikka, V.K.; Pankiw, R.I.

    2006-04-15

    Mechanical and Corrosion Properties (ORNL/TM-2005/81/R1). The final report on another related project at the University of Tennessee by George Pharr, Easo George, and Michael Santella has been published as Development of Combinatorial Methods for Alloy Design and Optimization (ORNL/TM-2005-133). The goal of the project was to increase the high-temperature strength by 50% and upper use temperature by 86 to 140 F (30 to 60 C) of H-Series of cast austenitic stainless steels. Meeting such a goal is expected to result in energy savings of 38 trillion Btu/year by 2020 and energy cost savings of $185 million/year. The goal of the project was achieved by using the alloy design methods developed at ORNL, based on precise microcharacterization and identification of critical microstructure/properties relationships and combining them with the modern computational science-based tools that calculate phases, phase fractions, and phase compositions based on alloy compositions. The combined approach of microcharacterization of phases and computational phase prediction would permit rapid improvement of the current alloy composition of an alloy and provide the long-term benefit of customizing alloys within grades for specific applications. The project was appropriate for the domestic industry because the current H-Series alloys have reached their limits both in high-temperature-strength properties and in upper use temperature. The desire of Duraloy's industrial customers to improve process efficiency, while reducing cost, requires that the current alloys be taken to the next level of strength and that the upper use temperature limit be increased. This project addressed a specific topic from the subject call: to develop materials for manufacturing processes that will increase high-temperature strength, fatigue resistance, corrosion, and wear resistance. The outcome of the project would benefit manufacturing processes in the chemical, steel, and heat-treating industries.

  16. Survival and heat resistance of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in peanut butter.

    PubMed

    He, Yingshu; Guo, Dongjing; Yang, Jingyun; Tortorello, Mary Lou; Zhang, Wei

    2011-12-01

    Significant differences (P < 0.05) were found between the survival rates of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in peanut butter with different formulations and water activity. High carbohydrate content in peanut butter and low incubation temperature resulted in higher levels of bacterial survival during storage but lower levels of bacterial resistance to heat treatment.

  17. Mi-1-mediated nematode resistance in tomatoes is broken by short-term heat stress but recovers over time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill.), the only available genomic resource of resistance to root-knot nematodes (RKN; Meloidogyne incognita, M. javanica and M. arenaria), which are considered among the most devastating crop pests worldwide, is a single dominant gene termed Mi-1. Heat stress is thou...

  18. Effect of microwave heating on BaTiO3:Nb ceramics with positive temperature coefficient of resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jida, Shin'suke; Suemasu, Takeshi; Miki, Toshikatsu

    1999-08-01

    The microwave heating technique is employed for obtaining high performance positive temperature coefficient of resistivity (PTCR) ceramics of Nb-doped BaTiO3 with a low resistivity at room temperature and a high resistivity jump above the Curie temperature. The grains of the BaTiO3:Nb ceramics prepared by microwave sintering are as large as 20-50 μm even when the Nb content exceeds 0.2 at. %, whereas such large grain size has never been obtained at this high content of Nb by ordinary sintering with an electric furnace. The large grains are also obtained by subjecting the heavily Nb-doped ceramics composed of fine grains to postheating with microwave after ordinary sintering. The room-temperature resistivity decreases down below 10 Ω cm and the PTCR character is obtained by postannealing in air. The mechanism of grain growth by microwave heating is discussed in terms of nonuniform temperature distribution of specimens during heating. The experimental data indicate that the microwave heating technique and the employment of a dopant that forms donor levels even at high doping levels will enable to develop high performance PTCR ceramics.

  19. Farmers' perceptions and knowledge of cattle adaptation to heat stress and tick resistance in the eastern cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Katiyatiya, C L F; Muchenje, V; Mushunje, A

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the perceptions and knowledge of farmers of heat stress and tick resistance in cattle. A cross-sectional survey was conducted and 110 farmers in four villages in the sour and sweet velds of the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa were interviewed. The associations among area (municipality), gender, age, level of education, employment and religion were computed using Chi-square tests. The majority of the respondents had on average 4 bulls, 4 cows, 4 heifers, 4 calves, and 4 oxen. Milk was considered as the major (28.3%) reason for keeping cattle. Most farmers owned non-descript (72.6%), and Nguni (45.3%) cattle because of their heat tolerance (54.7%), tick resistance (54.7%), and milking ability (28.2%) traits. Excessive panting (56.6%) and disease transmission (76%) were regarded as the major effects of heat stress and tick infestation in cattle, respectively. About 50% of the respondents agreed that hair length influences tick resistance and 47.17% considered coat colour when acquiring cattle. In the sampled areas, ticks were prevalent in the summer season (93%), and 77.36% of the respondents use acaricides every fortnight. Gall sickness was reported to be a major problem in the cattle herds by 36.79% of the respondents. Our results showed that farmers in the two municipalities had knowledge of cattle adaptation to heat stress and tick resistance.

  20. Physiological quality and gene expression related to heat-resistant proteins at different stages of development of maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Andrade, T; Von Pinho, E V R; Von Pinho, R G; Oliveira, G E; Andrade, V; Fernandes, J S

    2013-09-13

    We quantified and characterized the expression of heat-resistant proteins during seed development of maize lines with distinct levels of tolerance to high drying temperature. A corn field was planted for multiplication of seeds of different lines, two tolerant and two non-tolerant to high drying temperatures. Harvest of the seeds was carried out at various stages of development and they were then subjected to tests of moisture content, germination, first count of germination, accelerated aging, and cold test. The seeds were stored in a freezer for later analysis of expression of heat-resistant proteins by means of real-time PCR, electrophoresis, and spectrophotometry. We observed that heat-resistant proteins are expressed in a differential manner in seeds from different lines and at different stages of development. The expression of heat-resistant proteins was earlier in lines tolerant to high drying temperatures. Greater germination and vigor values was found for seeds collected at the last stage of development.

  1. Nonuniform distribution of carbonitride particles and its effect on prior austenite grain size in the simulated coarse-grained heat-affected zone of thermomechanical control-processed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, D. W.; Karjalainen, L. P.; Qian, Bainian; Chen, Xiaofeng

    1996-12-01

    The spatial distribution of carbonitride particles in the simulated coarse-grained heat-affected zone (HAZ) of Nb-Ti microalloyed thermomechanical control-processed (TMCP) steels was investigated using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). It was found that the particles in quenched coarse-grained HAZ were frequently distributed in a nonuniform way, forming clusters and arrays of particles. This nonhomogeneity is defined by the grouping tendency of particles and described by the closeness of the average number density (the mean particle number per unit area) to the average local number density (the mean particle number per unit area, excluding the examined areas without particles). A high concentration of Nb (0.04 mass pct in this article) promoted the formation of carbonitride particle arrays and clusters because of its high segregation tendency at grain and subgrain boundaries during the cooling of a slab. Some of these particles remain undissolved at the peak temperature of a welding thermocycle and may result in sympathetic nucleation of new particles on them. The effectiveness of the particle groups to restrict grain growth is discussed.

  2. Identification and characterization of a heat-resistant protease from Serratia liquefaciens isolated from Brazilian cold raw milk.

    PubMed

    Machado, Solimar Gonçalves; Heyndrickx, Marc; De Block, Jan; Devreese, Bart; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas; Van Coillie, Els

    2016-04-02

    The cold storage of raw milk before heat treatment in dairy industry promotes the growth of psychrotrophic microorganisms, which are known for their ability to produce heat-resistant proteolytic enzymes. Although Pseudomonas is described as the main causative genus for high proteolytic spoilage potential in dairy products, Serratia liquefaciens secretes proteases and may be found in raw milk samples as well. However, at the present there is no information about the proteolytic spoilage potential of S. liquefaciens in milk after heat-treatment. The main aim of this research was to assess the proteolytic spoilage potential of S. liquefaciens isolated from Brazilian raw milk and to characterize the involved protease. S. liquefaciens was shown to secrete one heat-resistant spoilage metalloprotease of, approximately, 52 kDa encoded by the ser2 gene. The heat-resistance of Ser2 was similar to the aprX encoded metalloprotease produced by Pseudomonas. Although the ser2 gene was detected in all S. liquefaciens isolates tested in this study, the proteolytic activity of the isolates in milk was highly heterogeneous. Since nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of ser2 of all tested isolates are identical, this heterogeneity may be attributed to differences in enzyme expression levels or post-translational modifications.

  3. Case reviews on the effect of microstructure on the corrosion behavior of austenitic alloys for processing and storage of nuclear waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kain, V.; Sengupta, P.; de, P. K.; Banerjee, S.

    2005-05-01

    This article describes the corrosion behavior of special austenitic alloys for waste management applications. The special stainless steels have controlled levels of alloying and impurity elements and inclusion levels. It is shown that “active” inclusions and segregation of chromium along flow lines accelerated IGC of nonsensitized stainless steels. Concentration of Cr+6 ions in the grooves of dissolved inclusions increased the potential to the transpassive region of the material, leading to accelerated attack. It is shown that a combination of cold working and controlled solution annealing resulted in a microstructure that resisted corrosion even after a sensitization heat treatment. This imparted extra resistance to corrosion by increasing the fraction of “random” grain boundaries above a threshold value. Randomization of grain boundaries made the stainless steels resistant to sensitization, IGC, and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in even hot chloride environments. The increased corrosion resistance has been attributed to connectivity of random grain boundaries. The reaction mechanism between the molten glass and the material for process pot, alloy 690, during the vitrification process has been shown to result in depletion of chromium from the reacting surfaces. A comparison is drawn between the electrochemical behavior of alloys 33 and 22 in 1 M HCl at 65 °C. It is shown that a secondary phase formed during welding of alloy 33 impaired corrosion properties in the HCl environment.

  4. Crystallography of lath martensite and stabilization of retained austenite

    SciTech Connect

    Sarikaya. M.

    1982-10-01

    TEM was used to study the morphology and crystallography of lath martensite in low and medium carbon steels in the as-quenched and 200/sup 0/C tempered conditions. The steels have microduplex structures of dislocated lath martensite and continuous thin films of retained austenite at the lath interfaces. Stacks of laths form the packets which are derived from different (111) variants of the same austenite grain. The residual parent austenite enables microdiffraction experiments with small electron beam spot sizes for the orientation relationships (OR) between austenite and martensite. All three most commonly observed ORs, namely Kurdjumov-Sachs, Nishiyama-Wassermann, and Greninger-Troiano, operate within the same sample.

  5. The effect of niobium on the hardenability of microalloyed austenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossaert, C.; Rees, G.; Maurickx, T.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    1995-01-01

    The powerful effect that varying the extent of niobium-carbide dissolution has on the “hardenability” of microalloyed austenite is demonstrated using dilatometric measurement of the critical cooling rate required to from microstructures containing >95 Pct martensite. The results can be rationalized on the hypothesis that the hardenability of austenite is enhanced by niobium in solid solution, possibly by its segregation to austenite grain boundaries, but is decreased by precipitation of niobium-carbide particles. This effect appears analogous to that of boron in steels and is found to be independent of variations in the austenite grain size.

  6. Comparative proteomic and metabolomic profiling of citrus fruit with enhancement of disease resistance by postharvest heat treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background From field harvest to the consumer’s table, fresh citrus fruit spends a considerable amount of time in shipment and storage. During these processes, physiological disorders and pathological diseases are the main causes of fruit loss. Heat treatment (HT) has been widely used to maintain fruit quality during postharvest storage; however, limited molecular information related to this treatment is currently available at a systemic biological level. Results Mature ‘Kamei’ Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) fruits were selected for exploring the disease resistance mechanisms induced by HT during postharvest storage. Proteomic analyses based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and metabolomic research based on gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QToF-MS) were conducted. The results show resistance associated proteins were up-regulated in heat treated pericarp, such as beta-1, 3-glucanase, Class III chitinase, 17.7 kDa heat shock protein and low molecular weight heat-shock protein. Also, redox metabolism enzymes were down-regulated in heat treated pericarp, including isoflavone reductase, oxidoreductase and superoxide dismutase. Primary metabolic profiling revealed organic acids and amino acids were down-regulated in heat treated pericarp; but significant accumulation of metabolites, including tetradecanoic acid, oleic acid, ornithine, 2-keto-d-gluconic acid, succinic acid, turanose, sucrose, galactose, myo-inositol, glucose and fructose were detected. Noticeably, H2O2 content decreased, while, lignin content increased in heat treated pericarp compared to the control, which might increase fruit resistibility in response to external stress. Also, flavonoids, substances which are well-known to be effective in reducing external stress, were up-regulated in heat treated pericarp. Conclusions This study provides a broad picture of differential

  7. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steels applicable to LWR core internals.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    This report summarizes work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels that were irradiated in the Halden reactor in simulation of irradiation-induced degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) core internal components. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests in BWR-like oxidizing water were conducted on 27 austenitic stainless steel alloys that were irradiated at 288 C in helium to 0.4, 1.3, and 3.0 dpa. Fractographic analysis was conducted to determine the fracture surface morphology. Microchemical analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy was performed on BWR neutron absorber tubes to characterize grain-boundary segregation of important elements under BWR conditions. At 0.4 and 1.4 dpa, transgranular fracture was mixed with intergranular fracture. At 3 dpa, transgranular cracking was negligible, and fracture surface was either dominantly intergranular, as in field-cracked core internals, or dominantly ductile or mixed. This behavior indicates that percent intergranular stress corrosion cracking determined at {approx}3 dpa is a good measure of IASCC susceptibility. At {approx}1.4 dpa, a beneficial effect of a high concentration of Si (0.8-1.5 wt.%) was observed. At {approx}3 dpa, however, such effect was obscured by a deleterious effect of S. Excellent resistance to IASCC was observed up to {approx}3 dpa for eight heats of Types 304, 316, and 348 steel that contain very low concentrations of S. Susceptibility of Types 304 and 316 steels that contain >0.003 wt.% S increased drastically. This indicates that a sulfur related critical phenomenon plays an important role in IASCC. A sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% is the primary material factor necessary to ensure good resistance to IASCC. However, for Types 304L and 316L steel and their high-purity counterparts, a sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% alone is not a sufficient condition to ensure good resistance to IASCC. This is in distinct contrast to

  8. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds with artificially produced stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, Sandra; Wagner, Sabine

    2014-02-18

    Austenitic stainless steel welds and nickel alloy welds, which are widely used in nuclear power plants, present major challenges for ultrasonic inspection due to the grain structure in the weld. Large grains in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material lead to increased scattering and affect sound wave propagation in the weld. This results in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio, and complicates the interpretation of signals and the localization of defects. Mechanized ultrasonic inspection was applied to study austenitic stainless steel test blocks with different types of flaws, including inter-granular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC). The results show that cracks located in the heat affected zone of the weld are easily detected when inspection from both sides of the weld is possible. In cases of limited accessibility, when ultrasonic inspection can be carried out only from one side of a weld, it may be difficult to distinguish between signals from scattering in the weld and signals from cracks.

  9. Intermetallic Strengthened Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steels for Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Bin; Baker, Ian

    2016-03-31

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 % for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, the materials required must be strong, corrosion-resistant at high temperatures (>700°C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase and L12 precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The creep resistance of these alloys is significantly improved through intermetallic strengthening (Laves-Fe2Nb + L12-Ni3Al precipitates) without harmful effects on oxidation resistance. Microstructural and microchemical analyses of the recently developed alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) steels (Fe-14Cr-32Ni-3Nb-3Al-2Ti-based) indicated they are strengthened by Ni3Al(Ti) L12, NiAl B2, Fe2Nb Laves phase and MC carbide precipitates. Different thermomechanical treatments (TMTs) were performed on these stainless steels in an attempt to further improve their mechanical properties. The thermo-mechanical processing produced nanocrystalline grains in AFA alloys and dramatically increased their yield strength at room temperature. Unfortunately, the TMTs didn’t increase the yield strengths of AFA alloys at ≥700ºC. At these temperatures, dislocation climb is the dominant mechanism for deformation of TMT alloys according to strain rate jump tests. After the characterization of aged AFA alloys, we found that the largest strengthening effect from L12 precipitates can be obtained by aging for less than 24 h. The coarsening behavior of the L12 precipitates was not influenced by carbon and boron additions. Failure analysis and post-mortem TEM analysis were performed to study the creep failure mechanisms of these AFA steels after creep tests. Though the Laves and B2-NiAl phase precipitated along the boundaries can improve the creep properties, cracks were

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Heat-Resistant Mutant Strains (A52 and B41) of the Photosynthetic Hydrogen-Producing Bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Abdulmecit; Cakar, Zeynep Petek; Yucel, Meral; Ozcan, Orhan; Sencan, Sevde; Sertdemir, Ibrahim; Erguner, Bekir; Yuceturk, Betul; Sarac, Aydan; Yuksel, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of two heat-resistant mutant strains, A52 and B41, derived from Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710, and with different hydrogen production levels, are reported here. These sequences may help understand the molecular basis of heat resistance and hydrogen production in R. capsulatus. PMID:27284151

  11. Impact of transient heat stress on polar lipid metabolism in seedlings of wheat near-isogenic lines contrasting in resistance to hessian fly (Cecidomyiidae) infestation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transient heat stress compromises resistance of host plants to Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), and other biotic stresses. However, the mechanism for the loss of plant resistance under heat stress remains to be determined. In this study, we determined polar lipid profiles in control and Hess...

  12. Effects of alpha-tocopherol addition to polymeric coatings on the UV and heat resistance of a fibrous collagen material--chrome-free leather

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    UV and heat resistance are very important qualities of leather because most leather products are constantly exposed to outdoor environments. In recent years, we have focused on using environmentally friendly antioxidants that will improve the UV and heat resistance of chrome-free leather. Tocopher...

  13. A novel protein quality control mechanism contributes to heat shock resistance of worldwide-distributed Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone C strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Wigren, Edvard; Trček, Janja; Peters, Verena; Kim, Jihong; Hasni, Muhammad Sharif; Nimtz, Manfred; Lindqvist, Ylva; Park, Chankyu; Curth, Ute; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Römling, Ute

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly successful nosocomial pathogen capable of causing a wide variety of infections with clone C strains most prevalent worldwide. In this study, we initially characterize a molecular mechanism of survival unique to clone C strains. We identified a P. aeruginosa clone C-specific genomic island (PACGI-1) that contains the highly expressed small heat shock protein sHsp20c, the founding member of a novel subclass of class B bacterial small heat shock proteins. sHsp20c and adjacent gene products are involved in resistance against heat shock. Heat stable sHsp20c is unconventionally expressed in stationary phase in a wide temperature range from 20 to 42°C. Purified sHsp20c has characteristic features of small heat shock protein class B as it is monodisperse, forms sphere-like 24-meric oligomers and exhibits significant chaperone activity. As the P. aeruginosa clone C population is significantly more heat shock resistant than genetically unrelated P. aeruginosa strains without sHsp20c, the horizontally acquired shsp20c operon might contribute to the survival of worldwide-distributed clone C strains.

  14. Repeated exposure to heat stress results in a diaphragm phenotype that resists ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Toshinori; Ichinoseki-Sekine, Noriko; Kakigi, Ryo; Tsuzuki, Takamasa; Sugiura, Takao; Powers, Scott K; Naito, Hisashi

    2015-11-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) is a life-saving intervention for patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) results in diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction, both of which are predicted to contribute to problems in weaning patients from the ventilator. Therefore, developing a strategy to protect the diaphragm against ventilator-induced weakness is important. We tested the hypothesis that repeated bouts of heat stress result in diaphragm resistance against CMV-induced atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six experimental groups: 1) control; 2) single bout of whole body heat stress; 3) repeated bouts of whole body heat stress; 4) 12 h CMV; 5) single bout of whole body heat stress 24 h before CMV; and 6) repeated bouts of whole body heat stress 1, 3, and 5 days before 12 h of CMV. Our results revealed that repeated bouts of heat stress resulted in increased levels of heat shock protein 72 in the diaphragm and protection against both CMV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction at submaximal stimulation frequencies. The specific mechanisms responsible for this protection remain unclear: this heat stress-induced protection against CMV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and weakness may be partially due to reduced diaphragmatic oxidative stress, diminished activation of signal transducer/transcriptional activator-3, lower caspase-3 activation, and decreased autophagy in the diaphragm.

  15. Heat-resistant, electrically conducting joint between ceramic end plates and metallic conductors in solid oxide fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkenhoener, R.; Buchkremer, H.P.; Stoever, D.; Stolten, D.; Koch, A.

    2000-07-01

    Ceramic parts made of doped lanthanum chromite are used as interconnects and end plates in stacks for several solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) designs. Metallic conductors have to be attached to enable a low-resistance connection between individual stacks in each SOFC unit and to permit power to be drawn from the SOFC. The resistances of the metal-ceramic bond and the metallic conductors have to be stable under operating conditions, i.e., 1,000 C in air. Consequently, heat-resistant materials have to be used. A two-step process has been developed to connect commercially available, Ni- or Fe-based metallic conductors to ceramic SOFC end plates by vacuum furnace brazing. In the first step, a metallic sheet, which acts as the current collector, is brazed onto the ceramic end plate. Thereby, the much lower electrical conductivity of the ceramic part is compensated by that of the metal. The chromium alloy CrFe5Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}1 is suitable because it is heat-resistant, and its thermal expansion coefficient is close to that of lanthanum chromite. In the second step, metallic wires or strips are brazed on the current collector. Since this joint area is significantly smaller than that of the first joint, materials with a different thermal expansion coefficient can be used, such as conventional heat-resistant nickel alloys (Inconel 617) and ferritic stainless steels (FeCrAl 25 5). Filler alloys for both brazing steps with matching melting points have been found. Hence, both brazing steps can be performed cost-effectively in one heating step. Suitable parameters for vacuum furnace brazing of both joints are presented, and the composition of the filler alloys is given. Data concerning the long-term behavior of the joint resistances in air at 1,000 C are discussed.

  16. ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE HEATING OF SOILS AT C-REACTOR AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Blundy, R; Michael Morgenstern, M; Joseph Amari, J; Annamarie MacMurray, A; Mark Farrar, M; Terry Killeen, T

    2007-09-10

    Chlorinated solvent contamination of soils and groundwater is an endemic problem at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and originated as by-products from the nuclear materials manufacturing process. Five nuclear reactors at the SRS produced special nuclear materials for the nation's defense program throughout the cold war era. An important step in the process was thorough degreasing of the fuel and target assemblies prior to irradiation. Discharges from this degreasing process resulted in significant groundwater contamination that would continue well into the future unless a soil remediation action was performed. The largest reactor contamination plume originated from C-Reactor and an interim action was selected in 2004 to remove the residual trichloroethylene (TCE) source material by electrical resistance heating (ERH) technology. This would be followed by monitoring to determine the rate of decrease in concentration in the contaminant plume. Because of the existence of numerous chlorinated solvent sources around SRS, it was elected to generate in-house expertise in the design and operation of ERH, together with the construction of a portable ERH/SVE system that could be deployed at multiple locations around the site. This paper describes the waste unit characteristics, the ERH system design and operation, together with extensive data accumulated from the first deployment adjacent to the C-Reactor building. The installation heated the vadose zone down to 62 feet bgs over a 60 day period during the summer of 2006 and raised soil temperatures to over 200 F. A total of 730 lbs of trichloroethylene (TCE) were removed over this period, and subsequent sampling indicated a removal efficiency of 99.4%.

  17. Characterization of Service Induced Flaws on the Far Side of Austenitic Welds Using Phased Array Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonic testing methods continue to exhibit problems for applications involving coarse-grained structures. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is evaluating the capabilities and limitations of phased array (PA) technology to detect service-type flaws in these coarse-grained materials. The work is being sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Research. Work to determine detection capabilities through welds with varied grain structures is being explored to provide a better understanding of the acoustic properties of these welded structures. Piping specimens with welds fabricated in vertical and horizontal positions to simulate field conditions have been studied. The insights gained from the austenitic piping will be applied to dissimilar metal weld configurations, corrosion resistant clad piping and cast stainless steels. This paper presents results for using PA ultrasonic technology to determine the effectiveness of detecting and accurately characterizing flaws on the far-side of austenitic piping welds.

  18. Resistant starch content among several sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) genotypes and the effect of heat treatment on resistant starch retention in two genotypes.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Natália de Carvalho; Queiroz, Valéria Aparecida Vieira; Rocha, Maria Clara; Amorim, Aline Cristina Pinheiro; Soares, Thayana Oliveira; Monteiro, Marlene Azevedo Magalhães; de Menezes, Cícero Beserra; Schaffert, Robert Eugene; Garcia, Maria Aparecida Vieira Teixeira; Junqueira, Roberto Gonçalves

    2016-04-15

    The resistant starch (RS) contents in 49 sorghum genotypes and the effects of heat treatment using dry and wet heat on the grain and flour from two sorghum genotypes were investigated. The results showed a wide variation in the RS contents of the genotypes analyzed. The RS mean values were grouped into six distinct groups and ranged from 0.31±0.33 g/100 g to 65.66±5.46 g/100 g sorghum flour on dry basis. Dry heat causes minor losses in the RS content with retentions of up to 97.19±1.92% of this compound, whereas wet heat retained at most 6.98±0.43% of the RS. The SC 59 and (SSN76)FC6608 RED KAFIR BAZINE (ASA N23) cultivars, which have an average RS content of 65.51 g/100 g, were appropriate for human consumption, and the use of dry heat is presented as a better alternative for the preservation of RS in heat-treated grains.

  19. Consideration of different heating lengths of needles with induction heating and resistance system: A novel design of needle module for thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Bui, Huy-Tien; Hwang, Sheng-Jye; Lee, Huei-Huang; Huang, Durn-Yuan

    2017-04-01

    Thermal ablation using alternating electromagnetic fields is a promising method to treat tissues including tumors. With this approach, an electromagnetic field is generated around an induction coil, which is supplied with high frequency current from a power source. Any electrically conducting object, which is placed in the electromagnetic field, is then heated due to eddy currents. Basic principles underlying this novel thermotherapy needle system are internal induction and resistance heating. This presents a new design of a standard gauge 18 percutaneous trans-hepatic cholangiography needle module combined with a compact power source. Three needle modules containing coils of different lengths were used to locally heat up different volumes of tissues in in vitro experiments on pig livers. Temperature on the inside surface of the needle was controlled and monitored through a K-type thermocouple. By using this needle module system, no two-section or ferromagnetic nanoparticle-coated needles were required; the system worked well with the SUS-304 stainless-steel needle. Successful results were demonstrated in the in vitro experiments on pig livers with different heating lengths of 10, 20, and 30 mm needles. With low power sources, needles could be heated up to a high temperature. The novel design of the needle module incorporated with a high frequency power source was thus shown to be a promising technology for tissue ablation. Bioelectromagnetics.38:220-226, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. NOREM wear-resistant, iron-based hard-facing alloys: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grobner, P.; Ohriner, E.K.; Wada, T.; Whelan, E.P.

    1989-07-01

    Wear-resistance cobalt-free hardfacing alloys are needed to replace the cobalt-base alloys used to hardface nuclear valves in order to reduce the exposure of maintenance personnel. Some thirty heats of cast iron-base alloys were prepared and characterized. Selected heats were prepared and applied as hardfacing overlays on austenitic steel substrates using both GTA and PTA welding processes. Some of the iron-base alloys exhibited galling wear resistance as high as that of cobalt-base standards both in the cast condition and in the PTA overlays. Hardness, mechanical properties, and galling wear resistance were determined on weld overlays and on cast alloys. Dilution and thermal expansivity were determined for weld overlays. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to determine the alloys' microstructures. Other commercially available alloys were tested for galling wear resistance and compared to iron-base alloys. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Heat-Shocked Monocytes Are Resistant to Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Apoptotic DNA Fragmentation due to Expression of HSP72

    PubMed Central

    Guzik, Krzysztof; Bzowska, Małgorzata; Dobrucki, Jerzy; Pryjma, Juliusz

    1999-01-01

    Human peripheral blood monocytes became apoptotic following phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus. The consequences of heat stress for monocytes were studied with regard to the effect on S. aureus-induced apoptosis. Exposure of monocytes to 41.5°C for 1 h resulted in HSP72 expression and had no influence on phagocytosis of bacteria; moreover, phagocytosis of S. aureus immediately or shortly after heat shock had no effect on the S. aureus-induced monocyte apoptosis, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation assay. In contrast, cells which recovered from heat shock for 18 to 24 h, although active as phagocytes, were resistant to the S. aureus-induced apoptosis. The observed protective effect was related to the induction of HSP72, since blocking of HSP72 synthesis by an antisense oligomer abolished the protective effect of heat shock on bacterium-induced monocyte apoptosis. PMID:10417194

  2. Computational design and analysis of high strength austenitic TRIP steels for blast protection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Padmanava

    Recent assessment of material property requirements for blast resistant applications, especially for the naval ship hulls, has defined the need to design steels with high stretch ductility and fragment penetration resistance, along with high strength and adequate toughness. Using a system based computational materials design approach, two series of austenitic (gamma) steels have been designed -- BA120 to exhibit high uniform ductility in tension (>20%) and SA120 to exhibit high tensile (>20%) and shear strains (>50%), with both alloys maintaining high levels of yield strength (120 ksi/827 MPa) at room temperature under Tensile and Shear stress states. BA120 is low chromium (4 wt %) high nickel (23.5 wt %) alloy while the SA120 is a high chromium design (10 wt %), both designed for non-magnetic behavior. The Thermo-Calc computational thermodynamics software in conjunction with a Ni-DATA 7 thermodynamic database has been used to model precipitation strengthening of the alloy, by quantifying the dependence of yield stress of austenitic steels on the mole fraction of the precipitated gamma' (Gamma Prime) Ni3(Ti, Al) phase. The required high strength has been achieved by the precipitation of spheroidal intermetallic gamma' -- phase of optimum diameter (15 nm) in equilibrium with the matrix at the standard aging temperature. Adequate Al and Ti with respect 5 to the Ni in the matrix ensure enough gamma' phase fraction and number density of precipitates to provide the necessary strength. The predicted gamma' precipitation strengthening to 120-130 ksi for both BA120 and SA120 has been validated through both microhardness as well as static and dynamic tensile and shear tests conducted at room temperature. 3-D LEAP analysis of the aged specimens has shown the expected size and distribution of gamma' -- precipitates with good compositional accuracy of predicted values from the thermodynamic models, for both matrix austenite and gamma'. Metastable austenitic steels have been

  3. Thermal shock and fatigue resistance of tungsten materials under transient heat loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxin; Yan, Qingzhi; Lang, Shaoting; Xia, Min; Liu, Xiang; Ge, Changchun

    2014-12-01

    Transient heat loading tests were performed on rolled pure tungsten (PW) and lanthanum oxide doped tungsten (WL10) as well as swaged + rolled potassium doped tungsten (W-K) samples using an electron beam. In thermal shock tests, the cracking threshold was 0.44-0.66, 0.17-0.22 and 0.44-0.66 GW/m2 for PW, WL10 and W-K, respectively. The melting threshold was over 1.1 GW/m2 for PW and W-K while 0.66-0.88 GW/m2 for WL10. In thermal fatigue tests, the obvious roughening threshold was over 1000 cycles for PW and WL10 while 1-100 cycles for W-K. The cracking threshold was 100-1000 cycles for PW, 1-100 cycles for WL10 and over 1000 cycles for W-K alloy. WL10 displayed worse thermal and fatigue resistance while W-K exhibited better properties compared with PW, which was attributed to differences in thermal-mechanical properties of the three tungsten alloys, in addition to the size and number density of La2O3 particles and potassium bubbles.

  4. Resistant Starch Contents of Native and Heat-Moisture Treated Jackfruit Seed Starch

    PubMed Central

    Kittipongpatana, Ornanong S.

    2015-01-01

    Native jackfruit seed starch (JFS) contains 30% w/w type II resistant starch (RS2) and can potentially be developed as a new commercial source of RS for food and pharmaceutical application. Heat-moisture treatment (HMT) was explored as a mean to increase RS content of native JFS. The effect of the conditions was tested at varied moisture contents (MC), temperatures, and times. Moisture levels of 20–25%, together with temperatures 80–110°C, generally resulted in increases of RS amount. The highest amount of RS (52.2%) was achieved under treatment conditions of 25% MC and 80°C, for 16 h (JF-25-80-16). FT-IR peak ratio at 1047/1022 cm−1 suggested increases in ordered structure in several HMT-JFS samples with increased RS. SEM showed no significant change in the granule appearance, except at high moisture/temperature treatment. XRD revealed no significant change in peaks intensities, suggesting the crystallinity within the granule was mostly retained. DSC showed increases in Tg and, in most cases, ΔT, as the MC was increased in the samples. Slight but significant decreases in ΔH were observed in samples with low RS, indicating that a combination of high moisture and temperature might cause partial gelatinization. HMT-JFS with higher RS exhibited less swelling, while the solubility remained mostly unchanged. PMID:25642454

  5. Tracking heat-resistant, cold-thriving fluid milk spoilage bacteria from farm to packaged product.

    PubMed

    Huck, J R; Sonnen, M; Boor, K J

    2008-03-01

    Control of psychrotolerant endospore-forming spoilage bacteria, particularly Bacillus and Paenibacillus spp., is economically important to the dairy industry. These microbes form endospores that can survive high-temperature, short-time pasteurization; hence, their presence in raw milk represents a major potential cause of milk spoilage. A previously developed culture-dependent selection strategy and an rpoB sequence-based subtyping method were applied to bacterial isolates obtained from environmental samples collected on a New York State dairy farm. A total of 54 different rpoB allelic types putatively identified as Bacillus (75% of isolates), Paenibacillus (24%), and Sporosarcina spp. (1%) were identified among 93 isolates. Assembly of a broader data set, including 93 dairy farm isolates, 57 raw milk tank truck isolates, 138 dairy plant storage silo isolates, and 336 pasteurized milk isolates, identified a total of 154 rpoB allelic types, representing an extensive diversity of Bacillus and Paenibacillus spp. Our molecular subtype data clearly showed that certain endospore-forming bacterial subtypes are present in the dairy farm environment as well as in the processing plant. The potential for entry of these ubiquitous heat-resistant spoilage organisms into milk production and processing systems, from the dairy farm to the processing plant, represents a considerable challenge that will require a comprehensive farm-to-table approach to fluid milk quality.

  6. Structural transformations in heat-resistant protective coatings on nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Veksler, Yu.G.; Lesnikov, V.P.; Paleeva, S.Ya.; Lesnikova, E.G.; Myal'nitsa, G.F.

    1987-09-01

    In this work a comprehensive metallophysical study was carried out for two aluminosilicide slip coatings of the systems Al-Si and Al-Nb-Si and an electron-beam Co-Cr-Al-Y coating on alloy EP-539 (17...19% Cr, 4...6% Co, 2.5...4% W, 4.5...6.5% Mo, 2...3% Ti, 3...4% Al, 1.4...2% Nb, balance Ni) after high-temperature testing. The protective properties of the coatings were evaluated from the results of laboratory tests for heat resistance at 1000/sup 0/C in the combustion products of diesel fuel with added sulfur at 970, 1000, and 1060/sup 0/C for 100 h and after full-scale tests for 150, 250, 400, and 700 h. Metallographic, hardness, x-ray, and micro x-ray studies of the coating were carried out. Layer-by-layer phase composition and the lattice spacing of the main phases were determined. X-ray analysis was carried out in an a DRON-1 diffractometer in copper K/sub ..-->../-radiation, and x-ray microanalysis was carried out in a MS-46 Cameca microanalyzer

  7. Microstructural characterization of dissimilar welds between alloy 800 and HP heat-resistant steel

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmolaei, R.; Shamanian, M. Kermanpur, A.

    2008-10-15

    In this study, dissimilar welds between HP heat-resistant steel and Incoloy 800 were made with four different filler materials including: 309 stainless steel and nickel-based Inconel 82, 182 and 617. The microstructure of the base metals, weld metals and their interfaces were characterized by utilizing optical and scanning electron microscopy. Grain boundaries migration in the weld metals was studied. It was found that the migration of grain boundaries in the Inconel 82 weld metal was very extensive. Precipitates of TiC and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (M = Cr and Mo) in the Inconel 617 weld metal are identified. The necessary conditions for the formation of cracks close to the fusion line of the 309-HP joints are described. Furthermore unmixed zone near the fusion line between HP steel base metal and Inconel 82 weld metal is discussed. An epitaxial growth is characterized at the fusion line of the 309-Alloy 800 and Inconel 617-Alloy 800 joints.

  8. Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical Resistance Heating for In Situ Trichloroethene Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Macbeth, Tamzen; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Mackley, Rob D.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Sandberg, Greg; Powell, Thomas; Powers, Jeff; Pitre, Emile; Michalsen, Mandy M.; Ballock-Dixon, Sage; Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2011-06-27

    The effectiveness of in situ treatment using zero-valent iron to remediate sites with non-aqueous phase or significant sediment-associated contaminant mass can be limited by relatively low rates of mass transfer to bring contaminants in contact with the reactive media. For a field test in a trichloroethene source area, combining moderate-temperature (maximum 50oC) subsurface electrical resistance heating with in situ ZVI treatment was shown to accelerate dechlorination and dissolution rates by a factor of 4 to 6 based on organic daughter products and a factor 8-16 using a chloride concentrations. A mass-discharge-based analysis was used to evaluate reaction, dissolution, and volatilization at ambient groundwater temperature (~10oC) and as temperature was increased up to about 50oC. Increased reaction and contaminant dissolution were observed with increased temperature, but volatilization was minimal during the test because in situ reactions maintained low aqueous-phase TCE concentrations.

  9. Resistant starch contents of native and heat-moisture treated jackfruit seed starch.

    PubMed

    Kittipongpatana, Ornanong S; Kittipongpatana, Nisit

    2015-01-01

    Native jackfruit seed starch (JFS) contains 30% w/w type II resistant starch (RS2) and can potentially be developed as a new commercial source of RS for food and pharmaceutical application. Heat-moisture treatment (HMT) was explored as a mean to increase RS content of native JFS. The effect of the conditions was tested at varied moisture contents (MC), temperatures, and times. Moisture levels of 20-25%, together with temperatures 80-110°C, generally resulted in increases of RS amount. The highest amount of RS (52.2%) was achieved under treatment conditions of 25% MC and 80°C, for 16 h (JF-25-80-16). FT-IR peak ratio at 1047/1022 cm(-1) suggested increases in ordered structure in several HMT-JFS samples with increased RS. SEM showed no significant change in the granule appearance, except at high moisture/temperature treatment. XRD revealed no significant change in peaks intensities, suggesting the crystallinity within the granule was mostly retained. DSC showed increases in T g and, in most cases, ΔT, as the MC was increased in the samples. Slight but significant decreases in ΔH were observed in samples with low RS, indicating that a combination of high moisture and temperature might cause partial gelatinization. HMT-JFS with higher RS exhibited less swelling, while the solubility remained mostly unchanged.

  10. Hydraulic resistance and convective heat transfer within independent power generation micro sources (IPM) channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V, Sudarev A.; V, Sudarev B.; A, Suryaninov A.

    2012-05-01

    The introduction of new structural materials and technologies contributes to the efficiency increase for the compact IPMs used in various branches of engineering. Use of a driving high-temperature (TIT600K), regenerative (the regeneration ratio is E>85%) micro gas turbine engine μGTE, major components which are made of structural ceramics, allows not only to maintain the effective efficiency at ηe=26-30%, but, also, sharply reduce the material consumption rate for the micro source as a whole. Application of the laser prototyping technique to manufacture the air heater, which is a part of μGTE, increases the IPM compactness. Miniaturization of the air heater, manufactured by the structural ceramics laser fusion, can significantly reduce the hydraulic diameter (dh<=1.0 mm) of the channels, designed to transport the working media inside it. Reducing dh leads to a significant increase in the hydraulic resistance of the micro channels. The associated increase in the energy consumption for μGTE's own needs is compensated by increasing the TIT, E, and heat transfer coefficients in micro channels, and by eliminating the need in cooling for high temperature IPM components.

  11. Pasteurization of milk and the heat resistance of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: a critical review of the data.

    PubMed

    Lund, Barbara M; Gould, Grahame W; Rampling, Anita M

    2002-07-25

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) causes Johne's disease in ruminants (including cattle, sheep and goats) and other animals, and may contribute to Crohn's disease in humans. This possibility, and the fact that M. paratuberculosis may be present in raw milk, make it important to ensure that the heat treatment specified for pasteurization of milk will give acceptable inactivation of this bacterium, with an adequate margin of safety. Published studies of the heat resistance of this bacterium in milk have given widely differing results. Possible reasons for these differences, and the technical problems involved in the work, are reviewed. It is concluded that there is a need (i) for the adoption of an agreed Performance Criterion for pasteurization of milk in relation to this bacterium, (ii) a need for definitive laboratory experiments to understand and determine the heat resistance of M. paratuberculosis, and (iii) a need for an assessment of whether the minimum heat treatments specified at present for pasteurization of milk (Process Criteria) will meet the Performance Criterion for M. paratuberculosis. Measures are also required to ensure that commercial processes deliver continually the specified heat treatment, and to ensure that post-pasteurization contamination is avoided.

  12. Recovery of viability and radiation resistance by heat-injured conidia of Penicillium expansum Lk. ex Thom.

    PubMed

    Baldy, R W; Sommer, N F; Buckley, P M

    1970-05-01

    Spores heated in water at 54 C for up to 1 hr were plated on nutrient agar immediately or held for 3 days in aerated water at 23 C and then plated. Under these conditions, holding was optimal for recovery, increasing survival percentage up to 20-fold over values for immediate plating. Recovery was prevented partially or completely, however, when spores were held in any of the following solutions: glucose, potassium phosphate, ammonium or sodium acetate, sodium azide, or 2,4-dinitrophenol, or in the sodium or potassium salts of pyruvate, and tricarboxylic acid cycle acids. Both anaerobiosis and incubation at 0 C prevented recovery. Survivors of a heat treatment were more sensitive to gamma radiation than were unheated spores. Conditions which affected the recovery of viability had the same effect on restoration of radiation resistance. Thus, many of the processes for restoration of radiation resistance seem involved also in recovery of viability after heating. After a 99% inactivating treatment (about 30 min at 54 C), heated spores respired as fast as unheated spores, or faster. Malate, citrate, succinate, and acetate stimulated respiration in unheated spores and inhibited it in heated spores.

  13. Modifications in membrane fatty acid composition of Salmonella typhimurium in response to growth conditions and their effect on heat resistance.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; López, Mercedes; Arenas, Ricardo; Bernardo, Ana

    2008-04-30

    The effects of growth temperature (in the range 10-45 degrees C) and acidification up to pH 4.5 of the culture medium (Brain Heart Infusion, BHI) with different organic acids (acetic, citric and lactic) and hydrochloric acid on membrane fatty acid composition and heat resistance of Salmonella typhimurium CECT 443 were studied. The heat resistance was maximal in cells grown at 45 degrees C (cells grown in non-acidified BHI showed a D58-value of 0.90 min) and decreased with decreasing growth temperature up to 10 degrees C (D58-value of 0.09 min). The growth of cells in acidified media caused an increase in their heat resistance. In general, acid adapted cells showed D-values of between 1.5 and 2 times higher than the corresponding for non-acid adapted control cells. This cross-protection response, which has important implications in food processing, was not dependent on the pH value and the acid used to acidify the growth medium. A membrane adaptation corresponding to an increase in the unsaturated to saturated fatty acids ratio (UFA/SFA) and membrane fluidity was observed at low growth temperature. Moreover, the acidification of the growth medium caused a decrease in UFA/SFA ratio and in the C18:1 relative concentration, and an increase in cyclopropane fatty acids (CFA) content mainly due to the increase in cyc19 relative concentration. Thus, acid adapted cells showed CFA levels 1.5 times higher than non-acid adapted control cells. A significant proportion of unsaturated fatty acids were converted to their cyclopropane derivatives during acid adaptation. These changes in membrane fatty acid composition result in cells with decreased membrane fluidity. A clear relation between membrane fatty acid composition and heat resistance was observed. In general, D-values were maximum for cells with low UFA/SFA ratio, and, consequently, with low membrane fluidity. Moreover, CFA formation played a major role in protecting acid adapted cells from heat inactivation. However

  14. Investigation of joining techniques for advanced austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Kikuchi, Y.; Shi, C.; Gill, T.P.S.

    1991-05-01

    Modified Alloys 316 and 800H, designed for high temperature service, have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Assessment of the weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys has been conducted at the University of Tennessee. Four aspects of weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys were included in the investigation.

  15. High-Level Heat Resistance of Spores of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus licheniformis Results from the Presence of a spoVA Operon in a Tn1546 Transposon.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Erwin M; Koning, Rosella A; Boekhorst, Jos; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial endospore formers can produce spores that are resistant to many food processing conditions, including heat. Some spores may survive heating processes aimed at production of commercially sterile foods. Recently, it was shown that a spoVA operon, designated spoVA(2mob), present on a Tn1546 transposon in Bacillus subtilis, leads to profoundly increased wet heat resistance of B. subtilis spores. Such Tn1546 transposon elements including the spoVA(2mob) operon were also found in several strains of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus licheniformis, and these strains were shown to produce spores with significantly higher resistances to wet heat than their counterparts lacking this transposon. In this study, the locations and compositions of Tn1546 transposons encompassing the spoVA(2mob) operons in B. amyloliquefaciens and B. licheniformis were analyzed. Introduction of these spoVA(2mob) operons into B. subtilis 168 (producing spores that are not highly heat resistant) rendered mutant 168 strains that produced high-level heat resistant spores, demonstrating that these elements in B. amyloliquefaciens and B. licheniformis are responsible for high level heat resistance of spores. Assessment of growth of the nine strains of each species between 5.2°C and 57.7°C showed some differences between strains, especially at lower temperatures, but all strains were able to grow at 57.7°C. Strains of B. amyloliquefaciens and B. licheniformis that contain the Tn1546 elements (and produce high-level heat resistant spores) grew at temperatures similar to those of their Tn1546-negative counterparts that produce low-level heat resistant spores. The findings presented in this study allow for detection of B. amyloliquefaciens and B. licheniformis strains that produce highly heat resistant spores in the food chain.

  16. High-Level Heat Resistance of Spores of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus licheniformis Results from the Presence of a spoVA Operon in a Tn1546 Transposon

    PubMed Central

    Berendsen, Erwin M.; Koning, Rosella A.; Boekhorst, Jos; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial endospore formers can produce spores that are resistant to many food processing conditions, including heat. Some spores may survive heating processes aimed at production of commercially sterile foods. Recently, it was shown that a spoVA operon, designated spoVA2mob, present on a Tn1546 transposon in Bacillus subtilis, leads to profoundly increased wet heat resistance of B. subtilis spores. Such Tn1546 transposon elements including the spoVA2mob operon were also found in several strains of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus licheniformis, and these strains were shown to produce spores with significantly higher resistances to wet heat than their counterparts lacking this transposon. In this study, the locations and compositions of Tn1546 transposons encompassing the spoVA2mob operons in B. amyloliquefaciens and B. licheniformis were analyzed. Introduction of these spoVA2mob operons into B. subtilis 168 (producing spores that are not highly heat resistant) rendered mutant 168 strains that produced high-level heat resistant spores, demonstrating that these elements in B. amyloliquefaciens and B. licheniformis are responsible for high level heat resistance of spores. Assessment of growth of the nine strains of each species between 5.2°C and 57.7°C showed some differences between strains, especially at lower temperatures, but all strains were able to grow at 57.7°C. Strains of B. amyloliquefaciens and B. licheniformis that contain the Tn1546 elements (and produce high-level heat resistant spores) grew at temperatures similar to those of their Tn1546-negative counterparts that produce low-level heat resistant spores. The findings presented in this study allow for detection of B. amyloliquefaciens and B. licheniformis strains that produce highly heat resistant spores in the food chain. PMID:27994575

  17. Combined resistive and laser heating technique for in situ radial X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil cell at high pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Raju, Selva Vennila; Kaercher, Pamela; Knight, Jason; MacDowell, Alastair; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Williams, Quentin; Alarcon, Eloisa Zepeda

    2013-02-01

    To extend the range of high-temperature, high-pressure studies within the diamond anvil cell, a Liermann-type diamond anvil cell with radial diffraction geometry (rDAC) was redesigned and developed for synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source. The rDAC, equipped with graphite heating arrays, allows simultaneous resistive and laser heating while the material is subjected to high pressure. The goals are both to extend the temperature range of external (resistive) heating and to produce environments with lower temperature gradients in a simultaneously resistive- and laser-heated rDAC. Three different geomaterials were used as pilot samples to calibrate and optimize conditions for combined resistive and laser heating. For example, in Run#1, FeO was loaded in a boron-mica gasket and compressed to 11 GPa then gradually resistively heated to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side). The laser heating was further applied to FeO to raise temperature to 2273 K. In Run#2, Fe-Ni alloy was compressed to 18 GPa and resistively heated to 1785 K (1973 K at the diamond side). The combined resistive and laser heating was successfully performed again on (Mg0.9Fe0.1)O in Run#3. In this instance, the sample was loaded in a boron-kapton gasket, compressed to 29 GPa, resistive-heated up to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side), and further simultaneously laser-heated to achieve a temperature in excess of 2273 K at the sample position. Diffraction patterns obtained from the experiments were deconvoluted using the Rietveld method and quantified for lattice preferred orientation of each material under extreme conditions and during phase transformation.

  18. Combined resistive and laser heating technique for in situ radial X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil cell at high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Kaercher, Pamela; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Alarcon, Eloisa Zepeda; Raju, Selva Vennila; Knight, Jason; MacDowell, Alastair; Williams, Quentin

    2013-02-15

    To extend the range of high-temperature, high-pressure studies within the diamond anvil cell, a Liermann-type diamond anvil cell with radial diffraction geometry (rDAC) was redesigned and developed for synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source. The rDAC, equipped with graphite heating arrays, allows simultaneous resistive and laser heating while the material is subjected to high pressure. The goals are both to extend the temperature range of external (resistive) heating and to produce environments with lower temperature gradients in a simultaneously resistive- and laser-heated rDAC. Three different geomaterials were used as pilot samples to calibrate and optimize conditions for combined resistive and laser heating. For example, in Run1, FeO was loaded in a boron-mica gasket and compressed to 11 GPa then gradually resistively heated to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side). The laser heating was further applied to FeO to raise temperature to 2273 K. In Run2, Fe-Ni alloy was compressed to 18 GPa and resistively heated to 1785 K (1973 K at the diamond side). The combined resistive and laser heating was successfully performed again on (Mg{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1})O in Run3. In this instance, the sample was loaded in a boron-kapton gasket, compressed to 29 GPa, resistive-heated up to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side), and further simultaneously laser-heated to achieve a temperature in excess of 2273 K at the sample position. Diffraction patterns obtained from the experiments were deconvoluted using the Rietveld method and quantified for lattice preferred orientation of each material under extreme conditions and during phase transformation.

  19. Study of the influence of sporulation conditions on heat resistance of Geobacillus stearothermophilus used in the development of biological indicators for steam sterilization.

    PubMed

    Guizelini, Belquis P; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Sella, Sandra Regina B R; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2012-12-01

    Biological indicators are important tools in infection control via sterilization process monitoring. The use of a standardized spore crop with a well-defined heat resistance will guarantee the quality of a biological indicator. Ambient factors during sporulation can affect spore characteristics and properties, including heat resistance. The aim of this study is to evaluate the main sporulation factors responsible for heat resistance in Geobacillus stearothermophilus, a useful biological indicator for steam sterilization. A sequence of a three-step optimization of variables (initial pH, nutrient concentration, tryptone, peptone, beef extract, yeast extract, manganese sulfate, magnesium sulfate, calcium chloride and potassium phosphate) was carried out to screen those that have a significant influence on heat resistance of produced spores. The variable exerting greatest influence on G. stearothermophilus heat resistance during sporulation was found to be the initial pH. Lower nutrient concentration and alkaline pH around 8.5 tended to enhance decimal reduction time at 121 °C (D(121°C)). A central composite design enabled a fourfold enhancement in heat resistance, and the model obtained accurately describes positive pH and negative manganese sulfate concentration influence on spore heat resistance.

  20. Capabilities of Ultrasonic Phased Arrays for Far-Side Examinations of Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2006-10-01

    A study was conducted to assess the ability of advanced ultrasonic techniques to detect and accurately determine the size of flaws from the far-side of wrought austenitic piping welds. Far-side inspections of nuclear system austenitic piping welds are currently performed on a “best effort” basis and do not conform to ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII performance demonstration requirements for near side inspection. For this study, four circumferential welds in 610mm (24inch) diameter, 36mm (1.42inch) thick ASTM A-358, Grade 304 vintage austenitic stainless steel pipe were examined. The welds were fabricated with varied welding parameters; both horizontal and vertical pipe orientations were used, with air and water backing, to simulate field welding conditions. A series of saw cuts, electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches, and implanted fatigue cracks were placed into the heat affected zones of the welds. The saw cuts and notches ranged in depth from 7.5% to 28.4% through-wall. The implanted cracks ranged in depth from 5% through-wall to 64% through-wall. The welds were examined with phased array technology at 2.0 MHz, and compared to conventional ultrasonic techniques as a baseline. The examinations showed that phased-array methods were able to detect and accurately length-size, but not depth size, the notches and flaws through the welds. The ultrasonic results were insensitive to the different welding techniques used in each weld.