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Sample records for heat shock-induced three-dimensional-like

  1. Heat shock induces barotolerance in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Hayman, Melinda M; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C; Knabel, Stephen J

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of heat shock on the resistance of Listeria monocytogenes to high pressure processing (HPP). L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 was grown to stationary phase at 15 degrees C and inoculated into whole ultrahigh-temperature milk at approximately 10(7) CFU/ml. Milk samples (5 ml) were placed into plastic transfer pipettes, which were heat sealed and then heated in a water bath at 48 degrees C for 10 min. Immediately after heat shock, the milk was cooled in water (20 degrees C) for 25 min and then placed on ice. The samples were high pressure processed at ambient temperature (approximately 23 degrees C) at 400 MPa for various times up to 150 s. Following HPP, the samples were spread plated on tryptic soy agar supplemented with yeast extract. Heat shock significantly increased the D400 MPa-value of L. monocytogenes from 35 s in non-heat-shocked cells to 127 s in heat-shocked cells (P < 0.05). Addition of chloramphenicol before heat shock eliminated the protective effect of heat shock (P < 0.05). Heat shock for 5, 10, 15, or 30 min at 48 degrees C resulted in maximal barotolerance (P < 0.05); increasing the time to 60 min significantly decreased survival compared with that at 5, 10, 15, or 30 min (P < 0.05). These results indicate that prior heat shock significantly increases the barotolerance of L. monocytogenes and that de novo protein synthesis during heat shock is required for this enhanced barotolerance.

  2. BH3-only protein BIM mediates heat shock-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Indra M; Chen, Miao-Der; Muro, Israel; Robertson, John D; Wright, Casey W; Bratton, Shawn B

    2014-01-01

    Acute heat shock can induce apoptosis through a canonical pathway involving the upstream activation of caspase-2, followed by BID cleavage and stimulation of the intrinsic pathway. Herein, we report that the BH3-only protein BIM, rather than BID, is essential to heat shock-induced cell death. We observed that BIM-deficient cells were highly resistant to heat shock, exhibiting short and long-term survival equivalent to Bax(-/-)Bak(-/-) cells and better than either Bid(-/-) or dominant-negative caspase-9-expressing cells. Only Bim(-/-) and Bax(-/-)Bak(-/-) cells exhibited resistance to mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and loss of mitochondrial inner membrane potential. Moreover, while dimerized caspase-2 failed to induce apoptosis in Bid(-/-) cells, it readily did so in Bim(-/-) cells, implying that caspase-2 kills exclusively through BID, not BIM. Finally, BIM reportedly associates with MCL-1 following heat shock, and Mcl-1(-/-) cells were indeed sensitized to heat shock-induced apoptosis. However, pharmacological inhibition of BCL-2 and BCL-X(L) with ABT-737 also sensitized cells to heat shock, most likely through liberation of BIM. Thus, BIM mediates heat shock-induced apoptosis through a BAX/BAK-dependent pathway that is antagonized by antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members.

  3. Chromosome behavior of heat shock induced triploid in Fenneropenaeus chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2003-09-01

    Triploidy was induced in Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis by 30±0.5°C heat shock treatment (initiated at 20 min after fertilization) for 10 min to inhibit the release of PB2 at 18.0°C. The highest triploid rate obtained was 84.5% in nauplius stage. The effect of heat shock treatment on meiosis and cleavage of eggs was investigated in this work aimed to establish efficient procedures for triploid induction and to gain understanding of the mechanism of triploid production. Three pronuclei that could be observed in the treated eggs under fluorescence microscope developed into triploid embryos. Some abnormal chromosome behavior was observed in heat shocked eggs.

  4. A thermochemical model for shock-induced reactions (heat detonations) in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boslough, Mark B.

    1990-02-01

    Recent advances in studies of shock-induced chemistry in reactive solids have led to the recognition of a new class of energetic materials which are unique in their response to shock waves. Experimental work has shown that chemical energy can be released on a time scale shorter than shock-transit times in laboratory samples. However, for many compositions, the reaction products remain in the condensed state upon release from high pressure, and no sudden expansion takes place. Nevertheless, if such a reaction is sufficiently rapid, it can be modeled as a type of detonation, termed ``heat detonation'' in the present paper. It is shown that unlike an explosive detonation, an unsupported heat detonation will decay to zero unless certain conditions are met. An example of such a reaction is Fe2 O3 +2Al+shock→Al2 O3 +2Fe (the standard thermite reaction). A shock-wave equation of state is determined from a mixture theory for reacted and unreacted porous thermite. The calculated shock temperatures are compared to experimentally measured shock temperatures, demonstrating that a shock-induced reaction takes place. Interpretation of the measured temperature history in the context of the thermochemical model implies that the principal rate-controlling kinetic mechanism is dynamic mixing at the shock front. Despite the similarity in thermochemical modeling of heat detonations to explosive detonations, the two processes are qualitatively very different in reaction mechanism as well as in the form the energy takes upon release, with explosives producing mostly work and heat detonations producing mostly heat.

  5. Jasmonic acid is a crucial signal transducer in heat shock induced sesquiterpene formation in Aquilaria sinensis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Liao, Yong-Cui; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Juan; Sun, Pei-Wen; Gao, Zhi-Hui; Sui, Chun; Wei, Jian-He

    2016-02-23

    Agarwood, a highly valuable resinous and fragrant heartwood of Aquilaria plants, is widely used in traditional medicines, incense and perfume. Only when Aquilaria trees are wounded by external stimuli do they form agarwood sesquiterpene defensive compounds. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway of wound-induced agarwood formation is important. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a well-characterized molecule that mediates a plant's defense response and secondary metabolism. However, little is known about the function of endogenous JA in agarwood sesquiterpene biosynthesis. Here, we report that heat shock can up-regulate the expression of genes in JA signaling pathway, induce JA production and the accumulation of agarwood sesquiterpene in A. sinensis cell suspension cultures. A specific inhibitor of JA, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), could block the JA signaling pathway and reduce the accumulation of sesquiterpene compounds. Additionally, compared to SA and H2O2, exogenously supplied methyl jasmonate has the strongest stimulation effect on the production of sesquiterpene compounds. These results clearly demonstrate the central induction role of JA in heat-shock-induced sesquiterpene production in A. sinensis.

  6. Jasmonic acid is a crucial signal transducer in heat shock induced sesquiterpene formation in Aquilaria sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Liao, Yong-Cui; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Juan; Sun, Pei-Wen; Gao, Zhi-Hui; Sui, Chun; Wei, Jian-He

    2016-01-01

    Agarwood, a highly valuable resinous and fragrant heartwood of Aquilaria plants, is widely used in traditional medicines, incense and perfume. Only when Aquilaria trees are wounded by external stimuli do they form agarwood sesquiterpene defensive compounds. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway of wound-induced agarwood formation is important. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a well-characterized molecule that mediates a plant’s defense response and secondary metabolism. However, little is known about the function of endogenous JA in agarwood sesquiterpene biosynthesis. Here, we report that heat shock can up-regulate the expression of genes in JA signaling pathway, induce JA production and the accumulation of agarwood sesquiterpene in A. sinensis cell suspension cultures. A specific inhibitor of JA, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), could block the JA signaling pathway and reduce the accumulation of sesquiterpene compounds. Additionally, compared to SA and H2O2, exogenously supplied methyl jasmonate has the strongest stimulation effect on the production of sesquiterpene compounds. These results clearly demonstrate the central induction role of JA in heat-shock-induced sesquiterpene production in A. sinensis. PMID:26902148

  7. Metacaspase-binding peptide inhibits heat shock-induced death in Leishmania (L.) amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Peña, Mauricio S; Cabral, Guilherme C; Fotoran, Wesley L; Perez, Katia R; Stolf, Beatriz S

    2017-03-02

    Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis is an important agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil. This parasite faces cell death in some situations during transmission to the vertebrate host, and this process seems to be dependent on the activity of metacaspase (MCA), an enzyme bearing trypsin-like activity present in protozoans, plants and fungi. In fact, the association between MCA expression and cell death induced by different stimuli has been demonstrated for several Leishmania species. Regulators and natural substrates of MCA are poorly known. To fulfill this gap, we have employed phage display over recombinant L. (L.) amazonensis MCA to identify peptides that could interact with the enzyme and modulate its activity. Four peptides were selected for their capacity to specifically bind to MCA and interfere with its activity. One of these peptides, similar to ecotin-like ISP3 of L. (L.) major, decreases trypsin-like activity of promastigotes under heat shock, and significantly decreases parasite heat shock-induced death. These findings indicate that peptide ligands identified by phage display affect trypsin-like activity and parasite death, and that an endogenous peptidase inhibitor is a possible natural regulator of the enzyme.

  8. The L-type cyclin CYL-1 and the heat-shock-factor HSF-1 are required for heat-shock-induced protein expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hajdu-Cronin, Yvonne M; Chen, Wen J; Sternberg, Paul W

    2004-12-01

    In a screen for suppressors of activated GOA-1 (Galpha(o)) under the control of the hsp-16.2 heat-shock promoter, we identified three genetic loci that affected heat-shock-induced GOA-1 expression. The cyl-1 mutants are essentially wild type in appearance, while hsf-1 and sup-45 mutants have egg-laying defects. The hsf-1 mutation also causes a temperature-sensitive developmental arrest, and hsf-1 mutants have decreased life span. Western analysis indicated that mutations in all three loci suppressed the activated GOA-1 transgene by decreasing its expression. Heat-shock-induced expression of hsp-16.2 mRNA was reduced in cyl-1 mutants and virtually eliminated in hsf-1 and sup-45 mutants, as compared to wild-type expression. The mutations could also suppress other transgenes under heat-shock control. cyl-1 and sup-45, but not hsf-1, mutations suppressed a defect caused by a transgene not under heat-shock control, suggesting a role in general transcription or a post-transcriptional aspect of gene expression. hsf-1 encodes the C. elegans homolog of the human heat-shock factor HSF1, and cyl-1 encodes a cyclin most similar to cyclin L. We believe HSF-1 acts in heat-shock-inducible transcription and CYL-1 acts more generally in gene expression.

  9. Heat shock induces apoptosis through reactive oxygen species involving mitochondrial and death receptor pathways in corneal cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Ling; Yu, Hsin-Su; Lin, Hsien-Chung; Wu, Kwou-Yeung; Yang, Rei-Cheng; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2011-10-01

    Although many studies have been performed to elucidate the molecular consequences of ultraviolet irradiation, little is known about the effect of infrared radiation on ocular disease. In addition to photons, heat is generated as a consequence of infrared irradiation, and heat shock is widely considered to be an environmental stressor. Here, we are the first to investigate the biological effect of heat shock on Statens Seruminstitut Rabbit Cornea (SIRC) cells. Our results indicate that heat shock exhibits effective cell proliferation inhibition by inducing apoptosis. Heat shock triggers the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway indicated by a change in Bax/Bcl-2 ratios, resulting in caspase-9 activity. In addition, heat shock triggered the death receptor apoptotic pathway indicated by a change in Fas ligand expression, resulting in caspase-8 activity. Furthermore, we also found that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a critical mediator in heat shock-induced apoptosis. In addition, the antioxidant vitamin C significantly decreased heat shock-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, these findings suggest a critical role for ROS involving mitochondrial and death receptor pathways in heat shock-mediated apoptosis of cornea cells.

  10. Gamma-effects on 2-dimensional transonic aerodynamics. [specific heat ratio due to shock induced separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuzla, K.; Russell, D. A.; Wai, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Nonlifting 10% biconvex airfoils are mounted in a 30 x 40 cm Ludwieg-tube-driven transonic test-section and the flow field recorded with a holographic interferometer. Nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide are used as the principal test gases. Experiments are conducted with Reynolds number based on chord of (0.5-3.5) x 10 to the 6th with Mach numbers of 0.70, 0.75, and 0.80. Supporting calculations use inviscid transonic small-disturbance and full-potential computer codes coupled with simple integral boundary-layer modeling. Systematic studies show that significant gamma-effects can occur due to shock-induced separation.

  11. Prediction and measurement of heat transfer rates for the shock-induced unsteady laminar boundary layer on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The unsteady laminar boundary layer induced by the flow-initiating shock wave passing over a flat plate mounted in a shock tube was theoretically and experimentally studied in terms of heat transfer rates to the plate for shock speeds ranging from 1.695 to 7.34 km/sec. The theory presented by Cook and Chapman for the shock-induced unsteady boundary layer on a plate is reviewed with emphasis on unsteady heat transfer. A method of measuring time-dependent heat-transfer rates using thin-film heat-flux gages and an associated data reduction technique are outlined in detail. Particular consideration is given to heat-flux measurement in short-duration ionized shocktube flows. Experimental unsteady plate heat transfer rates obtained in both air and nitrogen using thin-film heat-flux gages generally agree well with theoretical predictions. The experimental results indicate that the theory continues to predict the unsteady boundary layer behavior after the shock wave leaves the trailing edge of the plate even though the theory is strictly applicable only for the time interval in which the shock remains on the plate.

  12. Examination of KNK437- and quercetin-mediated inhibition of heat shock-induced heat shock protein gene expression in Xenopus laevis cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Manwell, Laurie A; Heikkila, John J

    2007-11-01

    We examined the effect of quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavon) and KNK437 (N-formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidene-gamma-butyrolactam), a benzylidene lactam compound, on heat-induced heat shock protein (hsp) gene expression in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells. In previous studies, both quercetin and KNK437 inhibited heat shock factor activity resulting in a repression of hsp mRNA and protein accumulation in human cultured cells. In this first study of the effect of these hsp gene expression inhibitors in a non-mammalian cell line, we report that both quercetin and KNK437 reduced the heat shock-induced accumulation of hsp30, hsp47 and hsp70 mRNA in X. laevis cultured cells. However, these inhibitors had no effect on the relative level of a non-heat shock protein mRNA, ef1alpha, in either control or heat shocked cells. Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses revealed that quercetin partially inhibited HSP30 protein accumulation. In contrast, HSP30 protein was not detectable in KNK437-treated cells. Finally, treatment of A6 cells with KNK437 inhibited the heat shock-induced acquisition of thermotolerance, as determined by preservation of actin filaments and cellular morphology using immunocytochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy.

  13. Effect of patchouli alcohol on the regulation of heat shock-induced oxidative stress in IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Jiang, Linshu; Liu, Fenghua; Chen, Yuping; Xu, Lei; Li, Deyin; Ma, Yunfei; Li, Huanrong; Xu, Jianqin

    2016-08-01

    Purpose Patchouli alcohol (PA) is used to treat gastrointestinal dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the function of PA in the regulated process of oxidative stress in rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Materials and methods Oxidative stress was stimulated by exposing IEC-6 cells to heat shock (42 °C for 3 h). IEC-6 cells in treatment groups were pretreated with various concentrations of PA (10, 40, and 80 ng/mL) for 3 h before heat shock. Results Heat shock caused damage to the morphology of IEC-6 cells, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Moreover, mRNA and protein expression by target genes related to oxidative stress in heat shock were also altered. Specifically, the mRNA expression by HSP70, HSP90, GSH-px, NRF2 nd HO-1were all increased, and Nrf2 and Keap1 protein expression were increased after heat shock. However, pretreatment with PA weakened the level of damage to the cellular morphology, and decreased the MDA content caused by heat shock, indicating PA had cytoprotective activities. Pretreatment with PA at high dose significantly increased generation of intracellular ROS. Compared with the heat shock group alone, PA pretreatment significantly decreased the mRNA expression by HSP70, HSP90, SOD, CAT, GSH-px, KEAP1 and HO-1. Furthermore, the high dose of PA significantly increased Nrf2 protein expression, while both the intermediate and high dose of PA significantly increased HO-1 protein expression. Conclusion Heat-shock-induced oxidative stress in IEC-6 cells, and PA could alleviate the Nrf2-Keap1 cellular oxidative stress responses.

  14. Heat shock-induced interactions among nuclear HSFs detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Chan-Gi; Ahn, Sang-Gun

    2015-07-31

    The cellular response to stress is primarily controlled in cells via transcriptional activation by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 is well-known to form homotrimers for activation upon heat shock and subsequently bind to target DNAs, such as heat-shock elements, by forming stress granules. A previous study demonstrated that nuclear HSF1 and HSF2 molecules in live cells interacted with target DNAs on the stress granules. However, the process underlying the binding interactions of HSF family in cells upon heat shock remains unclear. This study demonstrate for the first time that the interaction kinetics among nuclear HSF1, HSF2, and HSF4 upon heat shock can be detected directly in live cells using dual color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). FCCS analyses indicated that the binding between HSFs was dramatically changed by heat shock. Interestingly, the recovery kinetics of interaction between HSF1 molecules after heat shock could be represented by changes in the relative interaction amplitude and mobility. - Highlights: • The binding interactions among nuclear HSFs were successfully detected. • The binding kinetics between HSF1s during recovery was quantified. • HSF2 and HSF4 strongly formed hetero-complex, even before heat shock. • Nuclear HSF2 and HSF4 bound to HSF1 only after heat shock.

  15. Heat shock-induced degradation of Msn2p, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor, occurs in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lallet, S; Garreau, H; Poisier, C; Boy-Marcotte, E; Jacquet, M

    2004-10-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the zinc finger transcription factor Msn2p is a central component of the general stress response. It is activated in response to a wide variety of environmental changes, including physicochemical stresses as well as nutritional starvation, and induces the expression of a large set of genes required for cellular adaptation. The transcriptional activity of Msn2p in response to stresses is transient, and must therefore be strictly controlled. It is mainly regulated by reversible translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus upon the onset of stress, under the control of the cAMP-APK and the TOR pathways. In this report, we describe a new level of control: heat shock-induced degradation of Msn2p by the 26S proteasome. This degradation occurs in the nucleus and is further enhanced when Msn2p is fully active. Moreover, we show that the cyclin-dependent protein kinase Srb10p, a component of the transcription machinery, plays a role in the enhanced degradation of Msn2p upon heat shock. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms by which Msn2p is transiently activated in response to stress.

  16. Polyamine regulation of heat-shock-induced spermidine N1-acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, D J; Carper, S W; Clay, L; Chen, J R; Gerner, E W

    1990-01-01

    The enzyme spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (N1-SAT) is rapidly induced by heat shock in CHO and A549 cells, with activity declining by 24 h. Depletion of intracellular polyamines by alpha-difluoromethylornithine, an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, blocks this induction. Re-addition of putrescine to these cultures restores the response to heat shock, with a concomitant increase in intracellular N1-acetylspermidine. Diaminopropane is more than twice as effective as the naturally occurring diamine putrescine, suggesting that the propylamine moiety of spermidine is involved in the regulation of N1-SAT induction. Inhibitor studies indicate transcriptional activation and that the enzyme has an apparent half-life of 30-60 min. A second heat shock rapidly inhibits induced N1-SAT activity, which decays with a half-life of 2-3 min. Despite its induction by heat, N1-SAT is not a stable enzyme, suggesting that the activity observed is not due to a modification of an existing peptide, but is due to a transcriptional event, which may justify the inclusion of this enzyme in the family of heat-shock proteins. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2111132

  17. FTSJ2, a Heat Shock-Inducible Mitochondrial Protein, Suppresses Cell Invasion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken-Yo; Liu, Fang-Chueh; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Cheng, Winston T. K.; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA large subunit methyltransferase J (RrmJ), an Escherichia coli heat shock protein, is responsible for 2′-O-ribose methylation in 23S rRNA. In mammals, three close homologs of RrmJ have been identified and have been designated as FTSJ1, FTSJ2 and FTSJ3; however, little is known about these genes. In this study, we characterized the mammalian FTSJ2, which was the most related protein to RrmJ in a phylogenetic analysis that had similar amino acid sequence features and tertiary protein structures of RrmJ. FTSJ2 was first identified in this study as a nucleus encoded mitochondrial protein that preserves the heat shock protein character in mammals in which the mRNA expressions was increased in porcine lung tissues and A549 cells after heat shock treatment. In addition, a recent study in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) suggested that the FTSJ2 gene is located in a novel oncogenic locus. However, our results demonstrate that the expression of FTSJ2 mRNA was decreased in the more invasive subline (CL1-5) of the lung adenocarcinoma cells (CL1) compared with the less invasive subline (CL1-0), and overexpression of FTSJ2 resulted in the inhibition of cell invasion and migration in the rhabdomyosarcoma cell (TE671). In conclusion, our findings indicate that mammalian FTSJ2 is a mitochondrial ortholog of E. coli RrmJ and conserves the heat shock protein properties. Moreover, FTSJ2 possesses suppressive effects on the invasion and migration of cancer cells. PMID:24595062

  18. Proteomic analysis of heat shock-induced protection in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Fetaud-Lapierre, Vanessa; Pastor, Catherine M; Farina, Annarita; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2010-11-05

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas, which can result in serious morbidity or death. Acute pancreatitis severity can be reduced in experimental models by preconditioning animals with a short hyperthermia prior to disease induction. Heat shock proteins 27 and 70 are key effectors of this protective effect. In this study, we performed a comparative proteomic analysis using a combination of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis and isobaric tagging to investigate changes in pancreatic proteins expression that were associated with thermal stress, both in healthy rats and in a model of caerulein-induced pancreatitis. In agreement with previous studies, we observed modulation of heat shock and inflammatory proteins expression in response to heat stress or pancreatitis induction. We also identified numerous other proteins, whose pancreatic level changed following pancreatitis induction, when acute pancreatitis severity was reduced by prior thermal stress, or in healthy rats in response to hyperthermia. Interestingly, we showed that the expression of various proteins associated with the secretory pathway was modified in the different experimental models, suggesting that modulation of this process is involved in the protective effect against pancreatic tissue damage.

  19. Heat shock induces mini-Cajal bodies in the Xenopus germinal vesicle.

    PubMed

    Handwerger, Korie E; Wu, Zheng'an; Murphy, Christine; Gall, Joseph G

    2002-05-15

    Cajal bodies are evolutionarily conserved nuclear organelles that are believed to play a central role in assembly of RNA transcription and processing complexes. Although knowledge of Cajal body composition and behavior has greatly expanded in recent years, little is known about the molecules and mechanisms that lead to the formation of these organelles in the nucleus. The Xenopus oocyte nucleus or germinal vesicle is an excellent model system for the study of Cajal bodies, because it is easy to manipulate and it contains 50-100 Cajal bodies with diameters up to 10 microm. In this study we show that numerous mini-Cajal bodies (less than 2 microm in diameter) form in the germinal vesicle after oocytes recover from heat shock. The mechanism for heat shock induction of mini-Cajal bodies is independent of U7 snRNA and does not require transcription or import of newly translated proteins from the cytoplasm. We suggest that Cajal bodies originate by self-organization of preformed components, preferentially on the surface of B-snurposomes.

  20. Characterization of a heat-shock-inducible hsp70 gene of the green alga Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qian; Hallmann, Armin; Edwards, Lisseth; Miller, Stephen M

    2006-04-12

    The green alga Volvox carteri possesses several thousand cells, but just two cell types: large reproductive cells called gonidia, and small, biflagellate somatic cells. Gonidia are derived from large precursor cells that are created during embryogenesis by asymmetric cell divisions. The J domain protein GlsA (Gonidialess A) is required for these asymmetric divisions and is believed to function with an Hsp70 partner. As a first step toward identifying this partner, we cloned and characterized V. carteri hsp70A, which is orthologous to HSP70A of the related alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Like HSP70A, V. carteri hsp70A contains multiple heat shock elements (HSEs) and is highly inducible by heat shock. Consistent with these properties, Volvox transformants that harbor a glsA antisense transgene that is driven by an hsp70A promoter fragment express Gls phenotypes that are temperature-dependent. hsp70A appears to be the only gene in the genome that encodes a cytoplasmic Hsp70, so we conclude that Hsp70A is clearly the best candidate to be the chaperone that participates with GlsA in asymmetric cell division.

  1. Expression of hsrω-RNAi transgene prior to heat shock specifically compromises accumulation of heat shock-induced Hsp70 in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anand K; Lakhotia, Subhash C

    2016-01-01

    A delayed organismic lethality was reported in Drosophila following heat shock when developmentally active and stress-inducible noncoding hsrω-n transcripts were down-regulated during heat shock through hs-GAL4-driven expression of the hsrω-RNAi transgene, despite the characteristic elevation of all heat shock proteins (Hsp), including Hsp70. Here, we show that hsrω-RNAi transgene expression prior to heat shock singularly prevents accumulation of Hsp70 in all larval tissues without affecting transcriptional induction of hsp70 genes and stability of their transcripts. Absence of the stress-induced Hsp70 accumulation was not due to higher levels of Hsc70 in hsrω-RNAi transgene-expressing tissues. Inhibition of proteasomal activity during heat shock restored high levels of the induced Hsp70, suggesting very rapid degradation of the Hsp70 even during the stress when hsrω-RNAi transgene was expressed ahead of heat shock. Unexpectedly, while complete absence of hsrω transcripts in hsrω (66) homozygotes (hsrω-null) did not prevent high accumulation of heat shock-induced Hsp70, hsrω-RNAi transgene expression in hsrω-null background blocked Hsp70 accumulation. Nonspecific RNAi transgene expression did not affect Hsp70 induction. These observations reveal that, under certain conditions, the stress-induced Hsp70 can be selectively and rapidly targeted for proteasomal degradation even during heat shock. In the present case, the selective degradation of Hsp70 does not appear to be due to down-regulation of the hsrω-n transcripts per se; rather, this may be an indirect effect of the expression of hsrω-RNAi transgene whose RNA products may titrate away some RNA-binding proteins which may also be essential for stability of the induced Hsp70.

  2. Differential heat shock tolerance and expression of heat shock inducible proteins in two stored-product psocids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent recognition of psocid infestations as a major concern in stored products, where their management with fumigants and conventional insecticides has proven difficult, and also the recent reemergence of heat treatment as a potential tactic for control of stored-product insects led to the pres...

  3. Ultrastructural detection of nucleic acids within heat shock-induced perichromatin granules of HeLa cells by cytochemical and immunocytological methods.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Christine; Lamaye, Françoise; Thelen, Nicolas; Thiry, Marc

    2009-06-01

    The perichromatin granules (PGs) are enigmatic structures of the cell nucleus. The major drawbacks for a biological study are their rare occurrence and their small size in normal conditions. As heat shock has been shown to increase their number, we applied a hyperthermal shock on HeLa cells to investigate the nucleic acid content of PGs by means of cytochemical and immunocytological approaches. These heat shock-induced PGs (hsiPGs) appeared as clusters organized in the form of honeycomb structures and were always associated with some blocks of condensed chromatin, such as the perinucleolar chromatin shell. A stalk connecting the hsiPG to the chromatin could be observed. For the detection of RNA, we applied an immunocytological method involving two anti-RNA antibodies and quantified the gold labelling obtained. The results clearly revealed that hsiPGs contained RNA. Regarding to the detection of DNA, we used three different methods followed by quantitative analyses. The results seemed to indicate that a small amount of DNA was present in hsiPGs. Together, these findings suggest that hsiPGs might be RNP structures associated with particular regions of DNA.

  4. Heat shock-induced attenuation of hydroxyl radical generation and mitochondrial aconitase activity in cardiac H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ilangovan, Govindasamy; Venkatakrishnan, C D; Bratasz, Anna; Osinbowale, Sola; Cardounel, Arturo J; Zweier, Jay L; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2006-02-01

    A mild heat shock (hyperthermia) protects cells from apoptotic and necrotic deaths by inducing overexpression of various heat shock proteins (Hsps). These proteins, in combination with the activation of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzyme, play important roles in the protection of the myocardium against a variety of diseases. In the present work we report that the generation of potent reactive oxygen species (ROS), namely *OH in cardiac H9c2 cells, is attenuated by heat shock treatment (2 h at 42 degrees C). Western blot analyses showed that heat shock treatment induced overexpression of Hsp70, Hsp60, and Hsp25. The observed *OH was found to be derived from the superoxide (O(2)(-)*) generated by the mitochondria. Whereas the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity was increased in the heat-shocked cells, the mitochondrial aconitase activity was reduced. The mechanism of O(2)(-)* conversion into *OH in mitochondria is proposed as follows. The O(2)(-)* leaked from the electron transport chain, oxidatively damages the mitochondrial aconitase, releasing a free Fe(2+). The aconitase-released Fe(2+) combines with H(2)O(2) to generate *OH via a Fenton reaction and the oxidized Fe(3+) recombines with the inactivated enzyme after being reduced to Fe(2+) by other cellular reductants, turning it over to be active. However, in heat-shocked cells, because of higher MnSOD activity, the excess H(2)O(2) causes irreversible damage to the mitochondrial aconitase enzyme, thus inhibiting its activity. In conclusion, we propose that attenuation of *OH generation after heat shock treatment might play an important role in reducing the myocardial ischemic injury, observed in heat shock-treated animals.

  5. Heat shock induces production of reactive oxygen species and increases inner mitochondrial membrane potential in winter wheat cells.

    PubMed

    Fedyaeva, A V; Stepanov, A V; Lyubushkina, I V; Pobezhimova, T P; Rikhvanov, E G

    2014-11-01

    Heat shock leads to oxidative stress. Excessive ROS (reactive oxygen species) accumulation could be responsible for expression of genes of heat-shock proteins or for cell death. It is known that in isolated mammalian mitochondria high protonic potential on the inner membrane actuates the production of ROS. Changes in viability, ROS content, and mitochondrial membrane potential value have been studied in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultured cells under heat treatment. Elevation of temperature to 37-50°C was found to induce elevated ROS generation and increased mitochondrial membrane potential, but it did not affect viability immediately after treatment. More severe heat exposure (55-60°C) was not accompanied by mitochondrial potential elevation and increased ROS production, but it led to instant cell death. A positive correlation between mitochondrial potential and ROS production was observed. Depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane by the protonophore CCCP inhibited ROS generation under the heating conditions. These data suggest that temperature elevation leads to mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization in winter wheat cultured cells, which in turn causes the increased ROS production.

  6. Shiga toxin-2 enhances heat-shock-induced apoptotic cell death in cultured and primary glial cells.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Toma, Tomoko; Shimizu, Masaki; Kuroda, Mondo; Wada, Taizo; Yachie, Akihiro

    2014-10-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) selectively controls the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) environment using specific structural and biochemical features of the endothelial cells, pericytes, and glial limitans. Glial cells, which represent the cellular components of the mature BBB, are the most numerous cells in the brain and are indispensable for neuronal functioning. We investigated the effects of Shiga toxin on glial cells in vitro. Shiga toxin failed to inhibit cell proliferation but attenuated expression of heat shock protein 70, which is one of the chaperone proteins, in cultured and primary glial cells. Furthermore, the combination of Shiga toxin and a heat shock procedure induced cell apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation in both cells. Thus, we speculate that glial cell death in response to the combination of Shiga toxin and heat shock might weaken the BBB and induce central nervous system complications.

  7. Turbulence measurements in shock induced flow using hot wire anemometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, Lin C.; Duffy, Robert E.; Trolier, James W.

    1988-01-01

    Heat transfer measurements over various geometric shapes have been made by immersing models in shock-induced flows. The heat transfer to a body is strongly dependent on the turbulence level of the stream. The interpretation of such heat transfer measurements requires a knowledge of the turbulence intensity. Turbulence intensity measurements, using hot-wire anemometry, have been successfully carried out in shock-induced flows. The experimental procedures for making such measurements and the techniques required are discussed.

  8. Thermotolerance induced at a mild temperature of 40°C alleviates heat shock-induced ER stress and apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Bettaieb, Ahmed; Averill-Bates, Diana A

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia (39-45°C) has emerged as an alternate prospect for cancer therapy in combination with radiation and chemotherapy. Despite promising progress in the clinic, molecular mechanisms involved in hyperthermia-induced cell death are not clear. Hyperthermia causes protein denaturation/aggregation, which results in cell death by apoptosis and/or necrosis. Hyperthermia also induces thermotolerance, which renders cells resistant to subsequent exposure to lethal heat shock. This study investigates the role of both lethal (42-43°C) and mild (40°C) hyperthermia in regulating ER stress and ER stress-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. The ability of mild thermotolerance induced at 40°C to alleviate either or both of these processes is also determined. Hyperthermia (42-43°C) induced ER stress, revealed by phosphorylation of PERK, eIF2α and IRE1α, cleavage of ATF6 and increased expression of BiP and sXBP1. Real-time PCR revealed that mRNA levels of ATF6, ATF4, BiP, sXBP1 and CHOP increased in cells exposed to hyperthermia. Moreover, hyperthermia caused disruption of calcium homeostasis and activated the calpain-calpastatin proteolytic system and ER resident caspase 4. Pre-exposure to mild hyperthermia (40°C) alleviated the induction of cytotoxicity and ER stress by hyperthermia (42-43°C) and protected cells against ER stress-induced apoptosis. ShRNA-mediated depletion of Hsp72 abrogated protective effects of mild thermotolerance (40°C) against heat-shock induced ER stress and sensitized cells to ER stress-mediated apoptosis. Our findings show that Hsp72 contributes to the protective effects of mild hyperthermia (40°C) against hyperthermia-induced ER stress and apoptosis.

  9. Effect of heat-shock induced oxidative stress is suppressed in BcZAT12 expressing drought tolerant tomato.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kavita; Singh, Major; Rai, Avinash Chandra

    2013-11-01

    The transcription factor ZAT12 is a member of stress-responsive C2H2 type zinc finger protein (ZFP) reported to control the expression of stress-activated genes mediated via ROS in plants. BcZAT12-transformed tomato cv. H-86, var. Kashi vishesh (lines ZT1-ZT6) over-expressing the gene product is demonstrated herein to be tolerant to heat-shock (HS)-induced oxidative stress. Results reveal that the relative expression of ZAT12 as well as heat induced Hsp17.4 and Hsp21 gene transcripts increased in transgenic upon exposure to HS. The transformed tomato lines ZT1 and ZT5 had significantly lowered free radical formation, improved electrolyte leakage, relative water content and chlorophyll levels with an enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes viz. superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase when exposed to HS. HS-induced oxidative stress by over-expression of the BcZAT12 gene transcripts in tomato as well as by largely enhancing the ROS-scavenging capacity and up regulation of Hsp transcripts. This enables the transgenic tomato plants to acquire a greater ability to counteract HS-induced oxidative stress, being endowed with more reduced antioxidant pools. The use of these HS-tolerant tomato lines could possibly be used for tomato cultivation in the areas affected by sudden temperature changes.

  10. Cathepsin B is involved in the heat shock induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis as well as the anti-apoptosis effect of HSP-70.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Cheng, Bor-Chih; Lin, Cheng-Hsien

    2014-11-01

    Cathepsin B is one of the major lysosomal cysteine proteases that plays an important role in apoptosis. Herein, we investigated whether Cathepsin B is involved in cardiomyocyte apoptosis caused by hyperthermic injury (HI) and heat shock protein (HSP)-70 protects these cells from HI-induced apoptosis mediated by Cathepsin. HI was produced in H9C2 cells by putting them in a circulating 43 °C water bath for 120 min, whereas preinduction of HSP-70 was produced in H9C2 cells by mild heat preconditioning (or putting them in 42 °C water bath for 30 min) 8 h before the start of HI. It was found that HI caused both cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased Cathepsin B activity in H9C2 cells. E-64-c, in addition to reducing Cathepsin B activity, significantly attenuated HI-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis (evidenced by increased apoptotic cell numbers, increased tuncated Bid (t-Bid), increased cytochrome C, increased caspase-9/-3, and decreased Bcl-2/Bax) in H9C2 cells. In addition, preinduction of HSP-70 by mild heat preconditioning or inhibition of HSP-70 by Tripolide significantly attenuated or exacerbated respectively both the cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased Cathepsin B activity in H9C2 cells. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of pre-induction of HSP-70 by mild heat production in reducing both cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased Cathepsin B activity caused by HI can be significantly reduced by Triptolide preconditioning. These results indicate that Cathepsin B is involved in HI-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis in H9C2 cells and HSP-70 protects these cells from HI-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis through Cathepsin B pathways.

  11. Heat shock induced excision of selectable marker genes in transgenic banana by the Cre-lox site-specific recombination system.

    PubMed

    Chong-Pérez, Borys; Kosky, Rafael G; Reyes, Maritza; Rojas, Luis; Ocaña, Bárbara; Tejeda, Marisol; Pérez, Blanca; Angenon, Geert

    2012-06-30

    Selectable marker genes are indispensable for efficient production of transgenic events, but are no longer needed after the selection process and may cause public concern and technological problems. Although several gene excision systems exist, few have been optimized for vegetatively propagated crops. Using a Cre-loxP auto-excision strategy, we obtained transgenic banana plants cv. Grande Naine (Musa AAA) devoid of the marker gene used for selection. We used T-DNA vectors with the cre recombinase gene under control of a heat shock promoter and selectable marker gene cassettes placed between two loxP sites in direct orientation, and a gene of interest inserted outside of the loxP sites. Heat shock promoters pGmHSP17.6-L and pHSP18.2, from soybean and Arabidopsis respectively, were tested. A transient heat shock treatment of primary transgenic embryos was sufficient for inducing cre and excising cre and the marker genes. Excision efficiency, as determined by PCR and Southern hybridization was 59.7 and 40.0% for the GmHSP17.6-L and HSP18.2 promoters, respectively. Spontaneous excision was not observed in 50 plants derived from untreated transgenic embryos. To our knowledge this is the first report describing an efficient marker gene removal system for banana. The method described is simple and might be generally applicable for the production of marker-free transgenic plants of many crop species.

  12. Heat shock-induced accumulation of 70-kDa stress protein (HSP70) can protect ATP-depleted tumor cells from necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kabakov, A E; Gabai, V L

    1995-03-01

    The phenomenon of cell resistance to prolonged energy deprivation after mild thermal stress was studied in vitro. Murine P3O1 myeloma and Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells were treated with rotenone (an inhibitor of respiration) in glucose-free medium to block ATP generation. ATP rapidly decreased in these cells to 3-6% of the initial level that resulted in powerful aggregation of cytoskeletal proteins, blebbing, and necrotic death of 60-70% cells within 2 h. Prior heat shock (43 degrees C for 10 min) with a subsequent 3-h recovery in a rich medium considerably suppressed the rotenone-induced actin aggregation and rate of necrosis in the energy-deprived cells without effecting the ATP drop in them. Using [14C]leucine labeling, gel electrophoresis, and fluorography, stimulation of the heat-shock protein (HSP) synthesis and total suppression of any other translation were revealed in the cells during recovery after the heat pretreatment. Significantly elevated levels of HSP70 but not HSP90 and HSP27 were found by means of immunoblotting in both cell cultures rendered resistant to necrosis under ATP-depleting conditions. Inhibition of the thermo-induced HSP synthesis by cycloheximide fully prevented development of the tolerance to energy deprivation. A novel function of HSP70 consisting of protection of ATP-deprived cells from "lethal" aggregation of cytoskeletal proteins is suggested.

  13. The antioxidant transcription factor Nrf2 contributes to the protective effect of mild thermotolerance (40°C) against heat shock-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Glory, Audrey; Averill-Bates, Diana A

    2016-10-01

    The exposure of cells to low doses of stress induces adaptive survival responses that protect cells against subsequent exposure to toxic stress. The ability of cells to resist subsequent toxic stress following exposure to low dose heat stress at 40°C is known as mild thermotolerance. Mild thermotolerance involves increased expression of heat shock proteins and antioxidants, but the initiating factors in this response are not understood. This study aims to understand the role of the Nrf2 antioxidant pathway in acquisition of mild thermotolerance at 40°C, and secondly, whether the Nrf2 pathway could be involved in the protective effect of thermotolerance against heat-shock (42°C)-induced apoptosis. During cell preconditioning at 40°C, protein expression of the Nrf2 transcription factor increased after 15-60min. In addition, levels of the Nrf2 targets MnSOD, catalase, heme oxygenase-1, glutamate cysteine ligase and Hsp70 increased at 40°C. Levels of these Nrf2 targets were enhanced by Nrf2 activator oltipraz and decreased by shRNA targeting Nrf2. Levels of pro-oxidants increased after 30-60min at 40°C. Pro-oxidant levels were decreased by oltipraz and increased by knockdown of Nrf2. Increased Nrf2 expression and catalase activity at 40°C were inhibited by the antioxidant PEG-catalase and by p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α. These results suggest that mild thermotolerance (40°C) increases cellular pro-oxidant levels, which in turn activate Nrf2 and its target genes. Moreover, Nrf2 contributes to the protective effect of thermotolerance against heat-shock (42°C)-induced apoptosis, because Nrf2 activation by oltipraz enhanced thermotolerance, whereas Nrf2 knockdown partly reversed thermotolerance. Improved knowledge about the different protective mechanisms that mild thermotolerance can activate is crucial for the potential use of this adaptive survival response to treat stress-related diseases.

  14. Benjamin Franklin and Shock-Induced Amnesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finger, Stanley; Zaromb, Franklin

    2006-01-01

    Shock-induced amnesia received considerable attention after Cerletti popularized electroconvulsive shock therapy in the late 1930s. Yet, often overlooked is the fact that Benjamin Franklin recognized that passing electricity through the head could affect memory for the traumatic event. Franklin described his findings on himself and others in…

  15. Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Dana M; Sheffield, Steve; Engelke, Ray; Manner, Virginia; Chellappa, Raja; Yoo, Choong - Shik

    2011-01-20

    The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

  16. Observations on shock induced chemistry of cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Akin, M C; Chau, R

    2013-07-14

    We use double pass absorption spectroscopy to examine shock induced reactions in situ in cyclohexane and benzene at pressures up to 33.1 GPa. Reactions in cyclohexane begin by 27 GPa and complete by 33.1 GPa. Reactions in benzene are observed to begin by 12 GPa and are complete by 18 GPa. Absorption spectra indicate that the first reaction in cyclohexane occurs within or near the shock front, and that a metastable local equilibrium is reached in the post-shock state. A second process may be observed upon reshock at the lower pressures, suggesting a new equilibrium is reached post-reshock as well. Absorption bands are consistent with the formation of short radicals or fragments upon decomposition; however, spectral resolution is too low to confirm this mechanism.

  17. Shock-induced devolatilization of calcite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.; Vizgirda, J.; Becker, R. H.; Epstein, S.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the release adiabats by Vizgirda (1981) indicate that substantial vaporization takes place upon release from shock pressures of 37 GPa for calcite and 14 GPa for aragonite. The present investigation includes the first controlled partial vaporization experiments on calcite. The experiments were conducted to test the predictions of the release adiabat experiments. The quantities of the gaseous species produced from shocked calcite and their carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions were determined, and the shock-induced effect on the Mn(2+) electron spin resonance spectrum in the shock-recovered calcite was observed. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that shock stresses at the 17-18 GPa level give rise to volatilization of 0.03-0.3 (mole) percent of calcite to CO2 and CO. The devolatilization of calcite occurs at low pressure at significantly lower entropy densities than predicted on the basis of thermodynamic continuum models.

  18. Benjamin Franklin and shock-induced amnesia.

    PubMed

    Finger, Stanley; Zaromb, Franklin

    2006-04-01

    Shock-induced amnesia received considerable attention after Cerletti popularized electroconvulsive shock therapy in the late 1930s. Yet, often overlooked is the fact that Benjamin Franklin recognized that passing electricity through the head could affect memory for the traumatic event. Franklin described his findings on himself and others in several letters from the mid-1700s, 2 of which were published in his lifetime. What he observed was confirmed in 1783 by physician Jan Ingenhousz, who was one of his correspondents. Although Ingenhousz had lost his memory for his electrical accident and was confused immediately afterward, he felt strangely elated and unusually sharp the next morning. Hence, he called for clinical trials with patients with melancholia who were not responding to more conventional therapies. After Franklin received Ingenhousz's letter, he also called for clinical trials. Neither man, however, tied the possible new cure for melancholia to the memory loss--nor did the operators that began to treat some patients with melancholia successfully with cranial shocks. Only much later would the amnesia be thought to be associated with the cure.

  19. Multiple-shocks induced nanocrystallization in iron

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Tomoki; Hirose, Akio; Sano, Tomokazu; Arakawa, Kazuto

    2014-07-14

    We found that multiple shots of femtosecond laser-driven shock pulses changed coarse crystalline iron grains with a size of 140 μm into nanocrystals with a high density of dislocations, which had never been observed in conventional shock processes. We performed metallurgical microstructure observations using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and hardness measurements using nanoindentation on cross-sections of shocked iron. TEM images showed that grains with sizes from 10 nm through 1 μm exist within 2 μm of the surface, where the dislocation density reached 2 × 10{sup 15 }m{sup −2}. Results of the hardness measurements showed a significant increase in hardness in the nanocrystallized region. We suggest that the formation of a high density of dislocations, which is produced by a single shock, induces local three-dimensional pile-up by the multiple-shocks, which causes grain refinement at the nanoscale.

  20. Shock induced crystallization of amorphous Nickel powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental work has shown the efficacy of amorphous Ni/crystalline Al composites as energetic materials, with flame velocities twice that of a comparable crystalline Ni/crystalline Al system. Of further interest is the recrystallization mechanisms in the pure amorphous Ni powders, both thermally induced and mechanically induced. We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced recrystallization in loosely packed amorphous Nickel powders. We study the time dependent nucleation and growth processes by holding the shocked samples at the induced pressures and temperatures for extended periods following the passage of the shock (up to 6 ns). We find that the nanostructure of the recrystallized Ni and time scales of recrystallization are dependent on the piston velocity. At low piston velocities, nucleation events are rare, leading to long incubation times and a relatively coarse nanostructure. At higher piston velocities, local variations in temperature due to jetting phenomena and void collapse, give rise to multiple nucleation events on time scales comparable to the passage of the shock wave, leading to the formation of a fine-grained nanostructure. Interestingly, we observe that the nucleation and growth process occurs in two steps, with the first nuclei crystallizing into the BCC structure, before evolving over time into the expected FCC structure. U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, HDTRA1-10-1-0119 (Program Manager Suhithi Peiris).

  1. Shock-induced arrhythmogenesis in the myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trayanova, Natalia; Eason, James

    2002-09-01

    The focus of this article is the investigation of the electrical behavior of the normal myocardium following the delivery of high-strength defibrillation shocks. To achieve its goal, the study employs a complex three-dimensional defibrillation model of a slice of the canine heart characterized with realistic geometry and fiber architecture. Defibrillation shocks of various strengths and electrode configurations are delivered to the model preparation in which a sustained ventricular tachycardia is induced. Instead of analyzing the post-shock electrical events as progressions of transmembrane potential maps, the study examines the evolution of the postshock phase singularities (PSs) which represent the organizing centers of reentry. The simulation results demonstrate that the shock induces numerous PSs the majority of which vanish before the reentrant wavefronts associated with them complete half of a single rotation. Failed shocks are characterized with one or more PSs that survive the initial period of PS annihilation to establish a new postshock arrhythmia. The increase in shock strength results in an overall decrease of the number of PSs that survive over 200 ms after the end of the shock; however, the exact behavior of the PSs is strongly dependent on the shock electrode configuration.

  2. Study of Unsteady, Sphere-Driven, Shock-Induced Combustion for Application to Hypervelocity Airbreathing Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axdahl, Erik; Kumar, Ajay; Wilhite, Alan

    2011-01-01

    A premixed, shock-induced combustion engine has been proposed in the past as a viable option for operating in the Mach 10 to 15 range in a single stage to orbit vehicle. In this approach, a shock is used to initiate combustion in a premixed fuel/air mixture. Apparent advantages over a conventional scramjet engine include a shorter combustor that, in turn, results in reduced weight and heating loads. There are a number of technical challenges that must be understood and resolved for a practical system: premixing of fuel and air upstream of the combustor without premature combustion, understanding and control of instabilities of the shock-induced combustion front, ability to produce sufficient thrust, and the ability to operate over a range of Mach numbers. This study evaluated the stability of the shock-induced combustion front in a model problem of a sphere traveling in a fuel/air mixture at high Mach numbers. A new, rapid analysis method was developed and applied to study such flows. In this method the axisymmetric, body-centric Navier-Stokes equations were expanded about the stagnation streamline of a sphere using the local similarity hypothesis in order to reduce the axisymmetric equations to a quasi-1D set of equations. These reduced sets of equations were solved in the stagnation region for a number of flow conditions in a premixed, hydrogen/air mixture. Predictions from the quasi-1D analysis showed very similar stable or unstable behavior of the shock-induced combustion front as compared to experimental studies and higher-fidelity computational results. This rapid analysis tool could be used in parametric studies to investigate effects of fuel rich/lean mixtures, non-uniformity in mixing, contaminants in the mixture, and different chemistry models.

  3. Investigation of shock-induced combustion past blunt projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, J. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to simulate shock-induced combustion in premixed hydrogen-air mixtures at various free-stream conditions and parameters. Two-dimensional axisymmetric, reacting viscous flow over blunt projectiles is computed to study shock-induced combustion at Mach 5.11 and Mach 6.46 in hydrogen-air mixture. A seven-species, seven reactions finite rate hydrogen-air chemical reaction mechanism is used combined with a finite-difference, shock-fitting method to solve the complete set of Navier-Stokes and species conservation equations. The study has allowed an improved understanding of the physics of shock-induced combustion over blunt projectiles and the numerical results can now be explained more readily with one-dimensional wave-interaction model.

  4. Intermittency and Topology of Shock Induced Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez, Jackson; Redondo, Jose M.; Ben Mahjoub, Otman; Malik, Nadeem; Vila, Teresa

    2016-04-01

    The advance of a Rayleigh-Taylor front is described in Linden & Redondo (1991),[1-3] and may be shown to follow a quadratic law in time where the width of the growing region of instability depends on the local mixing efficiency of the different density fluids that accelerate against each other g is the acceleration and A is the Atwood number defined as the diference of densities divided by their sum. This results show the independence of the large amplitude structures on the initial conditions the width of the mixing region depends also on the intermittency of the turbulence. Then dimensional analysis may also depend on the relevant reduced acceleration driven time and the molecular reactive time akin to Damkholer number and the fractal structure of the contact zone [2,4]. Detailed experiments and simulations on RT and RM shock induced fronts analized with respect to structure functions are able to determine which mechanisms are most effective in local mixing which increase the effective fractal dimension, as well as the effect of higher order geometrical parameters, such as the structure functions, in non-homogeneous fluids (Mahjoub et al 1998)[5]. The structure of a Mixing blob shows a relatively sharp head with most of the mixing taking place at the sides due to what seems to be shear instability very similar to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, but with sideways accelerations. The formation of the blobs and spikes with their secondary instabilities produces a turbulent cascade, evident just after about 1 non-dimensional time unit, from a virtual time origin that takes into account the linear growth phase, as can be seen by the growth of the fractal dimension for different volume fractions. Two-dimensional cuts of the 3D flow also show that vortex flows have closed or spiral streamlines around their core. Examples of such flows can be also seen in the laboratory, for example at the interface of atwo-layer stratified fluid in a tank in which case streamlines

  5. Shock Induced Starting of Gasdynamic Laser Nozzles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    Operating Frequency, Hertz y Ratio of Specific Heat at Constant Pressure to Specific Heat at Constant Volume Hg Mercury hir Measured Mercury Manometer Column...Heraeus type E-70 vacuum pump and measured with a mercury manometer . Minimum attainable pressure was approximately 2.0 inches of mercury absolute. The...P4/ . Atm Pressurization P I Bleed Valve P Valve Gage Atm Shutoff P4 Bleed Valve Valve P Gage Shutoff Valve P4 Gage P 1 Mercury Manometer 0-30 in Hg

  6. Shock-induced damage in rocks: Application to impact cratering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Huirong

    Shock-induced damage beneath impact craters is studied in this work. Two representative terrestrial rocks, San Marcos granite and Bedford limestone, are chosen as test target. Impacts into the rock targets with different combinations of projectile material, size, impact angle, and impact velocity are carried out at cm scale in the laboratory. Shock-induced damage and fracturing would cause large-scale compressional wave velocity reduction in the recovered target beneath the impact crater. The shock-induced damage is measured by mapping the compressional wave velocity reduction in the recovered target. A cm scale nondestructive tomography technique is developed for this purpose. This technique is proved to be effective in mapping the damage in San Marcos granite, and the inverted velocity profile is in very good agreement with the result from dicing method and cut open directly. Both compressional velocity and attenuation are measured in three orthogonal directions on cubes prepared from one granite target impacted by a lead bullet at 1200 m/s. Anisotropy is observed from both results, but the attenuation seems to be a more useful parameter than acoustic velocity in studying orientation of cracks. Our experiments indicate that the shock-induced damage is a function of impact conditions including projectile type and size, impact velocity, and target properties. Combined with other crater phenomena such as crater diameter, depth, ejecta, etc., shock-induced damage would be used as an important yet not well recognized constraint for impact history. The shock-induced damage is also calculated numerically to be compared with the experiments for a few representative shots. The Johnson-Holmquist strength and failure model, initially developed for ceramics, is applied to geological materials. Strength is a complicated function of pressure, strain, strain rate, and damage. The JH model, coupled with a crack softening model, is used to describe both the inelastic response of

  7. Electron beam control using shock-induced density downramp injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, K.; Tsai, H.-E.; Barber, S.; Lehe, R.; Mao, H.-S.; Steinke, S.; van Tilborg, J.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-03-01

    In these experiments, we improve the quality of electrons injected along a shock-induced density downramp. We demonstrate that beam ellipticity and steering are influenced by the shock front tilt, and we present simple models to explain these effects. By adjusting the shock front angle, we minimize the beam's off-axis steering and ellipticity, producing high-quality electron beams over a tunable energy range.

  8. Atomistic modeling of shock-induced void collapse in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Davila, L P; Erhart, P; Bringa, E M; Meyers, M A; Lubarda, V A; Schneider, M S; Becker, R; Kumar, M

    2005-03-09

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that shock-induced void collapse in copper occurs by emission of shear loops. These loops carry away the vacancies which comprise the void. The growth of the loops continues even after they collide and form sessile junctions, creating a hardened region around the collapsing void. The scenario seen in our simulations differs from current models that assume that prismatic loop emission is responsible for void collapse. We propose a new dislocation-based model that gives excellent agreement with the stress threshold found in the MD simulations for void collapse as a function of void radius.

  9. Shock-induced deformation phenomena in magnetite and their consequences on magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, Boris; Kontny, Agnes; Fritz, Jörg; Gerhards, Uta

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of shock waves on magnetic and microstructural behavior of multidomain magnetite from a magnetite-bearing ore, experimentally shocked to pressures of 5, 10, 20, and 30 GPa. Changes in apparent crystallite size and lattice parameter were determined by X-ray diffraction, and grain fragmentation and defect accumulation were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic properties were characterized by low-temperature saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM), susceptibility measurements around the Verwey transition as well as by hysteresis parameters at room temperature. It is established that the shock-induced refinement of magnetic domains from MD to SD-PSD range is a result of cooperative processes including brittle fragmentation of magnetite grains, plastic deformation with shear bands and twins as well as structural disordering in form of molten grains and amorphous nanoclusters. Up to 10 GPa, a decrease of coherent crystallite size, lattice parameter, saturation magnetization (Ms), and magnetic susceptibility and an increase in coercivity, SIRM, and width of Verwey transition are mostly associated with brittle grain fragmentation. Starting from 20 GPa, a slight recovery is documented in all magnetic and nonmagnetic parameters. In particular, the recovery in SIRM is correlated with an increase of the lattice constant. The recovery effect is associated with the increasing influence of shock heating/annealing at high shock pressures. The strong decrease of Ms at 30 GPa is interpreted as a result of strong lattice damage and distortion. Our results unravel the microstructural mechanisms behind the loss of magnetization and the modification of magnetic properties of magnetite and contribute to our understanding of shock-induced magnetic phenomena in impacted rocks on earth and in meteorites.

  10. Shock induced phase transition of water: Molecular dynamics investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-02-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out using numerous force potentials to investigate the shock induced phenomenon of pure bulk liquid water. Partial phase transition was observed at single shock velocity of 4.0 km/s without requirement of any external nucleators. Change in thermodynamic variables along with radial distribution function plots and spectral analysis revealed for the first time in the literature, within the context of molecular dynamic simulations, the thermodynamic pathway leading to formation of ice VII from liquid water on shock loading. The study also revealed information for the first time in the literature about the statistical time-frame after passage of shock in which ice VII formation can be observed and variations in degree of crystallinity of the sample over the entire simulation time of 100 ns.

  11. Shock Interaction with Substrate in a Shock Induced Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozinski, Kevin

    To further the knowledge of the Shock Induced Spray Process (SISP), an experimental apparatus which simulates Centerline's Waverider thermal spray gun was created which uses an unsteady flow to propel solid particles onto a substrate by the use of a shock wave to produce a coating. Experiments were conducted at a variety of operating supply pressures, firing frequencies, and stand off distances. A qualitative analysis was done using a custom Schlieren system along with a high speed camera. Insight into the flow behaviour in the SISP was established with the definition of six distinct phases. The formation of a bow shock, which is known to be detrimental to the SISP operation, is shown to be more prominent in the cases with higher supply pressure and close proximity of the apparatus exit to the substrate than with changes in firing frequency.

  12. Shock-induced synthesis of high temperature superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.; Venturini, E.L.

    1987-06-18

    It has now been determined that the unique features of the high pressure shock method, especially the shock-induced chemical synthesis technique, are fully applicable to high temperature superconducting materials. Extraordinarily high yields are achievable in accordance with this invention, e.g., generally in the range from about 20% to about 99%, often in the range from about 50% to about 90%, lower and higher yields, of course, also being possible. The method of this invention involves the application of a controlled high pressure shock compression pulse which can be produced in any conventional manner, e.g., by detonation of a high explosive material, the impact of a high speed projectile or the effect of intense pulsed radiation sources such as lasers or electron beams. Examples and a discussion are presented.

  13. Mechanisms of shock-induced reactions in high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Jeffrey J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which shock waves initiate chemical reactions in explosives is key to understanding their unique and defining property: the ability to undergo rapid explosive decomposition in response to mechanical stimulus. Although shock-induced reactions in explosives have been studied experimentally and computationally for decades, the nature of even the first chemical reactions that occur in response to shock remain elusive. To predictively understand how explosives respond to shock, the detailed sequence of events that occurs - mechanical deformation, energy transfer, bond breakage, and first chemical reactions - must be understood at the quantum-mechanical level. This paper reviews recent work in this field and ongoing experimental and theoretical work at Sandia National Laboratories in this important area of explosive science.

  14. Active suppression of an 'apparent shock induced instability'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, William M., Jr.; Tiffany, Sherwood H.; Bardusch, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    A control law was designed, using constrained optimization techniques, to suppress an apparent shock induced instability of a sweptback, aeroelastic wing with supercritical airfoil sections. The controller design was based on an approximate linear plant representation obtained using forced response data from a previous entry in the Langley Transonic Dynamics tunnel. During a second tunnel entry, it was found that there was not an instability in the uncontrolled case but there was a region of very low damping (high dynamic response) near a Mach number of 0.92. Controller performance was obtained during the test in near real-time and revealed that the controller attenuated the open-loop response and provided a small but significant amount of damping over a Mach number range from M = 0.70 to M = 0.92.

  15. Simulation of shock-induced melting of Ni using molecular dynamics coupled to a two-temperature model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koči, L.; Bringa, E. M.; Ivanov, D. S.; Hawreliak, J.; McNaney, J.; Higginbotham, A.; Zhigilei, L. V.; Belonoshko, A. B.; Remington, B. A.; Ahuja, R.

    2006-07-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we study shock-induced melting in Ni with an embedded atom method (EAM). Dynamic melting is probed by the pair correlation function, and we find a melting lattice temperature of Tmelt=6400±300K for a melting pressure of Pmelt=275±10GPa . When a combined MD+TTM (two-temperature model) approach is used to include electronic heat conduction and electron-phonon coupling, Pmelt and Tmelt change. For a given pressure, the temperature behind the shock decreases due to electronic heat diffusion into the cold, unshocked material. This cooling of the material behind the shock slightly increases the melting pressure compared to simulations without electronic heat conduction and electron-phonon coupling. The decrease in the temperature behind the shock front is enhanced if the electron-phonon coupling is artificially made larger. We also explore the feasibility of using x-ray diffraction to detect melting.

  16. Prediction of Shock-Induced Cavitation in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundage, Aaron

    2013-06-01

    Fluid-structure interaction problems that require estimating the response of thin structures within fluids to shock loading has wide applicability. For example, these problems may include underwater explosions and the dynamic response of ships and submarines; and biological applications such as Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and wound ballistics. In all of these applications the process of cavitation, where small cavities with dissolved gases or vapor are formed as the local pressure drops below the vapor pressure due to shock hydrodynamics, can cause significant damage to the surrounding thin structures or membranes if these bubbles collapse, generating additional shock loading. Hence, a two-phase equation of state (EOS) with three distinct regions of compression, expansion, and tension was developed to model shock-induced cavitation. This EOS was evaluated by comparing data from pressure and temperature shock Hugoniot measurements for water up to 400 kbar, and data from ultrasonic pressure measurements in tension to -0.3 kbar, to simulated responses from CTH, an Eulerian, finite volume shock code. The new EOS model showed significant improvement over pre-existing CTH models such as the SESAME EOS for capturing cavitation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy/NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Unraveling shock-induced chemistry using ultrafast lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David S

    2009-01-01

    The exquisite time synchronicity between shock and diagnostics needed to unravel chemical events occurring in picoseconds has been achieved using a shaped ultrafast laser pulse to both drive the shocks and interrogate the sample via a multiplicity of optical diagnostics. The shaped laser drive pulse can produce well-controlled shock states of sub-ns duration with sub-10 ps risetimes, sufficient for investigation of fast reactions or phase transformations in a thin layer with picosecond time resolution. The shock state is characterized using ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry (UDE) in either planar or Gaussian spatial geometries, the latter allowing measurements of the equation of state of materials at a range of stresses in a single laser pulse. Time-resolved processes in materials are being interrogated using UDE, ultrafast infrared absorption, ultrafast UV/visible absorption, and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy. Using these tools we showed that chemistry in an energetic thin film starts only after an induction time of a few tens of ps, an observation that allows differentiation between proposed shock-induced reaction mechanisms. These tools are presently being applied to a variety of energetic and reactive sample systems, from nitromethane and carbon disulfide, to micro-engineered interfaces in tunable energetic mixtures.

  18. Prediction of shock-induced cavitation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundage, A.

    2014-05-01

    Fluid-structure interaction problems that require estimating the response of thin structures within fluids to shock loading have wide applicability. For example, these problems may include underwater explosions and the dynamic response of ships and submarines; and biological applications such as Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and wound ballistics. In all of these applications the process of cavitation, where small cavities with dissolved gases or vapor are formed as the local pressure drops below the vapor pressure due to shock hydrodynamics, can cause significant damage to the surrounding thin structures or membranes if these bubbles collapse, generating additional shock loading. Hence, a two-phase equation of state (EOS) with three distinct regions of compression, expansion, and tension was developed to model shock-induced cavitation. This EOS was evaluated by comparing data from pressure and temperature shock Hugoniot measurements for water up to 400 kbar, and data from ultrasonic pressure measurements in tension to -0.3 kbar, to simulated responses from CTH, an Eulerian, finite volume shock code. The new EOS model showed significant improvement over preexisting CTH models such as the SESAME EOS for capturing cavitation.

  19. Unraveling shock-induced chemistry using ultrafast lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven

    2010-12-06

    The exquisite time synchronicity between shock and diagnostics needed to unravel chemical events occurring in picoseconds has been achieved using a shaped ultrafast laser pulse to both drive the shocks and interrogate the sample via a multiplicity of optical diagnostics. The shaped laser drive pulse can produce well-controlled shock states of sub-ns duration with sub-10 ps risetimes, sufficient for investigation offast reactions or phase transformations in a thin layer with picosecond time resolution. The shock state is characterized using ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry (UDE) in either planar or Gaussian spatial geometries, the latter allowing measurements of the equation of state of materials at a range of stresses in a single laser pulse. Time-resolved processes in materials are being interrogated using UDE, ultrafast infrared absorption, ultrafast UV/visible absorption, and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy. Using these tools we showed that chemistry in an energetic thin film starts only after an induction time of a few tens of ps, an observation that allows differentiation between proposed shock-induced reaction mechanisms. These tools are presently being applied to a variety of energetic and reactive sample systems, from nitromethane and carbon disulfide, to microengineered interfaces in tunable energetic mixtures. Recent results will be presented, and future trends outlined.

  20. Shock-induced thermal history of an EH3 chondrite, Asuka 10164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Yamaguchi, A.; Miyahara, M.

    2017-01-01

    Shock-induced features are abundantly observed in meteorites. Especially, shock veins, including high-pressure minerals, characterize many kinds of heavily shocked meteorite. On the other hand, no high-pressure phases have been yet reported from enstatite chondrites. We studied a heavily shocked EH3 chondrite, Asuka 10164, containing a vein, which comprises fragments of fine-grained silicate and opaque minerals, and chondrules. In this vein, we found a silica polymorph, coesite. This is the first discovery of a high-pressure phase in enstatite chondrites. Other high-pressure polymorphs were not observed in the vein. The assemblages and chemical compositions of minerals, and the occurrence of coesite indicate that the vein was subjected to the high-pressure and temperature condition at about 3-10 GPa and 1000 °C. The host also experienced heating for a short time under lower temperature conditions, from 700 to 1000 °C, based on the opaque minerals typical of EH chondrites and textural features. Although the pressure condition of the vein in this chondrite is much lower than those in the other meteorites, our results suggest that all major meteorite groups contain high-pressure polymorphs. Heavy shock events commonly took place in the solar system.

  1. Boundary-layer development and transition due to free-stream exothermic reactions in shock-induced flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the effect of free-stream thermal-energy release from shock-induced exothermic reactions on boundary-layer development and transition is presented. The flow model is that of a boundary layer developing behind a moving shock wave in two-dimensional unsteady flow over a shock-tube wall. Matched sets of combustible hydrogen-oxygen-nitrogen mixtures and inert hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures were used to obtain transition data over a range of transition Reynolds numbers from 1,100,000 to 21,300,000. The heat-energy is shown to significantly stabilize the boundary layer without changing its development character. A method for application of this data to flat-plate steady flows is included.

  2. Combining Observations of Shock-induced Minerals with Calculations to Constrain the Shock History of Meteorites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carli, P. S.; Xie, Z.; Sharp, T. G.

    2007-12-01

    All available evidence from shock Hugoniot and release adiabat measurements and from shock recovery experiments supports the hypothesis that the conditions for shock-induced phase transitions are similar to the conditions under which quasistatic phase transitions are observed. Transitions that require high temperatures under quasistatic pressures require high temperatures under shock pressures. The high-pressure phases found in shocked meteorites are almost invariably associated with shock melt veins. A shock melt vein is analogous to a pseudotachylite, a sheet of locally melted material that was quenched by conduction to surrounding cooler material. The mechanism by which shock melt veins form is not known; possible mechanisms include shock collisions, shock interactions with cracks and pores, and adiabatic shear. If one assumes that the phases within the vein crystallized in their stability fields, then available static high-pressure data constrain the shock pressure range over which the vein solidified. Since the veins have a sheet-like geometry, one may use one-dimensional heat flow calculations to constrain the cooling and crystallization history of the veins (Langenhorst and Poirier, 2000). Although the formation mechanism of a melt vein may involve transient pressure excursions, pressure equilibration of a mm-wide vein will be complete within about a microsecond, whereas thermal equilibration will require seconds. Some of our melt vein studies have indicated that the highly-shocked L chondrite meteorites were exposed to a narrow range of shock pressures, e.g., 18-25 GPa, over a minimum duration of the order of a second. We have used the Autodyn(TM) wave propagation code to calculate details of plausible impacts on the L-chondrite parent body for a variety of possible parent body stratigraphies. We infer that some meteorites probably represent material that was shocked at a depth of >10 km in their parent bodies.

  3. Proof-of-Principle Experiment of a Shock-Induced Combustion Ramjet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Mayer , A.E.H.J., Veraar, R.G., Stowe , R.A., Farinaccio, R., and Harris, P.G., “Design of a Shock-Induced Combustion Experiment in an Axisymmetric...RTO-EN-AVT-185 8 - 1 Proof-of-Principle Experiment of a Shock-Induced Combustion Ramjet R.G. Veraar and A.E.H.J. Mayer TNO Defence...Security and Safety 2280 AA Rijwijk NETHERLANDS J. Verreault McGill University Montréal, QC H3A 2K6 CANADA R.A. Stowe , R. Farinaccio, P.G. Harris

  4. Structure and dynamics of shock-induced nanobubble collapse in water.

    PubMed

    Vedadi, M; Choubey, A; Nomura, K; Kalia, R K; Nakano, A; Vashishta, P; van Duin, A C T

    2010-07-02

    Shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations based on a reactive force field. We observe a focused jet at the onset of bubble shrinkage and a secondary shock wave upon bubble collapse. The jet length scales linearly with the nanobubble radius, as observed in experiments on micron-to-millimeter size bubbles. Shock induces dramatic structural changes, including an ice-VII-like structural motif at a particle velocity of 1  km/s. The incipient ice VII formation and the calculated Hugoniot curve are in good agreement with experimental results.

  5. Cholinergic Modulation of the Hippocampus during Encoding and Retrieval of Tone/Shock-Induced Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jason L.; Kesner, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the role of acetylcholine (ACh) during encoding and retrieval of tone/shock-induced fear conditioning with the aim of testing Hasselmo's cholinergic modulation model of encoding and retrieval using a task sensitive to hippocampal disruption. Lesions of the hippocampus impair acquisition and retention of contextual conditioning with…

  6. Preservation and detectability of shock-induced magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikoo, Sonia M.; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas L.; Weiss, Benjamin P.; Suavet, Clément; Cournède, Cécile

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the effects of hypervelocity impacts on the magnetization of natural samples is required for interpreting paleomagnetic records of meteorites, lunar rocks, and cratered planetary surfaces. Rocks containing ferromagnetic minerals have been shown to acquire shock remanent magnetization (SRM) due to the passage of a shock wave in the presence of an ambient magnetic field. In this study, we conducted pressure remanent magnetization (PRM) acquisition experiments on a variety of natural samples as an analog for SRM acquisition at pressures ranging up to 1.8 GPa. Comparison of the alternating field (AF) and thermal demagnetization behavior of PRM confirms that AF demagnetization is a more efficient method for removing SRM overprints than thermal demagnetization because SRM may persist to unblocking temperatures approaching the Curie temperatures of magnetic minerals. The blocking of SRM to high temperatures suggests that SRM could persist without being eradicated by viscous relaxation over geologic timescales. However, SRM has been rarely observed in natural samples likely because of two factors: (1) other forms of impact-related remanence (e.g., thermal remanent magnetization from impact-related heating or chemical remanent magnetization from postimpact hydrothermal activity) are often acquired by target rocks that overprint SRM, and (2) low SRM acquisition efficiencies may prevent SRM from being distinguished from the underlying primary remanence or other overprints due to its low magnetization intensity.

  7. Numerical study of shock-induced combustion in methane-air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, Shaye; Rabinowitz, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    The shock-induced combustion of methane-air mixtures in hypersonic flows is investigated using a new reaction mechanism consisting of 19 reacting species and 52 elementary reactions. This reduced model is derived from a full kinetic mechanism via the Detailed Reduction technique. Zero-dimensional computations of several shock-tube experiments are presented first. The reaction mechanism is then combined with a fully implicit Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to conduct numerical simulations of two-dimensional and axisymmetric shock-induced combustion experiments of stoichiometric methane-air mixtures at a Mach number of M = 6.61. Applications to the ram accelerator concept are also presented.

  8. Shock-Induced Ordering in a Nano-segregated Network-Forming Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke; Lee, Jaejun; Sottos, Nancy R; Moore, Jeffrey S

    2015-12-30

    Understanding shockwave-induced physical and chemical changes of impact-absorbing materials is an important step toward the rational design of materials that mitigate the damage. In this work, we report a series of network-forming ionic liquids (NILs) that possess an intriguing shockwave absorption property upon laser-induced shockwave. Microstructure analysis by X-ray scattering suggests nano-segregation of alkyl side chains and charged head groups in NILs. Further post-shock observations indicate changes in the low-Q region, implying that the soft alkyl domain in NILs plays an important role in absorbing shockwaves. Interestingly, we observe a shock-induced ordering in the NIL with the longest (hexyl) side chain, indicating that both nano-segregated structure and shock-induced ordering contribute to NIL's shockwave absorption performance.

  9. The role of intrinsic apoptotic signaling in hemorrhagic shock-induced microvascular endothelial cell barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Devendra A; Tharakan, Binu; Hunter, Felicia A; Childs, Ed W

    2014-11-01

    Hemorrhagic shock leads to endothelial cell barrier dysfunction resulting in microvascular hyperpermeability. Hemorrhagic shock-induced microvascular hyperpermeability is associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients with traumatic injuries. The results from our laboratory have illustrated a possible pathophysiological mechanism showing involvement of mitochondria-mediated "intrinsic" apoptotic signaling in regulating hemorrhagic shock-induced microvascular hyperpermeability. Hemorrhagic shock results in overexpression of Bcl-2 family of pro-apoptotic protein, BAK, in the microvascular endothelial cells. The increase in BAK initiates "intrinsic" apoptotic signaling cascade with the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in the cytoplasm and activation of downstream effector caspase-3, leading to loss of endothelial cell barrier integrity. Thus, this review article offers a brief overview of important findings from our past and present research work along with new leads for future research. The summary of our research work will provide information leading to different avenues in developing novel strategies against microvascular hyperpermeability following hemorrhagic shock.

  10. Shock induced shear strength in an HMX based plastic bonded explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millett, J. C. F.; Taylor, P.; Appleby-Thomas, G.

    2017-01-01

    The shock induced mechanical response of an HMX based plastic bonded explosive (PBX) has been investigated in terms of the shear strength. Results show that shear strength increases with impact stress. However comparison with the calculated elastic response of both the PBX and pure HMX suggests that the overall mechanical response is controlled by the HMX crystals, with the near liquid like nature of the binder phase having a minimal contribution.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Upstream Boundary Layer Acceleration on Unsteadiness of Shock-Induced Separation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Experimental Study of the Driving Mechanism and Control of the Unsteady Shock Induced Turbulent Separation in a Mach 5 compression Corner Flow...University of Tokyo, Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan, Oct. 25-29, 1987. 12 Figure 1. Schematic diagram of the test section with compression...ramp. Seeding System Optics FLOW CCD Cameras Dual-Cavity Nd: Yag Laser Photodiode Beam Splitter Timing Electronics ``` FLC Shutter Controller

  12. Shock-induced spall in copper: the effects of anisotropy, temperature, loading pulse and defect

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shengnian; Germann, Timothy C; An, Qi; Han, Li - Bo

    2009-07-28

    Shock-induced spall in Cu is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. We examine spallation in initially perfect crystals and defective solids with grain boundaries (columnar bicrystals), stacking faults or vacancies, as well as the effect of temperature and loading pulses. Spall in single crystal Cu is anisotropic, and defects and high temperature may reduce the spall strength. Taylor-wave (triangular shock-release wave) loading is explored in comparison with square wave shock loading.

  13. Some Observations of Shock-induced Turbulent Separation on Supersonic Diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nussdorfer, Theodore J

    1954-01-01

    A survey of experimental data at supersonic speed indicated that shock-induced separation of a turbulent boundary layer will result for Mach numbers of approximately 1.33 or greater when a theoretical stream static-pressure-rise ratio of approximately 1.89 occurs across a shock interacting with the boundary layer. The significance of this tentative criterion for turbulent boundary-layer separation is discussed with respect to the design of supersonic diffusers.

  14. Structure and Dynamics of Shock-Induced Nanobubble Collapse in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedadi, Mohammad; Choubey, Amit; Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; van Duin, Adri

    2011-03-01

    Structure of water under shock and shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water are investigated with molecular dynamics simulations based on a reactive force field. Shock induces dramatic structural changes, including an ice-VII-like structural motif at a particle velocity of 1 km/s. The incipient ice VII formation and the calculated Hugoniot curve are in good agreement with experimental results. In the presence of a nanobubble, we observe a focused nanojet at the onset of nanobubble shrinkage and a secondary shock wave upon nanobubble collapse. The secondary shock wave propagates spherically backwards and induces high pressure as it propagates. Both the propagation velocity and the induced pressure are larger than those of the primary shock. We explored effects of nanobubble radius and shock amplitude on nanojet formation. The nanojet size increases by increasing particle velocity but the effect of increasing radius is more significant. The jet length scales linearly with the nanobubble radius, as observed in experiments on micron-to-millimeter size bubbles. Shock-induced collapse of a nanobubble in the vicinity of a cell membrane creates a transient nanopore when the nanojet impacts the membrane. Transient cell poration has potential applications in drug delivery.

  15. MINKOWSKI FUNCTIONALS FOR QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENTS OF SHOCK-INDUCED MIXING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    STRELITZ, RICHARD A.; KAMM, JAMES R.

    2007-01-22

    We describe the morphological descriptors known as Minkowski Functionals (MFs) on a shock-induced mixing problem. MFs allow accurate and compact characterization of complex images. MFs characterize connectivity, size, and shape of disordered structures. They possess several desirable properties, such as additivity, smoothness, and a direct relationship to certain physical properties. The scalar MFs that we describe can be extended to a moment-based tensor form that allows more thorough image descriptions. We apply MFs to experimental data for shock-induced mixing experiments conducted at the LANL shock tube facility. Those experiments, using low Mach number shock waves in air to induce the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability on air-SF{sub 6} interfaces, provide high-resolution, quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) images. We describe MFs and use them to quantify experimental PLIF images of shock-induced mixing. This method can be used as a tool fo r validation, i.e., the quantitative comparison of simulation results against experimental data.

  16. Shock-induced decomposition of high energy materials: A ReaxFF molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Subodh; Mishra, Ankit; Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    Atomistic simulations of shock-induced detonation provide critical information about high-energy (HE) materials such as sensitivity, crystallographic anisotropy, detonation velocity, and reaction pathways. However, first principles methods are unable to handle systems large enough to describe shock appropriately. We report reactive-force-field ReaxFF simulations of shock-induced decomposition of 1, 3, 5-triamino-2, 3, 6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and 1,1-diamino 2-2-dinitroethane (FOX-7) crystal. A flyer acts as mechanical stimuli to introduce a shock, which in turn initiated chemical reactions. Our simulation showed a shock speed of 9.8 km/s and 8.23 km/s for TATB and FOX-7, respectively. Reactivity analysis proves that FOX-7 is more reactive than TATB. Chemical reaction pathways analysis revealed similar pathways for the formation of N2 and H2O in both TATB and FOX-7. However, abundance of NH3 formation is specific to FOX-7. Large clusters formed during the reactions also shows different compositions between TATB and FOX-7. Carbon soot formation is much more pronounced in TATB. Overall, this study provides a detailed comparison between shock induced reaction pathway between FOX-7 and TATB. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research Grant No. N000014-12-1-0555.

  17. Evolution of shock-induced pressure on a flat-face/flat-base body and afterbody flow separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, K. K.; Wray, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The time-dependent, compressible Reynolds-averaged, Navier-Stokes equations are applied to solve an axisymmetric supersonic flow around a flat-face/flat-base body with and without a sting support. Important transient phenomena, not yet well understood, are investigated, and the significance of the present solution to the phenomena is discussed. The phenomena, described in detail, are as follows: the transient formation of the bow and recompression shock waves; the evolution of a pressure buildup due to diffraction of the incident shock wave in the forebody and afterbody regions, including the luminosity accompanying the pressure buildup; the separation of the flow as influenced by pressure buildup; the location of the separation and the reattachment points; and the transient period of the shock-induced base flow. The important influence of the nonsteady (transient) and steady flow on the aerodynamic characteristics, radiative heat transfer, and, thus, on the survivability or safeguard problems for an aircraft fuselage, missile, or planetary entry probe at very high flight speeds is described.

  18. Shock-induced collapse of a bubble inside a deformable vessel

    PubMed Central

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy repeatedly focuses shockwaves on kidney stones to induce their fracture, partially through cavitation erosion. A typical side effect of the procedure is hemorrhage, which is potentially the result of the growth and collapse of bubbles inside blood vessels. To identify the mechanisms by which shock-induced collapse could lead to the onset of injury, we study an idealized problem involving a preexisting bubble in a deformable vessel. We utilize a high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, finite-volume scheme and simulate the three-dimensional shock-induced collapse of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column which is embedded in a gelatin/water mixture. The mixture is a soft tissue simulant, 10% gelatin by weight, and is modeled by the stiffened gas equation of state. The bubble dynamics of this model configuration are characterized by the collapse of the bubble and its subsequent jetting in the direction of the propagation of the shockwave. The vessel wall, which is defined by the material interface between the water and gelatin/water mixture, is invaginated by the collapse and distended by the impact of the jet. The present results show that the highest measured pressures and deformations occur when the volumetric confinement of the bubble is strongest, the bubble is nearest the vessel wall and/or the angle of incidence of the shockwave reduces the distance between the jet tip and the nearest vessel surface. For a particular case considered, the 40 MPa shockwave utilized in this study to collapse the bubble generated a vessel wall pressure of almost 450 MPa and produced both an invagination and distention of nearly 50% of the initial vessel radius on a 𝒪(10) ns timescale. These results are indicative of the significant potential of shock-induced collapse to contribute to the injury of blood vessels in shockwave lithotripsy. PMID:24015027

  19. Use of hot-wire anemometry for turbulence measurements in shock induced flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, L. C.; Duffy, R. E.; Troller, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    A research program is currently being conducted with the aim to investigate the operating environment of future gas turbines. The present paper provides a description of the experimental methods which have been employed in performing turbulence intensity measurements in shock-induced flows. In a discussion of the instrumentation, attention is given to the employed low pressure shock tube, the hot-wire probe, the anemometer, the test facility, the experimental setup, the Kistler pressure transducer, and silicon piezoresistive gages. Aspects of instrumentation calibration are considered along with data corrections, experimental data, and data processing.

  20. Impact-shocked zircons: Discovery of shock-induced textures reflecting increasing degrees of shock metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohor, B. F.; Betterton, W. J.; Krogh, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    Textural effects specifically characteristic of shock metamorphism in zircons from impact environments have not been reported previously. However, planar deformation features (PDF) due to shock metamorphism are well documented in quartz and other mineral grains from these same environments. An etching technique was developed that allows scanning electron microscope (SEM) visualization of PDF and other probable shock-induced textural features, such as granular (polycrystalline) texture, in zircons from a variety of impact shock environments. These textural features in shocked zircons from K/T boundary distal ejecta form a series related to increasing degrees of shock that should correlate with proportionate resetting of the U-Pb isotopic system.

  1. Stimulated Raman scattering from ice-VIII by shock-induced compression in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Zhiwei; Li, Zuowei; Zhou, Mi; Lu, Guohui; Zou, Bo; Li, Zhanlong; Sun, Chenglin

    2012-03-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) from ice-VIII was investigated using shock-induced compression (SIC) generated by laser-induced breakdown in liquid water. Three backward SRS peaks of OH stretching vibrations and one backward SRS characteristic peak of lattice translation were observed. The SRS spectra indicated that the ice-VIII structure is formed by SIC, as the trajectory of the SIC passes through the stable pressure-temperature range of ice-VIII. The static electric field generated by electron jets protects proton-ordered structure. The laser-induced shock wave mechanism is also discussed.

  2. A Study of Premixed, Shock-Induced Combustion With Application to Hypervelocity Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axdahl, Erik L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the current goals of research in hypersonic, airbreathing propulsion is access to higher Mach numbers. A strong driver of this goal is the desire to integrate a scramjet engine into a transatmospheric vehicle airframe in order to improve performance to low Earth orbit (LEO) or the performance of a semiglobal transport. An engine concept designed to access hypervelocity speeds in excess of Mach 10 is the shock-induced combustion ramjet (i.e. shcramjet). This dissertation presents numerical studies simulating the physics of a shcramjet vehicle traveling at hypervelocity speeds with the goal of understanding the physics of fuel injection, wall autoignition mitigation, and combustion instability in this flow regime.

  3. Numerical simulation of shock-induced combustion past blunt bodies using shock-fitting technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, J. K.; Singh, D. J.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional axisymmetric, reacting viscous flow over blunt projectiles is computed to study shock-induced combustion at Mach 5.11 and Mach 6.46 in hydrogen-air mixture. A finite-difference, shock-fitting method is used to solve the complete set of Navier-Stokes and species conservation equations. In this approach, the bow shock represents a boundary of the computational domain and is treated as a discontinuity across which Rankine-Hugoniot conditions are applied. All interior details of the flow such as compression waves, reaction front, and the wall boundary layer are captured automatically in the solution. Since shock-fitting approach reduces the amount of artificial dissipation, all the intricate details of the flow are captured much more clearly than has been possible with the shock-capturing approach. This has allowed an improved understanding of the physics of shock-induced combustion over blunt projectiles and the numerical results can now be explained more readily with one-dimensional wave-interaction model than before.

  4. Shock-induced fine-grained recrystallization of olivine - Evidence against subsolidus reduction of Fe/2+/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Tsay, F.-D.; Live, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies have been carried out on three single grains of terrestrial olivine (Fo90) shock loaded along the 010 line to peak pressures of 280, 330, and 440 kbar. The results indicate that neither metallic Fe similar to that observed in returned lunar soils nor paramagnetic Fe(3+) caused by oxidation of Fe(2+) has been produced in these shock experiments. Trace amounts of Mn (2+) have been detected in both shocked and unshocked olivine. The ESR signals of Mn(2+) show spectral features which are found to correlate with the degree of shock-induced recrystallization observed petrographically. The increasing mass fraction of recrystallized olivine correlates with increasing shock pressures. This phenomenon is modelled assuming it results from the progressive effect of the shock-induced transformation of the olivine to a yet unknown high-pressure phase and its subsequent reversion to the low-pressure olivine phase. The mass fraction of recrystallized material is predicted to be nearly linear with shock pressure.

  5. Shock induced ignition and DDT in the presence of mechanically driven fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wentian; McDonald, James G.; Radulescu, Matei I.

    2015-11-01

    The present study addresses the problem of shock induced ignition and transition to detonation in the presence of mechanical and thermal fluctuations. These departures from a homogeneous medium are of significant importance in practical situations, where such fluctuations may promote hot-spot ignition and favor the flame transition to detonation. The problem is studied in 1D, where a piston-induced shock ignites the gas. The fluctuations in the shock-compressed medium are controlled by allowing the piston's speed to oscillate around a mean, with controllable frequency and amplitude. A Lagrangian numerical formulation is used, which allows to treat exactly the transient boundary condition at the piston head. The hydrodynamic solver is coupled with the reactive dynamics of the gas using Cantera. The code was verified by comparison with steady state ZND solutions and previous shock induced ignition results in homogeneous media. Results obtained for different fuels illustrate the strong relation of the DDT amplification length to mechanical fluctuations in systems with a high effective activation energy and fast rate of energy deposition, consistent with experiments performed on fast flame acceleration in the presence of strong mechanical perturbations. Financial support from NSERC and Shell, with A. Pekalski and M. Levin as technical monitors, are greatly acknowledged.

  6. Effects of porosity on shock-induced melting of honeycomb-shaped Cu nanofoams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fengpeng

    Metallic foams are of fundamental and applied interests in various areas, including structure engineering (e.g., lightweight structural members and energy absorbers), and shock physics (e.g., as laser ablators involving shock-induced melting and vaporization).Honeycomb-shaped metallic foams consist of regular array of hexagonal cells in two dimensions and have extensive applications and represent a unique, simple yet useful model structure for exploring mechanisms and making quantitative assessment. We investigate shock-induced melting in honeycomb-shaped Cu nanofoams with extensive molecular dynamics simulations. A total of ten porosities (phi) are explored, ranging from 0 to 0.9 at an increment of 0.1. Upon shock compression, void collapse induces local melting followed by supercooling for sufficiently high porosity at low shock strengths. While superheating of solid remnants occurs for sufficiently strong shocks at phi<0.1. Both supercooling of melts and superheating of solid remnants are transient, and the equilibrated shock states eventually fall on the equilibrium melting curve for partial melting. However, phase equilibrium has not been achieved on the time scale of simulations in supercooled Cu liquid (from completely melted nanofoams). The temperatures for incipient and complete melting are related to porosity via a power law and approach the melting temperature at zero pressure as phi tends to 1.

  7. Shock-induced phase transition in systems of hard spheres with internal degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Shigeru; Mentrelli, Andrea; Zhao, Nanrong; Ruggeri, Tommaso; Sugiyama, Masaru

    2010-06-01

    Shock waves and shock-induced phase transitions are theoretically and numerically studied on the basis of the system of Euler equations with caloric and thermal equations of state for a system of hard spheres with internal degrees of freedom. First, by choosing the unperturbed state (the state before the shock wave) in the liquid phase, the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions are studied and their solutions are classified on the basis of the phase of the perturbed state (the state after the shock wave), being a shock-induced phase transition possible under certain conditions. With this regard, the important role of the internal degrees of freedom is shown explicitly. Second, the admissibility (stability) of shock waves is studied by means of the results obtained by Liu in the theory of hyperbolic systems. It is shown that another type of instability of a shock wave can exist even though the perturbed state is thermodynamically stable. Numerical calculations have been performed in order to confirm the theoretical results in the case of admissible shocks and to obtain the actual evolution of the wave profiles in the case of inadmissible shocks (shock splitting phenomena).

  8. ILES for mechanism of ramp-type MVG reducing shock induced flow separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Yan, YongHua; Liu, ChaoQun

    2016-12-01

    A high order implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) is carried out to study the mechanism of shock induced flow separation reduction under ramp-type MVG control. The mechanism was originally considered as that MVG can generate streamwise vortices which strongly mix boundary layer and the boundary layer becomes more capable to resist strong adverse pressure gradient caused by shock and to keep the boundary layer attached. However, according to our ILES, a chain of ring-like vortices is generated behind the ramp-type MVG and goes further to interact with the shock. When the ring-like vortices pass through the shock, the shock wave is weakened and altered while the vortex structures are quite stable. The instantaneous simulation shows that the spanwise ring-like vortex, not the streamwise vortex, plays a key role to weaken the shock and reduce the shock-induced separation. Detailed investigation on ring-like vortices and shock interaction will be given in this paper.

  9. Morphology and growth speed of hcp domains during shock-induced phase transition in iron.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2014-01-10

    Emergence and time evolution of micro-structured new-phase domains play a crucial role in determining the macroscopic physical and mechanical behaviors of iron under shock compression. Here, we investigate, through molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical modelings, shock-induced phase transition process of iron from body-centered-cubic (bcc) to hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) structure. We present a central-moment method and a rolling-ball algorithm to calculate and analyze the morphology and growth speed of the hcp phase domains, and then propose a phase transition model to clarify our derived growth law of the phase domains. We also demonstrate that the new-phase evolution process undergoes three distinguished stages with different time scales of the hcp phase fraction in the system.

  10. Dynamics of the shock-induced transition from graphite to warm dense diamond and liquid carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Frydrych, S.; Helfrich, J.; Schaumann, G.; Vorberger, J.; Gericke, D. O.; Fletcher, L. B.; Gauthier, M.; Goede, S.; Granados, E.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Gamboa, E.; Ravasio, A.; Schumaker, W.; Doeppner, T.; Bachmann, B.; Neumayer, P.; Gregori, G.; Roth, M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Falcone, R. W.

    2015-03-01

    We present novel experimental observations of the ion structure in warm dense carbon at pressures from 20 to 220 GPa and temperatures of several thousand Kelvins. Our experiments employ x-ray sources at kilo-joule class laser facilities and at the Linac Coherent Light Source to perform spectrally and angularly resolved x-ray scattering from shock-compressed graphite samples. Using different types of graphite and varying drive laser intensity, we were able to probe conditions below and above the melting line, resolving the shock-induced graphite-to-diamond and graphite-to-liquid transitions on nanosecond time scale. Moreover, we have observed the dynamic formation of hexagonal diamond by shock-compression of highly oriented graphite samples. This work was supported SSAA program Contract No. DEFG52- 06NA26212.

  11. Shear wave measurements in shock-induced, high-pressure phases

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    Structural phase transformations under shock loading are of considerable interest for understanding the response of solids under nonhydrostatic stresses and at high strain-rates. Examining shock-induced transformations from continuum level measurements is fundamentally constrained by the inability to directly identify microscopic processes, and also by the limited number of material properties that can be directly measured. ne latter limitation can be reduced by measuring both shear and compression waves using Lagrangian gauges in combined, compression and shear loading. The shear wave serves as an important, real-time probe of the shocked state and unloading response. Using results from a recent study of CaCO[sub 3], the unique information obtained from the shear wave speed and the detailed structure of the shear wave are shown to be useful for distinguishing the effects of phase transformations from yielding, as well as in characterizing the high-pressure phases and the yielding process under shock loading.

  12. Shear wave measurements in shock-induced, high-pressure phases

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.

    1993-07-01

    Structural phase transformations under shock loading are of considerable interest for understanding the response of solids under nonhydrostatic stresses and at high strain-rates. Examining shock-induced transformations from continuum level measurements is fundamentally constrained by the inability to directly identify microscopic processes, and also by the limited number of material properties that can be directly measured. ne latter limitation can be reduced by measuring both shear and compression waves using Lagrangian gauges in combined, compression and shear loading. The shear wave serves as an important, real-time probe of the shocked state and unloading response. Using results from a recent study of CaCO{sub 3}, the unique information obtained from the shear wave speed and the detailed structure of the shear wave are shown to be useful for distinguishing the effects of phase transformations from yielding, as well as in characterizing the high-pressure phases and the yielding process under shock loading.

  13. An investigation of passive control methods for shock-induced separation at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rallo, R.; Walsh, M.; Van Leer, Bram

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of several passive control techniques on shock-induced boundary-layer separation at hypersonic speed was investigated. Two approaches for alleviating the turbulent separation losses were examined: porous surface mass transfer and surface grooving. A total of four perforated surfaces with varying porosities were evaluated, and three groove orientations with respect to the freestream direction were studied. A comparison of the results from passive control techniques with those from an 'uncontrolled' shock impingement showed that the porous surface with the greatest porosity provided the greatest reduction in the pressure rise across the oblique shock wave. The grooved surface tested were found to be not effective; each of the grooved configurations examined increased the peak pressure value.

  14. Shock-induced CO2 loss from CaCO3: Implications for early planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Recovered samples from shock recovery experiments on single crystal calcite were subjected to thermogravimetric analysis to determine the amount of post-shock CO2, the decarbonization interval and the activation energy, for the removal of remaining CO2 in shock-loaded calcite. Comparison of post-shock CO2 with that initially present determines shock-induced CO2 loss as a function of shock pressure. Incipient to complete CO2 loss occurs over a pressure range of approximately 10 to approximately 70 GPa. Optical and scanning electron microscopy reveal structural changes, which are related to the shock-loading. The occurrence of dark, diffuse areas, which can be resolved as highly vesicular areas as observed with a scanning electron microscope are interpreted as representing quenched partial melts, into which shock-released CO2 was injected. The experimental results are used to constrain models of shock-produced, primary CO2 atmospheres on the accreting terrestrial planets.

  15. Shock-induced migration of Σ3 <110 > grain boundaries in Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, X. J.; Wang, L.; Li, B.; Zhu, J.; Luo, S. N.

    2017-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we systematically investigate shock-induced migration of a set of Σ3 <110 >70.53 ° tilt grain boundaries in Cu, including coherent twin boundary, 15 asymmetric tilt grain boundaries (ATGBs), and symmetric incoherent twin boundary (SITB), with inclination angle ( Φ) increasing from 0° to 90°. Grain boundary migration occurs only in ATGBs, via faceting for Φ≤70.53 ° and translation for Φ>70.53 ° (with the 9R phase). Migration magnitude increases with increasing Φ for ATGBs. Migration mode and magnitude depend on the grain boundary structure including SITB orientation and length fraction, and the symmetry of resolved shear stress distribution across a grain boundary.

  16. Mineralogy and Microstructures of Shock-Induced Melt Veins in Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, Thomas G.

    2000-01-01

    The applicability of phase equilibrium data to the interpretation of shock-induced melt veins can only be tested by a detailed study of melt- vein mineralogy to see how high-pressure assemblages vary as a function of shock conditions inferred from other indicators. We have used transmission electron microscopy (TEM), analytical electron microscopy (AEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EMA) and optical petrography to characterize the mineralogy, microstructures, and compositions of melt veins and associated high-pressure minerals in shocked chondrites and SNC meteorites. In the processes, we have gained a better understanding of what melt veining can tell us about shock conditions and we have discovered new mineral phases in chondritic and SNC meteorites.

  17. Shock-Induced Transformation Exsolution Lamellae in Olivine in Black Veins of the Mbale Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Wopenka, B.; El Goresy, A.

    1995-09-01

    Mbale is a shocked L6 chondrite [1]. Some shock-induced veins of 0.1 to 2 mm width intersect the meteorite. The veins consist of diaplectic plagioclase glass, unmelted silicate fragments including olivines and pyroxenes, and the shock-induced melt materials consisting of metal-troilite intergrowths, microcrystalline pyroxene and olivine, and silicate glass. Here we report the first finding of shock-induced exsolutions in olivine that appear as compositionally different lamellae which presumably formed at high pressure by inversion of olivine (alpha) to the beta+gamma polymorphs. Olivine compositions in the chondritic part of Mbale range from Fa(sub)22.5 to Fa(sub)26 (average Fa(sub)24). In contrast, the exsolved olivines in the shock-induced veins (30 to 100 mm in diameter) consist of alternating Fe-rich (Fa(sub)22-32) and Fe-poor (Fa(sub)9.9-18.5) lamellae that range in width from less than 0.5 micrometers to up to 10 micrometers. Each individual lamella actually consists of microcrystals of less than 0.5 micrometers in diameter with rather diffuse borders within the lamella. The lamellae occur in ~30 micrometer segments which were formed by faulting and displacement. Micro-Raman spectroscopy confirms that both types of exsolution lamellae currently have the olivine (alpha) structure. The partially melted veins of Mbale may have reached a post-shock peak temperature of 1473 K >= T <= 1873 K. Based on the phase diagrams of the olivine(alpha)-wadsleyite(beta)-ringwoodite(gamma) transformations in the system Mg(sub)2SiO(sub)4-Fe(sub)2SiO(sub)4 at 1473 K [2], olivine of composition ~Fa(sub)24 should exsolve at equilibrium conditionsins to beta- + gamma-phases at P >12.7 GPa, and transform to a single gamma-phase at >15 GPa. Figure 1 shows that the determined compositions of the Fe-rich and Fe-poor lamellae in Mbale match perfectly the compositions at the beta + gamma/gamma and the beta + gamma/beta phase boundaries, respectively. Since these grains depict well ordered

  18. Investigation of Shock-Induced Chemical Reactions in Mo-Si Powder Mixtures Using Instrumented Experiments with PVDF Stress Gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Thadhani, N N

    2001-05-29

    Shock-induced chemical reactions in {approx}58% dense Mo+2Si powder mixtures were investigated using time-resolved instrumented experiments, employing PVDF-piezoelectric stress gauges placed at the front and rear surfaces of the powders to measure the input and propagated stresses, and wave speed through the powder mixture. Experiments performed on the powders at input stresses less than 4 GPa, showed characteristics of powder densification and dispersed propagated wave stress profiles with rise time > {approx}40 nanoseconds. At input stress between 4-6 GPa, the powder mixtures showed a sharp rise time (<{approx}10 ns) of propagated wave profile and an expanded state of products revealing evidence of shock-induced chemical reaction. At input stresses greater than 6 GPa, the powder mixtures showed a slower propagated-stress-wave rise time and transition to a low-compressibility (melt) state indicating lack of shock-induced reaction. The results illustrate that premature melting of Si, at input stresses less than the crush-strength of the powder mixtures, restricts mixing between reactants and inhibits ''shock-induced'' reaction initiation.

  19. Shock-induced deformation of Shergottites: Shock-pressures and perturbations of magmatic ages on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Goresy, Ahmed; Gillet, Ph.; Miyahara, M.; Ohtani, E.; Ozawa, S.; Beck, P.; Montagnac, G.

    2013-01-01

    Shergottites and Chassignites practiced major deformation effects whose nature, magnitude and relevance were controversially evaluated and disputatively debated. Our studies of many shocked shergottites present, contrary to numerous previous reports, ample evidence for pervasive shock-induced melting amounting of at least 23 vol.% of the shergottite consisting of maskelynite and pyrrhotite, partial melting of pyroxene, titanomagnetite, ilmenite and finding of several high-pressure polymorphs and pressure-induced dissociation reactions. Our results cast considerable doubt on using the refractive index (RI) or cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of maskelynite, in estimating the magnitudes of peak-shock pressure in both shergottites and ordinary chondrites. RI of maskelynite was set after quenching of the feldspar liquid before decompression to maskelynite glass followed by glass relaxation after decompression at the closure temperature of relaxation. The RI procedure widely practiced in the past 38 years revealed unrealistic very high-pressure estimates discrepant with the high-pressure mineral inventory in shocked shergottites and ordinary chondrites and with results obtained by robust laboratory static experiments. Shergottites contain the silica high-pressure polymorphs: the scrutinyite-structured polymorph seifertite, a monoclinic ultra dense polymorph of silica with ZrO2-structure, stishovite, a dense liquidus assemblage consisting of stishovite + Na-hexa-aluminosilicate (Na-CAS) and both K-lingunite and Ca-lingunite. Applying individual high-pressure silica polymorphs alone like stishovite, to estimate the equilibrium shock pressure, is inadequate due to the considerable shift of their nominal upper pressure bounds intrinsically induced by spatially variable absorptions of minor oxides like Al2O3, Na2O, FeO, MgO and TiO2. This practice revealed variable pressure estimates even within the same shergottite subjected to the same peak-shock pressure. Occurrence of Na

  20. A time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau phase field formalism for shock-induced phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Belof, Jonathan L.; Benedict, Lorin X.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-field models have become popular in the last two decades to describe a host of free-boundary problems. The strength of the method relies on implicitly describing the dynamics of surfaces and interfaces by a continuous scalar field that enters the global grand free energy functional of the system. Here we explore the potential utility of this method in order to describe shock-induced phase transitions. To this end we make use of the Multiphase Field Theory (MFT) to account for the existence of multiple phases during the transition, and we couple MFT to a hydrodynamic model in the context of a new LLNL code for phase transitions, SAMSA. As a demonstration of this approach, we apply our code to the α - ɛ-Fe phase transition under shock wave loading conditions and compare our results with experiments of Jensen et. al. [J. Appl. Phys., 105:103502 (2009)] and Barker and Hollenbach [J. Appl. Phys., 45:4872 (1974)].

  1. Flash X-Ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; ...

    2015-11-23

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using amore » load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.« less

  2. Flash X-Ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward Paisley; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-11-23

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  3. Formation of a disordered solid via a shock-induced transition in a dense particle suspension.

    PubMed

    Petel, Oren E; Frost, David L; Higgins, Andrew J; Ouellet, Simon

    2012-02-01

    Shock wave propagation in multiphase media is typically dominated by the relative compressibility of the two components of the mixture. The difference in the compressibility of the components results in a shock-induced variation in the effective volume fraction of the suspension tending toward the random-close-packing limit for the system, and a disordered solid can take form within the suspension. The present study uses a Hugoniot-based model to demonstrate this variation in the volume fraction of the solid phase as well as a simple hard-sphere model to investigate the formation of disordered structures within uniaxially compressed model suspensions. Both models are discussed in terms of available experimental plate impact data in dense suspensions. Through coordination number statistics of the mesoscopic hard-sphere model, comparisons are made with the trends of the experimental pressure-volume fraction relationship to illustrate the role of these disordered structures in the bulk properties of the suspensions. A criterion for the dynamic stiffening of suspensions under high-rate dynamic loading is suggested as an analog to quasi-static jamming based on the results of the simulations.

  4. Septic Shock Induced by Bacterial Prostatitis with Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a Posttransplantation Patient

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofan; Chen, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection is a common complication after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). Morganella morganii is ubiquitous Gram-negative facultative anaerobe, which may cause many kinds of opportunistic infection. Herein we report a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with frequent urination, urgency, and mild pain that comes and goes low in the abdomen and around the anus. The patient had a medical history of chronic prostatitis for 4 years. He received HLA-matched sibling allo-HSCT because of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma 29 months ago. The routine examination of prostatic fluid showed increased leukocytes and the culture of prostatic fluid showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient developed chills and fever 18 hours after examination. Both urine culture and blood culture showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy and septic shock management. Taken together, Morganella morganii should be considered a possible pathogen when immunocompromised patients develop prostatitis. Also, prostatic massage could be a possible trigger of septic shock induced by Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a posttransplantation patient. PMID:26798544

  5. Phase-field modeling of shock-induced α- γ phase transformation of RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahul, -; de, Suvranu

    2015-06-01

    A thermodynamically consistent continuum phase field model has been developed to investigate the role of shock-induced α- γ phase transition in the sensitivity of RDX. Dislocations and phase transformations are distinguished and modeled within a crystal plasticity framework. The Landau potential is derived for the finite elastic deformation analysis. The response of the shock loaded RDX crystal is obtained by solving the continuum momentum equation along with phase evolution equation using a Helmholtz free energy functional, which consists of elastic potential energy and local interfacial energy that follows from the Cahn-Hilliard formalism. We observe that the orientations for which there is a resolved shear stress along the slip direction, the material absorbs large shear strain through plastic deformation, allowing it to be less sensitive as less mechanical work is available for temperature rise. Therefore, plastic slip should be associated with greater shear relaxation and, hence, decreased sensitivity. For elastic orientations, large shear stress arises from steric hindrance that may provides much more mechanical work to increase the temperature and hence more sensitive to detonation. Our simulations suggest that the α- γ phase transformation in RDX may be associated with the increased temperature rise and hence the shock sensitivity. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of this work through Office of Naval Research (ONR) Grants N000140810462 and N000141210527 with Dr. Clifford Bedford as the cognizant Program Manager.

  6. Shock induced phase transition of different TiO2 precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pengwan; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Jianjun; Zhou, Qiang

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the effects of phase composition and particle size on shock-induced phase transition of TiO2, different TiO2 precursors including MC-150 TiO2(pure anatase,5nm), P25 TiO2(85% anatase/15% rutile,15nm), T2 TiO2(pure anatase,35nm) and T1 TiO2(pure rutile, 24nm) were impacted by detonation-driven high velocity flyers. Powder X-ray diffraction(XRD) was used to characterize the phase composition of recovered samples. Two types of phase transition were observed, including anatase to rutile transition and anatase to high pressure phase of srilankite transition. The phase transition mechanisms and effects of shock conditions, initial phase composition and particle size were analyzed. Complete transition from anatase to srilankite can be obtained by adjusting the shock conditions. In the case of impacting pure P25 TiO2, anatase to srilankite transition was hardly observed, which may be due to the restraint of initial phase of thermodynamically stable rutile. However, in the case of impacting a mixture of P25 TiO2 and dicyandiamide(C2N4H4) , it is interesting to observe anatase to srilankite transition and the mechanisms was analyzed. National Natural Science Foundation of China

  7. Flash X-ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward P.; Pruett, Brian O.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas-solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer-Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. The bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  8. Simulation of shock-induced bubble collapse with application to vascular injury in shockwave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coralic, Vedran

    Shockwave lithotripsy is a noninvasive medical procedure wherein shockwaves are repeatedly focused at the location of kidney stones in order to pulverize them. Stone comminution is thought to be the product of two mechanisms: the propagation of stress waves within the stone and cavitation erosion. However, the latter mechanism has also been implicated in vascular injury. In the present work, shock-induced bubble collapse is studied in order to understand the role that it might play in inducing vascular injury. A high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing numerical scheme is developed to simulate the three-dimensional collapse of the bubble in both the free-field and inside a vessel phantom. The primary contributions of the numerical study are the characterization of the shock-bubble and shock-bubble-vessel interactions across a large parameter space that includes clinical shockwave lithotripsy pressure amplitudes, problem geometry and tissue viscoelasticity, and the subsequent correlation of these interactions to vascular injury. Specifically, measurements of the vessel wall pressures and displacements, as well as the finite strains in the fluid surrounding the bubble, are utilized with available experiments in tissue to evaluate damage potential. Estimates are made of the smallest injurious bubbles in the microvasculature during both the collapse and jetting phases of the bubble's life cycle. The present results suggest that bubbles larger than one micrometer in diameter could rupture blood vessels under clinical SWL conditions.

  9. Shock-induced bubble collapse in a vessel: Implications for vascular injury in shockwave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2014-11-01

    In shockwave lithotripsy, shocks are repeatedly focused on kidney stones so to break them. The process leads to cavitation in tissue, which leads to hemorrhage. We hypothesize that shock-induced collapse (SIC) of preexisting bubbles is a potential mechanism for vascular injury. We study it numerically with an idealized problem consisting of the three-dimensional SIC of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column embedded in gelatin. The gelatin is a tissue simulant and can be treated as a fluid due to fast time scales and small spatial scales of collapse. We thus model the problem as a compressible multicomponent flow and simulate it with a shock- and interface-capturing numerical method. The method is high-order, conservative and non-oscillatory. Fifth-order WENO is used for spatial reconstruction and an HLLC Riemann solver upwinds the fluxes. A third-order TVD-RK scheme evolves the solution. We evaluate the potential for injury in SIC for a range of pressures, bubble and vessel sizes, and tissue properties. We assess the potential for injury by comparing the finite strains in tissue, obtained by particle tracking, to ultimate strains from experiments. We conclude that SIC may contribute to vascular rupture and discuss the smallest bubble sizes needed for injury. This research was supported by NIH Grant No. 2PO1DK043881 and utilized XSEDE, which is supported by NSF Grant No. OCI-1053575.

  10. Shock-induced devolatization of calcium sulfate and implications for K-T extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Guangqing; Tyburczy, James A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    Calcium sulfate devolatization during the impact at Chicxulub, Mexico and dispersal in the stratosphere of the resultant sulfuric acid aerosol have been suggested as a possible mechanism for the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinctions. In this paper, we investigated two shock-induced devolatization reactions of calcium sulfate up to 42 GPa in the laboratory: CaSO4 + SiO2 yields CaSiO3 + SO3(degassed) and CaSO4 yields CaO + SO2(degassed) + 1/2 O2(degassed). We found both to proceed to a much less extent than calculated by equilibrium thermodynamic calculations. Reaction products are found to be 10(exp -2) times those calculated for equilibrium. Consequently our estimate of the amount of sulfur oxides degassed into the atmosphere from shock devolatization of CaS04 in the Chicxulub lithographic section (6x10(exp 15)-2x10(exp 16)g in sulfur mass) is lower by a factor of 70 to 400 than previous estimates; the related environmental stress arising from the resultant global cooling of approximately 4 K and fallout of acid rain does not appear to suffice to explain the widespread K-T extinctions.

  11. Shock-induced devolatilization of calcium sulfate and implications for K-T extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Guangqing; Tyburczy, James A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    The devolatilization of calcium sulfate, which is present in the target rock of the Chicxulub, Mexico impact structure, and dispersal in the stratosphere of the resultant sulfuric acid aerosol have been suggested as a possible mechanism for the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinctions. We measured the amount of SO2 produced from two shock-induced devolatilization reactions of calcium sulfate up to 42 GPa in the laboratory. We found both to proceed to a much lower extent than calculated by equilibrium thermodynamic calculations. Reaction products are found to be approx. 10(exp -2) times those calculated for equilibrium. Upon modeling the quantity of sulfur oxides degassed into the atmosphere from shock devolatilization of CaSO4 in the Chicxulub lithographic section, the resulting 9 x 10(exp 16) to 6 x 10(exp 17) g (in sulfur mass) is lower by a factor of 10-100 than previous upper limit estimates, the related environmental stress arising from the resultant global cooling and fallout of acid rain is insufficient to explain the widespread K-T extinctions.

  12. The role of shock induced trailing-edge separation in limit cycle oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Atlee M., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The potential role of shock induced trailing edge separation (SITES) in limit cycle oscillations (LCO) was established. It was shown that the flip-flop characteristics of transition to and from SITES as well as its hysteresis could couple with wing modes with torsional motion and low damping. This connection led to the formulation of a very simple nonlinear math model using the linear equations of motion with a nonlinear step forcing function with hysteresis. A finite difference solution with time was developed and calculations were made for the F-111 TACT were used to determine the step forcing function due to SITES transition. Since no data were available for the hysteresis, a parameter study was conducted allowing the hysteresis effect to vary. Very small hysteresis effects, which were within expected bounds, were required to obtain reasonable response levels that essentially agreed with flight test results. Also in agreement with wind tunnel tests, LCO calculations for the 1/6 scale F-111 model showed that the model should have not experienced LCO.

  13. Solution and shock-induced exsolution of argon in vitreous carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, Carey; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    To add to the knowledge of noble gas solution and exsolution in carbonaceus material, experiments were performed on vitreous carbon. Ar-rich vitreous carbon samples were prepared under vapor-saturated conditions using argon as the pressurizing medium. Solubility data were obtained for temperatures of 773 to 973 K and pressures of 250 to 1500 bars. Up to 7 wt pct Ar was dissolved in the carbon. The solubility data were compared to a thermodynamic model of argon atoms dissolving into a fixed population of 'holes' in the carbon. Two variations of the model yielded estimates of the enthalpy of solution of Ar in vitreous carbon equal to about -4700 cal/mole. Preliminary shock experiments showed that 28 percent of the total argon was released by driving 4 GPa shocks into the argon-rich carbon. It was demonstrated that shock-induced argon loss is not simply caused by the impact-induced diminution of grain size. The present value of shock pressure required for partial impact devolatilization of Ar from carbon is below the range (5-30 GPa) at which H2O is released from phyllosilicates.

  14. Multiscale dislocation dynamics simulations of shock-induced plasticity in small volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehadeh, Mutasem A.

    2012-04-01

    Multiscale dislocation dynamics plasticity (MDDP) was used to investigate shock-induced deformation in monocrystalline copper. In order to enhance the numerical simulations, a periodic boundary condition was implemented in the continuum finite element (FE) scale so that the uniaxial compression of shocks could be attained. Additionally, lattice rotation was accounted for by modifying the dislocation dynamics (DD) code to update the dislocations' slip systems. The dislocation microstructures were examined in detail and a mechanism of microband formation is proposed for single- and multiple-slip deformation. The simulation results show that lattice rotation enhances microband formation in single slip by locally reorienting the slip plane. It is also illustrated that both confined and periodic boundary conditions can be used to achieve uniaxial compression; however, a periodic boundary condition yields a disturbed wave profile due to edge effects. Moreover, the boundary conditions and the loading rise time show no significant effects on shock-dislocations interaction and the resulting microstructures. MDDP results of high strain rate calculations are also compared with the predictions of the Armstrong-Zerilli model of dislocation generation and movement. This work confirms that the effect of resident dislocations on the strain rate can be neglected when a homogeneous nucleation mechanism is included.

  15. Computation of unsteady shock-induced combustion using logarithmic species conservation equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory J.; Sussman, Myles A.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical simulations are used to investigate periodic combustion instabilities observed in ballistic-range experiments of blunt bodies flying at supersonic speeds through hydrogen-air mixtures. The computations are validated by comparing experimental shadowgraphs with shadowgraphs created from the computed flowfields and by comparing the experimentally measured instability frequencies with computed frequencies. The numerical simulations use a logarithmic transformation of the species conservation equations as a way to reduce the grid requirements for computing shock-induced combustion. The transformation is applied to the Euler equations coupled to a detailed hydrogen-air chemical reaction mechanism with 13 species and 33 reactions. The resulting differential equations are solved using a finite volume formulation and a two-step predictor-corrector scheme to advance the solution in time. Results are presented and compared for both a flux-vector splitting scheme and an upwind TVD scheme. The computations add insight to the physical processes observed in the experiments and the numerical methods needed to simulate them. The usefulness of the ballistic-range experiments for the validation of numerical techniques and chemical kinetic models is also demonstrated.

  16. Dynamic behaviour and shock-induced martensite transformation in near-beta Ti-5553 alloy under high strain rate loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Yangwei; Xu, Xin; Liu, Chengze

    2015-09-01

    Ti-5553 alloy is a near-beta titanium alloy with high strength and high fracture toughness. In this paper, the dynamic behaviour and shock-induced martensite phase transformation of Ti-5553 alloy with alpha/beta phases were investigated. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar was employed to investigate the dynamic properties. Microstructure evolutions were characterized by Scanning Electronic Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscope. The experimental results have demonstrated that Ti-5553 alloy with alpha/beta phases exhibits various strain rate hardening effects, both failure through adiabatic shear band. Ti-5553 alloy with Widmannstatten microstructure exhibit more obvious strain rate hardening effect, lower critical strain rate for ASB nucleation, compared with the alloy with Bimodal microstructures. Under dynamic compression, shock-induced beta to alpha" martensite transformation occurs.

  17. A Previously Unrecognized Example of the Shock-Induced Breakdown of Biotite to Garnet from the Steen River Impact Structure, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, E. L.; Sharp, T. G.; Hu, J.; Tschauner, O.

    2016-08-01

    The novel shock-induced transformation of biotite to almandine garnet accompanied by fluid release and Fe-oxidation is reported from those grains adjacent to shock veins in crystalline basement rocks of the Steen River impact structure.

  18. Tomography Study of Shock-Induced Damage Beneath Craters by Normal and Oblique Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, H.; Ahrens, T.

    2004-12-01

    Comparisons of laboratory impact craters produced in rock and planetary-scale impact structures, indicate that the observed reductions in elastic wave velocities by shock-induced damage of rock beneath impact craters can be used to constrain the impact history. A series of small-scale normal and oblique impact experiments were conducted on 20x20x15 cm samples of San Marcos granite by a 1.2 km/s, 2 kJ impactor. The resulting largely circular (8 cm in diameter) crater dimensions agrees closely with previous data. By conducting a multiple source-receiver ultrasonic survey of the shocked rock beneath laboratory craters (sampled by 290 ray paths beneath the crater) we have tomographically mapped the in-situ P-wave velocity beneath craters and find measurable damage, as defined by > 0.1 km/s velocity reduction, are induced to depths of 7 cm beneath the crater for normal impacts. However, oblique impacts produce shallower damage zone ( ˜ 3 cm deep) that are asymmetric along the plane containing the impact trajectory. The downrange shows more damage than the uprange. Since the extent of the shock-damage region depends on impact velocity and impact energy, the extent of damage in our laboratory impact structures , and we presume also planetary scale impact structures, carries both impact velocity and direction of impact information not previously recognized or sought. Hence damage zone dimensions are expected to constrain planetary impacts parameters. Oblique impacts, where the tracjectory is ≥ 15° relative to the impacted surface, yields approximately circular craters, can in principle, provide information on impactor trajectory. For planetary impacts, the damage profile, as measured by seismic velocity deficit, beneath craters allow some statistical constraint on impacts produced by low-inclination orbit objects (asteroids and Jupiter-family comets), versus, high-inclination orbit objects (long-period and new comets).

  19. Shock-induced phase transformation in the Sixiangkou chondrite (L6): Ringwoodite, majorite?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; El Goresy, A.

    1994-07-01

    The Sixiangkou chondrite (L6) is a rare example of heavily shocked chondrites. The meteorite is intersected by black silicate melt veins containing isotropic phases formed by shock transformation of silicates. Grains of olivine and pyroxene compositions in the veins are either isotropic mineral glass or ringwoodite or majorite respectively. Plagioclase has been transformed to isotropic glass. The phase tentatively identified as ringwoodite occures as isotropic and colorless large grains up to 300 microns in length usually with rounded outlines. Several sets of regular fractures dissect the grains. These structural features are considered to be related to the deformation process of olivine induced by the impact event. Numerous microprobe analyses indicate that the phase has the same composition as the birefringent olivine in the neighboring unmolten material. Three types compositional of the phase suspected to be majorite were encountered. Type 1 is colorless to yellowish brown and consists of isotropic polycrystalline aggregates ranging in size from approximately 20 to 150 microns. This type has the same composition as the low-Ca pyroxene of the chondrite mass. Type 2 has comparable optical properties to type 1, but the grains are smaller in size, ranging from approximately 5 to 20 microns. The main compositional difference between type 1 and type 2 is that the second one has higher Na2O contents. Type 3 consists of isolated yellowish brown microcrystals ranging in size from 1-3 microns. This phase occurs as subhedral or euhedral crystals in the matrix of veins, and is usually surrounded by fine-grained troilite and FeNi metal or plagioclase glass. Microprobe analyses indicate that this type is relatively rich in Al, Ca, Na, and Cr. Based on the mineralogical features of the veins, we conclude that the shock-induced phase transformation of minerals may have been produced in different stages of a shock event.

  20. Large-Scale Reactive Atomistic Simulation of Shock-induced Initiation Processes in Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Aidan

    2013-06-01

    Initiation in energetic materials is fundamentally dependent on the interaction between a host of complex chemical and mechanical processes, occurring on scales ranging from intramolecular vibrations through molecular crystal plasticity up to hydrodynamic phenomena at the mesoscale. A variety of methods (e.g. quantum electronic structure methods (QM), non-reactive classical molecular dynamics (MD), mesoscopic continuum mechanics) exist to study processes occurring on each of these scales in isolation, but cannot describe how these processes interact with each other. In contrast, the ReaxFF reactive force field, implemented in the LAMMPS parallel MD code, allows us to routinely perform multimillion-atom reactive MD simulations of shock-induced initiation in a variety of energetic materials. This is done either by explicitly driving a shock-wave through the structure (NEMD) or by imposing thermodynamic constraints on the collective dynamics of the simulation cell e.g. using the Multiscale Shock Technique (MSST). These MD simulations allow us to directly observe how energy is transferred from the shockwave into other processes, including intramolecular vibrational modes, plastic deformation of the crystal, and hydrodynamic jetting at interfaces. These processes in turn cause thermal excitation of chemical bonds leading to initial chemical reactions, and ultimately to exothermic formation of product species. Results will be presented on the application of this approach to several important energetic materials, including pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO). In both cases, we validate the ReaxFF parameterizations against QM and experimental data. For PETN, we observe initiation occurring via different chemical pathways, depending on the shock direction. For PETN containing spherical voids, we observe enhanced sensitivity due to jetting, void collapse, and hotspot formation, with sensitivity increasing with void size. For ANFO, we

  1. Shock priming enhances the efficacy of SSRIs in the foot shock-induced ultrasonic vocalization test.

    PubMed

    Kassai, Ferenc; Gyertyán, István

    2012-01-10

    Data on the effect of acutely administered serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in animal anxiety models have been inconsistent. In some of the models these compounds showed anxiolytic properties, while in others they were ineffective or even anxiogenic. In the foot shock-induced ultrasonic vocalization (USV) test in the adult rat, SSRIs were reported to be effective, however, they were only tested with protocols using multiple shocking design. In the present study, anxiolytic effects of various SSRI compounds (sertraline, fluoxetine, paroxetine, escitalopram) were tested in three distinct USV test protocols in comparison with alprazolam and 8-OH-DPAT. In the single shocking protocol, animals were exposed to one shocking session after the drug treatment. In the multiple shocking protocol, rats went through a foot shock priming session before each drug test. On priming days animals received foot shocks without drug treatment. On the test day (the day after), rats received drug treatment and then were shocked again. In the context conditioning protocol animals were exposed to foot shocks on two consecutive days before the drug test. On the third, test day, after drug treatment animals were replaced to the shocking chamber, but this time shocks were not delivered. SSRIs were ineffective using the single shocking protocol. In the context conditioned protocol, all SSRIs showed linear dose-response relationship with ED50 values of 8.5, 2.2, 0.77 and 0.93 mg/kg i.p. for fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine and escitalopram, respectively. Using the multiple shocking protocol, SSRIs were only partially effective with maximum inhibitions ranging between 44% and 62%. In contrast to SSRIs, the benzodiazepine anxiolytics, alprazolam showed anxiolytic activity with linear dose-response relationship in all of the test protocols, with ED50 values varying from 1.3 to 4.0 mg/kg i.p. The serotonin 5HT1A receptor antagonist 8-OH-DPAT also showed linear dose-response relationship in all

  2. A shock-induced polymorph of anatase and rutile from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure, Virginia, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, J.C.; Horton, J.W.; Chou, I.-Ming; Belkin, H.E.

    2006-01-01

    A shock-induced polymorph (TiO2II) of anatase and rutile has been identified in breccias from the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure. The breccia samples are from a recent, partially cored test hole in the central uplift at Cape Charles, Virginia. The drill cores from 744 to 823 m depth consist of suevitic crystalline-clast breccia and brecciated cataclastic gneiss in which the TiO2 phases anatase and rutile are common accessory minerals. Electron-microprobe imaging and laser Raman spectroscopy of TiO2 crystals, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) of mineral concentrates, confirm that a high-pressure, ??-PbO2 structured polymorph of TiO2 (TiO2II) coexists with anatase and rutile in matrix-hosted crystals and in inclusions within chlorite. Raman spectra of this polymorph include strong bands at wavenumbers (cm-1) 175, 281, 315, 342, 356, 425, 531, 571, and 604; they appear with anatase bands at 397, 515, and 634 cm-1, and rutile bands at 441 and 608 cm-1. XRD patterns reveal 12 lines from the polymorph that do not significantly interfere with those of anatase or rutile, and are consistent with the TiO2II that was first reported to occur naturally as a shock-induced phase in rutile from the Ries crater in Germany. The recognition here of a second natural shock-induced occurrence of TiO2II suggests that its presence in rocks that have not been subjected to ultrahigh-pressure regional metamorphism can be a diagnostic indicator for confirmation of suspected impact structures.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Shock-Induced Combustion Past Blunt Bodies Using Shock-Fitting Technique. Appendix A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, J. K.; Kumar, A.; Singh, D. J.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional axisymmetric, reacting viscous flow over blunt projectiles is computed to study shock induced combustion at Mach 5.11 and Mach 6.46 in hydrogen-air mixture. A finite-difference, shock-fitting method is used to solve the complete set of Navier Stokes and species conservation equations. In this approach, the bow shock represents a boundary of the computational domain and is treated as a discontinuity across which Rankine-Hugoniot conditions are applied. All interior details of the flow such as compression waves, reaction front, and the wall boundary layer are captured automatically in the solution. Since shock-fitting approach reduces the amount of artificial dissipation, all the intricate details of the flow are captured much more clearly than has been possible with the shock-capturing approach. This has allowed an improved understanding of the physics of shock-induced combustion over blunt projectiles and the numerical results can now be explained more readily with one dimensional wave-interaction model than before.

  4. Time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau type Multiphase Field for description of shock-induced Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Belof, Jonathan; Benedict, Lorin

    2015-06-01

    Phase-field models have become popular in last two decades to describe a host of free-boundary problems. The strength of the method relies on implicitly describing the dynamics of surfaces and interfaces by continuous scalar field that enter in the global grand free energy functional of the system. We adapt this method in order to describe shock-induced phase transition. To this end we make use of the Multiphase Field Theory (MFT) to account for the existence of multiple phases during the transition. In this talk I will initially describe the constitutive equations that couple the dynamic of the phase field with that of the thermodynamic fields like T, P, c etc. I will then give details on developing a thermodynamically consistent phase-field interpolation function for multiple-phase system in the context of shock-induced phase-transition. At the end I will briefly comment on relating the dynamics of the interfaces in the shock/ramp compression to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation. This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. High-pressure phases in shock-induced melt of the unique highly shocked LL6 chondrite Northwest Africa 757

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinping; Sharp, Thomas G.

    2016-07-01

    Northwest Africa 757 is unique in the LL chondrite group because of its abundant shock-induced melt and high-pressure minerals. Olivine fragments entrained in the melt transform partially and completely into ringwoodite. Plagioclase and Ca-phosphate transform to maskelynite, lingunite, and tuite. Two distinct shock-melt crystallization assemblages were studied by FIB-TEM analysis. The first melt assemblage, which includes majoritic garnet, ringwoodite plus magnetite-magnesiowüstite, crystallized at pressures of 20-25 GPa. The other melt assemblage, which consists of clinopyroxene and wadsleyite, solidified at ~15 GPa, suggesting a second veining event under lower pressure conditions. These shock features are similar to those in S6 L chondrites and indicate that NWA 757 experienced an intense impact event, comparable to the impact event that disrupted the L chondrite parent body at 470 Ma.

  6. Shock-induced temperatures of CaMgSi2O6. [relevant to earth mantle composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svendsen, Bob; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from experiments on CaMgSi2O6 (diopside) single crystal, an end-member pyroxene relevant to studies of the composition of the earth's mantle. Also, experiments were conducted on diopside glass with a density 86 percent that of the diopside crystal. The shock-induced radiation from diopside is used to constrain the temperature of its shock-compressed (Hugoniot) states. The results are combined with other data to place constraints on the high-pressure phase relations in the CaMgSi2O6 system. These constraints are compared with existing models for the earth's mantle. The results imply that the temperature of the D-double prime region must be less than 3000 K.

  7. Shock-Induced Melting and Vaporization of MgO by Multi-Mbar Shock and Release Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, R. G.; Root, S.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Stewart, S. T.; Shulenburger, L.; Knudson, M. D.; Lemke, R.; Dolan, D. H.; Seagle, C. T.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Flicker, D. G.; Mattsson, T.

    2012-12-01

    The thermal state of the Earth after the final giant impact event is uncertain due to the lack of accurate wide-ranging equations of state for mantle minerals. In particular, current models for shock-induced melting and vaporization of the refractory phases within the Earth's mantle are poorly constrained due to the difficulty in reaching and measuring states in the relevant regions of the phase diagram. Using the Z-machine at Sandia National Laboratory, we performed high velocity (15-25 km/s) planar impact experiments onto MgO. We use a novel shock, release, and stagnation technique to determine the density of MgO along the liquid branch of the liquid-vapor dome. This region of the phase diagram is inaccessible to most static techniques and these experiments represent the first measurements of their kind. We will present our measurements of the temperature and density along the liquid-vapor dome of MgO and discuss the utility of these measurements in developing wide-ranging multi-phase equation of state models. We will also present a new model for the entropy along the principal Hugoniot of MgO, which we use to derive the criteria for shock-induced melting and vaporization and to address the commonly made assumption that the Moon-forming impact event melted Earth's entire mantle. We acknowledge support from NNSA SSGF, NNSA HEDLP, and the Z Fundamental Science User Program. We also thank the Z facility staff and technicians. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Melatonin prevents hemorrhagic shock-induced liver injury in rats through an Akt-dependent HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jun-Te; Kuo, Chia-Jung; Chen, Tsung-Hsing; Wang, Frank; Lin, Chun-Jun; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Hwang, Tsann-Long; Jan, Yi-Yin

    2012-11-01

    Although melatonin treatment following trauma-hemorrhage or ischemic reperfusion prevents organs from dysfunction and injury, the precise mechanism remains unknown. This study tested whether melatonin prevents liver injury following trauma-hemorrhage involved the protein kinase B (Akt)-dependent heme oxygenase (HO)-1 pathway. After a 5-cm midline laparotomy, male rats underwent hemorrhagic shock (mean blood pressure approximately 40 mmHg for 90 min) followed by fluid resuscitation. At the onset of resuscitation, rats were treated with vehicle, melatonin (2 mg/kg), or melatonin plus phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin (1 mg/kg). At 2 hr after trauma-hemorrhage, the liver tissue myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde, adenosine triphosphate, serum alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase levels were significantly increased compared with sham-operated control. Trauma-hemorrhage resulted in a significant decrease in the Akt activation in comparison with the shams (relative density, 0.526 ± 0.031 versus 1.012 ± 0.066). Administration of melatonin following trauma-hemorrhage normalized liver Akt phosphorylation (0.993 ± 0.061), further increased mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation (5.263 ± 0.338 versus 2.556 ± 0.225) and HO-1 expression (5.285 ± 0.325 versus 2.546 ± 0.262), and reduced cleaved caspase-3 levels (2.155 ± 0.297 versus 5.166 ± 0.309). Coadministration of wortmannin abolished the melatonin-mediated attenuation of the shock-induced liver injury markers. Our results collectively suggest that melatonin prevents hemorrhagic shock-induced liver injury in rats through an Akt-dependent HO-1 pathway.

  9. Laser shock-induced mechanical and microstructural modification of welded maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Banas, G. ); Elsayed-Ali, H.E. ); Lawrence, F.V. Jr. ); Rigsbee, J.M. )

    1990-03-01

    The effect of laser-induced high-intensity stress waves on the hardness, fatigue resistance, and microstructure in the heat affected zone of welded 18 Ni(250) maraging steel was investigated. Laser-shock processing increased the hardness and fatigue strength of the weldments. Some melting of the surface was involved during laser-shock hardening which produced the reverted austenite phase. Microscopic analyses showed an increased dislocation density in the laser-shocked area.

  10. Numerical study on the suppression of shock induced separation on the non-adiabatic wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Doug-Bong

    2000-12-01

    A numerical model is constructed to simulate the interaction of supersonic ( M=2.4) oblique shock wave / turbulent boundary layer on a strongly heated wall. The heated wall temperature is two times higher than the adiabatic wall temperature and the shock wave is strong enough to induce boundary layer separation. The turbulence model is Spalart-Allmaras model. The comparison of the wall pressure distribution with the experimental data ensures the validity of this numerical model. The effect of strong wall heating enlarges the separation region upstream and downstream. In order to eliminate the separation, wall bleeding is applied at the shock foot position. As a result of the parametric study, the best position of the bleeding slot is selected. The position of the bleeding is very important for the separation suppression. If the bleeding is applied upstream of shock foot, then separation reoccurs after the bleeding slot. If the bleeding is applied downstream of shock foot, the upstream boundary layer is little influenced and still separated. The bleeding vent width is about same as the upstream boundary layer thickness and suction mass flow is 20 to 80 % of the flow rate in the upstream boundary layer. The bleeding mass flow rate is very sensitive to the bleeding vent position if we fix the vent outlet pressure. The final configuration of the shock reflection pattern approaches to the non-viscous value when wall bleeding is applied at the shock impinging point.

  11. Shock-induced star formation in IC2153 - A colliding pair of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, K.; Bergvall, N.; Ekman, A.

    1984-08-01

    Direct photographic, photometric and spectroscopic observations of the interacting galaxy-pair IC2153 = ESO 364-IG 22 are reported. The observations were performed with the ESO 3.6-m, 1.5 m and 1-m telescopes at La Silla, Chile. The mean radial velocity of the system is 2630 km/s ( = or 30 km/s), corresponding to a distance of 35 Mpc. The system is aobut nine kpc across, and its UBV colors are consistent with those found in irregular galaxies. The absolute magnitude of the system is -18.4 mag. Spectral tracings of the main components show an early-type absorption spectrum and an emission spectrum. Spectra in the intermediate region of the pair have pure emission-line characteristics. Evidence of shock-heating in the galactic H-II regions, and it is estimated that about 7 percent of the light in H-beta originates from shock-heating and that the remainder arises from photoionization by hot stars. From a stellar population model, it is found that the UBV Johnson colors in the pair represent a burst of star formation with an age of 150 million years.

  12. Chemical studies of L chondrites. II - Shock-induced trace element mobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, T. M.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    Data for 13 trace elements in 14 L4-6 chondrites of established shock history are reported and discussed. These data are combined with data for an additional 13 L4-6 chondrites to delineate the full extent of losses by shock. Trace element contents vary with petrologic type, S/Fe subgroup, and shock history, the last dominating strongly. Absolute abundances and interelement relationships for the six or seven most mobile elements vary with degree of shock-loading established from mineralogic and petrologic study. Shock-heating, previously known to have affected radiogenic Ar-40 and/or He-4 in meteorites but not other elements, apparently was at least as effective as other open-system processes in establishing mobile trace element contents of L chondrites and probably others.

  13. Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations of the shock-induced chemistry of phenylacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Cawkwell, M. J. Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.

    2015-02-14

    The initial chemical events that occur during the shock compression of liquid phenylacetylene have been investigated using self-consistent tight binding molecular dynamics simulations. The extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism enabled us to compute microcanonical trajectories with precise conservation of the total energy. Our simulations revealed that the first density-increasing step under shock compression arises from the polymerization of phenylacetylene molecules at the acetylene moiety. The application of electronic structure-based molecular dynamics with long-term conservation of the total energy enabled us to identify electronic signatures of reactivity via monitoring changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap, and to capture directly adiabatic shock heating, transient non-equilibrium states, and changes in temperature arising from exothermic chemistry in classical molecular dynamics trajectories.

  14. An indirect method of measuring gas- and particulate-phase velocities of shock-induced dusty-gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, James J.

    1992-03-01

    A method of indirectly measuring the temporally varying velocities of both the particulate and gas phases in the nonequilibrium region of a shock wave moving at constant speed in a dusty-gas mixture is described. This method is implemented by using experimental data from shock-induced air flows containing glass beads 40 microns in diameter in a dusty-gas shock-tube facility featuring a large horizontal channel 197 mm high by 76 mm wide with a special dust-injection device. Simultaneous measurements of the shock-front speed with time-of-arrival gauges, particulate concentration by light extinctiometry, and combined particulate concentration and gas density by beta-ray absorption are used in conjunction with two mass conservation laws to provide these indirect two-phase velocity measurements. Direct measurements of the particulate-phase velocity by laser-Doppler velocimetry are also presented for comparison, and the capability of the indirect velocity-measurement method is assessed.

  15. On the method of indirectly measuring gas and particulate phase velocities in shock induced dusty-gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, G. D.

    A method of indirectly measuring the temporally varying velocities of the gas and particulate phases in the nonequilibrium region of a shock wave moving at constant speed in a dusty-gas flow is described, and this method is assessed by using experimental data from shock-induced air flows containing 40-micron-diameter glass beads in a dusty-gas shock-tube facility featuring a large horizontal channel (19.7-cm by 7.6-cm in cross section). Simultaneous measurements of the shock-front speed with time-of-arrival gauges, particle concentration by light extinctiometry, and gas-particle mixture density by beta-ray absorption are used in conjunction with two mass conservation laws to obtain the indirect velocity measurements of both phases. A second indirect measurement of the gas-phase velocity is obtained when the gas pressure is simultaneously recorded along with the particle concentration and shock-front speed when used in conjunction with the conservation of mixture momentum. Direct measurements of the particulate-phase velocity by laser-Doppler velocimetry are also presented as a means of assessing the indirect velocity measurement method.

  16. The Effect of Shock Stress and Field Strength on Shock-Induced Depoling of Normally Poled PZT 95/5

    SciTech Connect

    CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; FURNISH,MICHAEL D.; MONTGOMERY,STEPHEN T.; SETCHELL,ROBERT E.

    1999-09-01

    Shock-induced depoling of the ferroelectric ceramic PZT 95/5 is utilized in a number of pulsed power devices. Several experimental and theoretical efforts are in progress in order to improve numerical simulations of these devices. In this study we have examined the shock response of normally poled PZT 95/5 under uniaxial strain conditions. On each experiment the current produced in an external circuit and the transmitted waveform at a window interface were recorded. The peak electrical field generated within the PZT sample was varied through the choice of external circuit resistance. Shock pressures were varied from 0.6 to 4.6 GPa, and peak electrical fields were varied from 0.2 to 37 kV/cm. For a 2.4 GPa shock and the lowest peak field, a nearly constant current governed simply by the remanent polarization and the shock velocity was recorded. Both decreasing the shock pressure and increasing the electrical field resulted in reduced current generation, indicating a retardation of the depoling kinetics.

  17. Hypo-osmotic shock-induced subclinical inflammation of skin in a rat model of disrupted skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Chihiro; Minematsu, Takeo; Huang, Lijuan; Mugita, Yuko; Kitamura, Aya; Nakagami, Gojiro; Yamane, Takumi; Yoshida, Mikako; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Funakubo, Megumi; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    Aging disrupts skin barrier function and induces xerosis accompanied by pruritus. In many cases, elderly patients complain of pruritus during skin hygiene care, a condition called aquagenic pruritus of the elderly (APE). To date, the pathophysiology and mechanism of action of APE have not been elucidated. We conducted the present study to test the hypothesis that hypo-osmotic shock of epidermal cells induces skin inflammation and elongation of C-fibers by nerve growth factor β (NGFβ) as a basic mechanism of APE. The dorsal skin of HWY rats, which are a model for disrupted skin barrier function, was treated with distilled water (hypotonic treatment [Hypo] group) or normal saline (isotonic treatment [Iso] group) by applying soaked gauze for 7 days. Untreated rats were used as a control (no-treatment [NT] group). Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses revealed inflammatory responses in the epidermis and the dermal papillary layer in the Hypo group, while no alterations were observed in the Iso or NT groups. Induction of expression and secretion of NGFβ and elongation of C-fibers into the epidermis were found in the Hypo group. In contrast, secretion of NGFβ was significantly lower and elongation of C-fibers was not observed in the Iso group. These results suggest that hypo-osmotic shock-induced inflammatory reactions promote hypersensitivity to pruritus in skin with disrupted barrier function.

  18. Shock-Induced Transformation and Melting of Lower Mantle Minerals: Implications for Earth Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Mosenfelder, J. L.; Asimow, P. D.

    2008-12-01

    than expected isentropic rises in temperature with depth in model magma oceans encompassing the entire mantle. Taking into account our interpretation of the shock melting data and a critically evaluated subset of the published database of equation of state determinations from static (multi-anvil and diamond anvil) methods, we construct a proposed deep mantle and core geotherm. We note the similarity of our resulting magma ocean model [Asimow, 2008] and that of Labrosse et al. [2007]. The notion put forward by Labrosse et al. that the present ULVZ is a very thin remnant of the ancient magma ocean, which initially started to crystallize at mid-lower mantle depths, deserves further study. Evidently, if the ULVZ is indeed a dynamically stable, partially molten remnant of the primordial magma ocean, it is a candidate for hosting the deep Earth's hidden reservoir of incompatible elements,including both a substantial portion of the global inventory of heat-producing elements and the missing primordial noble gas isotopes. The density of such melts contributes to this reservoir being effectively unsampled by either solid-state mantle convection or magmatic fluids derived from the very deep Earth. Asimow, P.D., 2007. Magmatism and the evolution of the Earth's interior. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta, 71(15): A40. Labrosse, S., Hernlund, J.W. and Coltice, N., 2007. A crystallizing dense magma ocean at the base of the Earth's mantle. Nature, 450(7171): 866-869.

  19. The magnetic field of IRAS 16293-2422 as traced by shock-induced H2O masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, F. O.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Girart, J. M.; Torrelles, J. M.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Shock-induced H2O masers are important magnetic field tracers of very high density gas. Water masers are found in both high- and low-mass star-forming regions, and are a powerful tool for comparing magnetic field morphologies in both mass regimes. Aims: We present one of the first magnetic field determinations for the low-mass protostellar core IRAS 16293-2422 at volume densities as high as 108-10 cm-3. Our goal is to determine wether the collapsing regime of this source is controlled by magnetic fields or other factors such as turbulence. Methods: We used the Very Large Array (VLA) to carry out spectropolarimetric observations of the 22 GHz Zeeman emission from H2O masers. From the Stokes V line profile, we are then able to estimate the magnetic field strength in the dense regions around the protostar. Results: A blend of at least three maser features can be inferred from our relatively high spatial resolution data set (~0.1''), which is reproduced as a clear non-Gaussian line profile. The emission is very stable in terms of polarization fraction and position angle across the channels. The maser spots are aligned with some components of the complex outflow configuration of IRAS 16293-2422, and are excited in zones of compressed gas produced by shocks. The post-shock particle density is in the range of 1-3 × 109 cm-3, consistent with typical water-maser pumping densities. Zeeman emission is produced by a very strong line-of-sight magnetic field (B ~ 113 mG). Conclusions: The magnetic field pressure derived from our data is comparable to the ram pressure of the outflow dynamics. This indicates that the magnetic field is energetically important to the dynamical evolution of IRAS 16293-2422.

  20. Computational study of inlet injection for a Pre-Mixed, Shock-Induced Combustion (PM/SIC) engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    A computational simulation of reacting 2-D and 3-D flowfields in a model inlet section of a Pre-Mixed, Shock-Induced Combustion (PM/SIC) engine concept was performed. LARCK, a multi-dimensional Navier-Stokes code with finite-rate kinetics chemistry developed at NASA LaRC by J.A. White, was adapted for this simulation. The flow conditions in the simulation match those envisioned for the PM/SIC engine experiments currently planned at LaRC. The reacting flowfields were Mach 6.3 freestream air and Mach 2 hydrogen at various pressure and temperature conditions injected through a slot injector at the base of the inlet section. In the PM/SIC engine, fuel is injected at the inlet section upstream of the combustor, and reaction is initiated by the shock wave at the inlet which increases the gas temperature and pressure beyond the kinetic limits for reaction. Many challenges exist prior to establishing shock-controlled combustion as a practical engine concept. These challenges include fuel injection schemes that can provide proper fuel-air mixing without creating large losses in the inlet section, and control of the combustion process so that early ignition or combustion propagation through the inlet boundary layer does not occur. For this project, a parametrics study was carried out to model the fuel injection of hydrogen at different flow conditions. It was found that, as the fuel temperature and pressure were increased, the potential for pre-ignition was high at a short distance downstream of the slot injector. The next stage of this work will investigate injection techniques for enhancing mixing of fuel and air in a manner that prevents or reduces the potential for premature ignition observed numerically.

  1. Hemorrhagic shock-induced cerebral bioenergetic imbalance is corrected by pharmacologic treatment with EF24 in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Rao, Geeta; Xie, Jun; Hedrick, Andria; Awasthi, Vibhudutta

    2015-12-01

    Maintenance of cerebral viability and function is an important goal of critical care in victims of injury due to ischemia and hypovolemia. As part of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, the brain function after trauma is influenced by the systemic inflammatory response. We investigated the effect of EF24, an anti-inflammatory bis-chalcone, on cerebral bioenergetics in a rat model of 45% hemorrhagic shock. The rats were treated with EF24 (0.4 mg/kg) or EF24 with an artificial oxygen carrier liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEH). The volume of LEH administered was equal to the shed blood. The brain was collected after 6 h of shock for biochemical assays. EF24 treatment showed significant recovery of ATP, phosphocreatine, and NAD/NADH ratio. It also increased citrate synthase activity and cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV expression which were reduced in shock brain. Furthermore, it reduced the shock-induced accumulation of pyruvate and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 expression, suggesting that EF24 treatment improves cerebral energetics by restoring perturbed pyruvate metabolism in the mitochondria. These effects of EF24 were associated with reduced poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and a significant improvement in the levels of nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in shock brain. Co-administration of LEH with EF24 was only marginally more effective as compared to the treatment with EF24 alone. These results show that EF24 treatment sets up a pro-survival phenotype in shock by resurrecting cerebral bioenergetics. Since EF24 was effective in the absence of accompanying fluid resuscitation, it has potential utility as a pre-hospital pharmacotherapy in shock due to accidental blood loss.

  2. Role of p38 MAPK pathway in 17β-estradiol-mediated attenuation of hemorrhagic shock-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jun-Te; Chen, Tsung-Hsing; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Kuo, Chia-Jung; Lin, Chun-Jung; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2015-01-15

    Although 17β-estradiol (E2) treatment following hemorrhagic shock or ischemic reperfusion prevents organs from dysfunction and injury, the precise mechanism remains unknown. We hypothesize that the E2-mediated attenuation of liver injury following hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation occurs via the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent heme oxygenase (HO)-1 pathway. After a 5-cm midline laparotomy, male rats underwent hemorrhagic shock (mean blood pressure ∼40 mmHg for 90 min) followed by fluid resuscitation. At the onset of resuscitation, rats were treated with vehicle, E2 (1 mg/kg) alone, or E2 plus p38 MAPK inhibitor SB-203580 (2 mg/kg), HO-1 inhibitor chromium mesoporphyrin-IX chloride (2.5 mg/kg) or estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 (3 mg/kg). At 2 h after hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation, the liver injury markers were significantly increased compared with sham-operated control. Hemorrhagic shock resulted in a significant decrease in p38 MAPK phosphorylation compared with the shams. Administration of E2 following hemorrhagic shock normalized liver p38 MAPK phosphorylation, further increased HO-1 expression, and reduced cleaved caspase-3 levels. Coadministration of SB-203580 abolished the E2-mediated attenuation of the shock-induced liver injury markers. In addition, administration of chromium mesoporphyrin-IX chloride or ICI 182,780 abolished E2-mediated increases in liver HO-1 expression or p38 MAPK activation following hemorrhagic shock. Our results collectively suggest that the salutary effects of E2 on hepatic injury following hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation are in part mediated through an estrogen-receptor-related p38 MAPK-dependent HO-1 upregulation.

  3. Shock induced cavity collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, Jonathan; Doyle, Hugo; Tully, Brett; Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Ramasamy, Rohan; Parkin, James; Edwards, Tom; Hawker, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Results from the experimental investigation of cavity collapse driven by a strong planar shock (>6km/s) are presented. Data from high speed framing cameras, laser backlit diagnostics and time-resolved pyromety are used to validate the results of hydrodynamic front-tracking simulations. As a code validation exercise, a 2-stage light gas gun was used to accelerate a 1g Polycarbonate projectile to velocities exceeding 6km/s; impact with a PMMA target containing a gas filled void results in the formation of a strong shockwave with pressures exceeding 1Mbar. The subsequent phenomena associated with the collapse of the void and excitation of the inert gas fill are recorded and compared to simulated data. Variation of the mass density and atomic number of the gas fill is used to alter the plasma parameters furthering the extent of the code validation.

  4. Shock Induced Cavitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    Rehak, Margareta L, Frank L. DiMaggio and Ivan S. Sandler, "Interactive Ap- proximations for a Cavitating Fluid around a Floating Structure...INC ATTN: LIBRARY ATTN: R FRANK DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE BDM INTERNATIONAL INC ATTN: E DORCHAK AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY/EN ATTN: COMMANDER...F SHELTON ATTN: LIBRARY B KINSLOW SCIENCE APPLICATIONS INTL CORP ATTN: J R BRITT KAMAN SCIENCES CORP ATTN: DASIAC SRI INTERNATIONAL ATTN: E CONRAD

  5. Shock-induced microdeformations in quartz and other mineralogical indications of an impact event at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohor, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    The event terminating the Cretaceous period and the Mesozoic era caused massive extinctions of flora and fauna worldwide. Theories of the nature of this event can be classed as endogenic (volcanic, climatic, etc.) or exogenic (extraterrestrial causes). Mineralogical evidence from the boundary clays and claystones strongly favor the impact of an extraterrestrial body as the cause of this event. Nonmarine KT boundary claystones are comprised of two separate layers-an upper layer composed of high-angle ejecta material (shocked quartz, altered glass and spinel) and a basal kaolinitic layer containing spherules, clasts, and altered glass, together with some shocked grains. Recognition of this dual-layered nature of the boundary clay is important for the determination of the timing and processes involved in the impact event and in the assignment and interpretation of geochemical signatures. Multiple sets of shock-induced microdeformations (planar features) in quartz grains separated from KT boundary clays provide compelling evidence of an impact event. This mineralogical manifestation of shock metamorphism is associated worldwide with a large positive anomaly of iridium in these boundary clays, which has also been considered indicative of the impact of a large extraterrestrial body. Global distributions of maximum sizes of shocked quartz grains from the boundary clays and the mineralogy of the ejecta components favor an impact on or near the North American continent. Spinel crystals (magnesioferrite) occur in the boundary clays as micrometer-sized octahedra or skeletal forms. Their composition differs from that of spinels found in terrestrial oceanic basalts. Magnesioferrite crystals are restricted to the high-angle ejecta layer of the boundary clays and their small size and skeletal morphology suggest that they are condensation products of a vaporized bolide. Hollow spherules ranging up to 1 mm in size are ubiquitously associated with the boundary clays. In nonmarine

  6. High Reynolds number tests of a C-141A aircraft semispan model to investigate shock-induced separation. [boundary layer separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackerby, W. T.; Cahill, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Results from a high Reynolds number transonic wind tunnel investigation are presented. Wing chordwise pressure distributions were measured over a matrix of Mach numbers and angles-of-attack for which shock-induced separations are known to exist. The range of Reynolds number covered by these data nearly spanned the gap between previously available wind tunnel and flight test data. The results are compared with both flight and low Reynolds number data, and show that use of the semispan test technique produced good correlation with the prior data at both ends of the Reynolds number range, but indicated strong sensitivity to details of the test setup.

  7. CD44-Deficiency Attenuates the Immunologic Responses to LPS and Delays the Onset of Endotoxic Shock-Induced Renal Inflammation and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rampanelli, Elena; Dessing, Mark C.; Claessen, Nike; Teske, Gwendoline J. D.; Joosten, Sander P. J.; Pals, Steven T.; Leemans, Jaklien C.; Florquin, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication during systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), a potentially deadly clinical condition characterized by whole-body inflammatory state and organ dysfunction. CD44 is a ubiquitously expressed cell-surface transmembrane receptor with multiple functions in inflammatory processes, including sterile renal inflammation. The present study aimed to assess the role of CD44 in endotoxic shock-induced kidney inflammation and dysfunction by using CD44 KO and WT mice exposed intraperitoneally to LPS for 2, 4, and 24 hours . Upon LPS administration, CD44 expression in WT kidneys was augmented at all time-points. At 2 and 4 hours, CD44 KO animals showed a preserved renal function in comparison to WT mice. In absence of CD44, the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in plasma and kidneys were lower, while renal expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was higher. The cytokine levels were associated with decreased leukocyte influx and endothelial activation in CD44 KO kidneys. Furthermore, in vitro assays demonstrated a role of CD44 in enhancing macrophage cytokine responses to LPS and leukocyte migration. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that lack of CD44 impairs the early pro-inflammatory cytokine response to LPS, diminishes leukocyte migration/chemotaxis and endothelial activation, hence, delays endotoxic shock-induced AKI. PMID:24376813

  8. Further Applications of a Crystal Lattice Disintegration Criterion to Predict Shock-Induced Reactive Conditions in Solid Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    Table B-3 and plotted in Figure B-I, it appears that Cb 2 is a good measure of the heat of detonation (AHDEr) of energetic materials. That is, this...information indicates that: C2 - A HDET = AbDET mAv (B-13) where: AHDET = Heat of Detonation , Mega Joules/Kilogram or (km/sec) 2. The values of Cb and...Comparison of Elastic Wave Velocities and Heat of Detonation for Selected Energetic Materials. Substance AHDET AHDET VAHDET Cb Cs MJ/KG (km/sec) 2 km

  9. Effects of Early Continuous Venovenous Hemofiltration on E-Selectin, Hemodynamic Stability, and Ventilatory Function in Patients with Septic-Shock-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effects of 72-hour early-initiated continuous venovenous hemofiltration (ECVVH) treatment in patients with septic-shock-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (not acute kidney injury, AKI) with regard to serum E-selectin and measurements of lung function and hemodynamic stability. Methods. This prospective nonblinded single institutional randomized study involved 51 patients who were randomly assigned to receive or not receive ECVVH, an ECVVH group (n = 24) and a non-ECVVH group (n = 27). Besides standard therapies, patients in ECVVH group underwent CVVH for 72 h. Results. At 0 and 24 h after initiation of treatment, arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) ratio, extravascular lung water index (EVLWI), and E-selectin level were not significantly different between groups (all P > 0.05). Compared to non-ECVVH group, PaO2/FiO2 is significantly higher and EVLWI and E-selectin level are significantly lower in ECVVH group (all P < 0.05) at 48 h and 72 h after initiation of treatment. The lengths of mechanical ventilation and stay in intensive care unit (ICU) were shorter in ECVVH group (all P < 0.05), but there was no difference in 28-day mortality between two groups. Conclusions. In patients with septic-shock-induced ARDS (not AKI), treatment with ECVVH in addition to standard therapies improves endothelial function, lung function, and hemodynamic stability and reduces the lengths of mechanical ventilation and stay in ICU. PMID:28044135

  10. Suppressor of sable [Su(s)] and Wdr82 down-regulate RNA from heat-shock-inducible repetitive elements by a mechanism that involves transcription termination.

    PubMed

    Brewer-Jensen, Paul; Wilson, Carrie B; Abernethy, John; Mollison, Lonna; Card, Samantha; Searles, Lillie L

    2016-01-01

    Although RNA polymerase II (Pol II) productively transcribes very long genes in vivo, transcription through extragenic sequences often terminates in the promoter-proximal region and the nascent RNA is degraded. Mechanisms that induce early termination and RNA degradation are not well understood in multicellular organisms. Here, we present evidence that the suppressor of sable [su(s)] regulatory pathway of Drosophila melanogaster plays a role in this process. We previously showed that Su(s) promotes exosome-mediated degradation of transcripts from endogenous repeated elements at an Hsp70 locus (Hsp70-αβ elements). In this report, we identify Wdr82 as a component of this process and show that it works with Su(s) to inhibit Pol II elongation through Hsp70-αβ elements. Furthermore, we show that the unstable transcripts produced during this process are polyadenylated at heterogeneous sites that lack canonical polyadenylation signals. We define two distinct regions that mediate this regulation. These results indicate that the Su(s) pathway promotes RNA degradation and transcription termination through a novel mechanism.

  11. Shock-induced poration, cholesterol flip-flop and small interfering RNA transfection in a phospholipid membrane: Multimillion atom, microsecond molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit

    Biological cell membranes provide mechanical stability to cells and understanding their structure, dynamics and mechanics are important biophysics problems. Experiments coupled with computational methods such as molecular dynamics (MD) have provided insight into the physics of membranes. We use long-time and large-scale MD simulations to study the structure, dynamics and mechanical behavior of membranes. We investigate shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water using MD simulations based on a reactive force field. We observe a focused jet at the onset of bubble shrinkage and a secondary shock wave upon bubble collapse. The jet length scales linearly with the nanobubble radius, as observed in experiments on micron-to-millimeter size bubbles. Shock induces dramatic structural changes, including an ice-VII-like structural motif at a particle velocity of 1 km/s. The incipient ice VII formation and the calculated Hugoniot curve are in good agreement with experimental results. We also investigate molecular mechanisms of poration in lipid bilayers due to shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles. Our multimillion-atom MD simulations reveal that the jet impact generates shear flow of water on bilayer leaflets and pressure gradients across them. This transiently enhances the bilayer permeability by creating nanopores through which water molecules translocate rapidly across the bilayer. Effects of nanobubble size and temperature on the porosity of lipid bilayers are examined. The second research project focuses on cholesterol (CHOL) dynamics in phospholipid bilayers. Several experimental and computational studies have been performed on lipid bilayers consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and CHOL molecules. CHOL interleaflet transport (flip-flop) plays an important role in interleaflet coupling and determining CHOL flip-flop rate has been elusive. Various studies report that the rate ranges between milliseconds to seconds. We calculate CHOL flip-flop rates by

  12. A study of the effects of Reynolds number and Mach number on constant pressure coefficient jump for shock-induced trailing-edge separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Atlee M., Jr.; Spragle, Gregory S.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of Mach and Reynolds numbers as well as airfoil and planform geometry on the phenomenon of constant shock jump pressure coefficient for conditions of shock induced trailing edge separation (SITES) was studied. It was demonstrated that the phenomenon does exist for a wide variety of two and three dimensional flow cases and that the influence of free stream Mach number was not significant. The influence of Reynolds number was found to be important but was not strong. Airfoil and planform geometric characteristics were found to be very important where the pressure coefficient jump was shown to vary with the sum of: (1) airfoil curvature at the upper surface crest, and (2) camber surface slope at the trailing edge. It was also determined that the onset of SITES could be defined as a function of airfoil geometric parameters and Mach number normal to the leading edge. This onset prediction was shown to predict the angle of onset to within + or - 1 deg accuracy or better for about 90% of the cases studied.

  13. Shock induced reaction in Chicxulub target materials (CaSO4 and SiO2) and their relation to extinctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangqing; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1993-03-01

    The global platinum element rich layer, the presence of shocked quartz grains (in some cases with stishovite), and the observation of a tektite-rich layer, precisely at the K-T boundary, are the three major arguments for the extinction bolide impact hypothesis of Alvarez et al. Tektites (spherules) from Beloc in Haiti and Mimbral in Mexico received particular interest because of their geological proximity to the Chicxulub impact structure, which is a leading candidate for at least one of the K-T impact craters. Although in most localities the original glass has weathered to clay minerals, some shock-induced glass is found in outcrops and drill cores which is used for Ar-38/Ar-39 dating. The glassy tektites were found to be chemically similar and coeval at 65.0 Ma with Chicxulub melt rock. Two kinds of K-T spherules were discovered: (1) a silic black glass; and (2) a yellow glass, enriched in Ca, Mg, and S. The high sulfur content of the glass and the abundance of anhydrite (CaSO4) in the carbonate-evaporite sequence observed in Drill Holes Y-1 and Y-2 at Chicxulub prompted studies of calcium sulfate devolatization. Further discussion of our experiments is presented.

  14. Shock induced dissociation of polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; Loughran, E.D.; Mortensen, G.F.; Gray, G.T. III; Shaw, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    To identify the physical processes occurring on the Hugoniot, shock-recovery experiments were performed. Cylindrical recovery systems were used that enabled a wide range of single-shock Hugoniot states to be examined. Mass spectroscopy was used to examine the gaseous dissociation products. X-ray and TEM measurements were made to characterize the post-shock carbon structures. A dissociation product equation of state is presented to interpret the observed results. Polyethylene (PE) samples that were multiply shocked to their final states dissociated at much higher pressures than single-shocked samples. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Influence of heat shock on glycerol production in alcohol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Berovic, Marin; Pivec, Aleksandra; Kosmerl, Tatjana; Wondra, Mojmir; Celan, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    The influence of single and double heat shocks induced during the exponential growth phase of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation of cultivar Sauvignon Blanc grape must was examined. Rapid temperature changes from 18 degrees C to 34 degrees C have been applied. The effect of the duration of exposure to a high temperature has been analyzed. By the applications of a single heat shock and a double heat shock, up to 8.2 g l(-1) and 11.0 g l(-1) glycerol have been produced, respectively. To prevent the evaporation of fine wine bouquet compounds during the temperature changes, reflux coolers on the top of bioreactors have been employed. By using this method, glycerol production was increased by up to 65%.

  16. Heat Shock Partially Dissociates the Overlapping Modules of the Yeast Protein-Protein Interaction Network: A Systems Level Model of Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Mihalik, Ágoston; Csermely, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Network analysis became a powerful tool giving new insights to the understanding of cellular behavior. Heat shock, the archetype of stress responses, is a well-characterized and simple model of cellular dynamics. S. cerevisiae is an appropriate model organism, since both its protein-protein interaction network (interactome) and stress response at the gene expression level have been well characterized. However, the analysis of the reorganization of the yeast interactome during stress has not been investigated yet. We calculated the changes of the interaction-weights of the yeast interactome from the changes of mRNA expression levels upon heat shock. The major finding of our study is that heat shock induced a significant decrease in both the overlaps and connections of yeast interactome modules. In agreement with this the weighted diameter of the yeast interactome had a 4.9-fold increase in heat shock. Several key proteins of the heat shock response became centers of heat shock-induced local communities, as well as bridges providing a residual connection of modules after heat shock. The observed changes resemble to a ‘stratus-cumulus’ type transition of the interactome structure, since the unstressed yeast interactome had a globally connected organization, similar to that of stratus clouds, whereas the heat shocked interactome had a multifocal organization, similar to that of cumulus clouds. Our results showed that heat shock induces a partial disintegration of the global organization of the yeast interactome. This change may be rather general occurring in many types of stresses. Moreover, other complex systems, such as single proteins, social networks and ecosystems may also decrease their inter-modular links, thus develop more compact modules, and display a partial disintegration of their global structure in the initial phase of crisis. Thus, our work may provide a model of a general, system-level adaptation mechanism to environmental changes. PMID:22022244

  17. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  18. Heat shock protein synthesis and trehalose accumulation are not required for induced thermotolerance in depressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gross, C; Watson, K

    1996-03-27

    Intrinsic and heat shock induced thermotolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated in cells grown on glucose and acetate supplemented media. Heat shocked cells (37 degrees C/30 min), in either medium, exhibited induced synthesis of heat shock proteins (hsp) and trehalose. In all cases, with the notable exception of repressed cells of a relatively thermosensitive strain, heat shock acquisition of thermotolerance also occurred in the absence of protein synthesis and coincident decrease in trehalose accumulation. Results indicted that the marked increase in thermotolerance exhibited by non-fermenting (acetate) cells compared with fermenting (glucose) cells was not closely correlated with levels of hsp or trehalose. It was concluded that mechanisms for intrinsic and induced thermotolerance appear to be different and that growth on acetate endows cells with a biochemical predisposition, other than hsp or trehalose, that confers intrinsic tolerance, a factor which may be subject to heat induced modification.

  19. Genome-wide chromatin remodeling modulates the Alu heat shock response.

    PubMed

    Kim, C; Rubin, C M; Schmid, C W

    2001-10-03

    During heat shock recovery in Hela cells, the level of Alu RNA transiently increases with kinetics that approximately parallel the transient expression of heat shock protein mRNAs. Coincidentally, there is a transient increase in the accessibility of Alu chromatin to restriction enzyme cleavage suggesting that an opening and re-closing of chromatin regulates the Alu stress response. Similar changes occur in alpha satellite and LINE1 chromatin showing that heat shock induces a genome-wide remodeling of chromatin structure which is independent of transcription. The increased accessibility of restriction sites within these repetitive sequences is inconsistent with a simple lengthening of the nucleosome linker region but instead suggests a scrambling of nucleosome positions. Chromatin structure and its dynamics account for many of the principal features of SINE transcriptional regulation potentially providing a functional rationale for the dispersion and high copy number of SINEs.

  20. Heat Islands

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  1. The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) protects cells against cold-shock-induced apoptosis by maintaining phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT)

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Dale; Hsiang, Chinhui; Jiang, Xianzhi; Osorio, Nelson; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Jones, Clinton

    2017-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) blocks apoptosis and inhibits caspase-3 activation. We previously showed that serum starvation (removal of serum from tissue culture media), which takes several days to induce apoptosis, results in decreased levels of both AKT (protein kinase B) and phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) in cells not expressing LAT. In contrast in mouse neuroblastoma cells expressing LAT, AKT, and pAKT levels remained high. AKT is a serine/threonine protein kinase that promotes cell survival. To examine the effect of LAT on AKT-pAKT using a different and more rapid method of inducing apoptosis, a stable cell line expressing LAT was compared to non-LAT expressing cells as soon as 15 min following recovery from cold-shock-induced apoptosis. Expression of LAT appeared to inhibit dephosphorylation of pAKT. This protection correlated with blocking numerous pro-apoptotic events that are inhibited by pAKT. These results support the hypothesis that inhibiting dephosphorylation of pAKT may be one of the pathways by which LAT protects cells against apoptosis. PMID:26071090

  2. Widespread regulation of translation by elongation pausing in heat shock.

    PubMed

    Shalgi, Reut; Hurt, Jessica A; Krykbaeva, Irina; Taipale, Mikko; Lindquist, Susan; Burge, Christopher B

    2013-02-07

    Global repression of protein synthesis is a hallmark of the cellular stress response and has been attributed primarily to inhibition of translation initiation, although this mechanism may not always explain the full extent of repression. Here, using ribosome footprinting, we show that 2 hr of severe heat stress triggers global pausing of translation elongation at around codon 65 on most mRNAs in both mouse and human cells. The genome-wide nature of the phenomenon, its location, and features of protein N termini suggested the involvement of ribosome-associated chaperones. After severe heat shock, Hsp70's interactions with the translational machinery were markedly altered and its association with ribosomes was reduced. Pretreatment with mild heat stress or overexpression of Hsp70 protected cells from heat shock-induced elongation pausing, while inhibition of Hsp70 activity triggered elongation pausing without heat stress. Our findings suggest that regulation of translation elongation in general, and by chaperones in particular, represents a major component of cellular stress responses.

  3. Effect of sequential heat and cold shocks on nuclear phenotypes of the blood-sucking insect, Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister) (Hemiptera, Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Garcia, Simone L; Pacheco, Raquel M; Rodrigues, Vera L C C; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2002-12-01

    Thermal shocks induce changes in the nuclear phenotypes that correspond to survival (heterochromatin decondensation, nuclear fusion) or death (apoptosis, necrosis) responses in the Malpighian tubules of Panstrongylus megistus. Since thermal tolerance increased survival and molting rate in this species following sequential shocks, we investigated whether changes in nuclear phenotypes accompanied the insect survival response to sequential thermal shocks. Fifth instar nymphs were subjected to a single heat (35 or 40 degrees C, 1 h) or cold (5 or 0 degrees C, 1 h) shock and then subjected to a second shock for 12 h at 40 or 0 degrees C, respectively, after 8, 18, 24 and 72 h at 28 degrees C (control temperature). As with specimen survival, sequential heat and cold shocks induced changes in frequency of the mentioned nuclear phenotypes although their patterns differed. The heat shock tolerance involved decrease in apoptosis simultaneous to increase in cell survival responses. Sequential cold shocks did not involve cell/nuclear fusion and even elicited increase in necrosis with advancing time after shocks. The temperatures of 40 and 0 degrees C were more effective than the temperatures of 35 and 5 degrees C in eliciting the heat and cold shock tolerances, respectively, as shown by cytological analysis of the nuclear phenotypes. It is concluded that different sequential thermal shocks can trigger different mechanisms of cellular protection against stress in P. megistus, favoring the insect to adapt to various ecotopes.

  4. Heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilli, P. V.

    1982-11-01

    Heat pumps for residential/commercial space heating and hot tap water make use of free energy of direct or indirect solar heat and save from about 40 to about 70 percent of energy if compared to a conventional heating system with the same energy basis. In addition, the electrically driven compressor heat pump is able to substitute between 40% (bivalent alternative operation) to 100% (monovalent operation) of the fuel oil of an oilfired heating furnace. For average Central European conditions, solar space heating systems with high solar coverage factor show the following sequence of increasing cost effectiveness: pure solar systems (without heat pumps); heat pump assisted solar systems; solar assisted heat pump systems; subsoil/water heat pumps; air/water heat pumps; air/air heat pumps.

  5. Heat Pipes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction, function, and applications of heat pipes. Suggests using the heat pipe to teach principles related to heat transfer and gives sources for obtaining instructional kits for this purpose. (GS)

  6. Application of the cis-regulatory region of a heat-shock protein 70 gene to heat-inducible gene expression in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Akane; Utsumi, Nanami; Morita, Maki; Ohya, Aya; Wada, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Temporally controlled induction of gene expression is a useful technique for analyzing gene function. To make such a technique possible in Ciona intestinalis embryos, we employed the cis-regulatory region of the heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) gene Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like for heat-inducible gene expression in C. intestinalis embryos. We showed that Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like becomes heat shock-inducible by the 32-cell stage during embryogenesis. The 5'-upstream region of Ci-HSPA1/6/7-like, which contains heat-shock elements indispensable for heat-inducible gene expression, induces the heat shock-dependent expression of a reporter gene in the whole embryo from the 32-cell to the middle gastrula stages and in progressively restricted areas of embryos in subsequent stages. We assessed the effects of heat-shock treatments in different conditions on the normality of embryos and induction of transgene expression. We evaluated the usefulness of this technique through overexpression experiments on the well-characterized, developmentally relevant gene, Ci-Bra, and showed that this technique is applicable for inferring the gene function in C. intestinalis.

  7. Heat Rash

    MedlinePlus

    ... clear up the heat rash?Should I use diaper ointment on my child?What caused my heat rash?Should I stop exercising until the heat rash clears up?What is the best way to prevent heat rash? Last Updated: April 2014 This article was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Tags: ...

  8. Shock-Induced Reaction in Carbon Disulfide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    and gore on Tc nedesicn tne absorption experiment to overcome two prie-i-paproblems. One was the inade- quacy of the light source being used. The...Target and projectile design to provide suitable control of temperature and pressure histories in a geometry which car, be adapted to absorption ...continuous time measurement of broad band spectral absorption . Initial measurements must be continuous in both time and wavelength because, in general, the

  9. Shock Induced Molecular Excitation in Solids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-06

    Atomistic Relations in Physics and Chemistry of Solids," in Optical Properties of Solids , ed. by S. Nudelman and S. S. Mitra, Plenum, New York... Properties of Solids , S. Nudelman and S. S. Mitra, eds., • Plenum, New York (1969), p. 310 ff. K • J 9 1 • 1...lOf) I • * - ’Plendl, J. Mi, "New Spectral and Atomistic Relations in Physics and Chemistry • t< ot Solids," in Optical

  10. Shock-induced activation of acrylamide polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, B.W.; Arnold, C. Jr.

    1983-08-04

    We have subjected polycrystalline acrylamide to planar impact loading to peak pressures of 4.8 and 6.7 GPa using an air-driven projectile. In contrast to previous experiments involving explosive loading, postshock chemical analysis shows no formation of polyacrylamide associated with the shock loading. However, the impact shocked acrylamide spontaneously polymerizes when dissolved in tetrahydrofuran. This result implies that the stress history produced by the impact experiment results in the formation of a large density of stable active centers, which become mobile in solution. ESR measurements of the shocked acrylamide samples confirms the presence of substantial densities of free radicals. 2 figures.

  11. Shock-induced melting and rapid solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Gourdin, W.H.; Maple, M.B.

    1987-08-01

    Model calculations are presented to estimate that approx.50 GPa is required to completely shock melt metal powders with quenching at rates up to 10/sup 8/ K/s. Experiments are discussed for powders of a Cu-Zr alloy compacted in the usual way at 16 GPa and melted by shocking to 60 GPa. 12 refs.

  12. Novel Approaches to Shock Induced Acute MODS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    ORGANIZATION: University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey Newark, NJ 07103 REPORT DATE: May 2014 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S... Dentistry of New Jersey AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Newark, NJ 07103 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS

  13. Capsaicin partially mimics heat in mouse fibroblast cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Katakura, Masanori; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Yachie, Akihiro; Shido, Osamu

    2017-03-01

    Capsaicin activates transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a cation channel in the transient receptor potential family, resulting in the transient entry of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) and a warm sensation. However, the effects of capsaicin on cells have not fully elucidated in fibroblasts. In this study, we investigated whether capsaicin could induce signal transduction in mouse fibroblast cells and compared the effect with that of heat-induced signal transduction. The activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) ERK and p38 MAPK, expression levels of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and HSP90, actin assembly, and cell proliferation were analyzed in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells. A 15-min stimulation with capsaicin (∼100 μM) phosphorylated ERK and p38 MAPK and induced actin assembly. A 2-day stimulation with capsaicin increased the level of HSP70, but not HSP90, and the 2-day stimulation with capsaicin (∼100 μM) did not affect cell proliferation. A 15-min exposure to moderate heat (39.5 °C) phosphorylated both ERK and p38 MAPK and induced actin assembly to similar degrees as stimulation with capsaicin. A 2-day exposure to moderate heat increased the levels of both HSP70 and HSP90 and prevented cell proliferation. However, the 2-day stimulation with capsaicin (100 μM) failed to prevent heat shock-induced cell death. Thus, our results suggest that the effects of capsaicin on fibroblast cells partially differ from those of heat. Notably, the 2-day stimulation with capsaicin was not sufficient to develop heat tolerance in fibroblast cells.

  14. Heat Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms include heavy sweating, rapid breathing and a fast, weak pulse Heat cramps - muscle pains or spasms that happen during heavy exercise Heat rash - skin irritation from excessive sweating Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  15. Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stress Learn some tips to protect workers including: acclimatization, rest breaks, and fluid recommendations. NIOSH Workplace Solution: ... Blog: Adjusting to Work in the Heat: Why Acclimatization Matters The natural adaptation to the heat takes ...

  16. Extreme Heat

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies Biological Threats Chemical Threats Cyber Incident Drought Earthquakes Extreme Heat Explosions Floods Hazardous Materials Incidents Home ... Emergencies Biological Threats Chemical Threats Cyber ... Heat Explosions Floods Hazardous Materials Incidents Home ...

  17. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  18. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Heat Pipes were originally developed by NASA and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory during the 1960s to dissipate excessive heat build- up in critical areas of spacecraft and maintain even temperatures of satellites. Heat pipes are tubular devices where a working fluid alternately evaporates and condenses, transferring heat from one region of the tube to another. KONA Corporation refined and applied the same technology to solve complex heating requirements of hot runner systems in injection molds. KONA Hot Runner Systems are used throughout the plastics industry for products ranging in size from tiny medical devices to large single cavity automobile bumpers and instrument panels.

  19. Monitoring heat energy transfer in condensed phases using ultrafast transient spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Nhan; Gottfried, Jennifer

    2015-06-01

    The primary motivation for this work is the desire to observe the initial evolution of temperature transfer into a solid explosive on the picosecond timescale following indirect ultrafast flash heating, which may provide insight the role of temperature in the shock-induced initiation mechanism in explosives. In this presentation, we describe the methods of indirect flash heating on glass-gold-sample substrates using femtosecond laser pulses; and the methods of monitoring the sample response under the influence of the heat transferred from the heated gold layer through the sample using time-resolved visible transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy and coherent Raman spectroscopies. Data presented here are the evolution of heat energy transfer in a drop-cast thin film of unreacted cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) monitored using visible TA and surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. The method of nonequilibrium temperature measurement using femtosecond-stimulated Raman spectroscopy reported in will be also discussed here for the application of monitoring and measuring temperature in real-time.

  20. Possible involvement of phosphorylated heat-shock factor-1 in changes in heat shock protein 72 induction in the failing rat heart following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Marunouchi, Tetsuro; Murata, Mao; Takagi, Norio; Tanonaka, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    It is supposed that an increase in the level of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in the failing heart would be beneficial for reducing the myocardial damage. However, the induction of HSP72 after an exposure to heat shock is blunted in the failing rat heart following myocardial infarction. In this study, to clarify the possible mechanisms underlying this reduction in the ability for HSP72 induction in the failing heart, the possible involvement of heat-shock factor-1 (HSF1), an HSP transcription factor, in this reduction was examined. When hemodynamic parameters of rats with myocardial infarction 8 weeks after coronary artery ligation were measured, the animals showed the signs of chronic heart failure. The HSF1 content was increased in the viable myocardium in the failing heart. The ability to induce cardiac HSP72 was reduced after an exposure to hyperthermia. The level of HSF1 in the cytosolic fraction from the failing heart with or without exposure to hyperthermia was increased, whereas that of HSF1 in the nuclear fraction was reduced. In the failing heart, the level of HSF1 on its serine 303 (Ser303) residue, which phosphorylation represses HSF1, was increased. These findings suggest that HSF1 translocation from the cytosol into the nucleus was attenuated after an exposure to hyperthermia and that an increase in the phosphorylation of HSF1 Ser303 was involved in the impairment of heat shock-induced HSP72 induction in the failing heart following myocardial infarction.

  1. Heat Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Heat problems and heat cramps related to jogging can be caused by fluid imbalances, medications, dietary insufficiency, vomiting or diarrhea, among other factors. If the condition keeps reoccurring, the advice of a physician should be sought. Some preventive measures that can be taken include: (1) running during the cooler hours of the day; (2)…

  2. Heat collector

    DOEpatents

    Merrigan, Michael A.

    1984-01-01

    A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

  3. Heat collector

    DOEpatents

    Merrigan, M.A.

    1981-06-29

    A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

  4. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  5. Increase in UV mutagenesis by heat stress on UV-irradiated E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Saha, Swati; Basu, Tarakdas

    2012-06-01

    When leu- auxotrophs of Escherichia coli, after UV irradiation, were grown at temperatures between 30 and 47°C, the frequency of UV-induced mutation from leu- to leu+ revertant increased as the UV dose and the temperature increased. For cells exposed to a UV dose of 45 J/m2, the mutation frequency at 47°C was 1.9 times that at 30°C; for a dose of 90 J/m2, it was 3.25 times; and for 135 J/m2, it was 4.8 times. Similar enhancement of reversion frequency was observed when the irradiated cells were grown at 30°C in the presence of a heat shock inducer, ethanol (8% v/v). Heat shock-mediated enhancement of UV mutagenesis did not occur in an E. coli mutant sigma 32 (heat shock regulator protein), but sigma 32 overexpression in the mutant strain (transformed with a sigma 32-bearing plasmid) increased the UV-induced mutation frequency. These results suggest that heat stress alone has no mutagenic property, but when applied to UV-damaged cells, it enhances the UV-induced frequency of cell mutation.

  6. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  7. Heat shock factor 1 binds to and transcribes satellite II and III sequences at several pericentromeric regions in heat-shocked cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eymery, Angeline; Souchier, Catherine; Vourc'h, Claire; Jolly, Caroline

    2010-07-01

    Cells respond to stress by activating the synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) which protect the cells against the deleterious effects of stress. This mechanism is controlled by the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). In parallel to HSP gene transcription, in human cells, HSF1 also binds to and transcribes satellite III repeated sequences present in numerous copies in the 9q12 pericentromeric region of chromosome 9. These HSF1 accumulation sites are termed nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). In tumor cells, however, the number of nSBs is higher than the number of 9q12 copies, suggesting the existence of other HSF1 targets. In this paper, we were interested in characterizing these other HSF1 binding sites. We show that HSF1 indeed binds to the pericentromeric region of 14 chromosomes, thereby directing the formation of 'secondary nSBs'. The appearance of secondary nSBs depends on the number of satellite sequences present in the target locus, and on the cellular amount of HSF1 protein. Moreover, secondary nSBs also correspond to transcription sites, thus demonstrating that heat shock induces a genome-wide transcription of satellite sequences. Finally, by analyzing published transcriptomic data, we show that the derepression of these large heterochromatic blocks does not significantly affect the transcription of neighboring genes.

  8. Magnetar Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Li, Xinyu

    2016-12-01

    We examine four candidate mechanisms that could explain the high surface temperatures of magnetars. (1) Heat flux from the liquid core heated by ambipolar diffusion. It could sustain the observed surface luminosity {{\\mathscr{L}}}s≈ {10}35 erg s-1 if core heating offsets neutrino cooling at a temperature {T}{core}\\gt 6× {10}8 K. This scenario is viable if the core magnetic field exceeds 1016 G and the heat-blanketing envelope of the magnetar has a light-element composition. However, we find that the lifetime of such a hot core should be shorter than the typical observed lifetime of magnetars. (2) Mechanical dissipation in the solid crust. This heating can be quasi-steady, powered by gradual (or frequent) crustal yielding to magnetic stresses. We show that it obeys a strong upper limit. As long as the crustal stresses are fostered by the field evolution in the core or Hall drift in the crust, mechanical heating is insufficient to sustain persistent {{\\mathscr{L}}}s≈ {10}35 erg s-1. The surface luminosity is increased in an alternative scenario of mechanical deformations triggered by external magnetospheric flares. (3) Ohmic dissipation in the crust, in volume or current sheets. This mechanism is inefficient because of the high conductivity of the crust. Only extreme magnetic configurations with crustal fields B\\gt {10}16 G varying on a 100 meter scale could provide {{\\mathscr{L}}}s≈ {10}35 erg s-1. (4) Bombardment of the stellar surface by particles accelerated in the magnetosphere. This mechanism produces hot spots on magnetars. Observations of transient magnetars show evidence of external heating.

  9. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Bobs Candies, Inc. produces some 24 million pounds of candy a year, much of it 'Christmas candy.' To meet Christmas demand, it must produce year-round. Thousands of cases of candy must be stored a good part of the year in two huge warehouses. The candy is very sensitive to temperature. The warehouses must be maintained at temperatures of 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit with relative humidities of 38- 42 percent. Such precise climate control of enormous buildings can be very expensive. In 1985, energy costs for the single warehouse ran to more than $57,000 for the year. NASA and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) were adapting heat pipe technology to control humidity in building environments. The heat pipes handle the jobs of precooling and reheating without using energy. The company contacted a FSEC systems engineer and from that contact eventually emerged a cooperative test project to install a heat pipe system at Bobs' warehouses, operate it for a period of time to determine accurately the cost benefits, and gather data applicable to development of future heat pipe systems. Installation was completed in mid-1987 and data collection is still in progress. In 1989, total energy cost for two warehouses, with the heat pipes complementing the air conditioning system was $28,706, and that figures out to a cost reduction.

  10. Heat Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    Bobs Candies, Inc. produces some 24 million pounds of candy a year, much of it 'Christmas candy.' To meet Christmas demand, it must produce year-round. Thousands of cases of candy must be stored a good part of the year in two huge warehouses. The candy is very sensitive to temperature. The warehouses must be maintained at temperatures of 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit with relative humidities of 38- 42 percent. Such precise climate control of enormous buildings can be very expensive. In 1985, energy costs for the single warehouse ran to more than 57,000 for the year. NASA and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) were adapting heat pipe technology to control humidity in building environments. The heat pipes handle the jobs of precooling and reheating without using energy. The company contacted a FSEC systems engineer and from that contact eventually emerged a cooperative test project to install a heat pipe system at Bobs' warehouses, operate it for a period of time to determine accurately the cost benefits, and gather data applicable to development of future heat pipe systems. Installation was completed in mid-1987 and data collection is still in progress. In 1989, total energy cost for two warehouses, with the heat pipes complementing the air conditioning system was 28,706, and that figures out to a cost reduction.

  11. Chromospheric heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1989-01-01

    The solar chromosphere is identified with the atmosphere inside magnetic flux tubes. Between the temperature minimum and the 7000 K level, the chromosphere in the bright points of the quiet sun is heated by large-amplitude, long-period, compressive waves with periods mainly between 2 and 4 minutes. These waves do not observe the cutoff condition according to which acoustic waves with periods longer than 3 minutes do not propagate vertically in the upper solar photosphere. It is concluded that the long-period waves probably supply all the energy required for the heating of the bright points in the quiet solar chromosphere.

  12. HEAT GENERATION

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1963-12-01

    Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

  13. Glucose Starvation Alters Heat Shock Response, Leading to Death of Wild Type Cells and Survival of MAP Kinase Signaling Mutant.

    PubMed

    Plesofsky, Nora; Higgins, LeeAnn; Markowski, Todd; Brambl, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A moderate heat shock induces Neurospora crassa to synthesize large quantities of heat shock proteins that are protective against higher, otherwise lethal temperatures. However, wild type cells do not survive when carbohydrate deprivation is added to heat shock. In contrast, a mutant strain defective in a stress-activated protein kinase does survive the combined stresses. In order to understand the basis for this difference in survival, we have determined the relative levels of detected proteins in the mutant and wild type strain during dual stress, and we have identified gene transcripts in both strains whose quantities change in response to heat shock or dual stress. These data and supportive experimental evidence point to reasons for survival of the mutant strain. By using alternative respiratory mechanisms, these cells experience less of the oxidative stress that proves damaging to wild type cells. Of central importance, mutant cells recycle limited resources during dual stress by undergoing autophagy, a process that we find utilized by both wild type and mutant cells during heat shock. Evidence points to inappropriate activation of TORC1, the central metabolic regulator, in wild type cells during dual stress, based upon behavior of an additional signaling mutant and inhibitor studies.

  14. Glucose Starvation Alters Heat Shock Response, Leading to Death of Wild Type Cells and Survival of MAP Kinase Signaling Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, LeeAnn; Markowski, Todd; Brambl, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A moderate heat shock induces Neurospora crassa to synthesize large quantities of heat shock proteins that are protective against higher, otherwise lethal temperatures. However, wild type cells do not survive when carbohydrate deprivation is added to heat shock. In contrast, a mutant strain defective in a stress-activated protein kinase does survive the combined stresses. In order to understand the basis for this difference in survival, we have determined the relative levels of detected proteins in the mutant and wild type strain during dual stress, and we have identified gene transcripts in both strains whose quantities change in response to heat shock or dual stress. These data and supportive experimental evidence point to reasons for survival of the mutant strain. By using alternative respiratory mechanisms, these cells experience less of the oxidative stress that proves damaging to wild type cells. Of central importance, mutant cells recycle limited resources during dual stress by undergoing autophagy, a process that we find utilized by both wild type and mutant cells during heat shock. Evidence points to inappropriate activation of TORC1, the central metabolic regulator, in wild type cells during dual stress, based upon behavior of an additional signaling mutant and inhibitor studies. PMID:27870869

  15. Antioxidant enzymes and DPPH-radical scavenging activity in chilled and heat-shocked rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings radicles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho-Min; Saltveit, Mikal E

    2002-01-30

    Chilling whole rice seedlings at 5 degrees C significantly increased the time needed to recover linear growth and reduced the subsequent linear rate of radicle growth. Subjecting nonchilled seedlings to a 45 degrees C heat shock for up to 20 min did not alter subsequent growth, whereas a 3 min heat shock was optimal in reducing growth inhibition caused by 2 days of chilling. The activity of five antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6), ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11), glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2), and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX; EC 1.11.1.7)] and DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl)-radical scavenging activity were measured in heat-shocked and/or chilled radicles. Heat shock slightly increased the activity of CAT, APX, and GR and suppressed the increase of GR and GPX activity during recovery from chilling. Increased CAT, APX, GR, and DPPH-radical scavenging activity and protection of CAT activity during chilling appear to be correlated with heat shock-induced chilling tolerance.

  16. Renewable Heating and Cooling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  17. Lysosomal responses to heat-shock of seasonal temperature extremes in Cd-exposed mussels.

    PubMed

    Múgica, M; Izagirre, U; Marigómez, I

    2015-07-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the effect of temperature extremes on lysosomal biomarkers in mussels exposed to a model toxic pollutant (Cd) at different seasons. For this purpose, temperature was elevated 10°C (from 12°C to 22°C in winter and from 18°C to 28°C in summer) for a period of 6h (heat-shock) in control and Cd-exposed mussels, and then returned back to initial one. Lysosomal membrane stability and lysosomal structural changes in digestive gland were investigated. In winter, heat-shock reduced the labilisation period (LP) of the lysosomal membrane, especially in Cd-exposed mussels, and provoked transient lysosomal enlargement. LP values recovered after the heat-shock cessation but lysosomal enlargement prevailed in both experimental groups. In summer, heat-shock induced remarkable reduction in LP and lysosomal enlargement (more markedly in Cd-exposed mussels), which recovered within 3 days. Besides, whilst heat-shock effects on LP were practically identical for Cd-exposed mussels in winter and summer, the effects were longer-lasting in summer than in winter for control mussels. Thus, lysosomal responsiveness after heat-shock was higher in summer than in winter but recovery was faster as well, and therefore the consequences of the heat shock seem to be more decisive in winter. In contrast, inter-season differences were attenuated in the presence of Cd. Consequently, mussels seem to be better prepared in summer than in winter to stand short periods of abrupt temperature change; this is, however, compromised when mussels are exposed to pollutants such as Cd.

  18. Flash Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2000-03-01

    Meteorites contain millimeter-sized objects called chondrules. They were melted in the solar nebula, the cloud of gas and dust in which the Sun and planets formed. Numerous experiments on rock powders have been done to understand the melting process and the cooling rates chondrules experienced. Most meteorite specialists believe that chondrules formed by flash heating, with almost instantaneous melting, though the length of time they remained molten is uncertain. Can conventional laboratory furnaces heat rock powders rapidly enough to flash melt them? Susan Maharaj and Roger Hewins (Rutgers University, New Brunswick) tested this idea by inserting tiny wires of pure elements (which have precise melting temperatures) into compressed rock powders about 3.5 mm in diameter, and placing the samples into a furnace heated to a range of temperatures. They found that at 1600 C, a sample took only six seconds to reach 1538 C. When placed into a furnace at 1500 C, samples took ten seconds to reach 1495 C. This shows that the flash heating process can be studied in conventional laboratory furnaces.

  19. Infrared heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    IR heating was first industrially used in the 1930s for automotive curing applications and rapidly became a widely applied technology in the manufacturing industry. Contrarily, a slower pace in the development of IR technologies for processing foods and agricultural products was observed, due to lim...

  20. Bayonet heat exchangers in heat-assisted Stirling heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Yagyu, S.; Fukuyama, Y.; Morikawa, T.; Isshiki, N.; Satoh, I.; Corey, J.; Fellows, C.

    1998-07-01

    The Multi-Temperature Heat Supply System is a research project creating a city energy system with lower environmental load. This system consists of a gas-fueled internal combustion engine and a heat-assisted Stirling heat pump utilizing shaft power and thermal power in a combination of several cylinders. The heat pump is mainly driven by engine shaft power and is partially assisted by thermal power from engine exhaust heat source. Since this heat pump is operated by proportioning the two energy sources to match the characteristics of the driving engine, the system is expected to produce cooling and heating water at high COP. This paper describes heat exchanger development in the project to develop a heat-assisted Stirling heat pump. The heat pump employs the Bayonet type heat exchangers (BHX Type I) for supplying cold and hot water and (BHX Type II) for absorbing exhaust heat from the driving engine. The heat exchanger design concepts are presented and their heat transfer and flow loss characteristics in oscillating gas flow are investigated. The main concern in the BHX Type I is an improvement of gas side heat transfer and the spirally finned tubes were applied to gas side of the heat exchanger. For the BHX Type II, internal heat transfer characteristics are the main concern. Shell-and-tube type heat exchangers are widely used in Stirling machines. However, since brazing is applied to the many tubes for their manufacturing processes, it is very difficult to change flow passages to optimize heat transfer and loss characteristics once they have been made. The challenge was to enhance heat transfer on the gas side to make a highly efficient heat exchanger with fewer parts. It is shown that the Bayonet type heat exchanger can have good performance comparable to conventional heat exchangers.

  1. Geothermal district heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budney, G. S.; Childs, F.

    1982-06-01

    Ten district heating demonstration projects and their present status are described. The projects are Klamath County YMCA, Susanville District Heating, Klamath Falls District Heating, Reno Salem Plaza Condominium, El Centro Community Center Heating/Cooling, Haakon School and Business District Heating, St. Mary's Hospital, Diamond Ring Ranch, Pagosa Springs District Heating, and Boise District Heating.

  2. Geothermal heating

    SciTech Connect

    Aureille, M.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of the study is to demonstrate the viability of geothermal heating projects in energy and economic terms and to provide nomograms from which an initial estimate may be made without having to use data-processing facilities. The effect of flow rate and temperature of the geothermal water on drilling and on the network, and the effect of climate on the type of housing are considered.

  3. Heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, A.J.

    1982-11-30

    A single working fluid heat pump system having a turbocompressor with a first fluid input for the turbine and a second fluid input for the compressor, and a single output volute or mixing chamber for combining the working fluid output flows of the turbine and the compressor. The system provides for higher efficiency than single fluid systems whose turbine and compressor are provided with separate output volutes.

  4. Heat shock increases oxidative stress to modulate growth and physico-chemical attributes in diverse maize cultivars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Iqbal; Ashraf, Muhammad Arslan; Rasheed, Rizwan; Iqbal, Muhammad; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Ashraf, Shamila

    2016-10-01

    The present investigation was conducted to appraise the physiochemical adjustments in contrasting maize cultivars, namely, PakAfgoi (tolerant) and EV-5098 (sensitive) subjected to heat shock. Seven-day-old seedlings were exposed to heat shock for different time intervals (1, 3, 6, 24, 48 and 72 h) and data for various physiochemical attributes determined to appraise time course changes in maize. After 72 h of heat shock, the plants were grown under normal conditions for 5 d and data for different growth attributes and photosynthetic pigments recorded. Exposure to heat shock reduced growth and photosynthetic pigments in maize cultivars. The plants exposed to heat shock for up to 3 h recovered growth and photosynthetic pigments when stress was relieved. A time course rise in the relative membrane permeability, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde contents was recorded particularly in the EV-5098 indicating that heat shock-induced oxidative stress. Activities of different enzymatic antioxidants greatly altered due to heat shock. For instance, an increase in superoxide dismutase activity was recorded in both maize cultivars. The activity of ascorbate peroxidase was greater in Pak-Afgoi. However, the peroxidase and catalase activities were higher in plants of EV-5098. Heat shock caused a significant rise in the proline and decline in the total free amino acids. Overall, the performance of Pak-Afgoi was better in terms of having lesser oxidative damage and greater cellular levels of proline. The results suggested that oxidative stress indicators (relative membrane permeability, H2O2 and malondialdehyde) and proline can be used as markers for heat shock tolerant plants.

  5. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1982-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchanges and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

  6. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1979-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchangers and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

  7. Towards Understanding the Fluid Dynamic Phenomenon of Interest to Rocket Base Heating: A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, E.; Park, C.; Palmer, G.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    capture such phenomenon as shock induced base separation and base-burning phenomenon. A survey of experimental, theoretical and computational work that details the fluid dynamics of the base flow environment will be presented in the proposed paper. CFD simulations of rocket base flows using standard CFD codes such as OVERFLOW or GASP will be explored to capture these phenomenon accurately. Merits and limitations of these codes for base flow environment predictions will be explored.

  8. Repression of hsp70 heat shock gene transcription by the suppressor of hairy-wing protein of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, C.; Dorsett, D. )

    1991-04-01

    The suppressor of hairy-wing [su(Hw)] locus of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a zinc finger protein that binds a repeated motif in the gypsy retroposon. Mutations of su(Hw) suppress the phenotypes associated with mutations caused by gypsy insertions. To examine the mechanisms by which su(Hw) alters gene expression, a fragment of gypsy containing multiple su(Hw) protein-binding sites was inserted into various locations in the well-characterized Drosophila hsp70 heat shock gene promoter. The authors found no evidence for activation of basal hsp70 transcription by su(Hw) protein in cultured Drosophila cells but observed that it can repress heat shock-induced transcription. Repression occurred only when su(Hw) protein-binding sites were positioned between binding sites for proteins required for heat shock transcription. They propose that su(Hw) protein interferes nonspecifically with protein-protein interactions required for heat shock transcription, perhaps sterically, or by altering the ability of DNA to bend or twist.

  9. Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  10. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  11. Tissue-specific induction of Hsp90 mRNA and plasma cortisol response in chinook salmon following heat shock, seawater challenge, and handling challenge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palmisano, Aldo N.; Winton, J.R.; Dickhoff, Walton W.

    2000-01-01

    In studying the whole-body response of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to various stressors, we found that 5-hour exposure to elevated temperature (mean 21.6??C; + 10.6??C over ambient) induced a marked increase in Hsp90 messenger RNA accumulation in heart, brain, gill, muscle, liver, kidney, and tail fin tissues. The most vital tissues (heart, brain, gill, and muscle) showed the greatest Hsp90-mRNA response, with heart tissue increasing approximately 35-fold, Heat shock induced no increase in plasma cortisol. In contrast, a standard handling challenge induced high plasma cortisol levels, but no elevation in Hsp90 mRNA in any tissue, clearly separating the physiological and cellular stress responses. We saw no increase either in tissue Hsp90 mRNA levels or in plasma cortisol concentrations after exposing the fish to seawater overnight.

  12. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbury, Phillip J.

    1986-04-01

    A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

  13. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  14. Heat pipe methanator

    DOEpatents

    Ranken, William A.; Kemme, Joseph E.

    1976-07-27

    A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

  15. Latent Heat in Soil Heat Flux Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  16. Segmented heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  17. Dual source heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.; Pietsch, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  18. Heat recovery method

    SciTech Connect

    Richarts, F.

    1985-04-16

    Heat is recovered by combining a heat transfer system including heat exchangers interconnected in a circulatory system, with a heat pump system. The heat pump system is preferably operated in accordance with the Lorenz-Principle. It is not necessary to divide the heat carrier circuit of the heat pump into two or three separate circulatory circuits. The heat carrier circuit of the heat pump can thus continue to operate unchanged even if the heat pump is switched off. For this purpose the warm heat carrier coming from a discharge fluid cooler, is heated further in a condenser of the heat pump and the cold heat carrier coming from a preheater or cooler group, is cooled further in an evaporator of the heat pump.

  19. Shock compression and flash-heating of molecular adsorbates on the picosecond time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Christopher Michael

    An ultrafast nonlinear coherent laser spectroscopy termed broadband multiplex vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) with nonresonant suppression was employed to monitor vibrational transitions of molecular adsorbates on metallic substrates during laser-driven shock compression and flash-heating. Adsorbates were in the form of well-ordered self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and included molecular explosive simulants, such as nitroaromatics, and long chain-length alkanethiols. Based on reflectance measurements of the metallic substrates, femtosecond flash-heating pulses were capable of producing large-amplitude temperature jumps with DeltaT = 500 K. Laser-driven shock compression of SAMs produced pressures up to 2 GPa, where 1 GPa ≈ 1 x 104 atm. Shock pressures were estimated via comparison with frequency shifts observed in the monolayer vibrational transitions during hydrostatic pressure measurements in a SiC anvil cell. Molecular dynamics during flash-heating and shock loading were probed with vibrational SFG spectroscopy with picosecond temporal resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution. Flash-heating studies of 4-nitrobenzenethiolate (NBT) on Au provided insight into effects from hot-electron excitation of the molecular adsorbates at early pump-probe delay times. At longer delay times, effects from the excitation of SAM lattice modes and lower-energy NBT vibrations were shown. In addition, flash-heating studies of alkanethiolates demonstrated chain disordering behaviors as well as interface thermal conductances across the Au-SAM junction, which was of specific interest within the context of molecular electronics. Shock compression studies of molecular explosive simulants, such as 4-nitrobenzoate (NBA), demonstrated the proficiency of this technique to observe shock-induced molecular dynamics, in this case orientational dynamics, on the picosecond time scale. Results validated the utilization of these refined shock loading techniques to probe the shock

  20. Small heat shock proteins can release light dependence of tobacco seed during germination.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia; Hong, Choo Bong

    2015-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination.

  1. Engagement of Components of DNA-Break Repair Complex and NFκB in Hsp70A1A Transcription Upregulation by Heat Shock

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Joyita; Mukherjee, Pooja; Ali, Asif; Poddar, Soumita; Pal, Mahadeb

    2017-01-01

    An involvement of components of DNA-break repair (DBR) complex including DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1) in transcription regulation in response to distinct cellular signalling has been revealed by different laboratories. Here, we explored the involvement of DNA-PK and PARP-1 in the heat shock induced transcription of Hsp70A1A. We find that inhibition of both the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK (DNA-PKc), and Ku70, a regulatory subunit of DNA-PK holo-enzyme compromises transcription of Hsp70A1A under heat shock treatment. In immunoprecipitation based experiments we find that Ku70 or DNA-PK holoenzyme associates with NFκB. This NFκB associated complex also carries PARP-1. Downregulation of both NFκB and PARP-1 compromises Hsp70A1A transcription induced by heat shock treatment. Alteration of three bases by site directed mutagenesis within the consensus κB sequence motif identified on the promoter affected inducibility of Hsp70A1A transcription by heat shock treatment. These results suggest that NFκB engaged with the κB motif on the promoter cooperates in Hsp70A1A activation under heat shock in human cells as part of a DBR complex including DNA-PK and PARP-1. PMID:28099440

  2. Spermatocyte-specific expression of constitutively active heat shock factor 1 induces HSP70i-resistant apoptosis in male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Vydra, N; Malusecka, E; Jarzab, M; Lisowska, K; Glowala-Kosinska, M; Benedyk, K; Widlak, P; Krawczyk, Z; Widlak, W

    2006-02-01

    Spermatocytes, the most sensitive male germ cells to heat-induced apoptosis, do not respond to hyperthermia by inducing heat shock proteins (HSPs), including HSP70i, which has been previously shown to confer resistance to apoptosis in somatic cells. To dissect the mechanism of heat-induced apoptosis and to determine if we could protect spermatocytes by expressing HSP70i, we engineered transgenic mice that express in spermatocytes constitutively active heat shock transcription factor (HSF)1. Such HSF1 expression did not lead to transcription of inducible Hsp70 genes, but instead induced caspase-dependent apoptosis that mimicked heat shock-induced death of spermatogenic cells. Both mitochondria-dependent and death receptor-dependent pathways appear to be involved in such HSF1-induced apoptosis: the levels of Bcl-2 family proteins became increased, p53 protein accumulated and expression levels of caspase-8 and death-receptor-interacting proteins (including Fas-associated death domain protein and TNF receptor associated death domain protein) became elevated. Surprisingly, the constitutive spermatocyte-specific expression of HSP70i in double-transgenic males did not protect against such HSF1-induced apoptosis.

  3. Nonazeotropic Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ealker, David H.; Deming, Glenn

    1991-01-01

    Heat pump collects heat from water circulating in heat-rejection loop, raises temperature of collected heat, and transfers collected heat to water in separate pipe. Includes sealed motor/compressor with cooling coils, evaporator, and condenser, all mounted in outer housing. Gradients of temperature in evaporator and condenser increase heat-transfer efficiency of vapor-compression cycle. Intended to recover relatively-low-temperature waste heat and use it to make hot water.

  4. Impact on the deuterium retention of simultaneous exposure of tungsten to a steady state plasma and transient heat cycling loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, A.; Sergienko, G.; Wirtz, M.; Steudel, I.; Arakcheev, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Burdakov, A.; Dittmar, T.; Esser, H. G.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Linsmeier, Ch; Mertens, Ph; Möller, S.; Philipps, V.; Pintsuk, G.; Reinhart, M.; Schweer, B.; Shoshin, A.; Terra, A.; Unterberg, B.

    2016-02-01

    The impact on the deuterium retention of simultaneous exposure of tungsten to a steady-state plasma and transient cyclic heat loads has been studied in the linear PSI-2 facility with the main objective of qualifying tungsten (W) as plasma-facing material. The transient heat loads were applied by a high-energy laser, a Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm) with an energy per pulse of up to 32 J and a duration of 1 ms. A pronounced increase in the D retention by a factor of 13 has been observed during the simultaneous transient heat loads and plasma exposure. These data indicate that the hydrogen clustering is enhanced by the thermal shock exposures, as seen on the increased blister size due to mobilization and thermal production of defects during transients. In addition, the significant increase of the D retention during the simultaneous loads could be explained by an increased diffusion of D atoms into the W material due to strong temperature gradients during the laser pulse exposure and to an increased mobility of D atoms along the shock-induced cracks. Only 24% of the retained deuterium is located inside the near-surface layer (d<4 μm). Enhanced blister formation has been observed under combined loading conditions at power densities close to the threshold for damaging. Blisters are not mainly responsible for the pronounced increase of the D retention.

  5. High heat flux single phase heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A.; Izenson, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained to date in a program to develop a high heat flux, single-phase heat exchanger for spacecraft thermal management. The intended application is a net generation interface heat exchanger to couple the crew module water thermal bus to the two-phase ammonia main thermal bus in the Space Station Freedom. The large size of the interface heat exchanger is dictated by the relatively poor water-side heat transfer characteristics. The objective of this program is to develop a single-phase heat transfer approach which can achieve heat fluxes and heat transfer coefficients comparable to those of the evaporation ammonia side. A new heat exchanger concept has been developed to meet these objecties. The main feature of this heat exchanger is that it can achieve very high heat fluxes with a pressure drop one to two orders of magnitude lower than those of previous microchannel or jet impingement high heat flux heat exchangers. This paper describes proof-of-concept experiments performed in air and water and presents analytical model of the heat exchanger.

  6. Multiple source heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

  7. Effects of Heat Shock on Amino Acid Metabolism of Cowpea Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Randall R.; Cherry, Joe H.; Rhodes, David

    1990-01-01

    When cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) cells maintained at 26°C are transferred to 42°C, rapid accumulation of γ-aminobutyrate (>10-fold) is induced. Several other amino acids (including β-alanine, alanine, and proline) are also accumulated, but less extensively than γ-aminobutyrate. Total free amino acid levels are increased approximately 1.5-fold after 24 hours at 42°C. Heat shock also leads to release of amino acids into the medium, indicating heat shock damage to the integrity of the plasmalemma. Some of the changes in metabolic rates associated with heat shock were estimated by monitoring the 15N labeling kinetics of free intracellular, extracellular and protein-bound amino acids of cultures supplied with 15NH4+, and analyzing the labeling data by computer simulation. Preliminary computer simulation models of nitrogen flux suggest that heat shock induces an increase in the γ-aminobutyrate synthesis rate from 12.5 nanomoles per hour per gram fresh weight in control cells maintained at 26°C, to as high as 800 nanomoles per hour per gram fresh weight within the first 2 hours of heat shock. This 64-fold increase in the γ-aminobutyrate synthesis rate greatly exceeds the expected (Q10) change of metabolic rate of 2.5- to 3-fold due to a 16°C increase in temperature. We suggest that this metabolic response may in part involve an activation of glutamate decarboxylase in vivo, perhaps mediated by a transient cytoplasmic acidification. Proline appears to be synthesized from glutamate and not from ornithine in cowpea cells. Proline became severalfold more heavily labeled than ornithine, citrulline and arginine in both control and heat-shocked cultures. Proline synthesis rate was increased 2.7-fold by heat shock. Alanine, β-alanine, valine, leucine, and isoleucine synthesis rates were increased 1.6-, 3.5-, 2.0-, 5.0-, and 6.0-fold, respectively, by heat shock. In contrast, the phenylalanine synthesis rate was decreased by 50% in response to heat shock. The

  8. Heat pipe technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A bibliography of heat pipe technology to provide a summary of research projects conducted on heat pipes is presented. The subjects duscussed are: (1) heat pipe applications, (2) heat pipe theory, (3) design and fabrication, (4) testing and operation, (5) subject and author index, and (6) heat pipe related patents.

  9. Heat powered refrigeration compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goad, R. R.

    This prototype will be of similar capacity as the compressor that will eventually be commercially produced. This unit can operate on almost any moderate temperature water heat source. This heat source could include such applications as industrial waste heat, solar, wood burning stove, resistance electrical heat produced by a windmill, or even perhaps heat put out by the condenser of another refrigeration system.

  10. Equation of state of heated glassy carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekine, Toshimori; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    New Hugoniot data are presented for glassy carbon preheated to 1550 K and shocked to 20 GPa. The high-temperature Hugoniot is very similar to the principal Hugoniot. This results argues against the diffusional mechanism for the shock-induced transformaton of amorphous carbon to diamond, although the present results are obviously limited to below 20 GPa. This study provides the first Higoniot data for carbon preheated to significantly high temperatures.

  11. Decrease in penicillin susceptibility due to heat shock protein ClpL in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kwon, Hyog-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ki-Woo; Briles, David E; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance and tolerance are increasing threats to global health as antibiotic-resistant bacteria can cause severe morbidity and mortality and can increase treatment cost 10-fold. Although several genes contributing to antibiotic tolerance among pneumococci have been identified, we report here that ClpL, a major heat shock protein, could modulate cell wall biosynthetic enzymes and lead to decreased penicillin susceptibility. On capsular type 1, 2, and 19 genetic backgrounds, mutants lacking ClpL were more susceptible to penicillin and had thinner cell walls than the parental strains, whereas a ClpL-overexpressing strain showed a higher resistance to penicillin and a thicker cell wall. Although exposure of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to penicillin inhibited expression of the major cell wall synthesis gene pbp2x, heat shock induced a ClpL-dependent increase in the mRNA levels and protein synthesized by pbp2x. Inducible ClpL expression correlated with PBP2x expression and penicillin susceptibility. Fractionation and electron micrograph data revealed that ClpL induced by heat shock is localized at the cell wall, and the ΔclpL showed significantly reduced net translocation of PBP2x into the cell wall. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation with either ClpL or PBP2x antibody followed by reprobing with ClpL or PBP2x antibody showed an interaction between ClpL and PBP2x after heat stress. This interaction was confirmed by His tag pulldown assay with either ClpLHis₆ or PBP2xHis₆. Thus, ClpL stabilized pbp2x expression, interacted with PBP2x, and facilitated translocation of PBP2x, a key protein of cell wall synthesis process, contributing to the decrease of antibiotic susceptibility in S. pneumoniae.

  12. Heat Rash (Prickly Heat or Miliaria)

    MedlinePlus

    ... humid weather. Heat rash develops when blocked pores (sweat ducts) trap perspiration under your skin. Symptoms range ... symptoms is to cool your skin and prevent sweating. Adults usually develop heat rash in skin folds ...

  13. Energy Corner: Heat Reclamation Rescues Wasted Heat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    Heat reclamation systems added to pre-existing central heating systems provide maximum savings at minimum cost. The benefits of a particular appliance marketed under the brand name "Energizer" are discussed. (Author/MLF)

  14. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  15. Extreme Heat Guidebook

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The 'Climate Change and Extreme Heat: What You Can Do to Prepare' handbook explains the connection between climate change and extreme heat events, and outlines actions citizens can take to protect their health during extreme heat.

  16. Heat Wave Safety Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    ... heat has caused more deaths than all other weather events, including floods. A heat wave is a ... care for heat- related emergencies … ❏ Listen to local weather forecasts and stay aware of upcoming temperature changes. ❏ ...

  17. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  18. The expression and function of hsp30-like small heat shock protein genes in amphibians, birds, fish, and reptiles.

    PubMed

    Heikkila, John J

    2017-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are a superfamily of molecular chaperones with important roles in protein homeostasis and other cellular functions. Amphibians, reptiles, fish and birds have a shsp gene called hsp30, which was also referred to as hspb11 or hsp25 in some fish and bird species. Hsp30 genes, which are not found in mammals, are transcribed in response to heat shock or other stresses by means of the heat shock factor that is activated in response to an accumulation of unfolded protein. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that representative HSP30s from different classes of non-mammalian vertebrates were distinct from other sHSPs including HSPB1/HSP27. Studies with amphibian and fish recombinant HSP30 determined that they were molecular chaperones since they inhibited heat- or chemically-induced aggregation of unfolded protein. During non-mammalian vertebrate development, hsp30 genes were differentially expressed in selected tissues. Also, heat shock-induced stage-specific expression of hsp30 genes in frog embryos was regulated at the level of chromatin structure. In adults and/or tissue culture cells, hsp30 gene expression was induced by heat shock, arsenite, cadmium or proteasomal inhibitors, all of which enhanced the production of unfolded/damaged protein. Finally, immunocytochemical analysis of frog and chicken tissue culture cells revealed that proteotoxic stress-induced HSP30 accumulation co-localized with aggresome-like inclusion bodies. The congregation of damaged protein in aggresomes minimizes the toxic effect of aggregated protein dispersed throughout the cell. The current availability of probes to detect the presence of hsp30 mRNA or encoded protein has resulted in the increased use of hsp30 gene expression as a marker of proteotoxic stress in non-mammalian vertebrates.

  19. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, R.R.

    1984-07-16

    This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  20. Non-Lethal Heat Shock of the Asian Green Mussel, Perna viridis, Promotes Hsp70 Synthesis, Induces Thermotolerance and Protects Against Vibrio Infection.

    PubMed

    Aleng, Nor Afiqah; Sung, Yeong Yik; MacRae, Thomas H; Abd Wahid, Mohd Effendy

    2015-01-01

    Mild heat stress promotes thermotolerance and protection against several different stresses in aquatic animals, consequences correlated with the accumulation of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). The purpose of this study was to determine if non-lethal heat shock (NLHS) of the Asian green mussel, Perna viridis, an aquatic species of commercial value, promoted the production of Hsp70 and enhanced its resistance to stresses. Initially, the LT50 and LHT for P. viridis were determined to be 42°C and 44°C, respectively, with no heat shock induced death of mussels at 40°C or less. Immunoprobing of western blots revealed augmentation of constitutive (PvHsp70-1) and inducible (PvHsp70-2) Hsp70 in tissue from adductor muscle, foot, gill and mantel of P. viridis exposed to 38°C for 30 min followed by 6 h recovery, NLHS conditions for this organism. Characterization by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) revealed that PvHsp70-1 and PvHsp70-2 respectively corresponded most closely to Hsp70 from P. viridis and Mytilus galloprovincialis. Priming of adult mussels with NLHS promoted thermotolerance and increased resistance to V. alginolyticus. The induction of Hsp70 in parallel with enhanced thermotolerance and improved protection against V. alginolyticus, suggests Hsp70 functions in P. viridis as a molecular chaperone and as a stimulator of the immune system.

  1. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  2. Activation of the p38 signaling pathway by heat shock involves the dissociation of glutathione S-transferase Mu from Ask1.

    PubMed

    Dorion, Sonia; Lambert, Herman; Landry, Jacques

    2002-08-23

    Despite the importance of the stress-activated protein kinase pathways in cell death and survival, it is unclear how stressful stimuli lead to their activation. In the case of heat shock, the existence of a specific mechanism of activation has been evidenced, but the molecular nature of this pathway is undefined. Here, we found that Ask1 (apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1), an upstream activator of the stress-activated protein kinase p38 during exposure to oxidative stress and other stressful stimuli, was also activated by heat shock. Ask1 activity was required for p38 activation since overexpression of a kinase dead mutant of Ask1, Ask1(K709M), inhibited heat shock-induced p38 activation. The activation of Ask1 by oxidative stress involves the oxidation of thioredoxin, an endogenous inhibitor of Ask1. A different activation mechanism takes place during heat shock. In contrast to p38 induction by H(2)O(2), induction by heat shock was not antagonized by pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine or by overexpressing thioredoxin and was not accompanied by the dissociation of thioredoxin from Ask1. Instead, heat shock caused the dissociation of glutathione S-transferase Mu1-1 (GSTM1-1) from Ask1 and overexpression of GSTM1-1-inhibited induction of p38 by heat shock. We concluded that because of an alternative regulation by the two distinct repressors thioredoxin and GSTM1-1, Ask1 constitutes the converging point of the heat shock and oxidative stress-sensing pathways that lead to p38 activation.

  3. ULTRAFAST MEASUREMENT OF THE OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF SHOCKED NICKEL AND LASER HEATED GOLD

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, D. J.; Reho, J. H.; Moore, David S.; Gahagan, K. A.; Rabie, R. L.; McGrane, S.

    2001-01-01

    We have used high-resolution Frequency Domain Interferometry (FDI) to make the first ultrafast measurement of shock-induced changes in the optical properties of thin nickel ({approx}500 nm) targets. Data taken at several angles of incidence allowed the separation of optical effects from material motion, yielding an effective complex index for the shocked material. In contrast to our previous studies of aluminum, measurements with an 800 nm probe wavelength found a phase shift attributable to optical property changes with the same sign as that due to surface motion, during an 11.5 GPa shock breakout. A similar experiment was attempted with thin gold films ({approx}180 nm) using Ultrafast Spatial Interferometry (USI). However, since the electron-phonon coupling in gold is extremely weak, a shock is observed as it 'forms'. Ballistic electrons and electron-electron equilibrium cause fast heating of the electrons in the entire thickness of the thin film, followed by lattice excitation through electron-phonon coupling, eventually leading to melt and frustrated thermal expansion yielding the observed surface motion. We suggest that these experiments offer a new path for observation of phase changes or for temperature measurements, by allowing a determination of the complex index under dynamic loading conditions and comparing the measured values to those obtained under static conditions.

  4. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R.

    1987-05-05

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  5. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Kirol, L.D.

    1987-02-11

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation. 5 figs.

  6. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Kirol, Lance D.

    1988-01-01

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation.

  7. Nature's Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the heat-transfer systems of different animals. Systems include heat conduction into the ground, heat transferred by convection, heat exchange in lizards, fish and polar animals, the carotid rete system, electromagnetic radiation from animals and people, and plant and animal fiber optics. (MDH)

  8. Solar heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanson, R.

    Brief discussions of the major components of a solar powered, chemical ground source heat pump are presented. The components discussed are the solar collectors and the chemical heat storage battery. Sodium sulfide is the medium used for heat storage. Catalog information which provides a description of all of the heat pump systems is included.

  9. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.; Root, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  10. REACH. Heating Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Carter; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized units in the area of heating. The instructional units focus on electric heating systems, gas heating systems, and oil burning systems. Each unit follows a typical format that includes a unit…

  11. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R.

    1987-01-01

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  12. Solar Heating Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Solar Unlimited, Inc.'s suncatcher line includes a variety of solar arrays, derived from NASA's satellite program: water heating only, partial home heating, or water and whole house central heating. Solar Unlimited developed a set of vigorous requirements to avoid problems common to solar heating technologies.

  13. Heat Pipe Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, William B.; Simon, Justin I.; Webb, A. Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    When volcanism dominates heat transport, a terrestrial body enters a heat-pipe mode, in which hot magma moves through the lithosphere in narrow channels. Even at high heat flow, a heat-pipe planet develops a thick, cold, downwards-advecting lithosphere dominated by (ultra-)mafic flows and contractional deformation at the surface. Heat-pipes are an important feature of terrestrial planets at high heat flow, as illustrated by Io. Evidence for their operation early in Earth's history suggests that all terrestrial bodies should experience an episode of heat-pipe cooling early in their histories.

  14. Heat Treating Apparatus

    DOEpatents

    De Saro, Robert; Bateman, Willis

    2002-09-10

    Apparatus for heat treating a heat treatable material including a housing having an upper opening for receiving a heat treatable material at a first temperature, a lower opening, and a chamber therebetween for heating the heat treatable material to a second temperature higher than the first temperature as the heat treatable material moves through the chamber from the upper to the lower opening. A gas supply assembly is operatively engaged to the housing at the lower opening, and includes a source of gas, a gas delivery assembly for delivering the gas through a plurality of pathways into the housing in countercurrent flow to movement of the heat treatable material, whereby the heat treatable material passes through the lower opening at the second temperature, and a control assembly for controlling conditions within the chamber to enable the heat treatable material to reach the second temperature and pass through the lower opening at the second temperature as a heated material.

  15. Thulium-170 heat source

    DOEpatents

    Walter, Carl E.; Van Konynenburg, Richard; VanSant, James H.

    1992-01-01

    An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

  16. Fundamentals of heat measurement. [heat flux transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerashchenko, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    Various methods and devices for obtaining experimental data on heat flux density over wide ranges of temperature and pressure are examined. Laboratory tests and device fabrication details are supplemented by theoretical analyses of heat-conduction and thermoelectric effects, providing design guidelines and information relevant to further research and development. A theory defining the measure of correspondence between transducer signal and the measured heat flux is established for individual (isolated) heat flux transducers subject to space and time-dependent loading. An analysis of the properties of stacked (series-connected) transducers of various types (sandwich-type, plane, and spiral) is used to derive a similarity theory providing general governing relationships. The transducers examined are used in 36 types of derivative devices involving direct heat loss measurements, heat conduction studies, radiation pyrometry, calorimetry in medicine and industry and nuclear reactor dosimetry.

  17. Heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A simple heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump process with rejected or waste heat from a higher temperature chemisorption circuit (HTCC) powering a lower temperature physisorption circuit (LTPC) which provides a 30% total improvement over simple regenerative physisorption compression heat pumps when ammonia is both the chemisorbate and physisorbate, and a total improvement of 50% or more for LTPC having two pressure stages. The HTCC contains ammonia and a chemisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of canisters, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, and a heater, operatively connected together. The LTPC contains ammonia and a physisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of compressors, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. A closed heat transfer circuit (CHTC) is provided which contains a flowing heat transfer liquid (FHTL) in thermal communication with each canister and each compressor for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTPC. Heat is regenerated within the LTPC by transferring heat from one compressor to another. In one embodiment the regeneration is performed by another CHTC containing another FHTL in thermal communication with each compressor. In another embodiment the HTCC powers a lower temperature ammonia water absorption circuit (LTAWAC) which contains a generator-absorber system containing the absorbent, and a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. The absorbent is water or an absorbent aqueous solution. A CHTC is provided which contains a FHTL in thermal communication with the generator for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTAWAC. Heat is regenerated within the LTAWAC by transferring heat from the generator to the absorber. The chemical composition of the chemisorbent is different than the chemical composition of the physisorbent, and the absorbent. The chemical composition of the FHTL is different than the chemisorbent, the physisorbent, the absorbent, and ammonia.

  18. Shock-Induced Turbulence and Acoustic Loading on Aerospace Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-22

    shockwave . The effects of grid resolution was investigated using three different grids (see Table 1). Each level of grid refinement used a smaller y...turbulent inflow technique. Past the shockwave front, the grid refinement appears to have little to no effect on the structure of the vortices...the interaction of the separation bubble and shockwave . The most important factor that determines the physical processes occurring here is the

  19. Computational considerations for the simulation of shock-induced sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Jay; Carpenter, Mark H.

    1996-01-01

    The numerical study of aeroacoustic problems places stringent demands on the choice of a computational algorithm, because it requires the ability to propagate disturbances of small amplitude and short wavelength. The demands are particularly high when shock waves are involved, because the chosen algorithm must also resolve discontinuities in the solution. The extent to which a high-order-accurate shock-capturing method can be relied upon for aeroacoustics applications that involve the interaction of shocks with other waves has not been previously quantified. Such a study is initiated in this work. A fourth-order-accurate essentially nonoscillatory (ENO) method is used to investigate the solutions of inviscid, compressible flows with shocks in a quasi-one-dimensional nozzle flow. The design order of accuracy is achieved in the smooth regions of a steady-state test case. However, in an unsteady test case, only first-order results are obtained downstream of a sound-shock interaction. The difficulty in obtaining a globally high-order-accurate solution in such a case with a shock-capturing method is demonstrated through the study of a simplified, linear model problem. Some of the difficult issues and ramifications for aeroacoustics simulations of flows with shocks that are raised by these results are discussed.

  20. Shock-Induced Martensite Reversal in Fe/30%Ni.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-14

    Reed (1961) (88) 95 8.032 2016 -- Graham et al. (1967) 95 8.020±.003 2315 541 1594 Present work 5 8.158 HuOoniot modulus: 1163 Graham et al. (1967) 95...stress deviators (Subroutine DEVIAT). h h T h AV Vh ,S Z At are transferred from F- subroutine EXSTAT2 a. - x h )a,, + xh bo = (1-x )b,, + xhb112 h hcp

  1. Shock-Induced Effect on Chathodoluminesence of Experimentally Shocked Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.; Kayama, M.; Tajika, E.; Sekine, Y.; Sekine, T.; Nishido, H.; Kobayashi, T.

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a series of shock recovery experiments on single crystals of natural and synthetic quartz. In the presentation, we show the results of the variation of Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectral features with increasing shock pressure.

  2. Shock-Induced Separated Structures in Symmetric Corner Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAmbrosio, Domenic; Marsilio, Roberto

    1995-01-01

    Three-dimensional supersonic viscous laminar flows over symmetric corners are considered in this paper. The characteristic features of such configurations are discussed and an historical survey on the past research work is presented. A new contribution based on a numerical technique that solves the parabolized form of the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. Such a method makes it possible to obtain very detailed descriptions of the flowfield with relatively modest CPU time and memory storage requirements. The numerical approach is based on a space-marching technique, uses a finite volume discretization and an upwind flux-difference splitting scheme (developed for the steady flow equations) for the evaluation of the inviscid fluxes. Second order accuracy is reached following the guidelines of the ENO schemes. Different free-stream conditions and geometrical configurations are considered. Primary and secondary streamwise vortical structures embedded in the boundary layer and originated by the interaction of the latter with shock waves are detected and studied. Computed results are compared with experimental data taken from literature.

  3. Shock-Induced Chemical Reactions in Condensed Matter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    Technical, 4/1/78 - 6/30/82 Matter 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMUER(e) George E. Duvall, Principal Investigator...CHEMICAL REACTIONS IN CONDENSED MATTER George E. Duvall, Principal Investigator Stephen A. Sheffield* Kendal M. OgilvieT 4 C. Robert Wilson Paul...Temperture," in Sixth Symposium (International on Detonation (Office of Naval Research, Arlington, 1976), ACR-Z21, p. 36. 24. G. Gamow , "Tentative

  4. Characterization of Surfaces and the Estimation of Shock Induced Vorticity

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, L; Ray, J; Peyser, T

    2002-09-17

    When shocks impinge on a surface separating fluids of two different densities, one observes the development and growth of various vortical structures. The flow induced by this Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability depends on a variety of factors such as the shock strength, the density ratio of the fluids and the exact form of the surface perturbation. The most common way to model the form of the surface perturbation is through Fourier analysis which is suitable for large-scale sinusoidal structures and is straightforward mathematically. In surfaces of practical interest, however, to a wide range of application, there may also be a broad spectrum of high frequency modes in addition to the lower frequency modes described by Fourier methods. We propose here that these high frequency modes can be efficiently quantified in terms of wavelet analysis. From a numerical point of view, the scale that the roughness occurs at is far to small to numerically resolve and thus we propose that our new methodology can be used to model the subgrid scale generation of vorticity. Thus the combination of wavelet analysis and Fourier analysis will be used to model the generation of vorticity for the RM instability.

  5. Shock induced multi-mode damage in depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, Darcie D; Cerreta, Ellen K; Gray, Ill, George T

    2009-01-01

    Recent dynamic damage studies on depleted uranium samples have revealed mixed mode failure mechanisms leading to incipient cracking as well as ductile failure processes. Results show that delamination of inclusions upon compression may provide nucleation sites for damage initiation in the form of crack tip production. However, under tension the material propagates cracks in a mixed shear localization and mode-I ductile tearing and cracking. Cracks tips appear to link up through regions of severe, shear dominated plastic flow. Shock recovery experiments were conducted on a 50 mm single stage light gas gun. Serial metallographic sectioning was conducted on the recovered samples to characterize the bulk response of the sample. Experiments show delaminated inclusions due to uniaxial compression without damage propagation. Further results show the propagation of the damage through tensile loading to the incipient state, illustrating ductile processes coupled with mixed mode-I tensile ductile tearing, shear localization, and mode-I cracking in depleted uranium.

  6. Shock-induced effects in calcite from Cactus Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vizgirda, J.; Ahrens, T. J.; Tsay, F.-D.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses shock metamorphism of calcite from coralline limestone samples retrieved from a borehole drilled into rocks beneath Cactus Crater, a nuclear explosion crater at Eniwetok Atoll. The metamorphism was detected and quantified using electron spin resonance (ESR); the ESR spectra of Mn(+) present as a trace constituent in the coral samples, show a consistent decrease in hyperfine peak splitting with decreasing depth of sample. It is suggested that the decrease in hyperfine peak splitting reflects a decrease in crystal field splitting, and therefore, small increases on cation-anion distances produced by mechanical energy input during the shock process. Two alternative crater models suggested by the ESR results are a depiction of a steady decay of the shock wave, and a delineation of a breccia lens with a breccia-bedrock interface at 20 plus or minus 5 m.

  7. Shock-induced defects in HgO

    SciTech Connect

    Morosin, B.; Venturini, E.L.; Holman, G.T.; Newcomer, P.N.; Dunn, R.G.; Graham, R.A.

    1995-09-01

    Powder compacts of HgO have been subjected to shock-loading and preserved for postshock analysis to understand its reactivity and stability under transient temperature-pressure excursions. Recovered samples indicate several solid state reactions which are dependent on shock conditions. Metallic Hg is recovered in small amounts in the HgO compact as well as an as-yet unidentified ferromagnetic impurity not present in the as-received HgO powder. Further, there is evidence of reaction with the Cu capsule, forming an intermetallic alloy.

  8. Hypervelocity-Impact Shock-Induced Damage to Steel Armor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    21310 1 Director Ballistics Research Laboratory ATTN: Dr. Robert Eichelberger Tech Dir Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 1 Clint Frank ...University of Missouri-Columbia College of Engineering, Rm. 2007 Columbia, MO 65201 1 Professor Ray Kinslow Box 5002 Tennessee Technological

  9. Studies of shock induced flows in strengthless materials on Pegasus

    SciTech Connect

    Oro, D.M.; Fulton, R.D.; Stokes, J.; Guzik, J.A.; Adams, P.J.; Morgan, D.; Platts, D.; Obst, A.W.; Fell, M.

    1998-12-31

    Experiments on the Pegasus II pulsed power facility at Los Alamos are being conducted to study the evolution and flow of strengthless materials as a result of being shocked. Of particular interest is vorticity and mixing that is induced in the materials by a shock-wave passing through a non-uniform boundary. The experiments provide an important benchmark for hydrodynamic codes, and are a precursor to experiments planned on Atlas in which the materials will be pre-ionized before being shocked. For these experiments, flash radiography is used to image the position of the target boundaries at specific times. In these experiments 3 radiographs along target radii and 2 radiographs along the target axis are taken at independent times. The central cavity of the target is imaged with visible framing cameras. The Xe in this cavity radiates when shocked, and therefore the shape and timing of the shock front in the Xe can be determined from the images. Other diagnostics employed for this work include electric and magnetic field probes that are used to determine the current through the liner and when the liner impacts the target. Both the 1-d magnetohydrodynamics code RAVEN, and the 2-d/3-d adaptive grid eulerian code RAGE are used for pre-shot calculations. In this talk the authors will discuss the motivation for these experiments, compare calculations with radiographs and visible images and discuss future experiments on Pegasus and Atlas.

  10. Experimental study on shock-induced doping of titania photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Liu, Jianjun; Chen, Pengwan

    2009-06-01

    Titania is a most effective photo-functional material and is widely used. But since the band gap of titania is large (Eg=3.2 eV), it is only active in the ultraviolet region, which accouts only 3%-5% of the overall solar intensity. Therefore, it is very important to enhance the visible light activity of the titania photocatalyst. In this study, the nitrogen-doping of titania photocatalysts were induced by shock waves, which were generated through detonation-driven flyer impact. The samples were shocked at different flyer impact velocities and recovered successfully. Two nitrogen resources containing hexamethylene tetramine(HMT) and dicyandiamide were considered. The phase composition, light absorption spectra and N doping status of the recovered samples under different shock conditions were characterized. The absorption edge of the N-doped titania photocatalysts by shock wave was extended to 450nm corresponding to visible light region. The photocatalytic degradation to rhodamine B of the samples doped with dicyandiamide increased with the increase of the flyer velocity due to the higher N doping concentration and wider response to visible light.

  11. Shock induced by spontaneous rupture of a giant thymoma.

    PubMed

    Santoprete, Stefano; Ragusa, Mark; Urbani, Moira; Puma, Francesco

    2007-04-01

    Spontaneous bleeding of thymoma is a very rare event. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who was referred to our hospital for acute onset of chest pain followed by shock. Chest computed tomographic scanning showed a huge mediastinal tumor with abundant left pleural effusion and contralateral shift of the mediastinum. Emergency surgical treatment was carried out through a clamshell incision. At the opening of the left pleura 1,600 mL of fresh blood was found, originating from a rupture of the tumor's capsular veins. The lesion was completely resected, en-bloc with a wide pericardial excision. The postoperative course was uneventful. The pathology report classified the lesion as thymoma AB.

  12. Survival of fossils under extreme shocks induced by hypervelocity impacts

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, M. J.; McDermott, K. H.; Price, M. C.; Yolland, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data are shown for survival of fossilized diatoms undergoing shocks in the GPa range. The results were obtained from hypervelocity impact experiments which fired fossilized diatoms frozen in ice into water targets. After the shots, the material recovered from the target water was inspected for diatom fossils. Nine shots were carried out, at speeds from 0.388 to 5.34 km s−1, corresponding to mean peak pressures of 0.2–19 GPa. In all cases, fragmented fossilized diatoms were recovered, but both the mean and the maximum fragment size decreased with increasing impact speed and hence peak pressure. Examples of intact diatoms were found after the impacts, even in some of the higher speed shots, but their frequency and size decreased significantly at the higher speeds. This is the first demonstration that fossils can survive and be transferred from projectile to target in hypervelocity impacts, implying that it is possible that, as suggested by other authors, terrestrial rocks ejected from the Earth by giant impacts from space, and which then strike the Moon, may successfully transfer terrestrial fossils to the Moon. PMID:25071234

  13. Shock-induced modifications of magnetic minerals from impact structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontny, A. M.

    2013-05-01

    Meteorite impact structures are an important feature of most planetary surfaces. The effects of shock waves on the intrinsic magnetic properties of minerals and rocks are therefore essential for the understanding of magnetization processes related to impact events on Earth and other planetary bodies. Despite numerous observations on natural settings (Carporzen et al. 2005; Mang et al. 2012), and experimental studies (Louzada et al. 2010, 2011; Gattacecca et al 2007; Gilder et al. 2004; Mang et al. 2013) there remain uncertainties concerning the rock magnetic properties and the magnetization process related to natural impact structures on Earth. In general, the magnetic signature of terrestrial impact structures is a combined effect between disrupted main regional magnetic trends due to shock and / or thermal demagnetization and high-amplitude, short-wavelength magnetic anomalies in the centre of intermediate to large impact structures. Some large structures (>40 km) are reported to exhibit central high-amplitude anomalies but the dominant magnetic feature is a magnetic low (Pilkington and Grieve 1992). The latter observation is especially important for the giant non-magnetized impact basins on Mars. Therefore numerous studies focused on the understanding of the demagnetization processes during shock pressure (Gilder et al. 2004; Louzada et al. 2010, 2011; Rochette et al. 2003). Many investigations of terrestrial impact structures, however, demonstrated that a natural remanent magnetization (NRM), which is imprinted into terrestrial rocks by the Earth magnetic field, is the main cause of the observed magnetic anomalies. Magnetic signatures of impact structures on Earth are therefore thought to be a combination of three parameters: (1) composition and magnetic properties of the target rocks, (2) modification of rocks and magnetic minerals (fracturing and melting) due to impact-related p-T conditions, (3) acquisition of new natural remanent magnetization (TRM, SRM or CRM). This contribution is focussed on the modification of the magnetic behavior by shock of pyrrhotite and magnetite, the two most important magnetic minerals in the Earth crust. Microstructural features and magnetic properties from shock experiments between 3 and 30 GPa conducted on a pyrrhotite ore will be compared with observations from naturally shocked lithologies from the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure, USA. It will be shown, that especially magnetic minerals strongly react on post-impact hydrothermal alteration, which significantly masks original impact-related features. References Carporzen L. et al. (2005) Nature, 435, 198-201. Gattacceca J. et al. (2007) Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 162, 85-98. Gilder S.A. et al. (2004) Geophys. Res. Lett., 31, L10612, doi:10.1029/2004GL019844. Louzada K. L. et al. (2011) Earth Planetary Science Letters, 305, 257- 269. Louzada K.L. et al. (2010) Earth Planetary Science Letters, 290, 90-101. Mang C. et al. (2013) G-cubed, doi: 10.1029/2012GC004242 Mang, C. et al. (2012) Meteoritics and Planetary Sciences 47, 277-295, doi: 10.1111/j.1945-5100.2012.01329.x. Pilkington M. and Grieve R.A.F. (1992) Reviews of Geophysics, 30, 161-181. Rochette P. et al. (2003) Geophys. Res. Lett., 30 (13), 1683, doi:10.1029/2003GL017359.

  14. Reflectance Changes during Shock-induced Phase Transformations in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.; Jensen, B. J.; Rigg, P. A.

    2010-06-01

    In performing shock wave experiments to study the characteristics of metals at high pressures, wave profiles (i.e., velocity measurements of the surface of the sample) are an established and useful way to study phase transformations. For example, a sudden change in the velocity or its slope can occur when the phase transformation induces a large volume change leading to a change in particle velocity. Allowing the shock to release into a transparent window that is in contact with the sample surface allows the study of conditions away from the shock Hugoniot. However, in cases where the wave profile is not definitive an additional phase-transformation diagnostic would be useful. Changes in the electronic structure of the atoms in the crystal offer opportunities to develop new phase-change diagnostics. We have studied optical reflectance changes for several phase transformations to see whether reflectance changes might be a generally applicable phase-transformation diagnostic. Shocks were produced by direct contact with explosives or with impacts from guns. Optical wavelengths for the reflectance measurements ranged from 355 to 700 nm. We studied samples of tin, iron, gallium, and cerium as each passed through a phase transformation during shock loading and, if observable, a reversion upon unloading. For solid-solid phase changes in tin and iron we saw small changes in the surface scattering characteristics, perhaps from voids or rough areas frozen into the surface of the sample as it transformed to a new crystal structure. For melt in gallium and cerium we saw changes in the wavelength dependence of the reflectance, and we surmise that these changes may result from changes in the crystal electronic structure. It appears that reflectance measurements can be a significant part of a larger suite of diagnostics to search for difficult-to-detect phase transformations.

  15. Survival of fossils under extreme shocks induced by hypervelocity impacts.

    PubMed

    Burchell, M J; McDermott, K H; Price, M C; Yolland, L J

    2014-08-28

    Experimental data are shown for survival of fossilized diatoms undergoing shocks in the GPa range. The results were obtained from hypervelocity impact experiments which fired fossilized diatoms frozen in ice into water targets. After the shots, the material recovered from the target water was inspected for diatom fossils. Nine shots were carried out, at speeds from 0.388 to 5.34 km s(-1), corresponding to mean peak pressures of 0.2-19 GPa. In all cases, fragmented fossilized diatoms were recovered, but both the mean and the maximum fragment size decreased with increasing impact speed and hence peak pressure. Examples of intact diatoms were found after the impacts, even in some of the higher speed shots, but their frequency and size decreased significantly at the higher speeds. This is the first demonstration that fossils can survive and be transferred from projectile to target in hypervelocity impacts, implying that it is possible that, as suggested by other authors, terrestrial rocks ejected from the Earth by giant impacts from space, and which then strike the Moon, may successfully transfer terrestrial fossils to the Moon.

  16. Shock-induced explosive chemistry in a deterministic sample configuration.

    SciTech Connect

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Trott, Wayne Merle; Baer, Melvin R.; Tappan, Alexander Smith

    2005-10-01

    Explosive initiation and energy release have been studied in two sample geometries designed to minimize stochastic behavior in shock-loading experiments. These sample concepts include a design with explosive material occupying the hole locations of a close-packed bed of inert spheres and a design that utilizes infiltration of a liquid explosive into a well-defined inert matrix. Wave profiles transmitted by these samples in gas-gun impact experiments have been characterized by both velocity interferometry diagnostics and three-dimensional numerical simulations. Highly organized wave structures associated with the characteristic length scales of the deterministic samples have been observed. Initiation and reaction growth in an inert matrix filled with sensitized nitromethane (a homogeneous explosive material) result in wave profiles similar to those observed with heterogeneous explosives. Comparison of experimental and numerical results indicates that energetic material studies in deterministic sample geometries can provide an important new tool for validation of models of energy release in numerical simulations of explosive initiation and performance.

  17. Role of plastic deformation in shock-induced phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, Punam; Germann, T. C.; Ravelo, R.

    2015-06-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of shock-wave propagation in fcc single crystals exhibit high elastic limits and large anisotropies in the yield strength. They can be used to explore the role of plastic deformation in the morphology and kinetics of solid-solid phase transformations. We report on large-scale atomistic simulations of defect-mediated phase transformations under shock and quasi-isentropic compression (QIC). An analytical embedded atom method (EAM) description is used to model a fcc-bcc phase transition (PT) boundary fitted to occur below or above the elastic-plastic threshold in order to model systems undergoing a PT with and without plasticity. For cases where plastic deformation precedes the phase transformation, the defect-mediated PT proceeds at faster rates than the defect-free ones. The bcc fraction growth rate can be correlated with a sharp decrease in the dislocation densities originally present in the parent phase. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award FA9550-12-1-0476. Work at Los Alamos was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  18. Shock induced polymorphic transition in quartz, carbon, and boron nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Hua; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    The model proposed by Ahrens (1988) to explain the mechanism of the polymorphism in silicates is revised, and the revised model is applied to the quartz/stishovite, graphite/diamond, and graphite-boron nitride (g-BN) phase transformations. In this model, a key assumption is that transformation to a high-density amorphous or possibly liquid phase which rapidly crystallized to the high-pressure phase is triggered by the high temperatures in the shear band and upon crossing the metastable extension of a melting curve. Good agreement between the calcualted results and published data is obtained. The present theory predicts the standard entropy for cubic BN to be 0.4-0.5 J/g K.

  19. Shock induced deformation substructures in a copper bicrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Fang; Beyerlein, Irene J; Cerreta, Ellen K; Trujillo, Carl P; Gray Ill, George T; Sencer, Bulent H

    2008-01-01

    Controlled shock recovery experiments have been conducted to assess the role of shock pressure and orientation dependence on the substructure evolution of a [100]/[01{ovr 1}] copper bicrystal. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to characterize orientation variation and substructure evolution of the post-shock specimens. Well defined dislocation cell structures were displayed in both grains and the average cell size was observed to decrease with increasing shock pressure. Twinning was occasionally observed in the 5 GPa shocked [100] grain and became the dominant substructure at higher shock pressure. The stress and directional dependence of twinning in the bicrystal was analyzed with consideration of the energetically favorable dissociation of dislocations into Shockley partials and the stress-orientation effect on the partial width. Moreover, a critical 'tear apart' stress is proposed and a good agreement is obtained between the calculated value and the experimental observations.

  20. Shock-induced turbulent flow in baffle systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.; Reichenbach, H.

    1993-07-01

    Experiments are described on shock propagation through 2-D aligned and staggered baffle systems. Flow visualization was provided by shadow and schlieren photography, recorded by the Cranz-Schardin camera. Also single-frame, infinite-fringe, color interferograms were used. Intuition suggests that this is a rather simple 2-D shock diffraction problem. However, flow visualization reveals that the flow rapidly evolved into a complex 3-D turbulent mixing problem. Mushroom-shaped mixing regions blocked the flow into the next baffle orifice. Thus energy was transferred from the directed kinetic energy (induced by the shock) to rotational energy of turbulent mixing, and then dissipated by molecular effects. These processes dramatically dissipate the strength of the shock wave. The experiments provide an excellent test case that could be used to assess the accuracy of computer code calculations of such problems.

  1. Heat pump augmentation of nuclear process heat

    SciTech Connect

    Koutz, S.L.

    1986-03-18

    A system is described for increasing the temperature of a working fluid heated by a nuclear reactor. The system consists of: a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor having a core and a primary cooling loop through which a coolant is circulated so as to undergo an increase in temperature, a closed secondary loop having a working fluid therein, the cooling and secondary loops having cooperative association with an intermediate heat exchanger adapted to effect transfer of heat from the coolant to the working fluid as the working fluid passes through the intermediate heat exchanger, a heat pump connected in the secondary loop and including a turbine and a compressor through which the working fluid passes so that the working fluid undergoes an increase in temperature as it passes through the compressor, a process loop including a process chamber adapted to receive a process fluid therein, the process chamber being connected in circuit with the secondary loop so as to receive the working fluid from the compressor and transfer heat from the working fluid to the process fluid, a heat exchanger for heating the working fluid connected to the process loop for receiving heat therefrom and for transferring heat to the secondary loop prior to the working fluid passing through the compressor, the secondary loop being operative to pass the working fluid from the process chamber to the turbine so as to effect driving relation thereof, a steam generator operatively associated with the secondary loop so as to receive the working fluid from the turbine, and a steam loop having a feedwater supply and connected in circuit with the steam generator so that feedwater passing through the steam loop is heated by the steam generator, the steam loop being connected in circuit with the process chamber and adapted to pass steam to the process chamber with the process fluid.

  2. Heat Pipe Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The heat pipe, a sealed chamber whose walls are lined with a "wick," a thin capillary network containing a working fluid in liquid form was developed for a heat distribution system for non-rotating satellites. Use of the heat pipe provides a continuous heat transfer mechanism. "Heat tubes" that improve temperature control in plastics manufacturing equipment incorporated the heat pipe technology. James M. Stewart, an independent consultant, patented the heat tubes he developed and granted a license to Kona Corporation. The Kona Nozzle for heaterless injection molding gets heat for its operation from an external source and has no internal heating bands, reducing machine maintenance and also eliminating electrical hazards associated with heater bands. The nozzles are used by Eastman Kodak, Bic Pen Corporation, Polaroid, Tupperware, Ford Motor Company, RCA, and Western Electric in the molding of their products.

  3. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  4. Flexible Heating Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L.; Johnson, Samuel D.; Coultrip, Robert H.; Phillips, W. Morris

    1994-01-01

    United States Air Force is investigating method of repairing aircraft by use of adhesive bonding with induction heating to cure adhesive. Fast-acting and reliable induction heating device that is lightweight, portable, and easy to use needed for such applications. Newly developed flexible heating head lightweight and conforms to complex, curved surfaces. Incorporates principles and circuitry of toroid joining gun described in "Toroid Joining Gun for Fittings and Couplings" (LAR-14278). Concentrates heat in local area through induction heating. Flexible heating head contains tank circuit, connected via cable to source of power.

  5. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  6. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  7. Radial heat flux transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basiulis, A.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Unit moves heat radially from small diameter shell to larger diameter shell, or vice versa, with negligible temperature drop, making device useful wherever heating or cooling of concentrically arranged materials, substances, and structures is desired.

  8. Fusion heating technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, A.J.

    1982-06-01

    John Lawson established the criterion that in order to produce more energy from fusion than is necessary to heat the plasma and replenish the radiation losses, a minimum value for both the product of plasma density and confinement time t, and the temperature must be achieved. There are two types of plasma heating: neutral beam and electromagnetic wave heating. A neutral beam system is shown. Main development work on negative ion beamlines has focused on the difficult problem of the production of high current sources. The development of a 30 keV-1 ampere multisecond source module is close to being accomplished. In electromagnetic heating, the launcher, which provides the means of coupling the power to the plasma, is most important. The status of heating development is reviewed. Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), lower hybrid heating (HHH), and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) are reviewed.

  9. An electrohydrodynamic heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    Dielectric liquid for transfer of heat provides liquid flow from the condenser section to the evaporator section in conventional heat pipes. Working fluid is guided or pumped by an array of wire electrodes connected to a high-voltage source.

  10. Monogroove liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F. (Inventor); Edelstein, Fred (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid supply control is disclosed for a heat transfer system which transports heat by liquid-vapor phase change of a working fluid. An assembly (10) of monogroove heat pipe legs (15) can be operated automatically as either heat acquisition devices or heat discharge sources. The liquid channels (27) of the heat pipe legs (15) are connected to a reservoir (35) which is filled and drained by respective filling and draining valves (30, 32). Information from liquid level sensors (50, 51) on the reservoir (35) is combined (60) with temperature information (55) from the liquid heat exchanger (12) and temperature information (56) from the assembly vapor conduit (42) to regulate filling and draining of the reservoir (35), so that the reservoir (35) in turn serves the liquid supply/drain needs of the heat pipe legs (15), on demand, by passive capillary action (20, 28).

  11. Decrease in Penicillin Susceptibility Due to Heat Shock Protein ClpL in Streptococcus pneumoniae▿†

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kwon, Hyog-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ki-Woo; Briles, David E.; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance and tolerance are increasing threats to global health as antibiotic-resistant bacteria can cause severe morbidity and mortality and can increase treatment cost 10-fold. Although several genes contributing to antibiotic tolerance among pneumococci have been identified, we report here that ClpL, a major heat shock protein, could modulate cell wall biosynthetic enzymes and lead to decreased penicillin susceptibility. On capsular type 1, 2, and 19 genetic backgrounds, mutants lacking ClpL were more susceptible to penicillin and had thinner cell walls than the parental strains, whereas a ClpL-overexpressing strain showed a higher resistance to penicillin and a thicker cell wall. Although exposure of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to penicillin inhibited expression of the major cell wall synthesis gene pbp2x, heat shock induced a ClpL-dependent increase in the mRNA levels and protein synthesized by pbp2x. Inducible ClpL expression correlated with PBP2x expression and penicillin susceptibility. Fractionation and electron micrograph data revealed that ClpL induced by heat shock is localized at the cell wall, and the ΔclpL showed significantly reduced net translocation of PBP2x into the cell wall. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation with either ClpL or PBP2x antibody followed by reprobing with ClpL or PBP2x antibody showed an interaction between ClpL and PBP2x after heat stress. This interaction was confirmed by His tag pulldown assay with either ClpLHis6 or PBP2xHis6. Thus, ClpL stabilized pbp2x expression, interacted with PBP2x, and facilitated translocation of PBP2x, a key protein of cell wall synthesis process, contributing to the decrease of antibiotic susceptibility in S. pneumoniae. PMID:21422206

  12. The effect of age on the synthesis of two heat shock proteins in the hsp70 family.

    PubMed

    Wu, B; Gu, M J; Heydari, A R; Richardson, A

    1993-03-01

    Hepatocytes isolated from male F344 rats were exposed to elevated temperatures (40 degrees C to 45 degrees C), and the incorporation of [35S]-L-methionine into proteins was measured from fluorograms of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. The synthesis of two proteins was induced by temperatures of 40 degrees C to 42.5 degrees C; however, 45 degrees C inhibited the synthesis of all proteins. Based on their apparent molecular weights and pI values and their recognition by a monoclonal antibody to the HSP70 gene family, the two proteins induced by hyperthermia were found to be the highly heat-inducible hsp70 and the constitutive hsc70. Because a heat shock of 42.5 degrees C for 30 minutes had very little effect on cell viability and induced the synthesis of hsp70 and hsc70, this heat shock was used to study the effect of age on the ability of hepatocytes to respond to the stress of hyperthermia. Neither hepatocytes isolated from young adult (5-7 months) nor old (25-27 months) rats synthesized detectable amounts of hsp70 when incubated at 37 degrees C. However, heat shock induced the synthesis of both hsp70 and hsc70 in hepatocytes isolated from young adult and old rats. The induction of hsp70 synthesis was significantly lower (37%) for hepatocytes isolated from old rats compared to hepatocytes isolated from young adult rats. However, neither the basal level nor the induced level of hsc70 synthesis changed significantly with age. Thus, aging resulted in a decrease in the ability of hepatocytes to synthesize hsp70 in response to hyperthermia; this effect, however, was specific for hsp70.

  13. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  14. Solar heat receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.; Hansen, L.J.; Evans, D.B.

    1982-09-29

    A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  15. Solar heat receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.; Hansen, Leif J.; Evans, David B.

    1985-01-01

    A receiver for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700.degree.-900.degree. C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  16. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  17. Compact, super heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, A.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Heat exchanger uses porous media to enhance heat transfer through walls of cooling channels, thereby lowering wall temperature. Porous media within cooling channel increases internal surface area from which heat can be transferred to coolant. Comparison data shows wall has lower temperature and coolant has higher temperature when porous medium is used within heat exchanger. Media can be sintered powedered metal, metal fibers, woven wire layers, or any porous metal having desired permeability and porosity.

  18. Cold Climate Heat Pump

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    central heating , cooling, and air conditioning (HVAC) system . Both buildings had two zones for heating and cooling, which allowed for a direct...section calls for improved efficiency of mechanical systems as well as an increase of renewable resource usage. Current heating technologies in cold... heated refrigerant is injected into a mixing chamber between the two compressors. The injection leads to a gain in performance of the system through

  19. Champagne Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    2004-01-01

    The term champagne heat pump denotes a developmental heat pump that exploits a cycle of absorption and desorption of carbon dioxide in an alcohol or other organic liquid. Whereas most heat pumps in common use in the United States are energized by mechanical compression, the champagne heat pump is energized by heating. The concept of heat pumps based on other absorption cycles energized by heat has been understood for years, but some of these heat pumps are outlawed in many areas because of the potential hazards posed by leakage of working fluids. For example, in the case of the water/ammonia cycle, there are potential hazards of toxicity and flammability. The organic-liquid/carbon dioxide absorption/desorption cycle of the champagne heat pump is similar to the water/ammonia cycle, but carbon dioxide is nontoxic and environmentally benign, and one can choose an alcohol or other organic liquid that is also relatively nontoxic and environmentally benign. Two candidate nonalcohol organic liquids are isobutyl acetate and amyl acetate. Although alcohols and many other organic liquids are flammable, they present little or no flammability hazard in the champagne heat pump because only the nonflammable carbon dioxide component of the refrigerant mixture is circulated to the evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, which are the only components of the heat pump in direct contact with air in habitable spaces.

  20. Electric heating pad burns.

    PubMed

    Bill, T J; Edlich, R F; Himel, H N

    1994-01-01

    Patients with sensory deficits are especially prone to heating pad burns. Two cases are reported of patients with anesthetic skin who received partial and full-thickness burns of their feet from an electric heating pad. These burn injuries could have been prevented if the patients understood the potential hazard of heating pads.

  1. Heat pipes. [technology utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The development and use of heat pipes are described, including space requirements and contributions. Controllable heat pipes, and designs for automatically maintaining a selected constant temperature, are discussed which would add to the versatility and usefulness of heat pipes in industrial processing, manufacture of integrated circuits, and in temperature stabilization of electronics.

  2. Heat-related illness.

    PubMed

    Atha, Walter F

    2013-11-01

    Environmental exposure to high temperatures can result in abnormalities ranging from mild heat exhaustion to heat stroke with multiorgan system failure. An understanding of the mechanisms of thermoregulation and how those mechanisms fail with extreme heat stress is critical for management of the patient with elevated body temperature in the emergency department.

  3. Heat Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Ball Metal's design of ducting and controls for series of roof top heat exchangers was inspired by Tech Briefs. Heat exchangers are installed on eight press and coating lines used to decorate sheet metal. The heat recovery system provides an estimated energy savings of more than $250,000 per year.

  4. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  5. HEAT TRANSFER MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Wislicenus, G.F.

    1961-07-11

    A heat exchanger is adapted to unifomly cool a spherical surface. Equations for the design of a spherical heat exchanger hav~g tubes with a uniform center-to-center spining are given. The heat exchanger is illustrated in connection with a liquid-fueled reactor.

  6. Geothermal heat in a heat pump use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, A.; Hansen, J.; Obermeyer, H.; Pavlova, I.

    2016-09-01

    The considered innovative technology proposes to use alternative energy sources for the process efficiency in low-height construction. The world economy depends on price rises for energy sources and the danger of environmental pollution increases. Geothermal energy is the basic resource saving and environmentally safe renewable heat source that is characterized by inexhaustibility, permanent all the-year-round use, universal prevalence of resources and the ability to replace considerable volumes of traditional energy carriers. The expediency and power efficiency to apply a heat pump with the use of geothermal heat is proved for low-height construction.

  7. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1980-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

  9. Urban heat island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hongsuk H.

    1991-01-01

    The phenomenon of urban heat island was investigated by the use of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper data sets collected over the metropolitan area of Washington DC (U.S.). By combining the retrieved spectral albedos and temperatures, urban modification on radiation budgets of five surface categories were analyzed. The surface radiation budget imagery of the area show that urban heating is attributable to a large heat flux from the rapidly heating surfaces of asphalt, bare soil and short grass. In summer, symptoms of diurnal heating begin to appear by mid morning and can be about 10 degrees warmer than nearby woodlands in summer.

  10. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  11. "E" Heating Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L.; Swaim, Robert J.; Johnson, Samuel D.; Coultrip, Robert H.; Phillips, W. Morris; Copeland, Carl E.

    1994-01-01

    Two separate areas heated inductively for adhesive bonding in single operation. "E" heating head developed to satisfy need for fast-acting and reliable induction heating device. Used in attaching "high-hat" stiffeners to aircraft panels. Incorporates principles and circuitry of toroid joining gun. Width and length configured to provide variously sized heat zones, depending on bonding requirements. Lightweight, portable and provides rapid, reliable heating of dual areas in any environment. Well suited for flight-line and depot maintenance, and battlefield repair. Also useful in automotive assembly lines to strengthen automobile panels.

  12. Flexible heating head for induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An induction heating head includes a length of wire having first and second opposite ends and being wound in a flat spiral shape to form an induction coil, a capacitor connected to the first and second ends of the wire, the induction coil and capacitor defining a tank circuit, and a flexible, elastomeric body molded to encase the induction coil. When a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the body, and the tank circuit is powered, the susceptor is inductively heated.

  13. Heat pump apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Paul A.; Horowitz, Jeffrey S.

    1983-01-01

    A heat pump apparatus including a compact arrangement of individual tubular reactors containing hydride-dehydride beds in opposite end sections, each pair of beds in each reactor being operable by sequential and coordinated treatment with a plurality of heat transfer fluids in a plurality of processing stages, and first and second valves located adjacent the reactor end sections with rotatable members having multiple ports and associated portions for separating the hydride beds at each of the end sections into groups and for simultaneously directing a plurality of heat transfer fluids to the different groups. As heat is being generated by a group of beds, others are being regenerated so that heat is continuously available for space heating. As each of the processing stages is completed for a hydride bed or group of beds, each valve member is rotated causing the heat transfer fluid for the heat processing stage to be directed to that bed or group of beds. Each of the end sections are arranged to form a closed perimeter and the valve member may be rotated repeatedly about the perimeter to provide a continuous operation. Both valves are driven by a common motor to provide a coordinated treatment of beds in the same reactors. The heat pump apparatus is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

  14. Heat pipe cooling system with sensible heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Calvin C.

    1988-01-01

    A heat pipe cooling system which employs a sensible heat sink is discussed. With this type of system, incident aerodynamic heat is transported via a heat pipe from the stagnation region to the heat sink and absorbed by raising the temperature of the heat sink material. The use of a sensible heat sink can be advantageous for situations where the total mission heat load is limited, as it is during re-entry, and a suitable radiation sink is not available.

  15. Nanofluid heat capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starace, Anne K.; Gomez, Judith C.; Wang, Jun; Pradhan, Sulolit; Glatzmaier, Greg C.

    2011-12-01

    Significant increases in the heat capacity of heat transfer fluids are needed not only to reduce the costs of liquid heating and cooling processes, but also to bring clean energy producing technologies like concentrating solar power (CSP) to price parity with conventional energy generation. It has been postulated that nanofluids could have higher heat capacities than conventional fluids. In this work, nano- and micron-sized particles were added to five base fluids (poly-α olefin, mineral oil, ethylene glycol, a mixture of water and ethylene glycol, and calcium nitrate tetrahydrate), and the resulting heat capacities were measured and compared with those of the neat base fluids and the weighted average of the heat capacities of the components. The particles used were inert metals and metal oxides that did not undergo any phase transitions over the temperature range studied. In the nanofluids studied here, we found no increase in heat capacity upon the addition of the particles larger than the experimental error.

  16. Heat tube device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattar, Mukesh K. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention discloses a heat tube device through which a working fluid can be circulated to transfer heat to air in a conventional air conditioning system. The heat tube device is disposable about a conventional cooling coil of the air conditioning system and includes a plurality of substantially U-shaped tubes connected to a support structure. The support structure includes members for allowing the heat tube device to be readily positioned about the cooling coil. An actuatable adjustment device is connected to the U-shaped tubes for allowing, upon actuation thereof, for the heat tubes to be simultaneously rotated relative to the cooling coil for allowing the heat transfer from the heat tube device to air in the air conditioning system to be selectively varied.

  17. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  18. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1977-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  19. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1983-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  20. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Catton

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics )pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger disign.

  1. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1983-06-21

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  2. Lunar base heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Jeffrey H.; Tetreault, R.; Fischbach, D.; Walker, D.

    1994-01-01

    A heat pump is a device which elevates the temperature of a heat flow by a means of an energy input. By doing this, the heat pump can cause heat to transfer faster from a warm region to a cool region, or it can cause heat to flow from a cool region to a warmer region. The second case is the one which finds vast commercial applications such as air conditioning, heating, and refrigeration. Aerospace applications of heat pumps include both cases. The NASA Johnson Space Center is currently developing a Life Support Systems Integration Facility (LSSIF, previously SIRF) to provide system-level integration, operational test experience, and performance data that will enable NASA to develop flight-certified hardware for future planetary missions. A high lift heat pump is a significant part of the TCS hardware development associated with the LSSIF. The high lift heat pump program discussed here is being performed in three phases. In Phase 1, the objective is to develop heat pump concepts for a lunar base, a lunar lander, and for a ground development unit for the SIRF. In Phase 2, the design of the SIRF ground test unit is being performed, including identification and evaluation of safety and reliability issues. In Phase 3, the SIRF unit will be manufactured, tested, and delivered to the NASA Johnson Space Center.

  3. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better

  4. "Bottle-Brush" Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tward, E.; Gatewood, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Heat exchanger consists of a metal tube with wires extending inward from wall. Conduction of heat along wires improves heat transfer to gas or other filling. Fluid is heated throughout the cross section of tube. Suggested applications are refrigerators, heat engines, thermal instrumentation, and heat switches.

  5. The stress protein heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) inhibits the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel

    PubMed Central

    Iftinca, Mircea; Flynn, Robyn; Basso, Lilian; Melo, Helvira; Aboushousha, Reem; Taylor, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Background Specialized cellular defense mechanisms prevent damage from chemical, biological, and physical hazards. The heat shock proteins have been recognized as key chaperones that maintain cell survival against a variety of exogenous and endogenous stress signals including noxious temperature. However, the role of heat shock proteins in nociception remains poorly understood. We carried out an expression analysis of the constitutively expressed 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein, a member of the stress-induced HSP70 family in lumbar dorsal root ganglia from a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain. We used immunolabeling of dorsal root ganglion neurons, behavioral analysis and patch clamp electrophysiology in both dorsal root ganglion neurons and HEK cells transfected with Hsc70 and Transient Receptor Potential Channels to examine their functional interaction in heat shock stress condition. Results We report an increase in protein levels of Hsc70 in mouse dorsal root ganglia, 3 days post Complete Freund’s Adjuvant injection in the hind paw. Immunostaining of Hsc70 was observed in most of the dorsal root ganglion neurons, including the small size nociceptors immunoreactive to the TRPV1 channel. Standard whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 current after exposure to heat shock. We found that capsaicin-evoked currents are inhibited by heat shock in dorsal root ganglion neurons and transfected HEK cells expressing Hsc70 and TRPV1. Blocking Hsc70 with matrine or spergualin compounds prevented heat shock-induced inhibition of the channel. We also found that, in contrast to TRPV1, both the cold sensor channels TRPA1 and TRPM8 were unresponsive to heat shock stress. Finally, we show that inhibition of TRPV1 depends on the ATPase activity of Hsc70 and involves the rho-associated protein kinase. Conclusions Our work identified Hsc70 and its ATPase activity as a central

  6. Fluidized bed heat treating system

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B; Pfennigwerth, Glenn L

    2014-05-06

    Systems for heat treating materials are presented. The systems typically involve a fluidized bed that contains granulated heat treating material. In some embodiments a fluid, such as an inert gas, is flowed through the granulated heat treating medium, which homogenizes the temperature of the heat treating medium. In some embodiments the fluid may be heated in a heating vessel and flowed into the process chamber where the fluid is then flowed through the granulated heat treating medium. In some embodiments the heat treating material may be liquid or granulated heat treating material and the heat treating material may be circulated through a heating vessel into a process chamber where the heat treating material contacts the material to be heat treated. Microwave energy may be used to provide the source of heat for heat treating systems.

  7. Heat-pipe Earth.

    PubMed

    Moore, William B; Webb, A Alexander G

    2013-09-26

    The heat transport and lithospheric dynamics of early Earth are currently explained by plate tectonic and vertical tectonic models, but these do not offer a global synthesis consistent with the geologic record. Here we use numerical simulations and comparison with the geologic record to explore a heat-pipe model in which volcanism dominates surface heat transport. These simulations indicate that a cold and thick lithosphere developed as a result of frequent volcanic eruptions that advected surface materials downwards. Declining heat sources over time led to an abrupt transition to plate tectonics. Consistent with model predictions, the geologic record shows rapid volcanic resurfacing, contractional deformation, a low geothermal gradient across the bulk of the lithosphere and a rapid decrease in heat-pipe volcanism after initiation of plate tectonics. The heat-pipe Earth model therefore offers a coherent geodynamic framework in which to explore the evolution of our planet before the onset of plate tectonics.

  8. Heat pipe development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienart, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to investigate analytically and experimentally the performance of heat pipes with composite wicks--specifically, those having pedestal arteries and screwthread circumferential grooves. An analytical model was developed to describe the effects of screwthreads and screen secondary wicks on the transport capability of the artery. The model describes the hydrodynamics of the circumferential flow in triangular grooves with azimuthally varying capillary menisci and liquid cross-sections. Normalized results were obtained which give the influence of evaporator heat flux on the axial heat transport capability of the arterial wick. In order to evaluate the priming behavior of composite wicks under actual load conditions, an 'inverted' glass heat pipe was designed and constructed. The results obtained from the analysis and from the tests with the glass heat pipe were applied to the OAO-C Level 5 heat pipe, and an improved correlation between predicted and measured evaporator and transport performance were obtained.

  9. Water-heating dehumidifier

    DOEpatents

    Tomlinson, John J.

    2006-04-18

    A water-heating dehumidifier includes a refrigerant loop including a compressor, at least one condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator including an evaporator fan. The condenser includes a water inlet and a water outlet for flowing water therethrough or proximate thereto, or is affixed to the tank or immersed into the tank to effect water heating without flowing water. The immersed condenser design includes a self-insulated capillary tube expansion device for simplicity and high efficiency. In a water heating mode air is drawn by the evaporator fan across the evaporator to produce cooled and dehumidified air and heat taken from the air is absorbed by the refrigerant at the evaporator and is pumped to the condenser, where water is heated. When the tank of water heater is full of hot water or a humidistat set point is reached, the water-heating dehumidifier can switch to run as a dehumidifier.

  10. Caenorhabditis elegans HSF-1 is an essential nuclear protein that forms stress granule-like structures following heat shock.

    PubMed

    Morton, Elizabeth A; Lamitina, Todd

    2013-02-01

    The heat shock transcription factor (HSF) is a conserved regulator of heat shock-inducible gene expression. Organismal roles for HSF in physiological processes such as development, aging, and immunity have been defined largely through studies of the single Caenorhabditis elegans HSF homolog, hsf-1. However, the molecular and cell biological properties of hsf-1 in C. elegans are incompletely understood. We generated animals expressing physiological levels of an HSF-1::GFP fusion protein and examined its function, localization, and regulation in vivo. HSF-1::GFP was functional, as measured by its ability to rescue phenotypes associated with two hsf-1 mutant alleles. Rescue of hsf-1 development phenotypes was abolished in a DNA-binding-deficient mutant, demonstrating that the transcriptional targets of hsf-1 are critical to its function even in the absence of stress. Under nonstress conditions, HSF-1::GFP was found primarily in the nucleus. Following heat shock, HSF-1::GFP rapidly and reversibly redistributed into dynamic, subnuclear structures that share many properties with human nuclear stress granules, including colocalization with markers of active transcription. Rapid formation of HSF-1 stress granules required HSF-1 DNA-binding activity, and the threshold for stress granule formation was altered by growth temperature. HSF-1 stress granule formation was not induced by inhibition of IGF signaling, a pathway previously suggested to function upstream of hsf-1. Our findings suggest that development, stress, and aging pathways may regulate HSF-1 function in distinct ways, and that HSF-1 nuclear stress granule formation is an evolutionarily conserved aspect of HSF-1 regulation in vivo.

  11. Saturn base heating handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, C. R.; Bender, R. L.; Bevill, R. L.; Reardon, J.; Hartley, L.

    1972-01-01

    A handbook containing a summary of model and flight test base heating data from the S-1, S-1B, S-4, S-1C, and S-2 stages is presented. A review of the available prediction methods is included. Experimental data are provided to make the handbook a single source of Saturn base heating data which can be used for preliminary base heating design predictions of launch vehicles.

  12. Hydride heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Cottingham, James G.

    1977-01-01

    Method and apparatus for the use of hydrides to exhaust heat from one temperature source and deliver the thermal energy extracted for use at a higher temperature, thereby acting as a heat pump. For this purpose there are employed a pair of hydridable metal compounds having different characteristics working together in a closed pressure system employing a high temperature source to upgrade the heat supplied from a low temperature source.

  13. Radioisotopic heat source

    DOEpatents

    Sayell, E.H.

    1973-10-23

    A radioisotopic heat source is described which includes a core of heat productive, radioisotopic material, an impact resistant layer of graphite surrounding said core, and a shell of iridium metal intermediate the core and the impact layer. The source may also include a compliant mat of iridium between the core and the iridium shell, as well as an outer covering of iridium metal about the entire heat source. (Official Gazette)

  14. Induction Heating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Induction heating technology, a magnetic non-deforming process, was developed by Langley researchers to join plastic and composite components in space. Under NASA license, Inductron Corporation uses the process to produce induction heating systems and equipment for numerous applications. The Torobonder, a portable system, comes with a number of interchangeable heads for aircraft repair. Other developments are the E Heating Head, the Toroid Joining Gun, and the Torobrazer. These products perform bonding applications more quickly, safely and efficiently than previous methods.

  15. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H. W.; Spong, D.; Majeski, R.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2008-01-18

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral beam injection, and radio-frequency (rf). Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, neutral beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The experimental plan requires 3 MW of 50-keV balanced neutral beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 ms for initial experiments, to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 s. Subsequent upgrades will add 3MW of neutral beam injection (NBI). This paper discusses the NCSX NBI requirements and design issues and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M NBI system. In addition, estimations are given for beam heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size and magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of rf heating by mode conversion ion Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the rf system lend themselves to current drive, so if current drive became desirable for any reason, only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The rf system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possiblyIBW-generated sheared flows.

  16. Heat Loss Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Infrared scanning devices are being used to produce images that show, by color or black-and-white shading differences, which buildings and homes are losing heat to the outdoors, and how much. Heat loss surveys done by Texas Instruments, Daedalus Enterprises, Inc. and other companies have growing acceptance of their services among industrial firms, utilities, local governments, and state and federal agencies interested in promoting heat loss awareness and inspiring corrective actions.

  17. Counterflow Regolith Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Jonscher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A problem exists in reducing the total heating power required to extract oxygen from lunar regolith. All such processes require heating a great deal of soil, and the heat energy is wasted if it cannot be recycled from processed material back into new material. The counterflow regolith heat exchanger (CoRHE) is a device that transfers heat from hot regolith to cold regolith. The CoRHE is essentially a tube-in-tube heat exchanger with internal and external augers attached to the inner rotating tube to move the regolith. Hot regolith in the outer tube is moved in one direction by a right-hand - ed auger, and the cool regolith in the inner tube is moved in the opposite direction by a left-handed auger attached to the inside of the rotating tube. In this counterflow arrangement, a large fraction of the heat from the expended regolith is transferred to the new regolith. The spent regolith leaves the heat exchanger close to the temperature of the cold new regolith, and the new regolith is pre-heated close to the initial temperature of the spent regolith. Using the CoRHE can reduce the heating requirement of a lunar ISRU system by 80%, reducing the total power consumption by a factor of two. The unique feature of this system is that it allows for counterflow heat exchange to occur between solids, instead of liquids or gases, as is commonly done. In addition, in variants of this concept, the hydrogen reduction can be made to occur within the counterflow heat exchanger itself, enabling a simplified lunar ISRU (in situ resource utilization) system with excellent energy economy and continuous nonbatch mode operation.

  18. Specific heat revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizarro, C. A.; Condat, C. A.; Lamberti, P. W.; Prato, D. P.

    1996-06-01

    The correlation between potential shape and specific heat is generally absent from textbook discussions. We present a detailed analysis of the specific heat contribution due to independent particles subject to one-dimensional classical and quantum model potentials. For the classical models, we use phase space concepts to develop a clear physical interpretation of the temperature dependence of the specific heat. For the quantum models, we make the interpretation in terms of the differences in quantum levels.

  19. Heat Capacity Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    A. Findikakis

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide heat capacity values for the host and surrounding rock layers for the waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The heat capacity representations provided by this analysis are used in unsaturated zone (UZ) flow, transport, and coupled processes numerical modeling activities, and in thermal analyses as part of the design of the repository to support the license application. Among the reports that use the heat capacity values estimated in this report are the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' report, the ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' report, the ''Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, the Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms'' report, the ''Dike/Drift Interactions report, the Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' report, and the ''In-Drift Natural Convection and Condensation'' report. The specific objective of this study is to determine the rock-grain and rock-mass heat capacities for the geologic stratigraphy identified in the ''Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170031], Table 1-1). This report provides estimates of the heat capacity for all stratigraphic layers except the Paleozoic, for which the mineralogic abundance data required to estimate the heat capacity are not available. The temperature range of interest in this analysis is 25 C to 325 C. This interval is broken into three separate temperature sub-intervals: 25 C to 95 C, 95 C to 114 C, and 114 C to 325 C, which correspond to the preboiling, trans-boiling, and postboiling regimes. Heat capacity is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of material by one degree (Nimick and Connolly 1991 [DIRS 100690], p. 5). The rock-grain heat capacity is defined as the heat capacity of the rock solids (minerals), and does not include the effect of water that exists in the rock pores. By comparison, the rock-mass heat capacity considers the heat capacity of both solids and pore

  20. An electrohydrodynamic heat pipe.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    A heat pipe of new design, using an electrode structure to orient and guide the dielectric liquid phase flow, is proposed. Analysis indicates that the operation of the electrohydrodynamic heat pipe is in direct analogy to capillary devices, with the polarization force acting in place of capillarity. Advantages of these new heat pipes include greatly reduced liquid friction, electrohydrodynamically enhanced evaporation and condensation heat transfer, and a possible voltage-controlled on/off feature. Preliminary calculations indicate that relatively high performance devices are possible.

  1. Introduction to Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. NCTS 21070-15. Course Description: This course will present operating principles of the heat pipe with emphases on the underlying physical processes and requirements of pressure and energy balance. Performance characterizations and design considerations of the heat pipe will be highlighted. Guidelines for thermal engineers in the selection of heat pipes as part of the spacecraft thermal control system, testing methodology, and analytical modeling will also be discussed.

  2. Heat Pipe Materials Compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.; Fleischman, G. L.; Luedke, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program to evaluate noncondensable gas generation in ammonia heat pipes was completed. A total of 37 heat pipes made of aluminum, stainless steel and combinations of these materials were processed by various techniques, operated at different temperatures and tested at low temperature to quantitatively determine gas generation rates. In order of increasing stability are aluminum/stainless combination, all aluminum and all stainless heat pipes. One interesting result is the identification of intentionally introduced water in the ammonia during a reflux step as a means of surface passivation to reduce gas generation in stainless-steel/aluminum heat pipes.

  3. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  4. Reclaiming Waste Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    'Air-O-Space' heater, based on spacecraft heat, requires no fuel other than electricity to run fan. Installed in chimney flue, heat pipes transfer heat from waste hot gases (but not the gases themselves) to fresh air blown across the other end of the pipes. It can transport roughly 500 times the heat flux of the best solid conductors with a temperature drop of less than 3 degrees per foot. This instrument has also been used by Kin-Tek Laboratories Inc. to produce an instrument to calibrate gas analyzers for air-pollution monitoring.

  5. Quantum heat traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramidi, Ivan G.

    2017-02-01

    We study new invariants of elliptic partial differential operators acting on sections of a vector bundle over a closed Riemannian manifold that we call the relativistic heat trace and the quantum heat traces. We obtain some reduction formulas expressing these new invariants in terms of some integral transforms of the usual classical heat trace and compute the asymptotics of these invariants. The coefficients of these asymptotic expansion are determined by the usual heat trace coefficients (which are locally computable) as well as by some new global invariants.

  6. Heat flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    A new automated, computer controlled heat flux measurement facility is described. Continuous transient and steady-state surface heat flux values varying from about 0.3 to 6 MW/sq m over a temperature range of 100 to 1200 K can be obtained in the facility. An application of this facility is the development of heat flux gauges for continuous fast transient surface heat flux measurement on turbine blades operating in space shuttle main engine turbopumps. The facility is useful for durability testing at fast temperature transients.

  7. Heat rejection system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Gregory C.; Tokarz, Richard D.; Parry, Jr., Harvey L.; Braun, Daniel J.

    1980-01-01

    A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

  8. Estimating heat capacity and heat content of rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Eugene C.; Hemingway, Bruch S.

    1995-01-01

    Our measured heat-capacity values for rocks and other measurements of heat capacity or heat content of rocks found in the literature have been compared with estimated rock heat capacities calculated from the summation of heat capacities of both minerals and oxide components. The validity of calculating the heat content or heat capacity of rocks to better than about ± 3% from its mineral or chemical composition is well demonstrated by the data presented here.

  9. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments.

  10. Tidal Heating in Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wisdom, J.

    2007-07-01

    The heating in Enceladus in an equilibrium resonant configuration with other saturnian satellites can be estimated independently of the physical properties of Enceladus. Our results update the values obtained for the equilibrium tidal heating found by Lissauer et al. (1984) and Peale (2003). We find that equilibrium tidal heating cannot account for the heat that is observed to be coming from Enceladus, and current heating rates are even less for conventional estimates of the Love number for Enceladus. Even allowing for a much larger dynamic Love number, as can occur in viscoelastic models (Ross and Schubert, 1989), the equilibrium tidal heating is less than the heat observed to be coming from Enceladus. One resolution is that the tidal equilibrium is unstable and that the system oscillates about equilibrium. Yoder (1981) suggested that Enceladus might oscillate about equilibrium if the Q of Enceladus is stress dependent. An alternate suggestion was made by Ojakangas and Stevenson (1986), who emphasized the possible temperature dependence of Q. In these models Enceladus would now be releasing heat stored during a recent high eccentricity phase. However, we have shown that the Ojakangas and Stevenson model does not produce oscillations for parameters appropriate for Enceladus. Other low-order resonance configurations are possible for the saturnian satellites in the past. These include the 3:2 Mimas-Enceladus and the 3:4 Enceladus-Tethys resonances. The latter resonance has no equilibrium because the orbits are diverging, and the former has an equilibrium heating rate of only 0.48 GW. So equilibrium heating at past resonances is no more successful at explaining past resurfacing events than equilibrium heating is at explaining the present activity.

  11. Lunar Base Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Fischbach, D.; Tetreault, R.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to investigate the feasibility of constructing a heat pump suitable for use as a heat rejection device in applications such as a lunar base. In this situation, direct heat rejection through the use of radiators is not possible at a temperature suitable for lde support systems. Initial analysis of a heat pump of this type called for a temperature lift of approximately 378 deg. K, which is considerably higher than is commonly called for in HVAC and refrigeration applications where heat pumps are most often employed. Also because of the variation of the rejection temperature (from 100 to 381 deg. K), extreme flexibility in the configuration and operation of the heat pump is required. A three-stage compression cycle using a refrigerant such as CFC-11 or HCFC-123 was formulated with operation possible with one, two or three stages of compression. Also, to meet the redundancy requirements, compression was divided up over multiple compressors in each stage. A control scheme was devised that allowed these multiple compressors to be operated as required so that the heat pump could perform with variable heat loads and rejection conditions. A prototype heat pump was designed and constructed to investigate the key elements of the high-lift heat pump concept. Control software was written and implemented in the prototype to allow fully automatic operation. The heat pump was capable of operation over a wide range of rejection temperatures and cooling loads, while maintaining cooling water temperature well within the required specification of 40 deg. C +/- 1.7 deg. C. This performance was verified through testing.

  12. Magnetic heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, J.E.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described for pumping heat for heating or refrigeration, comprising the steps of: exposing a system comprising a magnetic fluid to a magnetic field; causing the magnetic fluid to absorb heat of magnetization; transferring heat from the system to a heat sink; causing the magnetic fluid to exit the magnetic field, undergoing the cooling effect therefrom; and transferring heat to the system from a heat source.

  13. Heat pipes and use of heat pipes in furnace exhaust

    DOEpatents

    Polcyn, Adam D.

    2010-12-28

    An array of a plurality of heat pipe are mounted in spaced relationship to one another with the hot end of the heat pipes in a heated environment, e.g. the exhaust flue of a furnace, and the cold end outside the furnace. Heat conversion equipment is connected to the cold end of the heat pipes.

  14. Basic Comfort Heating Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempster, Chalmer T.

    The material in this beginning book for vocational students presents fundamental principles needed to understand the heating aspect of the sheet metal trade and supplies practical experience to the student so that he may become familiar with the process of determining heat loss for average structures. Six areas covered are: (1) Background…

  15. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1981-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  16. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  17. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to faciliate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  18. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate intallation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  19. Microchannel heat sink assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bonde, W.L.; Contolini, R.J.

    1992-03-24

    The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watertight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures. 13 figs.

  20. Scraped surface heat exchangers.

    PubMed

    Rao, Chetan S; Hartel, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    Scraped surface heat exchangers (SSHEs) are commonly used in the food, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries for heat transfer, crystallization, and other continuous processes. They are ideally suited for products that are viscous, sticky, that contain particulate matter, or that need some degree of crystallization. Since these characteristics describe a vast majority of processed foods, SSHEs are especially suited for pumpable food products. During operation, the product is brought in contact with a heat transfer surface that is rapidly and continuously scraped, thereby exposing the surface to the passage of untreated product. In addition to maintaining high and uniform heat exchange, the scraper blades also provide simultaneous mixing and agitation. Heat exchange for sticky and viscous foods such as heavy salad dressings, margarine, chocolate, peanut butter, fondant, ice cream, and shortenings is possible only by using SSHEs. High heat transfer coefficients are achieved because the boundary layer is continuously replaced by fresh material. Moreover, the product is in contact with the heating surface for only a few seconds and high temperature gradients can be used without the danger of causing undesirable reactions. SSHEs are versatile in the use of heat transfer medium and the various unit operations that can be carried out simultaneously. This article critically reviews the current understanding of the operations and applications of SSHEs.

  1. Heat transfer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, R.; Chen, Y.T.; Sathappan, A.K.

    1995-10-20

    Work continued from last quarter related to studies of heat transfer and fluid flow in porous media. One experiment focused on issues of drying in subresidually-saturated systems. The other experiment deals with studies of flows in a repository-like geometry around a heated horizontal annulus. In the subresidual saturation studies, elevated temperature environments were considered during this quarter. A 1 in. {times} 8 ft long heating tape (heating capabilities of 8.6 W/in{sup 2}) with an on-off type temperature controller has been used to maintain a constant temperature on the aluminum test section (the latter has been described in earlier reports). Nitrogen gas with a flow rate of 1 SLPM was flowed through a glass-bead medium with an isothermal (90{degrees}C) boundary condition. The drying characteristics of this system are reported. In a second experiment, that of flow and heat transfer around a simulated drift, a low, constant heat flux boundary condition on the heater has been used. Two different admitted water quantities, 200 ml and 300 ml, have been used as before. The response of temperatures and relative humidity in the porous medium and annulus are very similar to the results of the high constant heat flux on the case of 300 ml water experiments. This is not the case for the 200 ml water experiment. The low constant heat flux with a small quantity of water is found to have no significant effect on the temperature responses.

  2. Combined Heat and Power

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    CHP is on-site electricity generation that captures the heat that would otherwise be wasted to provide useful thermal energy such as steam or hot water than can be used for space heating, cooling, domestic hot water and industrial processes.

  3. Electron heat flux instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  4. Microchannel heat sink assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bonde, Wayne L.; Contolini, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watetight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures.

  5. Gyrokinetic turbulent heating

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, F. L.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-10-15

    Expressions for particle and energy fluxes and heating rates due to turbulence are derived. These fluxes and heating rates are identified from moments of an extended drift-kinetic equation for the equilibrium distribution function. These include neoclassical as well as turbulent diffusion and heating. Phase-space conservation is demonstrated, allowing the drift-kinetic equation to be expressed in conservative form. This facilitates taking moments with few approximations, mainly those consistent with drift kinetics for the equilibrium distribution function and the relative smallness of the fluctuations. The turbulent heating is uniquely defined by choosing the standard gyrokinetic definition for the energy flux. With this definition, most of the heating can be expressed in the form of ohmic heating from turbulent parallel and perpendicular current density perturbations. The latter current is identified with grad-B and curvature drifts, plus terms involving magnetic perturbations (which are smaller for low beta). A small contribution to the heating comes from the divergence of an energy flux that is dependent on the finite gyroradius of the ions. The fluxes and heating rates are expressed in a form that can be easily evaluated from gyrokinetic turbulence simulations.

  6. Heat Shield in Pieces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the remains of the rover's heat shield, broken into two key pieces, the main piece on the left side and a broken-off flank piece near the middle of the image. The heat shield impact site is identified by the circle of red dust on the right side of the picture. In this view, Opportunity is approximately 20 meters (66 feet) away from the heat shield, which protected it while hurtling through the martian atmosphere.

    In the far left of the image, a meteorite called 'Heat Shield Rock,' sits nearby, The Sun is reflecting off the silver-colored underside of the internal thermal blankets of the heat shield.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact.

    This is an approximately true-color rendering of the scene acquired around 1:22 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity sol 324 (Dec. 21, 2004) in an image mosaic using panoramic filters at wavelengths of 750, 530, and 430 nanometers.

  7. Vacuum powered heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffolo, R.F.

    1986-06-24

    In an internal combustion engine including an oil lubrication system, a liquid cooling system, and an improved air intake system is described. The improved air intake system comprises: a housing including a first opening in one end, which opening is open to the atmosphere and a second opening comprising an air outlet opening in the other end open to the air intake manifold of the engine, a heat exchanger positioned in the first opening. The heat exchanger consists of a series of coils positioned in the flow path of the atmospheric air as it enters the housing, the heat exchanger being fluidly connected to either the engine lubrication system or the cooling system to provide a warm heat source for the incoming air to the housing, acceleration means positioned in the housing downstream of the heat exchanger, the acceleration means comprising a honeycomb structure positioned across the air intake flow path. The honey-comb structure includes a multitude of honey combed mini-venturi cells through which the heated air flows in an accelerated mode, a removable air filter positioned between the heat exchanger and the acceleration means and a single opening provided in the housing through which the air filter can be passed and removed, and additional openings in the housing positioned downstream of the heat exchanger and upstream of the air filter, the additional openings including removable flaps for opening and closing the openings to control the temperature of the air flowing through the housing.

  8. Introductory heat-transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widener, Edward L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to introduce some concepts of thermodynamics in existing heat-treating experiments using available items. The specific objectives are to define the thermal properties of materials and to visualize expansivity, conductivity, heat capacity, and the melting point of common metals. The experimental procedures are described.

  9. Radioisotopic heat source

    DOEpatents

    Jones, G.J.; Selle, J.E.; Teaney, P.E.

    1975-09-30

    Disclosed is a radioisotopic heat source and method for a long life electrical generator. The source includes plutonium dioxide shards and yttrium or hafnium in a container of tantalum-tungsten-hafnium alloy, all being in a nickel alloy outer container, and subjected to heat treatment of from about 1570$sup 0$F to about 1720$sup 0$F for about one h. (auth)

  10. Heat pipe investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Techniques associated with thermal-vacuum and bench testing, along with flight testing of the OAO-C spacecraft heat pipes are outlined, to show that the processes used in heat transfer design and testing are adequate for good performance evaluations.

  11. Heat and Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearlman, Norman

    Unlike many elementary presentations on heat, this monograph is not restricted to explaining thermal behavior in only macroscopic terms, but also developes the relationships between thermal properties and atomic behavior. "It relies at the start on intuition about heat at the macroscopic level. Familiarity with the particle model of mechanics,…

  12. The Aries heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, G.; Jerger, J. J.; Jerger, J. H.

    1980-06-01

    The failure analysis performed for ARIES sounding rocket motor failures, and the remedy developed for motor overheating are described. The principal failure hypothesis was that the motor-dome insulator fails under high gravity boost and the subsequent radiant heating of the titanium motor dome weakens the pressure vessel. The supporting heat transfer and ablation analyses are summarized. These detailed analyses and digital simulations quantitatively correlated the precise time-of-failure with known ablation and heat transfer rates and established firm design criteria for the aluminum heat sink. Analysis of the international magnetospheric study test rocket temperature data is described. This analysis confirmed the validity of the design and the effectiveness of the heat sink.

  13. Solar heating system

    DOEpatents

    Schreyer, James M.; Dorsey, George F.

    1982-01-01

    An improved solar heating system in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75.degree. to 180.degree. F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing and releasing heat for distribution.

  14. Heat Flow Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Heat gauges are used to measure heat flow in industrial activities. They must periodically be certified by instruments designed to provide a heat flux measurement standard. CSTAR, a NASA CCDS, and REMTECH have developed a portable heat flux checker/calibrator. The Q-CHEC can be carried to the heat gauge for certification, reducing out of service time for the gauge and eliminating the need for a replacement gauge during certification. It can provide an "end-to-end" check of the instrumentation measurement system or be used as a standalone calibrator. Because Q-CHEC offers on-site capability to detect and eliminate measurement errors, measurements do not have to be repeated, and money is saved.

  15. Ammoniated salt heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, W. R.; Jaeger, F. J.; Giordano, T. J.

    A thermochemical heat pump/energy storage system using liquid ammoniate salts is described. The system, which can be used for space heating or cooling, provides energy storage for both functions. The bulk of the energy is stored as chemical energy and thus can be stored indefinitely. The system is well suited to use with a solar energy source or industrial waste heat. Several liquid ammoniates are identified and the critical properties of three of the most promising are presented. Results of small scale (5000 Btu) system tests are discussed and a design concept for a prototype system is given. This system represents a significant improvement over the system using solid ammoniates investigated previously because of the increase in heat transfer rates (5 to 60 Btu/hr sq ft F) and the resulting reduction in heat exchanger size. As a result the concept shows promise of being cost competitive with conventional systems.

  16. Improved solar heating systems

    DOEpatents

    Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

    1980-05-16

    An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

  17. Heat Pipe Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The heat pipe was developed to alternately cool and heat without using energy or any moving parts. It enables non-rotating spacecraft to maintain a constant temperature when the surface exposed to the Sun is excessively hot and the non Sun-facing side is very cold. Several organizations, such as Tropic-Kool Engineering Corporation, joined NASA in a subsequent program to refine and commercialize the technology. Heat pipes have been installed in fast food restaurants in areas where humid conditions cause materials to deteriorate quickly. Moisture removal was increased by 30 percent in a Clearwater, FL Burger King after heat pipes were installed. Relative humidity and power consumption were also reduced significantly. Similar results were recorded by Taco Bell, which now specifies heat pipe systems in new restaurants in the Southeast.

  18. Silica heat shield sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebbesmeyer, L. H.; Christensen, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    The sensitivity of silica heat shield requirements to gap width, tile edge radius, and heat transfer distribution within tile gaps was investigated. A two-dimensional thermal model was modified and used to determine the effect of two dimensional heat transfer distributions at high temperature reusable surface insulation edges on shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) requirements. The sensitivity of TPS requirements to coating thickness, emissivity, substructure thickness, and changes in gap heating for several locations on shuttle was also studied. An inverse solution technique was applied to temperature data obtained in the Ames 20 MW turbulent duct in order to examine the effect of tile edge radius on TPS requirements. The derived heating values were then used to predict TPS requirements. Results show that increasing tile radius reduces TPS requirements.

  19. Textile dryer heat recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J. S.

    1985-08-06

    A textile dryer heat recovery system includes a textile dryer and a heat exchanger. A duct is provided for directing dryer exhaust gas to the heat exchanger for preheating dryer input air. A cleaning system within the heat exchanger removes dryer exhaust gas contaminants deposited in the heat exchanger.

  20. Heat flow in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranganu, Constantin

    Twenty new heat flow values are incorporated, along with 40 previously published data, into a heat flow map of Oklahoma. The new heat flow data were estimated using previous temperature measurements in boreholes made by American Petroleum Institute researchers and 1,498 thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings. The mean of 20 average thermal gradients is 30.50sp°C/km. In general, thermal gradients increase from SW (14.11sp°C/km) to NE (42.24sp°C/km). The range of 1,498 in situ thermal conductivity measurements (after corrections for anisotropy, in situ temperature, and porosity) is 0.90-6.1 W/m-K; the average is 1.68 W/m-K. Estimated near-surface heat flow (±20%) at 20 new sites in Oklahoma varies between 22 ± 4 mW/msp2 and 86 ± 17 mW/msp2; the average is 50 mW/msp2. Twenty-seven new heat-generation estimates, along with 22 previously published data, are used to create a heat generation map of Oklahoma. The range of heat production estimates is 1.1-3.5 muW/msp3, with an average of 2.5 muW/msp3. The heat flow regime in Oklahoma is primarily conductive in nature, except for a zone in northeast. Transient effects due to sedimentary processes and metamorphic/igneous activity, as well as past climatic changes, do not significantly influence the thermal state of the Oklahoma crust. Heat flow near the margins of the Arkoma and Anadarko Basins may be depressed or elevated by 5-13 mW/msp2 by refraction of heat from sedimentary rocks of relatively low thermal conductivity (1-2 W/m-K) into crystalline basement rocks of relatively high thermal conductivity (˜3-4 W/m-K). The heat generation-heat flow relationship shows a modest correlation. The relatively high heat flow (˜70-80 mW/msp2) in part of northeastern Oklahoma suggests that the thermal regime there may be perturbed by regional groundwater flow originating in the fractured outcrops of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the Arbuckle Mountains.

  1. Heat pipe dynamic behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Issacci, F.; Roche, G. L.; Klein, D. B.; Catton, I.

    1988-01-01

    The vapor flow in a heat pipe was mathematically modeled and the equations governing the transient behavior of the core were solved numerically. The modeled vapor flow is transient, axisymmetric (or two-dimensional) compressible viscous flow in a closed chamber. The two methods of solution are described. The more promising method failed (a mixed Galerkin finite difference method) whereas a more common finite difference method was successful. Preliminary results are presented showing that multi-dimensional flows need to be treated. A model of the liquid phase of a high temperature heat pipe was developed. The model is intended to be coupled to a vapor phase model for the complete solution of the heat pipe problem. The mathematical equations are formulated consistent with physical processes while allowing a computationally efficient solution. The model simulates time dependent characteristics of concern to the liquid phase including input phase change, output heat fluxes, liquid temperatures, container temperatures, liquid velocities, and liquid pressure. Preliminary results were obtained for two heat pipe startup cases. The heat pipe studied used lithium as the working fluid and an annular wick configuration. Recommendations for implementation based on the results obtained are presented. Experimental studies were initiated using a rectangular heat pipe. Both twin beam laser holography and laser Doppler anemometry were investigated. Preliminary experiments were completed and results are reported.

  2. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  3. Micro heat barrier

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2003-08-12

    A highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  4. Integrating preconcentrator heat controller

    DOEpatents

    Bouchier, Francis A.; Arakaki, Lester H.; Varley, Eric S.

    2007-10-16

    A method and apparatus for controlling the electric resistance heating of a metallic chemical preconcentrator screen, for example, used in portable trace explosives detectors. The length of the heating time-period is automatically adjusted to compensate for any changes in the voltage driving the heating current across the screen, for example, due to gradual discharge or aging of a battery. The total deposited energy in the screen is proportional to the integral over time of the square of the voltage drop across the screen. Since the net temperature rise, .DELTA.T.sub.s, of the screen, from beginning to end of the heating pulse, is proportional to the total amount of heat energy deposited in the screen during the heating pulse, then this integral can be calculated in real-time and used to terminate the heating current when a pre-set target value has been reached; thereby providing a consistent and reliable screen temperature rise, .DELTA.T.sub.s, from pulse-to-pulse.

  5. Heat-related illness.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jonathan A; Stewart, Lynsey K

    2011-06-01

    Heat-related illness is a set of preventable conditions ranging from mild forms (e.g., heat exhaustion, heat cramps) to potentially fatal heat stroke. Hot and humid conditions challenge cardiovascular compensatory mechanisms. Once core temperature reaches 104°F (40°C), cellular damage occurs, initiating a cascade of events that may lead to organ failure and death. Early recognition of symptoms and accurate measurement of core temperature are crucial to rapid diagnosis. Milder forms of heat-related illness are manifested by symptoms such as headache, weakness, dizziness, and an inability to continue activity. These are managed by supportive measures including hydration and moving the patient to a cool place. Hyperthermia and central nervous system symptoms should prompt an evaluation for heat stroke. Initial treatments should focus on lowering core temperature through cold water immersion. Applying ice packs to the head, neck, axilla, and groin is an alternative. Additional measures include transporting the patient to a cool environment, removing excess clothing, and intravenous hydration. Delayed access to cooling is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with heat stroke. Identification of at-risk groups can help physicians and community health agencies provide preventive measures.

  6. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  7. Acoustically enhanced heat transport.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10(6) Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ∼ 10(-9) m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ∼ 10(-8) m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10(-8) m with 10(6) Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  8. Joule heating in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fangohr, Hans; Chernyshenko, Dmitri S.; Franchin, Matteo; Fischbacher, Thomas; Meier, Guido

    2011-08-01

    We study the effect of Joule heating from electric currents flowing through ferromagnetic nanowires on the temperature of the nanowires and on the temperature of the substrate on which the nanowires are grown. The spatial current density distribution, the associated heat generation, and diffusion of heat are simulated within the nanowire and the substrate. We study several different nanowire and constriction geometries as well as different substrates: (thin) silicon nitride membranes, (thick) silicon wafers, and (thick) diamond wafers. The spatially resolved increase in temperature as a function of time is computed. For effectively three-dimensional substrates (where the substrate thickness greatly exceeds the nanowire length), we identify three different regimes of heat propagation through the substrate: regime (i), where the nanowire temperature increases approximately logarithmically as a function of time. In this regime, the nanowire temperature is well described analytically by You [Appl. Phys. Lett.APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.2399441 89, 222513 (2006)]. We provide an analytical expression for the time tc that marks the upper applicability limit of the You model. After tc, the heat flow enters regime (ii), where the nanowire temperature stays constant while a hemispherical heat front carries the heat away from the wire and into the substrate. As the heat front reaches the boundary of the substrate, regime (iii) is entered, where the nanowire and substrate temperature start to increase rapidly. For effectively two-dimensional substrates (where the nanowire length greatly exceeds the substrate thickness), there is only one regime in which the temperature increases logarithmically with time for large times, before the heat front reaches the substrate boundary. We provide an analytical expression, valid for all pulse durations, that allows one to accurately compute this temperature increase in the nanowire on thin substrates.

  9. Pioneering Heat Pump Project

    SciTech Connect

    Aschliman, Dave; Lubbehusen, Mike

    2015-06-30

    This project was initiated at a time when ground coupled heat pump systems in this region were limited in size and quantity. There were economic pressures with costs for natural gas and electric utilities that had many organizations considering ground coupled heat pumps; The research has added to the understanding of how ground temperatures fluctuate seasonally and how this affects the performance and operation of the heat pumps. This was done by using a series of temperature sensors buried within the middle of one of the vertical bore fields with sensors located at various depths below grade. Trending of the data showed that there is a lag in ground temperature with respect to air temperatures in the shoulder months, however as full cooling and heating season arrives, the heat rejection and heat extraction from the ground has a significant effect on the ground temps; Additionally it is better understood that while a large community geothermal bore field serving multiple buildings does provide a convenient central plant to use, it introduces complexity of not being able to easily model and predict how each building will contribute to the loads in real time. Additional controllers and programming were added to provide more insight into this real time load profile and allow for intelligent shedding of load via a dry cooler during cool nights in lieu of rejecting to the ground loop. This serves as a means to ‘condition’ the ground loop and mitigate thermal creep of the field, as is typically observed; and It has been observed when compared to traditional heating and cooling equipment, there is still a cost premium to use ground source heat pumps that is driven mostly by the cost for vertical bore holes. Horizontal loop systems are less costly to install, but do not perform as well in this climate zone for heating mode

  10. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems are being developed. The effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

  11. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems are considered. This effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

  12. Probe tip heating assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  13. [Clothing and heat disorder].

    PubMed

    Satsumoto, Yayoi

    2012-06-01

    The influence of the clothing material properties(like water absorbency and rapid dryness, water vapor absorption, water vapor permeability and air permeability) and the design factor of the clothing(like opening condition and fitting of clothing), which contributed to prevent heat disorder, was outlined. WBGT(wet-bulb globe temperature) is used to show a guideline for environmental limitation of activities to prevent heat disorder. As the safety function is more important than thermal comfort for some sportswear and protective clothing with high cover area, clothing itself increases the risk of heat disorder. WBGT is corrected by CAF (clothing adjustment factor) in wearing such kind of protective clothing.

  14. Absorption Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Yoshifumi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Various advanced absorption cycles are studied, developed and invented. In this paper, their cycles are classified and arranged using the three categories: effect, stage and loop, then an outline of the cycles are explained on the Duehring diagram. Their cycles include high COP cycles for refrigerations and heat pumps, high temperature lift cycles for heat transformer, absorption-compression hybrid cycles and heat pump transformer cycle. The highest COPi is attained by the seven effect cycle. In addition, the cycles for low temperature are invented and explained. Furthermore the power generation • refrigeration cycles are illustrated.

  15. Heat treatment furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

    2014-10-21

    A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

  16. Electrohydrodynamic heat pipes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.

    1973-01-01

    An electrohydrodynamic heat pipe of radical design is proposed which substitutes polarization electrohydrodynamic force effects for capillarity in collecting, guiding, and pumping a condensate liquid phase. The discussed device is restricted to the use of dielectric liquids as working fluids. Because of the relatively poor thermal transport properties of these liquids, capillary heat pipes using these liquids have not been high performance devices. The employment of the electrohydrodynamic concept should enhance this performance and help fill the performance gap that exists in the temperature range from 250 F to 750 F for 'conventional' capillary heat pipes.

  17. Venus Heat Flow Instrument Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauken, M.; Smith, K.; Sujittosakul, S.; Li, B.; Firdosy, S.; Smrekar, S.; Morgan, P.

    2016-10-01

    A heat flux measurement instrument is being developed to determine the heat flow through the Venus surface. Heat flow measurement provides data for distinguishing between various hypotheses of planetary evolution.

  18. Measuring the Heats of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, James L.; Tegart, Tracy L.

    1994-01-01

    Uses common equipment (tea kettle and vacuum bottles) to precisely measure the specific heat, latent heat of fusion, and latent heat of vaporization of water. Provides descriptions for all three experiments. (MVL)

  19. Visualization of heat transport in heat pipes using thermocamera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Čaja, Alexander; Lenhard, Richard

    2010-10-01

    Heat pipes, as passive elements show a high level of reliability when taking heat away and they can take away heat flows having a significantly higher density than systems with forced convection. A heat pipe is a hermetically closed duct, filled with working fluid. Transport of heat in heat pipes is procured by the change of state of the working fluid from liquid state to steam and vice versa and depends on the hydrodynamic and heat processes in the pipe. This study have been focused on observing the impact these processes have on the heat process, the transport of heat within the heat pipe with the help of thermovision. The experiment is oriented at scanning the changes in the surface temperatures of the basic structural types of capillary heat pipes in vertical position.

  20. Heat generating and recycling system for utilizing waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Yuji; Tanaka, Tadayoshi; Takashima, Takumi

    1999-07-01

    The authors proposed an efficient utilization system of low temperature waste heat. It converts the low temperature thermal energy below 573 K into electric energy by using chemical heat pump systems and thermoelectric devices. They named this system a heat regenerating and recycling system. In this system, low temperature heat is recovered and its temperature is raised by the heat pump systems. They conducted the system analysis to clarify its performance. Two kinds of thermoelectric devices and two kinds of chemical heat pump systems are arranged in their analytical model. The authors examined how the efficiency of the chemical heat pumps, that of the thermoelectric devices, and heat flow influenced the efficiency of the system. By using the chemical heat pump system, the efficiency of the system not only is improved but also it is possible to store thermal energy as chemical energy. The authors show that the heat regenerating and recycling system contributes to use low temperature waste heat effectively.

  1. Photothermal heating of nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bennett E.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Davis, E. James; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Nanoscale optical materials are of great interest for building future optoelectronic devices for information processing and sensing applications. Although heat transfer ultimately limits the maximum power at which nanoscale devices may operate, gaining a quantitative experimental measurement of photothermal heating within single nanostructures remains a challenge. Here, we measure the nonlinear optical absorption coefficient of optically trapped cadmium-sulfide nanoribbons at the level of single nanostructures through observations of their Brownian dynamics during single-beam laser trapping experiments. A general solution to the heat transfer partial differential equation is derived for nanostructures having rectilinear morphology including nanocubes and nanoribbons. Numerical electromagnetic calculations using the discrete-dipole approximation enable the simulation of the photothermal heating source function and the extraction of nonlinear optical absorption coefficients from experimental observations of single nanoribbon dynamics.

  2. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  3. Heat pipe manufacturing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1974-01-01

    Heat pipe manufacturing methods are examined with the goal of establishing cost effective procedures that will ultimately result in cheaper more reliable heat pipes. Those methods which are commonly used by all heat pipe manufacturers have been considered, including: (1) envelope and wick cleaning, (2) end closure and welding, (3) mechanical verification, (4) evacuation and charging, (5) working fluid purity, and (6) charge tube pinch off. The study is limited to moderate temperature aluminum and stainless steel heat pipes with ammonia, Freon-21 and methanol working fluids. Review and evaluation of available manufacturers techniques and procedures together with the results of specific manufacturing oriented tests have yielded a set of recommended cost-effective specifications which can be used by all manufacturers.

  4. Structures for Reentry Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger A.; Swann, Robert T.

    1960-01-01

    The basic structural approaches for dealing with reentry heating of manned vehicles are summarized. The weight and development status of both radiative and ablative shields are given and the application of these shields to various vehicles is indicated.

  5. Digitized Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, Kamran; Young, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    This presentation presents theoretical and numerical results describing digitized heat transfer (DHT), an active thermal management technique for high-power electronics and integrated micro systems. In digitized heat transfer discrete droplets are employed. The internal flow inside a discrete droplet is dominated by internal circulation imposed by the boundaries. This internal circulation imposes a new timescale for recirculating cold liquid from the middle of the droplet to the boundary. This internal circulation produces periodic oscillation in the overall convective heat transfer rate. Numerical simulations are presented for heat transfer in the droplet for both constant temperature and flux boundary conditions. The effectiveness of DHT for managing both localized temperature spikes and steady state cooling is demonstrated, identifying key parameters for optimization of the DHT method.

  6. Microchannel heat sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Microchannel heat sinks useful in the cooling of diode laser arrays have been fabricated from InP and exhibit a thermal resistance as low as 0.072 C/(W/sq cm), corresponding to the dissipation of heat loads in excess of 1 kW/sq cm and representing a two-orders-of-magnitude reduction of levels achievable by current methods. The pumping power required to force liquid coolants through microchannel heat sinks can be kept as low as as 10 W/sq cm. Attention is presently given to a thermal- and fluid-performance model for these heat sinks, as well as to illustrative examples of microchannel fabrication for both InP and aluminum. 19 references.

  7. Turbine heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohde, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Objectives and approaches to research in turbine heat transfer are discussed. Generally, improvements in the method of determining the hot gas flow through the turbine passage is one area of concern, as is the cooling air flow inside the airfoil, and the methods of predicting the heat transfer rates on the hot gas side and on the coolant side of the airfoil. More specific areas of research are: (1) local hot gas recovery temperatures along the airfoil surfaces; (2) local airfoil wall temperature; (3) local hot gas side heat transfer coefficients on the airfoil surfaces; (4) local coolant side heat transfer coefficients inside the airfoils; (5) local hot gas flow velocities and secondary flows at real engine conditions; and (6) local delta strain range of the airfoil walls.

  8. Advanced heat pump cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Groll, E.A.; Radermacher, R.

    1993-07-01

    The desorption and absorption process of a vapor compression heat pump with a solution circuit (VCHSC) proceeds at gliding temperature intervals, which can be adjusted over a wide range. In case that the gliding temperature intervals in the desorber and the absorber overlap, a modification of the VCHSC employing a desorber/absorber heat exchange (DAHX) can be introduced, which results in an extreme reduction of the pressure ratio. Although the DAHX-cycle has features of a two-stage cycle, it still requires only one solution pump, one separator and one compressor. Such a cycle for the working pair ammonia/water is built in the Energy Laboratory of the Center for Environmental Energy Engineering at the University of Maryland. The experimental results obtained with the research plant are discussed and compared to those calculated with a simulation program. The possible temperature lift between heat source and heat sink depending on the achievable COP are presented.

  9. Opportunity's Heat Shield Scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity reveals the scene of the rover's heat shield impact. In this view, Opportunity is approximately 130 meters (427 feet) away from the device that protected it while hurtling through the martian atmosphere.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact.

    This is the panoramic camera team's best current attempt at generating a true-color view of what this scene would look like if viewed by a human on Mars. It was generated from a mathematical combination of six calibrated, left-eye panoramic camera images acquired around 1:50 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 322 (Dec. 19, 2004) using filters ranging in wavelengths from 430 to 750 nanometers.

  10. Methane heat transfer investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Future high chamber pressure LOX/hydrocarbon booster engines require copper base alloy main combustion chamber coolant channels similar to the SSME to provide adequate cooling and reusable engine life. Therefore, it is of vital importance to evaluate the heat transfer characteristics and coking thresholds for LNG (94% methane) cooling, with a copper base alloy material adjacent to he fuel coolant. High pressure methane cooling and coking characteristics recently evaluated at Rocketdyne using stainless steel heated tubes at methane bulk temperatures and coolant wall temperatures typical of advanced engine operation except at lower heat fluxes as limited by the tube material. As expected, there was no coking observed. However, coking evaluations need be conducted with a copper base surface exposed to the methane coolant at higher heat fluxes approaching those of future high chamber pressure engines.

  11. Methane heat transfer investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Future high chamber pressure LOX/hydrocarbon booster engines require copper-base alloy main combustion chamber coolant channels similar to the SSME to provide adequate cooling and resuable engine life. Therefore, it is of vital importance to evaluate the heat transfer characteristics and coking thresholds for LNG (94% methane) cooling, with a copper-base alloy material adjacent to the fuel coolant. High-pressure methane cooling and coking characteristics were recently evaluated using stainless-steel heated tubes at methane bulk temperatures and coolant wall temperatures typical of advanced engine operation except at lower heat fluxes as limited by the tube material. As expected, there was no coking observed. However, coking evaluations need be conducted with a copper-base surface exposed to the methane coolant at higher heat fluxes approaching those of future high chamber pressure engines.

  12. Heat Island Compendium

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Heat islands can be mitigated through measures like planting trees and vegetation, installing green roofs and cool roofs, and using cool pavements. The compendium describes all of these strategies and shows how communities around the country are being used

  13. HEAT TRANSFER METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Gambill, W.R.; Greene, N.D.

    1960-08-30

    A method is given for increasing burn-out heat fluxes under nucleate boiling conditions in heat exchanger tubes without incurring an increase in pumping power requirements. This increase is achieved by utilizing a spinning flow having a rotational velocity sufficient to produce a centrifugal acceleration of at least 10,000 g at the tube wall. At this acceleration the heat-transfer rate at burn out is nearly twice the rate which can be achieved in a similar tube utilizing axial flow at the same pumping power. At higher accelerations the improvement over axial flow is greater, and heat fluxes in excess of 50 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr/sq ft can be achieved.

  14. Improved Thin, Flexible Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Gernert, Nelson J.; Sarraf, David B.; Wollen, Peter J.; Surina, Frank C.; Fale, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Flexible heat pipes of an improved type are fabricated as layers of different materials laminated together into vacuum- tight sheets or tapes. In comparison with prior flexible heat pipes, these flexible heat pipes are less susceptible to leakage. Other advantages of these flexible heat pipes, relative to prior flexible heat pipes, include high reliability and greater ease and lower cost of fabrication. Because these heat pipes are very thin, they are highly flexible. When coated on outside surfaces with adhesives, these flexible heat pipes can be applied, like common adhesive tapes, to the surfaces of heat sinks and objects to be cooled, even if those surfaces are curved.

  15. Heat-Related Illnesses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    immersion is rapid (see Chapter 3). Convection Heat loss to air and water vapor molecules circulating around the body is termed convection. As ambient...Skin temperature is believed to have an effect on sweating and heat loss , since a person resting in a warm environment with elevated skin temperature...exercise, rapid (10-20 minutes) decreases in central blood volume occur due to several mechanisms, including osmotic loss of plasma water into working

  16. Heat Pipe Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Solar Fundamentals, Inc.'s hot water system employs space-derived heat pipe technology. It is used by a meat packing plant to heat water for cleaning processing machinery. Unit is complete system with water heater, hot water storage, electrical controls and auxiliary components. Other than fans and a circulating pump, there are no moving parts. System's unique design eliminates problems of balancing, leaking, corroding, and freezing.

  17. Heat flux limiting sleeves

    DOEpatents

    Harris, William G.

    1985-01-01

    A heat limiting tubular sleeve extending over only a portion of a tube having a generally uniform outside diameter, the sleeve being open on both ends, having one end thereof larger in diameter than the other end thereof and having a wall thickness which decreases in the same direction as the diameter of the sleeve decreases so that the heat transfer through the sleeve and tube is less adjacent the large diameter end of the sleeve than adjacent the other end thereof.

  18. Heat switches for ADRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  19. Solar heat transport fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The progress made on the development and delivery of noncorrosive fluid subsystems is reported. These subsystems are to be compatible with closed-loop solar heating or combined heating and hot water systems. They are also to be compatible with both metallic and non-metallic plumbing systems. At least 100 gallons of each type of fluid recommended by the contractor will be delivered under the contract. The performance testing of a number of fluids is described.

  20. Heat exchange apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2003-08-12

    A heat exchange apparatus comprising a coolant conduit or heat sink having attached to its surface a first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles and a second radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles thermally coupled to a body to be cooled and meshed with, but not contacting the first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles.

  1. Freezable heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.; Sanzi, James L.

    1981-02-03

    A heat pipe whose fluid can be repeatedly frozen and thawed without damage to the casing. An additional part is added to a conventional heat pipe. This addition is a simple porous structure, such as a cylinder, self-supporting and free standing, which is dimensioned with its diameter not spanning the inside transverse dimension of the casing, and with its length surpassing the depth of maximum liquid.

  2. Heat Switches for ADRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  3. Chimney heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, I.C.

    1981-09-01

    A heat exchanger for installation on the top of a chimney of a building includes a housing having a lower end receiving the top of the chimney and an upper end with openings permitting the escape of effluent from the chimney and a heat exchanger assembly disposed in the housing including a central chamber and a spirally arranged duct network defining an effluent spiral path between the top of the chimney and the central chamber and a fresh air spiral path between an inlet disposed at the lower end of the housing and the central chamber, the effluent and fresh air spiral paths being in heat exchange relationship such that air passing through the fresh air spiral path is heated by hot effluent gases passing upward through the chimney and the effluent spiral path for use in heating the building. A pollution trap can be disposed in the central chamber of the heat exchanger assembly for removing pollutants from the effluent, the pollution trap including a rotating cage carrying pumice stones for absorbing pollutants from the effluent with the surface of the pumice gradually ground off to reveal fresh stone as the cage rotates.

  4. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  5. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-01-01

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. The second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat.

  6. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-12-25

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. The second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat. 11 figs.

  7. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1984-01-01

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. the second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat.

  8. Protuberance heating test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieker, W. D.

    1966-01-01

    Results are presented of the protuberance heating test program. Four general protuberance shapes on a flat plate were tested. Presentation and evaluation of the data both on the protuberance and in the wake regions are made. The test program is an extension of the general protuberance heat transfer test. The additional series of tests was conducted to define the extent of wake heating and to assess the effects of Reynolds number variation on heating both on and around the protuberances. The protuberance models were mounted near the forward end of a six-foot instrumented test plate with stringers that simulated interstage and skirt structure of the Saturn S-4B stage. The tests were performed at Mach numbers of 2.49, 3.51, and 4.44. Reynolds numbers per foot of 3 million and 1.5 million were used for the two lower Mach numbers and 3 million for a Mach number of 4.44. The test Mach numbers simulated the Saturn S-4B flight conditions during the most severe aerodynamic heating period. The test Reynolds numbers were somewhat higher than the flight values, but lower values could not be used because of tunnel and instrumentation limitations. Oil flow runs were made on two representative models at various combinations of Mach number and Reynolds number to help define the extent of wake heating.

  9. Human heat adaptation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nigel A S

    2014-01-01

    In this overview, human morphological and functional adaptations during naturally and artificially induced heat adaptation are explored. Through discussions of adaptation theory and practice, a theoretical basis is constructed for evaluating heat adaptation. It will be argued that some adaptations are specific to the treatment used, while others are generalized. Regarding ethnic differences in heat tolerance, the case is put that reported differences in heat tolerance are not due to natural selection, but can be explained on the basis of variations in adaptation opportunity. These concepts are expanded to illustrate how traditional heat adaptation and acclimatization represent forms of habituation, and thermal clamping (controlled hyperthermia) is proposed as a superior model for mechanistic research. Indeed, this technique has led to questioning the perceived wisdom of body-fluid changes, such as the expansion and subsequent decay of plasma volume, and sudomotor function, including sweat habituation and redistribution. Throughout, this contribution was aimed at taking another step toward understanding the phenomenon of heat adaptation and stimulating future research. In this regard, research questions are posed concerning the influence that variations in morphological configuration may exert upon adaptation, the determinants of postexercise plasma volume recovery, and the physiological mechanisms that modify the cholinergic sensitivity of sweat glands, and changes in basal metabolic rate and body core temperature following adaptation.

  10. Conducting the Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Heat conduction plays an important role in the efficiency and life span of electronic components. To keep electronic components running efficiently and at a proper temperature, thermal management systems transfer heat generated from the components to thermal surfaces such as heat sinks, heat pipes, radiators, or heat spreaders. Thermal surfaces absorb the heat from the electrical components and dissipate it into the environment, preventing overheating. To ensure the best contact between electrical components and thermal surfaces, thermal interface materials are applied. In addition to having high conductivity, ideal thermal interface materials should be compliant to conform to the components, increasing the surface contact. While many different types of interface materials exist for varying purposes, Energy Science Laboratories, Inc. (ESLI), of San Diego, California, proposed using carbon velvets as thermal interface materials for general aerospace and electronics applications. NASA s Johnson Space Center granted ESLI a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to develop thermal interface materials that are lightweight and compliant, and demonstrate high thermal conductance even for nonflat surfaces. Through Phase II SBIR work, ESLI created Vel-Therm for the commercial market. Vel-Therm is a soft, carbon fiber velvet consisting of numerous high thermal conductivity carbon fibers anchored in a thin layer of adhesive. The velvets are fabricated by precision cutting continuous carbon fiber tows and electrostatically flocking the fibers into uncured adhesive, using proprietary techniques.

  11. Moist Heat or Dry Heat for Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Berk, Lee; Bains, Gurinder; Khowailed, Iman Akef; Hui, Timothy; Granado, Michael; Laymon, Mike; Lee, Haneul

    2013-01-01

    Background Heat is commonly used in physical therapy following exercise induced delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Most heat modalities used in a clinical setting for DOMS are only applied for 5 to 20 minutes. This minimal heat exposure causes little, if any, change in deep tissue temperature. For this reason, long duration dry chemical heat packs are used at home to slowly and safely warm tissue and reduce potential heat damage while reducing pain associated from DOMS. Clinically, it has been shown that moist heat penetrates deep tissue faster than dry heat. Therefore, in home use chemical moist heat may be more efficacious than dry heat to provide pain relief and reduce tissue damage following exercise DOMS. However, chemical moist heat only lasts for 2 hours compared to the 8 hours duration of chemical dry heat packs. The purpose of this study was to compare the beneficial effect of dry heat versus moist heat on 100 young subjects after exercise induce DOMS. Methods One hundred subjects exercised for 15 minutes accomplishing squats. Before and for 3 days after, strength, muscle soreness, tissue resistance, and the force to passively move the knee were recorded. Heat and moist heat were applied in different groups either immediately after exercise or 24 hours later. Results The research results of this study showed that immediate application of heat, either dry (8 hours application) or moist (2 hours application), had a similar preservation of quadriceps muscle strength and muscle activity. Results also revealed that the greatest pain reduction was shown after immediate application of moist heat. Never the less, immediate application of dry heat had a similar effect but to a lesser extent. Conclusion It should be noted that moist heat had not only similar benefits of dry heat but in some cases enhanced benefits, and with only 25% of the time of application of the dry heat. PMID:24171053

  12. Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P [San Ramon, CA

    2012-07-24

    Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

  13. Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P

    2013-12-10

    Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

  14. Latent heat sink in soil heat flux measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  15. Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2015-12-08

    Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

  16. Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P

    2015-03-24

    Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

  17. Passive thermosyphon solar heating and cooling module with supplementary heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A collection of three quarterly reports from Sigma Research, Inc., covering progress and status from January through September 1977 are presented. Three heat exchangers are developed for use in a solar heating and cooling system for installation into single-family dwellings. Each exchanger consists of one heating and cooling module and one submerged electric water heating element.

  18. Enceladus' Enigmatic Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howett, C.; Spencer, J. R.; Spencer, D.; Verbiscer, A.; Hurford, T.; Segura, M.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of Enceladus' heat flow is important because it provides a vital constraint on Enceladus' tidal dissipation mechanisms, orbital evolution, and the physical processes that generate the plumes. In 2011 we published an estimate of the current heat flow from Enceladus' active south polar terrain: 15.8 +/- 3.1 GW (Howett et al., 2011). This value was calculated by first estimating by modeling, and then removing, the passive component from 17 to 1000 micron observations made of the entire south polar terrain by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). The heat flow was then directly calculated from the residual, assumed endogenic, component. The derived heat flow of 15.8 GW was surprisingly high, about 10 times greater than that predicted by steady-state tidal heating (Meyer and Wisdom, 2007). CIRS has also returned high spatial resolution observations of Enceladus' active south polar terrain. Two separate observations are used: 9 to 16 micron observations taken over nearly the complete south polar terrain and a single 17 to 1000 micron scan over Damascus, Baghdad and Cairo. The shorter wavelength observations are only sensitive to high temperature emission (>70 K), and so longer wavelength observations are required (despite their limited spatial coverage) to estimate the low temperature emission from the stripes. Analysis of these higher resolution observations tells a different story of Enceladus' endogenic heat flow: the preliminary estimate of the heat flow from the active tiger stripes using these observations is 4.2 GW. An additional 0.5 GW must be added to this number to account for the latent heat release by the plumes (Ingersoll and Pankine 2009), giving a total preliminary estimate of 4.9 GW. The discrepancy in these two numbers is significant and we are currently investigating the cause. One possible reason is that there is significantly higher endogenic emission from the regions between the tiger stripes than we currently estimate

  19. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  20. Heat Pipe Thermal Conditioning Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.

    1973-01-01

    The development, fabrication, and evaluation of heat pipe thermal conditioning panels are discussed. The panels were designed and fabricated to be compatible with several planned NASA space vehicles, in terms of panel size, capacity, temperature gradients, and integration with various heat exchangers and electronic components. It was satisfactorily demonstrated that the heat pipe thermal conditioning panel meets the thermal efficiency and heat transport requirements.

  1. Low cost uniform heat source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. B.; Prok, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    Electrically powered heat source was developed for ground simulation of isotope heat-source assembly in Brayton power system. Heat source, which operates on ordinary 110 vac power, consists of tungsten filament heating element wound onto a spirally grooved boron nitride core and inserted in a hollowed-out graphite hexahedron.

  2. Guide to Geothermal Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-01

    Geothermal heat pumps, also known as ground source heat pumps, geoexchange, water-source, earth-coupled, and earth energy heat pumps, take advantage of this resource and represent one of the most efficient and durable options on the market to heat and cool your home.

  3. Protecting Workers from Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... temperatures are high and the job involves physical work. Risk Factors for Heat Illness • High temperature and humidity, ... heat or those that have been away from work to adapt to working in the heat (acclimatization). • Routinely check workers who are at risk of heat stress due to protective clothing and ...

  4. Protecting Yourself from Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, or heat cramps. Heat Stroke A condition that occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature, and can cause death or permanent disability. Symptoms ■■ High body temperature ■■ Confusion ■■ ...

  5. Experiments Demonstrate Geothermal Heating Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    When engineers design heat-pump-based geothermal heating systems for homes and other buildings, they can use coil loops buried around the perimeter of the structure to gather low-grade heat from the earth. As an alternative approach, they can drill well casings and store the summer's heat deep in the earth, then bring it back in the winter to warm…

  6. Heat Pipe Blocks Return Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Metal-foil reed valve in conventional slab-wick heat pipe limits heat flow to one direction only. With sink warmer than source, reed is forced closed and fluid returns to source side through annular transfer wick. When this occurs, wick slab on sink side of valve dries out and heat pipe ceases to conduct heat.

  7. Fireplace heat generating system

    SciTech Connect

    Emmendorfer, C.

    1981-03-10

    A fireplace heat generating system includes a plurality of conduits which cooperate to define a grate for seating logs or other combustible material there atop. The conduits are in communication with a heat deflector or shield at the base thereof. Discharge or heat issuing conduits or other suitable conveyances are disposed at the top of the shield and are in fluid communication with the shield. Intermediate discharge or heat issuing conduits are disposed between the upper discharge conduits and the grate conduits. The intermediate conduits are disposed in fluid communication with the deflector at one end thereof and are pivotal about the one end so as to be adapted to rest on and follow the top of the pile of combustible material seated on the grate downward as the combustible material is consumed. According to the present invention, cold air is transported through the device via the grate conduits whereat it is heated and transported through the deflector and exits out of the discharge conduits. A hollow container having an aperture therein in communication with an air duct is disposed within an ash dump in the fireplace. A retractable door is carried by the container for selectively blocking or opening the aperture in the container to prohibit or permit entry of air into the fireplace.

  8. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  9. Heat transfer fluids containing nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dileep; Routbort, Jules; Routbort, A.J.; Yu, Wenhua; Timofeeva, Elena; Smith, David S.; France, David M.

    2016-05-17

    A nanofluid of a base heat transfer fluid and a plurality of ceramic nanoparticles suspended throughout the base heat transfer fluid applicable to commercial and industrial heat transfer applications. The nanofluid is stable, non-reactive and exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties relative to the base heat transfer fluid, with only minimal increases in pumping power required relative to the base heat transfer fluid. In a particular embodiment, the plurality of ceramic nanoparticles comprise silicon carbide and the base heat transfer fluid comprises water and water and ethylene glycol mixtures.

  10. Induction heating coupler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Copeland, Carl E. (Inventor); Swaim, Robert J. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Johnston, David F. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Dinkins, James R. (Inventor); Buckley, John D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An induction heating device includes a handle having a hollow interior and two opposite ends, a wrist connected to one end of the handle, a U-shaped pole piece having two spaced apart ends, a tank circuit including an induction coil wrapped around the pole piece and a capacitor connected to the induction coil, a head connected to the wrist and including a housing for receiving the U-shaped pole piece, the two spaced apart ends of the pole piece extending outwardely beyond the housing, and a power source connected to the tank circuit. When the tank circuit is energized and a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the ends of the U-shaped pole piece, the susceptor is heated by induction heating due to magnetic flux passing between the two ends of the pole piece.

  11. Artificial muscles on heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Thomas G.; Shin, Dong Ki; Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; McGarry, Scott; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Many devices and processes produce low grade waste heat. Some of these include combustion engines, electrical circuits, biological processes and industrial processes. To harvest this heat energy thermoelectric devices, using the Seebeck effect, are commonly used. However, these devices have limitations in efficiency, and usable voltage. This paper investigates the viability of a Stirling engine coupled to an artificial muscle energy harvester to efficiently convert heat energy into electrical energy. The results present the testing of the prototype generator which produced 200 μW when operating at 75°C. Pathways for improved performance are discussed which include optimising the electronic control of the artificial muscle, adjusting the mechanical properties of the artificial muscle to work optimally with the remainder of the system, good sealing, and tuning the resonance of the displacer to minimise the power required to drive it.

  12. Heat illness. I. Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, F P

    1976-01-01

    Reliable information on the epidemiology of heat illness has come, until recently, mainly from the armed forces and, to a lesser extent, from some industries and civil communities. Data from the records of the British Army, Royal Navy, Royal Air Force, Indian Armed Forces, U.S. Army and forces engaged in the Arab-Israeli wars, from the South African gold mining corporations and Persian Gulf oil tankers, and from civilian communities, mainly in the U.S.A., are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to the classification of heat illness and definition of the terms used, and the effects on acclimatized and non-acclimatized personnel and on other sections of the civilian communities most at risk, i.e. the old and very young. This section concludes with an outline of the classification of acute heat illnesses from 1899 to the eighth revision of the WHO International Classification of Diseases in 1967.

  13. Laser-heated thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, N. H.; Krech, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    The development of computer codes for the thrust chamber of a rocket of which the propellant gas is heated by a CW laser beam was investigated. The following results are presented: (1) simplified models of laser heated thrusters for approximate parametric studies and performance mapping; (3) computer programs for thrust chamber design; and (3) shock tube experiment to measure absorption coefficients. Two thrust chamber design programs are outlined: (1) for seeded hydrogen, with both low temperature and high temperature seeds, which absorbs the laser radiation continuously, starting at the inlet gas temperature; and (2) for hydrogen seeded with cesium, in which a laser supported combustion wave stands near the gas inlet, and heats the gas up to a temperature at which the gas can absorb the laser energy.

  14. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  15. Externally heated thermal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pracchia, Louis; Vetter, Ronald F.; Rosenlof, Darwin

    1991-04-01

    A thermal battery activated by external heat comprising an anode (e.g., composed of a lithium-aluminum alloy), a cathode (e.g., composed of iron disulfide), and an electrolyte (e.g., a lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic) with the electrolyte inactive at ambient temperature but activated by melting at a predetermined temperature when exposed to external heating is presented. The battery can be used as a sensor or to ignite pyrotechnic and power electronic devices in a system for reducing the hazard of ordnance exposed to detrimental heating. A particular application is the use of the battery to activate a squib to function in conjunction with one or more other components to vent an ordnance case in order to prevent its explosion in a fire.

  16. Microchannel heat sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Philips, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Microchannel heat sinks can be used in a wide variety of applications, including microelectronics, diode laser arrays, and high-energy-laser mirrors. Heat sinks that can be used to cool diode laser arrays were fabricated in indium phosphide (InP) with a thermal resistance as low as 0.072 C/(W/sq.cm), which allows these devices to dissipate loads in excess of 1,000 W/sq.cm. This thermal resistance is nearly two orders of magnitude lower than that achieved by the methods presently used in the microelectronics industry. A heat-sink thermal- and fluid-performance model is presented; microchannel fabrication techniques are described for InP and aluminum.

  17. Electrochemical heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Guy R. B.; Holley, Charles E.; Houseman, Barton L.; Sibbitt, Jr., Wilmer L.

    1978-01-01

    Electrochemical heat engines produce electrochemical work, and mechanical motion is limited to valve and switching actions as the heat-to-work cycles are performed. The electrochemical cells of said heat engines use molten or solid electrolytes at high temperatures. One or more reactions in the cycle will generate a gas at high temperature which can be condensed at a lower temperature with later return of the condensate to electrochemical cells. Sodium, potassium, and cesium are used as the working gases for high temperature cells (above 600 K) with halogen gases or volatile halides being used at lower temperature. Carbonates and halides are used as molten electrolytes and the solid electrolyte in these melts can also be used as a cell separator.

  18. Solar heat pump simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catan, M. A.

    A simulator was utilized to provide controlled-temperature sources and sinks to an experimental water-to-water laboratory heat pump test bed. This combination was used to demonstrate and explore the potential of the vapor-compression cycle to deliver high COP's at SAHP source temperatures. Results from the simulator were used in computer simulations of complete systems performed by BNL, by the SAHP contractors, and by others. A two-speed compressor was first tested at high source temperatures on the BNL simulator. In view of the decision by both contractors to construct water-to-air (rather than water-to-water) heat pumps, the BNL simulator was fitted with an air-side test loop. The prototype heat pump was tested under steady-state conditions on the BNL simulator.

  19. Heat distribution ceramic processing method

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.

    2001-01-01

    A multi-layered heat distributor system is provided for use in a microwave process. The multi-layered heat distributors includes a first inner layer of a high thermal conductivity heat distributor material, a middle insulating layer and an optional third insulating outer layer. The multi-layered heat distributor system is placed around the ceramic composition or article to be processed and located in a microwave heating system. Sufficient microwave energy is applied to provide a high density, unflawed ceramic product.

  20. Heat budget of ionospheric electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, S. S.; Schneck, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    Heat input calculations were detached from solar extreme UV data and monatomic oxygen densities were derived from simultaneously measured data sets (ion composition 146-191 km) in a study of the heat budget of ionosphere electrons. Earlier inferences that cooling predominates over heating are supported. A search for additional heat sources or a revision of the cooling rates is recommended, by way of balancing the heat budget. Importance is attached to electron cooling by fine structure excitation of monatomic oxygen.

  1. Heat flow in Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cranganu, C.; Deming, D.

    1996-12-31

    Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring in the Anadarko Basin. In the late 1920s, the American Petroleum Institute made a set of equilibrium temperature logs in idle oil wells. These temperature data are generally regarded as being high quality, accurate estimates of rock temperature and they cover the entire central part of Oklahoma. Average thermal gradients in the API survey range from 14 to 43 {sup 0}C/km (average 31.2 {sup 0}C/km) over depth intervals that extend from the surface to a an average depth of 961 m. Geothermal gradients decrease from NNE to SSW. The observed change in thermal gradients could be due to a number of factors. The change in thermal gradients could simply reflect changes in lithology and thermal conductivity. Alternatively, the variation in thermal gradients could be indicative of a change in heat flow related perhaps to variations in the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the crust or heat transport by one or more regional groundwater flow systems. We are proceeding to reduce ambiguity in interpretation by estimating heat flow from thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings and heat production from available gamma-ray logs which penetrate basement rocks.

  2. Heat flow in Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cranganu, C.; Deming, D. )

    1996-01-01

    Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring in the Anadarko Basin. In the late 1920s, the American Petroleum Institute made a set of equilibrium temperature logs in idle oil wells. These temperature data are generally regarded as being high quality, accurate estimates of rock temperature and they cover the entire central part of Oklahoma. Average thermal gradients in the API survey range from 14 to 43 [sup 0]C/km (average 31.2 [sup 0]C/km) over depth intervals that extend from the surface to a an average depth of 961 m. Geothermal gradients decrease from NNE to SSW. The observed change in thermal gradients could be due to a number of factors. The change in thermal gradients could simply reflect changes in lithology and thermal conductivity. Alternatively, the variation in thermal gradients could be indicative of a change in heat flow related perhaps to variations in the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the crust or heat transport by one or more regional groundwater flow systems. We are proceeding to reduce ambiguity in interpretation by estimating heat flow from thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings and heat production from available gamma-ray logs which penetrate basement rocks.

  3. Milliwatt generator heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mershad, E. A.

    1984-03-01

    All LANL hardware requirements were met during the reporting period as scheduled. Lot 12 of T-111 alloy sheet and Lot 8 of yttrium platelets were procured to meet future WR production needs. The GEND IP schedule requirements for 49 fueled MC2893 heat sources were met. Pressure burst surveillance activities continued to be conducted in accordance with SNLA document BB328965. Final results of evaluations of two pressure-burst capsules were normal, suggesting that the corresponding heat sources should be in good condition. The hardware production period ended with an overall hardware process yield of 98.4%.

  4. Heat exchanger panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  5. Precision Heating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A heat sealing process was developed by SEBRA based on technology that originated in work with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The project involved connecting and transferring blood and fluids between sterile plastic containers while maintaining a closed system. SEBRA markets the PIRF Process to manufacturers of medical catheters. It is a precisely controlled method of heating thermoplastic materials in a mold to form or weld catheters and other products. The process offers advantages in fast, precise welding or shape forming of catheters as well as applications in a variety of other industries.

  6. Solar industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsdaine, E.

    1981-04-01

    The aim of the assessment reported is to candidly examine the contribution that solar industrial process heat (SIPH) is realistically able to make in the near and long-term energy futures of the United States. The performance history of government and privately funded SIPH demonstration programs, 15 of which are briefly summarized, and the present status of SIPH technology are discussed. The technical and performance characteristics of solar industrial process heat plants and equipment are reviewed, as well as evaluating how the operating experience of over a dozen SIPH demonstration projects is influencing institutional acceptance and economoc projections. Implications for domestic energy policy and international implications are briefly discussed. (LEW)

  7. [Pathophysiology of heat illness].

    PubMed

    Aruga, Tohru; Miyake, Yasufumi

    2012-06-01

    Human core temperature is strictly controlled by mechanism of radiation, conduction, convection, and evaporation from skin surface. Serial hot and humid climate induces dehydration which interferes heat pump-out from the body. Heart dysfunction is the third factor to rise body temperature. Hyperthermia and hypo-perfusion caused by dehydration and heart failure deteriorate specific organ functions, i.e. central nervous system, liver and renal functions and coagulation system. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy is one of the standard indicators of severity and mortality of heat stroke.

  8. Tidal heating of Ariel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittemore, William C.

    1990-09-01

    During evolution through the 4:1 commensurability early in the history of the Uranian system, over 3.8 billion years ago, tidal heating may have raised the internal temperature of Ariel by up to about 20 K; the internal temperature of Ariel may already have been high in virtue of both accretional and radiogenic heating. The additional increase in Ariel's temperature could then have triggered the geological activity that led to a late resurfacing, by decreasing lithospheric thickness and exacerbating thermal stresses on it to the point where observed cracks and faults formed.

  9. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MaCarthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  10. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  11. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  12. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  13. Optical heat flux gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-06-25

    A heat flux gauge is described comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  14. Optical heat flux gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1989-06-07

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figs.

  15. Optical heat flux gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MaCarthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-09-03

    A heat flux gauge is described comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

  16. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  17. Air heating system

    DOEpatents

    Primeau, John J.

    1983-03-01

    A self-starting, fuel-fired, air heating system including a vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with the provision of heat exchanger and circuitry for cooling the condensed fluid output from the pump prior to its return to the vapor generator.

  18. Tidal heating of Ariel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittemore, William C.

    1990-01-01

    During evolution through the 4:1 commensurability early in the history of the Uranian system, over 3.8 billion years ago, tidal heating may have raised the internal temperature of Ariel by up to about 20 K; the internal temperature of Ariel may already have been high in virtue of both accretional and radiogenic heating. The additional increase in Ariel's temperature could then have triggered the geological activity that led to a late resurfacing, by decreasing lithospheric thickness and exacerbating thermal stresses on it to the point where observed cracks and faults formed.

  19. Heat pump concepts for industrial use of waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, H.P.

    1981-05-01

    Heat pump systems for recovering waste heat are considered. To compare different cycles on a consistent basis, a definition of performance based on the Second Law of Thermodynamics is presented. A high-grade heat-actuated cycle that uses a steam ejector is analyzed, but no substantial development effort is anticipated for implementing heat pumps of this type. Three residual-heat-actuated-heat pumps are analyzed. A turbine-compressor heat pump is presented that can attain relatively high delivery temperatures (approximately 120 to 130/sup 0/C from a source at 60/sup 0/C. The other two residual-heat-actuated concepts presented are absorption heat pumps. One operates on a closed cycle and the other on an open cycle. Delivery temperatures on the order of 115 10 130/sup 0/C with a 60/sup 0/C source are possible, provided that advanced heat/mass transfer configurations are developed. The open-cycle concept is an interesting possibility for heat recovery. It can, in principle, operate with lower waste heat temperatures than a closed cycle, and during the heating season it may provide both process and space heat.

  20. A Systems Biology Approach to Heat Stress, Heat Injury and Heat Stroke

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    A systems biology approach to heat stress, heat injury and heat stroke Jonathan D. Stallings and Danielle L. Ippolito US Army Center for...paramount importance to the military. Here, we review our recent systems biology approaches to heat stress in order to develop a 3-dimensional (3D...Transcriptomics, Proteomics, Systems biology, Protein aggregation, Metabolomics, Energetics, Computational modeling 1. HEAT ILLNESS IN THE U.S. ARMED FORCES

  1. Solar-heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Report describes solar modular domestic-hot-water and space-heating system intended for use in small single family dwelling where roof-mounted collectors are not feasible. Contents include design, performance, and hardware specifications for assembly, installation, operation, and maintenance of system.

  2. Heating element support clip

    DOEpatents

    Sawyer, William C.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for supporting a heating element in a channel formed in a heater base is disclosed. A preferred embodiment includes a substantially U-shaped tantalum member. The U-shape is characterized by two substantially parallel portions of tantalum that each have an end connected to opposite ends of a base portion of tantalum. The parallel portions are each substantially perpendicular to the base portion and spaced apart a distance not larger than a width of the channel and not smaller than a width of a graphite heating element. The parallel portions each have a hole therein, and the centers of the holes define an axis that is substantially parallel to the base portion. An aluminum oxide ceramic retaining pin extends through the holes in the parallel portions and into a hole in a wall of the channel to retain the U-shaped member in the channel and to support the graphite heating element. The graphite heating element is confined by the parallel portions of tantalum, the base portion of tantalum, and the retaining pin. A tantalum tube surrounds the retaining pin between the parallel portions of tantalum.

  3. Heating element support clip

    DOEpatents

    Sawyer, W.C.

    1995-08-15

    An apparatus for supporting a heating element in a channel formed in a heater base is disclosed. A preferred embodiment includes a substantially U-shaped tantalum member. The U-shape is characterized by two substantially parallel portions of tantalum that each have an end connected to opposite ends of a base portion of tantalum. The parallel portions are each substantially perpendicular to the base portion and spaced apart a distance not larger than a width of the channel and not smaller than a width of a graphite heating element. The parallel portions each have a hole therein, and the centers of the holes define an axis that is substantially parallel to the base portion. An aluminum oxide ceramic retaining pin extends through the holes in the parallel portions and into a hole in a wall of the channel to retain the U-shaped member in the channel and to support the graphite heating element. The graphite heating element is confined by the parallel portions of tantalum, the base portion of tantalum, and the retaining pin. A tantalum tube surrounds the retaining pin between the parallel portions of tantalum. 6 figs.

  4. Coronal heating by waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, J. V.

    1983-01-01

    Alfven waves or Alfvenic surface waves carry enough energy into the corona to provide the coronal energy requirements. Coronal loop resonances are an appealing means by which large energy fluxes enter active region loops. The wave dissipation mechanism still needs to be elucidated, but a Kolmogoroff turbulent cascade is fully consistent with the heating requirements in coronal holes and active region loops.

  5. Wastewater heat recovery apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

  6. Wastewater heat recovery apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-09-01

    A heat recovery system is described with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature. 6 figs.

  7. Sudurnes Regional Heating Corp.

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.

    1996-11-01

    The Svartsengi geothermal area is close to the town of Grindavik on the Rekjanes peninsula and is part of an active fissure swarm, lined with crater-rows and open fissures and faults. The high-temperature area has an area of 2 sq. km and shows only limited signs of geothermal activity at the surface. The reservoir, however, contains lots of energy and at least 8 wells supply the Svartsengi Power Plant with steam. The steam is not useable for domestic heating purposes so that heat exchangers are used to heat cold groundwater with the steam. Some steam is also used for producing 16.4 MW{sub e} of electrical power. The article shows the distribution system piping hot water to nine towns and the Keflavik International Airport. The effluent brine from the Svartsengi Plant is disposed of into a surface pond, called the Blue Lagoon, popular to tourists and people suffering from psoriasis and other forms of eczema seeking therapeutic effects from the silica rich brine. This combined power plant and regional district heating system (cogeneration) is an interesting and unique design for the application of geothermal energy.

  8. Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    Solar panels were mounted with different designs onto 1:800 scale building models while temperature and radiation were measured. While there have been other studies aimed at finding the optimal angles for solar panels [9], in this study both the angle and the mounting method were tested. The three PV mounting designs that were considered to provide the most insulation to a building's rooftop were flush, offset (control), and angled. The solar panel offset height became a key component for rooftop insulation as well as the performance of the actual solar panel. Experimental results were given to verify the thermal behavior of the heat loads from the different designs of the photovoltaic panel. From the results, the angled PV design needed 16Z more heat extraction than the offset and flush PV design needed 60% more heat extracted than the offset. In addition to the heat transfer analysis, thermal models were performed to incorporate main atmospheric conditions which were based on the effects of PV mounting structure.

  9. Congenital heat disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Silverman, N.H.; Kersting-Somerhoff, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The book covers the tomographic anatomy of the normal and congenitally malformed heart and tomographic imaging of the normal heat. It then compares echocardiographic evaluation and the use of MR imaging in the diagnosis and evaluation of individual congenital cardiac malformations.

  10. Solar heating device

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, P.T.

    1984-07-10

    A stationary solar heating device is disclosed herein for heating water usable for domestic or industrial purposes which provides a solar ray collector assembly having a conical shell retained on a supporting base having a conical arrangement of tubular coils carried on the exterior surface thereof. The coils are characterized as having a generally circular cross section with a flat mounting side adjacent to the conical shell for maximum thermal transference to a circulating fluid carried by the coils. A transparent or light permeable protective shield encloses the entire collector assembly and opposite ends of the tubular coil at the base and the apex respectively serve as fluid input and output conduits. An air relief valve is operably coupled into the topmost coil of the assembly and the interior of the shell is substantially insulated to preserve heat in the shell and in the fluid carried by the tubular coils. An anchoring system is provided for coupling the protective shield and the collector assembly together into a unitary construction and which includes a cable tie-down arrangement for securing the complete solar heating device in a stationary, non-movable manner to a roof or ground foundation.

  11. Solar Energy: Home Heating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on home heating is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The module…

  12. Solar Energy: Heat Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat transfer is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The…

  13. Solar Energy: Heat Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat storage is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The module…

  14. Heating Systems Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Force Training Command, Sheppard AFB, TX.

    This instructional package is intended for use in training Air Force personnel enrolled in a program for apprentice heating systems specialists. Training includes instruction in fundamentals and pipefitting; basic electricity; controls, troubleshooting, and oil burners; solid and gas fuel burners and warm air distribution systems; hot water…

  15. Pitot heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, R.D.

    1981-12-08

    A pitot heat pump is described wherein a multi-stage pitot pump is employed as the compression means in a heat pump thermodynamic cycle. The heat pump is comprised of a multi-stage vapor pitot pump, liquid pitot pump, turbine, vaporizer, evaporator, condenser and expansion valve. The turbine is used to rotate a shaft to which the impellers of the pitot pump are attached. Refrigerant gas from the evaporator enters the first stage of the pitot pump and the impeller therein forces the refrigerant gas outwardly where it enters the narrow end of a pitot tube provided therein. The discharge end of the pitot tube is in communication with the next stage of the pitot pump. In passing through the pitot tube, the refrigerant gas expands and the centrifugal force and the kinetic energy of the gas provide the energy whereby the refrigerant gas is compressed. After the last stage, the compressed gas is transmitted to the condenser of the heat pump.

  16. Solar heating and you

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-08-01

    This fact sheet for use with primary school classes describes what solar collectors are and how they work, passive solar rooms, flat-plate collectors, and why one should use solar heating systems. Making a solar air heater is described step-by-step with illustrations. A resource list for both students and teachers is provided for further information.

  17. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, F. D.

    1991-04-01

    During the last quarter, Doty Scientific, Inc. (DSI) continued to make progress on the microtube strip (MTS) heat exchangers. The team has begun a heat exchanger stress analysis; however, they have been concentrating the bulk of their analytical energies on a computational fluid dynmaics (CFD) model to determine the location and magnitude of shell-side flow maldistribution which decreases heat exchanger effectiveness. DSI received 120 fineblanked tubestrips from Southern Fineblanking (SFB) for manufacturing process development. Both SFB and NIST provided inspection reports of the tubestrips. DSI completed the tooling required to encapsulate a tube array and press tubestrips on the array. Pressing the tubestrips on tube arrays showed design deficiencies both in the tubestrip design and the tooling design. DSI has a number of revisions in process to correct these deficiencies. The research effort has identified a more economical fusible alloy for encapsulating the tube array, and determined the parameters required to successfully encapsulate the tube array with the new alloy. A more compact MTS heat exchanger bank was designed.

  18. Heat pipe thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, D. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A thermal switch for controlling the dissipation of heat between a body is described. The thermal switch is comprised of a flexible bellows defining an expansible vapor chamber for a working fluid located between an evaporation and condensation chamber. Inside the bellows is located a coiled retaining spring and four axial metal mesh wicks, two of which have their central portions located inside of the spring while the other two have their central portions located between the spring and the side wall of the bellows. The wicks are terminated and are attached to the inner surfaces of the outer end walls of evaporation and condensation chambers respectively located adjacent to the heat source and heat sink. The inner surfaces of the end walls furthermore include grooves to provide flow channels of the working fluid to and from the wick ends. The evaporation and condensation chambers are connected by turnbuckles and tension springs to provide a set point adjustment for setting the gap between an interface plate on the condensation chamber and the heat sink.

  19. Earth-coupled heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, J. A.

    1981-08-01

    The object of the research work was to demonstrate that a water source heat pump could be used with an earth-coupled heat exchanger which was buried in an absorption field of a domestic sewage disposal system to provide the heating and cooling requirements for residential use in an energy efficient fashion. The system consists of a 3 ton heat pump (nominal rating of 34,000 Btu/hr), a closed-loop heat exchanger which was fabricated from 200 feet of 2 inch diameter cast iron soil pipe, and a calorimeter house which had heat transmission characteristics similar to a 100 sq ft house. The earth-coupled heat exchanger was connected to the water side heat exchanger of the heat pump. Water was circulated through the heat exchanger coil in the earth and through the water side heat exchanger of the heat pump. The earth served as the energy source (for heating) or sink (for cooling) for the heat pump.

  20. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1992-07-09

    The purpose of this contract has been to explore the limits of miniaturization of heat exchangers with the goals of (1) improving the theoretical understanding of laminar heat exchangers, (2) evaluating various manufacturing difficulties, and (3) identifying major applications for the technology. A low-cost, ultra-compact heat exchanger could have an enormous impact on industry in the areas of cryocoolers and energy conversion. Compact cryocoolers based on the reverse Brayton cycle (RBC) would become practical with the availability of compact heat exchangers. Many experts believe that hardware advances in personal computer technology will rapidly slow down in four to six years unless lowcost, portable cryocoolers suitable for the desktop supercomputer can be developed. Compact refrigeration systems would permit dramatic advances in high-performance computer work stations with conventional'' microprocessors operating at 150 K, and especially with low-cost cryocoolers below 77 K. NASA has also expressed strong interest in our MTS exchanger for space-based RBC cryocoolers for sensor cooling. We have demonstrated feasibility of higher specific conductance by a factor of five than any other work in high-temperature gas-to-gas exchangers. These laminar-flow, microtube exchangers exhibit extremely low pressure drop compared to alternative compact designs under similar conditions because of their much shorter flow length and larger total flow area for lower flow velocities. The design appears to be amenable to mass production techniques, but considerable process development remains. The reduction in materials usage and the improved heat exchanger performance promise to be of enormous significance in advanced engine designs and in cryogenics.