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Sample records for heat solubilized human

  1. Solubilization of human platelet vasopressin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Thibonnier, M.

    1987-02-02

    The human platelet membrane receptor for vasopressin (AVP) has been solubilized with the cholic acid derivative detergent 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio)-1-propane sulfonate. Rapid and simple separation of free tritiated AVP ((/sup 3/H)AVP) from the solubilized receptor-hormone complex was done by filtration through polyethylenimine-treated filters. (/sup 3/H)AVP binds to this soluble receptor with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 11.03 +/- 1.86 nM and a maximal number of binding sites = 288 +/- 66 fmol/mg protein while the corresponding values of the membrane-bound receptor are 1.62 +/- 0.21 nM and 237 +/- 38 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. The Ki value for native AVP derived from competition experiments is 11.02 +/- 20.5 nM for the soluble receptor. Competition experiments with specific vascular and renal antagonists confirm that the solubilized receptor belongs to the V1-vascular subtype. 10 references, 5 figures.

  2. Characterization and solubilization of the human platelet vasopressin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Thibonnier, M.; Hinko, A.

    1986-03-01

    The authors recently showed that human platelets bear specific vasopressin (AVP) V1-vascular receptors. They now present the identification of AVP intra-platelet messenger and solubilization of AVP receptors. AVP binding to its platelet receptors is modulated by divalent cations but not TP or Gpp(NH)p, (10 /sup 3/M). AVP-induced reduction of adenylate cyclase activity is blocked by a phospholipase C inhibitor. In the presence of calcium (1 mM), AVP stimulates the phosphorylation of two endogenous proteins (M.W. = 40,000 and 20,000 daltons) which are substrates for protein kinase C and calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase, respectively. Phosphorylation is also stimulated by a V1-vascular agonist but not V2-renal agonists and is more potently blocked by a V1-vascular antagonist than by a V2-renal antagonist. AVP platelet membrane receptor is solubilized with 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio)-1-propane sulfonate. Separation of free (/sub 3/H)AVP from solubilized receptor-hormone complexes is done by filtration through polyethylenimine-treated filters. The solubilized receptor retains its binding characteristics (Kd = 11.03 +/- 1.86 nM, Bmax 288 +/- 66 fmol/mg protein, n = 6). In human platelets, AVP intra-cellular messengers are diacylglycerol and calcium, not adenylate cyclase. Solubilization of AVP human receptor opens the way to its purification.

  3. Solubilization of human erythrocyte membranes by ASB detergents.

    PubMed

    Domingues, C C; Malheiros, S V P; Paula, E de

    2008-09-01

    Understanding the membrane solubilization process and finding effective solubilizing agents are crucial challenges in biochemical research. Here we report results on the interaction of the novel linear alkylamido propyl dimethyl amino propanosulfonate detergents, ASB-14 and ASB-16, with human erythrocyte membranes. An estimation of the critical micelle concentration of these zwitterionic detergents (ASB-14 = 100 microM and ASB-16 = 10 microM) was obtained using electron paramagnetic resonance. The amount of proteins and cholesterol solubilized from erythrocytes by these detergents was then determined. The hemolytic activities of the ASB detergents were assayed and the detergent/lipid molar ratios for the onset of hemolysis (Re sat) and total lysis (Re sol) were calculated, allowing the determination of the membrane binding constants (Kb). ASB-14 presented lower membrane affinity (Kb = 7050 M(-1)) than ASB-16 (Kb = 15610 M(-1)). The amount of proteins and cholesterol solubilized by both ASB detergents was higher while Re sat values (0.22 and 0.08 detergent/lipid for ASB-14 and ASB-16, respectively) were smaller than those observed with the classic detergents CHAPS and Triton X-100. These results reveal that, besides their well-known use as membrane protein solubilizers to enhance the resolution of two dimensional electrophoresis/mass spectrometry, ASB-14 and ASB-16 are strong hemolytic agents. We propose that the physicochemical properties of ASB detergents determine their membrane disruption efficiency and can help to explain the improvement in the solubilization of membrane proteins, as reported in the literature.

  4. Heat-solubilized curry spice curcumin inhibits antibody-antigen interaction in in vitro studies: A possible therapy to alleviate autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kurien, Biji T.; D'Souza, Anil; Scofield, R. Hal

    2010-01-01

    Chronic and complex autoimmune diseases, currently treated palliatively with immunosuppressives, require multi-targeted therapy for greater effectiveness. The naturally occurring polyphenol curcumin has emerged as a powerful “nutraceutical” that interacts with multiple targets to regress diseases safely and inexpensively. Upto 8 g/day of curcumin for 18 months was non-toxic to humans. However, curcumin's utility is limited by its aqueous insolubility. We have demonstrated a heat-mediated 12-fold increase in curcumin's aqueous solubility. Here we show by, SDS-PAGE and SPR, that heat-solubilized curcumin binds to proteins. Based on this binding we hypothesized that heat-solubilized curcumin or turmeric would prevent autoantibody targeting of cognate autoantigens. Heat-solubilized curcumin/turmeric significantly decreased binding of autoantibodies from Sjögren's syndrome (SS) (up to 43/70 % respectively) and SLE (up to 52/70 % respectively) patients as well as an animal model of SS (up to 50/60 % respectively) to their cognate antigens. However, inhibition was not specific to autoimmunity. Heat-solubilized curcumin/turmeric also inhibited binding of polyclonal anti-spectrin to spectrin (50/56 % respectively). Thus, we suggest that the multifaceted heat-solubilized curcumin can ameliorate autoimmune disorders. In addition, the non-toxic curcumin could serve as a new protein stain in SDS-PAGE even though it is less sensitive than the Coomassie system which involves toxic chemicals. PMID:20146265

  5. Solubilization of native actin monomers from human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Tilley, L; Dwyer, M; Ralston, G B

    1986-01-01

    Up to 50% of the actin in erythrocyte membranes can be solubilized at low ionic strength in a form capable of inhibiting DNAse I, in the presence of 0.4 mM ATP and 0.05 mM calcium. In the absence of calcium and ATP, actin is released but is apparently rapidly denatured. Solubilization of G-actin increases with temperature up to 37 degrees C. At higher temperatures, actin is released rapidly but quickly loses its ability to inhibit DNAse I. PMID:3789986

  6. Characterization of solubilized human and rat brain US -endorphin-receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Helmeste, D.M.; Li, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been solubilized from human striatal and rat whole-brain membranes by use of 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS). Tritiated human US -endorphin (TH-US /sub h/-EP) binding revealed high-affinity competition by morphine, naloxone, and various US -EP analogues. Lack of high-affinity competition by (+/-)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl)benzeneacetamide methanesulfonate (U50-488, Upjohn) indicated that k sites were not labeled by TH-US -/sub h/-EP under these conditions. Affinities were similar in both soluble and membrane preparations except for (Met)enkephalin, which appears to be rapidly degraded by the solubilized extract. Size differences between human and rat solubilized TH-US /sub h/-EP-receptor complexes were revealed by exclusion chromatography.

  7. Optimization of inclusion body solubilization and renaturation of recombinant human growth hormone from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Patra, A K; Mukhopadhyay, R; Mukhija, R; Krishnan, A; Garg, L C; Panda, A K

    2000-03-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) was expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies. In 10 h of fed-batch fermentation, 1.6 g/L of r-hGH was produced at a cell concentration of 25 g dry cell weight/L. Inclusion bodies from the cells were isolated and purified to homogeneity. Various buffers with and without reducing agents were used to solubilize r-hGH from the inclusion bodies and the extent of solubility was compared with that of 8 M urea as well as 6 M Gdn-HCl. Hydrophobic interactions as well as ionic interactions were found to be the dominant forces responsible for the formation of r-hGH inclusion bodies during its high-level expression in E. coli. Complete solubilization of r-hGH inclusion bodies was observed in 100 mM Tris buffer at pH 12.5 containing 2 M urea. Solubilization of r-hGH inclusion bodies in the presence of low concentrations of urea helped in retaining the existing native-like secondary structures of r-hGH, thus improving the yield of bioactive protein during refolding. Solubilized r-hGH in Tris buffer containing 2 M urea was found to be less susceptible to aggregation during buffer exchange and thus was refolded by simple dilution. The r-hGH was purified by use of DEAE-Sepharose ion-exchange chromatography and the pure monomeric r-hGH was finally obtained by using size-exclusion chromatography. The overall yield of the purified monomeric r-hGH was approximately 50% of the initial inclusion body proteins and was found to be biologically active in promoting growth of rat Nb2 lymphoma cell lines.

  8. Solubilization and characterization of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors from the human platelet and rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    Alpha-2 adrenergic receptor heterogeneity has been hypothesized to explain functional and radioligand binding differences between rodent and non-rodent species. Computer analysis of the inhibition of (/sup 3/He)yohimbine binding by prazosin in the rat cerebral cortex indicates the possibility of at least two binding sites rather than negative cooperativity at a single site. There appear to be three alternative hypotheses which may explain the rodent vs. non-rodent differences. To develop the technical capability to distinguish between the above alternatives, the human platelet and rat cerebral cortex were solubilized and p-azidoclonidine (AZC) an alpha-2 receptor photoaffinity label was synthesized. Soluble preparations from both species showed saturable, high affinity (/sup 3/He)yohimbine binding. The rank order of potencies for various adrenergic agonists and antagonists are consistent with the notion that (/sup 3/He)yohimbine binding detected solubilized alpha-2 receptors. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation of soluble alpha-2 receptors indicated no significant molecular size difference. (/sup 3/H)AZC binding to the alpha-2 receptor in the rat cerebral cortex demonstrated high affinity saturability and the correct rank order of potency.

  9. High pH solubilization and chromatography-based renaturation and purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Fan, Hua; Liu, Jiahua; Wang, Minhong; Wang, Lili; Wang, Chaozhan

    2012-03-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is a very efficient therapeutic protein drug which has been widely used in human clinics to treat cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. In this study, rhG-CSF was solubilized from inclusion bodies by using a high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea. It was found that solubilization of the rhG-CSF inclusion bodies greatly depended on the buffer pH employed; alkalic pH significantly favored the solubilization. In addition, when small amount of urea was added to the solution at high pH, the solubilization was further enhanced. After solubilization, the rhG-CSF was renatured with simultaneous purification by using weak anion exchange, strong anion exchange, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, separately. The results indicated that the rhG-CSF solubilized by the high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea had much higher mass recovery than the one solubilized by 8 M urea when using anyone of the three refolding methods employed in this work. In the case of weak anion exchange chromatography, the high pH solubilized rhG-CSF could get a mass recovery of 73%. The strategy of combining solubilization of inclusion bodies at high pH with refolding of protein using liquid chromatography may become a routine method for protein production from inclusion bodies.

  10. Human heat adaptation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nigel A S

    2014-01-01

    In this overview, human morphological and functional adaptations during naturally and artificially induced heat adaptation are explored. Through discussions of adaptation theory and practice, a theoretical basis is constructed for evaluating heat adaptation. It will be argued that some adaptations are specific to the treatment used, while others are generalized. Regarding ethnic differences in heat tolerance, the case is put that reported differences in heat tolerance are not due to natural selection, but can be explained on the basis of variations in adaptation opportunity. These concepts are expanded to illustrate how traditional heat adaptation and acclimatization represent forms of habituation, and thermal clamping (controlled hyperthermia) is proposed as a superior model for mechanistic research. Indeed, this technique has led to questioning the perceived wisdom of body-fluid changes, such as the expansion and subsequent decay of plasma volume, and sudomotor function, including sweat habituation and redistribution. Throughout, this contribution was aimed at taking another step toward understanding the phenomenon of heat adaptation and stimulating future research. In this regard, research questions are posed concerning the influence that variations in morphological configuration may exert upon adaptation, the determinants of postexercise plasma volume recovery, and the physiological mechanisms that modify the cholinergic sensitivity of sweat glands, and changes in basal metabolic rate and body core temperature following adaptation.

  11. Optimization of Protein Solubilization for the Analysis of the CD14 Human Monocyte Membrane Proteome Using LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoying; Johann, Donald J.; Hakami, Ramin M.; Xiao, Zhen; Meng, Zhaojing; Ulrich, Robert G.; Issaq, Haleem J.; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Blonder, Josip

    2009-01-01

    Proteomic profiling of membrane proteins is of vital importance in the search for disease biomarkers and drug development. However, the slow pace in this field has resulted mainly from the difficulty to analyze membrane proteins by mass spectrometry (MS). The objective of this investigation was to explore and optimize solubilization of membrane proteins for shotgun membrane proteomics of the CD14 human monocytes by examining different systems that rely on: i) an organic solvent (methanol) ii) an acid-labile detergent 3-[3-(1,1-bisalkyloxyethyl)pyridin-1-yl]propane-1-sulfonate) (PPS), iii) a combination of both agents (methanol + PPS). Solubilization efficiency of different buffers was first compared using bacteriorhodopsin as a model membrane protein. Selected approaches were then applied on a membrane subproteome isolated from a highly enriched human monocyte population that was ~98% positive for CD14 expression by FACS analysis. A methanol-based buffer yielded 194 proteins of which 93 (48%) were mapped as integral membrane proteins. The combination of methanol and acid-cleavable detergent gave similar results; 203 identified proteins of which 93 (46 %) were mapped integral membrane proteins. However, employing PPS a total of 216 proteins of which 75 (35 %) were mapped integral membrane proteins. These results indicate that methanol unaided or in combination with PPS yielded significantly higher membrane protein identification/enrichment than the PPS alone. PMID:19709643

  12. Microbial solubilization of coal

    DOEpatents

    Strandberg, G.W.; Lewis, S.N.

    1988-01-21

    The present invention relates to a cell-free preparation and process for the microbial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products. More specifically, the present invention relates to bacterial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products and a cell-free bacterial byproduct useful for solubilizing coal. 5 tabs.

  13. How Humans Adapt To Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, Hanna

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses adaptive responses of humans to hot environment. Describes thermoregulation by integrated responses of nervous system, vascular/fluid/electrolyte system, and endocrine system. Considers disorders resulting from failure of thermoregulation and less serious heat stress.

  14. Complete solubilization and purification of recombinant human growth hormone produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ji; Park, Hyun Soo; Seo, Kyung Hye; Yang, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Choi, Jun-Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    High-level expression of recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) in Escherichia coli (E. coli) leads to the formation of insoluble aggregates as inclusion bodies devoid of biological activity. Until recently, significant efforts have been made to improve the recovery of active hGH from inclusion bodies. Here, we developed an efficient procedure for the production of completely soluble hGH by minimizing the formation of inclusion bodies and optimizing protein purification conditions. Under the newly established conditions we were able to obtain most of the total hGH in the soluble fraction. We show that the soluble protein can be efficiently purified in high yield by a series of chromatographic procedures. We analyzed the resulting hGH using various analytical techniques such as reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, and circular dichroism (CD). These multiple analyses support the conclusion that we obtained highly pure hGH with the expected molecular mass and intact secondary structure. The biological activity of purified hGH was also confirmed by evaluating its growth-promoting effect using a cell proliferation assay. Taken together, we describe a straightforward strategy for the production of completely soluble and biologically active hGH in E. coli.

  15. Quantification of Cholesterol Solubilized in Dietary Micelles: Dependence on Human Bile Salt Variability and the Presence of Dietary Food Ingredients.

    PubMed

    Coreta-Gomes, Filipe M; Vaz, Winchil L C; Wasielewski, Emeric; Geraldes, Carlos F G; Moreno, Maria João

    2016-05-10

    The solubility of cholesterol in bile salt (BS) micelles is important to understand the availability of cholesterol for absorption in the intestinal epithelium and to develop strategies to decrease cholesterol intake from the intestinal lumen. This has been the subject of intense investigation, due to the established relation between the development of diseases such as atherosclerosis and high levels of cholesterol in the blood. In this work we quantify the effect of BS variability on the amount of cholesterol solubilized. The effect of some known hypocholesterolemic agents usually found in the diet is also evaluated, as well as some insight regarding the mechanisms involved. The results show that, depending on the bile salt composition, the average value of sterol per micelle is equal to or lower than 1. The amount of cholesterol solubilized in the BS micelles is essentially equal to its total concentration until the solubility limit is reached. Altogether, this indicates that the maximum cholesterol solubility in the BS micellar solution is the result of saturation of the aqueous phase and depends on the partition coefficient of cholesterol between the aqueous phase and the micellar pseudophase. The effect on cholesterol maximum solubility for several food ingredients usually encountered in the diet was characterized using methodology developed recently by us. This method allows the simultaneous quantification of both cholesterol and food ingredient solubilized in the BS micelles even in the presence of larger aggregates, therefore avoiding their physical separation with possible impacts on the overall equilibrium. The phytosterols stigmasterol and stigmastanol significantly decreased cholesterol solubility with a concomitant reduction in the total amount of sterol solubilized, most pronounced for stigmasterol. Those results point toward coprecipitation being the major cause for the decrease in cholesterol solubilization by the BS micelles. The presence of

  16. Acclimatization to heat in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, Hanna

    1989-01-01

    The responses and mechanisms of both natural and artificial acclimatization to a hot environment in mammals are addressed with specific reference to humans. The purpose is to provide basic information for designers of thermal protection systems and countermeasures for astronauts during intra- and extravehicular activity. Areas covered are energy metabolism, thermal balance at rest and during exercise, water and electrolyte balance during exercise and immobilization, and heat diseases.

  17. A quantitative receptor assay using Triton X-114 for plasminogen activator binding proteins in solubilized membranes from human liver and placenta.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, G; Kruithof, E K

    1993-02-01

    Cell surface binding proteins play an important role in the localization of plasminogen activator (PA) activity at the cell surface or in the clearance of PAs. We describe a rapid and quantitative receptor assay applicable to the quantification and affinity determination of binding proteins for tissue-type PA and urokinase-type PA in solubilized membranes obtained from human liver, human placenta, or human monocyte-like cells. The method is based on the ability of a solution of the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 to phase separate at temperatures above 20 degrees C. After incubation of integral membrane proteins with radiolabeled ligand, a solution of Triton X-114 is added at 4 degrees C and warmed to 37 degrees C to allow phase partitioning. Radiolabeled ligand bound to membrane protein is recovered in the detergent-rich lower phase which is separated by centrifugation from the detergent-poor upper phase containing free radiolabeled ligand.

  18. Microbial solubilization of phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, R.D.; Wolfram, J.H.

    1993-10-26

    A process is provided for solubilizing phosphate from phosphate containing ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of phosphate ore, microorganisms operable for solubilizing phosphate from the phosphate ore and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the microbial solubilization process. An aqueous solution containing soluble phosphorus can be separated from the reacted mixture by precipitation, solvent extraction, selective membrane, exchange resin or gravity methods to recover phosphate from the aqueous solution. 6 figures.

  19. Microbial solubilization of phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Wolfram, James H.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for solubilizing phosphate from phosphate containing ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of phosphate ore, microorganisms operable for solubilizing phosphate from the phosphate ore and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the microbial solubilization process. An aqueous solution containing soluble phosphorous can be separated from the reacted mixture by precipitation, solvent extraction, selective membrane, exchange resin or gravity methods to recover phosphate from the aqueous solution.

  20. Solubilization and molecular characterization of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptor in human platelets: Comparison with ANP receptors in rat tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffrin, E.L.; Carrier, F.; Thibault, G.; Deslongchamps, M. )

    1991-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated the presence of binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in human platelets. These sites have pharmacological characteristics similar to those of rat vascular smooth muscle. They are subject to regulation by circulating levels of ANP in plasma, varying inversely with the latter after high sodium intake, in arterial hypertension and congestive heart failure. We have now solubilized these platelet receptors with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 (0.6%). The preparations were incubated with (125I)ANP in the presence of increasing concentrations of ANP-(99-126), ANP-(101-126), ANP-(103-126), and ANP-(103-123). The order of potency of these peptides to displace (125I)ANP was similar for the solubilized and particulate receptor. Bound (125I)ANP was covalently cross-linked to the receptor with 5 mM disuccinimidyl suberate. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel showed that (125I)ANP specifically interacts with a 125-kDa membrane component, some of which may be reduced by 2% mercaptoethanol or 10 mmol/L dithiothreitol to a 70-kDa species. A small proportion of a 70-kDa peptide is also found under nonreducing conditions. The concentration of ANP-(99-126) that inhibits binding of (125I)ANP by 50% to both the 125-kDa and the 70-kDa species was 0.1 nM, while that for ANP-(103-123) was 3 nM. The internally ring-deleted analog Des(Gln116,Ser117,Gly118,Leu119,Gly120)ANP -(102-121) or C-ANP displaced with equal potency ANP binding to the high and low mol wt (Mr) bands, as also found in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells, but not in the mesemteric arteries these cells are derived from. In the latter, C-ANP displaced only binding from the lower Mr band. These results show that the ANP receptor in human platelets is heterogeneous.

  1. Solubilization of proteins: the importance of lysis buffer choice.

    PubMed

    Peach, Mandy; Marsh, Noelle; Miskiewicz, Ewa I; MacPhee, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The efficient extraction of proteins of interest from cells and tissues is not always straightforward. Here we demonstrate the differences in extraction of the focal adhesion protein Kindlin-2 from choriocarcinoma cells using NP-40 and RIPA lysis buffer. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of a more denaturing urea/thiourea lysis buffer for solubilization, by comparing its effectiveness for solubilization of small heat-shock proteins from smooth muscle with the often utilized RIPA lysis buffer. Overall, the results demonstrate the importance of establishing the optimal lysis buffer for specific protein solubilization within the experimental workflow.

  2. Coal solubilization by lower fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Faison, B.D.

    1989-01-01

    Research on microbial coal solubilization is presented. Topics include: model compound studies, coalification, structural models, fungal degradation of recalcitrant substrates, product utilization, and product characterization. (CBS)

  3. Human cardiovascular responses to passive heat stress.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Craig G; Wilson, Thad E

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress increases human morbidity and mortality compared to normothermic conditions. Many occupations, disease states, as well as stages of life are especially vulnerable to the stress imposed on the cardiovascular system during exposure to hot ambient conditions. This review focuses on the cardiovascular responses to heat stress that are necessary for heat dissipation. To accomplish this regulatory feat requires complex autonomic nervous system control of the heart and various vascular beds. For example, during heat stress cardiac output increases up to twofold, by increases in heart rate and an active maintenance of stroke volume via increases in inotropy in the presence of decreases in cardiac preload. Baroreflexes retain the ability to regulate blood pressure in many, but not all, heat stress conditions. Central hypovolemia is another cardiovascular challenge brought about by heat stress, which if added to a subsequent central volumetric stress, such as hemorrhage, can be problematic and potentially dangerous, as syncope and cardiovascular collapse may ensue. These combined stresses can compromise blood flow and oxygenation to important tissues such as the brain. It is notable that this compromised condition can occur at cardiac outputs that are adequate during normothermic conditions but are inadequate in heat because of the increased systemic vascular conductance associated with cutaneous vasodilation. Understanding the mechanisms within this complex regulatory system will allow for the development of treatment recommendations and countermeasures to reduce risks during the ever-increasing frequency of severe heat events that are predicted to occur.

  4. Human Cardiovascular Responses to Passive Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Craig G.; Wilson, Thad E.

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress increases human morbidity and mortality compared to normothermic conditions. Many occupations, disease states, as well as stages of life are especially vulnerable to the stress imposed on the cardiovascular system during exposure to hot ambient conditions. This review focuses on the cardiovascular responses to heat stress that are necessary for heat dissipation. To accomplish this regulatory feat requires complex autonomic nervous system control of the heart and various vascular beds. For example, during heat stress cardiac output increases up to twofold, by increases in heart rate and an active maintenance of stroke volume via increases in inotropy in the presence of decreases in cardiac preload. Baroreflexes retain the ability to regulate blood pressure in many, but not all, heat stress conditions. Central hypovolemia is another cardiovascular challenge brought about by heat stress, which if added to a subsequent central volumetric stress, such as hemorrhage, can be problematic and potentially dangerous, as syncope and cardiovascular collapse may ensue. These combined stresses can compromise blood flow and oxygenation to important tissues such as the brain. It is notable that this compromised condition can occur at cardiac outputs that are adequate during normothermic conditions but are inadequate in heat because of the increased systemic vascular conductance associated with cutaneous vasodilation. Understanding the mechanisms within this complex regulatory system will allow for the development of treatment recommendations and countermeasures to reduce risks during the ever-increasing frequency of severe heat events that are predicted to occur. PMID:25589263

  5. Solubilization of DNAPLs by mixed surfactant: synergism and solubilization capacity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baowei; Zhu, Lizhong

    2006-08-25

    Efforts to remove the dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in subsurface by mobilizing them face with risks of driving the contaminants deeper into aquifer zones. In this paper, a synergistical solubilization of DNAPLs by mixed nonionic and anionic surfactant, Triton X-100 (TX100) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) in DNAPL/water systems was presented. Given 1:40 phase ratio of DNAPL:water (v/v), mixed TX100-SDBS exhibited significantly synergistical solubilization for the DNAPLs, trichloroethene (TCE), chlorobenzene (CB) and 1,2-dichlorobenzene (1,2-DCB), respectively, when the total surfactant concentration was up to 6000mg/L, i.e. the condition when solubilization by the mixture was better than those attainable with individual components by themselves. The synergistical extents depended on the initial ratios of TX100 to SDBS, the initial surfactant concentrations and the properties of DNAPLs. Given the total surfactant concentration, synergistical extents increased with the fraction of SDBS in mixed surfactant. On the contrary, did with the total surfactant concentration. The solubilization capacity by 3:1, 1:1 and 1:3 of mass ratio of TX100-SDBS were determined and compared with those by single ones. In the view of the mass solubilization ratio (SR), the mixed TX100-SDBS could solubilize more DNAPLs than single SDBS at given surfactant concentration. Reduction in partition of TX100 and synergistic solubilization were responsible for the significant solubilization extent of mixed system. The work presented here demonstrates that mixed nonionic-anionic surfactants would be preferred over the corresponding single surfactants for solubilization remediation of DNAPLs, which could decrease risks of driving the contaminants deeper into aquifers.

  6. Solubilized xenon 133 lung scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.

    1988-11-01

    Lung scanning using solubilized xenon 133 can provide important information concerning both pulmonary perfusion and ventilation. This technique proved valuable in establishing the diagnosis of congenital lobar emphysema in a 7-month-old baby.

  7. Solubilization of insoluble phosphates by thermophilic fungi.

    PubMed

    Singh, C P; Mishra, M M; Yadav, K S

    1980-01-01

    The solubilization of tricalcium phosphate and rock phosphate and assimilation of solubilized P by thermophilic fungi isolated from compost were studied. The solubilization of tricalcium phosphate was greater than that of rock phosphate on inoculation with fungi in liquid medium, but growth of most of the fungi was greater in rock phosphate. Torula thermophila solubilized tricalcium phosphate maximally. There was solubilization of rock phosphate in semi-solid lignocellulose medium by Aspergillus fumigatus.

  8. Strategy for large scale solubilization of coal - characterization of Neurospora protein and gene

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Chen, Y.P.; Mishra, N.C.

    1995-12-31

    Low grade coal placed on mycelial mat of Neurospora crassa growing on Petri plate was found to be solubilized by this fungus. A heat stable protein has been purified to near homogeneity which can solubilize low grade coal in in vitro. The biochemical properties of the Neurospora protein will be presented. The nature of the product obtained after solubilization of coal by Neurospora protein in vivo and in vitro will also be presented. The N-terminus sequence of the amino acids of this protein will be used to design primer for possible cloning of gene for Neurospora protein capable of solubilization of coal in order to develop methodology for coal solubilization on a large scale.

  9. Heat waves, aging, and human cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Kenney, W Larry; Craighead, Daniel H; Alexander, Lacy M

    2014-10-01

    This brief review is based on a President's Lecture presented at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in 2013. The purpose of this review was to assess the effects of climate change and consequent increases in environmental heat stress on the aging cardiovascular system. The earth's average global temperature is slowly but consistently increasing, and along with mean temperature changes come increases in heat wave frequency and severity. Extreme passive thermal stress resulting from prolonged elevations in ambient temperature and prolonged physical activity in hot environments creates a high demand on the left ventricle to pump blood to the skin to dissipate heat. Even healthy aging is accompanied by altered cardiovascular function, which limits the extent to which older individuals can maintain stroke volume, increase cardiac output, and increase skin blood flow when exposed to environmental extremes. In the elderly, the increased cardiovascular demand during heat waves is often fatal because of increased strain on an already compromised left ventricle. Not surprisingly, excess deaths during heat waves 1) occur predominantly in older individuals and 2) are overwhelmingly cardiovascular in origin. Increasing frequency and severity of heat waves coupled with a rapidly growing at-risk population dramatically increase the extent of future untoward health outcomes.

  10. HEAT WAVES, AGING, AND HUMAN CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, W. Larry; Craighead, Daniel H.; Alexander, Lacy M.

    2014-01-01

    This brief review is based on a President’s Lecture presented at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in 2013. The purpose of this review is to assess the effects of climate change and consequent increases in environmental heat stress on the aging cardiovascular system. The earth’s average global temperature is slowly but consistently increasing, and along with mean temperature changes come increases in heat wave frequency and severity. Extreme passive thermal stress resulting from prolonged elevations in ambient temperature, as well as prolonged physical activity in hot environments, creates a high demand on the left ventricle to pump blood to the skin to dissipate heat. Even healthy aging is accompanied by altered cardiovascular function, which limits the extent to which older individuals can maintain stroke volume, increase cardiac output, and increase skin blood flow when exposed to environmental extremes. In the elderly, the increased cardiovascular demand during heat waves is often fatal due to increased strain on an already compromised left ventricle. Not surprisingly, excess deaths during heat waves 1) occur predominantly in older individuals and 2) are overwhelmingly cardiovascular in origin. Increasing frequency and severity of heat waves coupled with a rapidly growing at-risk population dramatically increases the extent of future untoward health outcomes. PMID:24598696

  11. [Mechanism of heat transfer in various regions of human body].

    PubMed

    Luchakov, Iu I; Nozdrachev, A D

    2009-01-01

    The processes of heat transfer in a human body were studied with the use of a mathematical model. It has been shown that only conductive or only convective heat transfer may occur in different body areas. The rate of blood-mediated heat transfer in the presence of blood circulation is many times higher than heat transfer due to temperature gradient; therefore, the convective process prevails over the conductive process. The body core contains a variety of blood vessels, and the bulk of blood concentrates there in the norm. Hence, heat transfer in it is mainly convective. In surface tissues, where the rate of blood circulation is lower and the vasculature has certain specific features, heat transfer is mainly conductive. Hence, the core and surface tissues are absolutely different body zones in terms of heat transfer.

  12. Effects of heat stress on baroreflex function in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, Craig G.; Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Heat stress significantly reduces orthostatic tolerance in humans. The mechanism(s) causing this response remain unknown. The purpose of this review article is to present data pertaining to the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance in heat stressed individuals is a result of heat stress induced alterations in baroflex function. METHODS: In both normothermic and heat stressed conditions baroreflex responsiveness was assessed via pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods. In addition, the effects of heat stress on post-synaptic vasoconstrictor responsiveness were assessed. RESULTS: Generally, whole body heating did not alter baroreflex sensitivity defined as the gain of the linear portion of the baroreflex curve around the operating point. However, whole body heating shifted the baroreflex curve to the prevailing (i.e. elevated) heart rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Finally, the heat stress impaired vasoconstrictor responses to exogenous administration of adrenergic agonists. CONCLUSION: Current data do not support the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance associated with heat stress in humans is due to impaired baroreflex responsiveness. This phenomenon may be partially due to the effects of heat stress on reducing vasoconstrictor responsiveness.

  13. Solubilization of high affinity corticotropin-releasing factor receptors from rat brain: Characterization of an active digitonin-solubilized receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriadis, D.E.; Zaczek, R.; Pearsall, D.M.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1989-12-01

    The binding characteristics of CRF receptors in rat frontal cerebral cortex membranes solubilized in 1% digitonin were determined. The binding of (125I)Tyro-ovine CRF ((125I)oCRF) to solubilized membrane proteins was dependent on incubation time, temperature, and protein concentration, was saturable and of high affinity, and was absent in boiled tissue. The solubilized receptors retained their high affinity for (125I) oCRF in the solubilized state, exhibiting a dissociation constant (KD) of approximately 200 pM, as determined by direct binding saturation isotherms. Solubilized CRF receptors maintained the rank order of potencies for various related and unrelated CRF peptides characteristic of the membrane CRF receptor: rat/human CRF congruent to ovine CRF congruent to Nle21,38-rat CRF greater than alpha-helical oCRF-(9-41) greater than oCRF-(7-41) much greater than vasoactive intestinal peptide, arginine vasopressin, or the substance-P antagonist. Furthermore, the absolute potencies (Ki values) for the various CRF-related peptides in solubilized receptors were almost identical to those observed in the membrane preparations, indicating that the CRF receptor retained its high affinity binding capacity in the digitonin-solubilized state. Chemical affinity cross-linking of digitonin-solubilized rat cortical membrane proteins revealed a specifically labeled protein with an apparent mol wt of 58,000 which was similar to the labeled protein in native membrane homogenates. Although solubilized CRF receptors retained their high affinity for agonists, their sensitivity for guanine nucleotide was lost. Size exclusion chromatography substantiated these results, demonstrating that in the presence or absence of guanine nucleotides, (125I)oCRF labeled the same size receptor complex.

  14. Detergent solubilization of the EGF receptor from A431 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayanidhi, R.; Rintoul, D. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Functional reconstitution of purified preparations of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) requires dissociation of the protein from its plasma membrane lipid environment. Solubilization of membrane proteins in this manner requires the use of detergents, which are known to disrupt plasma membrane lipid/protein interactions. We have investigated the ability of three nonionic detergents to solubilize the human EGFR selectively, and have also analyzed the effect of these various treatments on the intrinsic tyrosyl kinase activity of the receptor. The nonionic detergent known as n-octyl glucoside (n-octyl beta-D-glucopyranoside) was found to give the best combination of selectivity, yield, and maintenance of enzymatic activity of the human EGFR.

  15. AIRAP, a New Human Heat Shock Gene Regulated by Heat Shock Factor 1*

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Antonio; Trotta, Edoardo; Brandi, Rossella; Arisi, Ivan; Coccia, Marta; Santoro, M. Gabriella

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock factor-1 (HSF1) is the central regulator of heat-induced transcriptional responses leading to rapid expression of molecular chaperones that protect mammalian cells against proteotoxic stress. The main targets for HSF1 are specific promoter elements (HSE) located upstream of heat shock genes encoding a variety of heat shock proteins, including HSP70, HSP90, HSP27, and other proteins of the network. Herein we report that the zinc finger AN1-type domain-2a gene, also known as AIRAP, behaves as a canonical heat shock gene, whose expression is temperature-dependent and strictly controlled by HSF1. Transcription is triggered at temperatures above 40 °C in different types of human cancer and primary cells, including peripheral blood monocytes. As shown by ChIP analysis, HSF1 is recruited to the AIRAP promoter rapidly after heat treatment, with a kinetics that parallels HSP70 promoter HSF1-recruitment. In transfection experiments HSF1-silencing abolished heat-induced AIRAP promoter-driven transcription, which could be rescued by exogenous Flag-HSF1 expression. The HSF1 binding HSE sequence in the AIRAP promoter critical for heat-induced transcription was identified. Because its expression is induced at febrile temperatures in human cells, AIRAP may represent a new potential component of the protective response during fever in humans. PMID:20185824

  16. The Distribution of Solubilized Molecules among Micelles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Dennis J.

    1978-01-01

    Conflicting views have been put forward on the derivation of the distribution of solubilized molecules among micelles. This stems from failure to consider the arrangement of the solubilized molecules in the micelles. In the treatment presented enthalpy effects are ignored as they are not amenable to a simple general theory. (Author/BB)

  17. Solubilization and reconstitution of renal vasopressin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Aiyar, N.; Nambi, P.; Stassen, F.; Crooke, S.T.

    1987-05-01

    Renal vasopressin receptors (V/sub 2/) mediating antidiuresis are coupled to adenylate cyclase. To determine the molecular properties of these vasopressin receptors, it is necessary to solubilize the receptors from the membranes. Solubilization of vasopressin receptors in the non-liganded state was shown to abolish hormone recognition. To preserve ligand binding capacity they have developed reconstitution procedures for the renal vasopressin receptors. The pig kidney membranes were solubilized using a zwitterionic detergent, egg lysolecithin and then reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H) lysine vasopressin ((/sup 3/H)LVP) to these solubilized reconstituted fractions was fast, saturable and increased linearly with protein concentration. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)LVP binding indicated the presence of single class of binding sites with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2.3 nM. In competition binding experiments, the solubilized receptors displayed the same pharmacological profile as was observed with membrane V/sub 2/ receptors.

  18. Heat Shock Proteins in the Human Eye

    PubMed Central

    Urbak, Lærke; Vorum, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are believed to primarily protect and maintain cell viability under stressful conditions such as those occurring during thermal and oxidative challenges chiefly by refolding and stabilizing proteins. Hsps are found throughout the various tissues of the eye where they are thought to confer protection from disease states such as cataract, glaucoma, and cancer. This minireview summarizes the placement, properties, and roles of Hsps in the eye and aims to provide a better comprehension of their function and involvement in ocular disease pathogenesis. PMID:22084677

  19. In vitro investigation of heat transfer in human tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min; Liu, Q. Da; Xu, Feng; Bai, B. Feng; Lu, T. Jian

    2010-03-01

    The understanding of heat transfer in human teeth is important for optimizing clinical practice protocols and daily intake instructions. However, it is technically challenging to study the in vitro thermal behavior of human tooth due to its small size and complex biological/geometrical structure. The currently widely used method is based on thermocouples, which has several limitations such as low spatial resolution, contact measurement and, in particular, lack of whole-field information. To address these challenges, an experimental system was developed to measure the whole-field temperature distribution in human tooth in vitro. The human tooth sample was heated at the tooth crown with flowing hot water (60 °C) for 10 s and then cooled down by natural convection of air. The temperature of the whole sectioned sample surface was recorded using an infrared camera. The results demonstrate that the developed system is capable of measuring temperature evolution in small human tooth samples. The biological junction of tooth (e.g., dental-enamel junction) is shown to have great influence on its heat transfer behavior. The present study could open the door for several future applications, e.g., systemic investigation of heat transfer in intact/restored tooth heated with clinical methods for treatment optimization, and measurement of thermal properties for different tooth layers.

  20. In vitro investigation of heat transfer in human tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min; Liu, Q. Da; Xu, Feng; Bai, B. Feng; Lu, T. Jian

    2009-12-01

    The understanding of heat transfer in human teeth is important for optimizing clinical practice protocols and daily intake instructions. However, it is technically challenging to study the in vitro thermal behavior of human tooth due to its small size and complex biological/geometrical structure. The currently widely used method is based on thermocouples, which has several limitations such as low spatial resolution, contact measurement and, in particular, lack of whole-field information. To address these challenges, an experimental system was developed to measure the whole-field temperature distribution in human tooth in vitro. The human tooth sample was heated at the tooth crown with flowing hot water (60 °C) for 10 s and then cooled down by natural convection of air. The temperature of the whole sectioned sample surface was recorded using an infrared camera. The results demonstrate that the developed system is capable of measuring temperature evolution in small human tooth samples. The biological junction of tooth (e.g., dental-enamel junction) is shown to have great influence on its heat transfer behavior. The present study could open the door for several future applications, e.g., systemic investigation of heat transfer in intact/restored tooth heated with clinical methods for treatment optimization, and measurement of thermal properties for different tooth layers.

  1. Cardiovascular adaptations supporting human exercise-heat acclimation.

    PubMed

    Périard, Julien D; Travers, Gavin J S; Racinais, Sébastien; Sawka, Michael N

    2016-04-01

    This review examines the cardiovascular adaptations along with total body water and plasma volume adjustments that occur in parallel with improved heat loss responses during exercise-heat acclimation. The cardiovascular system is well recognized as an important contributor to exercise-heat acclimation that acts to minimize physiological strain, reduce the risk of serious heat illness and better sustain exercise capacity. The upright posture adopted by humans during most physical activities and the large skin surface area contribute to the circulatory and blood pressure regulation challenge of simultaneously supporting skeletal muscle blood flow and dissipating heat via increased skin blood flow and sweat secretion during exercise-heat stress. Although it was traditionally held that cardiac output increased during exercise-heat stress to primarily support elevated skin blood flow requirements, recent evidence suggests that temperature-sensitive mechanisms may also mediate an elevation in skeletal muscle blood flow. The cardiovascular adaptations supporting this challenge include an increase in total body water, plasma volume expansion, better sustainment and/or elevation of stroke volume, reduction in heart rate, improvement in ventricular filling and myocardial efficiency, and enhanced skin blood flow and sweating responses. The magnitude of these adaptations is variable and dependent on several factors such as exercise intensity, duration of exposure, frequency and total number of exposures, as well as the environmental conditions (i.e. dry or humid heat) in which acclimation occurs. PMID:26905458

  2. A study of the distribution of aluminium in human placental tissues based on alkaline solubilization with determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Pamela C; Schell, Lawrence M; Stark, Alice D; Parsons, Patrick J

    2010-09-01

    Aluminium (Al) is a nonessential element known to induce neurotoxic effects, such as dialysis dementia, in patients on hemodialysis, with compromised kidney function. The role of Al in the progression of some neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), is controversial, and remains unclear. The effects of Al on other vulnerable populations, such as fetuses and infants, have been infrequently studied. In the present study, Al has been measured in human placenta samples, comprising ∼160 each of placenta bodies, placenta membranes, and umbilical cords, using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after atmospheric pressure digestion with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) and ethylenediaminetetraacidic acid (EDTA). The sensitivity, or characteristic mass (m(0)), for Al at the 309.3-nm line was found to be 30 ± 4 pg. The instrumental detection limit (IDL) (3s) for Al in solution was calculated as 0.72 μg L(-1) while the method detection limit (MDL) (3s) was 0.25 μg g(-1). Accuracy was assessed through analysis of quality control (QC) materials, including certified reference materials (CRMs), in-house reference materials (RMs), and spike recovery experiments, of varying matrices. Placental tissue analyses revealed geometric mean concentrations of approximately 0.5 μg g(-1) Al in placenta bodies (n = 165) and membranes (n = 155), while Al concentrations in umbilical cords (n = 154) were about 0.3 μg g(-1). Al was detected in 95% of placenta bodies, and 81% of placenta membranes, but only in 46% of umbilical cords.

  3. Fungal rock phosphate solubilization using sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Gilberto O; Dias, Carla S; Silva, Ivo R; Júnior, José Ivo Ribeiro; Pereira, Olinto L; Costa, Maurício D

    2013-01-01

    The effects of different doses of rock phosphate (RP), sucrose, and (NH(4))(2)SO(4) on the solubilization of RP from Araxá and Catalão (Brazil) by Aspergillus niger, Penicillium canescens, Eupenicillium ludwigii, and Penicillium islandicum were evaluated in a solid-state fermentation (SSF) system with sugarcane bagasse. The factors evaluated were combined following a 2(3) + 1 factorial design to determine their optimum concentrations. The fitted response surfaces showed that higher doses of RP promoted higher phosphorus (P) solubilization. The addition of sucrose did not have effects on P solubilization in most treatments due to the presence of soluble sugars in the bagasse. Except for A. niger, all the fungi required high (NH(4))(2)SO(4) doses to achieve the highest level of P solubilization. Inversely, addition of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) was inhibitory to P solubilization by A. niger. Among the fungi tested, A. niger stood out, showing the highest solubilization capacity and for not requiring sucrose or (NH(4))(2)SO(4) supplementation. An additional experiment with A. niger showed that the content of soluble P can be increased by adding higher RP doses in the medium. However, P yield decreases with increasing RP doses. In this experiment, the maximal P yield (approximately 60 %) was achieved with the lower RP dose (3 g L(-1)). Our results show that SSF can be used to obtain a low cost biofertilizer rich in P combining RP, sugarcane bagasse, and A. niger. Moreover, sugarcane bagasse is a suitable substrate for SSF aiming at RP solubilization, since this residue can supply the C and N necessary for the metabolism of A. niger within a range that favors RP solubilization.

  4. Human locomotion and heat loss: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    Humans are unique in many respects including being furless, striding bipeds that excel at walking and running long distances in hot conditions. This review summarizes what we do and do not know about the evolution of these characteristics, and how they are related. Although many details remain poorly known, the first hominins (species more closely related to humans than to chimpanzees) apparently diverged from the chimpanzee lineage because of selection for bipedal walking, probably because it improved their ability to forage efficiently. However, because bipedal hominins are necessarily slow runners, early hominins in open habitats likely benefited from improved abilities to dump heat in order to forage safely during times of peak heat when predators were unable to hunt them. Endurance running capabilities evolved later, probably as adaptations for scavenging and then hunting. If so, then there would have been strong selection for heat-loss mechanisms, especially sweating, to persistence hunt, in which hunters combine endurance running and tracking to drive their prey into hyperthermia. As modern humans dispersed into a wide range of habitats over the last few hundred thousand years, recent selection has helped populations cope better with a broader range of locomotor and thermoregulatory challenges, but all humans remain essentially adapted for long distance locomotion rather than speed, and to dump rather than retain heat.

  5. Effects of aqueous humor hydrodynamics on human eye heat transfer under external heat sources.

    PubMed

    Tiang, Kor L; Ooi, Ean H

    2016-08-01

    The majority of the eye models developed in the late 90s and early 00s considers only heat conduction inside the eye. This assumption is not entirely correct, since the anterior and posterior chambers are filled aqueous humor (AH) that is constantly in motion due to thermally-induced buoyancy. In this paper, a three-dimensional model of the human eye is developed to investigate the effects AH hydrodynamics have on the human eye temperature under exposure to external heat sources. If the effects of AH flow are negligible, then future models can be developed without taking them into account, thus simplifying the modeling process. Two types of external thermal loads are considered; volumetric and surface irradiation. Results showed that heat convection due to AH flow contributes to nearly 95% of the total heat flow inside the anterior chamber. Moreover, the circulation inside the anterior chamber can cause an upward shift of the location of hotspot. This can have significant consequences to our understanding of heat-induced cataractogenesis.

  6. Effects of aqueous humor hydrodynamics on human eye heat transfer under external heat sources.

    PubMed

    Tiang, Kor L; Ooi, Ean H

    2016-08-01

    The majority of the eye models developed in the late 90s and early 00s considers only heat conduction inside the eye. This assumption is not entirely correct, since the anterior and posterior chambers are filled aqueous humor (AH) that is constantly in motion due to thermally-induced buoyancy. In this paper, a three-dimensional model of the human eye is developed to investigate the effects AH hydrodynamics have on the human eye temperature under exposure to external heat sources. If the effects of AH flow are negligible, then future models can be developed without taking them into account, thus simplifying the modeling process. Two types of external thermal loads are considered; volumetric and surface irradiation. Results showed that heat convection due to AH flow contributes to nearly 95% of the total heat flow inside the anterior chamber. Moreover, the circulation inside the anterior chamber can cause an upward shift of the location of hotspot. This can have significant consequences to our understanding of heat-induced cataractogenesis. PMID:27340100

  7. Carotid baroreflex responsiveness in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of whole body heating on human baroreflex function are relatively unknown. The purpose of this project was to identify whether whole body heating reduces the maximal slope of the carotid baroreflex. In 12 subjects, carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac baroreflex responsiveness were assessed in normothermia and during whole body heating. Whole body heating increased sublingual temperature (from 36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.4 +/- 0.1 degrees C, P < 0.01) and increased heart rate (from 59 +/- 3 to 83 +/- 3 beats/min, P < 0. 01), whereas mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was slightly decreased (from 88 +/- 2 to 83 +/- 2 mmHg, P < 0.01). Carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac responsiveness were assessed by identifying the maximal gain of MAP and heart rate to R wave-triggered changes in carotid sinus transmural pressure. Whole body heating significantly decreased the responsiveness of the carotid-vasomotor baroreflex (from -0.20 +/- 0.02 to -0.13 +/- 0.02 mmHg/mmHg, P < 0.01) without altering the responsiveness of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex (from -0.40 +/- 0.05 to -0.36 +/- 0.02 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1), P = 0.21). Carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac baroreflex curves were shifted downward and upward, respectively, to accommodate the decrease in blood pressure and increase in heart rate that accompanied the heat stress. Moreover, the operating point of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex was shifted closer to threshold (P = 0.02) by the heat stress. Reduced carotid-vasomotor baroreflex responsiveness, coupled with a reduction in the functional reserve for the carotid baroreflex to increase heart rate during a hypotensive challenge, may contribute to increased susceptibility to orthostatic intolerance during a heat stress.

  8. Sympathetic activity during passive heat stress in healthy aged humans

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Daniel; Schlader, Zachary J; Crandall, Craig G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular adjustments during heat stress are generally attenuated in healthy aged humans, which could be due to lower increases in sympathetic activity compared to the young. We compared muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) between 11 young (Y: 28 ± 4 years) and 10 aged (A: 70 ± 5 years) subjects prior to and during passive heating. Furthermore, MSNA responses were compared when a cold pressor test (CPT) and lower body negative pressure (LBNP) were superimposed upon heating. Baseline MSNA burst frequency (Y: 15 ± 4 vs. A: 31 ± 3 bursts min−1, P ≤ 0.01) and burst incidence (Y: 26 ± 8 vs. A: 50 ± 7 bursts (100 cardiac cycles (CC))−1, P ≤ 0.01) were greater in the aged. Heat stress increased core temperature to a similar extent in both groups (Y: +1.2 ± 0.1 vs. A: +1.2 ± 0.0°C, P = 0.99). Absolute levels of MSNA remained greater in the aged during heat stress (burst frequency: Y: 47 ± 6 vs. A: 63 ± 11 bursts min−1, P ≤ 0.01; burst incidence: Y: 48 ± 8 vs. A: 67 ± 9 bursts (100 CC)−1, P ≤ 0.01); however, the increase in both variables was similar between groups (both P ≥ 0.1). The CPT and LBNP further increased MSNA burst frequency and burst incidence, although the magnitude of increase was similar between groups (both P ≥ 0.07). These results suggest that increases in sympathetic activity during heat stress are not attenuated in healthy aged humans. Key points Cardiovascular adjustments to heat stress are attenuated in healthy aged individuals, which could contribute to their greater prevalence of heat-related illnesses and deaths during heat waves. The attenuated cardiovascular adjustments in the aged could be due to lower increases in sympathetic nerve activity during heat stress. We examined muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and plasma catecholamine concentrations in healthy young and aged individuals during whole-body passive heat stress. The main finding

  9. Effects of passive heat stress on human somatosensory processing.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroki; Oshiro, Misaki; Namba, Mari; Shibasaki, Manabu

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we investigated the effects of passive heat stress on human somatosensory processing recorded by somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs). Fifteen healthy subjects received a median nerve stimulation at the left wrist under two thermal conditions: Heat Stress and normothermic Time Control. The latencies and amplitudes of P14, N20, P25, N35, P45, and N60 at C4' and P14, N18, P22, and N30 at Fz were evaluated. Under the Heat Stress condition, SEPs were recorded at normothermic baseline (1st), early in heat stress (2nd), when esophageal temperature had increased by ~1.0°C (3rd) and ~2.0°C (4th), and after heat stress (5th). In the Time Control condition, SEPs were measured at the same time intervals as those in the Heat Stress condition. The peak latencies and amplitudes of SEPs did not change early in heat stress. However, the latencies of P14, N20, and N60 at C4' and P14, N18, and P22 at Fz were significantly shorter in the 4th session than in the 1st session. Furthermore, the peak amplitudes of P25 and N60 at C4', and P22 and N30 at Fz decreased with increases in body temperature. On the other hand, under the Time Control condition, no significant differences were observed in the amplitudes or latencies of any component of SEPs. These results suggested that the conduction velocity of the ascending somatosensory input was accelerated by increases in body temperature, and hyperthermia impaired the neural activity of cortical somatosensory processing. PMID:26468258

  10. Human thermal physiological and psychological responses under different heating environments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojun; Ning, Haoran; Ji, Yuchen; Hou, Juan; He, Yanan

    2015-08-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that many residents of severely cold areas of China who use floor heating (FH) systems feel warmer but drier compared to those using radiant heating (RH) systems. However, this phenomenon has not been verified experimentally. In order to validate the empirical hypothesis, and research the differences of human physiological and psychological responses in these two asymmetrical heating environments, an experiment was designed to mimic FH and RH systems. The subjects participating in the experiment were volunteer college-students. During the experiment, the indoor air temperature, air speed, relative humidity, globe temperature, and inner surface temperatures were measured, and subjects' heart rate, blood pressure and skin temperatures were recorded. The subjects were required to fill in questionnaires about their thermal responses during testing. The results showed that the subjects' skin temperatures, heart rate and blood pressure were significantly affected by the type of heating environment. Ankle temperature had greatest impact on overall thermal comfort relative to other body parts, and a slightly cool FH condition was the most pleasurable environment for sedentary subjects. The overall thermal sensation, comfort and acceptability of FH were higher than that of RH. However, the subjects of FH felt drier than that of RH, although the relative humidity in FH environments was higher than that of the RH environment. In future environmental design, the thermal comfort of the ankles should be scrutinized, and a FH cool condition is recommended as the most comfortable thermal environment for office workers. Consequently, large amounts of heating energy could be saved in this area in the winter. The results of this study may lead to more efficient energy use for office or home heating systems.

  11. Understanding heat facilitated drug transport across human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Wood, D G; Brown, M B; Jones, S A

    2012-08-01

    The application of moderate heat is a safe and effective means to increase drug transport across human skin. However, the cascade of events that follows the exposure of a topical skin formulation to a heating source is not well understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate how three potential rate limiting stages in the drug transport process; formulation release, drug partitioning and epidermal diffusion, responded to changes in local temperature using the model drug lidocaine. Release from the formulation measured using regenerated cellulose membrane was shown to be driven by drug diffusion in the vehicle; it responded linearly when the local temperature was changed (21.6 μg/cm(2)/h for every 1 °C rise) and displayed no measurable partitioning of lidocaine into RCM. Once the drug was within the human epidermis, the structural changes of the barrier controlled its transport. The apparent lidocaine diffusion coefficient through silicone membrane increased from 6.52 to 8.43 × 10(-4) over the 32-45 °C temperature range, but it increased from 7.74 × 10(-5)cm(2)h(-1) to 4.8 × 10(-4)cm(2)h(-1) in the human epidermis. In the absence of large increases in drug partitioning, fluidisation of the lipids in the upper layers of the epidermis at 37-45 °C was shown to facilitate lidocaine diffusion which for human skin transport was the rate limiting process.

  12. Computational prediction of solubilizers' effect on partitioning.

    PubMed

    Hoest, Jan; Christensen, Inge T; Jørgensen, Flemming S; Hovgaard, Lars; Frokjaer, Sven

    2007-02-01

    A computational model for the prediction of solubilizers' effect on drug partitioning has been developed. Membrane/water partitioning was evaluated by means of immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatography. Four solubilizers were used to alter the partitioning in the IAM column. Two types of molecular descriptors were calculated: 2D descriptors using the MOE software and 3D descriptors using the Volsurf software. Structure-property relationships between each of the two types of descriptors and partitioning were established using partial least squares, projection to latent structures (PLS) statistics. Statistically significant relationships between the molecular descriptors and the IAM data were identified. Based on the 2D descriptors structure-property relationships R(2)Y=0. 99 and Q(2)=0.82-0.83 were obtained for some of the solubilizers. The most important descriptor was related to logP. For the Volsurf 3D descriptors models with R(2)Y=0.53-0.64 and Q(2)=0.40-0.54 were obtained using five descriptors. The present study showed that it is possible to predict partitioning of substances in an artificial phospholipid membrane, with or without the use of solubilizers.

  13. Amphiphiles for protein solubilization and stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Gellman, Samuel Helmer; Chae, Pil Seok; Laible, Philip D.; Wander, Marc J.

    2012-09-11

    The invention provides amphiphiles for manipulating membrane proteins. The amphiphiles can feature carbohydrate-derived hydrophilic groups and branchpoints in the hydrophilic moiety and/or in a lipophilic moiety. Such amphiphiles are useful as detergents for solubilization and stabilization of membrane proteins, including photosynthetic protein superassemblies obtained from bacterial membranes.

  14. Amphiphiles for protein solubilization and stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Gellman, Samuel Helmer; Chae, Pil Seok; Laible, Phillip D; Wander, Marc J

    2014-11-04

    The invention provides amphiphiles for manipulating membrane proteins. The amphiphiles can feature carbohydrate-derived hydrophilic groups and branchpoints in the hydrophilic moiety and/or in a lipophilic moiety. Such amphiphiles are useful as detergents for solubilization and stabilization of membrane proteins, including photosynthetic protein superassemblies obtained from bacterial membranes.

  15. Mechanisms of hormesis through mild heat stress on human cells.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Suresh I S

    2004-06-01

    In a series of experimental studies, it was shown that repetitive mild heat stress has antiaging hormetic effects on growth and various other cellular and biochemical characteristics of human skin fibroblasts undergoing aging in vitro. We have reported the hormetic effects of repeated challenge at the levels of maintenance of stress protein profile; reduction in the accumulation of oxidatively and glycoxidatively damaged proteins; stimulation of the proteasomal activities for the degradation of abnormal proteins; improved cellular resistance to ethanol, hydrogen peroxide, and ultraviolet-B rays; and enhanced levels of various antioxidant enzymes. Detailed analysis of the signal transduction pathways to determine alterations in the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation states of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAP kinases as a measure of cellular responsiveness to mild and severe heat stress is in progress. Furthermore, comparative studies using nonaging immortal cell lines, such as SV40-transformed human fibroblasts, spontaneous osteosarcoma cells, and telomerase-immortalized human bone marrow cells are also in progress for establishing differences in normal and cancerous cells for their responsiveness to mild and severe stresses.

  16. Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pump Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leidel, James

    2014-12-22

    The grant objectives of the DOE grant funded project have been successfully completed. The Human Health Building (HHB) was constructed and opened for occupancy for the Fall 2012 semester of Oakland University. As with any large construction project, some issues arose which all were overcome to deliver the project on budget and on time. The facility design is a geothermal / solar-thermal hybrid building utilizing both desiccant dehumidification and variable refrigerant flow heat pumps. It is a cooling dominant building with a 400 ton cooling design day load, and 150 ton heating load on a design day. A 256 vertical borehole (320 ft depth) ground source heat pump array is located south of the building under the existing parking lot. The temperature swing and performance over 2013 through 2015 shows the ground loop is well sized, and may even have excess capacity for a future building to the north (planned lab facility). The HHB achieve a US Green Building Counsel LEED Platinum rating by collecting 52 of the total 69 available LEED points for the New Construction v.2 scoring checklist. Being Oakland's first geothermal project, we were very pleased with the building outcome and performance with the energy consumption approximately 1/2 of the campus average facility, on a square foot basis.

  17. Human behavioral thermoregulation during exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Flouris, A D; Schlader, Z J

    2015-06-01

    The human capacity to perform prolonged exercise is impaired in hot environments. To address this issue, a number of studies have investigated behavioral aspects of thermoregulation that are recognized as important factors in determining performance. In this review, we evaluated and interpreted the available knowledge regarding the voluntary control of exercise work rate in hot environments. Our analysis indicated that: (a) Voluntary reductions in exercise work rate in uncompensable heat aid thermoregulation and are, therefore, thermoregulatory behaviors. (b) Unlike thermal behavior during rest, the role of thermal comfort as the ultimate mediator of thermal behavior during exercise in the heat remains uncertain. By contrast, the rating of perceived exertion appears to be the key perceptual controller under such conditions, with thermal perception playing a more modulatory role. (c) Prior to increases in core temperature (when only skin temperature is elevated), reductions in self-selected exercise work rate in the heat are likely mediated by thermal perception (thermal comfort and sensation) and its influence on the rating of perceived exertion. (d) However, when both core and skin temperatures are elevated, factors associated with cardiovascular strain likely dictate the rate of perceived exertion response, thereby mediating such voluntary reductions in exercise work rate.

  18. Human brain stem structures respond differentially to noxious heat.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Alexander; Franz, Marcel; Dietrich, Caroline; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Concerning the physiological correlates of pain, the brain stem is considered to be one core region that is activated by noxious input. In animal studies, different slopes of skin heating (SSH) with noxious heat led to activation in different columns of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG). The present study aimed at finding a method for differentiating structures in PAG and other brain stem structures, which are associated with different qualities of pain in humans according to the structures that were associated with different behavioral significances to noxious thermal stimulation in animals. Brain activity was studied by functional MRI in healthy subjects in response to steep and shallow SSH with noxious heat. We found differential activation to different SSH in the PAG and the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). In a second experiment, we demonstrate that the different SSH were associated with different pain qualities. Our experiments provide evidence that brainstem structures, i.e., the PAG and the RVM, become differentially activated by different SSH. Therefore, different SSH can be utilized when brain stem structures are investigated and when it is aimed to activate these structures differentially. Moreover, percepts of first pain were elicited by shallow SSH whereas percepts of second pain were elicited by steep SSH. The stronger activation of these brain stem structures to SSH, eliciting percepts of second vs. first pain, might be of relevance for activating different coping strategies in response to the noxious input with the two types of SSH.

  19. Insights into the role of heat shock protein 72 to whole-body heat acclimation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro; Fonseca, Ivana T; Machado-Moreira, Christiano A; Magalhães, Flávio de Castro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Heat acclimation results in systemic and cellular adaptions that reduce the negative effect of heat and, consequently, the risk of heat illness. Although the classical changes observed with heat acclimation lead to increased tolerance to exercise in the heat by reducing heat storage (reflected in reduced core and skin temperatures) and increasing whole-body capacity for heat dissipation (greater plasma volume, sweat output, and skin blood flow), it appears that heat acclimation also induces changes at the cellular level that might increase tolerance of the whole organism to a higher core temperature for the development of fatigue. Thermotolerance is a process that involves increased resilience to an otherwise lethal heat stress that follows a sublethal exposure to heat. Thermotolerance is believed to be the result of increased content of heat shock proteins (Hsp), specially a member of the 70 kDa family, Hsp72 kDa. In humans, we and others have reported that heat acclimation increases intracellular Hsp72 levels. This increase in intracellular Hsp72 could improve whole-body organism thermotolerance by maintaining intestinal epithelial tight junction barriers, by increasing resistance to gut-associated endotoxin translocation, or by reducing the inflammatory response. In this review, we will initially provide an overview of the physiological adaptations induced by heat acclimation and emphasize the main cellular changes that occur with heat acclimation associated with intracellular accumulation of Hsp72. Finally, we will present an argument for a role of whole-body heat acclimation in augmenting cellular thermotolerance, which may protect vital organs from deleterious effects of heat stress in humans. PMID:27227070

  20. Insights into the role of heat shock protein 72 to whole-body heat acclimation in humans.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro; Fonseca, Ivana T; Machado-Moreira, Christiano A; Magalhães, Flávio de Castro

    2015-01-01

    Heat acclimation results in systemic and cellular adaptions that reduce the negative effect of heat and, consequently, the risk of heat illness. Although the classical changes observed with heat acclimation lead to increased tolerance to exercise in the heat by reducing heat storage (reflected in reduced core and skin temperatures) and increasing whole-body capacity for heat dissipation (greater plasma volume, sweat output, and skin blood flow), it appears that heat acclimation also induces changes at the cellular level that might increase tolerance of the whole organism to a higher core temperature for the development of fatigue. Thermotolerance is a process that involves increased resilience to an otherwise lethal heat stress that follows a sublethal exposure to heat. Thermotolerance is believed to be the result of increased content of heat shock proteins (Hsp), specially a member of the 70 kDa family, Hsp72 kDa. In humans, we and others have reported that heat acclimation increases intracellular Hsp72 levels. This increase in intracellular Hsp72 could improve whole-body organism thermotolerance by maintaining intestinal epithelial tight junction barriers, by increasing resistance to gut-associated endotoxin translocation, or by reducing the inflammatory response. In this review, we will initially provide an overview of the physiological adaptations induced by heat acclimation and emphasize the main cellular changes that occur with heat acclimation associated with intracellular accumulation of Hsp72. Finally, we will present an argument for a role of whole-body heat acclimation in augmenting cellular thermotolerance, which may protect vital organs from deleterious effects of heat stress in humans. PMID:27227070

  1. Cyclodextrin solubilization of benzodiazepines: formulation of midazolam nasal spray.

    PubMed

    Loftsson, T; Gudmundsdóttir, H; Sigurjónsdóttir, J F; Sigurdsson, H H; Sigfússon, S D; Másson, M; Stefánsson, E

    2001-01-01

    The cyclodextrin solubilization of three benzodiazepines, i.e. alprazolam, midazolam and triazolam, was investigated. The cyclodextrin solubilization was enhanced through ring-opening of the benzodiazepine rings and ionization of the ring-open forms. Additional enhancement was obtained through interaction of a water-soluble polymer with the cyclodextrin complexes. The ring-opening was pH-dependent and completely reversible, the ring-open forms dominating at low pH but the ring-closed forms at physiologic pH. The ring-closed forms were rapidly regenerated upon elevation of pH. In freshly collected human serum in vitro at 37 degrees C, the half-life for the first-order rate constant for the ring-closing reaction was estimated to be less than 2 min for both alprazolam and midazolam. Midazolam (17 mg/ml) was solubilized in aqueous pH 4.3 nasal formulation containing 14% (w/v) sulfobutylether beta-cyclodextrin, 0.1% (w/v) hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, preservatives and buffer salts. Six healthy volunteers received 0.06 mg/kg midazolam intranasally and 2 mg intravenously, and blood samples were collected up to 360 min after the administration. Midazolam was absorbed rapidly reaching maximum serum concentrations of 54.3+/-5.0 ng/ml at 15+/-2 min. The elimination half-life of midazolam was 2.2+/-0.3 h and the absolute availability was 73+/-7%. All mean values+/-SEM. PMID:11165818

  2. Matrix solubilization and cell wall weakening by β-expansin (group-1 allergen) from maize pollen.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Akira; Li, Lian-Chao; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2011-11-01

    Beta-expansins accumulate to high levels in grass pollen, a feature apparently unique to grasses. These proteins, which are major human allergens, facilitate pollen tube penetration of the maize stigma and style (the silk). Here we report that treatment of maize silk cell walls with purified β-expansin from maize pollen led to solubilization of wall matrix polysaccharides, dominated by feruloyated highly substituted glucuronoarabinoxylan (60%) and homogalacturonan (35%). Such action was selective for cell walls of grasses, and indicated a target preferentially found in grass cell walls, probably the highly substituted glucuronoarabinoxylan. Several tests for lytic activities by β-expansin were negative and polysaccharide solubilization had weak temperature dependence, which indicated a non-enzymatic process. Concomitant with matrix solubilization, β-expansin treatment induced creep, reduced the breaking force and increased the plastic compliance of wall specimens. From comparisons of the pH dependencies of these processes, we conclude that matrix solubilization was linked closely to changes in wall plasticity and breaking force, but not so closely coupled to cell wall creep. Because matrix solubilization and increased wall plasticity have not been found with other expansins, we infer that these novel activities are linked to the specialized role of grass pollen β-expansins in promotion of penetration of the pollen tube through the stigma and style, most likely by weakening the middle lamella.

  3. Solubilization of poorly soluble lichen metabolites for biological testing on cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kristmundsdóttir, Thórdís; Jónsdóttir, Elsa; Ogmundsdóttir, Helga M; Ingólfsdóttir, Kristín

    2005-04-01

    The depside atranorin and depsidone fumarprotocetraric acid, isolated from the lichens Stereocaulon alpinum and Cetraria islandica, respectively, were chosen as prototypes for poorly soluble natural compounds in an effort to facilitate testing in pharmacological models. Solubilizing agents previously identified as being non-toxic towards a malignant leukemic (K-562) cell line and suitable for testing of anti-proliferative activity of the dibenzofuran lichen metabolite (+)-usnic acid were used in solubilization studies of the depside and depsidone. Cyclodextrin derivatives were found to be most suitable for solubilizing the lichen compounds, the greatest rise in solubility being witnessed for fumarprotocetraric acid, increasing almost 300-fold from 0.03 mg/ml in water to 8.98 mg/ml in 10% 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPbetaCD). Subsequently, the lichen compounds, including (+)-usnic acid, were solubilized in 10% HPbetaCD and tested for effects on three malignant human cell lines; T-47D (breast), Panc-1 (pancreas) and PC-3 (prostate) in a standard proliferation assay. Atranorin and fumarprotocetraric acid did not exhibit anti-proliferative effects but usnic acid was active against all test cell lines with EC50 values of 4.3-8.2 microg/ml. The non-toxic solubilizing agents used in this study could prove useful for pharmacological testing of other poorly soluble natural products. PMID:15784343

  4. Solubilization and Interaction Studies of Bile Salts with Surfactants and Drugs: a Review.

    PubMed

    Malik, Nisar Ahmad

    2016-05-01

    In this review, bile salt, bile salt-surfactant, and bile salt-drug interactions and their solubilization studies are mainly focused. Usefulness of bile salts in digestion, absorption, and excretion of various compounds and their rare properties in ordering the shape and size of the micelles owing to the presence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces are taken into consideration while compiling this review. Bile salts as potential bio-surfactants to solubilize drugs of interest are also highlighted. This review will give an insight into the selection of drugs in different applications as their properties get modified by interaction with bile salts, thus influencing their solution behavior which, in turn, modifies the phase-forming behavior, microemulsion, and clouding phenomenon, besides solubilization. Finally, their future perspectives are taken into consideration to assess their possible uses as bio-surfactants without side effects to human beings.

  5. Prediction of inclusion body solubilization from shaken to stirred reactors.

    PubMed

    Walther, Cornelia; Mayer, Sabrina; Trefilov, Alexandru; Sekot, Gerhard; Hahn, Rainer; Jungbauer, Alois; Dürauer, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion bodies (IBs) were solubilized in a µ-scale system using shaking microtiter plates or a stirred tank reactor in a laboratory setting. Characteristic dimensionless numbers for mixing, the Phase number Ph and Reynolds number Re did not correlate with the kinetics and equilibrium of protein solubilization. The solubilization kinetics was independent of the mixing system, stirring or shaking rate, shaking diameter, and energy input. Good agreement was observed between the solubilization kinetics and yield on the µ-scale and laboratory setting. We show that the IB solubilization process is controlled predominantly by pore diffusion. Thus, for the process it is sufficient to keep the IBs homogeneously suspended, and additional power input will not improve the process. The high-throughput system developed on the µ-scale can predict solubilization in stirred reactors up to a factor of 500 and can therefore be used to determine optimal solubilization conditions on laboratory and industrial scale.

  6. Prediction of inclusion body solubilization from shaken to stirred reactors.

    PubMed

    Walther, Cornelia; Mayer, Sabrina; Trefilov, Alexandru; Sekot, Gerhard; Hahn, Rainer; Jungbauer, Alois; Dürauer, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion bodies (IBs) were solubilized in a µ-scale system using shaking microtiter plates or a stirred tank reactor in a laboratory setting. Characteristic dimensionless numbers for mixing, the Phase number Ph and Reynolds number Re did not correlate with the kinetics and equilibrium of protein solubilization. The solubilization kinetics was independent of the mixing system, stirring or shaking rate, shaking diameter, and energy input. Good agreement was observed between the solubilization kinetics and yield on the µ-scale and laboratory setting. We show that the IB solubilization process is controlled predominantly by pore diffusion. Thus, for the process it is sufficient to keep the IBs homogeneously suspended, and additional power input will not improve the process. The high-throughput system developed on the µ-scale can predict solubilization in stirred reactors up to a factor of 500 and can therefore be used to determine optimal solubilization conditions on laboratory and industrial scale. PMID:23860724

  7. Gelation of protein recovered from whole Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) by isoelectric solubilization/precipitation as affected by functional additives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Jaczynski, Jacek

    2007-03-01

    This study demonstrated that the novel isoelectric solubilization/precipitation can be applied to recover functional muscle protein in a continuous mode from whole Antarctic krill. Protein recovered from whole krill had a much lower ash content than whole krill, suggesting good removal of inedible impurities (shell, appendages, etc.). Lipids were retained to a higher degree with krill protein solubilized at acidic rather than basic pH. The viscoelastic modulus (G') showed that recovered krill protein failed to form heat-induced gel unless beef plasma protein (BPP) was added. Therefore, protease inhibitors are suggested for development of krill-derived products. Even with BPP, the G' decreased between 45 and 55 degrees C. However, krill protein solubilized at acidic pH had a higher decrease of the G' than the protein solubilized at basic pH, likely due to krill endogenous cathepsin L. Krill protein-based gels developed from protein solubilized at basic pH, especially pH 12.0, had better texture (torsion and Kramer tests and texture profile analysis) than acidic counterparts, possibly due to higher proteolysis and denaturation at acidic pH. Gels made from protein solubilized at acidic pH were brighter and whiter likely due to a higher lipid content.

  8. Ozone solubilizes elastin and increases its susceptibility to elastase

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, R.S.; Johnson, D.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Ozone is a powerful oxidant gas that may contribute to lung diseases such as emphysema. Because the hallmark of emphysema is destruction of the elastin rich alveoli of the lung, ozonization of elastin was studied in vitro to examine the effects of ozone on elastin structure and susceptibility to proteolysis. Samples of bovine ligamentum nuchae elastin were suspended in 15 ml PBS and bubbled with 13.7 ppm ozone in argon at a flow rate of 3.5 ml/min. Ozone treatment resulted in the solubilization of elastin as evidenced by a visual decrease in turbidity and an increase in the 225 nm absorbance of the supernatant fraction after centrifugation to pellet the insoluble elastin. Insoluble elastin recovered from exposed suspensions was examined for proteolytic susceptibility with human neutrophil elastase (HNE), by incubating 600 {mu}g samples in 1 ml of 50 mM Tris-HCl, 200 mM NaCl, pH 8.0 with 3 {mu}g HNE for various times at room temp. Elastin proteolysis was followed by measuring the 225 nm absorbance of solubilized peptides in supernatant fractions. Ozone exposed elastin, which had been previously ozonized to 5% solubility was found to be approximately twice as susceptible to proteolysis as native elastin.

  9. [Theoretical analysis of factors affecting heat exchange stability of human body with environment].

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Wang, X

    1998-06-01

    Life could not be normal without the heat produced by metabolism of human body being transmitted into environment. This paper discussed the ways of heat exchange of human body with the environment, and analyzed their effects on the stability of heat exchange theoretically. In addition, factors that affects the stability of heat exchange were studied. The results indicate that the environmental temperature is the most important factor.

  10. The Hexameric Structures of Human Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Chung; Lin, Ta-Wei; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The human 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) functions as a dimeric molecular chaperone. HSP90 identified on the cell surface has been found to play a crucial role in cancer invasion and metastasis, and has become a validated anti-cancer target for drug development. It has been shown to self-assemble into oligomers upon heat shock or divalent cations treatment, but the functional role of the oligomeric states in the chaperone cycle is not fully understood. Principal Findings Here we report the crystal structure of a truncated HSP90 that contains the middle segment and the carboxy-terminal domain, termed MC-HSP90. The structure reveals an architecture with triangular bipyramid geometry, in which the building block of the hexameric assembly is a dimer. In solution, MC-HSP90 exists in three major oligomer states, namely dimer, tetramer and hexamer, which were elucidated by size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation. The newly discovered HSP90 isoform HSP90N that lacks the N-terminal ATPase domain also exhibited similar oligomerization states as did MC-HSP90. Conclusions While lacking the ATPase domain, both MC-HSP90 and HSP90N can self-assemble into a hexameric structure, spontaneously. The crystal structure of MC-HSP90 reveals that, in addition to the C-terminal dimerization domain, the residue W320 in the M domain plays a critical role in its oligomerization. This study not only demonstrates how the human MC-HSP90 forms a hexamer, but also justifies the similar formation of HSP90N by using 3D modeling analysis. PMID:21647436

  11. Regulation of Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression by Heat: A Novel Aspect of Heat Shock Factor 1 Function in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Edoardo; Angelini, Mara; Santoro, M. Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    The heat-shock response, a fundamental defense mechanism against proteotoxic stress, is regulated by a family of heat-shock transcription factors (HSF). In humans HSF1 is considered the central regulator of heat-induced transcriptional responses. The main targets for HSF1 are specific promoter elements (HSE) located upstream of heat-shock genes encoding cytoprotective heat-shock proteins (HSP) with chaperone function. In addition to its cytoprotective function, HSF1 was recently hypothesized to play a more complex role, regulating the expression of non-HSP genes; however, the non-canonical role of HSF1 is still poorly understood. Herein we report that heat-stress promotes the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a key regulator of inflammation controlling prostanoid and thromboxane synthesis, resulting in the production of high levels of prostaglandin-E2 in human cells. We show that heat-induced COX-2 expression is regulated at the transcriptional level via HSF1-mediated signaling and identify, by in-vitro reporter gene activity assay and deletion-mutant constructs analysis, the COX-2 heat-responsive promoter region and a new distal cis-acting HSE located at position −2495 from the transcription start site. As shown by ChIP analysis, HSF1 is recruited to the COX-2 promoter rapidly after heat treatment; by using shRNA-mediated HSF1 suppression and HSE-deletion from the COX-2 promoter, we demonstrate that HSF1 plays a central role in the transcriptional control of COX-2 by heat. Finally, COX-2 transcription is also induced at febrile temperatures in endothelial cells, suggesting that HSF1-dependent COX-2 expression could contribute to increasing blood prostaglandin levels during fever. The results identify COX-2 as a human non-classical heat-responsive gene, unveiling a new aspect of HSF1 function. PMID:22347460

  12. Human local and total heat losses in different temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Yin, Hui; Di, Yuhui; Liu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jiaping

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of operative temperature on the local and total heat losses, and the relationship between the heat loss and thermal sensation. 10 local parts of head, neck, chest, abdomen, upper arm, forearm, hand, thigh, leg and foot are selected. In all these parts, convection, radiation, evaporation, respiration, conduction and diffusion heat losses are analyzed when operative temperature is 23, 28, 33 and 37 °C. The local heat losses show that the radiation and convection heat losses are mainly affected by the area of local body, and the heat loss of the thigh is the most in the ten parts. The evaporation heat loss is mainly affected by the distribution of sweat gland, and the heat loss of the chest is the most. The total heat loss of the local body shows that in low temperature, the thigh, leg and chest have much heat loss, while in high temperature, the chest, abdomen, thigh and head have great heat loss, which are useful for clothing design. The heat losses of the whole body show that as the operative temperature increases, the radiation and convection heat losses decrease, the heat losses of conduction, respiration, and diffusion are almost constant, and the evaporation heat loss increases. By comparison, the heat loss ratios of the radiation, convection and sweat evaporation, are in agreement with the previous researches. At last, the formula about the heat loss ratio of convection and radiation is derived. It's useful for thermal comfort evaluation and HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) design. PMID:26879106

  13. Solubilization of herbicides by single and mixed commercial surfactants.

    PubMed

    Galán-Jiménez, M C; Gómez-Pantoja, E; Morillo, E; Undabeytia, T

    2015-12-15

    The solubilization capabilities of micellar solutions of three single surfactants, two alcohol alkoxylates B048 and B266, and the tallow alkyl ethoxylated amine ET15, and their equimolar mixed solutions toward the herbicides flurtamone (FL), metribuzin (MTZ) and mesotrione (MST) were investigated. The solubilization capacity was quantified in terms of the molar solubilization ratio (MSR), critical micellar concentration (CMC), micelle-water partition coefficient (Kmc), binding constant (K1), number of aggregation (Nagg) and Stern-Volmer constant (Ksv). The herbicides were greatly solubilized into different loci of the micelles: FL within the inner hydrophobic core, MST at the micelle/water interface and MTZ in the palisade region. Equimolar binary surfactant mixtures did not improve the solubilization of herbicides over those of single components, with the exception of MTZ by the B266/ET15 system which enhanced solubilization by 10-20%. This enhanced solubilization of MTZ was due to an increased number of micelles that arise from both the intermediate Nagg relative to that of the single surfactants and the lower CMC. The use of Ksv values was a better predictor of the solubilization of polar molecules within binary mixtures of these surfactants than the interaction parameter β(M) from regular solution theory (RST). The results herein suggest that the use of mixed surfactant systems for the solubilization of polar molecules in environmental remediation technologies may be very limited in scope, without clear advantages over the use of single surfactant systems.

  14. Solubilization of a functionally active platelet-activating factor receptor from rabbit platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, J E; Duronio, V; Wong, S I; McNeil, M; Salari, H

    1991-01-01

    Binding of platelet-activating factor (PAF) to a specific high-affinity membrane receptor has been demonstrated in numerous cell types, but very little is known about the molecular nature of this receptor. The receptor from rabbit platelets was solubilized using CHAPS, digitonin, octyl glucoside, Nonidet P-40 or sodium cholate, either with pre-bound [3H]PAF or in the absence of ligand. We have been able to demonstrate for the first time that the receptor solubilized with CHAPS, in the absence of ligand, could retain its binding activity. It migrated as a high molecular mass complex (greater than 350 kDa) on a Bio-Gel A-0.5 m gel filtration column. Binding to solubilized receptor rapidly reached an equilibrium at room temperature, but was much slower at 0 degrees C. Scatchard plots were used to calculate the number (approx. 100 per cell) and the affinity (Kd 2.5 +/- 1.4 nM) of the solubilized receptors. These values were comparable with those obtained from whole-cell binding experiments. Competition by PAF antagonists also verified that the assay was measuring PAF receptor binding activity. The presence of a protein in the receptor complex was demonstrated by heat and trypsin inactivation of binding activity. Trypsin had no effect on binding of PAF to whole cells, but was able to decrease binding activity in solubilized receptor preparations. Attempts to demonstrate the involvement of a glycoprotein by use of various lectin columns proved unsuccessful. The latter results are consistent with findings suggesting that the binding site of the PAF receptor may not be exposed at the cell surface. PMID:1654881

  15. Plant growth promotion by phosphate solubilizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, A; Khan, M S; Ahemad, M; Oves, M

    2009-09-01

    Most agronomic soils contain large reserves of total phosphorus [P], but the fixation and precipitation of P cause P deficiency, and in turn, restrict the growth of crops severely. Phosphorus replenishment, especially in sustainable production systems, remains a major challenge as it is mainly fertilizer-dependent. Though the use of chemical P fertilizers is obviously the best means to circumvent P deficiency in different agro-ecosystems, their use is always limited due to its spiralling cost. A greater interest has, therefore, been generated to find an alternative yet inexpensive technology that could provide sufficient P to plants while reducing the dependence on expensive chemical P fertilizers. Among the heterogeneous and naturally abundant microbes inhabiting the rhizosphere, the phosphate solubilizing microorganisms (PSM) including bacteria have provided an alternative biotechnological solution in sustainable agriculture to meet the P demands of plants. These organisms in addition to providing P to plants also facilitate plant growth by other mechanisms. Despite their different ecological niches and multiple functional properties, P-solubilizing bacteria have yet to fulfil their promise as commercial bio-inoculants. Current developments in our understanding of the functional diversity, rhizosphere colonizing ability, mode of actions and judicious application are likely to facilitate their use as reliable components in the management of sustainable agricultural systems. PMID:19789141

  16. Characteristics of halorhodopsin-bacterioruberin complex from Natronomonas pharaonis membrane in the solubilized system.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takanori; Razak, Nur Wahida Abdul; Kato, Noritaka; Mukai, Yuri

    2012-04-01

    Halorhodopsin is a retinal protein with a seven-transmembrane helix and acts as an inward light-driven Cl(-) pump. In this study, structural state of the solubilized halorhodopsin (NpHR) from the biomembrane of mutant strain KM-1 of Natronomonas pharaonis in nonionic detergent was investigated. A gel filtration chromatography monitored absorbances at 280 and 504 nm corresponding to the protein and a lipid soluble pigment of bacterioruberin (BR), respectively, has clearly detected an oligomer formation of the NpHRs and a complex formation between the NpHR and BR in the solubilized system. A molar ratio of NpHR:BR in the solubilized complex was close to 1:1. Further SDS-PAGE analysis of the solubilized NpHR cross-linked by 1% glutaraldehyde has revealed that the NpHR forms homotrimer in detergent system. Although this trimeric structure was stable in the presence of NaCl, it was dissociated to the monomer by the heat treatment at 45 °C in the desalted condition. The same tendency has been reported in the case of trimeric NpHR expressed heterologously on the E. coli membrane, leading to a conclusion that the change of strength of the trimeric association dependent on the ion binding is a universal feature of the NpHR. Interestingly, the trimer dissociation on the NpHR was accompanied by the complete dissociation of the BR molecule from the protein, indicated that the cavity formed by the NpHR protomers in the trimeric conformation is important for tight binding of the BR. Because the binding affinity for Cl(-) and the resistance to hydroxylamine under light illumination showed only minor differences between the NpHR in the solubilized state and that on the biomembrane, the influences of solubilization to the tertiary structure and function of the protein are thought to be minor. This NpHR-BR complex in the solubilized system has a potential to be a good model system to investigate the intermolecular interaction between the membrane protein and lipid. PMID:22369627

  17. Cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic paclitaxel solubilized and permeation-enhanced by natural product nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhijun; Zhang, Fang; Koh, Gar Yee; Dong, Xin; Hollingsworth, Javoris; Zhang, Jian; Russo, Paul S.; Yang, Peiying; Stout, Rhett W.

    2014-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the most potent intravenous chemotherapeutic agents to date, yet an oral formulation has been problematic due to its low solubility and permeability. Using the recently discovered solubilizing properties of rubusoside (RUB), we investigated this unique PTX-RUB formulation. Paclitaxel was solubilized by RUB in water to levels of 1.6 to 6.3 mg/mL at 10 to 40% weight/volume. These, nanomicellar, PTX-RUB complexes were dried to a powder which was subsequently reconstituted in physiologic solutions. After 2.5 hrs in gastric fluid 85 to 99% of PTX-RUB remained soluble, while 79 to 96% remained soluble in intestinal fluid. The solubilization of PTX was mechanized by the formation of water-soluble spherical nanomicelles between PTX and RUB with an average diameter of 6.6 nm. Compared with Taxol®, PTX-RUB nanoparticles were nearly four times more permeable in Caco-2 cell monocultures. In a side-by-side comparison with DMSO-solubilized PTX, PTX-RUB maintained the same level of cytotoxicity against three human cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 4 nM to 20 nM. Additionally, tubular formation and migration of HUVECs were inhibited at levels as low as 5 nM. These chemical and biological properties demonstrated by the PTX-RUB nanoparticles may improve oral bioavailability and enable further pharmacokinetic, toxicologic, and efficacy investigations. PMID:25243454

  18. The role of glycerol and phosphatidylcholine in solubilizing and enhancing insulin stability in reverse hexagonal mesophases.

    PubMed

    Amar-Yuli, Idit; Azulay, Doron; Mishraki, Tehila; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2011-12-15

    The potential of reverse hexagonal mesophases based on monoolein (GMO) and glycerol (as cosolvent) to facilitate the solubilization of proteins, such as insulin was explored. H(II) mesophases composed of GMO/decane/water were compared to GMO/decane/glycerol/water and GMO/phosphatidylcholine (PC)/decane/glycerol/water systems. The stability of insulin was tested, applying external physical modifications such as low pH and heat treatment (up to 70°C), in which insulin is known to form ordered amyloid-like aggregates (that are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases) with a characteristic cross β-pleated sheet structure. The impact of insulin confinement within these carriers on its stability, unfolding, and aggregation pathways was studied by combining SAXS, FTIR, and AFM techniques. These techniques provided a better insight into the molecular level of the "component interplay" in solubilizing and stabilizing insulin and its conformational modifications that dictate its final aggregate morphology. PC enlarged the water channels while glycerol shrank them, yet both facilitated insulin solubilization within the channels. The presence of glycerol within the mesophase water channels led to the formation of stronger hydrogen bonds with the hosting medium that enhanced the thermal stability of the protein and remarkably affected the unfolding process even after heat treatment (at 70°C for 60 min).

  19. Haloarchaea Endowed with Phosphorus Solubilization Attribute Implicated in Phosphorus Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ajar Nath; Sharma, Divya; Gulati, Sneha; Singh, Surender; Dey, Rinku; Pal, Kamal Krishna; Kaushik, Rajeev; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Archaea are unique microorganisms that are present in ecological niches of high temperature, pH and salinity. A total of 157 archaea were obtained from thirteen sediment, water and rhizospheric soil samples collected from Rann of Kutch, Gujarat, India. With an aim to screen phosphate solubilizing archaea, a new medium was designed as Haloarchaea P Solubilization (HPS) medium. The medium supported the growth and P solubilization activity of archaea. Employing the HPS medium, twenty isolates showed the P-solubilization. Phosphate solubilizing archaea were identified as seventeen distinct species of eleven genera namely Haloarcula, Halobacterium, Halococcus, Haloferax, Halolamina, Halosarcina, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, Natrialba, Natrinema and Natronoarchaeum. Natrinema sp. strain IARI-WRAB2 was identified as the most efficient P-solubilizer (134.61 mg/L) followed by Halococcus hamelinensis strain IARI-SNS2 (112.56 mg/L). HPLC analysis detected seven different kinds of organic acids, namely: gluconic acid, citric acid, formic acid, fumaric acid succinic acid, propionic acid and tartaric acid from the cultures of these isolates. These phosphate solubilizing halophilic archaea may play a role in P nutrition to vegetation growing in these hypersaline soils. This is the first report for these haloarchaea to solubilize considerable amount of P by production of organic acids and lowering of pH. PMID:26216440

  20. Haloarchaea Endowed with Phosphorus Solubilization Attribute Implicated in Phosphorus Cycle.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ajar Nath; Sharma, Divya; Gulati, Sneha; Singh, Surender; Dey, Rinku; Pal, Kamal Krishna; Kaushik, Rajeev; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2015-07-28

    Archaea are unique microorganisms that are present in ecological niches of high temperature, pH and salinity. A total of 157 archaea were obtained from thirteen sediment, water and rhizospheric soil samples collected from Rann of Kutch, Gujarat, India. With an aim to screen phosphate solubilizing archaea, a new medium was designed as Haloarchaea P Solubilization (HPS) medium. The medium supported the growth and P solubilization activity of archaea. Employing the HPS medium, twenty isolates showed the P-solubilization. Phosphate solubilizing archaea were identified as seventeen distinct species of eleven genera namely Haloarcula, Halobacterium, Halococcus, Haloferax, Halolamina, Halosarcina, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, Natrialba, Natrinema and Natronoarchaeum. Natrinema sp. strain IARI-WRAB2 was identified as the most efficient P-solubilizer (134.61 mg/L) followed by Halococcus hamelinensis strain IARI-SNS2 (112.56 mg/L). HPLC analysis detected seven different kinds of organic acids, namely: gluconic acid, citric acid, formic acid, fumaric acid succinic acid, propionic acid and tartaric acid from the cultures of these isolates. These phosphate solubilizing halophilic archaea may play a role in P nutrition to vegetation growing in these hypersaline soils. This is the first report for these haloarchaea to solubilize considerable amount of P by production of organic acids and lowering of pH.

  1. A general path for large-scale solubilization of cellular proteins: From membrane receptors to multiprotein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Pullara, Filippo; Guerrero-Santoro, Jennifer; Calero, Monica; Zhang, Qiangmin; Peng, Ye; Spåhr, Henrik; Kornberg, Guy L.; Cusimano, Antonella; Stevenson, Hilary P.; Santamaria-Suarez, Hugo; Reynolds, Shelley L.; Brown, Ian S.; Monga, Satdarshan P.S.; Van Houten, Bennett; Rapić-Otrin, Vesna; Calero, Guillermo; Levine, Arthur S.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of recombinant proteins in bacterial or eukaryotic systems often results in aggregation rendering them unavailable for biochemical or structural studies. Protein aggregation is a costly problem for biomedical research. It forces research laboratories and the biomedical industry to search for alternative, more soluble, non-human proteins and limits the number of potential “druggable” targets. In this study we present a highly reproducible protocol that introduces the systematic use of an extensive number of detergents to solubilize aggregated proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic systems. We validate the usefulness of this protocol by solubilizing traditionally difficult human protein targets to milligram quantities and confirm their biological activity. We use this method to solubilize monomeric or multimeric components of multi-protein complexes and demonstrate its efficacy to reconstitute large cellular machines. This protocol works equally well on cytosolic, nuclear and membrane proteins and can be easily adapted to a high throughput format. PMID:23137940

  2. Solubilization of nutraceuticals into reverse hexagonal mesophases.

    PubMed

    Amar-Yuli, Idit; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2008-08-21

    The solubilization of four bioactive molecules with different polarities, in three reverse hexagonal (HII) systems has been investigated. The three HII systems were a typical reverse hexagonal composed of glycerol monooleate (GMO)/tricaprylin/water and two fluid hexagonal systems containing either 2.75 wt % Transcutol or ethanol as a fourth component. The phase behavior of the liquid crystalline phases in the presence of ascorbic acid, ascorbyl palmitate, D-alpha-tocopherol and D-alpha-tocopherol acetate were determined by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and optical microscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) techniques were utilized to follow modifications in the thermal behavior and in the vibrations of different functional groups upon solubilizing the bioactive molecules. The nature of each guest molecule (in both geometry and polarity) together with the different HII structures (typical and fluids) determined the corresponding phase behavior, swelling or structural transformations and its location in the HII structures. Ascorbic acid was found to act as a chaotropic guest molecule, localized in the water-rich core and at the interface. The AP was also a chaotropic guest molecule with its head located in the vicinity of the GMO headgroup while its tail embedded close to the surfactant tail. D-alpha-tocopherol and D-alpha-tocopherol acetate were incorporated between the GMO tails; however, the D-alpha-tocopherol was located closer to the interface. Once Transcutol or ethanol was present and upon guest molecule incorporation, partial migration was detected.

  3. Molecular cloning and expression of a human heat shock factor, HSF1

    SciTech Connect

    Rabindran, S.K.; Giorgi, G.; Clos, J.; Wu, C. )

    1991-08-15

    Human cells respond to heat stress by inducing the binding of a preexisting transcriptional activator (heat shock factor, HSF) to DNA. The authors isolated recombinant DNA clones for a human cDNA fragment. The human HSF1 probe was produced by the PCR with primers deduced from conserved amino acids in the Drosophila and yeast HSF sequences. The human HSF1 mRNA is constitutively expressed in HeLa cells under nonshock conditions and encodes a protein with four conserved leucine zipper motifs. Like its counterpart in Drosophila, human HSF1 produced in Escherichia coli in the absence of heat shock is active as a DNA binding transcription factor, suggesting that the intrinsic activity of HSF is under negative control in human cells. Surprisingly, an independently isolated human HSF clone, HSF2, is related to but significantly different from HSF.

  4. The urban heat island and its impact on heat waves and human health in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianguo; Zheng, Youfei; Tang, Xu; Guo, Changyi; Li, Liping; Song, Guixiang; Zhen, Xinrong; Yuan, Dong; Kalkstein, Adam J; Li, Furong

    2010-01-01

    With global warming forecast to continue into the foreseeable future, heat waves are very likely to increase in both frequency and intensity. In urban regions, these future heat waves will be exacerbated by the urban heat island effect, and will have the potential to negatively influence the health and welfare of urban residents. In order to investigate the health effects of the urban heat island (UHI) in Shanghai, China, 30 years of meteorological records (1975-2004) were examined for 11 first- and second-order weather stations in and around Shanghai. Additionally, automatic weather observation data recorded in recent years as well as daily all-cause summer mortality counts in 11 urban, suburban, and exurban regions (1998-2004) in Shanghai have been used. The results show that different sites (city center or surroundings) have experienced different degrees of warming as a result of increasing urbanization. In turn, this has resulted in a more extensive urban heat island effect, causing additional hot days and heat waves in urban regions compared to rural locales. An examination of summer mortality rates in and around Shanghai yields heightened heat-related mortality in urban regions, and we conclude that the UHI is directly responsible, acting to worsen the adverse health effects from exposure to extreme thermal conditions.

  5. [Forecasting heat and functional state of human exposed to cooling in water medium].

    PubMed

    Afanas'eva, R F; Losik, T K; Bobrov, A F; Azhaev, A N; Ivanov, I V

    2005-01-01

    Based on mathematic and statistic analysis of results obtained in studies of human heat exchange with cooling water medium, the authors represented canonical correlational patterns to determine integral parameter of cooling conditions (IPCC) referred to naked human and with various clothes on, both with and without additional heat releasing sources. Mathematic and statistic analysis helped to present correlational patterns for predicting levels of changes in human functional state according to IPCC comprising complex of factors that determine heat exchange in water medium, including safe time for stay in it. PMID:16048063

  6. Solubilization and purification of melatonin receptors from lizard brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkees, S.A.; Conron, R.W. Jr.; Reppert, S.M. )

    1990-09-01

    Melatonin receptors in lizard brain were identified and characterized using {sup 125}I-labeled melatonin (({sup 125}I)MEL) after solubilization with the detergent digitonin. Saturation studies of solubilized material revealed a high affinity binding site, with an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of 181 +/- 45 pM. Binding was reversible and inhibited by melatonin and closely related analogs, but not by serotonin or norepinephrine. Treatment of solubilized material with the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog, guanosine 5'-(3-O-thiotriphosphate) (GTP-gamma-S), significantly reduced receptor affinity. Gel filtration chromatography of solubilized melatonin receptors revealed a high affinity, large (Mr 400,000) peak of specific binding. Pretreatment with GTP-gamma-S before solubilization resulted in elution of a lower affinity, smaller (Mr 150,000) peak of specific binding. To purify solubilized receptors, a novel affinity chromatography resin was developed by coupling 6-hydroxymelatonin with Epoxy-activated Sepharose 6B. Using this resin, melatonin receptors were purified approximately 10,000-fold. Purified material retained the pharmacologic specificity of melatonin receptors. These results show that melatonin receptors that bind ligand after detergent treatment can be solubilized and substantially purified by affinity chromatography.

  7. Solubilization of leonardite by an extracellular fraction from Coriolus versicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Pyne, J.W. Jr.; Stewart, D.L.; Fredrickson, J.; Wilson, B.W.

    1987-12-01

    Coriolus versicolor has previously been shown to degrade leonardite, an oxidized form of lignite. An extracellular fraction containing protein purified from a C. versicolor culture solubilized leonardite in vitro. Expression of the activity did not require the presence of leonardite and appeared during idiophase. During ion-exchange and gel filtration column chromatography, leonardite-biosolubilizing activity eluted with syringaldazine oxidase activity and with protein, as measured by A//sub 280/ and the biuret protein assay. Syringaldazine is a substrate of the polyphenol oxidase formed by C. versicolor. Comparison of leonardite-biosolubilizing activity with the effects of chelators and surface-active agents on leonardite showed that biosolubilization was not due to either surfactant or chelating ability. Heat treatment of the preparation at 60/sup 0/C for 30 min significantly reduced both syringaldazine oxidase and leonardite-biosolubilizing activities. Cyanide, azide, and thioglycolate, which are know inhibitors of syringaldazine oxidase activity of C. versicolor, also inhibited leonardite biosolubilization. From these data, we conclude that the purified protein fraction from C. versicolor contains a syringaldazine oxidase activity that participates in leonardite biosolubilization by enzymatic action.

  8. Phosphate Solubilization Potentials of Rhizosphere Isolates from Central Anatolia (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogut, M.; Er, F.

    2009-04-01

    Plant available-phosphorus (P) is usually low in Anatolian soils due mainly to the precipitation as calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) phosphates in alkaline conditions. Phosphate solubilizing microorganisms (PSM) can enhance plant P-availability by dissolving the hardly soluble-P within the rhizosphere, which is the zone that surrounds the plant roots. PSM's can be used as seed- or soil-inocula to increase plant P-uptake and the overall growth. A total of 162 PSM's were isolated from the rhizosphere of wheat plants excavated from different fields located along a 75 km part of a highway in Turkey. The mean, the standart deviation, and the median for solubilized-P (ppm) in a 24 h culture in a tricalcium phosphate broth were 681, 427, and 400 for glucose; 358, 266, and 236 for sucrose; and 102, 117, and 50 for starch, respectively. There was not a linear relationship between the phosphate solubilized in the liquid cultures and the solubilization index obtained in the Pikovskaya's agar. Nine isolates representing both weak and strong solubilizers [Bacillus megaterium (5), Bacillus pumilis (1), Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolica (1), Pseudomonas fluorescens (1), Arthrobacter aurescens (1) as determined by the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis] were further studied in a five day incubation. Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolica solubilized statistically (P<0.05) higher phosphate (409 ppm) than all the other strains did. There was not a statistically significant (P<0.05) difference in solubilized-P among the Bacillus strains. The pH of the medium fell to the levels between 4 and 5 from the initial neutrality. The phosphate solubilizing strains variably produced gluconic, 2-keto-D-gluconic, glycolic, acetic and butyric acids. The organic acids produced by these microorganisms seem to be the major source of phosphate solubilization in vitro.

  9. Pressure cell assisted solubilization of xyloglucans: tamarind seed polysaccharide and detarium gum.

    PubMed

    Picout, David R; Ross-Murphy, Simon B; Errington, Neil; Harding, Stephen E

    2003-01-01

    To improve the solubilization of two water-soluble xyloglucans, tamarind seed polysaccharide and detarium gum, by reducing substantially molecular aggregation, a "pressure cell" heating method was used. Conditions allowing solubilization and chain depolymerization were produced by varying appropriately the pressure, time, and temperature applied. The various MW fractions of solubilized xyloglucans were characterized by capillary viscometry and light scattering techniques in order to extract, with reliability, fundamental macromolecular parameters. Mark-Houwink and Flory exponents were found to be 0.67 +/- 0.04 and 0.51 +/- 0.06, respectively for both xyloglucan data combined, consistent with linear random coil behavior. A detailed analysis of the data seems to suggest that tamarind gum solutions are slightly perturbed by the effect of excluded volume, whereas detarium gum samples are close to the theta state. Chain flexibility parameters such characteristic ratio, C( proportional, variant ), and persistence length, L(p), were calculated for tamarind and detarium using the Burchard-Stockmayer-Fixman (BSF) geometric method. L(p) values of 6-8 nm were estimated for xyloglucans. The seemingly linear structure of tamarind and detarium, as suggested by the value of the Mark-Houwink and Flory exponents obtained, follows from analysis of the data by the classical Zimm method but not when employing the square root or Berry method which suggests a more branched chain profile. This was the approach adopted in our previous work on the characterization of detarium samples.

  10. Solubilization of active ingredients of different polarity in Pluronic® micellar solutions - Correlations between solubilizate polarity and solubilization site.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Kim, Viet; Prévost, Sylvain; Seidel, Karsten; Maier, Walter; Marguerre, Ann-Kathrin; Oetter, Günter; Tadros, Tharwat; Gradzielski, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The solubilization of two pharmaceutically active ingredients (AI) with significantly different water solubility, namely carbamazepine and fenofibrate (solubility of 150ppm and 10ppm, respectively), has been investigated using a series of Pluronics® (Poloxamers) containing different ethylene oxide and propylene oxide (EO/PO) units in the molecule. The results show largely enhanced solubilization of fenofibrate by Pluronic® micelles that increases with the PPO chain length provided the temperature is above the critical micelle temperature (cmt). In contrast the more water-soluble carbamazepine only shows a moderate increase in solubilization upon addition of Pluronics®. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR experiments show that the solubilization of fenofibrate occurs in the core of the micelles, whereas carbamazepine shows no direct association with the micelles. These clearly different solubilization mechanisms for the two AIs were confirmed by Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement Spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments, which show that fenofibrate interacts only with the PPO core of the micelle, whereas carbamazepine interacts with both PPO and PEO similarly. Accordingly, the large enhancement of the solubilization of fenofibrate is related to the fact that it is solubilized within the PPO core of the Pluronic® micelles, while the much more moderate increase of carbamazepine solubility is attributed to the change of solvent quality due to the presence of the amphiphilic copolymer and the interaction with the EO and PO units in solution. PMID:27244594

  11. Can intradermal administration of angiotensin II influence human heat loss responses during whole body heat stress?

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D.; Paull, Gabrielle; McGinn, Ryan; Foudil-bey, Imane; Akbari, Pegah

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear if angiotensin II, which can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (oxidative stress), modulates heat loss responses of cutaneous blood flow and sweating. We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II-induced increases in oxidative stress impair cutaneous perfusion and sweating during rest and exercise in the heat. Eleven young (24 ± 4 yr) healthy adults performed two 30-min cycling bouts at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). The first and second exercises were followed by a 20- and 40-min recovery. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for continuous administration of either: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 10 μM angiotensin II, 3) 10 mM ascorbate (an antioxidant), or 4) a combination of 10 μM angiotensin II + 10 mM ascorbate. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweating (ventilated capsule) were evaluated at each skin site. Compared with control, angiotensin II reduced both CVC and sweating at baseline resting and during each recovery in the heat (all P < 0.05). However, during both exercise bouts, there were no differences in CVC or sweating between the treatment sites (all P > 0.05). When ascorbate was coinfused with angiotensin II, the effect of angiotensin II on sweating was abolished (all P > 0.05); however, its effect on CVC at baseline resting and during each recovery remained intact (all P < 0.05). We show angiotensin II impairs cutaneous perfusion independent of oxidative stress, while it impairs sweating through increasing oxidative stress during exposure to an ambient heat stress before and following exercise. PMID:25767030

  12. Solubilization of gabapentin into HII mesophases.

    PubMed

    Achrai, Ben; Libster, Dima; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2011-02-10

    In the present work, we report on the solubilization of gabapentin (GBP) into lyotropic hexagonal mesophases composed of monoolein, tricaprylin, and water. It was demonstrated that the hexagonal structure remained intact up to 2 wt % gabapentin, whereas the lamellar phase coexisted with the hexagonal one in the concentration range of 3-4 wt % of the drug. At gabapentin content of 5-6 wt %, only lamellar phases containing defects such as dislocations and multilamellar vesicles were detected. Incorporation of GBP decreased the lattice parameter of the H(II) mesophase from 56.6 to 50.6 Å, while the structural dimensions of the lamellar phase were not affected. ATR-FTIR analysis suggested enhanced hydrogen bonding between the protonated amine of GBP and the O-H groups of the GMO and the water surrounding in the inner hydrophilic interface region. This led to intercalation of the drug into the water-lipid interface. At higher GBP loads of 4-6 wt %, thermal analysis revealed disordering within the lipid packing, apparently induced by the spatially altered interface area. Rheological measurements correlated the macroscopic features of the systems with alterations on the molecular level and allowed distinguishing between closely related mesophases due to their different rheological characteristics. In vitro transdermal delivery studies showed that the examined mesophases enabled a sustained release of GBP compared to its aqueous solution. Sustained release was more pronounced in the case of the hexagonal mesophase, compared to the lamellar one.

  13. Solubilization of 2-phenylethanol by dodecyldimethylamine oxide in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, Hirotaka; Christian, S.D.; Scamehorn, J.F. ); Abe, Masahiko; Ogino, Keizo )

    1991-01-01

    The solubilization of 2-phenylethanol (PEA) was measured over a wide range of solute activities and pH values by using dodecyldimethylamine oxide (DDAO) as the surfactant. The DDAO in micellar form is all cationic (protonated) at low pH and all nonionic at high pH. At intermediate pH levels, the DDAO forms mixed micelles containing both the cationic and nonionic forms of surfactant. Thus, measurement of the solubilization of PEA as a function of pH produces solubilization data as a function of mixed micelle composition for this amphoteric surfactant. The solubilization equilibrium constant was found to decrease with increasing mole fraction of PEA in the micelle for all pH values and to be less in the mixed micelles than in either pure cationic or pure nonionic micelles. This latter effect could be due to the hydrophilic region of the mixed micelle being more compact than that of the single-component micelles.

  14. Characterization and subsequent utilization of microbially solubilized coal: Preliminary studies

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, B.H.; Nicklaus, D.M.; Woodward, C.A.; Lewis, S.N.; Faison, B.D.

    1989-01-01

    The solubilization of low-ranked coals by fungi, such as Paecilomyces and Candida, in defined submerged culture systems has been demonstrated. Current efforts focus on the characterization of the aqueous solubilized coal products and the development of technologies for their subsequent utilization. Solubilized coal products have been fractionated, and preliminary characterizations performed. Differences in product composition have been detected with respect to the organism used in culture duration. Prospects for the conversion of the aerobically-solubilized coal into less-oxidized products have been developed which can remain active and viable in the presence of the aqueous coal product or vanillin, a coal model compound. The results suggest that a methanogenic consortium was able to produce methane and carbon dioxide from the product of coal biosolubilization by Paecilomyces as a sole carbon source. Work continues on the development of cultures able to convert the aqueous coal product and its various fractions into methane or fuel alcohols. 17 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Evidence for surfactant solubilization of plant epicuticular wax.

    PubMed

    Tamura, H; Knoche, M; Bukovac, M J

    2001-04-01

    The solubilization of isolated, reconstituted tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit and broccoli (Brassica oleracaea var. botrytis L.) leaf epicuticular waxes (ECW) by nonionic octylphenoxypolyethoxy ethanol surfactant (Triton X-100) was demonstrated in a model system by TLC and fluorescence analysis using pyrene as a fluorescent probe. ECW was solubilized at or above the surfactant critical micelle concentration; solubilization increased with an increase in micelle concentration. As shown by the fluorescence quenching of pyrene, surfactant solubilization of the ECW increased rapidly for the first 12 h, then approached a plateau, increased linearly with an increase in temperature (22--32 degrees C), and decreased linearly with the log of the polyoxyethylene chain length (range 5--40 oxyethylenes). These data are discussed in relation to surfactant effects on phytotoxicity and performance of foliar spray application of agrochemicals. PMID:11308330

  16. An efficient microbiological growth medium for screening phosphate solubilizing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Nautiyal, C S

    1999-01-01

    A novel defined microbiological growth medium, National Botanical Research Institute's phosphate growth medium (NBRIP), which is more efficient than Pikovskaya medium (PVK), was developed for screening phosphate solubilizing microorganisms. In plate assay the efficiency of NBRIP was comparable to PVK; however, in broth assay NBRIP consistently demonstrated about 3-fold higher efficiency compared to PVK. The results indicated that the criterion for isolation of phosphate solubilizers based on the formation of visible halo/zone on agar plates is not a reliable technique, as many isolates which did not show any clear zone on agar plates solubilized insoluble inorganic phosphates in liquid medium. It may be concluded that soil microbes should be screened in NBRIP broth assay for the identification of the most efficient phosphate solubilizers. PMID:9919677

  17. Measuring the effects of heat wave episodes on the human body's thermal balance.

    PubMed

    Katavoutas, George; Theoharatos, George; Flocas, Helena A; Asimakopoulos, Dimosthenis N

    2009-03-01

    During the peak of an extensive heat wave episode on 23-25 July 2007, simultaneous thermophysiological measurements were made in two non-acclimated healthy adults of different sex in a suburban area of Greater Athens, Greece. Based on experimental measurements of mean skin temperature and metabolic heat production, heat fluxes to and from the human body were calculated, and the biometeorological index heat load (HL) produced was determined according to the heat balance equation. Comparing experimental values with those derived from theoretical estimates revealed a great heat stress for both individuals, especially the male, while theoretical values underestimated heat stress. The study also revealed that thermophysiological factors, such as mean skin temperature and metabolic heat production, play an important role in determining heat fluxes patterns in the heat balance equation. The theoretical values of mean skin temperature as derived from an empirical equation may not be appropriate to describe the changes that take place in a non-acclimated individual. Furthermore, the changes in metabolic heat production were significant even for standard activity. PMID:19137329

  18. Calorimetric study on human erythrocyte glycolysis. Heat production in various metabolic conditions.

    PubMed

    Minakami, S; de Verdier, C H

    1976-06-01

    The heat production of human erythrocytes was measured on a flow microcalorimeter with simultaneous analyses of lactate and other metabolites. The heat production connected with the lactate formation was about 17 kcal (71 kJ) per mol lactate formed which corresponded to the sum of heat production due to the formation of lactate from glucose and the heat production due to neutralization. The heat production rate increased as the pH of the suspension increased, corresponding to the increase in lactate formation. Glycolytic inhibitors such as fluoride and monoiodoacetate caused a decrease in the rate of heat production, whereas arsenate induced a large transient increase in heat production associated with a transient increase in lactate formation. Decrease in pyruvate concentration was usually associated with increase in heat production, although the decreased pyruvate concentration was coupled with formation of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate. When inosine, dihydroxyacetone or D-glyceraldehyde was used as a substrate, an increase in the heat production rate was observed. Addition of methylene blue caused an oxygen uptake which was accompanied by a remarkable increase in heat production rate corresponding to about 160 kcal (670 kJ) per mol oxygen consumed. The value for heat production in red cells in the above-mentioned metabolic conditions was considered in relation to earlier known data on free energy and enthalpy changes of the different metabolic steps in the glycolytic pathway.

  19. Measuring the effects of heat wave episodes on the human body's thermal balance.

    PubMed

    Katavoutas, George; Theoharatos, George; Flocas, Helena A; Asimakopoulos, Dimosthenis N

    2009-03-01

    During the peak of an extensive heat wave episode on 23-25 July 2007, simultaneous thermophysiological measurements were made in two non-acclimated healthy adults of different sex in a suburban area of Greater Athens, Greece. Based on experimental measurements of mean skin temperature and metabolic heat production, heat fluxes to and from the human body were calculated, and the biometeorological index heat load (HL) produced was determined according to the heat balance equation. Comparing experimental values with those derived from theoretical estimates revealed a great heat stress for both individuals, especially the male, while theoretical values underestimated heat stress. The study also revealed that thermophysiological factors, such as mean skin temperature and metabolic heat production, play an important role in determining heat fluxes patterns in the heat balance equation. The theoretical values of mean skin temperature as derived from an empirical equation may not be appropriate to describe the changes that take place in a non-acclimated individual. Furthermore, the changes in metabolic heat production were significant even for standard activity.

  20. Measuring the effects of heat wave episodes on the human body's thermal balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katavoutas, George; Theoharatos, George; Flocas, Helena A.; Asimakopoulos, Dimosthenis N.

    2009-03-01

    During the peak of an extensive heat wave episode on 23-25 July 2007, simultaneous thermophysiological measurements were made in two non-acclimated healthy adults of different sex in a suburban area of Greater Athens, Greece. Based on experimental measurements of mean skin temperature and metabolic heat production, heat fluxes to and from the human body were calculated, and the biometeorological index heat load (HL) produced was determined according to the heat balance equation. Comparing experimental values with those derived from theoretical estimates revealed a great heat stress for both individuals, especially the male, while theoretical values underestimated heat stress. The study also revealed that thermophysiological factors, such as mean skin temperature and metabolic heat production, play an important role in determining heat fluxes patterns in the heat balance equation. The theoretical values of mean skin temperature as derived from an empirical equation may not be appropriate to describe the changes that take place in a non-acclimated individual. Furthermore, the changes in metabolic heat production were significant even for standard activity.

  1. Enriching vermicompost by nitrogen fixing and phosphate solubilizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Singh, K P

    2001-01-01

    The effect of inoculation of vermicompost with nitrogen-fixing Azotobacter chroococcum strains, Azospirillum lipoferum and the phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas striata on N and P contents of the vermicompost was assessed. Inoculation of N2 fixing bacteria into vermicompost increased contents of N and P. Enriching vermicompost with rock phosphate improved significantly the available P when inoculated with P. striata. During the incubation period, the inoculated bacterial strains proliferated rapidly, fixed N and solubilized added and native phosphate.

  2. Research and engineering assessment of biological solubilization of phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, R.D.; McIlwain, M.E.; Losinski, S.J.; Taylor, D.D.

    1993-03-01

    This research and engineering assessment examined a microbial phosphate solubilization process as a method of recovering phosphate from phosphorus containing ore compared to the existing wet acid and electric arc methods. A total of 860 microbial isolates, collected from a range of natural environments were tested for their ability to solubilize phosphate from rock phosphate. A bacterium (Pseudomonas cepacia) was selected for extensive characterization and evaluation of the mechanism of phosphate solubilization and of process engineering parameters necessary to recover phosphate from rock phosphate. These studies found that concentration of hydrogen ion and production of organic acids arising from oxidation of the carbon source facilitated microbial solubilization of both pure chemical insoluble phosphate compounds and phosphate rock. Genetic studies found that phosphate solubilization was linked to an enzyme system (glucose dehydrogenase). Process-related studies found that a critical solids density of 1% by weight (ore to liquid) was necessary for optimal solubilization. An engineering analysis evaluated the cost and energy requirements for a 2 million ton per year sized plant, whose size was selected to be comparable to existing wet acid plants.

  3. Projections of heat waves with high impact on human health in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amengual, A.; Homar, V.; Romero, R.; Brooks, H. E.; Ramis, C.; Gordaliza, M.; Alonso, S.

    2014-08-01

    Climate change will result in more intense, more frequent and longer lasting heat waves. The most hazardous conditions emerge when extreme daytime temperatures combine with warm night-time temperatures, high humidities and light winds for several consecutive days. Here, we assess present and future heat wave impacts on human health in Europe. Present daily physiologically equivalent temperatures (PET) are derived from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. PET allows to specifically focus on heat-related risks on humans. Regarding projections, a suite of high-resolution regional climate models - run under SRES A1B scenario - has been used. A quantile-quantile adjustment is applied to the daily simulated PET to correct biases in individual model climatologies and a multimodel ensemble strategy is adopted to encompass model errors. Two types of heat waves differently impacting human health - strong and extreme stress - are defined according to specified thresholds of thermal stress and duration. Heat wave number, frequency, duration and amplitude are derived for each type. Results reveal relatively strong correlations between the spatial distribution of strong and extreme heat wave amplitudes and mortality excess for the 2003 European summer. Projections suggest a steady increase and a northward extent of heat wave attributes in Europe. Strong stress heat wave frequencies could increase more than 40 days, lasting over 20 days more by 2075-2094. Amplitudes might augment up to 7 °C per heat wave day. Important increases in extreme stress heat wave attributes are also expected: up to 40 days in frequency, 30 days in duration and 4 °C in amplitude. We believe that with this information at hand policy makers and stakeholders on vulnerable populations to heat stress can respond more effectively to the future challenges imposed by climate warming.

  4. [Alterations in heat shock protein 70 kDa levels in human neutrophils under the heat shock conditions].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, A A; Vetchinin, S S; Sapozhnikov, A M; Kovalenko, E I

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular content of heat shock proteins of 70 kDa family (HSP70) possessing chaperone and cytoprotective functions depends on specialization and functional activity of the cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the dynamics of constitutive and inducible HSP70 levels evoked by heat shock in human neutrophils, the short-lived fraction of white blood cells providing non-specific defense against bacterial pathogens. Biphasic dynamics of the intracellular HSP70 level with an increase and following decrease in 15-30 min after the heat shock was revealed by flow cytometry. This dynamics was similar for constitutive and inducible forms of HSP70. Pre-incubation of neutrophils with cycloheximide, the inhibitor of protein synthesis, did not change the intracellular HSP70 dynamics registered by flow cytometry indicating that the increased HSP70 level detected immediately after the heat shock was not mediated by de novo protein synthesis. It was confirmed by Western blotting analysis of HSP70 intracellular content. It was suggested that the elevated HSP70 level was related to conformational HSP70 molecule changes and to increased availability of HSP70 epitopes for antibody binding. Using a panel of antibodies specific to the N-terminal ATP-binding or C-terminal substrate-binding domains of HSP70 it has been demonstrated by cell immunofluorescence and flow cytometry methods that the heat shock-associated increase of the intracellular HSP70 level was mediated by HSP70 interaction with antibodies recognizing HSP70 substrate-binding domain. It was demonstrated that the decrease of intracellular HSP70 level after heat treatment could be connected with a release of both inducible and constitutive HSP70 into extracellular space. Our data suggest that stress-induced release of HSP70 from neutrophils is regulated by ABC-transporters.

  5. Estimation and harvesting of human heat power for wearable electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziurdzia, P.; Brzozowski, I.; Bratek, P.; Gelmuda, W.; Kos, A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the issue of self-powered wearable electronic devices that are capable of harvesting free available energy dissipated by the user in the form of human heat. The free energy source is intended to be used as a secondary power source supporting primary battery in a sensor bracelet. The main scope of the article is a presentation of the concept for a measuring setup used to quantitative estimation of heat power sources in different locations over the human body area. The crucial role in the measurements of the human heat plays a thermoelectric module working in the open circuit mode. The results obtained during practical tests are confronted with the requirements of the dedicated thermoelectric generator. A prototype design of a human warmth energy harvester with an ultra-low power DC-DC converter based on the LTC3108 circuit is analysed.

  6. Advanced oxidation process using hydrogen peroxide/microwave system for solubilization of phosphate.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ping Huang; Wong, Wayne T; Lo, Kwang Victor

    2005-01-01

    An advanced oxidation process (AOP) combining hydrogen peroxide and microwave heating was used for the solubilization of phosphate from secondary municipal sludge from an enhanced biological phosphorus removal process. The microwave irradiation is used as a generator agent of oxidizing radicals as well as a heating source in the process. This AOP process could facilitate the release of a large amount of the sludge-bound phosphorus from the sewage sludge. More than 84% of the total phosphorous could be released at a microwave heating time of 5 min at 170 degrees C. This innovative process has the potential of being applied to simple sludge treatment processes in domestic wastewater treatment and to the recovery of phosphorus from the wastewater.

  7. Safety of human blood products: inactivation of retroviruses by heat treatment at 60 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Hilfenhaus, J; Mauler, R; Friis, R; Bauer, H

    1985-04-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) can be transferred to patients by blood transfusions or human blood preparations, such as cryoprecipitates or factor VIII concentrates. Retroviruses have been discussed as infectious AIDS agents and more recently human T-lymphotropic retroviruses designated as HTLV type III and LAV (lymphadenopathy-associated virus) have been isolated from AIDS patients. Whether heat treatment at 60 degrees C (pasteurization) of liquid human plasma protein preparations inactivates retroviruses was therefore investigated. Pasteurization had already been included in the routine manufacturing process of human plasma protein preparations in order to guarantee safety with regard to hepatitis B. Since high titer preparations of human retroviruses were not available, heat inactivation was studied using Rous sarcoma virus added to the various plasma protein preparations tested. This retrovirus which was obtained in preparations of 6.0 log10 FFU/ml was shown to be at least as heat stable as two mammalian retroviruses studied, i.e., feline and simian sarcoma virus. In all of eight different plasma protein preparations tested, Rous sarcoma virus was completely inactivated after a heat treatment lasting no longer than 4 hr. It is thus concluded that pasteurization of liquid plasma protein preparations at 60 degrees C over a period of 10 hr must confer safety to these products with respect to AIDS, provided that the AIDS agents are retroviruses of comparable heat stability as Rous sarcoma virus and the mammalian retroviruses tested.

  8. Fetal calf serum heat inactivation and lipopolysaccharide contamination influence the human T lymphoblast proteome and phosphoproteome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The effects of fetal calf serum (FCS) heat inactivation and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination on cell physiology have been studied, but their effect on the proteome of cultured cells has yet to be described. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of heat inactivation of FCS and LPS contamination on the human T lymphoblast proteome. Human T lymphoblastic leukaemia (CCRF-CEM) cells were grown in FCS, either non-heated, or heat inactivated, having low (< 1 EU/mL) or regular (< 30 EU/mL) LPS concentrations. Protein lysates were resolved by 2-DE followed by phospho-specific and silver nitrate staining. Differentially regulated spots were identified by nano LC ESI Q-TOF MS/MS analysis. Results A total of four proteins (EIF3M, PRS7, PSB4, and SNAPA) were up-regulated when CCRF-CEM cells were grown in media supplemented with heat inactivated FCS (HE) as compared to cells grown in media with non-heated FCS (NHE). Six proteins (TCPD, ACTA, NACA, TCTP, ACTB, and ICLN) displayed a differential phosphorylation pattern between the NHE and HE groups. Compared to the low concentration LPS group, regular levels of LPS resulted in the up-regulation of three proteins (SYBF, QCR1, and SUCB1). Conclusion The present study provides new information regarding the effect of FCS heat inactivation and change in FCS-LPS concentration on cellular protein expression, and post-translational modification in human T lymphoblasts. Both heat inactivation and LPS contamination of FCS were shown to modulate the expression and phosphorylation of proteins involved in basic cellular functions, such as protein synthesis, cytoskeleton stability, oxidative stress regulation and apoptosis. Hence, the study emphasizes the need to consider both heat inactivation and LPS contamination of FCS as factors that can influence the T lymphoblast proteome. PMID:22085958

  9. Plant growth promotion induced by phosphate solubilizing endophytic Pseudomonas isolates.

    PubMed

    Oteino, Nicholas; Lally, Richard D; Kiwanuka, Samuel; Lloyd, Andrew; Ryan, David; Germaine, Kieran J; Dowling, David N

    2015-01-01

    The use of plant growth promoting bacterial inoculants as live microbial biofertilizers provides a promising alternative to chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Inorganic phosphate solubilization is one of the major mechanisms of plant growth promotion by plant associated bacteria. This involves bacteria releasing organic acids into the soil which solubilize the phosphate complexes converting them into ortho-phosphate which is available for plant up-take and utilization. The study presented here describes the ability of endophytic bacteria to produce gluconic acid (GA), solubilize insoluble phosphate, and stimulate the growth of Pisum sativum L. plants. This study also describes the genetic systems within three of these endophyte strains thought to be responsible for their effective phosphate solubilizing abilities. The results showed that many of the endophytic strains produced GA (14-169 mM) and have moderate to high phosphate solubilization capacities (~400-1300 mg L(-1)). When inoculated into P. sativum L. plants grown in soil under soluble phosphate limiting conditions, the endophytes that produced medium-high levels of GA displayed beneficial plant growth promotion effects. PMID:26257721

  10. Solubilization of lignin by the ruminal anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix patriciarum.

    PubMed Central

    McSweeney, C S; Dulieu, A; Katayama, Y; Lowry, J B

    1994-01-01

    The ability of the ruminal anaerobic phycomycete Neocallimastix patriciarum to digest model lignin compounds and lignified structures in plant material was studied in batch culture. The fungus did not degrade or transform model lignin compounds that were representative of the predominant intermonomer linkages in lignin, nor did it solubilize acid detergent lignin that had been isolated from spear grass. In a stem fraction of sorghum, 33.6% of lignin was apparently solubilized by the fungus. Solubilization of ester- and either-linked phenolics accounted for 9.2% of the lignin released. The amounts of free phenolic acids detected in culture fluid were equivalent to the apparent loss of ester-linked phenolics from the sorghum substrate. However, the fungus was unable to cleave the ether bond in hydroxycinnamic acid bridges that cross-link lignin and polysaccharide. It is suggested that the majority of the solubilized lignin fraction was a lignin carbohydrate complex containing ether-linked hydroxycinnamic acids. The lignin carbohydrate complex was probably solubilized through dissolution of xylan in the lignin-xylan matrix rather than by lignin depolymerization. PMID:8085834

  11. Plant growth promotion induced by phosphate solubilizing endophytic Pseudomonas isolates

    PubMed Central

    Oteino, Nicholas; Lally, Richard D.; Kiwanuka, Samuel; Lloyd, Andrew; Ryan, David; Germaine, Kieran J.; Dowling, David N.

    2015-01-01

    The use of plant growth promoting bacterial inoculants as live microbial biofertilizers provides a promising alternative to chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Inorganic phosphate solubilization is one of the major mechanisms of plant growth promotion by plant associated bacteria. This involves bacteria releasing organic acids into the soil which solubilize the phosphate complexes converting them into ortho-phosphate which is available for plant up-take and utilization. The study presented here describes the ability of endophytic bacteria to produce gluconic acid (GA), solubilize insoluble phosphate, and stimulate the growth of Pisum sativum L. plants. This study also describes the genetic systems within three of these endophyte strains thought to be responsible for their effective phosphate solubilizing abilities. The results showed that many of the endophytic strains produced GA (14–169 mM) and have moderate to high phosphate solubilization capacities (~400–1300 mg L−1). When inoculated into P. sativum L. plants grown in soil under soluble phosphate limiting conditions, the endophytes that produced medium-high levels of GA displayed beneficial plant growth promotion effects. PMID:26257721

  12. Solubilization, stabilization, and purification of chemokine receptors using biosensor technology.

    PubMed

    Navratilova, Iva; Sodroski, Joseph; Myszka, David G

    2005-04-15

    Establishing solubilization conditions for membrane-associated receptors is often a tedious empirical process. Here we describe a novel application of SPR biosensor technology to screen solubilization conditions automatically and to assess receptor activity directly. We focus on two chemokine receptors, CXCR4 and CCR5, which are important in HIV cell invasion. The autosampler in Biacore 3000 permitted whole cells expressing C-terminally tagged receptors to be automatically lysed under a given solubilization condition and the lysates to be injected over an antibody surface. The total amount of solubilized receptor could be quantitated from the antibody capture level, whereas the amount of active receptor could be quantitated using a subsequent injection of conformationally sensitive antibody or protein. Using this approach, we identified detergent/lipid/buffer combinations that enhanced and maintained receptor activity. We also used the biosensor to demonstrate CD4-dependent binding of gp120 to solubilized CCR5 and to develop affinity chromatography-based purification methods that increased receptor activity more than 300%. Together, these results illustrate the benefits of using the biosensor as a tool for isolating functional membrane receptors and for analyzing ligand/receptor interactions.

  13. The effects of surfactant formulation on nonequilibrium NAPL solubilization.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lirong; Mayer, Alex S; Pope, Gary A

    2003-01-01

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) involves the injection of surfactant solutions into aquifers contaminated with nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPL). Batch and column experiments were used to assess the effect of surfactant formulation on the rate of NAPL solubilization. The experimental variables were surfactant type, surfactant concentration, electrolyte concentration, and cosolvent concentration. Model equations were proposed and solved to describe solubilization under the conditions of each type of experiment. Using these models, a solubilization rate constant, kappa(b), and an overall mass transfer rate coefficient, kappa, were estimated from the batch and column experiments, respectively. The solubilization rate constant was consistently sensitive to surfactant type, surfactant concentration, and electrolyte concentration. The estimated solubilization rate constants varied over two orders of magnitude. The results of the column experiments also were sensitive to the surfactant formulation. Variations in the fitted mass transfer rate coefficient parameter, beta(0), were related to variations in the surfactant formulations. A comparison between the results of the batch and column experiments yields an apparent relationship between beta(0) and kappa(b). This relationship suggests that the mass transfer rate coefficient is directly related to the formulation of the surfactant solution.

  14. Human thermoregulatory responses during heat exposure after artificially induced sunburn.

    PubMed

    Pandolf, K B; Gange, R W; Latzka, W A; Blank, I H; Kraning, K K; Gonzalez, R R

    1992-04-01

    Thermoregulatory responses in the heat (ambient temperature 49 degrees C, 20% relative humidity, 1 m/s wind) were investigated in 10 unacclimated men during 50 min of cycle ergometer exercise (approximately 53% of maximal aerobic power) after a 10-min rest before as well as 24 h and 1 wk after twice the minimal erythemal dose of UV-B radiation that covered approximately 85% of the body surface area. In 7 subjects esophageal temperature (Tes) was recorded while in all 10 subjects five-site skin and rectal temperatures, heart rate, and back, left forearm, and shielded (12 cm2 area) right forearm sweating rates (msw) were recorded at 15-s intervals. Venous blood was collected before and after exercise-heat stress. Mean skin temperature, Tes, rectal temperature, heart rate, and total body sweating rate were not significantly (P greater than 0.05) affected by sunburn. Pre- and postexercise values of hematocrit, hemoglobin, plasma protein, plasma volume, and plasma osmolality were also not affected (P greater than 0.05) by sunburn. Analysis of presunburn and post-sunburn data showed that the Tes intercept for sweating (degrees C) was unaffected (P greater than 0.05), but msw/Tes and final msw from the left forearm (msw/Tes 0.24 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.17 +/- 0.01 mg.cm-2.min-1. degrees C-1, P less than 0.05; msw 0.60 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.37 +/- 0.02, mg.cm-2.min-1, P less than 0.05) and back (msw/Tes 0.43 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.36 +/- 0.01 mg.cm-2.min-1. degrees C-1, P = 0.052; msw 1.08 +/- 0.09 vs. 0.74 +/- 0.05 mg.cm-2.min-1, P less than 0.05) were significantly reduced 24 h postsunburn.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Effect of short-term exercise-heat acclimation on ventilatory and cerebral blood flow responses to passive heating at rest in humans.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Tsuji, Bun; Honda, Yasushi; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Hyperthermia induces hyperventilation and cerebral hypoperfusion in resting humans. We tested the hypothesis that short-term exercise-heat acclimation would alleviate those effects. Twenty healthy male subjects were divided into two groups that performed exercise training in the heat (TR-HEAT, n = 10) or cold (TR-COLD, n = 10). Before and after the training, the subjects in both groups participated in passive-heat tests at rest. Training was performed at 37°C (TR-HEAT) or 10°C (TR-COLD) and entailed four 20-min bouts of cycling at 50% peak oxygen uptake separated by 10-min recoveries daily for 6 consecutive days. After TR-HEAT, esophageal temperature was lowered when measured before and during passive heating, as was the esophageal temperature threshold for cutaneous active vasodilation, whereas plasma volume was increased (all P < 0.05). These traditional indices of successful heat acclimation were not all induced by TR-COLD (all P > 0.05). TR-HEAT had no significant effect on passive heating-induced increases in minute ventilation, even when evaluated as the esophageal temperature threshold for increases in minute ventilation and the slope relating minute ventilation to esophageal temperature (all P > 0.05). By contrast, TR-HEAT attenuated the passive heating-induced reduction in the cerebral vascular conductance index (middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity/mean arterial pressure) (all P < 0.05). TR-COLD did not attenuate the increase in minute ventilation or the decrease in the cerebral vascular conductance index observed during passive heating (all P > 0.05). These data suggest that in resting heated humans, short-term heat acclimation achieved through moderate-intensity exercise training (i.e., 50% peak oxygen uptake) in the heat does not influence hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation, but it does potentially attenuate cerebral hypoperfusion.

  16. Human Monocyte Heat Shock Protein 72 Responses to Acute Hypoxic Exercise after 3 Days of Exercise Heat Acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ben J.; Mackenzie, Richard W. A.; Cox, Valerie; James, Rob S.; Thake, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether short-term heat acclimation (STHA) could confer increased cellular tolerance to acute hypoxic exercise in humans as determined via monocyte HSP72 (mHSP72) expression. Sixteen males were separated into two matched groups. The STHA group completed 3 days of exercise heat acclimation; 60 minutes cycling at 50% V˙O2peak in 40°C 20% relative humidity (RH). The control group (CON) completed 3 days of exercise training in 20°C, 40% RH. Each group completed a hypoxic stress test (HST) one week before and 48 hours following the final day of CON or STHA. Percentage changes in HSP72 concentrations were similar between STHA and CON following HST1 (P = 0.97). STHA induced an increase in basal HSP72 (P = 0.03) with no change observed in CON (P = 0.218). Basal mHSP72 remained elevated before HST2 for the STHA group (P < 0.05) and was unchanged from HST1 in CON (P > 0.05). Percent change in mHSP72 was lower after HST2 in STHA compared to CON (P = 0.02). The mHSP72 response to hypoxic exercise was attenuated following 3 days of heat acclimation. This is indicative of improved tolerance and ability to cope with the hypoxic insult, potentially mediated in part by increased basal reserves of HSP72. PMID:25874231

  17. Solubilization and reconstitution of vesicular stomatitis virus envelope using octylglucoside.

    PubMed Central

    Paternostre, M; Viard, M; Meyer, O; Ghanam, M; Ollivon, M; Blumenthal, R

    1997-01-01

    Reconstituted vesicular stomatitis virus envelopes or virosomes are formed by detergent removal from solubilized intact virus. We have monitored the solubilization process of the intact vesicular stomatitis virus by the nonionic surfactant octylglucoside at various initial virus concentrations by employing turbidity measurements. This allowed us to determine the phase boundaries between the membrane and the mixed micelles domains. We have also characterized the lipid and protein content of the solubilized material and of the reconstituted envelope. Both G and M proteins and all of the lipids of the envelope were extracted by octylglucoside and recovered in the reconstituted envelope. Fusion activity of the virosomes tested either on Vero cells or on liposomes showed kinetics and pH dependence similar to those of the intact virus. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:9083672

  18. Expression of Human DNAJ (Heat Shock Protein-40) B3 in Humanized UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mitsugi, Ryo; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    The human DNAJB3 gene encodes a DNAJ (Heat shock protein 40; Hsp40) homolog, subfamily B, member 3 chaperone protein (DNAJB3), which can be down-regulated in disease conditions, as observed in decreased expression of DNAJB3 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of obese patients. Recently, humanized UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1 mice (hUGT1 mice) were developed, in which the introduced human UGT1 gene contained a gene encoding human DNAJB3. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of human DNAJB3 mRNA in hUGT1 mice. Among the examined tissues, the testis had the highest expression of human DNAJB3 mRNA, while the lowest expression was observed in the liver. We found that the pattern of tissue-specific expression of mouse Dnajb3 in hUGT1 mice was very similar to that of human DNAJB3. We further demonstrated that the expression of human DNAJB3 in the liver was significantly reduced in high-fat-diet-fed hUGT1 mice compared to the expression level in the control mice, indicating that the expression of human DNAJB3 in hUGT1 mice could be similarly regulated in disease conditions such as obesity. Humanized UGT1 mice might therefore be useful to investigate the physiological role of human DNAJB3 in vivo. PMID:26147428

  19. Selected human physiological responses during extreme heat: the Badwater Ultramarathon.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jacqueline S; Connolly, Declan A

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to examine various physiological responses during an ultramarathon held in extreme heat. Our investigation was conducted at The Badwater Ultramarathon, a nonstop 217-km run across Death Valley, CA, USA. This study recruited 4 male athletes, average age of 43 (±SD) (±7.35), (range) 39-54 years. All 4 subjects successfully completed the race with a mean finish time of 36:20:23 hours (±SD) (±3:08:38) (range) 34:05:25-40:51:46 hours, and a mean running speed of 6.03 km·h(-1) (±SD) (±0.05), (range) 5.3-6.4 km·h(-1). The anthropometric variables measured were (mean, ±SD) mass 79.33 kg (±6.43), height 1.80 m (±0.09), body surface area 1.93 m2 (±0.16), body mass index 24.38 kg·m(-2) (±1.25), fat mass 13.88% (±2.29), and body water 62.08% (±1.56). Selected physiological variables measured were core body temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, breathing rate, and blood pressure. Rate of perceived intensity, rate of thermal sensation, and environmental factors were also monitored. Our study found (mean and ±SD) core body temperature 37.49° C (±0.88); skin temperature 31.13° C (±3.06); heart rate 106.79 b·min(-1) (±5.11); breathing rate 36.55 b·min(-1) (±0.60); blood pressure 128/86 mm Hg (±9.24/4.62); rate of perceived intensity 5.49 (±1.26); rate of thermal sensation 4.69 (±0.37); daytime high temperature of 46.6° C, and a mean temperature of 28.35° C. Our fastest finisher demonstrated a lower overall core body temperature (36.91° C) when compared with the group mean (37.49° C). In contrast to previous findings, our data show that the fastest finisher demonstrates a lower overall core body temperature. We conclude that it may be possible that a time threshold exists whereby success in longer duration events requires an ability to maintain a lower core body temperature vs. tolerating a higher core body temperature. PMID:25463692

  20. Effect of whole-body and local heating on cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thad E.; Cui, Jian; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that alpha-adrenergic-mediated vasoconstriction is compromised during whole-body heating. The purpose of this study was to identify whether whole-body heating and/or local surface heating reduce cutaneous alpha-adrenergic vasoconstrictor responsiveness in human skin. Protocol I: Six subjects were exposed to neutral skin temperature (i.e., 34 degrees C), whole-body heating, and local heating of forearm skin to increase skin blood flow to the same relative magnitude as that observed during whole-body heating. Protocol II: In eight subjects forearm skin was locally heated to 34, 37, 40, and 42 degrees C. During both protocols, alpha-adrenergic vasoconstrictor responsiveness was assessed by local delivery of norepinephrine (NE) via intradermal microdialysis. Skin blood flow was continuously monitored over each microdialysis membrane via laser-Doppler flowmetry. In protocol I, whole-body and local heating caused similar increases in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC). The EC50 (log NE dose) of the dose-response curves for both whole body (-4.2 +/- 0.1 M) and local heating (-4.7 +/- 0.4 M) were significantly greater (i.e., high dose required to cause 50% reduction in CVC) relative to neutral skin temperature (- 5.6 +/- 0.0 M; P<0.05 for both). In both local and whole-body heated conditions CVC did not return to pre-heating values even at the highest dose of NE. In protocol II, calculated EC50 for 34, 37, 40, and 42 degrees C local heating was - 5.5 +/- 0.4, -4.6 +/- 0.3, -4.5 +/- 0.3, - 4.2 +/- 0.4 M, respectively. Statistical analyses revealed that the EC50 for 37,40 and 42 degrees C were significantly greater than the EC50 for 34 degrees C. These results indicate that even during administration of high concentrations of NE, alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction does not fully compensate for local heating and whole-body heating induced vasodilatation in young, healthy subjects. Moreover, these data suggest that elevated local temperatures, above 37

  1. Induction temperature of human heat shock factor is reprogrammed in a Drosophila cell environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clos, Joachim; Rabindran, Sridhar; Wisniewski, Jan; Wu, Carl

    1993-07-01

    HEAT shock factor (HSF)1,2, the transcriptional activator of eukaryotic heat shock genes, is induced to bind DNA by a monomer to trimer transition involving leucine zipper interactions3,4. Although this mode of regulation is shared among many eukaryotic species, there is variation in the temperature at which HSF binding activity is induced. We investigated the basis of this variation by analysing the response of a human HSF expressed in Drosophila cells and Drosophila HSF expressed in human cells. We report here that the temperature that induces DNA binding and trimerization of human HSF in Drosophila was decreased by ~10 °C to the induction temperature for the host cell, whereas Drosophila HSF expressed in human cells was constitutively active. The results indicate that the activity of HSF in vivo is not a simple function of the absolute environmental temperature.

  2. [Solubilization Specificities Interferon beta-1b from Inclusion Bodies].

    PubMed

    Zhuravko, A S; Kononova, N V; Bobruskin, A I

    2015-01-01

    A new solubilization method of recombinant interferon beta-1b (IFNβ-1b) from the inclusion bodies was developed. This method allows to extract the target protein selectively in the solutions of different alcohols, such as ethanol, propanol and isopropanol. It was shown that the more effective IFNβ-1b solubilization was achieved in the 55% propanol solution. This method allowed to extract the target protein from inclusion bodies around 85-90%, and significantly reduced Escherichia coli content in the solubilizate, in comparison with standard methods.

  3. Cosolvent-induced solubilization of hydrophobic compounds into water

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.; Yalkowsky, S.H.

    1988-10-01

    The solubilization of toluene into water by propylene glycol and methanol was measured by a novel liquid chromatographic procedure. The relationship between solubilization and cosolvent content is linear up to 10-20 vol % of cosolvent, beyond which conventional logarithmic behavior is observed. The point of departure from linearity is believed to signal the onset of interaction between the extended hydration shells of the cosolvent. For propylene glycol, the volume of this shell is about 500 mL/mol, and the solubility of toluene within the shell is about 1.3 times its solubility in pure water.

  4. Wearable thermoelectric generator for harvesting human body heat energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Ki; Kim, Myoung-Soo; Lee, Seok; Kim, Chulki; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents the realization of a wearable thermoelectric generator (TEG) in fabric for use in clothing. A TEG was fabricated by dispenser printing of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 and Bi2Se0.3Te2.7 in a polymer-based fabric. The prototype consisted of 12 thermocouples connected by conductive thread over an area of 6 × 25 mm2. The device generated a power of 224 nW for a temperature difference of 15 K. When the TEG was used on the human body, the measured output power was 224 nW in an ambient temperature of 5 °C. The power of the TEG was affected by the movement of the wearer. A higher voltage was maintained while walking than in a stationary state. In addition, the device did not deform after it was bent and stretched several times. The prospect of using the TEG in clothing applications was confirmed under realistic conditions.

  5. Effects of infrared radiation and heat on human skin aging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soyun; Shin, Mi Hee; Kim, Yeon Kyung; Seo, Jo-Eun; Lee, Young Mee; Park, Chi-Hyun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2009-08-01

    Sunlight damages human skin, resulting in a wrinkled appearance. Since natural sunlight is polychromatic, its ultimate effects on the human skin are the result of not only the action of each wavelength separately, but also interactions among the many wavelengths, including UV, visible light, and infrared (IR). In direct sunlight, the temperature of human skin rises to about 40 degrees C following the conversion of absorbed IR into heat. So far, our knowledge of the effects of IR radiation or heat on skin aging is limited. Recent work demonstrates that IR and heat exposure each induces cutaneous angiogenesis and inflammatory cellular infiltration, disrupts the dermal extracellular matrix by inducing matrix metalloproteinases, and alters dermal structural proteins, thereby adding to premature skin aging. This review provides a summary of current research on the effects of IR radiation and heat on aging in human skin in vivo.Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings (2009) 14, 15-19; doi:10.1038/jidsymp.2009.7.

  6. Effects of whole body heating on dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Zhang, R.; Levine, B. D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to identify whether dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate (HR) is altered during whole body heating. In 14 subjects, dynamic baroreflex regulation of HR was assessed using transfer function analysis. In normothermic and heat-stressed conditions, each subject breathed at a fixed rate (0. 25 Hz) while beat-by-beat HR and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were obtained. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature, HR, and forearm skin blood flow. Spectral analysis of HR and SBP revealed that the heat stress significantly reduced HR and SBP variability within the high-frequency range (0.2-0.3 Hz), reduced SBP variability within the low-frequency range (0.03-0.15 Hz), and increased the ratio of low- to high-frequency HR variability (all P < 0.01). Transfer function gain analysis showed that the heat stress reduced dynamic baroreflex regulation of HR within the high-frequency range (from 1.04 +/- 0.06 to 0.54 +/- 0.6 beats. min(-1). mmHg(-1); P < 0.001) without significantly affecting the gain in the low-frequency range (P = 0.63). These data suggest that whole body heating reduced high-frequency dynamic baroreflex regulation of HR associated with spontaneous changes in blood pressure. Reduced vagal baroreflex regulation of HR may contribute to reduced orthostatic tolerance known to occur in humans during heat stress.

  7. Human TRPA1 is a heat sensor displaying intrinsic U-shaped thermosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Moparthi, Lavanya; Kichko, Tatjana I.; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Högestätt, Edward D.; Kjellbom, Per; Johanson, Urban; Reeh, Peter W.; Leffler, Andreas; Filipovic, Milos R.; Zygmunt, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Thermosensitive Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels are believed to respond to either cold or heat. In the case of TRP subtype A1 (TRPA1), there seems to be a species-dependent divergence in temperature sensation as non-mammalian TRPA1 is heat-sensitive whereas mammalian TRPA1 is sensitive to cold. It has been speculated but never experimentally proven that TRPA1 and other temperature-sensitive ion channels have the inherent capability of responding to both cold and heat. Here we show that redox modification and ligands affect human TRPA1 (hTRPA1) cold and heat sensing properties in lipid bilayer and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings as well as heat-evoked TRPA1-dependent calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from mouse trachea. Studies of purified hTRPA1 intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, in the absence of lipid bilayer, consolidate hTRPA1 as an intrinsic bidirectional thermosensor that is modified by the redox state and ligands. Thus, the heat sensing property of TRPA1 is conserved in mammalians, in which TRPA1 may contribute to sensing warmth and uncomfortable heat in addition to noxious cold. PMID:27349477

  8. Attributing human mortality during extreme heat waves to anthropogenic climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Daniel; Heaviside, Clare; Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Huntingford, Chris; Masato, Giacomo; Guillod, Benoit P.; Frumhoff, Peter; Bowery, Andy; Wallom, David; Allen, Myles

    2016-07-01

    It has been argued that climate change is the biggest global health threat of the 21st century. The extreme high temperatures of the summer of 2003 were associated with up to seventy thousand excess deaths across Europe. Previous studies have attributed the meteorological event to the human influence on climate, or examined the role of heat waves on human health. Here, for the first time, we explicitly quantify the role of human activity on climate and heat-related mortality in an event attribution framework, analysing both the Europe-wide temperature response in 2003, and localised responses over London and Paris. Using publicly-donated computing, we perform many thousands of climate simulations of a high-resolution regional climate model. This allows generation of a comprehensive statistical description of the 2003 event and the role of human influence within it, using the results as input to a health impact assessment model of human mortality. We find large-scale dynamical modes of atmospheric variability remain largely unchanged under anthropogenic climate change, and hence the direct thermodynamical response is mainly responsible for the increased mortality. In summer 2003, anthropogenic climate change increased the risk of heat-related mortality in Central Paris by ∼70% and by ∼20% in London, which experienced lower extreme heat. Out of the estimated ∼315 and ∼735 summer deaths attributed to the heatwave event in Greater London and Central Paris, respectively, 64 (±3) deaths were attributable to anthropogenic climate change in London, and 506 (±51) in Paris. Such an ability to robustly attribute specific damages to anthropogenic drivers of increased extreme heat can inform societal responses to, and responsibilities for, climate change.

  9. What effect will a few degrees of climate change have on human heat balance? Implications for human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Shane K.; Forbes, Cecil F.

    2011-03-01

    While many factors affecting human health that will alter with climate change are being discussed, there has been no discussion about how a warmer future will affect man's thermoregulation. Using historical climate data for an Australian city and projections for Australia's climate in 2070, we address the issue using heat balance modelling for humans engaged in various levels of activity from rest to manual labour. We first validate two heat balance models against empirical data and then use the models to predict the number of days at present and in 2070 that (1) sweating will be required to attain heat balance, (2) heat balance will not be possible and hyperthermia will develop, and (3) body temperature will increase by 2.5°C in less than 2 h, which we term "dangerous days". The modelling is applied to people in an unacclimatised and an acclimatised state. The modelling shows that, for unacclimatised people, outdoor activity will not be possible on 33-45 days per year, compared to 4-6 days per year at present. For acclimatised people the situation is less dire but leisure activity like golf will be not be possible on 5-14 days per year compared to 1 day in 5 years at present, and manual labour will be dangerous to perform on 15-26 days per year compared to 1 day per year at present. It is obvious that climate change will have important consequences for leisure, economic activity, and health in Australia.

  10. Surfactant micelles containing solubilized oil decrease foam film thickness stability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongju; Nikolov, Alex; Wasan, Darsh

    2014-02-01

    Many practical applications involving three-phase foams (aqueous foams containing oil) commonly employ surfactants at several times their critical micelle concentration (CMC); in these applications, the oil can exist in two forms: (1) oil drops or macroemulsions and (2) oil solubilized within the micelles. We have recently observed that in the case of aqueous foams stabilized with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and n-dodecane as an oil, the oil drops did not alter the foam stability but the solubilized oil (swollen micelles) greatly influenced the foam's stability. In order to explain the effect of oil solubilized in the surfactant micelles on foam stability, we studied the stability of a single foam film containing swollen micelles of SDS using reflected light microinterferometry. The film thinning occurs in stepwise manner (stratification). In addition, we obtained data for the film-meniscus contact angle versus film thickness (corresponding to the different number of micellar layers) and used it to calculate the film structural energy isotherm. The results of this study showed that the structural energy stabilization barrier decreased in the presence of swollen micelles in the film, thereby decreasing the foam stability. These results provide a better understanding of the role of oil solubilized by the micelles in affecting foam stability. PMID:24267325

  11. Influence of soil texture on rate-limited micellar solubilization

    SciTech Connect

    Abriola, L.M.; Condit, W.E.; Cowell, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Observations from 1D soil column experiments are used to explore the factors influencing surfactant-enhanced solubilization of entrapped non-aqueous-phase liquids in sandy porous media. These experiments were designed to quantify the influence of porous medium properties and flow system parameters on the rate of contaminant removal. A 1% flushing solution of polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Witconol 2722) was employed to recover residual phase decane from a range of Ottawa sands. Deviations from local equilibrium conditions were observed in all experiments. For solution phase Darcy velocities ranging from 0.83 to 9.3 cm/h, maximum column effluent concentration levels were consistently {lt}55% of the batch-measured equilibrium value. Column data were used to develop an empirical modified Sherwood correlation for the prediction of initial, pseudo steady-state, solubilization rates assuming a linear driving force mass transfer expression. This correlations incorporates the Reynolds number, the mean grain size, and the sand uniformity index. The adequacy of this correlation for the prediction of initial steady-state solubilization rates in other sandy media is demonstrated for a natural aquifer material. Results of this study suggest a similar dependence of mass transfer rates on system hydrodynamics and soil properties for both micellar solubilization and dissolution.

  12. Amphiphilic biopolymers (amphibiopols) as new surfactants for membrane protein solubilization

    PubMed Central

    Duval-Terrié, Caroline; Cosette, Pascal; Molle, Gérard; Muller, Guy; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new surfactants for membrane protein solubilization, from a natural, biodegradable polymer: the polysaccharide pullulan. A set of amphiphilic pullulans (HMCMPs), differing in hydrophobic modification ratio, charge ratio, and the nature of the hydrophobic chains introduced, were synthesized and tested in solubilization experiments with outer membranes of Pseudomonas fluorescens. The membrane proteins were precipitated, and then resolubilized with various HMCMPs. The decyl alkyl chain (C10) was the hydrophobic graft that gave the highest level of solubilization. Decyl alkyl chain-bearing HMCMPs were also able to extract integral membrane proteins from their lipid environment. The best results were obtained with an amphiphilic pullulan bearing 18% decyl groups (18C10). Circular dichroism spectroscopy and membrane reconstitution experiments were used to test the structural and functional integrity of 18C10-solubilized proteins (OmpF from Escherichia coli and bacteriorhodopsin from Halobacterium halobium). Whatever their structure type (α or β), 18C10 did not alter either the structure or the function of the proteins analyzed. Thus, HMCMPs appear to constitute a promising new class of polymeric surfactants for membrane protein studies. PMID:12649425

  13. Human heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) protects murine cells from injury during metabolic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R S; Thomas, J A; Fina, M; German, Z; Benjamin, I J

    1993-01-01

    Expression of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) is stimulated during ischemia, but its proposed cytoprotective function during metabolic stress has remained conjectural. We introduced a human hsp70 gene into mouse 10T1/2 cells and assessed the susceptibility of these cells to injury in response to conditions that mimic ischemia. Transiently transfected cells, in the absence of stress, expressed human hsp70 to levels equal to or greater than those induced by heat shock, as assessed by RNAse protection, immunoblot, and immunohistochemical analyses. By comparison to cells transfected with a control plasmid, cells expressing the human hsp70 transgene were resistant to injury induced by glucose deprivation and inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. These results provide direct evidence for a cytoprotective function of hsp70 during metabolic stress. Images PMID:8326014

  14. Skin cooling maintains cerebral blood flow velocity and orthostatic tolerance during tilting in heated humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thad E.; Cui, Jian; Zhang, Rong; Witkowski, Sarah; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance is reduced in the heat-stressed human. The purpose of this project was to identify whether skin-surface cooling improves orthostatic tolerance. Nine subjects were exposed to 10 min of 60 degrees head-up tilting in each of four conditions: normothermia (NT-tilt), heat stress (HT-tilt), normothermia plus skin-surface cooling 1 min before and throughout tilting (NT-tilt(cool)), and heat stress plus skin-surface cooling 1 min before and throughout tilting (HT-tilt(cool)). Heating and cooling were accomplished by perfusing 46 and 15 degrees C water, respectively, though a tube-lined suit worn by each subject. During HT-tilt, four of nine subjects developed presyncopal symptoms resulting in the termination of the tilt test. In contrast, no subject experienced presyncopal symptoms during NT-tilt, NT-tilt(cool), or HT-tilt(cool). During the HT-tilt procedure, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) decreased. However, during HT-tilt(cool), MAP, total peripheral resistance, and CBFV were significantly greater relative to HT-tilt (all P < 0.01). No differences were observed in calculated cerebral vascular resistance between the four conditions. These data suggest that skin-surface cooling prevents the fall in CBFV during upright tilting and improves orthostatic tolerance, presumably via maintenance of MAP. Hence, skin-surface cooling may be a potent countermeasure to protect against orthostatic intolerance observed in heat-stressed humans.

  15. Phenylephrine-induced elevations in arterial blood pressure are attenuated in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that phenylephrine-induced elevations in blood pressure are attenuated in heat-stressed humans, blood pressure was elevated via steady-state infusion of three doses of phenylephrine HCl in 10 healthy subjects in both normothermic and heat stress conditions. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature by 0.5 degrees C, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), heart rate, and cardiac output and decreased total peripheral vascular resistance (TPR; all P < 0.005) but did not change mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; P > 0.05). At the highest dose of phenylephrine, the increase in MAP and TPR from predrug baselines was significantly attenuated during the heat stress [DeltaMAP 8.4 +/- 1.2 mmHg; DeltaTPR 0.96 +/- 0.85 peripheral resistance units (PRU)] compared with normothermia (DeltaMAP 15.4 +/- 1.4 mmHg, DeltaTPR 7.13 +/- 1.18 PRU; all P < 0.001). The sensitivity of baroreflex control of MSNA and heart rate, expressed as the slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure, as well as the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure, respectively, was similar between thermal conditions (each P > 0.05). These data suggest that phenylephrine-induced elevations in MAP are attenuated in heat-stressed humans without affecting baroreflex control of MSNA or heart rate.

  16. Effect of solubilizing excipients on permeation of poorly water-soluble compounds across Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Saha, P; Kou, J H

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of solubilizing excipients on Caco-2 transport parameters of poorly water-soluble NCEs (new chemical entities), and determine their permeability class under the BCS guidance (Biopharmaceutics Classification System). The effect of solubilizing excipients on soluble donor concentration of Sch 56592, Sch-X and Sch-Y was estimated. The transport of reference compounds and NCEs was studied across Caco-2 monolayers in absence or presence of solubilizing agents. The Caco-2 permeability of reference compounds showed good correlation with their extent of human oral absorption data. Sch 56592, Sch-X and Sch-Y exhibited high baseline Caco-2 permeability (>10(-5) cm/s). Povidone (1%) improved soluble donor concentration and flux of Sch 56592 by 40%. Other solubilizing excipients predominantly improved Sch 56592 soluble donor concentration, with either no change or a decrease in flux. With Sch-X, 1% povidone, pluronic F68, gelucir 44/14, and 3:2 propylene glycol/Tween-80 markedly improved soluble donor concentration, while increasing Sch-X flux by 40-65%. The soluble donor concentration of Sch-Y was also enhanced by excipients; however, only 1% pluronic F68 and PEG 300 increased Sch-Y flux by 35-50%. Sch 56592, Sch-X and Sch-Y are low solubility-high permeability compounds under the BCS guidance. For such poorly water-soluble NCEs, solubilizing excipients should be carefully screened based on their effects on solubility profiles and membrane transport.

  17. Rock phosphate solubilization under alkaline conditions by Aspergillus japonicus and A. foetidus.

    PubMed

    Singal, R; Gupta, R; Saxena, R K

    1994-01-01

    Aspergillus japonicus and A. foetidus were found to solubilize five types of Indian rock phosphates at pH 8 and 9. Solubilization was higher in the presence of pyrite than in controls lacking either pyrite or fungal inoculum. Both the aspergilli were found to be good pyrite solubilizers and could grow over a wide pH range. Solubilization of rock phosphates was the result of organic acid release and pyrite oxidation.

  18. Phosphate solubilization potential and phosphatase activity of rhizospheric trichoderma spp.

    PubMed

    Anil, Kapri; Lakshmi, Tewari

    2010-07-01

    Trichoderma sp., a well known biological control agent against several phytopathogens, was tested for its phosphate (P) solubilizing potential. Fourteen strains of Trichoderma sp. were isolated from the forest tree rhizospheres of pinus, deodar, bamboo, guava and oak on Trichoderma selective medium. The isolates were tested for their in-vitro P-solubilizing potential using National Botanical Research Institute Phosphate (NBRIP) broth containing tricalcium phosphate (TCP) as the sole P source, and compared with a standard culture of T. harzianum. All the cultures were found to solubilize TCP but with varying potential. The isolate DRT-1 showed maximum amount of soluble phosphate (404.07 εg.ml(-1)), followed by the standard culture of T. harzianum (386.42 εg.ml(-1)) after 96 h of incubation at 30±1(0)C. Extra-cellular acid and alkaline phosphatases of the fungus were induced only in the presence of insoluble phosphorus source (TCP). High extra-cellular alkaline phosphatase activity was recorded for the isolate DRT-1 (14.50 U.ml(-1)) followed by the standard culture (13.41 U.ml(-1)) at 72h. The cultures showed much lesser acid phosphatase activities. Under glasshouse conditions, Trichoderma sp. inoculation increased chickpea (Cicer arietinum) growth parameters including shoot length, root length, fresh and dry weight of shoot as well as roots, in P-deficient soil containing only bound phosphate (TCP). Shoot weight was increased by 23% and 33% by inoculation with the isolate DRT-1 in the soil amended with 100 and 200 mg TCP kg(-1) soil, respectively, after 60 d of sowing. The study explores high P-solubilizing potential of Trichoderma sp., which can be exploited for the solubilization of fixed phosphates present in the soil, thereby enhancing soil fertility and plant growth.

  19. Afferent modulation of warmth sensation and heat pain in the human hand.

    PubMed

    Casey, K L; Zumberg, M; Heslep, H; Morrow, T J

    1993-01-01

    The hands of 14 normal humans were used to determine the somatotopic organization of the modulation of warmth sensation and heat pain by different forms of cutaneous stimuli. Test stimuli were 5-sec heat pulses ranging from 36 degrees to 51 degrees C, delivered to the fingerpads of digits 1, 2, 4, and 5 with a contact thermode. Conditioning stimuli (15 sec) bracketed the test stimuli and included vibration, noxious and innocuous heat, cold, and electrical pulses delivered to the fingerpads of digits that were adjacent or nonadjacent to the tested digits. Noxious (48 degrees +/- 1.3 degrees C), but not innocuous (43 degrees C), heat stimuli increased the perceived magnitude estimation of innocuous test stimuli (36-43 degrees C) by 20-37% when delivered to adjacent, but not to nonadjacent, digits. No other conditioning stimuli had any effect on the intensity of warmth perception. In contrast, both noxious and innocuous heat or electrical conditioning reduced the magnitude estimation of noxious (50-51 degrees C), but not innocuous, test pulses by 12-22% when delivered to adjacent digits. Conditioning of nonadjacent digits was significantly less effective. The analgesic effects of noxious and innocuous conditioning were approximately equal. Vibratory (120 Hz, 3.5 microns) and cold (15 degrees C) conditioning stimuli were ineffective. The results are consistent with a dermatomal somatotopic organization of tactile and heat modulatory influences on warmth sensation and heat pain. The results further suggest that the neural mechanism subserving warmth mediate a negative feedback influence on heat pain intensity.

  20. Spatial Mathematical Model of Heat Transfer in Human Skin Influenced by Heated up to High Temperatures Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranovskiy, Nikolay V.; Solodkin, Andrey S.; Stuparenko, Alexandr A.

    2016-02-01

    Numerical research results of heat transfer in system "air-heated particle-skin layer" presented. Skin was influenced by heated up to high temperatures particle. The problem is solved in tree-dimensional statement in Cartesian system of coordinates. The typical range of influence parameters of heated particle considered. Temperature distributions in different moments of time obtained. Condition of burn occurrence by heated particle is under consideration in this research.

  1. Cloning, sequencing, and mapping of the human chromosome 14 heat shock protein gene (HSPA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnycastle, L.L.C.; Chang-En Yu; Schellenberg, G.D.

    1994-09-01

    A genomic clone for the human heat shock protein (HSP) 70 gene located on chromosome 14 was isolated and sequenced. The gene, designated HSPA2, has a single open reading frame of 1917 bp that encodes a 639-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 70,030 Da. Analysis of the sequence indicates that HLPA2 is the human homologue of the murine Hsp 70-2 gene with 91.7% identity in the nucleotide coding sequence and 98.2% in the corresponding amino acid sequence. HSPA2 has less amino acid homology to other members of the human HSP70 gene family, 83.3% to the heat-inducible HSP70-1 gene and 86.1% with the human heat shock cognate gene HSC70. HSPA2 is constitutively expressed in most tissues, with very high levels in testis and skeletal muscle. Significant but lower levels are also expressed in ovary, small intestine, colon, brain, placenta, and kidney. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clone containing HSPA2 (YAC741H4) that also contained the polymorphic marker D14S63 was identified. This 670-kb YAC was mapped to 14q24.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Subsequent two-color FISH and genetic mapping placed HSPA2/D14S63 proximal to the markers D14S57 and D14S77. 50 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Cutaneous interstitial nitric oxide concentration does not increase during heat stress in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; MacLean, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Inhibition of cutaneous nitric oxide (NO) synthase reduces the magnitude of cutaneous vasodilation during whole body heating in humans. However, this observation is insufficient to conclude that NO concentration increases in the skin during a heat stress. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that whole body heating increases cutaneous interstitial NO concentration. This was accomplished by placing 2 microdialysis membranes in the forearm dermal space of 12 subjects. Both membranes were perfused with lactated Ringer solutions at a rate of 2 microl/min. In both normothermia and during whole body heating via a water perfused suit, dialysate from these membranes were obtained and analyzed for NO using the chemiluminescence technique. In six of these subjects, after the heat stress, the membranes were perfused with a 1 M solution of acetylcholine to stimulate NO release. Dialysate from these trials was also assayed to quantify cutaneous interstitial NO concentration. Whole body heating increased skin temperature from 34.6 +/- 0.2 to 38.8 +/- 0.2 degrees C (P < 0.05), which increased sublingual temperature (36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.6 +/- 0.1 degrees C; P < 0.05), heart rate (63 +/- 5 to 93 +/- 5 beats/min; P < 0.05), and skin blood flow over the membranes (21 +/- 4 to 88 +/- 10 perfusion units; P < 0.05). NO concentration in the dialysate did not increase significantly during of the heat stress (7.6 +/- 0.7 to 8.6 +/- 0.8 microM; P > 0.05). After the heat stress, administration of acetylcholine in the perfusate significantly increased skin blood flow (128 +/- 6 perfusion units) relative to both normothermic and heat stress values and significantly increased NO concentration in the dialysate (15.8 +/- 2.4 microM). These data suggest that whole body heating does not increase cutaneous interstitial NO concentration in forearm skin. Rather, NO may serve in a permissive role in facilitating the effects of an unknown neurotransmitter, leading to cutaneous vasodilation

  3. Combined facial heating and inhalation of hot air do not alter thermoeffector responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Wingo, Jonathan E; Low, David A; Keller, David M; Kimura, Kenichi; Crandall, Craig G

    2015-09-01

    The influence of thermoreceptors in human facial skin on thermoeffector responses is equivocal; furthermore, the presence of thermoreceptors in the respiratory tract and their involvement in thermal homeostasis has not been elucidated. This study tested the hypothesis that hot air directed on the face and inhaled during whole body passive heat stress elicits an earlier onset and greater sensitivity of cutaneous vasodilation and sweating than that directed on an equal skin surface area away from the face. Six men and two women completed two trials separated by ∼1 wk. Participants were passively heated (water-perfused suit; core temperature increase ∼0.9°C) while hot air was directed on either the face or on the lower leg (counterbalanced). Skin blood flux (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and local sweat rate (capacitance hygrometry) were measured at the chest and one forearm. During hot-air heating, local temperatures of the cheek and leg were 38.4 ± 0.8°C and 38.8 ± 0.6°C, respectively (P = 0.18). Breathing hot air combined with facial heating did not affect mean body temperature onsets (P = 0.97 and 0.27 for arm and chest sites, respectively) or slopes of cutaneous vasodilation (P = 0.49 and 0.43 for arm and chest sites, respectively), or the onsets (P = 0.89 and 0.94 for arm and chest sites, respectively), or slopes of sweating (P = 0.48 and 0.65 for arm and chest sites, respectively). Based on these findings, respiratory tract thermoreceptors, if present in humans, and selective facial skin heating do not modulate thermoeffector responses during passive heat stress.

  4. Combined facial heating and inhalation of hot air do not alter thermoeffector responses in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wingo, Jonathan E.; Low, David A.; Keller, David M.; Kimura, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    The influence of thermoreceptors in human facial skin on thermoeffector responses is equivocal; furthermore, the presence of thermoreceptors in the respiratory tract and their involvement in thermal homeostasis has not been elucidated. This study tested the hypothesis that hot air directed on the face and inhaled during whole body passive heat stress elicits an earlier onset and greater sensitivity of cutaneous vasodilation and sweating than that directed on an equal skin surface area away from the face. Six men and two women completed two trials separated by ∼1 wk. Participants were passively heated (water-perfused suit; core temperature increase ∼0.9°C) while hot air was directed on either the face or on the lower leg (counterbalanced). Skin blood flux (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and local sweat rate (capacitance hygrometry) were measured at the chest and one forearm. During hot-air heating, local temperatures of the cheek and leg were 38.4 ± 0.8°C and 38.8 ± 0.6°C, respectively (P = 0.18). Breathing hot air combined with facial heating did not affect mean body temperature onsets (P = 0.97 and 0.27 for arm and chest sites, respectively) or slopes of cutaneous vasodilation (P = 0.49 and 0.43 for arm and chest sites, respectively), or the onsets (P = 0.89 and 0.94 for arm and chest sites, respectively), or slopes of sweating (P = 0.48 and 0.65 for arm and chest sites, respectively). Based on these findings, respiratory tract thermoreceptors, if present in humans, and selective facial skin heating do not modulate thermoeffector responses during passive heat stress. PMID:26157054

  5. Volume analysis of heat-induced cracks in human molars: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Sandholzer, Michael A.; Baron, Katharina; Heimel, Patrick; Metscher, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Only a few methods have been published dealing with the visualization of heat-induced cracks inside bones and teeth. Aims: As a novel approach this study used nondestructive X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) for volume analysis of heat-induced cracks to observe the reaction of human molars to various levels of thermal stress. Materials and Methods: Eighteen clinically extracted third molars were rehydrated and burned under controlled temperatures (400, 650, and 800°C) using an electric furnace adjusted with a 25°C increase/min. The subsequent high-resolution scans (voxel-size 17.7 μm) were made with a compact micro-CT scanner (SkyScan 1174). In total, 14 scans were automatically segmented with Definiens XD Developer 1.2 and three-dimensional (3D) models were computed with Visage Imaging Amira 5.2.2. The results of the automated segmentation were analyzed with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and uncorrected post hoc least significant difference (LSD) tests using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) 17. A probability level of P < 0.05 was used as an index of statistical significance. Results: A temperature-dependent increase of heat-induced cracks was observed between the three temperature groups (P < 0.05, ANOVA post hoc LSD). In addition, the distributions and shape of the heat-induced changes could be classified using the computed 3D models. Conclusion: The macroscopic heat-induced changes observed in this preliminary study correspond with previous observations of unrestored human teeth, yet the current observations also take into account the entire microscopic 3D expansions of heat-induced cracks within the dental hard tissues. Using the same experimental conditions proposed in the literature, this study confirms previous results, adds new observations, and offers new perspectives in the investigation of forensic evidence. PMID:25125923

  6. A heterogeneous human tissue mimicking phantom for RF heating and MRI thermal monitoring verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yu; Wyatt, Cory; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul; Craciunescu, Oana; MacFall, James; Dewhirst, Mark; Das, Shiva K.

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes a heterogeneous phantom that mimics a human thigh with a deep-seated tumor, for the purpose of studying the performance of radiofrequency (RF) heating equipment and non-invasive temperature monitoring with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The heterogeneous cylindrical phantom was constructed with an outer fat layer surrounding an inner core of phantom material mimicking muscle, tumor and marrow-filled bone. The component materials were formulated to have dielectric and thermal properties similar to human tissues. The dielectric properties of the tissue mimicking phantom materials were measured with a microwave vector network analyzer and impedance probe over the frequency range of 80-500 MHz and at temperatures of 24, 37 and 45 °C. The specific heat values of the component materials were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter over the temperature range of 15-55 °C. The thermal conductivity value was obtained from fitting the curves obtained from one-dimensional heat transfer measurement. The phantom was used to verify the operation of a cylindrical four-antenna annular phased array extremity applicator (140 MHz) by examining the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) thermal imaging patterns for various magnitude/phase settings (including settings to focus heating in tumors). For muscle and tumor materials, MRI was also used to measure T1/T2* values (1.5 T) and to obtain the slope of the PRFS phase change versus temperature change curve. The dielectric and thermal properties of the phantom materials were in close agreement to well-accepted published results for human tissues. The phantom was able to successfully demonstrate satisfactory operation of the tested heating equipment. The MRI-measured thermal distributions matched the expected patterns for various magnitude/phase settings of the applicator, allowing the phantom to be used as a quality assurance tool. Importantly, the material formulations for the various tissue types

  7. Heat Transfer Behavior across the Dentino-Enamel Junction in the Human Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Lin; Dong, Shao-Jie; Kong, Ting-Ting; Wang, Rong; Zou, Rui; Liu, Qi-Da

    2016-01-01

    During eating, the teeth usually endure the sharply temperature changes because of different foods. It is of importance to investigate the heat transfer and heat dissipation behavior of the dentino–enamel junction (DEJ) of human tooth since dentine and enamel have different thermophysical properties. The spatial and temporal temperature distributions on the enamel, dentine, and pulpal chamber of both the human tooth and its discontinuous boundaries, were measured using infrared thermography using a stepped temperature increase on the outer boundary of enamel crowns. The thermal diffusivities for enamel and dentine were deduced from the time dependent temperature change at the enamel and dentine layers. The thermal conductivities for enamel and dentine were calculated to be 0.81 Wm-1K-1 and 0.48 Wm-1K-1 respectively. The observed temperature discontinuities across the interfaces between enamel, dentine and pulp-chamber layers were due to the difference of thermal conductivities at interfaces rather than to the phase transformation. The temperature gradient distributes continuously across the enamel and dentine layers and their junction below a temperature of 42°C, whilst a negative thermal resistance is observed at interfaces above 42°C. These results suggest that the microstructure of the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) junction play an important role in tooth heat transfer and protects the pulp from heat damage. PMID:27662186

  8. [Numerical Simulation of Heat Transfer in the Human Anterior Chamber at Different Corneal Temperatures].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingmin; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Junming

    2015-12-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of human anterior chamber is reconstructed to explore the effect of different corneal temperatures on the heat transfer in the chamber. Based on the optical coherence tomography imaging of the volunteers with normal anterior chamber, a 3D anterior chamber model was reconstructed by the method of UG parametric design. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and aqueous humor flow in the whole anterior chamber were analyzed by the finite volume methods at different corneal temperatures. The results showed that different corneal temperatures had obvious influence on the temperature distribution and the aqueous flow in the anterior chamber. The temperature distribution is linear and axial symmetrical around the pupillary axis. As the temperature difference increases, the symmetry becomes poorer. Aqueous floated along the warm side and sank along the cool side which forms a vortexing flow. Its velocity increased with the addition of temperature difference. Heat fluxes of cornea, lens and iris were mainly affected by the aqueous velocity. The higher the velocity, the bigger more absolute value of the above-mentioned heat fluxes became. It is practicable to perform the numerical simulation of anterior chamber by the optical coherence tomography imaging. The results are useful for studying the important effect of corneal temperature on the heat transfer and aqueous humor dynamics in the anterior chamber.

  9. Effect of Mild Heating on Human Lens Epithelial Cells: A Possible Model of Lens Aging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keke; Zhu, Xiangjia; Lu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of mild heating on lens epithelial cells and to explore its possibility as an in vitro model for lens aging. Human lens epithelial cells (LECs) were heated at 50 °C for a cellular lens aging study. Analysis of the head group order of lens membranes was performed using Laurdan labeling. Immunofluorescence was performed to detect changes in α-crystallin expression and its cellular distribution. The chaperone-like activity of α-crystallin was also assessed. After mild heating, α-crystallin in LECs showed a tendency towards accumulation around the nucleus. The membrane head group environment of lens epithelial cells became more fluid with increasing time of exposure to mild heating, as indicated by increased water penetration. Furthermore, the chaperone activity of α-crystallin decreased, and suggests a relatively lower protective effect on other functional proteins in LECs. Thus, compared to the mild heating model based on lens tissue, this cellular model could provide a more convenient and accurate method for studying lens aging in vitro, including changes in membrane head group order in each cell, the real-time observation of crystallin distribution, and the monitoring of functional changes in the chaperone activity of crystallins as a result of aging. PMID:27725687

  10. Simultaneous pasteurization and homogenization of human milk by combining heat and ultrasound: effect on milk quality.

    PubMed

    Czank, Charles; Simmer, Karen; Hartmann, Peter E

    2010-05-01

    The combination of ultrasound and heat (thermoultrasound) is an emerging food preservation technique that retains higher quantities of bioactive components compared with current thermal pasteurization practice, but has not yet been assessed for pasteurizing human milk. Artificially contaminated human milk samples were treated with ultrasound (20 kHz, 150 watts) with and without heating. The retention of four human milk proteins was quantified by biochemical assay and laser scattering particle sizing was used to determine the extent of homogenization. While ultrasonic treatment was effective at inactivating Escherichia coli (D4 degrees C=5.94 min), Staphylococcus epidermidis exhibited resistance (D4 degrees C=16.01 min). Thermoultrasonic treatment was considerably more effective (Esch. coli D45 degrees C=1.74 min, D50 degrees C=0.89 min; Staph. epidermidis D45 degrees C=2.08 min, D50 degrees C=0.94 minutes) with a predicted retention (2.8 min treatment, 50 degrees C) of secretory IgA lysozyme, lactoferrin and bile salt stimulated lipase of 91, 80, 77, and 45%, respectively. Homogenization of the milk samples occurred after 5 min and 2 min of ultrasonic and thermoultrasonic treatment, respectively. Thermoultrasonic treatment is an effective method for pasteurizing donor human milk and retaining a greater proportion of bioactive components compared with current practices. However, further studies are required to assess the practicality of applying this technique routinely to donor human milk.

  11. Phosphate solubilization potential and stress tolerance of Eupenicillium parvum from tea soil.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Pratibha; Rahi, Praveen; Chauhan, Anjali; Gulati, Arvind

    2007-08-01

    Eupenicillium parvum was recorded for first time during isolation of phosphate-solubilizing microorganisms from the tea rhizosphere. The fungus developed a phosphate solubilization zone on modified Pikovskaya agar, supplemented with tricalcium phosphate. Quantitative estimation of phosphate solubilization in Pikovskaya broth showed high solubilization of tricalcium phosphate and aluminium phosphate. The fungus also solubilized North Carolina rock phosphate and Mussoorie rock phosphate, and exhibited high levels of tolerance against desiccation, acidity, salinity, aluminium, and iron. Solubilization of inorganic phosphates by the fungus was also observed under high stress levels of aluminium, iron, and desiccation, though the significant decline in phosphate solubilization was marked in the presence of aluminium than iron. The fungal isolate showed 100% identity with E. parvum strain NRRL 2095 ITS 1, 5.8S rRNA gene and ITS 2, complete sequence; and 28S rRNA gene, partial sequence. PMID:17703934

  12. Effect of rhamnolipid biosurfactant on solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Li, Shudong; Pi, Yongrui; Bao, Mutai; Zhang, Cong; Zhao, Dongwei; Li, Yiming; Sun, Peiyan; Lu, Jinren

    2015-12-15

    Rhamnolipid biosurfactant-producing bacteria, Bacillus Lz-2, was isolated from oil polluted water collected from Dongying Shengli oilfield, China. The factors that influence PAH solubilization such as biosurfactant concentration, pH, ionic strength and temperature were discussed. The results showed that the solubilities of naphthalene, phenanthrene and pyrene increased linearly with the rise of rhamnolipid biosurfactant dose above the biosurfactant critical micelle concentration (CMC). Furthermore, the molar solubilization ratio (MSR) values decreased in the following order: naphthalene>phenanthrene>pyrene. However, the solubility percentage increased and followed the opposite order: pyrene>phenanthrene>naphthalene. The solubilities of PAHs in rhamnolipid biosurfactant solution increased with the rise of pH and ionic strength, and reached the maximum values under the conditions of pH11 and NaCl concentration 8 g · L(-1). The solubility of phenanthrene and pyrene increased with the rise of temperature.

  13. Interactions of selected bacterial isolates with DBT and solubilized coal

    SciTech Connect

    Key, D.H.; Fox, R.V.; Kase, R.S.; Willey, M.S.; Stoner, D.L.; Ward, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    We are studying the interactions of isolated bacteria with dibenzothiophene (DBT), a sulfur-containing model compound, and with a solubilized coal product derived from a high-organic-sulfur lignite. The sensitivity of the tetrazolium assay used to identify and study these strains was improved by substituting tetrazolium violet for triphenyltetrazolium. DBT metabolism by thirteen strains was investigated using qualitative and quantitative GC and GC-MS analyses. Growth medium and incubation time affect the extent of DBT degradation and the production of DBT metabolites. Under specific conditions, seven of the strains produce metabolites which elute close to the position of one or another of the biphenyl standards. However, when these samples are spiked with the standard compounds, the bacterial metabolites do not co-elute with the standards. The modification of solubilized high-organic-sulfur coal by six of these strains was also studied. No selective removal of sulfur relative to carbon was observed. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Recovery Act - Large Scale SWNT Purification and Solubilization

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Gemano; Dr. Linda B. McGown

    2010-10-07

    The goal of this Phase I project was to establish a quantitative foundation for development of binary G-gels for large-scale, commercial processing of SWNTs and to develop scientific insight into the underlying mechanisms of solubilization, selectivity and alignment. In order to accomplish this, we performed systematic studies to determine the effects of G-gel composition and experimental conditions that will enable us to achieve our goals that include (1) preparation of ultra-high purity SWNTs from low-quality, commercial SWNT starting materials, (2) separation of MWNTs from SWNTs, (3) bulk, non-destructive solubilization of individual SWNTs in aqueous solution at high concentrations (10-100 mg/mL) without sonication or centrifugation, (4) tunable enrichment of subpopulations of the SWNTs based on metallic vs. semiconductor properties, diameter, or chirality and (5) alignment of individual SWNTs.

  15. Enhanced aqueous solubilization of tetrachloroethylene by a rhamnolipid biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Joseph S; Ioannidis, Marios A; Legge, Raymond L

    2007-01-15

    A rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 was isolated, purified and characterized in terms of its ability to mobilize and solubilize tetrachloroethylene (PCE) for potential use in surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) applications. Using a drop volume method, the PCE-biosurfactant steady-state interfacial tension was determined and found to be ca. 10 mN/m which is not low enough to cause significant PCE nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mobilization. It was observed that the biosurfactant partitioned significantly into PCE at aqueous concentrations higher than the critical micelle concentration (CMC). After accounting for rhamnolipid partitioning into the PCE phase, a weight solubilization ratio (WSR) of 1.2 g(PCE)/g(rhamnolipid) was determined and through this mechanism the biosurfactant significantly improved the apparent aqueous solubility of PCE.

  16. The mechanism of detergent solubilization of lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Dov; Ahyayauch, Hasna; Goñi, Félix M

    2013-07-16

    Multiple data are available on the self-assembly of mixtures of bilayer-forming amphiphiles, particularly phospholipids and micelle-forming amphiphiles, commonly denoted detergents. The structure of such mixed assemblies has been thoroughly investigated, described in phase diagrams, and theoretically rationalized in terms of the balance between the large spontaneous curvature of the curvophilic detergent and the curvophobic phospholipids. In this critical review, we discuss the mechanism of this process and try to explain the actual mechanism involved in solubilization. Interestingly, membrane solubilization by some detergents is relatively slow and the common attribute of these detergents is that their trans-bilayer movement, commonly denoted flip-flop, is very slow. Only detergents that can flip into the inner monolayer cause relatively rapid solubilization of detergent-saturated bilayers. This occurs via the following sequence of events: 1), relatively rapid penetration of detergent monomers into the outer monolayer; 2), trans-membrane equilibration of detergent monomers between the two monolayers; 3), saturation of the bilayer by detergents and consequent permeabilization of the membrane; and 4), transition of the whole bilayer to thread-like mixed micelles. When the detergent cannot flip to the inner monolayer, the outer monolayer becomes unstable due to mass imbalance between the monolayers and inclusion of the curvophilic detergent molecules in a flat surface. Consequently, the outer monolayer forms mixed micellar structures within the outer monolayer. Shedding of these micelles into the aqueous solution results in partial solubilization. The consequent leakage of detergent into the liposome results in trans-membrane equilibration of detergent and subsequent micellization through the rapid bilayer-saturation mechanism.

  17. Fungal attack on rock: solubilization and altered infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Silverman, M P; Munoz, E F

    1970-09-01

    Penicillium simplicissimum, isolated from weathering basalt, produced citric acid when grown in a glucose-mineral salts medium with basalt, granite, granodiorite, rhyolite, andesite, peridotite, dunite, or quartzite. After 7 days' growth as much as 31 percent of the silicon, 11 percent of the aluminum, 64 percent of the iron, and 59 percent of the magnesium in some of the rocks were solubilized, and a number of rocks showed altered infrared absorption in the silicon-oxygen vibration region. PMID:17838175

  18. Mobilization and micellar solubilization of NAPL contaminants in aquifer rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanbakht, Gina; Goual, Lamia

    2016-02-01

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation is often performed to overcome the capillary forces that keep residual NAPL phases trapped within contaminated aquifers. The surfactant selection and displacement mechanism usually depend on the nature of NAPL constituents. For example, micellar solubilization is often used to cleanup DNAPLs from aquifers whereas mobilization is desirable in aquifers contaminated by LNAPLs. Although the majority of crude oils are LNAPLs, they often contain heavy organic macromolecules such as asphaltenes that are classified as DNAPLs. Asphaltenes contain surface-active components that tend to adsorb on rocks, altering their wettability. Previous studies revealed that surfactants that formed Winsor type III microemulsions could promote both mobilization and solubilization. However the extent by which these two mechanisms occur is still unclear, particularly in oil-contaminated aquifers. In this study we investigated the remediation of oil-contaminated aquifers using an environmentally friendly surfactant such as n-Dodecyl β-D-maltoside. Focus was given on asphaltenes to better understand the mechanisms of surfactant cleanup. Through phase behavior, spontaneous imbibition, dynamic interfacial tension and contact angle measurements, we showed that microemulsions formed by this surfactant are able to mobilize bulk NAPL (containing 9 wt.% asphaltenes) in the porous rock and solubilize DNAPL (i.e., 4-6 wt.% adsorbed asphaltenes) from the rock surface. Spontaneous imbibition tests, in particular, indicated that the ratio of mobilized to solubilized NAPL is about 6:1. Furthermore, aging the cores in NAPL beyond 3 days allowed for more NAPL to be trapped in the large pores of the rock but did not alter the amount of asphaltenes adsorbed on the mineral surface.

  19. Mobilization and micellar solubilization of NAPL contaminants in aquifer rocks.

    PubMed

    Javanbakht, Gina; Goual, Lamia

    2016-01-01

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation is often performed to overcome the capillary forces that keep residual NAPL phases trapped within contaminated aquifers. The surfactant selection and displacement mechanism usually depend on the nature of NAPL constituents. For example, micellar solubilization is often used to cleanup DNAPLs from aquifers whereas mobilization is desirable in aquifers contaminated by LNAPLs. Although the majority of crude oils are LNAPLs, they often contain heavy organic macromolecules such as asphaltenes that are classified as DNAPLs. Asphaltenes contain surface-active components that tend to adsorb on rocks, altering their wettability. Previous studies revealed that surfactants that formed Winsor type III microemulsions could promote both mobilization and solubilization. However the extent by which these two mechanisms occur is still unclear, particularly in oil-contaminated aquifers. In this study we investigated the remediation of oil-contaminated aquifers using an environmentally friendly surfactant such as n-Dodecyl β-D-maltoside. Focus was given on asphaltenes to better understand the mechanisms of surfactant cleanup. Through phase behavior, spontaneous imbibition, dynamic interfacial tension and contact angle measurements, we showed that microemulsions formed by this surfactant are able to mobilize bulk NAPL (containing 9wt.% asphaltenes) in the porous rock and solubilize DNAPL (i.e., 4-6wt.% adsorbed asphaltenes) from the rock surface. Spontaneous imbibition tests, in particular, indicated that the ratio of mobilized to solubilized NAPL is about 6:1. Furthermore, aging the cores in NAPL beyond 3days allowed for more NAPL to be trapped in the large pores of the rock but did not alter the amount of asphaltenes adsorbed on the mineral surface. PMID:26826983

  20. Fluoroimmunoassay studies with solubilized antigens from Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Hechemy, K E; Harris, H L; Wethers, J A; Stevens, R W; Stock, B R; Reilly, A A; Benach, J L

    1989-01-01

    Sodium deoxycholate-solubilized Borrelia burgdorferi antigen was prepared for use in a solid-phase fluoroimmunoassay (FIA-L) to detect antibodies in Lyme disease. Serum specimens were tested by FIA-L and by a microimmunofluorescence test. The FIA-L results are comparable to those of the standard microimmunofluorescence test. The overall agreement was 0.98. Moreover, the FIA-L procedure is simple and rapid; fluorescence is objectively determined and is proportional to antibody titer. Images PMID:2671034

  1. Fungal attack on rock: solubilization and altered infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Silverman, M P; Munoz, E F

    1970-09-01

    Penicillium simplicissimum, isolated from weathering basalt, produced citric acid when grown in a glucose-mineral salts medium with basalt, granite, granodiorite, rhyolite, andesite, peridotite, dunite, or quartzite. After 7 days' growth as much as 31 percent of the silicon, 11 percent of the aluminum, 64 percent of the iron, and 59 percent of the magnesium in some of the rocks were solubilized, and a number of rocks showed altered infrared absorption in the silicon-oxygen vibration region.

  2. Mobilization and micellar solubilization of NAPL contaminants in aquifer rocks.

    PubMed

    Javanbakht, Gina; Goual, Lamia

    2016-01-01

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation is often performed to overcome the capillary forces that keep residual NAPL phases trapped within contaminated aquifers. The surfactant selection and displacement mechanism usually depend on the nature of NAPL constituents. For example, micellar solubilization is often used to cleanup DNAPLs from aquifers whereas mobilization is desirable in aquifers contaminated by LNAPLs. Although the majority of crude oils are LNAPLs, they often contain heavy organic macromolecules such as asphaltenes that are classified as DNAPLs. Asphaltenes contain surface-active components that tend to adsorb on rocks, altering their wettability. Previous studies revealed that surfactants that formed Winsor type III microemulsions could promote both mobilization and solubilization. However the extent by which these two mechanisms occur is still unclear, particularly in oil-contaminated aquifers. In this study we investigated the remediation of oil-contaminated aquifers using an environmentally friendly surfactant such as n-Dodecyl β-D-maltoside. Focus was given on asphaltenes to better understand the mechanisms of surfactant cleanup. Through phase behavior, spontaneous imbibition, dynamic interfacial tension and contact angle measurements, we showed that microemulsions formed by this surfactant are able to mobilize bulk NAPL (containing 9wt.% asphaltenes) in the porous rock and solubilize DNAPL (i.e., 4-6wt.% adsorbed asphaltenes) from the rock surface. Spontaneous imbibition tests, in particular, indicated that the ratio of mobilized to solubilized NAPL is about 6:1. Furthermore, aging the cores in NAPL beyond 3days allowed for more NAPL to be trapped in the large pores of the rock but did not alter the amount of asphaltenes adsorbed on the mineral surface.

  3. Sequence and regulation of a gene encoding a human 89-kilodalton heat shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, E; Brandon, S E; Smale, G; Lloyd, D; Weber, L A

    1989-01-01

    Vertebrate cells synthesize two forms of the 82- to 90-kilodalton heat shock protein that are encoded by distinct gene families. In HeLa cells, both proteins (hsp89 alpha and hsp89 beta) are abundant under normal growth conditions and are synthesized at increased rates in response to heat stress. Only the larger form, hsp89 alpha, is induced by the adenovirus E1A gene product (M. C. Simon, K. Kitchener, H. T. Kao, E. Hickey, L. Weber, R. Voellmy, N. Heintz, and J. R. Nevins, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:2884-2890, 1987). We have isolated a human hsp89 alpha gene that shows complete sequence identity with heat- and E1A-inducible cDNA used as a hybridization probe. The 5'-flanking region contained overlapping and inverted consensus heat shock control elements that can confer heat-inducible expression on a beta-globin reporter gene. The gene contained 10 intervening sequences. The first intron was located adjacent to the translation start codon, an arrangement also found in the Drosophila hsp82 gene. The spliced mRNA sequence contained a single open reading frame encoding an 84,564-dalton polypeptide showing high homology with the hsp82 to hsp90 proteins of other organisms. The deduced hsp89 alpha protein sequence differed from the human hsp89 beta sequence reported elsewhere (N. F. Rebbe, J. Ware, R. M. Bertina, P. Modrich, and D. W. Stafford (Gene 53:235-245, 1987) in at least 99 out of the 732 amino acids. Transcription of the hsp89 alpha gene was induced by serum during normal cell growth, but expression did not appear to be restricted to a particular stage of the cell cycle. hsp89 alpha mRNA was considerably more stable than the mRNA encoding hsp70, which can account for the higher constitutive rate of hsp89 synthesis in unstressed cells. Images PMID:2527334

  4. [A new direct solubilizer for bilirubinate calcium stones].

    PubMed

    Asakawa, S; Igimi, H; Shimura, H

    1983-10-01

    Hepatobiliary surgeons must have faced difficulty in treating patients with intrahepatic gallstones. In spite of considerable progress in operative methods or mechanical techniques, it is very difficult to remove intrahepatic gallstones completely. Under such circumstances, the development of a solubilizer that can dissolve intrahepatic bilirubinate calcium stones by means of injecting it through a postoperative catheter or PTCD catheter has been awaited. Up to now, a chelating agent, so-called hexametaphosphate (HMP) has been used for removing the calcium from calcium bilirubinate. But this chelating agent, in itself, cannot dissolve the bilirubin. The authors found a direct solubilizer for bilirubin, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) which is a well known bi-polar non protonic solvent and used as an accelerator for bilirubin determination. After the purification of DMSO to 99.98%, toxicity was examined by oral administration, intravenous administration and infusion into biliary tract. But no remarkable toxicity or side effects were detected on biochemical and pathological examinations. Clinical application of 90% DMSO together with 5% HMP was performed and a satisfactory effect was obtained as a direct solubilizer for bilirubinate calcium stones.

  5. Effect of micellar solubilization on biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bury, S.J.; Miller, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted with a strain of Pseudomonas aeuroginsa and a strain of Ochrobactrum anthropi, both Gram-negative bacteria, growing on aqueous solutions containing straight-chain hydrocarbons solubilized in small micelles (204 nm) of nonionic surfactants. Measurements of optical density, a quantity proportional to bacterial cell concentration, and hydrocarbon content were made as a function of time. Since no macroscopic hydrocarbon drops were present and therefore there was no opportunity for the bacteria to attach themselves to oil-water interfaces, the results provided unambiguous confirmation that solubilization greatly enhances rates of hydrocarbon degradation in these systems compared to rates observed with bulk liquid hydrocarbon in the absence of surfactants. Solubilization of n-decane and n-tetradecane in micelles reduced the times required for cell density to double during exponential growth by a factor of {approximately}5 for one bacterial strain compared to results obtained for surfactant-free experiments. The improvement was even greater for the other strain. Except for very low hydrocarbon concentrations, the Monod model for a single substrate was able to describe reasonably well the time dependence of both cell growth and hydrocarbon consumption for experiments with n-decane. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  6. An improved tripod amphiphile for membrane protein solubilization.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, S. M.; McQuade, D. T.; Quinn, M. A.; Hackenberger, C. P.; Krebs, M. P.; Polans, A. S.; Gellman, S. H.

    2000-01-01

    Intrinsic membrane proteins represent a large fraction of the proteins produced by living organisms and perform many crucial functions. Structural and functional characterization of membrane proteins generally requires that they be extracted from the native lipid bilayer and solubilized with a small synthetic amphiphile, for example, a detergent. We describe the development of a small molecule with a distinctive amphiphilic architecture, a "tripod amphiphile," that solubilizes both bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and bovine rhodopsin (Rho). The polar portion of this amphiphile contains an amide and an amine-oxide; small variations in this polar segment are found to have profound effects on protein solubilization properties. The optimal tripod amphiphile extracts both BR and Rho from the native membrane environments and maintains each protein in a monomeric native-like form for several weeks after delipidation. Tripod amphiphiles are designed to display greater conformational rigidity than conventional detergents, with the long-range goal of promoting membrane protein crystallization. The results reported here represent an important step toward that ultimate goal. PMID:11206073

  7. Association of eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2B with fully solubilized CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Palmesino, Elena; Apuzzo, Tiziana; Thelen, Sylvia; Mueller, Bernd; Langen, Hanno; Thelen, Marcus

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine receptors are key regulators of leukocyte trafficking but also have an important role in development, tumor growth, and metastasis. Among the chemokine receptors, CXCR4 is the only one that leads to perinatal death when genetically ablated in mice, indicating a more-widespread function in development. To identify pathways that are activated downstream of CXCR4, a solubilization protocol was elaborated, which allows for the isolation of the endogenous receptor from human cells in its near-native conformation. Solubilized CXCR4 is recognized by the conformation-sensitive monoclonal antibody 12G5 and retains the ability to bind CXCL12 in solution, which was abolished in the presence of receptor antagonists. Mass spectrometry of CXCR4 immunoprecipitates revealed a specific interaction with the pentameric eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B. The observation that the addition of CXCL12 leads to the dissociation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B from CXCR4 suggests that stimulation of the receptor may trigger the local protein synthesis required for efficient cell movement. PMID:26609049

  8. Nicotine increases initial blood flow responses to local heating of human non-glabrous skin.

    PubMed

    Warner, David O; Joyner, Michael J; Charkoudian, Nisha

    2004-09-15

    Nicotine affects the regulation of skin blood flow (SkBF), but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that acute exposure to nicotine inhibits both the initial neurally mediated component and the later sustained component of SkBF responses to local heating of non-glabrous skin in humans. SkBF (measured by laser-Doppler) responses to local heating of forearm skin from 32 to 42 degrees C were measured in 11 chronic smokers. Heating occurred at one site over 15 min (RAMP) and over 90 s (STEP) at another site, and was maintained for an additional 30 min. STEP heating was also applied to a site pretreated with bretylium via iontophoresis to inhibit noradrenergic neurotransmission. Responses were measured before and after acute administration of nicotine via cigarettes or nasal spray in two experimental sessions. Nicotine decreased resting skin blood flow (P < 0.05); this response was inhibited by bretylium. During RAMP, nicotine increased the initial SkBF at 42 degrees C (by approximately 12%, P < 0.05). For STEP, nicotine increased the initial peak response (by approximately 25%, P < 0.05), and decreased the sustained plateau value (by approximately 10%, P < 0.05). In skin pretreated with bretylium, the increase caused by nicotine in the initial peak value persisted, but the plateau value was not different from pre-nicotine. These data suggest that in abstinent cigarette smokers, nicotine augments initial responses to both gradual and rapid non-painful heating of non-glabrous skin by sensitizing the sensory nerves that mediate the axon reflex associated with rapid vasodilatation. In contrast, nicotine decreases SkBF responses to prolonged heating by activating noradrenergic nerves.

  9. Heat shock inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced tissue factor activity in human whole blood

    PubMed Central

    Sucker, Christoph; Zacharowski, Kai; Thielmann, Matthias; Hartmann, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Background During gram-negative sepsis, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces tissue factor expression on monocytes. The resulting disseminated intravascular coagulation leads to tissue ischemia and worsens the prognosis of septic patients. There are indications, that fever reduces the mortality of sepsis, the effect on tissue factor activity on monocytes is unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether heat shock modulates LPS-induced tissue factor activity in human blood. Methods Whole blood samples and leukocyte suspensions, respectively, from healthy probands (n = 12) were incubated with LPS for 2 hours under heat shock conditions (43°C) or control conditions (37°C), respectively. Subsequent to further 3 hours of incubation at 37°C the clotting time, a measure of tissue factor expression, was determined. Cell integrity was verified by trypan blue exclusion test and FACS analysis. Results Incubation of whole blood samples with LPS for 5 hours at normothermia resulted in a significant shortening of clotting time from 357 ± 108 sec to 82 ± 8 sec compared to samples incubated without LPS (n = 12; p < 0.05). This LPS effect was mediated by tissue factor, as inhibition with active site-inhibited factor VIIa (ASIS) abolished the effect of LPS on clotting time. Blockade of protein synthesis using cycloheximide demonstrated that LPS exerted its procoagulatory effect via an induction of tissue factor expression. Upon heat shock treatment, the LPS effect was blunted: clotting times were 312 ± 66 s in absence of LPS and 277 ± 65 s in presence of LPS (n = 8; p > 0.05). Similarly, heat shock treatment of leukocyte suspensions abolished the LPS-induced tissue factor activity. Clotting time was 73 ± 31 s, when cells were treated with LPS (100 ng/mL) under normothermic conditions, and 301 ± 118 s, when treated with LPS (100 ng/mL) and heat shock (n = 8, p < 0.05). Control experiments excluded cell damage as a potential cause of the observed heat shock effect. Conclusion Heat

  10. Acyclic CB[n]-Type Molecular Containers: Effect of Solubilizing Group on their Function as Solubilizing Excipients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ben; Zavalij, Peter Y.; Isaacs, Lyle

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis and x-ray crystal structures of three acyclic CB[n]-type molecular containers (2a, 2h, 2f) that differ in the charge on their solubilizing groups (SO3−, OH, NH3+). The x-ray crystal structures of compounds 2h and 2f reveal a self-folding of the ArOCH2CH2X wall into the cavity driven by π–π interactions, H-bonds and ion-dipole interactions. The need to reverse this self-folding phenomenon upon guest binding decreases the affinity of 2h and 2f toward cationic guests in water relative to 2a as revealed by direct 1H NMR and UV/Vis titrations as well as UV/Vis competition experiments. We determined the pKa of 6-aminocoumarin 7 (pKa = 3.6) on its own and in the presence anionic, neutral, and cationic hosts (2a: pKa = 4.9; 2h: pKa = 4.1; 2f, pKa = 3.4) which reflect in part the relevance of direct ion-ion interactions between the arms of the host and the guest toward the recognition properties of acyclic CB[n]-type containers. Finally, we showed that the weaker binding affinities measured for neutral and positively charged hosts 2h and 2f compared to anionic 2a results in a decreased ability to act as solubilizing agents for either cationic (tamoxifen), neutral (17α–ethynylestradiol), or anionic (indomethacin) drugs in water. The results establish that acyclic CB[n] compounds that bear anionic solubilizing groups are most suitable for development as general purpose solubilizing excipients for insoluble pharmaceutical agents. PMID:24595500

  11. Beneficial effect of Oligonol supplementation on sweating response under heat stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Beom; Shin, Young Oh

    2014-10-01

    Oligonol is a low-molecular weight polyphenol that possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, nothing is known regarding the impact of Oligonol on sudomotor activity. This study investigated the effects of Oligonol supplementation on sudomotor activity during heat load in humans. Initially, we conducted a placebo-controlled, cross-over trial where participants took a daily dose of Oligonol 200 mg or placebo for one week. After a 2 week washout period, the subjects were switched to the other study arm. As a heat load, half-body immersion into hot water (42 ± 0.5 °C for 30 min) was performed in an automated climate chamber. Tympanic and skin temperatures were measured. Sudomotor activity, including onset time, sweat rate (SR) and volume (SV), active sweat gland density (ASGD), and sweat gland output (SGO), was tested in four or eight areas of skin. When compared with placebo, Oligonol attenuated increases in tympanic and skin temperatures after the heat load. There was an increasing trend in local sweat onset time, but there was a decrease in local SR, SV, ASGD, and SGO for Oligonol compared to placebo. The mean ASGD was significantly higher in the Oligonol group than in the placebo group for 10, 20, and 30 min. This study demonstrates that Oligonol appears to be worthy of consideration as a natural supplement to support more economical use of body fluids against heat stress. PMID:25124490

  12. Beneficial effect of Oligonol supplementation on sweating response under heat stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Beom; Shin, Young Oh

    2014-10-01

    Oligonol is a low-molecular weight polyphenol that possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, nothing is known regarding the impact of Oligonol on sudomotor activity. This study investigated the effects of Oligonol supplementation on sudomotor activity during heat load in humans. Initially, we conducted a placebo-controlled, cross-over trial where participants took a daily dose of Oligonol 200 mg or placebo for one week. After a 2 week washout period, the subjects were switched to the other study arm. As a heat load, half-body immersion into hot water (42 ± 0.5 °C for 30 min) was performed in an automated climate chamber. Tympanic and skin temperatures were measured. Sudomotor activity, including onset time, sweat rate (SR) and volume (SV), active sweat gland density (ASGD), and sweat gland output (SGO), was tested in four or eight areas of skin. When compared with placebo, Oligonol attenuated increases in tympanic and skin temperatures after the heat load. There was an increasing trend in local sweat onset time, but there was a decrease in local SR, SV, ASGD, and SGO for Oligonol compared to placebo. The mean ASGD was significantly higher in the Oligonol group than in the placebo group for 10, 20, and 30 min. This study demonstrates that Oligonol appears to be worthy of consideration as a natural supplement to support more economical use of body fluids against heat stress.

  13. Molecular action mechanisms of solar infrared radiation and heat on human skin.

    PubMed

    Akhalaya, M Ya; Maksimov, G V; Rubin, A B; Lademann, J; Darvin, M E

    2014-07-01

    The generation of ROS underlies all solar infrared-affected therapeutic and pathological cutaneous effects. The signaling pathway NF-kB is responsible for the induced therapeutic effects, while the AP-1 for the pathological effects. The different signaling pathways of infrared-induced ROS and infrared-induced heat shock ROS were shown to act independently multiplying the influence on each other by increasing the doses of irradiation and/or increasing the temperature. The molecular action mechanisms of solar infrared radiation and heat on human skin are summarized and discussed in detail in the present paper. The critical doses are determined. Protection strategies against infrared-induced skin damage are proposed.

  14. Levels of Antibodies against Human Heat Shock Protein (HSP) 60 in Patients with Glaucoma in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Grabska-Liberek, Iwona; Skonieczna, Katarzyna; Olesińska, Marzena; Terelak-Borys, Barbara; Kocięcki, Jarosandlstrokaw; Sikora, Mariusz; Jamrozy-Witkowska, Agnieszka; Tesla, Piotr; Czarnocka, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background Although elevated intraocular pressure is a major risk factor for the development of glaucoma, there is increasing evidence that the immune system may be involved in the development of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). The aim of this study was to determine if NTG is associated with elevated levels of antibodies against human heat shock protein (HSP) 60. Material/Methods The study was conducted in 139 subjects (35 subjects with NTG [Group 1], 34 subjects with primary open-angle glaucoma/POAG/[Group 2], 24 subjects with autoimmune rheumatic diseases [Group 3], and 36 healthy controls [Group 4]). All subjects had complete ophthalmologic examination (visual acuity, slit-lamp examination, tonometry, gonioscopy; visual-field examination, and optical coherence tomography/OCT/of the optic nerve head and the macula). Blood samples were collected for the measurements of serum levels of antibodies against human HSP60. Results The subjects with rheumatic diseases had the highest median serum level of antibodies against HSP60 – 20.49 ng/mL. The values in the subjects with NTG, POAG, and in controls were 18.79 ng/mL, 18.61 ng/mL and 17.61 ng/mL, respectively (p=0.96). Conclusions This study does not confirm the hypothesis that normal-tension glaucoma is associated with elevated blood levels of antibodies against human heat shock protein (HSP) 60. PMID:25786333

  15. A heterogeneous human tissue mimicking phantom for RF heating and MRI thermal monitoring verification

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yu; Wyatt, Cory; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul; Craciunescu, Oana; MacFall, James; Dewhirst, Mark; Das, Shiva K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a heterogeneous phantom that mimics a human thigh with a deep seated tumor, for the purpose of studying the performance of radiofrequency (RF) heating equipment and non-invasive temperature monitoring with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The heterogeneous cylindrical phantom was constructed with an outer fat layer surrounding an inner core of phantom material mimicking muscle, tumor and marrow-filled bone. The component materials were formulated to have dielectric and thermal properties similar to human tissues. The dielectric properties of the tissue-mimicking phantom materials were measured with a microwave vector network analyzer and impedance probe over the frequency range of 80 – 500 MHz and at temperatures of 24°C, 37°C, and 45°C. The specific heat values of the component materials were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter over the temperature range of 15 – 55°C. The thermal conductivity value was obtained from fitting the curves obtained from one-dimensional heat transfer measurement. The phantom was used to verify the operation of a cylindrical 4-antenna annular phased array extremity applicator (140 MHz), by examining the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) thermal imaging patterns for various magnitude/phase settings (including settings to focus heating in tumor). For muscle and tumor materials, MR imaging was also used to measure T1/T2* values (1.5 Tesla) and to obtain the slope of the PRFS phase change vs. temperature change curve. The dielectric and thermal properties of the phantom materials were in close agreement to well-accepted published results for human tissues. The phantom was able to successfully demonstrate satisfactory operation of the tested heating equipment. The MRI-measured thermal distributions matched the expected patterns for various magnitude/phase settings of the applicator, allowing the phantom to be used as a quality assurance tool. Importantly, the material formulations for the

  16. Exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 reduces response of human neuroblastoma cells to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Yurinskaya, M M; Funikov, S Y; Evgen'ev, M B; Vinokurov, M G

    2016-07-01

    The effect of exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), TNFα secretion, and mRNA expression by human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. It was shown that exogenous HSP70 protects neuroblastoma cells from the action of LPS. The protection mechanism of HSP70 includes a reduction in the production of ROS and TNFα and a decrease in the expression of TLR4 and IL-1β mRNA in SK-N-SH cells induced by LPS. PMID:27599502

  17. Exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 reduces response of human neuroblastoma cells to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Yurinskaya, M M; Funikov, S Y; Evgen'ev, M B; Vinokurov, M G

    2016-07-01

    The effect of exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), TNFα secretion, and mRNA expression by human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. It was shown that exogenous HSP70 protects neuroblastoma cells from the action of LPS. The protection mechanism of HSP70 includes a reduction in the production of ROS and TNFα and a decrease in the expression of TLR4 and IL-1β mRNA in SK-N-SH cells induced by LPS.

  18. Specific Genomic Fingerprints of Phosphate Solubilizing Pseudomonas Strains Generated by Box Elements

    PubMed Central

    Javadi Nobandegani, Mohammad Bagher; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Yun, Wong Mui

    2014-01-01

    Primers corresponding to conserved bacterial repetitive of BOX elements were used to show that BOX-DNA sequences are widely distributed in phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains. Phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas was isolated from oil palm fields (tropical soil) in Malaysia. BOX elements were used to generate genomic fingerprints of a variety of Pseudomonas isolates to identify strains that were not distinguishable by other classification methods. BOX-PCR, that derived genomic fingerprints, was generated from whole purified genomic DNA by liquid culture of phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas. BOX-PCR generated the phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas specific fingerprints to identify the relationship between these strains. This suggests that distribution of BOX elements' sequences in phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains is the mirror image of their genomic structure. Therefore, this method appears to be a rapid, simple, and reproducible method to identify and classify phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains and it may be useful tool for fast identification of potential biofertilizer strains. PMID:25580434

  19. Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, Eugene T.; Lin, Mow S.

    1994-11-22

    A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed, The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts, For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates.

  20. Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1994-11-22

    A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed. The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts. For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates. 54 figs.

  1. Evaluation of the ultrasonic method for solubilizing Daphnia magna before liquid scintillation counting

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, D.D.; Hanf, R.W. Jr.; Carlile, D.W.

    1984-11-01

    Adult Daphnia magna were exposed to /sup 14/C-labeled phenol and tissues analyzed for /sup 14/C uptake by three methods: (1) tissue solubilizer, (2) tissue solubilizer plus sonication, and (3) sonication alone. Analysis by liquid scintillation counting revealed that measurements of total activity among treatments were not significantly different (..cap alpha.. less than or equal to 0.10) at two count levels. Sonicated samples showed less variation than tissue samples that were solubilized. 5 references, 1 table.

  2. Fixed-bed bioreactor system for the microbial solubilization of coal

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Strandberg, G.W.

    1987-09-14

    A fixed-bed bioreactor system for the conversion of coal into microbially solubilized coal products. The fixed-bed bioreactor continuously or periodically receives coal and bio-reactants and provides for the large scale production of microbially solubilized coal products in an economical and efficient manner. An oxidation pretreatment process for rendering coal uniformly and more readily susceptible to microbial solubilization may be employed with the fixed-bed bioreactor. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Fluidized-bed bioreactor system for the microbial solubilization of coal

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Strandberg, G.W.

    1987-09-14

    A fluidized-bed bioreactor system for the conversion of coal into microbially solubilized coal products. The fluidized-bed bioreactor continuously or periodically receives coal and bio-reactants and provides for the production of microbially solubilized coal products in an economical and efficient manner. An oxidation pretreatment process for rendering coal uniformly and more readily susceptible to microbial solubilization may be employed with the fluidized-bed bioreactor. 2 figs.

  4. Climate extremes in urban area and their impact on human health: the summer heat waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Marina

    2014-05-01

    Shanghai, which is particularly prone to heat waves, recorded the hottest summer in over 50 years. During the event, the maximum number of daily deaths was 317, 42% above the non-heat day average, even though an heat warning system in operation. In this study results from the analysis of heat waves events in Italian cities is presented. Indices representative of extremely hot conditions have been taken into account and results of the analysis of indices such as the number of summer days (SU), number of tropical nights (TR), maxima and minima of daily maximum and minimum temperatures (TXx, TXn, TNx, TNn, respectively), exceedances over fixed thresholds is presented. Results show a clear increase in the past decades of the numbers of days affected by heat events. Some considerations are also presented about the impact on human health of the longest events occurred in the Country.

  5. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Mizuno, Rie; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ijiri, Kenichi

    2012-02-01

    The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA(Met) (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA(Met) was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules. PMID:22244871

  6. Inhibiting heat shock factor 1 in human cancer cells with a potent RNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Salamanca, H Hans; Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Richard A; Shi, Hua; Lis, John T

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a master regulator that coordinates chaperone protein expression to enhance cellular survival in the face of heat stress. In cancer cells, HSF1 drives a transcriptional program distinct from heat shock to promote metastasis and cell survival. Its strong association with the malignant phenotype implies that HSF1 antagonists may have general and effective utilities in cancer therapy. For this purpose, we had identified an avid RNA aptamer for HSF1 that is portable among different model organisms. Extending our previous work in yeast and Drosophila, here we report the activity of this aptamer in human cancer cell lines. When delivered into cells using a synthetic gene and strong promoter, this aptamer was able to prevent HSF1 from binding to its DNA regulation elements. At the cellular level, expression of this aptamer induced apoptosis and abolished the colony-forming capability of cancer cells. At the molecular level, it reduced chaperones and attenuated the activation of the MAPK signaling pathway. Collectively, these data demonstrate the advantage of aptamers in drug target validation and support the hypothesis that HSF1 DNA binding activity is a potential target for controlling oncogenic transformation and neoplastic growth.

  7. A numerical study of heat and water vapor transfer in MDCT-based human airway models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) thermo-fluid model is developed to study regional distributions of temperature and water vapor in three multi-detector row computed-tomography-based human airways with minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min. A one-dimensional (1D) model is also solved to provide necessary initial and boundary conditions for the 3D model. Both 3D and 1D predicted temperature distributions agree well with available in vivo measurement data. On inspiration, the 3D cold high-speed air stream is split at the bifurcation to form secondary flows, with its cold regions biased toward the inner wall. The cold air flowing along the wall is warmed up more rapidly than the air in the lumen center. The repeated splitting pattern of air streams caused by bifurcations acts as an effective mechanism for rapid heat and mass transfer in 3D. This provides a key difference from the 1D model, where heating relies largely on diffusion in the radial direction, thus significantly affecting gradient-dependent variables, such as energy flux and water loss rate. We then propose the correlations for respective heat and mass transfer in the airways of up to 6 generations: [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], where Nu is the Nusselt number, Sh is the Sherwood number, Re is the branch Reynolds number, D a is the airway equivalent diameter, and [Formula: see text] is the tracheal equivalent diameter.

  8. Morphological changes in human and animal enamel rods with heating--especially limits in temperature allowing discrimination between human and animal teeth.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Ohtani, S; Kato, S; Sugimoto, H; Miake, K; Nakamura, T

    1990-03-01

    Little has been revealed about making discrimination between human and animal using a piece of tooth found in a burned cadaver. From the viewpoint of forensic dental medicine, it is a theme no less valuable. This experimental study was attempted for this reason. Teeth from an individual body of human, monkey, dog, rabbit and rat were heated in turn on the muffle furnace. The heating temperatures were from 200 degrees C to 1,000 degrees C in time spans of 5, 30 and 60 minutes. After heating, each tooth and its control were observed by a scanning electron microscope (magnifying power: 3,500 x or 3,600 x). At heating temperature of 500 degrees C or 600 degrees C, enamel starts to come off in lumps and cracks appear in the enamel rods. The arcaded form in human and monkey, hexagon in dog, elongated chain in rabbit, rows of short, diagonal parallel lines equally directed at every other row in rat--these basic morphological features of the enamel rods--are retained till the heat reaches 700 degrees C. The enamel rods in monkey yield to heat more easily than those in human. At 600 degrees C many cracks appear and deformation of the arcaded form starts. With heating of 5 minutes at 800 degrees C the outline of the pattern is obscured. Human and animal teeth get varied forms of cracks in the enamel rods with heating more than 5 minutes at 800 degrees C. The structure of the enamel rods is broken and morphological characteristics are lost. This makes discrimination of human and animal quite difficult.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2133796

  9. Heating properties of the needle type applicator made of shape memory alloy by 3-D anatomical human head model.

    PubMed

    Mimoto, N; Kato, K; Kanazawa, Y; Shindo, Y; Tsuchiya, K; Kubo, M; Uzuka, T; Takahashi, H; Fujii, Y

    2009-01-01

    Since the human brain is protected by the skull, it is not easy to non-invasively heat deep brain tumors with electromagnetic energy for hyperthermia treatments. Generally, needle type applicators were used in clinical practice to heat brain tumors. To expand the heating area of needle type applicators, we have developed a new type of needle made of a shape memory alloy (SMA). In this paper, heating properties of the proposed SMA needle type applicator were discussed. Here, in order to apply the SMA needle type applicator clinically. First, we constructed an anatomical 3-D FEM model from MRI and X-ray CT images using 3D-CAD software. Second, we estimated electric and temperature distributions to confirm the SMA needle type applicator using the FEM soft were JMAG-Studio. From these results, it was confirmed that the proposed method can expand the heating area and control the heating of various sizes of brain tumors.

  10. Complete solubilization of pectins from cotton suspension culture cell walls with retention of most structural features

    SciTech Connect

    Mort, A.J.; Oiu, Feng; Otiko, G.; Maness, N.O.; West, P. ); An, Jinhua Univ. of Georgia, Athens ); Oi, Xiaoyang Univ. of Cincinnati, OH )

    1993-05-01

    Cotton suspension culture cell walls contain four major pectin substructures: (1) rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI), (2) rhamnogalacturonan II, (3) highly methyl esterified homogalacturonan, and (4) homogalacturonan of low degree of methyl esterification. Methods are described to solubilize and isolate each of the four major substructures from the cell walls in high yields. RGII is completely solubilized by an easily purified endopolygalacturonase (EPG). Around 40% of RGI can be solubilized by the sequential action of this EPG and a commercially available cellulase. Almost all of the RGI along with xyloglucan can be solubilized after the EPG treatment using strong alkali. Highly methyl esterified homogalacturonan (degree of methyl esterification [approximately]40%) is solubilized into water after HF treatment of the untreated walls, at [minus]23[degrees], and homogalacturonans with a very low degree of methyl esterification ([approximately]10%) can subsequently be solubilized into 500 mM imidazole buffer. the highly methyl esterified homogalacturonan co-solubilizes with the RGI during several extraction procedures and co-chromatographs with it, indicating that they are covalently attached to each other in the cell walls. Little of the RGI is solubilized from cotton walls by EPG digestion without a subsequent treatment that co-solubilizes the xyloglucan or degrades the xyloglucan, indicating crosslinks exist between the RGI and much of the xyloglucan.

  11. Solubilization of insoluble inorganic phosphate by Burkholderia cepacia DA23 isolated from cultivated soil

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ok-Ryul; Lee, Seung-Jin; Lee, Yong-Seok; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Keun-Ki; Choi, Yong-Lark

    2008-01-01

    A mineral phosphate solubilizing bacterium, Burkholderia cepacia DA23 has been isolated from cultivated soils. Phosphate-solubilizing activities of the strain against three types of insoluble phosphate were quantitatively determined. When 3% of glucose concentration was used for carbon source, the strain had a marked mineral phosphate-solubilizing activity. Mineral phosphate solubilization was directly related to the pH drop by the strain. Analysis of the culture medium by high pressure liquid chromatography identified gluconic acid as the main organic acid released by Burkholderia cepacia DA23. Gluconic acid production was apparently the result of the glucose dehydrogenase activity and glucose dehydrogenase was affected by phosphate regulation. PMID:24031195

  12. Metabolic effects of microwave radiation and convection heating on human mononuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kiel, J.L.; Wong, L.S.; Erwin, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of microwave radiation (2450 MHz, continuous wave, mean specific absorption rate of 103.5 +/- 4.2 W/kg) and convection heating on the nonphosphorylating oxidative metabolism of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes (96% lymphocytes, 4% monocytes) at 37 degrees C were investigated. Metabolic activity, determined by chemiluminescence (CL) of cells challenged with luminol (5-amino-2,3-dihydro-1,4-phthalazinedione) linked to bovine serum albumin, was detected with a brightness photometer. A significant stimulation after microwave exposure (p less than 0.005) over total CL of matched 37 degrees C incubator controls was observed. A similar degree of stimulation compared to incubator controls was also detected after sham treatment. There was no significant difference between changes in total CL or stimulation indices of the microwave and sham exposed groups. It appears that exposure to microwave radiation, under normothermic (37 +/- 0.03 degrees C) conditions, has no effect on the oxidative metabolic activity of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. However, the significant differences between microwave or sham exposed cells and their respective incubator controls occurred because the temperature of the incubator controls did not exceed 35.9 degrees C and this temperature required 39 minutes to reach from 22 degrees C. Slow heating of incubator controls must be accounted for in thermal and radiofrequency radiation studies in vitro.

  13. M. paratuberculosis Heat Shock Protein 65 and Human Diseases: Bridging Infection and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Coad Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the known infectious cause of Johne's disease, an enteric inflammatory disease mostly studied in ruminant animals. MAP has also been implicated in the very similar Crohn's disease of humans as well as sarcoidosis. Recently, MAP has been associated with juvenile sarcoidosis (Blau syndrome), autoimmune diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. While it is intuitive to implicate MAP in granulomatous diseases where the microbe participates in the granuloma, it is more difficult to assign a role for MAP in diseases where autoantibodies are a primary feature. MAP may trigger autoimmune antibodies via its heat shock proteins. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 (HSP65) is an immunodominant protein that shares sequential and conformational elements with several human host proteins. This molecular mimicry is the proposed etiopathology by which MAP stimulates autoantibodies associated with autoimmune (type 1) diabetes, autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. This paper proposes that MAP is a source of mycobacterial HSP65 and acts as a trigger of autoimmune disease. PMID:23056923

  14. Local heating of human skin causes hyperemia without mediation by muscarinic cholinergic receptors or prostanoids.

    PubMed

    Golay, Sandrine; Haeberli, Christian; Delachaux, Anne; Liaudet, Lucas; Kucera, Paul; Waeber, Bernard; Feihl, François

    2004-11-01

    Local changes in surface temperature have a powerful influence on the perfusion of human skin. Heating increases local skin blood flow, but the mechanisms and mediators of this response (thermal hyperemia response) are incompletely elucidated. In the present study, we examined the possible dependence of the thermal hyperemia response on stimulation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors and on production of vasodilator prostanoids. In 13 male healthy subjects aged 20-30 yr, a temperature-controlled chamber was positioned on the volar face of one forearm and used to raise surface temperature from 34 to 41 degrees C. The time course of the resulting thermal hyperemia response was recorded with a laser-Doppler imager. In one experiment, each of eight subjects received an intravenous bolus of the antimuscarinic agent glycopyrrolate (4 microg/kg) on one visit and saline on the other. The thermal hyperemia response was determined within the hour after the injections. Glycopyrrolate effectively inhibited the skin vasodilation induced by iontophoresis of acetylcholine but did not influence the thermal hyperemia response. In a second experiment, conducted in five other subjects, 1 g of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor aspirin administered orally totally abolished the vasodilation induced in the skin by anodal current but also failed to modify the thermal hyperemia response. The present study excludes the stimulation of muscarinic receptors and the production of vasodilator prostaglandins as essential and nonredundant mechanisms for the vasodilation induced by local heating in human forearm skin. PMID:15247159

  15. Attributing Human Mortality During Extreme Heat Waves to Anthropogenic Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D.; Heaviside, C.; Vardoulakis, S.; Huntingford, C.; Masato, G.; Guillod, B. P.; Frumhoff, P. C.; Bowery, A.; Allen, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is the biggest global health threat of the 21st century (Costello et al, 2009; Watts et al, 2015). Perhaps one of the clearest examples of this is the summer heat wave of 2003, which saw up to seventy thousand excess deaths across Europe (Robine et al, 2007). The extreme temperatures are now thought to be significantly enhanced due to anthropogenic climate change (Stott et al, 2004; Christidis et al, 2015). Here, we consider not only the Europe-wide temperature response of the heat wave, but the localised response using a high-resolution regional model simulating 2003 climate conditions thousands of times. For the first time, by employing end-to-end attribution, we attribute changes in mortality to the increased radiative forcing from climate change, with a specific focus on London and Paris. We show that in both cities, a sizable proportion of the excess mortality can be attributed to human emissions. With European heat waves projected to increase into the future, these results provide a worrying reality for what may lie ahead. Christidis, Nikolaos, Gareth S. Jones, and Peter A. Stott. "Dramatically increasing chance of extremely hot summers since the 2003 European heatwave." Nature Climate Change (2014). Costello, Anthony, et al. "Managing the health effects of climate change: lancet and University College London Institute for Global Health Commission." The Lancet 373.9676 (2009): 1693-1733. Stott, Peter A., Dáithí A. Stone, and Myles R. Allen. "Human contribution to the European heatwave of 2003." Nature 432.7017 (2004): 610-614 Watts, N., et al. "Health and climate change: policy responses to protect public health." Lancet. 2015.

  16. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Mizuno, Rie; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ijiri, Kenichi

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  17. Heat shock protein 27 expression in the human testis showing normal and abnormal spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adly, Mohamed A; Assaf, Hanan A; Hussein, Mahmoud Rezk A

    2008-10-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones involved in protein folding, assembly and transport, and which play critical roles in the regulation of cell growth, survival and differentiation. We set out to test the hypothesis that HSP27 protein is expressed in the human testes and its expression varies with the state of spermatogenesis. HSP27 expression was examined in 30 human testicular biopsy specimens (normal spermatogenesis, maturation arrest and Sertoli cell only syndrome, 10 cases each) using immunofluorescent methods. The biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing investigations for infertility. The seminiferous epithelium of the human testes showing normal spermatogenesis had a cell type-specific expression of HSP27. HSP27 expression was strong in the cytoplasm of the Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, and Leydig cells. Alternatively, the expression was moderate in the spermatocytes, weak in the spermatids and absent in the spermatozoa. In testes showing maturation arrest, HSP27 expression was strong in the Sertoli cells, weak in the spermatogonia, and spermatocytes. It was absent in the spermatids and Leydig cells. In Sertoli cell only syndrome, HSP27 expression was strong in the Sertoli cells and absent in the Leydig cells. We report for the first time the expression patterns of HSP27 in the human testes and show differential expression during normal spermatogenesis, indicating a possible role in this process. The altered expression of this protein in testes showing abnormal spermatogenesis may be related to the pathogenesis of male infertility.

  18. Epitopes of Microbial and Human Heat Shock Protein 60 and Their Recognition in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Elfaitouri, Amal; Herrmann, Björn; Bölin-Wiener, Agnes; Wang, Yilin; Gottfries, Carl-Gerhard; Zachrisson, Olof; Pipkorn, Rϋdiger; Rönnblom, Lars; Blomberg, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME, also called Chronic Fatigue Syndrome), a common disease with chronic fatigability, cognitive dysfunction and myalgia of unknown etiology, often starts with an infection. The chaperonin human heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) occurs in mitochondria and in bacteria, is highly conserved, antigenic and a major autoantigen. The anti-HSP60 humoral (IgG and IgM) immune response was studied in 69 ME patients and 76 blood donors (BD) (the Training set) with recombinant human and E coli HSP60, and 136 30-mer overlapping and targeted peptides from HSP60 of humans, Chlamydia, Mycoplasma and 26 other species in a multiplex suspension array. Peptides from HSP60 helix I had a chaperonin-like activity, but these and other HSP60 peptides also bound IgG and IgM with an ME preference, theoretically indicating a competition between HSP60 function and antibody binding. A HSP60-based panel of 25 antigens was selected. When evaluated with 61 other ME and 399 non-ME samples (331 BD, 20 Multiple Sclerosis and 48 Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients), a peptide from Chlamydia pneumoniae HSP60 detected IgM in 15 of 61 (24%) of ME, and in 1 of 399 non-ME at a high cutoff (p<0.0001). IgM to specific cross-reactive epitopes of human and microbial HSP60 occurs in a subset of ME, compatible with infection-induced autoimmunity. PMID:24312270

  19. Epitopes of microbial and human heat shock protein 60 and their recognition in myalgic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Elfaitouri, Amal; Herrmann, Björn; Bölin-Wiener, Agnes; Wang, Yilin; Gottfries, Carl-Gerhard; Zachrisson, Olof; Pipkorn, Rϋdiger; Rönnblom, Lars; Blomberg, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME, also called Chronic Fatigue Syndrome), a common disease with chronic fatigability, cognitive dysfunction and myalgia of unknown etiology, often starts with an infection. The chaperonin human heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) occurs in mitochondria and in bacteria, is highly conserved, antigenic and a major autoantigen. The anti-HSP60 humoral (IgG and IgM) immune response was studied in 69 ME patients and 76 blood donors (BD) (the Training set) with recombinant human and E coli HSP60, and 136 30-mer overlapping and targeted peptides from HSP60 of humans, Chlamydia, Mycoplasma and 26 other species in a multiplex suspension array. Peptides from HSP60 helix I had a chaperonin-like activity, but these and other HSP60 peptides also bound IgG and IgM with an ME preference, theoretically indicating a competition between HSP60 function and antibody binding. A HSP60-based panel of 25 antigens was selected. When evaluated with 61 other ME and 399 non-ME samples (331 BD, 20 Multiple Sclerosis and 48 Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients), a peptide from Chlamydia pneumoniae HSP60 detected IgM in 15 of 61 (24%) of ME, and in 1 of 399 non-ME at a high cutoff (p<0.0001). IgM to specific cross-reactive epitopes of human and microbial HSP60 occurs in a subset of ME, compatible with infection-induced autoimmunity.

  20. Solubilization and partial characterization of a microsomal high affinity GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Nicchitta, C.; Williamson, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    Isolated rat liver microsomes release sequestered Ca/sup 2 +/ following addition of GTP. In contrast to permeabilized cells, GTP dependent microsomal Ca/sup 2 +/ release requires low concentrations of polyethylene glycol (PEG). They have identified a microsomal, PEG-sensitive high affinity GTPase which shares a number of characteristics with the GTP-dependent Ca/sup 2 +/ release system. To aid in further characterization of this activity they have initiated studies on the solubilization and purification of the microsomal GTPases. When microsomes are solubilized under the following conditions (150 mM NaCl, 5 mg protein/ml, 1% Triton X-114) PEG sensitive GTPase activity selectively partitions into the detergent rich phase of the Triton X-114 extract. As observed in intact microsomal membranes the Triton X-114 soluble GTPase is maximally stimulated by 3% PEG. Half maximal stimulation is observed at 1% PEG. PEG increases the Vmax of this activity; no effects on Km were observed. The Km for GTP of the detergent soluble GTPase is 5 ..mu..M. This GTPase is sensitive to inhibition by sulfhydryl reagents. PEG-sensitive GTPase activity was completely inhibited in the presence of 25 ..mu..M p-hydroxymercuribenzoate (PHMB); half maximal inhibition was observed at 5 ..mu..M. Labeling of the Triton X-114 extract with the photosensitive compound (/sup 32/P) 8-azido GTP indicated the presence of two prominent GTP binding proteins of approximate molecular weights 17 and 54 kD.

  1. Solubilization and electrophoretic characterization of select edible nut seed proteins.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Shridhar K; Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Sharma, Girdhari M; Kshirsagar, Harshal H; Teuber, Suzanne S; Roux, Kenneth H

    2009-09-01

    The solubility of almond, Brazil nut, cashew nut, hazelnut, macadamia, pecan, pine nut, pistachio, walnut, and peanut proteins in several aqueous solvents was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed. In addition, the effects of extraction time and ionic strength on protein solubility were also investigated. Electrophoresis and protein determination (Lowry, Bradford, and micro-Kjeldahl) methods were used for qualitative and quantitative assessment of proteins, respectively. Depending on the seed, buffer type and ionic strength significantly affected protein solubility. The results suggest that buffered sodium borate (BSB; 0.1 M H(3)BO(3), 0.025 M Na(2)B(4)O(7), 0.075 M NaCl, pH 8.45) optimally solubilizes nut seed proteins. Qualitative differences in seed protein electrophoretic profiles were revealed. For a specific seed type, these differences were dependent on the solvent(s) used to solubilize the seed proteins. SDS-PAGE results suggest the polypeptide molecular mass range for the tree nut seed proteins to be 3-100 kDa. The results of native IEF suggested that the proteins were mainly acidic, with a pI range from >4.5 to <7.0. Western immunoblotting experiments indicated that rabbit polyclonal antibodies recognized substantially the same polypeptides as those recognized by the corresponding pooled patient sera IgE.

  2. Extraction, Enrichment, Solubilization, and Digestion Techniques for Membrane Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Moore, Stephanie M; Hess, Stephanie M; Jorgenson, James W

    2016-04-01

    The importance of membrane proteins in biological systems is indisputable; however, their amphipathic nature makes them difficult to analyze. In this study, the most popular techniques for extraction, enrichment, solubilization, and digestion are compared, resulting in an overall improved workflow for the insoluble portion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell lysate. Yeast cells were successfully lysed using a French press pressure cell at 20 000 psi, and resulting proteins were fractionated prior to digestion to reduce sample complexity. The proteins were best solubilized with the addition of ionic detergent sodium deoxycholate (1%) and through the application of high-frequency sonication prior to a tryptic digestion at 37 °C. Overall, the improved membrane proteomic workflow resulted in a 26% increase in membrane protein identifications for baker's yeast. In addition, more membrane protein identifications were unique to the improved protocol. When comparing membrane proteins that were identified in the improved protocol and the standard operating procedure (176 proteins), 93% of these proteins were present in greater abundance (higher intensity) when using the improved method. PMID:26979493

  3. Solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by perfluorinated surfactant micelles.

    PubMed

    An, Youn-Joo; Carraway, Elizabeth R; Schlautman, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    Due to their chemical and thermal stability, perfluorinated surfactants (PFSs) are promising materials for the development of novel environmental remediation applications. This stability also leads to the persistence of PFS in the environment; therefore, their properties and behavior should be well understood. This study focused on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and PFS interactions, particularly the solubilization of PAHs by PFS micelles. Naphthalene. phenanthrene, and pyrene were selected as representative PAHs and an anionic PFS, ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO) was used. Critical micelle concentration (CMC) values of APFO measured by surface tension, fluorescence probe, and solubility enhancement methods fell in the range of 20-30 mM at 22 +/- 1 degrees C. Apparent solubilities of molecular oxygen and PAHs in APFO micellar solutions depended linearly on the APFO concentration. Molar solubilization ratio (MSR) values were determined to be 9.50 x 10(-4), 4.17 x 10(-3), 2.31 x 10(-4), and 4.09 x 10(-5) and mole fraction micellar partition coefficient (Kmic) values were found to be 1.89 x 10(2), 9.50 x 10(2), 2.12 x 10(3), and 3.79 x 10(3) for oxygen, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene, respectively at 22 +/- 1 degrees C. log Kmic values for three PAHs were shown to be linearly correlated with the log values of octanol-water partition coefficients (log Kow).

  4. Maximizing mutagenesis with solubilized CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Burger, Alexa; Lindsay, Helen; Felker, Anastasia; Hess, Christopher; Anders, Carolin; Chiavacci, Elena; Zaugg, Jonas; Weber, Lukas M; Catena, Raul; Jinek, Martin; Robinson, Mark D; Mosimann, Christian

    2016-06-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 enables efficient sequence-specific mutagenesis for creating somatic or germline mutants of model organisms. Key constraints in vivo remain the expression and delivery of active Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) with minimal toxicity, variable mutagenesis efficiencies depending on targeting sequence, and high mutation mosaicism. Here, we apply in vitro assembled, fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs in solubilizing salt solution to achieve maximal mutagenesis efficiency in zebrafish embryos. MiSeq-based sequence analysis of targeted loci in individual embryos using CrispRVariants, a customized software tool for mutagenesis quantification and visualization, reveals efficient bi-allelic mutagenesis that reaches saturation at several tested gene loci. Such virtually complete mutagenesis exposes loss-of-function phenotypes for candidate genes in somatic mutant embryos for subsequent generation of stable germline mutants. We further show that targeting of non-coding elements in gene regulatory regions using saturating mutagenesis uncovers functional control elements in transgenic reporters and endogenous genes in injected embryos. Our results establish that optimally solubilized, in vitro assembled fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs provide a reproducible reagent for direct and scalable loss-of-function studies and applications beyond zebrafish experiments that require maximal DNA cutting efficiency in vivo.

  5. Solubilization and electrophoretic characterization of select edible nut seed proteins.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Shridhar K; Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Sharma, Girdhari M; Kshirsagar, Harshal H; Teuber, Suzanne S; Roux, Kenneth H

    2009-09-01

    The solubility of almond, Brazil nut, cashew nut, hazelnut, macadamia, pecan, pine nut, pistachio, walnut, and peanut proteins in several aqueous solvents was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed. In addition, the effects of extraction time and ionic strength on protein solubility were also investigated. Electrophoresis and protein determination (Lowry, Bradford, and micro-Kjeldahl) methods were used for qualitative and quantitative assessment of proteins, respectively. Depending on the seed, buffer type and ionic strength significantly affected protein solubility. The results suggest that buffered sodium borate (BSB; 0.1 M H(3)BO(3), 0.025 M Na(2)B(4)O(7), 0.075 M NaCl, pH 8.45) optimally solubilizes nut seed proteins. Qualitative differences in seed protein electrophoretic profiles were revealed. For a specific seed type, these differences were dependent on the solvent(s) used to solubilize the seed proteins. SDS-PAGE results suggest the polypeptide molecular mass range for the tree nut seed proteins to be 3-100 kDa. The results of native IEF suggested that the proteins were mainly acidic, with a pI range from >4.5 to <7.0. Western immunoblotting experiments indicated that rabbit polyclonal antibodies recognized substantially the same polypeptides as those recognized by the corresponding pooled patient sera IgE. PMID:19655801

  6. Novel Mitochondria-Targeted Heat-Soluble Proteins Identified in the Anhydrobiotic Tardigrade Improve Osmotic Tolerance of Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Sae; Tanaka, Junko; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Daiki D.; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called “anhydrobiosis”. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble) and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble) proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble), as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments. PMID:25675104

  7. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sae; Tanaka, Junko; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Daiki D; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble) and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble) proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble), as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments.

  8. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sae; Tanaka, Junko; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Daiki D; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble) and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble) proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble), as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments. PMID:25675104

  9. Dynamic Simulation of Human Thermoregulation and Heat Transfer for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Thomas R.; Nelson, David A.; Bue, Grant; Kuznetz, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Models of human thermoregulation and heat transfer date from the early 1970s and have been developed for applications ranging from evaluating thermal comfort in spacecraft and aircraft cabin environments to predicting heat stress during EVAs. Most lumped or compartment models represent the body as an assemblage cylindrical and spherical elements which may be subdivided into layers to describe tissue heterogeneity. Many existing models are of limited usefulness in asymmetric thermal environments, such as may be encountered during an EVA. Conventional whole-body clothing models also limit the ability to describe local surface thermal and evaporation effects in sufficient detail. A further limitation is that models based on a standard man model are not readily scalable to represent large or small subjects. This work describes development of a new human thermal model derived from the 41-node man model. Each segment is divided into four concentric, constant thickness cylinders made up of a central core surrounded by muscle, fat, and skin, respectively. These cylinders are connected by the flow of blood from a central blood pool to each part. The central blood pool is updated at each time step, based on a whole-body energy balance. Results show the model simulates core and surface temperature histories, sweat evaporation and metabolic rates which generally are consistent with controlled exposures of human subjects. Scaling rules are developed to enable simulation of small and large subjects (5th percentile and 95th percentile). Future refinements will include a clothing model that addresses local surface insulation and permeation effects and developing control equations to describe thermoregulatory effects such as may occur with prolonged weightlessness or with aging.

  10. Expression, purification and some properties of fluorescent chimeras of human small heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Datskevich, Petr N; Mymrikov, Evgeny V; Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Shemetov, Anton A; Sudnitsyna, Maria V; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2012-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsp) are ubiquitously expressed in all human tissues and have an important housekeeping role in preventing the accumulation of aggregates of improperly folded or denatured proteins. They also participate in the regulation of the cytoskeleton, proliferation, apoptosis and many other vital processes. Fluorescent chimeras composed of sHsp and enhanced fluorescent proteins have been used to determine the intracellular locations of small heat shock proteins and to analyse the hetero-oligomeric complexes formed by different sHsp. However, the biochemical properties and chaperone-like activities of these chimeras have not been investigated. To determine the properties of these chimeras, we fused enhanced yellow and cyan fluorescent proteins (EYFP and ECFP) to the N-termini of four ubiquitously expressed human small heat shock proteins: HspB1, HspB5, HspB6, and HspB8. The eight fluorescent chimeras of small heat shock proteins and isolated fluorescent proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. The chimeric proteins were isolated and purified via ammonium sulphate fractionation, ion exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. This method provided 20-100 mg of fluorescent chimeras from 1L of bacterial culture. The spectral properties of the chimeras were similar to those of the isolated fluorescent proteins. The fusion of fluorescent proteins to HspB6 and HspB8, which typically form dimers, did not affect their quaternary structures. Oligomers of the fluorescent chimeras of HspB1 and HspB5 were less stable and contained fewer subunits than oligomers formed by the wild-type proteins. Fusion with EYFP decreased the chaperone-like activity of HspB5 and HspB6 whereas fusion with ECFP increased chaperone-like activity. All fluorescent chimeras of HspB1 and HspB8 had higher chaperone-like activity than the wild-type proteins. Thus, although fluorescent chimeras are useful for many purposes, the fluorescent proteins used to form these chimeras may

  11. Human Mutation in the Anti-apoptotic Heat Shock Protein 20 Abrogates Its Cardioprotective Effects*

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaou, Persoulla; Knöll, Ralph; Haghighi, Kobra; Fan, Guo-Chang; Dorn, Gerald W.; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Kranias, Evangelia G.

    2008-01-01

    The small heat shock protein Hsp20 protects cardiomyocytes against apoptosis, and phosphorylation at its Ser16 site enhances its cardioprotection. To determine whether genetic variants exist in human Hsp20, which may modify these beneficial effects, we sequenced the coding region of the Hsp20 gene in 1347 patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy and 744 subjects with no heart disease. We identified a C59T substitution in the human Hsp20 gene in one patient and three individuals without heart disease. All subjects were heterozygous for this mutation, which changes a fully conserved proline residue into leucine at position 20 (P20L), resulting in secondary structural alterations. To examine the potential functional significance of the P20L-Hsp20 human variant, adult rat cardiomyocytes were infected with Ad.GFP (where Ad is adenovirus and GFP is green fluorescent protein), Ad.WT-Hsp20 (where WT is wild-type), and Ad.P20L-Hsp20 and subjected to simulated ischemia/reperfusion injury. Expression of WT-Hsp20 resulted in significant attenuation of apoptosis compared with the GFP control. However, the P20L-Hsp20 mutant showed no protection against apoptosis, assessed by Hoechst staining and DNA fragmentation. The loss of cardioprotection by the mutant Hsp20 was associated with its diminished phosphorylation at Ser16 compared with WT-Hsp20. Furthermore, maximal stimulation of cardiomyocytes with isoproterenol or protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation in vitro confirmed the impaired ability of the mutant Hsp20 to become phosphorylated at Ser16. In conclusion, we have identified a P20L substitution in human Hsp20, which is associated with diminished phosphorylation at Ser16 and complete abrogation of the Hsp20 cardioprotective effects which may adversely affect the ability of human carriers to cope with cellular stress. PMID:18790732

  12. Heat, Human Performance, and Occupational Health: A Key Issue for the Assessment of Global Climate Change Impacts.

    PubMed

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Briggs, David; Freyberg, Chris; Lemke, Bruno; Otto, Matthias; Hyatt, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Ambient heat exposure is a well-known health hazard, which reduces human performance and work capacity at heat levels already common in tropical and subtropical areas. Various health problems have been reported. Increasing heat exposure during the hottest seasons of each year is a key feature of global climate change. Heat exhaustion and reduced human performance are often overlooked in climate change health impact analysis. Later this century, many among the four billion people who live in hot areas worldwide will experience significantly reduced work capacity owing to climate change. In some areas, 30-40% of annual daylight hours will become too hot for work to be carried out. The social and economic impacts will be considerable, with global gross domestic product (GDP) losses greater than 20% by 2100. The analysis to date is piecemeal. More analysis of climate change-related occupational health impact assessments is greatly needed. PMID:26989826

  13. Heat, Human Performance, and Occupational Health: A Key Issue for the Assessment of Global Climate Change Impacts.

    PubMed

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Briggs, David; Freyberg, Chris; Lemke, Bruno; Otto, Matthias; Hyatt, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Ambient heat exposure is a well-known health hazard, which reduces human performance and work capacity at heat levels already common in tropical and subtropical areas. Various health problems have been reported. Increasing heat exposure during the hottest seasons of each year is a key feature of global climate change. Heat exhaustion and reduced human performance are often overlooked in climate change health impact analysis. Later this century, many among the four billion people who live in hot areas worldwide will experience significantly reduced work capacity owing to climate change. In some areas, 30-40% of annual daylight hours will become too hot for work to be carried out. The social and economic impacts will be considerable, with global gross domestic product (GDP) losses greater than 20% by 2100. The analysis to date is piecemeal. More analysis of climate change-related occupational health impact assessments is greatly needed.

  14. Differential effects on nitric oxide synthase, heat shock proteins and glutathione in human endothelial cells exposed to heat stress and simulated diving.

    PubMed

    Fismen, Lise; Hjelde, Astrid; Svardal, Asbjørn M; Djurhuus, Rune

    2012-07-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) may result from damage to the endothelium caused by the gas bubbles formed during decompression and may be related to nitric oxide (NO) production by nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Heat stress prior to diving has been shown to protect animals from DCS, and by simulating this treatment in human endothelial cells (HUVEC) we have shown that a simulated dive performed subsequent to a heat stress potentiated the heat-induced expression of HSP70 and increased the level of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH). Since operational saturation diving is performed at an increased oxygen level, HUVEC have been exposed to heat stress and simulated diving at 40 kPa O(2), comparing the response on HSP70, HSP90 and GSH level to the effects previously observed at 20 kPa O(2). In addition, we wanted to investigate the effect on both endothelial NOS (eNOS) protein and enzymatic activity. The present results showed that a heat stress (45°C, 1 h) decreased the NOS activity and the protein markedly. Hyperoxia (40 kPa) alone or a dive either at 20 or 40 kPa O(2),had no effects on NOS activity or protein. At 40 kPa O(2) a simulated dive after heat stress potentiated the HS-induced HSP70 response, whereas the heat-induced HSP90 response decreased. GSH levels were found to be inversely related to NOS activity and protein expression, and might be explained by a possible post-translational regulation by glutathionylation of eNOS protein. The results add to the limited knowledge of these critical factors in cellular defence mechanisms that can prevent injury during decompression.

  15. Soybean oil as a possible solubilizing and vehicular medium for zinc phthalocyanine in photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Iwunze, M O; Ekiko, D B

    2004-09-01

    Soybean oil (SBO) is used as a medium to solubilize zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc), a known photosensitizer, which has been found to be of potential use in photodynamic therapy. It absorbs red light in this medium at 670 nm with good molar absorptivity comparable to its value in most organic solvents (2.45 x 10(5) M(-1) cm(-1)). The wavelength of the fluorescence emission band peaked at 700 nm when excited at 591 nm, and when excited at 560 nm, the emission band was observed at 680 nm. The characteristic emission band of ZnPc at the near end of the visible spectral region suggests that this compound exists in this medium in a monomeric form, a form most useful in photo therapeutic applications. Moreover, the excitation wavelength, observed in the far-red region, precludes minimal effect, if any, of skin photonecrosis if this medium is used in PDT. A fluorescence spectral analysis of the ZnPc-SBO solution carried out for thirty-eight days indicates that this solution is stable within this time frame. No toxicity was detected when this solution was seeded in human endothelial cells in a culture well for 36 hr and also when injected subcutaneously into the nude and Balb C mice. In both cases the ZnPc was observed to clear from the injected area in a reasonable time. This fact coupled with its good solubilizing property for ZnPc and its virtual nontoxicity may make soybean oil a possible vehicular medium for transporting useful photosensitizers to target cells in photodynamic therapy and related applications.

  16. Improved Solubilization of Surface Proteins from Listeria monocytogenes for Two-dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solubilization of bacterial surface (cell wall and membrane-associated) proteins for 2-DE is challenging, particularly in the case of Gram-positive bacteria. This is primarily due to strong protein association with the cell wall peptidoglycan and protein hydrophobicity. We solubilized surface protei...

  17. Effect of an organophosphate pesticide, monocrotophos, on phosphate-solubilizing efficiency of soil fungal isolates.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rachna; Garg, Veena; Saxena, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Soil is a sink of pesticide residues as well as microorganisms. Fungi are well known for solubilization of inorganic phosphates, and this activity of fungal isolates may be affected by the presence of pesticide residues in the soil. In the present study, five generically different fungal isolates, viz. Aspergillus niger JQ660373, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium aculeatum JQ660374, Fusarium pallidoroseum and Macrophomina sp., were tested and compared for their phosphate-solubilizing ability in the absence and presence of monocrotophos (500 mg L(-1)). After 168 h of incubation, four times high amount of tricalcium phosphate was solubilized by isolates in the growth medium containing monocrotophos in comparison to control (without monocrotophos). Concurrently, 78 % of the applied monocrotophos was degraded by these fungal isolates. Kinetics of phosphate solubilization shifted from logarithmic to power model in the presence of monocrotophos. Similarly, the phosphatase activity was also found significantly high in the presence of monocrotophos. The combined order of phosphate solubilization as well as monocrotophos degradation was found to be A. niger JQ660373 > P. aculeatum JQ660374 > A. flavus > F. pallidoroseum > Macrophomina sp. On the contrary, phosphate solubilization negatively correlated with the pH of the growth medium. Hence, it could be concluded that these fungal species efficiently solubilize inorganic phosphates and monocrotophos poses a positive effect on their ability and in turn degraded by them. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on P solubilization by Macrophomina sp. and F. pallidoroseum. PMID:25344433

  18. Fluoride-tolerant mutants of Aspergillus niger show enhanced phosphate solubilization capacity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ubiana de Cássia; Mendes, Gilberto de Oliveira; Silva, Nina Morena R M; Duarte, Josiane Leal; Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Tótola, Marcos Rogério; Costa, Maurício Dutra

    2014-01-01

    P-solubilizing microorganisms are a promising alternative for a sustainable use of P against a backdrop of depletion of high-grade rock phosphates (RPs). Nevertheless, toxic elements present in RPs, such as fluorine, can negatively affect microbial solubilization. Thus, this study aimed at selecting Aspergillus niger mutants efficient at P solubilization in the presence of fluoride (F-). The mutants were obtained by exposition of conidia to UV light followed by screening in a medium supplemented with Ca3(PO4)2 and F-. The mutant FS1-555 showed the highest solubilization in the presence of F-, releasing approximately 70% of the P contained in Ca3(PO4)2, a value 1.7 times higher than that obtained for the wild type (WT). The mutant FS1-331 showed improved ability of solubilizing fluorapatites, increasing the solubilization of Araxá, Catalão, and Patos RPs by 1.7, 1.6, and 2.5 times that of the WT, respectively. These mutants also grew better in the presence of F-, indicating that mutagenesis allowed the acquisition of F- tolerance. Higher production of oxalic acid by FS1-331 correlated with its improved capacity for RP solubilization. This mutant represents a significant improvement and possess a high potential for application in solubilization systems with fluoride-rich phosphate sources. PMID:25310310

  19. Carbon and Nitrogen Sources Influence Tricalcium Phosphate Solubilization and Extracellular Phosphatase Activity by Talaromyces flavus.

    PubMed

    Stefanoni Rubio, P J; Godoy, M S; Della Mónica, I F; Pettinari, M J; Godeas, A M; Scervino, J M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study phosphate (P) solubilization (and the processes involved in this event) by Talaromyces flavus (BAFC 3125) as a function of carbon and/or nitrogen sources. P solubilization was evaluated in NBRIP media supplemented with different carbon (glucose, sorbitol, sucrose, and fructose) and nitrogen (L-asparagine, urea, ammonium sulfate (AS), and ammonium nitrate (AN) combinations. The highest P solubilization was related to the highest organic acid production (especially gluconic acid) and pH drop for those treatments where glucose was present. Also P solubilization was higher when an inorganic nitrogen source was supplemented to the media when compared to an organic one. Although not being present an organic P source, phosphatase activity was observed. This shows that P mineralization and P solubilization can occur simultaneously, and that P mineralization is not induced by the enzyme substrate. The combination that showed highest P solubilization was for AN-glucose. The highest acid phosphatase activity was for AS-fructose, while for alkaline phosphatase were for AS-fructose and AN-fructose. Acid phosphatase activity was higher than alkaline. P solubilization and phosphatase activity (acid and alkaline) were influenced by the different carbon-nitrogen combinations. A better understanding of phosphate-solubilizing fungi could bring a better use of soil P.

  20. Fluoride-Tolerant Mutants of Aspergillus niger Show Enhanced Phosphate Solubilization Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ubiana de Cássia; Mendes, Gilberto de Oliveira; Silva, Nina Morena R. M.; Duarte, Josiane Leal; Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Tótola, Marcos Rogério; Costa, Maurício Dutra

    2014-01-01

    P-solubilizing microorganisms are a promising alternative for a sustainable use of P against a backdrop of depletion of high-grade rock phosphates (RPs). Nevertheless, toxic elements present in RPs, such as fluorine, can negatively affect microbial solubilization. Thus, this study aimed at selecting Aspergillus niger mutants efficient at P solubilization in the presence of fluoride (F−). The mutants were obtained by exposition of conidia to UV light followed by screening in a medium supplemented with Ca3(PO4)2 and F−. The mutant FS1-555 showed the highest solubilization in the presence of F−, releasing approximately 70% of the P contained in Ca3(PO4)2, a value 1.7 times higher than that obtained for the wild type (WT). The mutant FS1-331 showed improved ability of solubilizing fluorapatites, increasing the solubilization of Araxá, Catalão, and Patos RPs by 1.7, 1.6, and 2.5 times that of the WT, respectively. These mutants also grew better in the presence of F−, indicating that mutagenesis allowed the acquisition of F− tolerance. Higher production of oxalic acid by FS1-331 correlated with its improved capacity for RP solubilization. This mutant represents a significant improvement and possess a high potential for application in solubilization systems with fluoride-rich phosphate sources. PMID:25310310

  1. Biochar enhances Aspergillus niger rock phosphate solubilization by increasing organic acid production and alleviating fluoride toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Gilberto de Oliveira; Zafra, David Lopez; Vassilev, Nikolay Bojkov; Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Ribeiro, José Ivo; Costa, Maurício Dutra

    2014-05-01

    During fungal rock phosphate (RP) solubilization, a significant quantity of fluoride (F(-)) is released together with phosphorus (P), strongly inhibiting the process. In the present study, the effect of two F(-) adsorbents [activated alumina (Al2O3) and biochar] on RP solubilization by Aspergillus niger was examined. Al2O3 adsorbed part of the F(-) released but also adsorbed soluble P, which makes it inappropriate for microbial RP solubilization systems. In contrast, biochar adsorbed only F(-) while enhancing phosphate solubilization 3-fold, leading to the accumulation of up to 160 mg of P per liter. By comparing the values of F(-) measured in solution at the end of incubation and those from a predictive model, it was estimated that up to 19 mg of F(-) per liter can be removed from solution by biochar when added at 3 g liter(-1) to the culture medium. Thus, biochar acted as an F(-) sink during RP solubilization and led to an F(-) concentration in solution that was less inhibitory to the process. In the presence of biochar, A. niger produced larger amounts of citric, gluconic, and oxalic acids, whether RP was present or not. Our results show that biochar enhances RP solubilization through two interrelated processes: partial removal of the released F(-) and increased organic acid production. Given the importance of organic acids for P solubilization and that most of the RPs contain high concentrations of F(-), the proposed solubilization system offers an important technological improvement for the microbial production of soluble P fertilizers from RP.

  2. Mathematical modeling of heat and water transport in human respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Daviskas, E; Gonda, I; Anderson, S D

    1990-07-01

    Excessive heat and water losses from the airways are stimuli to asthma. To study heat and water vapor transport in the human respiratory tract, a time-dependent model, based on a single differential equation with an analytical solution, was developed that could predict the intra-airway temperatures and water vapor contents. The key feature is the dependence of the temperature and water vapor along the respiratory tract as a function of the air residence time at each location. The model assumes disturbed laminar flow leading to enhanced transport mechanisms and wall temperature profiles modeled according to experimental data (E. R. McFadden, Jr., B. M. Pichurko, H. F. Bowman, E. Ingenito, S. Burns, N. Dowling, and J. Soloway. J. Appl. Physiol. 58: 564-570, 1985). It predicts that 1) the air equilibrates with the wall before it reaches body conditions (37 degrees C, 99.5% relative humidity); 2) conditioning of the inspired air involves several generations, with the number depending on the respiratory conditions; and 3) the walls of the upper airways are unsaturated, although it is difficult to judge at this state the depth of the respiratory tract affected.

  3. Total Human-Caused Global Ocean Heat Uptake Nearly Doubles During Recent Surface Warming Hiatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, P. J.; Durack, P. J.; Stouffer, R. J.; Johnson, G. C.; Forest, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Formal detection and attribution studies have used observations and climate models to identify an anthropogenic warming signature in the upper (0­-700 m) ocean. Recently, as a result of the so-called surface warming hiatus, there has been considerable interest in global ocean heat content (OHC) changes in the deeper ocean, including natural and anthropogenically forced changes evidenced in observational, modelling, and data re-analysis studies. We rely on OHC change estimates from a diverse collection of measurement systems including data from the 19th Century Challenger expedition, a multi-decadal record of ship-based in-situ mostly upper ocean measurements, the more recent near-global Argo floats profiling to intermediate (2000m) depths, and full-depth repeated transoceanic sections. By diagnosing simulated global OHC changes in historically-forced climate models in three depth layers, we show that the current generation of climate models is broadly consistent with multi-decadal estimates of upper, intermediate (700­-2000m) and deep (2000m - ­bottom) global OHC changes as well as with Argo-based estimates over the most recent period. Our results suggest that nearly half of the 1860-­present human-caused increases in global ocean heat content may have occurred since 1998.

  4. Heat shock protein-based therapeutic strategies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, B G; Wainberg, M A

    1999-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsps) and cyclophilins (CypA) are intracellular chaperone molecules that facilitate protein folding and assembly. These proteins are selectively expressed in cells following exposure to a range of stress stimuli, including viral infection. Hsp species are highly immunogenic, eliciting humoral, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cell responses against viruses, tumours, and infectious diseases. This review discusses the roles of stress proteins in immunity and viral life cycles, vis-à-vis the development of Hsp-based therapeutic strategies against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection. Cumulative findings are cited implicating the requirement of CypA in HIV-1 replication and formation of infectious virions. Studies by our group show the upregulated expression of hsp27 and hsp70 during single-cycle HIV infections. These species redistribute to the cell surface following HIV-infection and heat stress, serving as targets for NK and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot studies show that hsp27, hsp70, and hsp78 complex with HIV-1 viral proteins intracellularly. Hsp70, hsp56, and CypA are assembled into HIV-1 virions. The ability of hsps to interact with HIV-1 viral proteins, combined with their inherent adjuvant and immunogenic properties, indicates that hsps may serve as vehicles for antigen delivery and the design of vaccines against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:10231014

  5. Crystal structure of the hexamer of human heat shock factor binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueqi; Xu, Lingfeng; Liu, Yiwei; Tong, Xiaohang; Zhu, Guangyu; Zhang, Xuejun C; Li, Xuemei; Rao, Zihe

    2009-04-01

    Heat shock response (HSR) is a ubiquitous cellular mechanism that copes with a variety of stresses. This response is mediated by a family of transcriptional activators, heat shock factors (HSFs), which are under tight regulation. HSF binding protein 1 (HSBP1) is a negative regulator of HSR and is reported to bind specifically with the active trimeric form of HSF1, thus inhibiting its activity. HSBP1 contains heptad-repeats in the primary sequence and was believed to stay in a trimer form in solution. We report the crystal structure of the trimerization domain of the M30I/L55P mutant of human HSBP1 at 1.8 A resolution. In this crystal form, the HSBP1 fragment of residues 6-53 forms a continuous, 11-turn long helix. The helix self-associates to form a parallel, symmetrical, triple coiled-coil helix bundle, which further assembles into a dimer of trimers in a head-to-head fashion. Solution study confirmed that the wild-type HSBP1 shares similar biophysical properties with the crystallized variant. Furthermore, we identified Ser31, which buried its polar side chain in the hydrophobic interior of the helix bundle, as a stability weak-spot. Substitution of this residue with Ile increases the melting temperature by 24 degrees C, implicating that this conserved serine residue is maintained at position 31 for functional purposes.

  6. Heat stress increases long-term human migration in rural Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, V.; Gray, C.; Kosec, K.

    2014-03-01

    Human migration attributable to climate events has recently received significant attention from the academic and policy communities . Quantitative evidence on the relationship between individual, permanent migration and natural disasters is limited . A 21-year longitudinal survey conducted in rural Pakistan (1991-2012) provides a unique opportunity to understand the relationship between weather and long-term migration. We link individual-level information from this survey to satellite-derived measures of climate variability and control for potential confounders using a multivariate approach. We find that flooding--a climate shock associated with large relief efforts--has modest to insignificant impacts on migration. Heat stress, however--which has attracted relatively little relief--consistently increases the long-term migration of men, driven by a negative effect on farm and non-farm income. Addressing weather-related displacement will require policies that both enhance resilience to climate shocks and lower barriers to welfare-enhancing population movements.

  7. Isolation of a cDNA for HSF 2: Evidence for two heat shock factor genes in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz, T.J.; Gallo, G.J.; Sheldon, L.; Kingston, R.E. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Tempst, P. )

    1991-08-15

    The heat shock response is transcriptionally regulated by an evolutionarily conserved protein termed heat shock factor (HSF). The authors report the purification to homogeneity and the partial peptide sequence of HSF from HeLa cells. The peptide sequence was used to isolate a human cDNA with a predicted open reading frame that has homology to the DNA binding domains of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila HSFs. The cDNA directs the synthesis of a protein that binds to the heat shock element with specificity identical to HeLa HSF and stimulates transcription from a heat shock promoter. The expressed protein cross-reacts with anti-HSF antibodies. Surprisingly, however, this cDNA does not encode all of the peptides obtained from purified HeLa HSF. These peptides are encoded by a distinct human cDNA. HSF1. It therefore appears that there is a human heat shock factor gene family and that at least two separate but related HSF proteins regulate the stress response in humans.

  8. Visualization of surfactant enhanced NAPL mobilization and solubilization in a two-dimensional micromodel

    SciTech Connect

    ZHONG,LIRONG; MAYER,ALEX; GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.

    2000-03-08

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation is an emerging technology for aquifers contaminated with nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). A two-dimensional micromodel and image capture system were applied to observe NAPL mobilization and solubilization phenomena. In each experiment, a common residual NAPL field was established, followed by a series of mobilization and solubilization experiments. Mobilization floods included pure water floods with variable flow rates and surfactant floods with variations in surfactant formulations. At relatively low capillary numbers (N{sub ca}<10{sup {minus}3}), the surfactant mobilization floods resulted in higher NAPL saturations than for the pure water flood, for similar N{sub ca}.These differences in macroscopic saturations are explained by differences in micro-scale mobilization processes. Solubilization of the residual NAPL remaining after the mobilization stage was dominated by the formation of dissolution fingers, which produced nonequilibrium NAPL solubilization. A macroemulsion phase also as observed to form spontaneously and persist during the solubilization stage of the experiments.

  9. Effect of anions on selective solubilization of zinc and copper in bacterial leaching of sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Harahuc, L; Lizama, H M; Suzuki, I

    2000-07-20

    Bacterial leaching of sulfide ores using Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, or a combination of the two was studied at various concentrations of specific anions. Selective zinc and copper solubilization was obtained by inhibiting iron oxidation without affecting sulfur/sulfide oxidation. Phosphate reduced iron solubilization from a pyrite (FeS(2))-sphalerite (ZnS) mixture without significantly affecting zinc solubilization. Copper leaching from a chalcopyrite (CuFeS(2))-sphalerite mixture was stimulated by phosphate, whereas chloride accelerated zinc extraction. In a complex sulfide ore containing pyrite, chalcopyrite, and sphalerite, both phosphate and chloride reduced iron solubilization and increased copper extraction, whereas only chloride stimulated zinc extraction. Maximum leaching obtained was 100% zinc and 50% copper. Time-course studies of copper and zinc solubilization suggest the possibility of selective metal recovery following treatment with specific anions. PMID:10861398

  10. Survival of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria against DNA damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Manoj; Rajpurohit, Yogendra S; Misra, Hari S; D'Souza, S F

    2010-10-01

    Phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSBs) were isolated from different plant rhizosphere soils of various agroecological regions of India. These isolates showed synthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), production of gluconic acid, and release of phosphorus from insoluble tricalcium phosphate. The bacterial isolates synthesizing PQQ also showed higher tolerance to ultraviolet C radiation and mitomycin C as compared to Escherichia coli but were less tolerant than Deinococcus radiodurans. Unlike E. coli, PSB isolates showed higher tolerance to DNA damage when grown in the absence of inorganic phosphate. Higher tolerance to ultraviolet C radiation and oxidative stress in these PSBs grown under PQQ synthesis inducible conditions, namely phosphate starvation, might suggest the possible additional role of this redox cofactor in the survival of these isolates under extreme abiotic stress conditions. PMID:20962905

  11. Enhanced solubilization of curcumin in mixed surfactant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kansal, S K; Chaudhary, Ganga Ram; Mehta, S K

    2016-05-15

    Self-assemblies of equimolar double and single chain mixed ionic surfactants, with increasing numbers of carbon atoms of double chain surfactant, were analyzed on the basis of fluorescence and conductivity results. Attempts were also made to enhance the solubilization of curcumin in aqueous equimolar mixed surfactant systems. Mixed surfactant assembly was successful in retarding the degradation of curcumin in alkaline media (only 25-28 40% degraded in 10h at pH 13). Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching methods were employed to predict the binding position and mechanism of curcumin with self-assemblies. Results indicate that the interactions take place according to both dynamic and static quenching mechanisms and curcumin was distributed in a palisade layer of mixed aggregates. Antioxidant activity (using DPPH radical) and biocompatibility (using calf-thymus DNA) of curcumin-loaded mixed surfactant formulations were also evaluated. The prepared systems improved the stability, solubility and antioxidant activity of curcumin and additionally are biocompatible.

  12. Solubilization of iron-containing minerals by soil microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Arrieta, L; Grez, R

    1971-10-01

    Eighty-eight strains of microorganisms were isolated from soils collected in northern and southern Chile, and 10 fungi which showed the highest solubilizing action upon the iron in granodiorite were then selected. These fungi were incubated with the following iron-containing minerals: augite, hornblende, biotite, magnetite, hematite, and the igneous rock granodiorite. The solubility of iron in these minerals depended on their nature, crystalline structure, the concentration of metabolic products, or all three. Complex formation could be the mechanism involved, as a strong cation-exchange resin was not able to extract Fe from culture solutions. This conclusion is also confirmed by the R(F) values obtained by thin-layer chromatography of iron-containing culture solutions.

  13. Enhanced solubilization of curcumin in mixed surfactant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kansal, S K; Chaudhary, Ganga Ram; Mehta, S K

    2016-05-15

    Self-assemblies of equimolar double and single chain mixed ionic surfactants, with increasing numbers of carbon atoms of double chain surfactant, were analyzed on the basis of fluorescence and conductivity results. Attempts were also made to enhance the solubilization of curcumin in aqueous equimolar mixed surfactant systems. Mixed surfactant assembly was successful in retarding the degradation of curcumin in alkaline media (only 25-28 40% degraded in 10h at pH 13). Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching methods were employed to predict the binding position and mechanism of curcumin with self-assemblies. Results indicate that the interactions take place according to both dynamic and static quenching mechanisms and curcumin was distributed in a palisade layer of mixed aggregates. Antioxidant activity (using DPPH radical) and biocompatibility (using calf-thymus DNA) of curcumin-loaded mixed surfactant formulations were also evaluated. The prepared systems improved the stability, solubility and antioxidant activity of curcumin and additionally are biocompatible. PMID:26776022

  14. Solubilization, purification and functionalization of carbon nanotubes using polyoxometalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Bin; Lu, Haifeng; Hu, Zhigang; Xin, John H.

    2006-03-01

    In this work, we developed a convenient and efficient method for solubilization, purification and functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using a versatile reagent (phosphotungstic acid (HPW)). Because HPW can spontaneously attach to graphite walls as polyanions and provide static repulsion, CNT aggregates were divided into individual and small bundles of CNTs and turned into a stable solution by sonication in the presence of HPW. Amorphous carbon impurities and metal catalysts in the raw CNTs were removed by centrifugation and filtration. Finally, purified CNTs with a yield of 82 wt% were obtained. Using HPW on graphite walls as an electrostatic and acid anchor, positively charged titania nanoparticles and albumin molecules were successfully assembled around CNTs without altering their delocalized π-electron system. The versatility of this simple approach could be extended beyond inorganic nanoparticles and proteins, to other systems with desired properties.

  15. Solubilization of poorly water-soluble drugs using solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao T-D; Tran, Phuong H-L; Khanh, Tran N; Van, Toi V; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2013-08-01

    Many new drugs have been discovered in pharmaceutical industry and exposed their surprised potential therapeutic effects. Unfortunately, these drugs possess low absorption and bioavailability since their solubility limitation in water. Solid dispersion (SD) is the current technique gaining so many attractions from scientists due to its effect on improving solubility and dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs. A number of patents including the most recent inventions have been undertaken in this review to address various respects of this strategy in solubilization of poorly watersoluble drugs including type of carriers, preparation methods and view of technologies used to detect SD properties and mechanisms with the aim to accomplish a SD not only effective on enhanced bioavailability but also overcome difficulties associated with stability and production. Future prospects are as well discussed with an only hope that many developments and researches in this field will be successfully reached and contributed to commercial use for treatment as much as possible.

  16. Solubilization of glycoproteins of envelope viruses by detergents

    SciTech Connect

    Berezin, V.E.; Zaides, V.M.; Artamsnov, A.F.; Isaeva, E.S.; Zhdanov, V.M.

    1986-11-20

    The action of a number of known ionic and nonionic detergents, as well as the new nonionic detergent MESK, on envelope viruses was investigated. It was shown that the nonionic detergents MESK, Triton X-100, and octyl-..beta..-D-glucopyranoside selectively solubilize the outer glycoproteins of the virus particles. The nonionic detergent MESK has the mildest action. Using MESK, purified glycoproteins of influenza, parainfluenza, Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis, vesicular stomatitis, rabies, and herpes viruses were obtained. The procedure for obtaining glycoproteins includes incubation of the virus suspension with the detergent MESK, removal of subvirus structures by centrifuging, and purification of glycoproteins from detergents by dialysis. Isolated glycoproteins retain a native structure and biological activity and possess high immunogenicity. The detergent MESK is promising for laboratory tests and with respect to the production of subunit vaccines.

  17. Isolation of Plant Photosystem II Complexes by Fractional Solubilization

    PubMed Central

    Haniewicz, Patrycja; Floris, Davide; Farci, Domenica; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Loi, Maria C.; Büchel, Claudia; Bochtler, Matthias; Piano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) occurs in different forms and supercomplexes in thylakoid membranes. Using a transplastomic strain of Nicotiana tabacum histidine tagged on the subunit PsbE, we have previously shown that a mild extraction protocol with β-dodecylmaltoside enriches PSII characteristic of lamellae and grana margins. Here, we characterize residual granal PSII that is not extracted by this first solubilization step. Using affinity purification, we demonstrate that this PSII fraction consists of PSII-LHCII mega- and supercomplexes, PSII dimers, and PSII monomers, which were separated by gel filtration and functionally characterized. Our findings represent an alternative demonstration of different PSII populations in thylakoid membranes, and they make it possible to prepare PSII-LHCII supercomplexes in high yield. PMID:26697050

  18. Temperature driven reactant solubilization synthesis of BiCuOSe.

    PubMed

    Stampler, Evan S; Sheets, William C; Bertoni, Mariana I; Prellier, Wilfrid; Mason, Thomas O; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R

    2008-11-01

    Phase-pure BiCuOSe, which is isostructural to the layered p-type transparent conductor LaCuOS, has been synthesized in high yield by a single-step hydrothermal reaction at low temperature (250 degrees C) and pressure (<20 atm). A moderate reaction temperature of 250 degrees C was sufficiently high to solubilize both Bi2O3 and Cu2O and stabilize monovalent copper and low enough to impede the oxidation of dianionic selenium. BiCuOSe exhibits a relatively high electrical conductivity (sigma approximately 3.3 S cm(-1)) and a reduced band gap (E(g) = 0.75 eV), which compare favorably with the optoelectronic properties of BiCuOS and the cerium-based oxysulfides, CeAgOS and CeCuOS. PMID:18831580

  19. Isolation of Plant Photosystem II Complexes by Fractional Solubilization.

    PubMed

    Haniewicz, Patrycja; Floris, Davide; Farci, Domenica; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Loi, Maria C; Büchel, Claudia; Bochtler, Matthias; Piano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) occurs in different forms and supercomplexes in thylakoid membranes. Using a transplastomic strain of Nicotiana tabacum histidine tagged on the subunit PsbE, we have previously shown that a mild extraction protocol with β-dodecylmaltoside enriches PSII characteristic of lamellae and grana margins. Here, we characterize residual granal PSII that is not extracted by this first solubilization step. Using affinity purification, we demonstrate that this PSII fraction consists of PSII-LHCII mega- and supercomplexes, PSII dimers, and PSII monomers, which were separated by gel filtration and functionally characterized. Our findings represent an alternative demonstration of different PSII populations in thylakoid membranes, and they make it possible to prepare PSII-LHCII supercomplexes in high yield.

  20. The Rapid-Heat LAMPellet Method: A Potential Diagnostic Method for Human Urogenital Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Carranza-Rodríguez, Cristina; Pérez-Arellano, José Luis; Vicente, Belén; López-Abán, Julio; Muro, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Urogenital schistosomiasis due to Schistosoma haematobium is a serious underestimated public health problem affecting 112 million people - particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Microscopic examination of urine samples to detect parasite eggs still remains as definitive diagnosis. This work was focussed on developing a novel loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for detection of S. haematobium DNA in human urine samples as a high-throughput, simple, accurate and affordable diagnostic tool to use in diagnosis of urogenital schistosomiasis. Methodology/Principal Findings A LAMP assay targeting a species specific sequence of S. haematobium ribosomal intergenic spacer was designed. The effectiveness of our LAMP was assessed in a number of patients´ urine samples with microscopy confirmed S. haematobium infection. For potentially large-scale application in field conditions, different DNA extraction methods, including a commercial kit, a modified NaOH extraction method and a rapid heating method were tested using small volumes of urine fractions (whole urine, supernatants and pellets). The heating of pellets from clinical samples was the most efficient method to obtain good-quality DNA detectable by LAMP. The detection limit of our LAMP was 1 fg/µL of S. haematobium DNA in urine samples. When testing all patients´ urine samples included in our study, diagnostic parameters for sensitivity and specificity were calculated for LAMP assay, 100% sensitivity (95% CI: 81.32%-100%) and 86.67% specificity (95% CI: 75.40%-94.05%), and also for microscopy detection of eggs in urine samples, 69.23% sensitivity (95% CI: 48.21% -85.63%) and 100% specificity (95% CI: 93.08%-100%). Conclusions/Significance We have developed and evaluated, for the first time, a LAMP assay for detection of S. haematobium DNA in heated pellets from patients´ urine samples using no complicated requirement procedure for DNA extraction. The procedure has been named the Rapid-Heat

  1. Geochemical hosts of solubilized radionuclides in uranium mill tailings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.; Bush, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    The solubilization and subsequent resorption of radionuclides by ore components or by reaction products during the milling of uranium ores may have both economic and environmental consequences. Particle-size redistribution of radium during milling has been demonstrated by previous investigators; however, the identification of sorbing components in the tailings has received little experimental attention. In this study, uranium-bearing sandstone ore was milled, on a laboratory scale, with sulfuric acid. At regular intervals, filtrate from this suspension was placed in contact with mixtures of quartz sand and various potential sorbents which occur as gangue in uranium ores; the potential sorbents included clay minerals, iron and aluminum oxides, feldspar, fluorspar, barite, jarosite, coal, and volcanic glass. After equilibration, the quartz sand-sorbent mixtures were separated from the filtrate and radioassayed by gamma-spectrometry to determine the quantities of 238U, 230Th, 226Ra, and 210Pb sorbed, and the radon emanation coefficients. Sorption of 238U was low in all cases, with maximal sorptions of 1-2% by the bentonite- and coal-bearing samples. 230Th sorption also was generally less than 1%; maximal sorption here was observed in the fluorspar-bearing sample and appears to be associated with the formation of gypsum during milling. 226Ra and 210 Pb generally showed higher sorption than the other nuclides - more than 60% of the 26Ra solubilized from the ore was sorbed on the barite-bearing sample. The mechanism (s) for this sorption by a wide variety of substrates is not yet understood. Radon emanation coefficients of the samples ranged from about 5 to 30%, with the coal-bearing samples clearly demonstrating an emanating power higher than any of the other materials. ?? 1990.

  2. Spectroscopic studies of amphotericin B solubilized in nanoscale bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Peter L; Nguyen, Thanh-Son; Ryan, Robert O

    2006-01-01

    Nanodisks (ND) are discrete nanometer scale phospholipid bilayers whose perimeter is circumscribed by amphipathic apolipoproteins. The membranous environment of ND serves as a matrix for solubilizing the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B (AMB). The spectral properties of AMB in ND are dependent upon AMB concentration. Whereas AMB-ND prepared at a concentration of 2.5 mg AMB per 10 mg phospholipid are consistent with AMB self association in the ND membrane environment, AMB-ND prepared at 0.25 or 0.025 mg AMB per 10 mg phospholipid give rise to spectra reminiscent of AMB in organic solvent. Incubation of ND prepared at a phospholipid/AMB ratio of 400:1 (w/w) at 37 degrees C for 1 h induced a shift in absorbance and near UV circular dichroism spectra consistent with antibiotic self-association. The kinetics of this spectral transition were investigated as a function of incubation temperature. While no change in A388 nm occurred in incubations at 20 degrees C, a time-dependent decrease in A388 nm was observed at 25, 30 and 37 degrees C. Inclusion of ergosterol in the ND membrane attenuated temperature-induced AMB spectral changes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth inhibition assays, ND containing self associated AMB were somewhat less effective than ND possessing a greater proportion of monomeric AMB. On the other hand, inclusion of ergosterol or cholesterol in the ND particle did not alter the growth inhibition properties of AMB-ND. The miniature membrane environment of ND provides a novel milieu for solubilization and characterization of lipophilic biomolecules.

  3. [Inactivation of HIV-1 in human femur heads using a heat disinfection system (Lobator SD-1)].

    PubMed

    von Garrel, T; Knaepler, H; Gürtler, L

    1997-05-01

    The use of allogenic bone transplants in surgery has been greatly diminished owing to the risk of transmitting infectious diseases. This risk can be reduced by the use of a thermal disinfection system (Lobator SD-1). This is achieved by increasing the temperature to 80 degrees C, inactivating a number of bacterial and viral agents. In this study the decay of HIV at high temperature in the Lobator SD-1 was researched. In the center of human femoral heads 100 microliters of a highly concentrated suspension of free and cell-bound HIV (10(10)) was exposed to the thermal process at intervals of 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 62 min. For the recultivation HUT-78 cells were used through titration of the virus suspension in ten-fold dilutions over ten dilution steps and incubation up to a maximum of 21 days. Evidence of the virus was checked through observing giant cell formations and quantitative determination of p24 antigen using an Elisa test. Linear virus inactivation was found based upon the time the virus was exposed to heat. After a treatment of 40 min in the disinfection system, total virus inactivation was achieved. The normal disinfection process time using Lobator SD-1 is 92 min. A temperature of 80 degrees C is reached after approximately 45 min. The results prove that this system totally inactivates HIV in human femoral heads.

  4. Heat-Denatured Lysozyme Inactivates Murine Norovirus as a Surrogate Human Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hajime; Nakazawa, Moemi; Ohshima, Chihiro; Sato, Miki; Tsuchiya, Tomoki; Takeuchi, Akira; Kunou, Masaaki; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus infects humans through the consumption of contaminated food, contact with the excrement or vomit of an infected person, and through airborne droplets that scatter the virus through the air. Being highly infectious and highly viable in the environment, inactivation of the norovirus requires a highly effective inactivating agent. In this study, we have discovered the thermal denaturing capacity of a lysozyme with known antimicrobial activity against gram-positive bacteria, as well as its inactivating effect on murine norovirus. This study is the first report on the norovirus-inactivating effects of a thermally denatured lysozyme. We observed that lysozymes heat-treated for 40 min at 100 °C caused a 4.5 log reduction in infectivity of norovirus. Transmission electron microscope analysis showed that virus particles exposed to thermally denatured lysozymes were expanded, compared to the virus before exposure. The amino acid sequence of the lysozyme was divided into three sections and the peptides of each artificially synthesised, in order to determine the region responsible for the inactivating effect. These results suggest that thermal denaturation of the lysozyme changes the protein structure, activating the region responsible for imparting an inactivating effect against the virus. PMID:26134436

  5. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM
    IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    * Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue1
    1The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  6. Polymorphisms in human heat shock factor-1 and analysis of potential biological consequences.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Tiffany M; Scheraga, Rachel G; Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Suffredini, Dante; Liggett, Stephen B; Ramarathnam, Aparna; Potla, Ratnakar; Singh, Ishwar S; Hasday, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    The stress-activated transcription factor, heat shock factor-1 (HSF1), regulates many genes including cytoprotective heat shock proteins (HSPs). We hypothesized that polymorphisms in HSF1 may alter the level or function of HSF1 protein accounting for interindividual viability in disease susceptibility or prognosis. We searched for exomic variants in HSF1 by querying human genome databases and directly sequencing DNA from 80 anonymous genomic DNA samples. Overall, HSF1 sequence was highly conserved, with no common variations. We found 31 validated deviations from a reference sequence in the dbSNP database and an additional 5 novel variants by sequencing, with allele frequencies that were 0.06 or less. Of these 36, 2 were in 5'-untranslated region (5'UTR), 10 in 3'UTR, and 24 in the coding region. The potential effects of 5'UTR on secondary structure, protein structure/function, and 3'UTR targets of microRNAs were analyzed using RNAFold, PolyPhen-2, SIFT, and MicroSNiper. One of the 5'UTR variants was predicted to strengthen secondary structure. Eight of 3'UTR variants were predicted to modify microRNA target sequences. Eight of the coding region variants were predicted to modify HSF1 structure/function. Reducing HSF1 levels in A549 cells using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) increased sensitivity to heat-induced killing demonstrating the impact that genetic variants that reduce HSF1 levels might have. Using the pmirGLO expression system, we found that the wild-type HSF1 3'UTR suppressed translation of a firefly luciferase reporter plasmid by 65 %. Introducing two of four 3'UTR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) increased HSF1 3'UTR translational suppression by 27-44 % compared with the wild-type HSF1 3'UTR sequence while a third SNP reduced suppression by 25 %. HSF1 variants may alter HSF1 protein levels or function with potential effects on cell functions, including sensitivity to stress. PMID:25023647

  7. Phosphate Solubilization Potential of Rhizosphere Fungi Isolated from Plants in Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Firew

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the major bioelements limiting agricultural production. Phosphate solubilizing fungi play a noteworthy role in increasing the bioavailability of soil phosphates for plants. The present study was aimed at isolating and characterizing phosphate solubilizing fungi from different rhizospheres using both solid and liquid Pikovskaya (PVK) medium. A total of 359 fungal isolates were obtained from 150 rhizosphere soil samples of haricot bean, faba bean, cabbage, tomato, and sugarcane. Among the isolates, 167 (46.52%) solubilized inorganic phosphate. The isolated phosphate solubilizing fungi belonged to genera of Aspergillus (55.69%), Penicillium spp. (23.35%), and Fusarium (9.58%). Solubilization index (SI) ranged from 1.10 to 3.05. Isolates designated as JUHbF95 (Aspergillus sp.) and JUFbF59 (Penicillium sp.) solubilized maximum amount of P 728.77 μg·mL−1 and 514.44 μg mL−1, respectively, from TCP (tricalcium phosphate) after 15 days of incubation. The highest (363 μg mL−1) soluble-P was released from RP with the inoculation of JUHbF95 in the PVK broth after 10 days of incubation. The present study indicated the presence of diverse plant associated P-solubilizing fungi that may serve as potential biofertilizers.

  8. Phosphate Solubilization Potential of Rhizosphere Fungi Isolated from Plants in Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Firew

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the major bioelements limiting agricultural production. Phosphate solubilizing fungi play a noteworthy role in increasing the bioavailability of soil phosphates for plants. The present study was aimed at isolating and characterizing phosphate solubilizing fungi from different rhizospheres using both solid and liquid Pikovskaya (PVK) medium. A total of 359 fungal isolates were obtained from 150 rhizosphere soil samples of haricot bean, faba bean, cabbage, tomato, and sugarcane. Among the isolates, 167 (46.52%) solubilized inorganic phosphate. The isolated phosphate solubilizing fungi belonged to genera of Aspergillus (55.69%), Penicillium spp. (23.35%), and Fusarium (9.58%). Solubilization index (SI) ranged from 1.10 to 3.05. Isolates designated as JUHbF95 (Aspergillus sp.) and JUFbF59 (Penicillium sp.) solubilized maximum amount of P 728.77 μg·mL−1 and 514.44 μg mL−1, respectively, from TCP (tricalcium phosphate) after 15 days of incubation. The highest (363 μg mL−1) soluble-P was released from RP with the inoculation of JUHbF95 in the PVK broth after 10 days of incubation. The present study indicated the presence of diverse plant associated P-solubilizing fungi that may serve as potential biofertilizers. PMID:27688771

  9. Phosphate Solubilization Potential of Rhizosphere Fungi Isolated from Plants in Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Elias, Firew; Woyessa, Delelegn; Muleta, Diriba

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the major bioelements limiting agricultural production. Phosphate solubilizing fungi play a noteworthy role in increasing the bioavailability of soil phosphates for plants. The present study was aimed at isolating and characterizing phosphate solubilizing fungi from different rhizospheres using both solid and liquid Pikovskaya (PVK) medium. A total of 359 fungal isolates were obtained from 150 rhizosphere soil samples of haricot bean, faba bean, cabbage, tomato, and sugarcane. Among the isolates, 167 (46.52%) solubilized inorganic phosphate. The isolated phosphate solubilizing fungi belonged to genera of Aspergillus (55.69%), Penicillium spp. (23.35%), and Fusarium (9.58%). Solubilization index (SI) ranged from 1.10 to 3.05. Isolates designated as JUHbF95 (Aspergillus sp.) and JUFbF59 (Penicillium sp.) solubilized maximum amount of P 728.77 μg·mL(-1) and 514.44 μg mL(-1), respectively, from TCP (tricalcium phosphate) after 15 days of incubation. The highest (363 μg mL(-1)) soluble-P was released from RP with the inoculation of JUHbF95 in the PVK broth after 10 days of incubation. The present study indicated the presence of diverse plant associated P-solubilizing fungi that may serve as potential biofertilizers. PMID:27688771

  10. Solubilization of octane in cationic surfactant-anionic polymer complexes: effect of polymer concentration and temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Deng, Lingli; Zeeb, Benjamin; Weiss, Jochen

    2015-07-15

    Polymers may alter the ability of oppositely charged surfactant micelles to solubilize hydrophobic molecules depending on surfactant-polymer interactions. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of polymer concentration and temperature on the solubilization thermodynamics of an octane oil-in-water emulsion in mixtures of an anionic polymer (carboxymethyl cellulose) and cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant micelles using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Results showed that the CTAB binding capacity of carboxymethyl cellulose increased with increasing temperature from 301 to 323 K, and correspondingly the thermodynamic behavior of octane solubilization in CTAB micelles, either in the absence or presence of polymer, was found to depend on temperature. The addition of carboxymethyl cellulose caused the solubilization in CTAB micelles to be less endothermic, and increased the solubilization capacity. Based on the phase separation model, the solubilization was suggested to be mainly driven by enthalpy gains. Results suggest that increasing concentrations of the anionic polymer gave rise to a larger Gibbs energy decrease and a larger unfavorable entropy increase for octane solubilization in cationic surfactant micelles.

  11. Solubilization of octane in cationic surfactant-anionic polymer complexes: Effect of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Deng, Lingli; Sun, Ping; Que, Fei; Weiss, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Polymers may alter the ability of oppositely charged surfactant micelles to solubilize hydrophobic molecules depending on surfactant-polymer interactions. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of ionic strength on the solubilization thermodynamics of an octane oil-in-water emulsion in mixtures of an anionic polymer (carboxymethyl cellulose) and cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant micelles using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Results indicated that the CTAB binding capacity of carboxymethyl cellulose increased with increasing NaCl concentrations up to 100 mM, and the thermodynamic behavior of octane solubilization in CTAB micelles, either in the absence or presence of polymer, was found to have a strong dependence on ionic strength. The increasing ionic strength caused the solubilization in CTAB micelles to be less endothermic or even exothermic, but increased the solubilization capacity. Based on the phase separation model, the solubilization was suggested to be driven by enthalpy. It is indicated that increasing ionic strength gave rise to a larger Gibbs energy decrease but a smaller unfavorable entropy increase for octane solubilization in cationic surfactant micelles.

  12. Rock inhabiting potassium solubilizing bacteria from Kerala, India: characterization and possibility in chemical K fertilizer substitution.

    PubMed

    Anjanadevi, Indira Parameswaran; John, Neetha Soma; John, Kuzhivilayil Susan; Jeeva, Muthulekshmi Lajapathy; Misra, Raj Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    The role of rock inhabiting bacteria in potassium (K) solubilization from feldspar and their application in crop nutrition through substitution of fertilizer K was explored through the isolation of 36 different bacteria from rocks of a major hill station at Ponmudi in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. A comprehensive characterization of K solubilization from feldspar was achieved with these isolates which indicated that the K solubilizing efficiency increases with decrease in pH and increase in viscosity and viable cell count. Based on the level of K solubilization, two potent isolates were selected and identified as Bacillus subtilis ANctcri3 and Bacillus megaterium ANctcri7. Exopolysaccharide production, scanning electron microscopic and fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies with these efficient strains conclusively depicted the role of low pH, increase in viscosity, and bacterial attachment in K solubilization. They were also found to be efficient in phosphorus (P) solubilization, indole acetic acid production as well as tolerant to wide range of physiological conditions. Moreover, the applicability of K containing rock powder as a carrier for K solubilizing bacteria was demonstrated. A field level evaluation on the yield of a high K demanding tuberous vegetable crop, elephant foot yam (Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (dennst.) nicolson) established the possibility of substituting chemical K fertilizer with these biofertilizer candidates successfully.

  13. A biomaterial composed of collagen and solubilized elastin enhances angiogenesis and elastic fiber formation without calcification.

    PubMed

    Daamen, Willeke F; Nillesen, Suzan T M; Wismans, Ronnie G; Reinhardt, Dieter P; Hafmans, Theo; Veerkamp, Jacques H; van Kuppevelt, Toin H

    2008-03-01

    Elastin is the prime protein in elastic tissues that contributes to elasticity of, for example, lung, aorta, and skin. Upon injury, elastic fibers are not readily replaced, which hampers tissue regeneration. Incorporation of solubilized elastin (hydrolyzed insoluble elastin fibers or elastin peptides) in biomaterials may improve regeneration, because solubilized elastin is able to promote proliferation as well as elastin synthesis. Porous biomaterials composed of highly purified collagen without and without elastin fibers or solubilized elastin were prepared by freezing and lyophilization. Solubilized elastin formed spherical structures that were incorporated in the collagenous part of the scaffolds and that persisted after chemical crosslinking of the scaffolds. Crosslinked scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in young Sprague Dawley rats. Collagen-solubilized elastin and collagen scaffolds showed no calcification in this sensitive calcification model, in contrast to scaffolds containing elastin fibers. Collagen-solubilized elastin scaffolds also induced angiogenesis, as revealed by type IV collagen staining, and promoted elastic fiber synthesis, as shown with antibodies against rat elastin and fibrillin-1. It is concluded that scaffolds produced from collagen and solubilized elastin present a non-calcifying biomaterial with a capacity for soft-tissue regeneration, especially in relation to elastic fiber synthesis.

  14. Complete solubilization of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue may improve proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shan-Rong; Taylor, Clive R; Fowler, Carol B; Mason, Jeffrey T

    2013-04-01

    Tissue-based proteomic approaches (tissue proteomics) are essential for discovering and evaluating biomarkers for personalized medicine. In any proteomics study, the most critical issue is sample extraction and preparation. This problem is especially difficult when recovering proteins from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. However, improving and standardizing protein extraction from FFPE tissue is a critical need because of the millions of archival FFPE tissues available in tissue banks worldwide. Recent progress in the application of heat-induced antigen retrieval principles for protein extraction from FFPE tissue has resulted in a number of published FFPE tissue proteomics studies. However, there is currently no consensus on the optimal protocol for protein extraction from FFPE tissue or accepted standards for quantitative evaluation of the extracts. Standardization is critical to ensure the accurate evaluation of FFPE protein extracts by proteomic methods such as reverse phase protein arrays, which is now in clinical use. In our view, complete solubilization of FFPE tissue samples is the best way to achieve the goal of standardizing the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues. However, further studies are recommended to develop standardized protein extraction methods to ensure quantitative and qualitative reproducibility in the recovery of proteins from FFPE tissues.

  15. Derepression of Mineral Phosphate Solubilization Phenotype by Insertional Inactivation of iclR in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Maharshi; Jog, Rahul; G, Naresh Kumar; Rajkumar, Shalini

    2015-01-01

    The mode of succinate mediated repression of mineral phosphate solubilization and the role of repressor in suppressing phosphate solubilization phenotype of two free-living nitrogen fixing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains was studied. Organic acid mediated mineral phosphate solubilization phenotype of oxalic acid producing Klebsiella pneumoniae SM6 and SM11 were transcriptionally repressed by IclR in presence of succinate as carbon source. Oxalic acid production and expression of genes of the glyoxylate shunt (aceBAK) was found only in glucose but not in succinate- and glucose+succinate-grown cells. IclR, repressor of aceBAK operon, was inactivated using an allelic exchange system resulting in derepressed mineral phosphate solubilization phenotype through constitutive expression of the glyoxylate shunt. Insertional inactivation of iclR resulted in increased activity of the glyoxylate shunt enzymes even in succinate-grown cells. An augmented phosphate solubilization up to 54 and 59% soluble phosphate release was attained in glucose+succinate-grown SM6Δ and SM11Δ strains respectively, compared to glucose-grown cells, whereas phosphate solubilization was absent or negligible in wildtype cells grown in glucose+succinate. Both wildtype and iclR deletion strains showed similar indole-3-acetic acid production. Wheat seeds inoculated with wildtype SM6 and SM11 improved both root and shoot length by 1.2 fold. However, iclR deletion SM6Δ and SM11Δ strains increased root and shoot length by 1.5 and 1.4 folds, respectively, compared to uninoculated controls. The repressor inactivated phosphate solubilizers better served the purpose of constitutive phosphate solubilization in pot experiments, where presence of other carbon sources (e.g., succinate) might repress mineral phosphate solubilization phenotype of wildtype strains. PMID:26381651

  16. Diameter-selective solubilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes by reversible cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Acevedo, Alfonso; Xie, Hui; Zorbas, Vasiliki; Sampson, William M; Dalton, Alan B; Baughman, Ray H; Draper, Rockford K; Musselman, Inga H; Dieckmann, Gregg R

    2005-07-01

    We have utilized reversible cyclic peptides (RCPs)-peptides containing alternating l- and d-amino acids with N- and C-termini derivatized with thiol-containing groups allowing reversible peptide cyclization-to solubilize and noncovalently functionalize carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in aqueous solution. Solubilization occurs through wrapping of RCPs around the circumference of a SWNT, followed by the formation of head-to-tail covalent bonds, yielding closed rings on the nanotubes. By controlling the length of the RCPs, we have demonstrated limited diameter-selective solubilization of the SWNTs as revealed by UV/vis/NIR and Raman spectroscopies, as well as atomic force microscopy. PMID:15984878

  17. Definition and characterization of enzymes for maximal biocatalytic solubilization of prebiotic polysaccharides from potato pulp.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Lise V; Larsen, Dorte M; Mikkelsen, Jørn D; Meyer, Anne S

    2011-08-10

    Potato pulp is a high-volume co-processing product resulting from industrial potato starch manufacturing. Potato pulp is particularly rich in pectin, notably galactan branched rhamnogalacturonan I polysaccharides, which are highly bifidogenic when solubilized. The objective of the present study was to characterize and compare four homogalacturonan degrading enzymes capable of catalyzing the required solubilization of these pectinaceous polysaccharides from potato pulp in a 1 min reaction. An additional purpose was to assess the influence of the pH and the potential buffer chelating effects on the release of these polysaccharides from the potato pulp. The pH and temperature optima of two selected pectin lyases from Emericella nidulans (formerly known as Aspergillus nidulans) and Aspergillus niger were determined to 8.6 and 4.0, respectively, at ≥100 °C within 1 min of reaction. The optima for the two selected polygalacturonases from E. nidulans and Aspergillus aculeatus were determined to pH 4.4 and 46 °C, and pH 3.7 and ≥80 °C, respectively. The polygalacturonase from A. aculeatus was 4-42 times more heat-resistant at 50 °C than the other enzymes. The difference in pH optima of the pectin lyases and the exceptional thermal stabilities of some of the enzymes are proposed to be related to specific amino acid substitutions, stabilizing hydrogen bonding and structural traits of the enzymes. The K(M) and V(max) values ranged from 0.3-0.6g/L and 0.5-250.5 U/mg protein, respectively. Phosphate buffer induced release of a higher amount of dry matter than Tris-acetate buffer at pH 6, indicating a chelating effect of the phosphate. Moreover, the phosphate had a higher chelating effect at pH 6 than at pH 4. The optimal conditions for a high yield of polysaccharides from potato pulp were therefore: 1% (w/w) potato pulp treated with 1% (w/w) enzyme/substrate (E/S) pectin lyase from E. nidulans and 1% (w/w) E/S polygalacturonase from A. aculeatus at pH 6.0 and 60 °C for

  18. Potassium Solubilization in Fungal Degradation of Aluminosilicate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, H.; Lian, B.

    2007-12-01

    Potassium is an essential soil nutrient that performs a multitude of important biological functions to maintain plant growth and health. However, plants cannot directly use mineralic potassium. Only those that are released by weathering or dissolved in soil water are available for plants' nutrient uptake. On the other hand, microorganisms and related biological activities often play critical roles in mineral weathering and hence participate heavily in the geochemical cycles of nutrient elements. Here, we study the microbial release of potassium from K-bearing minerals orthoclase and illite. A strain of thermophilic fungus A. fumigatus was cultured with a mixture of the minerals to determine if microbe-mineral interactions enhance the solubilization of mineralic potassium. Experiments were carried in two settings, one with the mineral grains and the fungal cells in direct contact, and the other employing a membrane (pore size 0.22 um) to separate the two. Measurements over a period of 30 days showed that, irrespective of the experimental setup, the concentration of free K in the culture was drastically higher than those in any of the control experiments where no living organism was present. Moreover, the occurrence of mineral-cell physical contact enhanced potassium release by an additional factor of 3 to 4 in comparison to the separation experiments. For contact experiments, Electron Probe Microanalysis revealed the formation of mycelium-mineral aggregates, and Atomic Force Microscopy imaging further indicated the possible ingestion of mineral particles by the fungus cells. Contrasting to what was observed and expected in control experiments, the potassium solubilization rate showed a positive dependence upon pH when fungi and minerals were mixed directly, and exhibited no correlations with solution acidity if cell-rock contact was restrained. These results appear to suggest that A. fumigatus promoted potassium release by means of at least three likely routes, one

  19. A mathematical model of endovascular heat transfer for human brain cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan Carlos; Yon, Steven; Magers, Mike; Dobak, John

    2000-11-01

    Selective cooling of the brain has been shown to exhibit protective effects in cerebral ischemia, trauma, and spinal injury/ischemia. A multi-compartment, unsteady thermal model of the response of the human brain to endovascular cooling is discussed and its results compared to recent experimental data conducted with sheep and other mammals. The model formulation is based on the extension of the bioheat equation, originally proposed by Pennes(1) and later modified by Wissler(2), Stolwijk(3) and Werner and Webb(4). The temporal response of the brain temperature and that of the various body compartments to the cooling of the blood flowing through the common carotid artery is calculated under various scenarios. The effect of the boundary conditions as well as the closure assumptions used in the model, i.e. perfusion rate, metabolism heat production, etc. on the cooling rate of the brain are systematically investigated. (1) Pennes H. H., “Analysis of tissue and arterial blood temperature in the resting forearm.” J. Appl. Physiol. 1: 93-122, 1948. (2) Wissler E. H., “Steady-state temperature distribution in man”, J. Appl. Physiol., 16: 764-740, 1961. (3) Stolwick J. A. J., “Mathematical model of thermoregulation” in “Physiological and behavioral temperature regulation”, edited by J. D. Hardy, A. P. Gagge and A. J. Stolwijk, Charles C. Thomas Publisher, Springfiels, Ill., 703-721, 1971. (4) Werner J., Webb P., “A six-cylinder model of human thermoregulation for general use on personal computers”, Ann. Physiol. Anthrop., 12(3): 123-134, 1993.

  20. Significant differences in the activities of alpha-amylases in the absence and presence of polyethylene glycol assayed on eight starches solubilized by two methods.

    PubMed

    Mukerjea, Rupendra; Slocum, Giles; Mukerjea, Romila; Robyt, John F

    2006-09-01

    Starch is a reserve chemical source of the energy of the sun found in plants as a water-insoluble granule that differs in their chemical and physical properties, depending on the source. The granules can be solubilized by heating in water or by treatment with various reagents, such as 1M NaOH. alpha-Amylases are widely distributed enzymes that initiate the hydrolysis of starch into low molecular weight maltodextrins. We recently found that the activities of a single alpha-amylase on two different starches were significantly different. We then determined the activities of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and porcine pancreas alpha-amylases, using eight different starches, solubilized by two methods: autoclaving at 121 degrees C and 1M NaOH at 20 degrees C. There were significant differences in the activities of both of the amylases on all eight of the starches. Previously, it had been found that polyethylene glycol (PEG) stabilized and activated the activities of both enzymes, using a soluble amylose as the substrate. Addition of PEG to the enzymes greatly increased the activities on the eight starches, but the activities still differed significantly. The different activities with the starches were hypothesized as differences in the amounts of secondary and tertiary structures that are partially retained when the different starches are solubilized; the activities on addition of PEG is hypothesized as the formation of highly active species from a series of less active forms.

  1. Heat shock protein 27 regulates human prostate cancer cell motility and metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    Voll, Eric A; Ogden, Irene M; Pavese, Janet M; Huang, XiaoKe; Xu, Li; Jovanovic, Borko D; Bergan, Raymond C

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common form of cancer in American men. Mortality from PCa is caused by the movement of cancer cells from the primary organ to form metastatic tumors at distant sites. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is known to increase human PCa cell invasion and its overexpression is associated with metastatic disease. The role of HSP27 in driving PCa cell movement from the prostate to distant metastatic sites is unknown. Increased HSP27 expression increased metastasis as well as primary tumor mass. In vitro studies further examined the mechanism of HSP27-induced metastatic behavior. HSP27 did not affect cell detachment, adhesion, or migration, but did increase cell invasion. Cell invasion was dependent upon matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), whose expression was increased by HSP27. In vivo, HSP27 induced commensurate changes in MMP-2 expression in tumors. These findings demonstrate that HSP27 drives metastatic spread of cancer cells from the prostate to distant sites, does so across a continuum of expression levels, and identifies HSP27-driven increases in MMP-2 expression as functionally relevant. These findings add to prior studies demonstrating that HSP27 increases PCa cell motility, growth and survival. Together, they demonstrate that HSP27 plays an important role in PCa progression. PMID:24798191

  2. Expression of heat shock protein 90 at the cell surface in human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Cristina; Regidor, Ignacio; Poveda, Pedro D.

    2008-01-01

    In addition to the activity of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90/HSPC) as a chaperone, some recent studies have reported expression of Hsp90 at the cell surface in certain types of cancer and nervous system cells. We study the expression of Hsp90 at the cell surface in human neuroblastoma (NB69) cells. Immunofluorescence experiments labeling with anti-Hsp90 antibodies on both nonpermeabilized cells and live cells detected Hsp90 at the cell surface. Hsp90 was also identified in a membrane fraction from subcellular fractionation. Cell-surface Hsp90 was significantly more expressed in undifferentiated proliferative spherical neuroblastoma cells than in differentiated flattened cells. In addition, spherical cells were significantly more sensitive to Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin compared to flattened cells. This paper describes the first evidence of cell-surface Hsp90 expression in a cancer cell line from nervous tissue and may indicate a novel target for anti-tumoral agents. PMID:18800240

  3. Heat Stress Increases Long-term Human Migration in Rural Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, V.; Gray, C.; Kosec, K.

    2014-01-01

    Human migration attributable to climate events has recently received significant attention from the academic and policy communities (1-2). Quantitative evidence on the relationship between individual, permanent migration and natural disasters is limited (3-9). A 21-year longitudinal survey conducted in rural Pakistan (1991-2012) provides a unique opportunity to understand the relationship between weather and long-term migration. We link individual-level information from this survey to satellite-derived measures of climate variability and control for potential confounders using a multivariate approach. We find that flooding—a climate shock associated with large relief efforts—has modest to insignificant impacts on migration. Heat stress, however—which has attracted relatively little relief—consistently increases the long-term migration of men, driven by a negative effect on farm and non-farm income. Addressing weather-related displacement will require policies that both enhance resilience to climate shocks and lower barriers to welfare-enhancing population movements. PMID:25132865

  4. Protein carbonylation and heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle: relationships to age and sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Beltran Valls, Maria R; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Narici, Marco V; Smith, Kenneth; Phillips, Bethan E; Caporossi, Daniela; Atherton, Philip J

    2015-02-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of muscle mass termed sarcopenia, which has significant impact on quality-of-life. Because oxidative stress is proposed to negatively impact upon musculoskeletal aging, we investigated links between human aging and markers of oxidative stress, and relationships to muscle mass and strength in young and old nonsarcopenic and sarcopenic adults. Sixteen young and 16 old males (further subdivided into "old" and "old sarcopenic") were studied. The abundance of protein carbonyl adducts within skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein subfractions from musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were determined using Oxyblot immunoblotting techniques. In addition, concentrations of recognized cytoprotective proteins (eg, heat shock proteins [HSP], αβ-crystallin) were also assayed. Aging was associated with increased mitochondrial (but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic) protein carbonyl adducts, independently of (stage-I) sarcopenia. Correlation analyses of all subjects revealed that mitochondrial protein carbonyl abundance negatively correlated with muscle strength ([1-repetition maximum], p = .02, r (2) = -.16), but not muscle mass (p = .13, r (2) = -.08). Abundance of cytoprotective proteins, including various HSPs (HSP 27 and 70), were unaffected by aging/sarcopenia. To conclude, these data reveal that mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases moderately with age, and that this increase may impact upon skeletal muscle function, but is not a hallmark of (stage-I) sarcopenia, per se.

  5. Human resting extracellular heat shock protein 72 concentration decreases during the initial adaptation to exercise in a hot, humid environment

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Helen C.; Ferguson, Richard A.; Nimmo, Myra A.

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp) 72 is a cytosolic protein that also is present in the circulation. Extracellular Hsp72 (eHsp72) is inducible by exercise and is suggested to act as a danger signal to the immune system. The adaptive response of eHsp72 to repeated exercise-heat exposures in humans remains to be determined. An intracellular animal study found a reduced Hsp72 response, with no change in resting levels, during heat stress after a single day of passive heat acclimation. The current study therefore tested whether adaptations in human eHsp72 levels would similarly occur 24 hours after a single exercise-heat exposure. Seven males completed cycle exercise (42.5% V̇O2peak for 2 hours) in a hot, humid environment (38°C, 60% relative humidity) on each of 2 consecutive days. Blood samples were obtained from an antecubital vein before exercise and 0 hours and 22 hours postexercise for the analysis of eHsp72. Exercise-heat stress resulted in enhanced eHsp72, with a similar absolute increase found on both days (day 1: 1.26 ng/mL [0.80 ng/mL]; day 2: 1.29 ng/mL [1.60 ng/mL]). Resting eHsp72 decreased from rest on day 1 to day 2's 22-hour postexercise sample (P < 0.05). It is suggested that the reduction in resting eHsp72 after 2 consecutive exercise-heat exposures is possibly due to an enhanced removal from the circulation, for either immunoregulatory functions, or for improved cellular stress tolerance in this initial, most stressful period of acclimation. PMID:16817318

  6. Human recombinant factor VIIa may improve heat intolerance in mice by attenuating hypothalamic neuronal apoptosis and damage.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Lin, Cheng-Hsien; Yung, Ming-Chi

    2014-10-01

    Intolerance to heat exposure is believed to be associated with hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis impairment [reflected by decreases in blood concentrations of both adrenocorticotrophic-hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone]. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of human recombinant factor VIIa (rfVIIa) on heat intolerance, HPA axis impairment, and hypothalamic inflammation, ischemic and oxidative damage, and apoptosis in mice under heat stress. Immediately after heat stress (41.2 °C for 1 h), mice were treated with vehicle (1 mL/kg of body weight) or rfVIIa (65-270 µg/kg of body weight) and then returned to room temperature (26 °C). Mice still alive on day 4 of heat exposure were considered survivors. Cellular ischemia markers (e.g., glutamate, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio), oxidative damage markers (e.g., nitric oxide metabolite, hydroxyl radials), and pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α) in hypothalamus were determined. In addition, blood concentrations of both ACTH and corticosterone were measured. Hypothalamic cell damage was assessed by determing the neuronal damage scores, whereas the hypothalamic cell apoptosis was determined by assessing the numbers of cells stained with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated αUTP nick-end labeling, caspase-3-positive cells, and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecula-1-positive cells in hypothalamus. Compared with vehicle-treated heated mice, rfVIIa-treated heated mice had significantly higher fractional survival (8/10 vs 1/10), lesser thermoregulatory deficit (34.1 vs 24.8 °C), lesser extents of ischemic, oxidative, and inflammatory markers in hypothalamus, lesser neuronal damage scores and apoptosis in hypothalamus, and lesser HPA axis impairment. Human recombinant factor VIIa appears to exert a protective effect against heatstroke by attenuating hypothalamic cell apoptosis (due to ischemic, inflammatory, and oxidative damage

  7. Membrane Protein Solubilization and Composition of Protein Detergent Complexes.

    PubMed

    Duquesne, Katia; Prima, Valérie; Sturgis, James N

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are typically expressed in heterologous systems with a view to in vitro characterization. A critical step in the preparation of membrane proteins after expression in any system is the solubilization of the protein in aqueous solution, typically using detergents and lipids, to obtain the protein in a form suitable for purification, structural or functional analysis. This process is particularly difficult as the objective is to prepare the protein in an unnatural environment, a protein detergent complex, separating it from its natural lipid partners while causing the minimum destabilization or modification of the structure. Although the process is difficult, and relatively hard to master, an increasing number of membrane proteins have been successfully isolated after expression in a wide variety of systems. In this chapter we give a general protocol for preparing protein detergent complexes that is aimed at guiding the reader through the different critical steps. In the second part of the chapter we illustrate how to analyze the composition of protein detergent complexes; this analysis is important as it has been found that compositional variation often causes irreproducible results. PMID:27485340

  8. Solubilization, Solution Equilibria, and Biodegradation of PAH's under Thermophilic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Viamajala, S.; Peyton, B. M.; Richards, L. A.; Petersen, J. N.

    2007-01-01

    Biodegradation rates of PAHs are typically low at mesophilic conditions and it is believed that the kinetics of degradation is controlled by PAH solubility and mass transfer rates. Solubility tests were performed on phenanthrene, fluorene and fluoranthene at 20 C, 40 C and 60 C and, as expected, a significant increase in the equilibrium solubility concentration and of the rate of dissolution of these polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was observed with increasing temperature. A first-order model was used to describe the PAH dissolution kinetics and the thermodynamic property changes associated with the dissolution process (enthalpy, entropy and Gibb's free energy of solution) were evaluated. Further, other relevant thermodynamic properties for these PAHs, including the activity coefficients at infinite dilution, Henry's law constants and octanol-water partition coefficients, were calculated in the temperature range 20-60 C. In parallel with the dissolution studies, three thermophilic Geobacilli were isolated from compost that grew on phenanthrene at 60 C and degraded the PAH more rapidly than other reported mesophiles. Our results show that while solubilization rates of PAHs are significantly enhanced at elevated temperatures, the biodegradation of PAHs under thermophilic conditions is likely mass transfer limited due to enhanced degradation rates.

  9. Solubilization and Mineralization of Lignin by White Rot Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, C. David; Kropp, Bradley R.; Reid, Ian D.

    1992-01-01

    The white rot fungi Lentinula edodes, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Pleurotus sajor-caju, Flammulina velutipes, and Schizophyllum commune were grown in liquid media containing 14C-lignin-labelled wood, and the formation of water-soluble 14C-labelled products and 14CO2, the growth of the fungi, and the activities of extracellular lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and laccase were measured. Conditions that affect the rate of lignin degradation were imposed, and both long-term (0- to 16-day) and short-term (0- to 72-h) effects on the production of the two types of product and on the activities of the enzymes were monitored. The production of 14CO2-labelled products from the aqueous ones was also investigated. The short-term studies showed that the different conditions had different effects on the production of the two products and on the activities of the enzymes. Nitrogen sources inhibited the production of both products by all species when differences in growth could be discounted. Medium pH and manganese affected lignin degradation by the different species differently. With P. chrysosporium, the results were consistent, with lignin peroxidase playing a role in lignin solubilization and manganese peroxidase being important in subsequent CO2 production. PMID:16348781

  10. Production of humic substances through coal-solubilizing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Nelson; Gómez, Liliana; Pantoja, Manuel; Ramírez, Ramiro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the production of humic substances (HS) through the bacterial solubilization of low rank coal (LRC) was evaluated. The evaluation was carried out by 19 bacterial strains isolated in microenvironments with high contents of coal wastes. The biotransformed LRC and the HS produced were quantified in vitro in a liquid growth medium. The humic acids (HA) obtained from the most active bacterial strain were characterized via elemental composition (C, H, N, O), IR analyses, and the E4/E6 ratio; they were then compared with the HA extracted chemically using NaOH. There was LRC biotransformation ranged from 25 to 37%, and HS production ranged from 127 to 3100 mg.L−1. More activity was detected in the isolated strains of Bacillus mycoides, Microbacterium sp, Acinetobacter sp, and Enterobacter aerogenes. The HA produced by B. mycoides had an IR spectrum and an E4/E6 ratio similar to those of the HA extracted with NAOH, but their elemental composition and their degree of aromatic condensation was different. Results suggest that these bacteria can be used to exploit the LRC resulting from coal mining activities and thus produce HS in order to improve the content of humified organic matter in soils. PMID:25477925

  11. Electrochemical detection of nitromethane vapors combined with a solubilization device.

    PubMed

    Delile, Sébastien; Aussage, Adeline; Maillou, Thierry; Palmas, Pascal; Lair, Virginie; Cassir, Michel

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, the number of terrorism acts has increased and the need for efficient explosive detectors has become an urgent worldwide necessity. A prototype, Nebulex™, was recently developed in our laboratory. Basically, it couples the solubilization of an analyte from the atmosphere by a nebulization process and in-situ detection. This article presents the development and integration of an electrochemical sensor for the detection of nitromethane, a common chemical product that can be used to make an improvised explosive device. A gold screen-printed electrode was used in a flow-cell and a detection limit of 4.5 µM was achieved by square wave voltammetry. The detection method was also determined to be selective toward nitromethane over a large panel of interfering compounds. Detection tests with the Nebulex™ were thus carried out using a custom-made calibrated nitromethane vapor generator. Detection times of less than one minute were obtained for nitromethane contents of 8 and 90 ppmv. Further measurements were performed in a room-measurement configuration leading to detection times in the range of 1-2 min, clearly demonstrating the system's efficiency under quasi-real conditions.

  12. Propofol solubilization and structural transformations in dilutable microemulsion.

    PubMed

    Perlstein, My; Aserin, Abraham; Wachtel, Ellen J; Garti, Nissim

    2015-12-01

    Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) is a drug for both induction and maintenance of anesthesia. Pure propofol cannot be injected because of its lipophilic character, low water-solubility, and low bioavailability. Presently, propofol is formulated in an unstable emulsion, easily oxidized, and easily contaminated with bacteria. We are proposing new, propofol-loaded modified microemulsions, stable thermodynamically, and microbiologically safe; the microemulsions are fully dilutable with water. Structural characterization of the empty and the propofol-loaded systems as a function of water dilution was accomplished using advanced analytical tools such as SD-NMR, SAXS, cryo-TEM, DSC, electrical conductivity, and viscosity. Upon water dilution the propofol-loaded concentrate forms swollen reverse micelles that upon further dilution (40 wt% water) progressively transform into a bicontinuous mesophase and then invert (>65 wt% water) into O/W nanodroplets without "losing" the solubilized propofol. The drug exhibits strong interactions with the surfactant (DSC and SD-NMR). Propofol increases the size of the microemulsion nanodroplets, but does not modify the microemulsion behavior. Water, ethanol, and PG are essential structural components, but do not interact directly with propofol.

  13. Solubilized wheat protein isolate: functional properties and potential food applications.

    PubMed

    Ahmedna, M; Prinyawiwatkul, W; Rao, R M

    1999-04-01

    Solubility, foaming capacity/stability, water holding and fat absorption capacities, and emulsifying capacity/stability of a solubilized wheat protein isolate (SWPI) were compared with those of commercial protein, that is, sodium caseinate (NaCAS), dried egg white (DEW), nonfat dry milk (NFDM), and soy protein isolate (SPI). SWPI was highly soluble at pH 6.5-8.5. Foaming capacity of SWPI was superior to those of SPI, NFDM, and DEW, and its foaming stability was similar to those of the commercial proteins. Foaming properties of SWPI were greatly improved in the presence of 0.5% (w/v) CaCl(2). Water holding capacity of SWPI was greater than that of NaCAS, NFDM, and DEW, whereas its fat absorption capacity was comparable to that of SPI, NaCAS, and DEW. SWPI exhibited emulsifying properties similar to those of SPI. SWPI was incorporated at 5, 10, 15, or 20% into ice cream, chocolate chip cookies, banana nut muffins, and hamburger patties. Products containing <5% SWPI were acceptable to consumers.

  14. Lack of protection of prior heat shock against UV-induced oxidative stress in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sandra A; McArdle, Anne; McArdle, Francis; Jack, Catherine I A; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2003-01-01

    The effect of prior hyperthermia on UV-induced oxidative stress was studied in human skin fibroblasts. UV radiation alone induced an increased release of superoxide anions and increased lipid peroxidation in skin fibroblasts accompanied by a rise in catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. Hyperthermia was found to induce a significant rise in the cell content of heat-shock proteins, HSP60 and HSP70, but this treatment prior to UV radiation did not influence any indicators of oxidative stress in the fibroblasts. In contrast, the combination of heat shock prior to UV-exposure reduced fibroblast cell viability compared with UV radiation-exposure alone.

  15. Heat-labile- and heat-stable-toxoid fusions (LTR₁₉₂G-STaP₁₃F) of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli elicit neutralizing antitoxin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Ruan, Xiaosai; Zhang, Chengxian; Lawson, Steve R; Knudsen, David E; Nataro, James P; Robertson, Donald C; Zhang, Weiping

    2011-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Adhesins and enterotoxins, including heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (STa) toxins, are the key virulence factors. Antigenic adhesin and LT antigens have been used in developing vaccines against ETEC diarrhea. However, STa has not been included because of its poor immunogenicity and potent toxicity. Our recent study showed that porcine-type STa toxoids became immunogenic and elicited neutralizing anti-STa antibodies after being genetically fused to a full-length porcine-type LT toxoid, LT(R₁₉₂G) (W. Zhang et al., Infect. Immun. 78:316-325, 2010). In this study, we mutated human-type LT and STa genes, which are highly homologous to porcine-type toxin genes, for a full-length LT toxoid (LT(R₁₉₂)) and a full-length STa toxoid (STa(P₁₃F)) and genetically fused them to produce LT₁₉₂-STa₁₃ toxoid fusions. Mice immunized with LT₁₉₂-STa₁₃ fusion antigens developed anti-LT and anti-STa IgG (in serum and feces) and IgA antibodies (in feces). Moreover, secretory IgA antibodies from immunized mice were shown to neutralize STa and cholera toxins in T-84 cells. In addition, we fused the STa₁₃ toxoid at the N terminus and C terminus, between the A1 and A2 peptides, and between the A and B subunits of LT₁₉₂ to obtain different fusions in order to explore strategies for enhancing STa immunogenicity. This study demonstrated that human-type LT₁₉₂-STa₁₃ fusions induce neutralizing antitoxin antibodies and provided important information for developing toxoid vaccines against human ETEC diarrhea. PMID:21788385

  16. Oxidized amylose with high carboxyl content: A promising solubilizer and carrier of linalool for antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Ye, Youxin; Zhang, Wenwen; Li, Songling; Chen, Jing; Wang, Shiting; Li, Defu; Mu, Changdao

    2016-12-10

    The oxidized amyloses with different carboxyl content were prepared to include linalool for antimicrobial activity in aqueous environment. The results show that linalool can be effectively reserved from volatilization through encapsulation into amylose and oxidized amyloses. The inclusion ability of oxidized amyloses towards linalool is decreasing with the increase of oxidation level due to the depolymerization of amylose. However, the solubilization effect of oxidized amyloses to linalool is enhanced efficiently owning to the high water solubility of oxidized amyloses. It is interesting that the inclusion complexes have good antimicrobial activity in aqueous environment. Linalool solubilized by oxidized amyloses presents better antimicrobial performance than that solubilized by amylose, mainly resulting from that amylose-linalool inclusion complex would aggregate and retrograde fast in aqueous solution, which is disadvantageous for the release of linalool. The study suggests that oxidized amylose is a promising solubilizer and carrier of linalool for antimicrobial activity in aqueous environment. PMID:27577891

  17. Solubilization of leonardite by white-rot fungi grown in stationary and shake flasks

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlberg, M.D.; Bockrath, B.C.; Speers, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidized coals, including a naturally oxidized lignite identified as leonardite, are solubilized and sometimes degraded further by a variety of fungi and bacteria. Evidence for biosolubilization of coal was first presented by Fakoussa, and Cohen and Gabriele. Subsequent studies concentrated on screening organisms, characterization of the product, and determination of the biochemical mechanisms. Mechanisms of biosolubilization are poorly known and may vary with the species used and the media. There is evidence for both enzymatic degradation and alkaline solubilization. The objective of this study was to discover critical factors in solubilization and biosolubilization mechanisms by testing a variety of growth media, growth conditions, and fungi. Lignin-degrading species were emphasized because of similarities between the structures in lignin and in low-rank coals. The results indicate that during idiophase (secondary metabolism), the fungi produce alkaline materials that solubilize leonardite.

  18. SOLUBILIZATION OF DODECANE, TETRACHLOROETHYLENE, AND 1,2-DICHLOROBENZENE IN MICELLAR SOLUTIONS OF ETHOXYLATED NONIONIC SURFACTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although surfactants have received considerable attention as a potential means for enhancing the recovery of organic compounds from the subsurface, only limited information is available regarding the micellar solubilization of common groundwater contaminants by nonionic surfactan...

  19. [The radioprotective and antioxidant properties of solubilized alpha-tocopherol acetate].

    PubMed

    Samoĭlov, A V; Seĭfulla, R D; Kamaev, N O; Lukoianova, T I; Gukasov, V M; Belous, M V

    1992-01-01

    A single intravenous administration of solubilized alpha-tocopherol acetate in a dose of 1 mg/kg to CBA x C57Bl x F1 male mice 3 and 24 hours before radiation was demonstrated to increase 30-day survival rates in the animals. Oily alpha-tocopherol acetate had the identical effects when the agent was intramuscularly given in a dose of 10 mg/kg. There was a rise in peripheral leukocyte counts 0.5 hour after solubilized alpha-tocopherol acetate administration. The antioxidative activity of the solubilized agent was 3.3 times as high as that the routine agent when attacking Tween 80. The higher radioprotective activity of solubilized alpha-tocopherol acetate is accounted for by its enhanced bioavailability, antioxidative activity and effects on the factors of nonspecific body's resistance.

  20. Isolation and characterization of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria from seagrass rhizosphere soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Upasana; Subhashini, Ponnambalam; Dilipan, Elangovan; Raja, Subramanian; Thangaradjou, Thirunavukarassu; Kannan, Lakshmanan

    2012-03-01

    Phosphate-solubilizing bacterial strains (6 Nos.) were isolated from the rhizosphere soils of two seagrasses ( Halophila ovalis (R. Br.) Hook and Halodule pinifolia (Miki) Hartog) in the Vellar estuary. Experimental studies found that the strain PSSG6 was effective in phosphate solubilization with Phosphate Solubilization efficiency index E = 375 ± 8.54, followed by the strain PSSG5 with Phosphate Solubilization efficiency index E = 275 ± 27.3. Of the 6 strains isolated, the strains PSSG4 and PSSG5 belonged to the genus Bacillus, and PSSG1, PSSG2 and PSSG3 were identified as Citrobacter sp., Shigella sp., and Klebsiella sp., respectively, by conventional method, and PSSG6 was identified as Bacillus circulans using conventional and molecular methods.

  1. SURFACTANT-ENHANCED SOLUBILIZATION OF RESIDUAL DODECANE IN SOIL COLUMNS - 1. EXPERIMANTAL INVESTIGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solubilization of dodecane by polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate, a nonionic surfactant, was investigated as a potential means of recoveringnonaqueous-phase liquids from contaminated aquifers. Residual saturations of dodecane were established by injecting 14C...

  2. Co-solubilization of hydroxyproline and pectin. Is there a direct link between the two

    SciTech Connect

    Oi, Xiaoyang; Mort, A.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Extensin, a major hydroxyproline (hyp) rich glycoprotein in walls of cultured cells of dicots, is known to be very difficult to solubilize. It has been suggested that this may be because of covalent crosslinks to cell wall polysaccharides, or more recently, crosslinks between tyrosine residues of different extensin molecules to form isodityrosine. Neither of thee hypotheses has strong evidence to support it. We are attempting to solubilize fragments of extensin which contain crosslinks for subsequent characterization. Cotton suspension culture cell walls were digested with endopolygalacturonase followed by cellulase to remove homogalacturonan, and xyloglucan and cellulose, respectively. Very little extensin (as indicated by hyp) was released by those or a subsequent trypsin digestion. Treatment of the residue with anhydrous HF at {minus}73{degree}C selectively removed the arabinofuranose residues from the hydroxyproline residues and allowed trypsin to solubilize {approximately}50% of the hyp as peptides and glycopeptides. Sugars characteristic of pectin co-solubilized with hyp during the trypsin digestion.

  3. Oxidized amylose with high carboxyl content: A promising solubilizer and carrier of linalool for antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Ye, Youxin; Zhang, Wenwen; Li, Songling; Chen, Jing; Wang, Shiting; Li, Defu; Mu, Changdao

    2016-12-10

    The oxidized amyloses with different carboxyl content were prepared to include linalool for antimicrobial activity in aqueous environment. The results show that linalool can be effectively reserved from volatilization through encapsulation into amylose and oxidized amyloses. The inclusion ability of oxidized amyloses towards linalool is decreasing with the increase of oxidation level due to the depolymerization of amylose. However, the solubilization effect of oxidized amyloses to linalool is enhanced efficiently owning to the high water solubility of oxidized amyloses. It is interesting that the inclusion complexes have good antimicrobial activity in aqueous environment. Linalool solubilized by oxidized amyloses presents better antimicrobial performance than that solubilized by amylose, mainly resulting from that amylose-linalool inclusion complex would aggregate and retrograde fast in aqueous solution, which is disadvantageous for the release of linalool. The study suggests that oxidized amylose is a promising solubilizer and carrier of linalool for antimicrobial activity in aqueous environment.

  4. Bovine kidney gamma-glutamyltransferase. Solubilized forms, biochemical and immunochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Milnerowicz, H; Szewczuk, A

    1984-01-01

    By digestion of detergent-solubilized gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), isolated from bovine kidney with bromelain, the liberation of 4 protein fragments was demonstrated. The fragment migrating most quickly in gel electrophoresis showed gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity and the most slowly migrating fragment showed peptidase activity. Protease-solubilized GGT is a sialoprotein with a molecular weight of 95,000. After treatment with sodium dodecylsulfate it was separated into two unequal subunits with molecular weights of 26,000 and 69,000. Sugar components were found only in the heavy subunit. Some catalytic differences were found between the two solubilized GGT forms. The immunoprecipitate obtained from detergent-solubilized GGT retained about 50% of the initial enzyme activity. The enzyme is inactivated with phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride in the presence of maleate and with 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine.

  5. Techno-economic evaluation of an inclusion body solubilization and recombinant protein refolding process.

    PubMed

    Freydell, Esteban J; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Eppink, Michel H M; Ottens, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is normally accompanied by the formation of inclusion bodies (IBs). To obtain the protein product in an active (native) soluble form, the IBs must be first solubilized, and thereafter, the soluble, often denatured and reduced protein must be refolded. Several technically feasible alternatives to conduct IBs solubilization and on-column refolding have been proposed in recent years. However, rarely these on-column refolding alternatives have been evaluated from an economical point of view, questioning the feasibility of their implementation at a preparative scale. The presented study assesses the economic performance of four distinct process alternatives that include pH induced IBs solubilization and protein refolding (pH_IndSR); IBs solubilization using urea, dithiothreitol (DTT), and alkaline pH followed by batch size-exclusion protein refolding; inclusion bodies (IBs) solubilization using urea, DTT, and alkaline pH followed by simulated moving bed (SMB) size-exclusion protein refolding, and IBs solubilization using urea, DTT and alkaline pH followed by batch dilution protein refolding. The economic performance was judged on the basis of the direct fixed capital, and the production cost per unit of product (P(C)). This work shows that (1) pH_IndSR system is a relatively economical process, because of the low IBs solubilization cost; (2) substituting β-mercaptoethanol for dithiothreithol is an attractive alternative, as it significantly decreases the product cost contribution from the IBs solubilization; and (3) protein refolding by size-exclusion chromatography becomes economically attractive by changing the mode of operation of the chromatographic reactor from batch to continuous using SMB technology.

  6. Isolation and partial characterization of phosphate solubilizing bacteria isolated from soil and marine samples.

    PubMed

    Mujahid, Talat Yasmeen; Siddiqui, Khaizran; Ahmed, Rifat; Kazmi, Shahana U; Ahmed, Nuzhat

    2014-09-01

    In the present study the potential of indigenous bacterial isolates from soil rhizosphere and marine environment to promote plant growth was determined. Eight bacterial strains isolated from soil and marine samples were characterized for the phosphate solubilizing activity. Qualitative and quantitative estimation of phosphate solubilization is done. MIC of antibiotic and heavy metals were checked for these strains. Strains show a diverse pattern of antibiotic and heavy metals resistance.

  7. [The effect of solubilized alpha-tocopherol acetate on resistance to experimental physical loading].

    PubMed

    Samoĭlov, A V; Seĭfulla, R D; Kamaev, N O; Tunitskaia, T A; Teplova, N P; Karmanovskiĭ, A Ia; Belous, M V

    1992-01-01

    A single intravenous injection of solubilized alpha-tocopherol acetate to Wistar male rats in doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg noticeably increased the animals' working capacity. The stimulation effect appeared 18 hours after the injection and was observable for two weeks. Utilization of glucose reserves in bioenergy supply of muscle activity has been shown. The maintenance of the action for such a long time may be accounted for by high metabolic stability of solubilized alpha-tocopherol acetate.

  8. Cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by SDS-solubilized single-walled carbon nanotubes in normal rat kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chang-Won; Kang, Su-Jin; Kang, Youn Kyung; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung

    2011-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), promising novel nanomaterials, have been applied to drug delivery and bio-imaging; however, their potential harmful effects on human health and environment have gained much attention recently. In the present study, we investigated cytotoxic effect of solubilized single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs), which were dispersed in water by sodium dodesyl sulfate (SDS), in normal rat kidney epithelial cells (NRK-52E). SDS-SWCNT (0.125-10 μg/mL)-treated NRK-52E cells showed decreased cell viability and enhanced cytotoxicity marker levels following 24-48 h incubation. In addition, SDS-SWCNT treatment evoked the cell growth inhibition: 8 μg/mL SDS-SWCNT induced the growth arrest at G(0)/G(1) phase and levels of cell cycle-related proteins such as CDK2, CDK6 and phosphorylated-retinoblastoma (pRB) were significantly reduced by CNT. Whereas, at higher concentration of SDS-SWCNT, the percentage of cell numbers in apoptotic sub-G(1) phase was substantially increased. Along with these changes, SDS-SWCNT treatment elevated protein levels for p53 and p21 with a concomitant increase in the single strand DNA breakage. Taken together, these results suggest that SDS-solubilized SWCNTs exert genotoxic effect in renal epithelial cells, and p53-dependent signaling can be associated with the growth arrest and apoptosis events upon CNT-induced DNA damage.

  9. Ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis-enhanced mineral phosphate solubilization by groundnut-associated Serratia marcescens GPS-5.

    PubMed

    Tripura, Chaturvedula; Sashidhar, Burla; Podile, Appa Rao

    2007-02-01

    Twenty-three bacterial isolates were screened for their mineral phosphate-solubilizing (MPS) ability on Pikovskaya and National Botanical Research Institute's phosphate (NBRIP) agar. The majority of the isolates exhibited a strong ability to solubilize hydroxyapatite in both solid and liquid media. The solubilization in liquid medium corresponded with a decrease in the pH of the medium. Serratia marcescens GPS-5, known for its biocontrol of late leaf spot in groundnut, emerged as the best solubilizer. S. marcescens GPS-5 was subjected to ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis, and a total of 1700 mutants, resulting after 45 minutes of exposure, were screened on buffered NBRIP medium for alterations in MPS ability compared with that of the wild type. Seven mutants with increased (increased-MPS mutants) and 6 mutants with decreased (decreased-MPS mutants) MPS ability were isolated. All seven increased-MPS mutants were efficient at solubilizing phosphate in both solid and liquid NBRIP medium. Among the increased-MPS mutants, EMS XVIII Sm-35 showed the maximum (40%) increase in the amount of phosphate released in liquid medium compared with wild-type S. marcescens GPS-5, therefore, it would be a useful microbial inoculant in groundnut cultivation. EMS III Sm W, a nonpigmented mutant, showed the lowest solubilization of phosphate among the 6 decreased-MPS mutants. PMID:17200805

  10. Effect of purification followed by solubilization of receptor material on quantitative receptor assays for anticholinergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Smisterová, J; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R A

    1996-08-01

    In order to optimize quantitative receptor assays for anticholinergics, the different receptor preparations resulting from the purification and the solubilization of the P2 pellet from the calf striatum were evaluated. The dissociation constants for two chemically different anticholinergics, the tertiary amine scopolamine and the quaternary amine oxyphenonium, were calculated from inhibition studies of 3H-NMS binding in buffer and plasma. The Kd values for both anticholinergics were similar for all the membrane-bound receptor preparations (unpurified and the purified P2 pellet) either in buffer or in plasma. More pronounced differences were observed between the membrane-bound and solubilized receptors. By introducing the solubilized receptor as well, differences between the individual anticholinergics appeared. On the one hand, for scopolamine, a gain in sensitivity of 1.5-2.8 in plasma was observed for the solubilized receptor. On the other hand, in the case of oxyphenonium, a dramatic loss in sensitivity (by a factor of about 24) was observed with the solubilized receptor, as compared to the membrane-bound receptor, in buffer. Very interestingly, however, when the solubilized receptor was used in plasma, a lowering of the Kd value was found for both anticholinergics, i.e. the assays became more sensitive. Such an effect (not observed for the membrane-bound receptor) could be obtained only when the percentage of digitonin present in the assay was at least 0.12% (w/v) or higher. PMID:8877848

  11. Solubilization of Waste Activated Sludge and Nitrogenous Compounds Transformation During Solubilization by Thermophilic Enzyme (S-TE) Process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Luo, Kun; Li, Xiao-ming; Zhong, Yu; Chen, Hong-bo; Yang, Guo-jing; Shi, Yan-wei; Zeng, Guang-ming

    2015-06-01

    A representative thermophilic bacterial strain (AT06-1) capable of secreting protease was isolated from thermophilic aerobic digestion reactor, and 16S rRNA gene analysis indicated that it was Bacillus sp. The isolated strain was inoculated in waste activated sludge (WAS) to evaluate the performance of solubilization by thermophilic enzyme (S-TE) process under aerobic or microaerobic conditions at different temperatures (55-70 °C). Results showed that the inoculation of specific thermophilic strain significantly affected the volatile suspended solids (VSS) removal. At the optimal temperature of 65 °C, the maximum VSS removal of 43.6 % and highest SCOD of 4475 mg/L was achieved during microaerobic S-TE process. Compared to the noninoculation, more soluble protein was released during S-TE process due to the higher protease activity associated with the protein hydrolysis originated from cell lysis. The protease activity at aerobic and microaerobic S-TE process was respectively 1.73 and 1.88 times that of the noninoculation. Ammonia was the end nitrogenous compound of protein hydrolysis during S-TE process, which was stripped from the digestion system through continuous aeration.

  12. Cardiopulmonary baroreceptor control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Etzel, R. A.; Farr, D. B.

    1999-01-01

    Whole body heating decreases central venous pressure (CVP) while increasing muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). In normothermia, similar decreases in CVP elevate MSNA, presumably via cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading. The purpose of this project was to identify whether increases in MSNA during whole body heating could be attributed to cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading coincident with the thermal challenge. Seven subjects were exposed to whole body heating while sublingual temperature, skin blood flow, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and MSNA were monitored. During the heat stress, 15 ml/kg warmed saline was infused intravenously over 7-10 min to increase CVP and load the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors. We reported previously that this amount of saline was sufficient to return CVP to pre-heat stress levels. Whole body heating increased MSNA from 25 +/- 3 to 39 +/- 3 bursts/min (P < 0. 05). Central blood volume expansion via rapid saline infusion did not significantly decrease MSNA (44 +/- 4 bursts/min, P > 0.05 relative to heat stress period) and did not alter mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) or pulse pressure. To identify whether arterial baroreceptor loading decreases MSNA during heat stress, in a separate protocol MAP was elevated via steady-state infusion of phenylephrine during whole body heating. Increasing MAP from 82 +/- 3 to 93 +/- 4 mmHg (P < 0.05) caused MSNA to decrease from 36 +/- 3 to 15 +/- 4 bursts/min (P < 0.05). These data suggest that cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading during passive heating is not the primary mechanism resulting in elevations in MSNA. Moreover, arterial baroreceptors remain capable of modulating MSNA during heat stress.

  13. Prediction modeling of physiological responses and human performance in the heat with application to space operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandolf, Kent B.; Stroschein, Leander A.; Gonzalez, Richard R.; Sawka, Michael N.

    1994-01-01

    This institute has developed a comprehensive USARIEM heat strain model for predicting physiological responses and soldier performance in the heat which has been programmed for use by hand-held calculators, personal computers, and incorporated into the development of a heat strain decision aid. This model deals directly with five major inputs: the clothing worn, the physical work intensity, the state of heat acclimation, the ambient environment (air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar load), and the accepted heat casualty level. In addition to predicting rectal temperature, heart rate, and sweat loss given the above inputs, our model predicts the expected physical work/rest cycle, the maximum safe physical work time, the estimated recovery time from maximal physical work, and the drinking water requirements associated with each of these situations. This model provides heat injury risk management guidance based on thermal strain predictions from the user specified environmental conditions, soldier characteristics, clothing worn, and the physical work intensity. If heat transfer values for space operations' clothing are known, NASA can use this prediction model to help avoid undue heat strain in astronauts during space flight.

  14. Methodology for characterizing heat removal mechanism in human skin during cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Pikkula, Brian M; Tunnell, James W; Anvari, Bahman

    2003-05-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) reduces epidermal damage during laser treatment of various dermatoses. The goal of this study was to determine the heat removal mechanism in skin and quantify the amount in response to CSC. Thermocouples were imbedded in four model substrates with a range of thermal diffusivities, greater than three orders of magnitude in difference, to measure the temperature profiles in response to CSC and sapphire contact cooling, which removes heat completely by conduction. An algorithm solving an inverse heat conduction problem was subsequently used to quantify the amount of heat removal from the substrates using the measured temperatures. The interface thermal conductance and internal temperatures within the substrates were computed by a finite difference algorithm that solved the heat conduction equation. Results verify a marked increase in heat removal and interface thermal conductance with increasing thermal diffusivity. By estimation from the model substrate results, heat removal and interface thermal conductance values for skin were obtained. Data demonstrate that during CSC, evaporation is the dominant heat transfer mechanism in materials with higher thermal diffusivities; however, conductive cooling dominates in substrates with lower thermal diffusivities such as skin. PMID:12757194

  15. Binding to histo-blood group antigen-expressing bacteria protects human norovirus from acute heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate if histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) expressing bacteria have any protective role on human norovirus (NoV) from acute heat stress. Eleven bacterial strains were included, belonging to Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Clostridium difficile, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, and B. longum. HBGA expression of the bacteria as well as binding of human NoV virus-like particles (VLPs, GI.1, and GII.4 strains) to the bacteria were detected by flow cytometry. NoV VLPs pre-incubated with HBGA expressing or non-HBGA expressing bacteria were heated and detected by both direct ELISA and porcine gastric mucin-binding assay. The NoV-binding abilities of the bacteria correlated well with their HBGA expression profiles. Two HBGA expressing E. coli (LMG8223 and LFMFP861, both GI.1 and GII.4 binders) and one non-HBGA expressing E. coli (ATCC8739, neither GI.1 nor GII.4 binder) were selected for the heat treatment test with NoV VLPs. Compared with the same cell numbers of non-HBGA expressing E. coli, the presence of HBGA-expressing E. coli could always maintain higher antigen integrity, as well as mucin-binding ability of NoV VLPs of both GI.1 and GII.4 after heat-treatment at 90°C for 2 min. These results indicate that HBGA-expressing bacteria may protect NoVs during the food processing treatments, thereby facilitating their transmission. PMID:26191052

  16. Characterization of pepsin-solubilized bovine heart-valve collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Bashey, R I; Bashey, H M; Jimenez, S A

    1978-01-01

    Collagens extracted from heart valves by using limited pepsin digestion were fractionated by differential salt precipitation. Collagen types were identified by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, amino acid analysis and cleavage with CNBr. Heart-valve collagen was heterogeneous in nature, consisting of a mixture of type-I and type-III collagens. The identity of type-III collagen was established on the basis of (a) insolubility in 1.7 M-NaC1 at neutral pH, (b) behaviour of this collagen fraction on gel electrophoresis under reducing and non-reducing conditions, (c) amino acid analysis showing a hydroxyproline/proline ratio greater than 1, and (d) profile of CNBr peptides on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis showing a peak characteristic for type-III collagen containing peptides alpha1(III)CB8 and alpha1(III)CB3. In addition to types-I and -III collagen, a collagen polypeptide not previously described in heart valves was identified. This polypeptide represented approx. 30% of the collagen fraction precipitated at 4.0 M-NaCl, it migrated between beta- and alpha1-collagen chains on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and its electrophoretic behaviour was not affected by disulphide-bond reduction. All collagen fractions from the heart valves contained increased amounts of hydroxylysine when compared with type-I and -III collagens from other tissues. The presence of beta- and gamma-chains and higher aggregates in pepsin-solubilized collagen indicated that these collagens were highly cross-linked and suggested that some of these cross-links involved the triple-helical regions of the molecule. It is likely that the higher hydroxylysine content of heart-valve collagen is responsible for the high degree of intermolecular cross-linking and may be the result of an adaptive mechanism for the specialized function of these tissues. Images Fig. 5. PMID:361035

  17. Proteolytic digestion of meat is not necessary for iron solubilization.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, C E; Mahoney, A W

    1989-10-01

    The effects of digested cooked or raw meat and nondigested cooked or raw meat on iron solubility were investigated in vitro. Experiment 1 involved adding iron to meat slurries followed by in vitro digestion using pepsin and then pancreatin. Pepsin and pancreatin were excluded from incubation mixtures used as the nondigested treatment. Ferric iron in aqueous solution was used as an iron-only control. Dialyzable iron for each treatment was determined by measuring iron able to cross a dialysis membrane having a molecular weight cut-off of 6,000-8,000. Soluble iron was determined as that iron remaining in solution after centrifugation at 2,500 x g for 15 min. No differences (P greater than 0.05) in dialyzable iron were observed between treatments. However, soluble iron in the digested meat treatments was greater than soluble iron in the nondigested treatments (P = 0.05) or iron-only controls (P = 0.01). There was no difference (P greater than 0.05) between nondigested and iron-only treatments. In experiment 2, meat components were first separated by dialysis from digested or nondigested meat. The pH of the isolated components was adjusted to 2.0, iron added, and the pH adjusted to 7.0. Dialyzable and soluble iron were then determined. As in experiment 1, no differences (P greater than 0.05) in dialyzable iron among treatments were observed. Dialyzable components from digested or nondigested meat increased soluble iron as compared to the iron-only control (P = 0.01), with soluble iron values for the nondigested treatment being greater (P = 0.01) than for the digested treatment. Thus, meat contains a factor(s) that solubilizes iron independent of proteolytic digestion.

  18. Temperature and blood flow distribution in the human leg during passive heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Scott T.; Trangmar, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of temperature on the hemodynamic adjustments to direct passive heat stress within the leg's major arterial and venous vessels and compartments remains unclear. Fifteen healthy young males were tested during exposure to either passive whole body heat stress to levels approaching thermal tolerance [core temperature (Tc) + 2°C; study 1; n = 8] or single leg heat stress (Tc + 0°C; study 2; n = 7). Whole body heat stress increased perfusion and decreased oscillatory shear index in relation to the rise in leg temperature (Tleg) in all three major arteries supplying the leg, plateauing in the common and superficial femoral arteries before reaching severe heat stress levels. Isolated leg heat stress increased arterial blood flows and shear patterns to a level similar to that obtained during moderate core hyperthermia (Tc + 1°C). Despite modest increases in great saphenous venous (GSV) blood flow (0.2 l/min), the deep venous system accounted for the majority of returning flow (common femoral vein 0.7 l/min) during intense to severe levels of heat stress. Rapid cooling of a single leg during severe whole body heat stress resulted in an equivalent blood flow reduction in the major artery supplying the thigh deep tissues only, suggesting central temperature-sensitive mechanisms contribute to skin blood flow alone. These findings further our knowledge of leg hemodynamic responses during direct heat stress and provide evidence of potentially beneficial vascular alterations during isolated limb heat stress that are equivalent to those experienced during exposure to moderate levels of whole body hyperthermia. PMID:26823344

  19. Effects of humid heat exposure in later sleep segments on sleep stages and body temperature in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto-Mizuno, Kazue; Tsuzuki, Kazuyo; Mizuno, Koh

    2005-03-01

    This study sought to investigate the effects of humid heat exposure in later sleep segments on sleep stages and body temperature in humans. The subjects were eight healthy males, from whom informed consent had been obtained. The experiments were carried out under three different sets of conditions: a control climate [air temperature (Ta)=26°C, relative humidity (RH)=50%] (C); a humid heat climate (Ta=32°C, RH=80%) (H); and a humid heat exposure in later sleep segments (C for the first 3 h 45 min, followed by a 30-min transition to H, which was then maintained for the last 3 h 45 min) (C H). Electroencephalogram, EOG, and mental electromyogram, rectal temperature (Tre), and skin temperature (Tsk) were continuously measured. The total amount of wakefulness was significantly increased in H compared to C H or C. Compared to C, wakefulness in C H and H was significantly increased during later sleep segments. Tre and mean Tsk were significantly higher in H than in C H or C. In C H, Tsk and Tre increased to levels equal to those observed in H after Ta and RH increase. Whole body sweat loss was significantly lower in C H and C than in H. These results suggest that humid heat exposure in the later sleep segment reduces thermal load as compared to full-night humid heat exposure. In daily life, the use of air conditioning in the initial sleep hours can protect sleep and thermoregulation.

  20. Oligonol supplementation affects leukocyte and immune cell counts after heat loading in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Beom; Shin, Young Oh

    2014-06-24

    Oligonol is a low-molecular-weight form of polyphenol and has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, making it a potential promoter of immunity. This study investigates the effects of oligonol supplementation on leukocyte and immune cell counts after heat loading in 19 healthy male volunteers. The participants took a daily dose of 200 mg oligonol or a placebo for 1 week. After a 2-week washout period, the subjects were switched to the other study arm. After each supplement, half-body immersion into hot water was made, and blood was collected. Then, complete and differential blood counts were performed. Flow cytometry was used to enumerate and phenotype lymphocyte subsets. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in blood samples were analyzed. Lymphocyte subpopulation variables included counts of total T cells, B cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. Oligonol intake attenuated elevations in IL-1β (an 11.1-fold change vs. a 13.9-fold change immediately after heating; a 12.0-fold change vs. a 12.6-fold change 1h after heating) and IL-6 (an 8.6-fold change vs. a 9.9-fold change immediately after heating; a 9.1-fold change vs. a 10.5-fold change 1h after heating) immediately and 1 h after heating in comparison to those in the placebo group. Oligonol supplementation led to significantly higher numbers of leukocytes (a 30.0% change vs. a 21.5% change immediately after heating; a 13.5% change vs. a 3.5% change 1h after heating) and lymphocytes (a 47.3% change vs. a 39.3% change immediately after heating; a 19.08% change vs. a 2.1% change 1h after heating) relative to those in the placebo group. Oligonol intake led to larger increases in T cells, B cells, and NK cells at rest (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, and p < 0.001, respectively) and immediately after heating (p < 0.001) in comparison to those in the placebo group. In addition, levels of T cells (p < 0.001) and B cells (p < 0.001) were significantly higher 1 h after heating in comparison to those in the

  1. Similar nociceptive afferents mediate psychophysical and electrophysiological responses to heat stimulation of glabrous and hairy skin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Iannetti, G D; Zambreanu, L; Tracey, I

    2006-01-01

    The ability to perceive and withdraw rapidly from noxious environmental stimuli is crucial for survival. When heat stimuli are applied to primate hairy skin, first pain sensation is mediated by type-II A-fibre nociceptors (II-AMHs). In contrast, the reported absence of first pain and II-AMH microneurographical responses when heat stimuli are applied to the hand palm has led to the notion that II-AMHs are lacking in this primate glabrous skin. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of hairy and glabrous skin stimulation on neural transmission of nociceptive inputs elicited by different kinds of thermal heating. We recorded psychophysical and EEG brain responses to radiant (laser-evoked potentials, LEPs) and contact heat stimuli (contact heat-evoked potentials, CHEPs) delivered to the dorsum and the palm of the hand in normal volunteers. Brain responses were analysed at a single-trial level, using an automated approach based on multiple linear regression. Laser stimulation of hairy and glabrous skin at the same energy elicited remarkably similar psychophysical ratings and LEPs. This finding provides strong evidence that first pain to heat does exist in glabrous skin, and suggests that similar nociceptive afferents, with the physiological properties of II-AMHs, mediate first pain to heat stimulation of glabrous and hairy skin in humans. In contrast, when contact heat stimuli were employed, a significantly higher nominal temperature had to be applied to glabrous skin in order to achieve psychophysical ratings similar to those obtained following hairy skin stimulation, and CHEPs following glabrous skin stimulation had significantly longer latencies (N2 wave, +25%; P2 wave, +24%) and smaller amplitudes (N2 wave, −40%; P2 wave, −44%) than CHEPs following hairy skin stimulation. Irrespective of the stimulated territory, CHEPs always had significantly longer latencies (hairy skin N2 wave, +75%; P2 wave, +56%) and smaller amplitudes (hairy skin N2 wave, −42%; P

  2. Monounsaturated fatty acid ether oligomers formed during heating of virgin olive oil show agglutination activity against human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Patrikios, Ioannis S; Mavromoustakos, Thomas M

    2014-01-29

    The present work focuses on the characterization of molecules formed when virgin olive oil is heated at 130 °C for 24 h open in air, which are found to be strong agglutinins. The hemagglutinating activity of the newly formed molecule isolated from the heated virgin olive oil sample was estimated against human red blood cells (RBCs). Dimers and polymers (high molecular weight molecules) were identified through thin layer chromatography (TLC) of the oil mixture. (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) were the methods used for structural characterization. Among others, oligomerization of at least two monounsaturated fatty acids (FA) by an ether linkage between the hydrocarbon chains is involved. Light microscopy was used to characterize and visualize the agglutination process. Agglutination without fusion or lysis was observed. It was concluded that the heating of virgin olive oil open in air, among other effects, produces oligomerization as well as polymerization of unsaturated FA, possibly of monohydroxy, monounsaturated FA that is associated with strong hemagglutinating activity against human RBCs. The nutritional value and the effects on human health of such oligomers are not discussed in the literature and remain to be investigated. PMID:24410166

  3. Baroreflex modulation of sympathetic nerve activity to muscle in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    To identify whether whole body heating alters arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), MSNA and beat-by-beat arterial blood pressure were recorded in seven healthy subjects during acute hypotensive and hypertensive stimuli in both normothermic and heat stress conditions. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature (P < 0.01), MSNA (P < 0.01), heart rate (P < 0.01), and skin blood flow (P < 0.001), whereas mean arterial blood pressure did not change significantly (P > 0.05). During both normothermic and heat stress conditions, MSNA increased and then decreased significantly when blood pressure was lowered and then raised via intravenous bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine HCl, respectively. The slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure during heat stress (-128.3 +/- 13.9 U x beats(-1) x mmHg(-1)) was similar (P = 0.31) with normothermia (-140.6 +/- 21.1 U x beats(-1) x mmHg(-1)). Moreover, no significant change in the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure was observed. These data suggest that arterial baroreflex modulation of MSNA and heart rate are not altered by whole body heating, with the exception of an upward shift of these baroreflex curves to accommodate changes in these variables that occur with whole body heating.

  4. Adaptations and mechanisms of human heat acclimation: Applications for competitive athletes and sports.

    PubMed

    Périard, J D; Racinais, S; Sawka, M N

    2015-06-01

    Exercise heat acclimation induces physiological adaptations that improve thermoregulation, attenuate physiological strain, reduce the risk of serious heat illness, and improve aerobic performance in warm-hot environments and potentially in temperate environments. The adaptations include improved sweating, improved skin blood flow, lowered body temperatures, reduced cardiovascular strain, improved fluid balance, altered metabolism, and enhanced cellular protection. The magnitudes of adaptations are determined by the intensity, duration, frequency, and number of heat exposures, as well as the environmental conditions (i.e., dry or humid heat). Evidence is emerging that controlled hyperthermia regimens where a target core temperature is maintained, enable more rapid and complete adaptations relative to the traditional constant work rate exercise heat acclimation regimens. Furthermore, inducing heat acclimation outdoors in a natural field setting may provide more specific adaptations based on direct exposure to the exact environmental and exercise conditions to be encountered during competition. This review initially examines the physiological adaptations associated with heat acclimation induction regimens, and subsequently emphasizes their application to competitive athletes and sports. PMID:25943654

  5. Adaptations and mechanisms of human heat acclimation: Applications for competitive athletes and sports.

    PubMed

    Périard, J D; Racinais, S; Sawka, M N

    2015-06-01

    Exercise heat acclimation induces physiological adaptations that improve thermoregulation, attenuate physiological strain, reduce the risk of serious heat illness, and improve aerobic performance in warm-hot environments and potentially in temperate environments. The adaptations include improved sweating, improved skin blood flow, lowered body temperatures, reduced cardiovascular strain, improved fluid balance, altered metabolism, and enhanced cellular protection. The magnitudes of adaptations are determined by the intensity, duration, frequency, and number of heat exposures, as well as the environmental conditions (i.e., dry or humid heat). Evidence is emerging that controlled hyperthermia regimens where a target core temperature is maintained, enable more rapid and complete adaptations relative to the traditional constant work rate exercise heat acclimation regimens. Furthermore, inducing heat acclimation outdoors in a natural field setting may provide more specific adaptations based on direct exposure to the exact environmental and exercise conditions to be encountered during competition. This review initially examines the physiological adaptations associated with heat acclimation induction regimens, and subsequently emphasizes their application to competitive athletes and sports.

  6. Heat treatment for endocrinological investigations on plasma positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, M R; Knapp, M L; Ghany, H C; Mayne, P D

    1987-01-01

    The effects of heat treatment of serum samples on the hormone analyses used in this laboratory were studied. Total T4, testosterone, progesterone, and growth hormone were not systematically affected by heat treatment over the whole range of analyte concentrations studied; for thyroid stimulating hormone, no effect was noted on serum samples with concentrations of less than 10 mU/l. Significant changes occurred in total T3, cortisol, follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and prolactin. It is suggested that with appropriate preliminary study, heat treated plasma samples may be used in endocrinological investigations without adversely affecting the diagnostic validity of the results. PMID:3108328

  7. Assessment of genetic and functional diversity of phosphate solubilizing fluorescent pseudomonads isolated from rhizospheric soil

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Popavath Ravindra; Raman, Gurusamy; Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Sakthivel, Natarajan

    2008-01-01

    Background Phosphorus is an essential macronutrient for the growth of plants. However, in most soils a large portion of phosphorus becomes insoluble and therefore, unavailable to plants. Knowledge on biodiversity of phosphate-solubilizing fluorescent pseudomonads is essential to understand their ecological role and their utilization in sustainable agriculture. Results Of 443 fluorescent pseudomonad strains tested, 80 strains (18%) showed positive for the solubilization of tri-calcium phosphate (Ca3(PO4)2) by the formation of visible dissolution halos on Pikovskaya's agar. These phosphate solubilizing strains showed high variability in utilizing various carbon sources. Numerical taxonomy of the phosphate solubilizing strains based on their carbon source utilization profiles resulted into three major phenons at a 0.76 similarity coefficient level. Genotypic analyses of strains by BOX (bacterial repetitive BOX element)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) resulted into three distinct genomic clusters and 26 distinct BOX profiles at a 80% similarity level. On the basis of phenotypic characterization and 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analyses strains were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. mosselii, P. monteilii, P. plecoglossicida, P. putida, P. fulva and P. fluorescens. These phosphate solubilizing strains also showed the production of plant growth promoting enzymes, hormones and exhibited antagonism against phytopathogenic fungi that attack on various crops. Gene specific primers have identified the putative antibiotic producing strains. These putative strains were grown in fermentation media and production of antibiotics was confirmed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Conclusion Present study revealed a high degree of functional and genetic diversity among the phosphate solubilizing fluorescent pseudomonad bacteria. Due to their innate potential of producing an array of plant growth promoting enzymes, hormones and

  8. Properties of bovine erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase solubilized by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C1.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, R; Ikezawa, H

    1987-10-01

    The properties of acetylcholinesterase solubilized from bovine erythrocyte membrane by phosphatidylinositol (PI)-specific phospholipase C of Bacillus thuringiensis or with a detergent, Lubrol-PX, were studied. The activity of Lubrol-PX-solubilized acetylcholinesterase was broadly distributed in the fractions having Ve/Vo = 1.0-2.0 in gel filtration on a Sepharose 6B column. The intermediary fractions (Ve/Vo = 1.3-1.7) were collected as "the middle active Sepharose 6B eluate" and characterized on the basis of enzymology and protein chemistry. When this eluate was treated with PI-specific phospholipase C, the major activity peak was obtained in the later fractions with Ve/Vo = 1.75-2.0 on the same column chromatography. Lubrol-solubilized and phospholipase C-treated acetylcholinesterase preparations were different in the thermostability, the elution profiles of chromatography on Mono Q, butyl-Toyopearl and phenyl-Sepharose columns, and the affinity to phospholipid micelles. On treatment with PI-specific phospholipase C, Lubrol-solubilized acetylcholinesterase became more thermostable. The phospholipase C-treated enzyme was eluted at lower NaCl concentration from the Mono Q column than the Lubrol-solubilized enzyme. The most important difference was observed in the hydrophobicity of these two enzyme preparations. The Lubrol-solubilized enzyme shows high affinity to phospholipid micelles and hydrophobic adsorbents such as butyl-Toyopearl and phenyl-Sepharose. However, this hydrophobicity was lost when acetylcholinesterase was solubilized from bovine erythrocyte membrane by PI-specific phospholipase C. The presence of myo-inositol was confirmed in the purified preparation of acetylcholinesterase by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Solubilization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Single and Binary Mixed Rhamnolipid-Sophorolipid Biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Song, Dandan; Liang, Shengkang; Yan, Lele; Shang, Yujun; Wang, Xiuli

    2016-07-01

    Biosurfactants are promising additives for surfactant enhanced remediation (SER) technologies due to their low toxicity and high biodegradability. To develop green and efficient additives for SER, the aqueous solubility enhancements of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) by rhamnolipid (RL) and sophorolipid (SL) biosurfactants were investigated in single and binary mixed systems. The solubilization capacities were quantified in terms of the solubility enhancement factor, molar solubilization ratio (MSR), and micelle-water partition coefficient (). Rughbin's model was applied to evaluate the interaction parameters (β) in the mixed RL-SL micelles. The solubility of the PAHs increased linearly with the glycolipid concentration above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) in both single and mixed systems. Binary RL-SL mixtures exhibited greater solubilization than individual glycolipids. At a SL molar fraction of 0.7 to 0.8, the solubilization capacity was the greatest, and the MSR and reached their maximum values, and β values became positive. These results suggest that the two biosurfactants act synergistically to increase the solubility of the PAHs. The solubilization capacity of the RL-SL mixtures increased with increasing temperature and decreased with increasing salinity. The aqueous solubility of phenanthrene reached a maximum value at pH of 5.5. Moreover, the mixed RL-SL systems exhibited a strong ability to solubilize PAHs, even in the presence of heavy metal ions. These mixed biosurfactant systems have the potential to improve the performance of SER technologies using biosurfactants to solubilize hydrophobic organic contaminants by decreasing the applied biosurfactant concentration, which reduces the costs of remediation. PMID:27380091

  10. The effects of extreme heat on human mortality and morbidity in Australia: implications for public health.

    PubMed

    Bi, Peng; Williams, Susan; Loughnan, Margaret; Lloyd, Glenis; Hansen, Alana; Kjellstrom, Tord; Dear, Keith; Saniotis, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    Most regions of Australia are exposed to hot summers and regular extreme heat events; and numerous studies have associated high ambient temperatures with adverse health outcomes in Australian cities. Extreme environmental heat can trigger the onset of acute conditions, including heat stroke and dehydration, as well as exacerbate a range of underlying illnesses. Consequently, in the absence of adaptation, the associated mortality and morbidity are expected to increase in a warming climate, particularly within the vulnerable populations of the elderly, children, those with chronic diseases, and people engaged in physical labour in noncooled environments. There is a need for further research to address the evidence needs of public health agencies in Australia. Building resilience to extreme heat events, especially for the most vulnerable groups, is a priority. Public health professionals and executives need to be aware of the very real and urgent need to act now.

  11. A Multi-City Analysis of the Natural and Human Drivers of the Urban Heat Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, William Frederick

    The world's population is increasingly moving to cities, with a present day urban population of over 3.6 billion that is expected to nearly double by 2050. One of the key features of the urban environment is an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding rural areas, called the urban heat island, which can have negative impacts on the health and wellbeing of urban dwellers. This study uses a novel approach of analyzing a large number of cities from around the world to investigate the similarities and differences in urban environments among cities to explore the behavior and drivers of the urban heat island. This methodology reveals two new conditions that increase the magnitude of the heat island---low dewpoint temperature and high air temperature. Many of the cities show increases in the magnitude of the heat island during hot or dry periods of 1.0°C or more during the daytime and 2.0°C at night relative to cool or humid periods. The heat wave results are of particular note due to the added stress on urban residents during periods when the population is already at risk. For cities in temperate climate regimes, differences among cities in vegetative cover or impervious surface area leads to increases in urban temperatures of up to 1.0°C during the summer, while cities with high pollution can see reductions in the heat island by 1.5°C. Cities in tropical or Mediterranean climates have the strongest heat islands during the dry season indicating that urban infrastructure is the key driver in these cities. These results indicate that mitigation of the urban heat island is possible by altering the urban landscape through changes in the urban vegetation and the structure of the built environment.

  12. Inhibition of c-Kit signaling is associated with reduced heat and cold pain sensitivity in humans.

    PubMed

    Ceko, Marta; Milenkovic, Nevena; le Coutre, Philipp; Westermann, Jörg; Lewin, Gary R

    2014-07-01

    The tyrosine kinase receptor c-Kit is critically involved in the modulation of nociceptive sensitivity in mice. Ablation of the c-Kit gene results in hyposensitivity to thermal pain, whereas activation of c-Kit produces hypersensitivity to noxious heat, without altering sensitivity to innocuous mechanical stimuli. In this study, we investigated the role of c-Kit signaling in human pain perception. We hypothesized that subjects treated with Imatinib or Nilotinib, potent inhibitors of tyrosine kinases including c-Kit but also Abl1, PDFGFRα, and PDFGFRβ, that are used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), would experience changes in thermal pain sensitivity. We examined 31 asymptomatic CML patients (14 male and 17 female) receiving Imatinib/Nilotinib treatment and compared them to 39 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (12 male and 27 female). We used cutaneous heat and cold stimulation to test normal and noxious thermal sensitivity, and a grating orientation task to assess tactile acuity. Thermal pain thresholds were significantly increased in the Imatinib/Nilotinib-treated group, whereas innocuous thermal and tactile thresholds were unchanged compared to those in the control group. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the biological effects of c-Kit inhibition are comparable in mice and humans in that c-Kit activity is required to regulate thermal pain sensitivity but does not affect innocuous thermal and mechanical sensation. The effect on experimental heat pain observed in our study is comparable to those of several common analgesics; thus modulation of the c-Kit pathway can be used to specifically modulate noxious heat and cold sensitivity in humans.

  13. Cause-Specific Human Mortality by Building Climate Zone during the Great California Heat Wave of July 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnly, M. E.; Joe, L.; Smorodinsky, S.; Hoshiko, S.; Smith, D.

    2011-12-01

    California has suffered a number of heat waves (HWs) which have resulted in considerable human mortality. With climate change, HWs are predicted to increase, particularly in areas where HWs have historically occurred. The "Great" California HW of July 2006 was unprecedented in duration and occurred statewide, lasting ten days in much of the state and longer in some areas. Previous analysis has shown that an excess of all-cause human mortality occurred statewide and that the excess was higher in the Northern part of the state. We calculated the ratio of deaths during the heat wave period (July 15 - Aug 1, 2006) to deaths in reference days from the non-heat wave period in the same summer by cause of death. We have further calculated these cause-specific ratios by California's sixteen building climate zones. These zones were outlined in 1982 based on climate, geophysical features, and estimated energy consumption. We will discuss whether differences in mortality ratios by these climate zones may be related to zonal differences in HW intensity or duration, air conditioning use, building insulation requirements, or other factors. Identifying resilient (low health impact) and vulnerable zones (high health impacts) and factors that may mitigate the health impact will ultimately inform climate change mitigation and adaptation policies.

  14. Oral administration of γ-aminobutyric acid affects heat production in a hot environment in resting humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Central administration of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) induces lower body temperature in animals in hot ambient air. However, it is still unknown whether oral GABA administration affects temperature regulation at rest in a hot environment in humans. Therefore, in the present study, we specifically hypothesized that systemic administration of GABA in humans would induce hypothermia in a hot environment and that this response would be observed in association with decreased heat production. Methods Eight male participants drank a 200-ml sports drink with 1 g of GABA (trial G) or without GABA (trial C), then rested for 30 minutes in a sitting position in a hot environment (ambient air temperature 33°C, relative humidity 50%). Results We found that changes in esophageal temperature from before drinking the sports drink were lower in trial G than in trial C (-0.046 ± 0.079°C vs 0.001 ± 0.063°C; P < 0.05), with lower heat production calculated by oxygen consumption (41 ± 5 W/m2 vs 47 ± 8 W/m2; P < 0.05). Conclusions In this study, we have demonstrated that a single oral administration of GABA induced a larger decrease in body core temperature compared to a control condition during rest in a hot environment and that this response was concomitant with a decrease in total heat production. PMID:22738209

  15. Effects of acupuncture and heating on blood volume and oxygen saturation of human Achilles tendon in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Takayama, Miho; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro; Mizoguchi, Hideyuki; Takakura, Nobuari

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acupuncture (dry needling) and heating (application of hot pack) treatments on the blood volume and oxygen saturation of the human Achilles tendon in vivo. Nine healthy males participated in this study. During the treatments (acupuncture and heating; both 10 min) and recovery period (30 min), the blood volume and oxygen saturation of the Achilles tendon were measured using red laser lights. During needle insertion, the blood volume and oxygen saturation of the tendon increased significantly from the pre-treatment level and these values remained high throughout the 30-min recovery period. During heating treatment, the blood volume and oxygen saturation of the tendon also increased significantly. Although the increased blood volume was not maintained after removal of the hot pack, the oxygen saturation remained significantly elevated throughout the 30-min recovery period. These results suggested that acupuncture and heating treatments enhanced the blood flow in the tendon. The long-lasting increase, especially with acupuncture treatment, in the blood supply to the tendon implies that these treatments may have therapeutic effects on injured tendons.

  16. Ectoenzymes of the kidney microvillar membrane. Differential solubilization by detergents can predict a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol membrane anchor.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, N M; Turner, A J

    1988-01-01

    The pattern of solubilization of nine kidney microvillar ectoenzymes by a range of detergents distinguished two classes of membrane proteins: those released from the membrane by bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C and those not so released. The latter group of transmembrane proteins were solubilized efficiently (greater than 80%) by all the detergents examined. In contrast, proteins released by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C were solubilized effectively only by octyl glucoside, 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulphonate and sodium deoxycholate. Octyl glucoside solubilized the amphipathic forms of the ectoenzymes examined, suggesting that this may be a useful detergent in the purification of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored ectoenzymes. PMID:2839148

  17. Solubilization of octane in electrostatically-formed surfactant-polymer complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zeeb, Benjamin; Salminen, Hanna; Feng, Fengqin; Weiss, Jochen

    2014-03-01

    Polymers can be used to modulate the stability and functionality of surfactant micelles. The purpose of this study was to investigate the solubilization of an octane oil-in-water emulsion in mixtures of an anionic polymer (carboxymethyl cellulose) and anionic sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS), nonionic polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80) and cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant micelles using dynamic light scattering, microelectrophoresis and turbidity measurements. The results showed that the addition of anionic carboxymethyl cellulose accelerated octane solubilization in cationic CTAB and CTAB-Tween 80 micelles, but did not affect the solubilization behaviors of micelles that were nonionic and anionic. The surfactant-polymer interactions were also studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to characterize different physiochemical interaction regions depending on surfactant concentration in surfactant-polymer systems. Upon octane solubilization in CTAB-carboxymethyl cellulose mixtures, shape transitions of polymer-micelle complexes may have taken place that altered light scattering behavior. Based on these results, we suggest a mechanism for oil solubilization in electrostatically-formed surfactant-polymer complexes.

  18. Solubilization of two organic dyes by cationic ester-containing gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Tehrani-Bagha, A R; Singh, R G; Holmberg, K

    2012-06-15

    Solubilization of two different types of organic dyes, Quinizarin with an anthraquinone structure and Sudan I with an azo structure, has been studied in aqueous solutions of a series of cationic gemini surfactants and of a conventional monomeric cationic surfactant, dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). Surfactant concentrations both above and below the critical micelle concentration were used. The concentration of solubilized dye at equilibrium was determined from the absorbance of the solution at λ(max) with the aid of a calibration curve. The solubilization power of the gemini surfactants was higher than that of DTAB and increased with increasing alkyl chain length. An increase in length of the spacer unit resulted in increased solubilization power while a hydroxyl group in the spacer did not have much effect. Ester bonds in the alkyl chains reduced the solubilization power with respect to both dyes. A comparison between the absorbance spectra of the dyes in micellar solution with spectra in a range of solvents of different polarity indicated that the dye is situated in a relatively polar environment. One may therefore assume that the dye is located just below the head group region of the micelle. Attractive π-cation interactions may play a role for orienting the dye to the outer region of the micelle.

  19. Solubilization of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds into n-Decyltrimethylammonium Perfluorocarboxylate Micelles.

    PubMed

    Yoshida; Moroi

    2000-12-01

    Solubilization of polycyclic aromatic compounds in aqueous dilute solutions of three cationic amphiphiles was studied. The maximum additive concentrations (MACs) of the aromatic compounds were constant below their critical micelle concentrations (cmcs) and monotonically increased above the cmcs. The first stepwise association constants (K(1)) between a solubilizate monomer and a vacant micelle were evaluated from the MACs for the solubilizates using the mass action model for solubilization into micelles in the dilute solution. The standard Gibbs energy changes of solubilization (DeltaG degrees ) were calculated from K(1), and the enthalpy and entropy changes of solubilization were estimated from the temperature dependence. MACs of each surfactant at the same surfactant concentration above the cmc were different depending on the cmc, but there was little difference in the DeltaG degrees values. Some differences appeared in the enthalpy and entropy values in accordance with their micellar size or degrees of counterion binding to micelles. DeltaG degrees for solubilization decreased linearly with carbon number of aromatic solubilizate for each micellar solution. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  20. A novel solubilization technique for poorly soluble drugs through the integration of nanocrystal and cocrystal technologies.

    PubMed

    Karashima, Masatoshi; Kimoto, Kouya; Yamamoto, Katsuhiko; Kojima, Takashi; Ikeda, Yukihiro

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a novel solubilization technique consisting of a nano-cocrystal suspension by integrating cocrystal and nanocrystal formulation technologies to maximize solubilization over current solubilizing technologies. Monodisperse carbamazepine-saccharin, indomethacin-saccharin, and furosemide-caffeine nano-cocrystal suspensions, as well as a furosemide-cytosine nano-salt suspension, were successfully prepared with particle sizes of less than 300nm by wet milling with the stabilizers hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Interestingly, the properties of resultant nano-cocrystal suspensions were dramatically changed depending on the physicochemical and structural properties of the cocrystals. In the formulation optimization, the concentration and ratio of the stabilizers also influenced the zeta potentials and particles sizes of the resultant nano-cocrystal suspensions. Raman spectroscopic analysis revealed that the crystalline structures of the cocrystals were maintained in the nanosuspensions, and were physically stable for at least one month. Furthermore, their dissolution profiles were significantly improved over current solubilization-enabling technologies, nanocrystals, and cocrystals. In the present study, we demonstrated that nano-cocrystal formulations can be a new promising option for solubilization techniques to improve the absorption of poorly soluble drugs, and can expand the development potential of poorly soluble candidates in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:27393561

  1. Phosphate solubilizing ability of Emericella nidulans strain V1 isolated from vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Satya Sunder; Barman, Soma; Ghosh, Ranjan; Duary, Raj Kumar; Goswami, Linee; Mandal, Narayan C

    2013-10-01

    Phosphorus is one of the key factors that regulate soil fertility. Its deficiencies in soil are largely replenished by chemical fertilizers. The present study was aimed to isolate efficient phosphate solubilizing fungal strains from Eisenia fetida vermicompost. Out of total 30 fungal strains the most efficient phosphate solubilizing one was Emericella (Aspergillus) nidulans V1 (MTCC 11044), identified by custom sequencing of beta-tubulin gene and BLAST analysis. This strain solubilized 13 to 36% phosphate from four different rock phosphates. After three days of incubation of isolated culture with black Mussorie phosphate rock, the highest percentage of phosphate solubilization was 35.5 +/- 1.01 with a pH drop of 4.2 +/- 0.09. Kinetics of solubilization and acid production showed a linear relationship until day five of incubation. Interestingly, from zero to tenth day of incubation, solubility of soil phosphate increased gradually from 4.31 +/- 1.57 to 13.65 +/- 1.82 (mg kg(-1)) recording a maximum of 21.23 +/- 0.54 on day 45 in respect of the V1 isolate. Further, enhanced phosphorus uptake by Phaseolus plants with significant pod yield due to soil inoculation of Emericella nidulans V1 (MTCC 11044), demonstrated its prospect as an effective biofertilizer for plant growth.

  2. Phosphorus solubilization and plant growth enhancement by arsenic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Piyasa; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-09-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient, which is limited in most soils. The P solubilization and growth enhancement ability of seven arsenic-resistant bacteria (ARB), which were isolated from arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata, was investigated. Siderophore-producing ARB (PG4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 12 and 16) were effective in solubilizing P from inorganic minerals FePO4 and phosphate rock, and organic phytate. To reduce bacterial P uptake we used filter-sterilized Hoagland medium containing siderophores or phytase produced by PG12 or PG6 to grow tomato plants supplied with FePO4 or phytate. To confirm that siderophores were responsible for P release, we compared the mutants of siderophore-producing bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf5 (PchA) impaired in siderophore production with the wild type and test strains. After 7d of growth, mutant PchA solubilized 10-times less P than strain PG12, which increased tomato root biomass by 1.7 times. For phytate solubilization by PG6, tomato shoot biomass increased by 44% than control bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis. P solubilization by ARB from P. vittata may be useful in enhancing plant growth and nutrition in other crop plants. PMID:25880602

  3. Phosphorus solubilization and plant growth enhancement by arsenic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Piyasa; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-09-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient, which is limited in most soils. The P solubilization and growth enhancement ability of seven arsenic-resistant bacteria (ARB), which were isolated from arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata, was investigated. Siderophore-producing ARB (PG4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 12 and 16) were effective in solubilizing P from inorganic minerals FePO4 and phosphate rock, and organic phytate. To reduce bacterial P uptake we used filter-sterilized Hoagland medium containing siderophores or phytase produced by PG12 or PG6 to grow tomato plants supplied with FePO4 or phytate. To confirm that siderophores were responsible for P release, we compared the mutants of siderophore-producing bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf5 (PchA) impaired in siderophore production with the wild type and test strains. After 7d of growth, mutant PchA solubilized 10-times less P than strain PG12, which increased tomato root biomass by 1.7 times. For phytate solubilization by PG6, tomato shoot biomass increased by 44% than control bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis. P solubilization by ARB from P. vittata may be useful in enhancing plant growth and nutrition in other crop plants.

  4. Protein recovery from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli using mild solubilization process.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anupam; Upadhyay, Vaibhav; Upadhyay, Arun Kumar; Singh, Surinder Mohan; Panda, Amulya Kumar

    2015-03-25

    Formation of inclusion bodies in bacterial hosts poses a major challenge for large scale recovery of bioactive proteins. The process of obtaining bioactive protein from inclusion bodies is labor intensive and the yields of recombinant protein are often low. Here we review the developments in the field that are targeted at improving the yield, as well as quality of the recombinant protein by optimizing the individual steps of the process, especially solubilization of the inclusion bodies and refolding of the solubilized protein. Mild solubilization methods have been discussed which are based on the understanding of the fact that protein molecules in inclusion body aggregates have native-like structure. These methods solubilize the inclusion body aggregates while preserving the native-like protein structure. Subsequent protein refolding and purification results in high recovery of bioactive protein. Other parameters which influence the overall recovery of bioactive protein from inclusion bodies have also been discussed. A schematic model describing the utility of mild solubilization methods for high throughput recovery of bioactive protein has also been presented.

  5. Solubilization of n-alkylbenzenes into gemini surfactant micelles in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Hiromichi; Kojima, Yui; Moroi, Yoshikiyo; Shibata, Osamu

    2014-05-27

    Solubilization of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, n-propylbenzene, n-butylbenzene, and n-pentylbenzene into micelles of decanediyl-1-10-bis(dimethyltetradecylammonium bromide) (14-10-14,2Br(-)) has been investigated in the temperature range from 288.2 to 308.2 K. The equilibrium concentrations of all the solubilizates are determined spectrophotometrically. The concentration of the solubilizates remains constant below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) and increases linearly with an increase in 14-10-14,2Br(-) concentration above the cmc. Compared to the mother micelle, the solubilized micelles indicate much larger hydrodynamic diameters, which are determined by dynamic light scattering. Therefore, the Gibbs energy change for the solubilization of n-alkylbenzenes has been evaluated by the partitioning of the solubilizates between the aqueous and micellar phases. Furthermore, the enthalpy and entropy changes for the solubilization could be calculated from temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy change. From the thermodynamic parameters, it is found that the solubilization for the present system is entropy-driven and that the location of the solubilizates moves into the inner core of the micelle with an elongation of their alkyl chains. The movement on the location is also supported by the results of absorption spectra, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, and two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (2-D NOESY). PMID:24802668

  6. Solvent extraction for separating micellar-solubilized contaminants and anionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H; Sabatini, D A; Kibbey, T C

    2001-07-15

    Decontamination of contaminant-laden surfactant solutions is critical to successful implementation of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR). Solvent extraction was studied for removing micellar-solubilized contaminants having low equivalent alkyl carbon numbers (EACNs) from surfactant solutions. Factors influencing the solvent extraction of micellar-solubilized contaminant were studied, including surfactant concentration, solution salinity, solvent solubilization, and solvent/solution volumetric ratio. A model was developed to quantify the impacts of these factors on contaminant removal. The good agreement between experimental results and model predictions corroborates assumptions made in the model development. From these results, it is concluded that extracting solvents must have much higher EACNs than that of the contaminant to reduce the micellar solubilization of the solvents, which can significantly reduce contaminant removal efficiency. However, the highest EACN solvent is not necessarily the best one for contaminant removal due to other constraints (e.g., molecular weight and viscosity). Increasing the total surfactant concentration or salinity of an anionic surfactant solution increases its contaminant solubilization capacity but reduces the contaminant removal efficiency by solvent extraction. Continuous column extraction operated at a low column surface loading rate allowed contaminant partitioning to approach equilibrium conditions, and multistage column extraction was able to improve the contaminant removal efficiency while minimizing solvent requirement.

  7. Distinct Skeletal Muscle Gene Regulation from Active Contraction, Passive Vibration, and Whole Body Heat Stress in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Michael A.; Kimball, Amy L.; McHenry, Colleen L.; Suneja, Manish; Yen, Chu-Ling; Sharma, Arpit; Shields, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle exercise regulates several important metabolic genes in humans. We know little about the effects of environmental stress (heat) and mechanical stress (vibration) on skeletal muscle. Passive mechanical stress or systemic heat stress are often used in combination with many active exercise programs. We designed a method to deliver a vibration stress and systemic heat stress to compare the effects with active skeletal muscle contraction. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine whether active mechanical stress (muscle contraction), passive mechanical stress (vibration), or systemic whole body heat stress regulates key gene signatures associated with muscle metabolism, hypertrophy/atrophy, and inflammation/repair. Methods: Eleven subjects, six able-bodied and five with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) participated in the study. The six able-bodied subjects sat in a heat stress chamber for 30 minutes. Five subjects with SCI received a single dose of limb-segment vibration or a dose of repetitive electrically induced muscle contractions. Three hours after the completion of each stress, we performed a muscle biopsy (vastus lateralis or soleus) to analyze mRNA gene expression. Results: We discovered repetitive active muscle contractions up regulated metabolic transcription factors NR4A3 (12.45 fold), PGC-1α (5.46 fold), and ABRA (5.98 fold); and repressed MSTN (0.56 fold). Heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05); while vibration induced FOXK2 (2.36 fold change; p < 0.05). Vibration similarly caused a down regulation of MSTN (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05), but to a lesser extent than active muscle contraction. Vibration induced FOXK2 (p < 0.05) while heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold) and ANKRD1 genes (0.51 fold; p < 0.05). Conclusion: These findings support a distinct gene regulation in response to heat stress, vibration, and muscle contractions. Understanding these responses may assist in developing regenerative

  8. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates cutaneous vasodilation during local heating and is attenuated in middle-aged human skin.

    PubMed

    Bruning, Rebecca S; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Stanhewicz, Anna E; Smith, Caroline J; Berkowitz, Dan E; Kenney, W Larry; Holowatz, Lacy A

    2012-06-01

    Local skin heating is used to assess microvascular function in clinical populations because NO is required for full expression of the response; however, controversy exists as to the precise NO synthase (NOS) isoform producing NO. Human aging is associated with attenuated cutaneous vasodilation but little is known about the middle aged, an age cohort used for comparison with clinical populations. We hypothesized that endothelial NOS (eNOS) is the primary isoform mediating NO production during local heating, and eNOS-dependent vasodilation would be reduced in middle-aged skin. Vasodilation was induced by local heating (42°C) and during acetylcholine dose-response (ACh-DR: 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0, 100.0 mmol/l) protocols. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the skin of 24 men and women; age cohorts were 12 middle-aged (53 ± 1 yr) and 12 young (23 ± 1 yr). Sites served as control, nonselective NOS inhibited [N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)], inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibited (1400W), and neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibited (N(ω)-propyl-l-arginine). After full expression of the local heating response, l-NAME was perfused at all sites. Cutaneous vascular conductance was measured and normalized to maximum (%CVC(max): Nitropress). l-NAME reduced %CVCmax at baseline, all phases of the local heating response, and at all ACh concentrations compared with all other sites. iNOS inhibition reduced the initial peak (53 ± 2 vs. 60 ± 2%CVC(max); P < 0.001); however, there were no other differences between control, nNOS-, and iNOS-inhibited sites during the phases of local heating or ACh-DR. When age cohorts were compared, NO-dependent vasodilation during local heating (52 ± 6 vs. 68 ± 4%CVC(max); P = 0.013) and ACh perfusion (50 mmol/l: 83 ± 3 vs. 93 ± 2%CVC(max); 100 mmol/l: 83 ± 4 vs. 92 ± 3%CVC(max); both P = 0.03) were reduced in middle-aged skin. There were no differences in NOS isoform expression obtained from skin biopsy samples between groups (all

  9. Response of Urban Systems to Climate Change in Europe: Heat Stress Exposure and the Effect on Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Catherine; Thomas, Bart; Grommen, Mart

    2015-04-01

    Climate change is driven by global processes such as the global ocean circulation and its variability over time leading to changing weather patterns on regional scales as well as changes in the severity and occurrence of extreme events such as heavy rain- and windstorms, floods, drought, heat waves, etc. The summer 2003 European heat wave was the hottest summer on record in Europe over the past centuries leading to health crises in several countries like France and caused up to 70.000 excess deaths over four months in Central and Western Europe. The main risks induced by global climate change in urbanised areas are considered to be overheating and resulting health effects, increased exposure to flood events, increased damage losses from extreme weather conditions but also shortages in the provision of life-sustaining services. Moreover, the cities themselves create specific or inherent risks and urban adaptation is often very demanding. As most of Europe's inhabitants live in cities, it is of particular relevance to examine the impact of climate variability on urban areas and their populations. The present study focusses on the identification of heat stress variables related to human health and the extraction of this information by processing daily temperature statistics of local urban climate simulations over multiple timeframes of 20 years and three different European cities based on recent, near future and far future global climate predictions. The analyses have been conducted in the framework of the NACLIM FP7 project funded by the European Commission involving local stakeholders such as the cities of Antwerp (Belgium), Berlin (Germany) and Almada (Portugal) represented by different climate and urban characteristics. Apart from the urban-rural temperature increment (urban heat island effect), additional heat stress parameters such as the average number of heat wave days together with their duration and intensities have been covered during this research. In a

  10. Heat shock protein 72 expressing stress in sepsis: unbridgeable gap between animal and human studies--a hypothetical "comparative" study.

    PubMed

    Briassoulis, George; Briassouli, Efrossini; Fitrolaki, Diana-Michaela; Plati, Ioanna; Apostolou, Kleovoulos; Tavladaki, Theonymfi; Spanaki, Anna-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) exhibits a protective role during times of increased risk of pathogenic challenge and/or tissue damage. The aim of the study was to ascertain Hsp72 protective effect differences between animal and human studies in sepsis using a hypothetical "comparative study" model. Forty-one in vivo (56.1%), in vitro (17.1%), or combined (26.8%) animal and 14 in vivo (2) or in vitro (12) human Hsp72 studies (P < 0.0001) were enrolled in the analysis. Of the 14 human studies, 50% showed a protective Hsp72 effect compared to 95.8% protection shown in septic animal studies (P < 0.0001). Only human studies reported Hsp72-associated mortality (21.4%) or infection (7.1%) or reported results (14.3%) to be nonprotective (P < 0.001). In animal models, any Hsp72 induction method tried increased intracellular Hsp72 (100%), compared to 57.1% of human studies (P < 0.02), reduced proinflammatory cytokines (28/29), and enhanced survival (18/18). Animal studies show a clear Hsp72 protective effect in sepsis. Human studies are inconclusive, showing either protection or a possible relation to mortality and infections. This might be due to the fact that using evermore purified target cell populations in animal models, a lot of clinical information regarding the net response that occurs in sepsis is missing.

  11. Reflex control of the cutaneous circulation during passive body core heating in humans.

    PubMed

    Peters, J K; Nishiyasu, T; Mack, G W

    2000-05-01

    The impact of body core heating on the interaction between the cutaneous and central circulation during blood pressure challenges was examined in eight adults. Subjects were exposed to -10 to -90 mmHg lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in thermoneutral conditions and -10 to -60 mmHg LBNP during heat stress. We measured forearm vascular conductance (FVC; ml. min(-1). 100 ml(-1). mmHg(-1)) by plethysmography; cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) by laser-Doppler techniques; and central venous pressure, arterial blood pressure, and cardiac output by impedance cardiography. Heat stress increased FVC from 5.7 +/- 0.9 to 18.8 +/- 1.3 conductance units (CU) and CVC from 0.21 +/- 0.07 to 1.02 +/- 0.20 CU. The FVC-CVP relationship was linear over the entire range of LBNP and was shifted upward during heat stress with a slope increase from 0. 46 +/- 0.10 to 1.57 +/- 0.3 CU/mmHg CVP (P < 0.05). Resting CVP was lower during heat stress (6.3 +/- 0.6 vs. 7.7 +/- 0.6 mmHg; P < 0. 05) but fell to similar levels during LBNP as in normothermic conditions. Data analysis indicates an increased capacity, but not sensitivity, of peripheral baroreflex responses during heat stress. Laser-Doppler techniques detected thermoregulatory responses in the skin, but no significant change in CVC occurred during mild-to-moderate LBNP. Interestingly, very high levels of LBNP produced cutaneous vasodilation in some subjects.

  12. An ecological perspective on in-stream temperature: natural heat dynamics and mechanisms of human-caused thermal degradation.

    PubMed

    Poole, G C; Berman, C H

    2001-06-01

    While external factors (drivers) determine the net heat energy and water delivered to a stream, the internal structure of a stream determines how heat and water will be distributed within and exchanged among a stream's components (channel, alluvial aquifer, and riparian zone/floodplain). Therefore, the interaction between external drivers of stream temperature and the internal structure of integrated stream systems ultimately determines channel water temperature. This paper presents a synoptic, ecologically based discussion of the external drivers of stream temperature, the internal structures and processes that insulate and buffer stream temperatures, and the mechanisms of human influence on stream temperature. It provides a holistic perspective on the diversity of natural dynamics and human activities that influence stream temperature, including discussions of the role of the hyporheic zone. Key management implications include: (1) Protecting or reestablishing in-stream flow is critical for restoring desirable thermal regimes in streams. (2) Modified riparian vegetation, groundwater dynamics, and channel morphology are all important pathways of human influence on channel-water temperature and each pathway should be addressed in management plans. (3) Stream temperature research and monitoring programs will be jeopardized by an inaccurate or incomplete conceptual understanding of complex temporal and spatial stream temperature response patterns to anthropogenic influences. (4) Analyses of land-use history and the historical vs contemporary structure of the stream channel, riparian zone, and alluvial aquifer are important prerequisites for applying mechanistic temperature models to develop management prescriptions to meet in-channel temperature goals.

  13. Thermo-chemical pre-treatment to solubilize and improve anaerobic biodegradability of press mud.

    PubMed

    López González, Lisbet Mailin; Vervaeren, Han; Pereda Reyes, Ileana; Dumoulin, Ann; Romero Romero, Osvaldo; Dewulf, Jo

    2013-03-01

    Different pre-treatment severities by thermo-alkaline conditions (100°C, Ca(OH)2) on press mud were evaluated for different pre-treatment time and lime loading. COD solubilization and the methane yield enhancement were assessed. The biochemical methane potential was determined in batch assays under mesophilic conditions (37±1°C). The best pre-treatment resulted in a surplus of 72% of methane yield, adding 10g Ca(OH)2 100g(-1)TS(-1) for 1h. Pre-treatment also increased the COD solubilization, but the optimal severity for COD solubilization as determined by response surface methodology did not ensure the highest methane production. Inhibitory effects on anaerobic digestion were noticed when the severity was increased. These results demonstrate the relevance of thermo-alkaline pre-treatment severity in terms of both lime loading and pre-treatment time to obtain optimal anaerobic biodegradability of lignocellulosic biomass from press mud.

  14. EPS solubilization treatment by applying the biosurfactant rhamnolipid to reduce clogging in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Du, Mingpu; Xu, Dong; Trinh, Xuantung; Liu, Shuangyuan; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Junmei; Zhou, Qiaohong; Wu, Zhenbin

    2016-10-01

    Application of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) solubilization treatment with biosurfactant rhamnolipid (RL) to reduce clogging in constructed wetlands was first conducted in this study. The results showed significant improvement in the solubilization and dispersion of clogging matter following the treatment. And RL dosage of 0.09-0.15g/L altered microbial group make-up and had an overall positive effect on the growth of microorganisms. Moreover, RL was found to enhance EPS dissolution and dispersion, which was beneficial for the release of enzymes embedded in the EPS, and resulted in enhanced pollutant removal. The treatment had no apparent detrimental effect on wetland plants. Our results indicate that the optimum dosage of RL is 0.12g/L, and that the approach provides a promising and moderate option to reverse wetland clogging through RL-mediated solubilization treatment. PMID:27428300

  15. Concomitant rock phosphate dissolution and lead immobilization by phosphate solubilizing bacteria (Enterobacter sp.).

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hee; Bolan, Nanthi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2011-04-01

    This paper examines the potential value of phosphate solubilizing bacteria (Enterobacter cloacae) in the dissolution of rock phosphate (RP) and subsequent immobilization of lead (Pb) in both bacterial growth medium and soils. Enterobacter sp. showed resistance to Pb and the bacterium solubilized 17.5% of RP in the growth medium. Enterobacter sp. did not enhance Pb immobilization in solution because of acidification of bacterial medium, thereby inhibiting the formation of P-induced Pb precipitation. However, in the case of soil, Enterobacter sp. increased Pb immobilization by 6.98, 25.6 and 32.0% with the RP level of 200, 800 and 1600 mg P/kg, respectively. The immobilization of Pb in Pb-spiked soils was attributed to pyromorphite formation as indicated by XRD analysis. Inoculation of phosphate solubilizing bacteria with RP in soil can be used as an alternative technique to soluble P compounds which can cause eutrophication of surface water.

  16. A new spectrophotometric method for quantification of potassium solubilized by bacterial cultures.

    PubMed

    Rajawat, Mahendra Vikram Singh; Singh, Surender; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2014-03-01

    A new spectrophotometric method was developed for the quantification of potassium in the culture broth supernatant of K-solubilizing bacteria. The standard curve of potassium with the new method, which is based on the measurement of cobalt, showed a regression coefficient (R2) of 0.998. The quantification values of potassium obtained with flame photometric method and the newly developed method showed a significant correlation (r) of 0.978. The new method depends on the precipitation of sodium cobaltinitrite with solubilized potassium in liquid medium as potassium sodium cobaltinitrite, which develops bluish green colour by the addition of conc. HCl. The intensity of developed colour can be recorded at 623 nm. This method involves less number of steps, is easy and time saving, and can be used for the reliable estimation of available potassium in culture broth supernatant of K-solubilizing bacteria. PMID:24669669

  17. EPS solubilization treatment by applying the biosurfactant rhamnolipid to reduce clogging in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Du, Mingpu; Xu, Dong; Trinh, Xuantung; Liu, Shuangyuan; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Junmei; Zhou, Qiaohong; Wu, Zhenbin

    2016-10-01

    Application of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) solubilization treatment with biosurfactant rhamnolipid (RL) to reduce clogging in constructed wetlands was first conducted in this study. The results showed significant improvement in the solubilization and dispersion of clogging matter following the treatment. And RL dosage of 0.09-0.15g/L altered microbial group make-up and had an overall positive effect on the growth of microorganisms. Moreover, RL was found to enhance EPS dissolution and dispersion, which was beneficial for the release of enzymes embedded in the EPS, and resulted in enhanced pollutant removal. The treatment had no apparent detrimental effect on wetland plants. Our results indicate that the optimum dosage of RL is 0.12g/L, and that the approach provides a promising and moderate option to reverse wetland clogging through RL-mediated solubilization treatment.

  18. Self-assembly of an amphiphilic derivative of chitosan and micellar solubilization of puerarin.

    PubMed

    Weiping, Sui; Changqing, Yin; Yanjing, Chen; Zhiguo, Zhang; Xiangzheng, Kong

    2006-03-01

    A kind of amphiphilic derivatives of chitosan (2-hydroxyl-3-butoxyl)-propylcarboxymethyl-chitosan (HBP-CMCHS), has been synthesized, and the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of HBP-CMCHS was detected by the fluorescence method. The puerarin-loaded HBP-CMCHS micellar system was prepared by physical entrapped method. Result showed that when adding the same amount of puerarin, the solubilizing capacity was enhanced by increasing the concentration of HBP-CMCHS and temperature. Puerarin-loaded micellar system of HBP-CMCHS was characterized by TEM and DLS. TEM photograph revealed that the micelles were spherical and puerarin was solubilized in the cores of the spherical polymeric micelles. DLS showed that after solubilization the size of the micelles became bigger. In vitro tests showed that puerarin was slowly released from micellar solution and the release lasted up to 60 h by means of the dialysis method. PMID:16466908

  19. A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Anson; Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti; Yoo, Si-Eun; Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. {yields} HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1{sup +/0}) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1{sup +/0} mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1{sup +/0} cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1{sup +/0} cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

  20. Function of human eccrine sweat glands during dynamic exercise and passive heat stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, N.; Shibasaki, M.; Aoki, K.; Koga, S.; Inoue, Y.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the pattern of change in the density of activated sweat glands (ASG) and sweat output per gland (SGO) during dynamic constant-workload exercise and passive heat stress. Eight male subjects (22.8 +/- 0.9 yr) exercised at a constant workload (117.5 +/- 4.8 W) and were also passively heated by lower-leg immersion into hot water of 42 degrees C under an ambient temperature of 25 degrees C and relative humidity of 50%. Esophageal temperature, mean skin temperature, sweating rate (SR), and heart rate were measured continuously during both trials. The number of ASG was determined every 4 min after the onset of sweating, whereas SGO was calculated by dividing SR by ASG. During both exercise and passive heating, SR increased abruptly during the first 8 min after onset of sweating, followed by a slower increase. Similarly for both protocols, the number of ASG increased rapidly during the first 8 min after the onset of sweating and then ceased to increase further (P > 0.05). Conversely, SGO increased linearly throughout both perturbations. Our results suggest that changes in forearm sweating rate rely on both ASG and SGO during the initial period of exercise and passive heating, whereas further increases in SR are dependent on increases in SGO.

  1. Human acclimation and acclimatization to heat: A compendium of research, 1968-1978. [Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sciaraffa, D.; Fox, S. C.; Stockmann, R.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    Abstracts and annotations of the majority of scientific works that elucidate the mechanisms of short-term acclimation to heat in men and women are presented. The compendium includes material from 1968 through 1977. Subject and author indexes are provided and additional references of preliminary research findings or work of a peripheral nature are included in a bibliography.

  2. Non-thermal modification of heat-loss responses during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Koga, Shunsaku

    2010-10-01

    This review focuses on the characteristics of heat-loss responses during exercise with respect to non-thermal factors. In addition, the effects of physical training on non-thermal heat-loss responses are discussed. When a subject is already sweating the sweating rate increases at the onset of dynamic exercise without changes in core temperature, while cutaneous vascular conductance (skin blood flow) is temporarily decreased. Although exercise per se does not affect the threshold for the onset of sweating, it is possible that an increase in exercise intensity induces a higher sensitivity of the sweating response. Exercise increases the threshold for cutaneous vasodilation, and at higher exercise intensities, the sensitivity of the skin-blood-flow response decreases. Facilitation of the sweating response with increased exercise intensity may be due to central command, peripheral reflexes in the exercising muscle, and mental stimuli, whereas the attenuation of skin-blood-flow responses with decreased cutaneous vasodilation is related to many non-thermal factors. Most non-thermal factors have negative effects on magnitude of cutaneous vasodilation; however, several of these factors have positive effects on the sweating response. Moreover, thermal and non-thermal factors interact in controlling heat-loss responses, with non-thermal factors having a greater impact until core temperature elevations become significant, after which core temperature primarily would control heat loss. Finally, as with thermally induced sweating responses, physical training seems to also affect sweating responses governed by non-thermal factors.

  3. In Vitro Investigation of Heat Transfer Phenomenon in Human Immature Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Maryam; Moghimi, Sahar; Shafagh, Mina; Kalani, Hadi; Mazhari, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Heat generated within tooth during clinical dentistry can cause thermally induced damage to hard and soft components of the tooth (enamel, dentin and pulp). Geometrical characteristics of immature teeth are different from those of mature teeth. The purpose of this experimental and theoretical study was to investigate thermal changes in immature permanent teeth during the use of LED light-curing units (LCU). Materials and methods. This study was performed on the second mandibular premolars. This experimental investiga-tion was carried out for recording temperature variations of different sites of tooth and two dimensional finite element models were used for heat transfer phenomenon in immature teeth. Sensitivity analysis and local tests were included in the model validation phase. Results. Overall, thermal stimulation for 30 seconds with a low-intensity LED LCU increased the temperature from 28°C to 38°C in IIT (intact immature tooth) and PIT (cavity-prepared immature tooth). When a high-intensity LED LCU was used, tooth temperature increased from 28°C to 48°C. The results of the experimental tests and mathematical modeling illustrated that using LED LCU on immature teeth did not have any detrimental effect on the pulp temperature. Conclusion. Using LED LCU in immature teeth had no effect on pulp temperature in this study. Sensitivity analysis showed that variations of heat conductivity might affect heat transfer in immature teeth; therefore, further studies are required to determine thermal conductivity of immature teeth. PMID:25587383

  4. In vitro investigation of heat transfer phenomenon in human immature teeth.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Maryam; Moghimi, Sahar; Shafagh, Mina; Kalani, Hadi; Mazhari, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Heat generated within tooth during clinical dentistry can cause thermally induced damage to hard and soft components of the tooth (enamel, dentin and pulp). Geometrical characteristics of immature teeth are different from those of mature teeth. The purpose of this experimental and theoretical study was to investigate thermal changes in immature permanent teeth during the use of LED light-curing units (LCU). Materials and methods. This study was performed on the second mandibular premolars. This experimental investiga-tion was carried out for recording temperature variations of different sites of tooth and two dimensional finite element models were used for heat transfer phenomenon in immature teeth. Sensitivity analysis and local tests were included in the model validation phase. Results. Overall, thermal stimulation for 30 seconds with a low-intensity LED LCU increased the temperature from 28°C to 38°C in IIT (intact immature tooth) and PIT (cavity-prepared immature tooth). When a high-intensity LED LCU was used, tooth temperature increased from 28°C to 48°C. The results of the experimental tests and mathematical modeling illustrated that using LED LCU on immature teeth did not have any detrimental effect on the pulp temperature. Conclusion. Using LED LCU in immature teeth had no effect on pulp temperature in this study. Sensitivity analysis showed that variations of heat conductivity might affect heat transfer in immature teeth; therefore, further studies are required to determine thermal conductivity of immature teeth.

  5. Expression of Zinc Transporter Genes in Rice as Influenced by Zinc-Solubilizing Enterobacter cloacae Strain ZSB14

    PubMed Central

    Krithika, Selvaraj; Balachandar, Dananjeyan

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in major food crops has been considered as an important factor affecting the crop production and subsequently the human health. Rice (Oryza sativa) is sensitive to Zn deficiency and thereby causes malnutrition to most of the rice-eating Asian populations. Application of zinc solubilizing bacteria (ZSB) could be a sustainable agronomic approach to increase the soil available Zn which can mitigate the yield loss and consequently the nutritional quality of rice. Understanding the molecular interactions between rice and unexplored ZSB is useful for overcoming Zn deficiency problems. In the present study, the role of zinc solubilizing bacterial strain Enterobacter cloacae strain ZSB14 on regulation of Zn-regulated transporters and iron (Fe)-regulated transporter-like protein (ZIP) genes in rice under iron sufficient and deficient conditions was assessed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. The expression patterns of OsZIP1, OsZIP4, and OsZIP5 in root and shoot of rice were altered due to the Zn availability as dictated by Zn sources and ZSB inoculation. Fe sufficiency significantly reduced the root and shoot OsZIP1 expression, but not the OsZIP4 and OsZIP5 levels. Zinc oxide in the growth medium up-regulated all the assessed ZIP genes in root and shoot of rice seedlings. When ZSB was inoculated to rice seedlings grown with insoluble zinc oxide in the growth medium, the expression of root and shoot OsZIP1, OsZIP4, and OsZIP5 was reduced. In the absence of zinc oxide, ZSB inoculation up-regulated OsZIP1 and OsZIP5 expressions. Zinc nutrition provided to the rice seedling through ZSB-bound zinc oxide solubilization was comparable to the soluble zinc sulfate application which was evident through the ZIP genes’ expression and the Zn accumulation in root and shoot of rice seedlings. These results demonstrate that ZSB could play a crucial role in zinc fertilization and fortification of rice. PMID:27092162

  6. Expression of Zinc Transporter Genes in Rice as Influenced by Zinc-Solubilizing Enterobacter cloacae Strain ZSB14.

    PubMed

    Krithika, Selvaraj; Balachandar, Dananjeyan

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in major food crops has been considered as an important factor affecting the crop production and subsequently the human health. Rice (Oryza sativa) is sensitive to Zn deficiency and thereby causes malnutrition to most of the rice-eating Asian populations. Application of zinc solubilizing bacteria (ZSB) could be a sustainable agronomic approach to increase the soil available Zn which can mitigate the yield loss and consequently the nutritional quality of rice. Understanding the molecular interactions between rice and unexplored ZSB is useful for overcoming Zn deficiency problems. In the present study, the role of zinc solubilizing bacterial strain Enterobacter cloacae strain ZSB14 on regulation of Zn-regulated transporters and iron (Fe)-regulated transporter-like protein (ZIP) genes in rice under iron sufficient and deficient conditions was assessed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. The expression patterns of OsZIP1, OsZIP4, and OsZIP5 in root and shoot of rice were altered due to the Zn availability as dictated by Zn sources and ZSB inoculation. Fe sufficiency significantly reduced the root and shoot OsZIP1 expression, but not the OsZIP4 and OsZIP5 levels. Zinc oxide in the growth medium up-regulated all the assessed ZIP genes in root and shoot of rice seedlings. When ZSB was inoculated to rice seedlings grown with insoluble zinc oxide in the growth medium, the expression of root and shoot OsZIP1, OsZIP4, and OsZIP5 was reduced. In the absence of zinc oxide, ZSB inoculation up-regulated OsZIP1 and OsZIP5 expressions. Zinc nutrition provided to the rice seedling through ZSB-bound zinc oxide solubilization was comparable to the soluble zinc sulfate application which was evident through the ZIP genes' expression and the Zn accumulation in root and shoot of rice seedlings. These results demonstrate that ZSB could play a crucial role in zinc fertilization and fortification of rice. PMID:27092162

  7. The HumanIndexMod and New Calculations Demonstrating Heat Stress Effects All Aspects of Human Life Through Industry, Agriculture, and Daily Life.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzan, J. R.; Huber, M.

    2014-12-01

    We show the new climatic tool, HumanIndexMod (HIM), for quantitatively assessing key climatic variables that are critical for decision making. The HIM calculates 9 different heat stress and 4 moist thermodynamic quantities using meteorological inputs of T, P, and Q. These heat stress metrics are commonly used throughout the world. We show new methods for integrating and standardizing practices for applying these metrics with the latest Earth system models. We implemented the HIM into CLM4.5, a component of CESM, maintained by NCAR. These heat stress metrics cover philosophical approaches of comfort, physiology, and empirically based algorithms. The metrics are directly connected to the Urban, Canopy, Bare Ground, and Lake modules, to differentiate distinct regimes within each grid cell. The module calculates the instantaneous moisture-temperature covariance at every model time step and in every land surface type, capturing all aspects of non-linearity. The HIM uses the most accurate and computationally efficient moist thermodynamic algorithms available. Additionally, we show ways that the HIM may be effectively integrated into climate modeling and observations. The module is flexible. The user may decide which metrics to call, and there is an offline version of the HIM that is available to be used with weather and climate datasets. Examples include using high temporal resolution CMIP5 archive data, local weather station data, and weather and forecasting models. To provide comprehensive standards for applying the HIM to climate data, we executed a CLM4.5 simulation using the RCP8.5 boundary conditions. Preliminary results show moist thermodynamic and heat stress quantities have smaller variability in the extremes as compared to extremes in T (both at the 95th percentile). Additionally, the magnitude of the moist thermodynamic changes over land is similar to sea surface temperature changes. The metric changes from the early part of the 21st century as compared to the

  8. High-melting lipid mixtures and the origin of detergent-resistant membranes studied with temperature-solubilization diagrams.

    PubMed

    Sot, Jesús; Manni, Marco M; Viguera, Ana R; Castañeda, Verónica; Cano, Ainara; Alonso, Cristina; Gil, David; Valle, Mikel; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M

    2014-12-16

    The origin of resistance to detergent solubilization in certain membranes, or membrane components, is not clearly understood. We have studied the solubilization by Triton X-100 of binary mixtures composed of egg sphingomyelin (SM) and either ceramide, diacylglycerol, or cholesterol. Solubilization has been assayed in the 4-50°C range, and the results are summarized in a novel, to our knowledge, form of plots, that we have called temperature-solubilization diagrams. Despite using a large detergent excess (lipid/detergent 1:20 mol ratio) and extended solubilization times (24-48 h) certain mixtures were not amenable to Triton X-100 solubilization at one or more temperatures. DSC of all the lipid mixtures, and of all the lipid + detergent mixtures revealed that detergent resistance was associated with the presence of gel domains at the assay temperature. Once the system melted down, solubilization could occur. In general adding high-melting lipids limited the solubilization, whereas the addition of low-melting lipids promoted it. Lipidomic analysis of Madin-Darby canine kidney cell membranes and of the corresponding detergent-resistant fraction indicated a large enrichment of the nonsolubilized components in saturated diacylglycerol and ceramide. SM-cholesterol mixtures were special in that detergent solubilization was accompanied, for certain temperatures and compositions, by an independent phenomenon of reassembly of the partially solubilized lipid bilayers. The temperature at which lysis and reassembly prevailed was ∼25°C, thus for some SM-cholesterol mixtures solubilization occurred both above and below 25°C, but not at that temperature. These observations can be at the origin of the detergent resistance effects observed with cell membranes, and they also mean that cholesterol-containing detergent-resistant membrane remnants cannot correspond to structures existing in the native membrane before detergent addition.

  9. Heat-related deaths in hot cities: estimates of human tolerance to high temperature thresholds.

    PubMed

    Harlan, Sharon L; Chowell, Gerardo; Yang, Shuo; Petitti, Diana B; Morales Butler, Emmanuel J; Ruddell, Benjamin L; Ruddell, Darren M

    2014-03-20

    In this study we characterized the relationship between temperature and mortality in central Arizona desert cities that have an extremely hot climate. Relationships between daily maximum apparent temperature (ATmax) and mortality for eight condition-specific causes and all-cause deaths were modeled for all residents and separately for males and females ages <65 and ≥ 65 during the months May-October for years 2000-2008. The most robust relationship was between ATmax on day of death and mortality from direct exposure to high environmental heat. For this condition-specific cause of death, the heat thresholds in all gender and age groups (ATmax = 90-97 °F; 32.2-36.1 °C) were below local median seasonal temperatures in the study period (ATmax = 99.5 °F; 37.5 °C). Heat threshold was defined as ATmax at which the mortality ratio begins an exponential upward trend. Thresholds were identified in younger and older females for cardiac disease/stroke mortality (ATmax = 106 and 108 °F; 41.1 and 42.2 °C) with a one-day lag. Thresholds were also identified for mortality from respiratory diseases in older people (ATmax = 109 °F; 42.8 °C) and for all-cause mortality in females (ATmax = 107 °F; 41.7 °C) and males <65 years (ATmax = 102 °F; 38.9 °C). Heat-related mortality in a region that has already made some adaptations to predictable periods of extremely high temperatures suggests that more extensive and targeted heat-adaptation plans for climate change are needed in cities worldwide.

  10. The pentosidine concentration in human blood specimens is affected by heating.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masako; Kubota, Midori; Owada, Shigeru; Nagai, Ryoji

    2013-06-01

    Pentosidine is an advanced glycation end product, formed by oxidation and glycation that accumulates markedly during end-stage renal failure. Measurement of the pentosidine level in physiological samples is applied as a sensitive marker for the early diagnosis of renal failure. In the quantitative measurements of pentosidine reported to date, a rapid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been widely used to estimate the plasma/serum pentosidine levels in a number of clinical samples, because high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods require multiple preparation steps before the analysis. However, the currently used clinical analysis of the plasma/serum pentosidine level by ELISA requires incubation of the plasma/serum at 100°C for 15 min to inactivate the protease, which is required before the anti-pentosidine antibody can bind to the pentosidine. In the present study, we examined whether pentosidine could be generated artificially through the heating of serum. The pentosidine content, measured by HPLC, in the serum increased by heating in a temperature- and time-dependent manner. The pentosidine content was increased 1.1- to 4.2-fold by the heating process compared to unheated samples, and the increased rate was not identical for each sample. After removing low-molecular weight (<10,000) serum components, the heat-induced pentosidine formation was decreased. Furthermore, the increase in pentosidine formation was significantly inhibited by acidic conditions more than by the addition of diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid, a metal chelator. This indicates that the level of serum pentosidine will be measured more accurately by ELISA if hydrochloric acid is added during the heating process.

  11. Heat-Related Deaths in Hot Cities: Estimates of Human Tolerance to High Temperature Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Sharon L.; Chowell, Gerardo; Yang, Shuo; Petitti, Diana B.; Morales Butler, Emmanuel J.; Ruddell, Benjamin L.; Ruddell, Darren M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we characterized the relationship between temperature and mortality in central Arizona desert cities that have an extremely hot climate. Relationships between daily maximum apparent temperature (ATmax) and mortality for eight condition-specific causes and all-cause deaths were modeled for all residents and separately for males and females ages <65 and ≥65 during the months May–October for years 2000–2008. The most robust relationship was between ATmax on day of death and mortality from direct exposure to high environmental heat. For this condition-specific cause of death, the heat thresholds in all gender and age groups (ATmax = 90–97 °F; 32.2‒36.1 °C) were below local median seasonal temperatures in the study period (ATmax = 99.5 °F; 37.5 °C). Heat threshold was defined as ATmax at which the mortality ratio begins an exponential upward trend. Thresholds were identified in younger and older females for cardiac disease/stroke mortality (ATmax = 106 and 108 °F; 41.1 and 42.2 °C) with a one-day lag. Thresholds were also identified for mortality from respiratory diseases in older people (ATmax = 109 °F; 42.8 °C) and for all-cause mortality in females (ATmax = 107 °F; 41.7 °C) and males <65 years (ATmax = 102 °F; 38.9 °C). Heat-related mortality in a region that has already made some adaptations to predictable periods of extremely high temperatures suggests that more extensive and targeted heat-adaptation plans for climate change are needed in cities worldwide. PMID:24658410

  12. Improving solubilization in microemulsions with additives. 1. The lipophilic linker role

    SciTech Connect

    Graciaa, A.; Lachaise, J.; Cucuphat, C. ); Bourrel, M. ); Salager, J.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Very lipophilic additives are able to substantially improve the solubilization in surfactant-oil-water microemulsions. The so-called lipophilic linker effect is studied, and its role is discussed. It is shown that the presence of a very lipophilic amphiphilic additive may improve substantially the solubilization in microemulsions. This substance is called a lipophilic linker because its preferential orientation in the oil layers next to the interface might provide some ordering of the oil molecules as well as an additional link with the surfactant. Both effects result in a higher interaction on the oil side of the interface. 21 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Comparison of media used to evaluate Rhizobium leguminosarum bivar viciae for phosphate-solubilizing ability.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jia; Knight, J Diane; Leggett, Mary E

    2009-07-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum is well known for its ability to fix nitrogen (N). In addition, its capacity to solubilize phosphate (Ph) has been receiving attention in recent years. Our ultimate objective was to select a R. leguminosarum bv. viciae isolate with superior Ph-solubilizing ability. The first step was to identify a culture medium that is sensitive and effective in identifying the ability of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae isolates to solubilize Ph. Thirty isolates were evaluated for Ph solubilization in broth and on solid formulations of three media: yeast mannitol extract (YEM), National Botanical Research Institute phosphate nutrient medium (MNBRI), and Pikovskaya phosphate medium (PVK). All media contained 5 g/L CaHPO4 as the only phosphorus (P) source. All 30 isolates increased the Ph concentration in liquid cultures, but the amount of Ph released into solution by individual isolates varied from one medium to another. In contrast, only a subset of the 30 isolates solubilized Ph on the solid cultures. Furthermore, some of the isolates that were able to solubilize Ph were only able to do so on a single medium. Regression analysis revealed no relationship between the Ph concentration in the liquid media and the zones of clearing on the solid media (p > 0.05). Although the pH of all of the liquid media dropped after 12 days of growth of the isolates, a relationship between Ph concentration and pH existed only for the MNBRI medium (r2 = 0.485, p < 0.001). Increasing the amount of N in the MNBRI medium from 0.1 g/L of (NH4)2SO4 to 0.5 g/L of (NH4)2SO4 did not affect the amount of Ph in solution, but it profoundly reduced the survival of the R. leguminosarum by approximately 50-fold. Consequently, the surviving bacteria were either more efficient at solubilizing Ph in the high N media or organic acids released from the lysis of the dead cells solubilized the CaHPO4 source. PMID:19767866

  14. The solubilization of fatty acids in systems based on block copolymers and nonionic surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirgorodskaya, A. B.; Yatskevich, E. I.; Zakharova, L. Ya.

    2010-12-01

    The solubilizing action of micellar, microemulsion, and polymer-colloid systems formed on the basis of biologically compatible amphiphilic polymers and nonionic surfactants on capric, lauric, palmitic, and stearic acids was characterized quantitatively. Systems based on micelle forming oxyethyl compounds increased the solubility of fatty acids by more than an order of magnitude. Acid molecules incorporated into micelles increased their size and caused structural changes. Solubilization was accompanied by complete or partial destruction of intrinsic acid associates and an increase in their p K a by 1.5-2 units compared with water.

  15. Heating and ultraviolet light activate anti-stress gene functions in humans.

    PubMed

    Semenkov, Victor F; Michalski, Anatoli I; Sapozhnikov, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Different environmental factors (i.e., toxins, heavy metals, ultraviolet (UV) rays, and X-radiation) cause damage to DNA, cell membranes and other organelles and induce oxidative stress, which results in the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by phagocytes. All types of cell stress are accompanied by the activation of anti-stress genes that can suppress ROS synthesis. We hypothesized that different environmental factors would affect organisms through the activation of anti-stress genes by autologous serum (AS) proteins, followed by the synthesis of molecules that increase cell resistance to oxidative stress. The goal of this work was to study the influence of AS on ROS production by peripheral blood neutrophils isolated from donors in different age groups. Neutrophils were isolated from 59 donors (38-94 years old). AS was heated at 100°C for 30 s. or irradiated by UV light at 200-280 nm and 8 W for 10 min. Neutrophils were exposed to heat shock at 42°C for 1 min. (short-term heating stress) or 43°C for 10 min., followed by the determination of the chemiluminescence reaction induced by zymosan. AS can increase or decrease ROS production by neutrophils depending on the structure of the proteins in the serum; these structures can be changed by heating or UV treatment and the temperature of their interaction (4 or 37°C). We propose that the effect of environmental factors on AS proteins can cause an adverse increase in oxidative stress levels due to the functional reduction of anti-stress genes. We found a negative correlation between the quantity of intracellular Hsp70 and levels of intracellular ROS production following 10 min of heat shock at 43°C. Short-term heating stress (1 min) at 42°C was followed by a prominent reduction in ROS production. This effect may be a result of the impact of the hormone adrenaline on the functions of anti-stress genes. Indeed, the same effect was observed after treatment of the neutrophils with adrenaline at

  16. Studying the effects of the heat stress on the various layers of human skin using damage function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aijaz, Mir; Khanday, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    This paper develops a model to identify the effects of thermal stress on temperature distribution and damage in human dermal regions. The design and selection of the model takes into account many factors effecting the temperature distribution of skin, e.g., thermal conductance, perfusion, metabolic heat generation and thermal protective capabilities of the skin. The transient temperature distribution within the region is simulated using a two-dimensional finite element model of the Pennes’ bioheat equation. The relationship between temperature and time is integrated to view the damage caused to human skin by using Henriques’ model Henriques, F. C., Arch. Pathol. 43 (1947) 489-502]. The Henriques’ damage model is found to be more desirable for use in predicting the threshold of thermal damage. This work can be helpful in both emergency medicines as well as to plastic surgeon in deciding upon a course of action for the treatment of different burn injuries.

  17. [The perception of a temperature rise in human seasonal heat adaptation].

    PubMed

    Khudaĭberdiev, M D; Sultanov, F F; Pokormiakha, L M

    1991-01-01

    At ambient temperatures 20 degrees, 28 degrees and 40 degrees C the exponent of the power function of warmth perception was 1.40, 1.08 and 0.84 in winter and 1.66, 1.32 and 1.50 in summer, resp. Seasonal heat adaptation seems to lead to an increase of the warmth perception due to functional modification of temperature analyser activity.

  18. Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of heat killed Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP) on various human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Menaga; In, Lionel L A; Kumar, Ashutosh; Ahmed, Niyaz; Nagoor, Noor Hasima

    2016-01-28

    Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP) is a non-pathogenic mycobacterium, which has been tested on several cancer types like lung and bladder where tumour regression and complete recovery was observed. In discovering the potential cytotoxic elements, a preliminary test was carried out using four different fractions consisting of live bacteria, culture supernatant, heat killed bacteria and heat killed culture supernatant of MIP against two human cancer cells A549 and CaSki by 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was investigated in MCF-7 and ORL-115 cancer cells by poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and DNA fragmentation assays. Among four MIP fractions, only heat killed MIP fraction (HKB) showed significant cytotoxicity in various cancer cells with inhibitory concentration, IC50 in the range 5.6-35.0 μl/(1.0 × 10(6) MIP cells/ml), while cytotoxicity effects were not observed in the remaining fractions. HKB did not show cytotoxic effects on non-cancerous cells contrary to cancerous cells, suggesting its safe usage and ability to differentially recognize between these cells. Evaluation on PARP assay further suggested that cytotoxicity in cancer cells were potentially induced via caspase-mediated apoptosis. The cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of MIP HKB have indicated that this fraction can be a good candidate to further identify effective anti-cancer agents.

  19. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Modulates Heat Nociception in the Human Brain - An fMRI Study in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Becerra, Lino; Larsson, Henrik B. W.; Borsook, David; Ashina, Messoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Intravenous infusion of calcitonin-gene-related-peptide (CGRP) provokes headache and migraine in humans. Mechanisms underlying CGRP-induced headache are not fully clarified and it is unknown to what extent CGRP modulates nociceptive processing in the brain. To elucidate this we recorded blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the brain by functional MRI after infusion of CGRP in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of 27 healthy volunteers. BOLD-signals were recorded in response to noxious heat stimuli in the V1-area of the trigeminal nerve. In addition, we measured BOLD-signals after injection of sumatriptan (5-HT1B/1D antagonist). Results Brain activation to noxious heat stimuli following CGRP infusion compared to baseline resulted in increased BOLD-signal in insula and brainstem, and decreased BOLD-signal in the caudate nuclei, thalamus and cingulate cortex. Sumatriptan injection reversed these changes. Conclusion The changes in BOLD-signals in the brain after CGRP infusion suggests that systemic CGRP modulates nociceptive transmission in the trigeminal pain pathways in response to noxious heat stimuli. PMID:26990646

  20. Regional distribution of perceived temperatures estimated by the human heat budget model (the Klima-Michel model) in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Kyu Rang; Choi, Byoung-Cheol; Lee, Dae-Geun; Kim, Jeong-Sik

    2009-03-01

    The regional distribution of perceived temperatures (PT) for 28 major weather stations in South Korea during the past 22 years (1983-2004) was investigated by employing a human heat budget model, the Klima-Michel model. The frequencies of a cold stress and a heat load by each region were compared. The sensitivity of PT in terms of the input of synoptic meteorological variables were successfully tested. Seogwipo in Jeju Island appears to be the most comfortable city in Korea. Busan also shows a high frequency in the comfortable PT range. The frequency of the thermal comfort in Seoul is similar to that of Daejeon with a relatively low frequency. In this study, inland cities like Daegu and Daejeon had very hot thermal sensations. Low frequencies of hot thermal sensations appeared in coastal cities (e.g., Busan, Incheon, and Seogwipo). Most of the 28 stations in Korea exhibited a comfort thermal sensation over 40% in its frequency, except for the mountainous regions. The frequency of a heat load is more frequent than that of a cold stress. There are no cities with very cold thermal sensations. In this study, we found the decreasing trend of mortality with an increasing PT. If the PT is over any critical temperature point, however, the mortality rate increases again. The mortality variation with the PT of a station seems to be associated with the latitudinal location of the station, implying that it results from a regional acclimation effect of inhabitants.

  1. Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of heat killed Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP) on various human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Menaga; In, Lionel L A; Kumar, Ashutosh; Ahmed, Niyaz; Nagoor, Noor Hasima

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP) is a non-pathogenic mycobacterium, which has been tested on several cancer types like lung and bladder where tumour regression and complete recovery was observed. In discovering the potential cytotoxic elements, a preliminary test was carried out using four different fractions consisting of live bacteria, culture supernatant, heat killed bacteria and heat killed culture supernatant of MIP against two human cancer cells A549 and CaSki by 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was investigated in MCF-7 and ORL-115 cancer cells by poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and DNA fragmentation assays. Among four MIP fractions, only heat killed MIP fraction (HKB) showed significant cytotoxicity in various cancer cells with inhibitory concentration, IC50 in the range 5.6–35.0 μl/(1.0 × 106 MIP cells/ml), while cytotoxicity effects were not observed in the remaining fractions. HKB did not show cytotoxic effects on non-cancerous cells contrary to cancerous cells, suggesting its safe usage and ability to differentially recognize between these cells. Evaluation on PARP assay further suggested that cytotoxicity in cancer cells were potentially induced via caspase-mediated apoptosis. The cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of MIP HKB have indicated that this fraction can be a good candidate to further identify effective anti-cancer agents. PMID:26817684

  2. Synthesis of a Disulfonated Derivative of Cucurbit[7]uril and Investigations of its Ability to Solubilize Insoluble Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Elizabeth L.; Zavalij, Peter Y.; Isaacs, Lyle

    2015-01-01

    Cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) is currently being investigated as a solubilizing agent for insoluble drugs. We recently found that acyclic CB[n]-type receptors that bear sulfonate solubilizing groups are well suited for this application. Herein, we report cucurbit[7]uril derivative (1) that bears two sulfonate groups on its convex face that we hypothesized would be a superior solubilizing excipient for insoluble drugs. Before using 1 for drug solubilization experiments we showed that 1 does not self-associate and that it retained its ability to bind to diammonium compounds as common guests for CB[7] sized cavities. X-ray crystallography shows that 1 maintains the key structural features of CB[7] with only minor ellipsoidal deformations at the equator and carbonyl portals of 1. Unfortunately, the aqueous solubility of 1 (20 mM) is slightly lower than CB[7] (20-30 mM) which limits its potential as a solubilizing excipient for insoluble drugs. We created phase solubility diagrams for the solubilization of three drugs (camptothecin, albendazole, cinnarizine) with two different containers (1 and CB[7]). CB[7] and 1 exhibit comparable solubilization abilities (e.g. Ka and maximum solubility) toward camptothecin and albendazole but 1 is an inferior solubilizing agent for cinnarizine because of the low solubility exhibited by the 1•cinnarizine complex. PMID:25937787

  3. Heat and α1-adrenergic responsiveness in human skeletal muscle feed arteries: the role of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Andtbacka, Robert H. I.; Kwon, Sun Hyung; Shiu, Yan-Ting; Ruan, Ting; Noyes, R. Dirk; Zhang, Quan-Jiang; Symons, J. David; Richardson, Russell S.

    2012-01-01

    Increased local temperature exerts a sympatholytic effect on human skeletal muscle feed arteries. We hypothesized that this attenuated α1-adrenergic receptor responsiveness may be due to a temperature-induced increase in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, thereby reducing the impact of the α1-adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine (PE). Thirteen human skeletal muscle feed arteries were harvested, and wire myography was used to generate PE concentration-response curves at 37°C and 39°C, with and without the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA). A subset of arteries (n = 4) were exposed to 37°C or 39°C, and the protein content of endothelial NOS (eNOS) and α1-adrenergic receptors was determined by Western blot analysis. Additionally, cultured bovine endothelial cells were exposed to static or shear stress conditions at 37°C and 39°C and assayed for eNOS activation (phosphorylation at Ser1177), eNOS expression, and NO metabolites [nitrate + nitrite (NOx)]. Maximal PE-induced vasocontraction (PEmax) was lower at 39°C than at 37°C [39 ± 10 vs. 84 ± 30% maximal response to 100 mM KCl (KClmax)]. NO blockade restored vasocontraction at 39°C to that achieved at 37°C (80 ± 26% KClmax). Western blot analysis of the feed arteries revealed that heating increased eNOS protein, but not α1-adrenergic receptors. Heating of bovine endothelial cells resulted in greater shear stress-induced eNOS activation and NOx production. Together, these data reveal for the first time that, in human skeletal muscle feed arteries, NO blockade can restore the heat-attenuated α1-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasocontraction and implicate endothelium-derived NO bioavailability as a major contributor to heat-induced sympatholysis. Consequently, these findings highlight the important role of vasodilators in modulating the vascular response to vasoconstrictors. PMID:23042905

  4. Metabolic effects of microwave radiation and convection heating on human mononuclear leukocytes. Final report, January 1985-May 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kiel, J.L.; Wong, L.S.; Erwin, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated here were the effects of microwave (MW) radiation (2450-MHz, continuous-wave, mean specific absorption rate of 103.5 + or - 4.2 W/kg) and convention heating on the nonphosphorylating oxidative metabolism of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes (96% lymphocytes, 4% monocytes) at 37 C. Metabolic activity, determined by chemiluminescence (CL) of cells challenged with luminol (5-aminO-2, 3-dihydro-1, 4-phthalazinedione) linked to bovine serum albumin, was detected with a brightness photomer. A significant stimulation after after MW exposure (p < 0.005) over total CL of matched 37 C-incubator controls was observed. A similar degree of stimulation, compared to incubator controls, was also detected after sham treatment. No significant difference existed between changes in total CL or stimulation indices of the MW and sham-exposed groups. Exposure to MW radiation, under normothermic (37 + or - 0.03 C) conditions, appears to have no effect on the oxidative metabolic activity of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. However, the significant differences between MW or sham-exposed cells and their respective incubator controls occurred because the temperature of the incubator did not exceed 35.9 C, and 39 minutes were required for the temperature to rise from 22 to 35.9 C. Slow heating of incubator controls must be accounted for in thermal and redio-frequency radiation studies in vitro.

  5. Use of postmortem temperature decay response surface plots of heat transport in the human eye to predict time of death.

    PubMed

    Smart, Jimmy L

    2014-03-01

    A finite element heat transfer model of the human eye was previously constructed and applied to experimental postmortem temperature decay curves collected in eyeballs of ten human bodies. The model was applied in the early postmortem period of 0–24 h under conditions of natural convection–radiation. Based upon this previous model, response surfaces for postmortem temperature decay were constructed based upon variable ranges of the natural convective–radiation heat transfer coefficient from 7–13 W/m2 K, ambient temperatures of 10–33°C, and times of 0–24 h. Mathematical equations to describe these response surfaces have been developed. This response surface method is demonstrated for use by coroners/medical personnel to estimate time of death from recorded field temperature data collected over a 30-min period. Sensitivity of the model to small changes in the key variable of ambient temperature is explored. The response surface model is applied to two cases of previously collected experimental eyeball temperature data. This response surface model method is only valid for constant surrounding temperatures, conditions of natural convection, no radiation effects, and postmortem times of 0–24 h.

  6. Comparison of biological effects of modulated electro-hyperthermia and conventional heat treatment in human lymphoma U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Andocs, G; Rehman, M U; Zhao, Q-L; Tabuchi, Y; Kanamori, M; Kondo, T

    2016-01-01

    Loco-regional hyperthermia treatment has long history in oncology. Modulated electro-hyperthermia (mEHT, trade name: oncothermia) is an emerging curative treatment method in this field due to its highly selective actions. The impedance-matched, capacitive-coupled modulated radiofrequency (RF) current is selectively focused in the malignant cell membrane of the cancer cells. Our objective is studying the cell-death process and comparing the cellular effects of conventional water-bath hyperthermia treatment to mEHT. The U937 human histiocytic lymphoma cell line was used for the experiments. In the case of conventional hyperthermia treatment, cells were immersed in a thermoregulated water bath, whereas in the case of mEHT, the cells were treated using a special RF generator (LabEHY, Oncotherm) and an applicator. The heating dynamics, the maximum temperature reached (42 °C) and the treatment duration (30 min) were exactly the same in both cases. Cell samples were analysed using different flow cytometric methods as well as microarray gene expression assay and western blot analysis was also used to reveal the molecular basis of the induced effects. Definite difference was observed in the biological response to different heat treatments. At 42 °C, only mEHT induced significant apoptotic cell death. The GeneChip analysis revealed a whole cluster of genes, which are highly up-regulated in case of only RF heating, but not in conventional heating. The Fas, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and ERK signalling pathway was the dominant factor to induce apoptotic cell death in mEHT, whereas the cell-protective mechanisms dominated in case of conventional heating. This study has clearly shown that conventional hyperthermia and RF mEHT can result in different biological responses at the same temperature. The reason for the difference is the distinct, non-homogenous energy distribution on the cell membrane, which activates cell death-related signalling pathways in m

  7. Comparison of biological effects of modulated electro-hyperthermia and conventional heat treatment in human lymphoma U937 cells

    PubMed Central

    Andocs, G; Rehman, M U; Zhao, Q-L; Tabuchi, Y; Kanamori, M; Kondo, T

    2016-01-01

    Loco-regional hyperthermia treatment has long history in oncology. Modulated electro-hyperthermia (mEHT, trade name: oncothermia) is an emerging curative treatment method in this field due to its highly selective actions. The impedance-matched, capacitive-coupled modulated radiofrequency (RF) current is selectively focused in the malignant cell membrane of the cancer cells. Our objective is studying the cell-death process and comparing the cellular effects of conventional water-bath hyperthermia treatment to mEHT. The U937 human histiocytic lymphoma cell line was used for the experiments. In the case of conventional hyperthermia treatment, cells were immersed in a thermoregulated water bath, whereas in the case of mEHT, the cells were treated using a special RF generator (LabEHY, Oncotherm) and an applicator. The heating dynamics, the maximum temperature reached (42 °C) and the treatment duration (30 min) were exactly the same in both cases. Cell samples were analysed using different flow cytometric methods as well as microarray gene expression assay and western blot analysis was also used to reveal the molecular basis of the induced effects. Definite difference was observed in the biological response to different heat treatments. At 42 °C, only mEHT induced significant apoptotic cell death. The GeneChip analysis revealed a whole cluster of genes, which are highly up-regulated in case of only RF heating, but not in conventional heating. The Fas, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and ERK signalling pathway was the dominant factor to induce apoptotic cell death in mEHT, whereas the cell-protective mechanisms dominated in case of conventional heating. This study has clearly shown that conventional hyperthermia and RF mEHT can result in different biological responses at the same temperature. The reason for the difference is the distinct, non-homogenous energy distribution on the cell membrane, which activates cell death-related signalling pathways in m

  8. Differential translocation of heat shock factor-1 after mild and severe stress to human skin fibroblasts undergoing aging in vitro.

    PubMed

    Demirovic, Dino; de Toda, Irene Martinez; Nizard, Carine; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2014-12-01

    Repeated exposure to mild heat shock (HS) has been shown to induce a wide range of health promoting hormetic effects in various biological systems, including human cells undergoing aging in vitro. In order to understand how cells distinguish between mild and severe stress, we have investigated the extent of early and immediate HS response by analyzing the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor heat shock factor-1 (HSF1), in serially passaged normal adult human facial skin fibroblasts exposed to mild (41 °C) or severe (43 °C) HS. Cells respond differently when exposed to mild and severe HS at different passage levels in terms of the extent of HSF1 translocation. In early passage young cells there was a 5-fold difference between mild and severe HS in the extent of HSF1 translocation. However, in near senescent late passage cells, the difference between mild and severe stress in terms of the extent of HSF1 translocation was reduced to less than 2-fold. One of the reasons for this age-related attenuation of heat shock response is due to the fact there was a higher basal level of HSF1 in the nuclei of late passage cells, which is indicative of increased intrinsic stress during cellular aging. These observations are consistent with previously reported data that whereas repeated mild stress given at younger ages can slow down aging and increase the lifespan, the same level of stress given at older ages may not provide the same benefits. Therefore, elucidating the early and immediate steps in the induction of stress response can be useful in deciding whether a particular level of stress is potentially hormetically beneficial or not.

  9. Absence of arterial baroreflex modulation of skin sympathetic activity and sweat rate during whole-body heating in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T. E.; Cui, J.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    1. Prior findings suggest that baroreflexes are capable of modulating skin blood flow, but the effects of baroreceptor loading/unloading on sweating are less clear. Therefore, this project tested the hypothesis that pharmacologically induced alterations in arterial blood pressure in heated humans would lead to baroreflex-mediated changes in both skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) and sweat rate. 2. In seven subjects mean arterial blood pressure was lowered (approximately 8 mmHg) and then raised (approximately 13 mmHg) by bolus injections of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine, respectively. Moreover, in a separate protocol, arterial blood pressure was reduced via steady-state administration of sodium nitroprusside. In both normothermia and heat-stress conditions the following responses were monitored: sublingual and mean skin temperatures, heart rate, beat-by-beat blood pressure, skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry), local sweat rate and SSNA (microneurography from peroneal nerve). 3. Whole-body heating increased skin and sublingual temperatures, heart rate, cutaneous blood flow, sweat rate and SSNA, but did not change arterial blood pressure. Heart rate was significantly elevated (from 74 +/- 3 to 92 +/- 4 beats x min(-1); P < 0.001) during bolus sodium nitroprusside-induced reductions in blood pressure, and significantly reduced (from 92 +/- 4 to 68 +/- 4 beats x min(-1); P < 0.001) during bolus phenylephrine-induced elevations in blood pressure, thereby demonstrating normal baroreflex function in these subjects. 4. Neither SSNA nor sweat rate was altered by rapid (bolus infusion) or sustained (steady-state infusion) changes in blood pressure regardless of the thermal condition. 5. These data suggest that SSNA and sweat rate are not modulated by arterial baroreflexes in normothermic or moderately heated individuals.

  10. The effect of heat- or ultra violet ozone-treatment of titanium on complement deposition from human blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Linderbäck, Paula; Harmankaya, Necati; Askendal, Agneta; Areva, Sami; Lausmaa, Jukka; Tengvall, Pentti

    2010-06-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a well known metallic biomaterial extensively used in dental, orthopaedic-, and occasionally also in blood contacting applications. It integrates well to bone and soft tissues, and is shown upon blood plasma contact to activate the intrinsic pathway of coagulation and bind complement factor 3b. The material properties depend largely on those of the nm-thick dense layer of TiO(2) that becomes rapidly formed upon contact with air and water. The spontaneously formed amorphous Ti-oxide has a pzc approximately 5-6 and its water solubility is at the order of 1-2 micromolar. It is often subjected to chemical- and heat treatments in order to increase the anatase- and rutile crystallinity, to modify the surface topography and to decrease the water solubility. In this work, we prepared sol-gel derived titanium and smooth PVD titanium surfaces, and analysed their oxide and protein deposition properties in human blood plasma before and after annealing at 100-500 degrees C or upon UVO-treatment for up to 96 hours. The blood plasma results show that complement deposition vanished irreversibly after heat treatment at 250-300 degrees C for 30 minutes or after UVO exposure for 24 hours or longer. XPS and infrared spectroscopy indicated change of surface water/hydroxyl binding upon the heat- and UVO treatments, and increased Ti oxidation. XRD analysis confirmed an increased crystallinity and both control (untreated) and annealed smooth titanium displayed low XRD-signals indicating some nanocrystallinity, with predominantly anatase phase. The current results show that the behaviour of titanium dioxide in blood contact can be controlled through relatively simple means, such as mild heating and illumination in UV-light, which both likely irreversibly change the stoichiometry and structure of the outmost layers of titanium dioxide and its OH/H(2)O binding characteristics.

  11. Acceptability of heat treating breast milk to prevent mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus in Zimbabwe: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Israel-Ballard, Kiersten A; Maternowska, M Catherine; Abrams, Barbara F; Morrison, Pamela; Chitibura, Livona; Chipato, Tsungai; Chirenje, Zvavahera M; Padian, Nancy S; Chantry, Caroline J

    2006-02-01

    Although heat treatment of human milk is an official infant-feeding recommendation for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive mothers in Zimbabwe, its implementation has not been adequately addressed, because knowledge about the safety of this method is rudimentary and its acceptability is poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, the authors conducted focus group discussions among mothers, grandmothers, midwives, and husbands in various regions of Zimbabwe. Although the practice of heat treating expressed human milk was initially met with skepticism because of potential obstacles, including time constraints and social and cultural stigma, a pattern of opinion reversal emerged in all groups. By the end of each discussion, participants believed that, given its affordability and its potential to protect infants from HIV infection, heat-treated human milk may be a feasible infant-feeding option for HIV-positive mothers in Zimbabwe. These findings merit further investigation so that appropriate behavioral strategies can be designed. PMID:16467287

  12. Sub-CMC solubilization of dodecane by rhamnolipid in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Zhifeng; Yang, Xin; Brusseau, Mark L.; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-09-01

    Experiments were conducted with a two-dimensional flow cell to examine the effect of monorhamnolipid surfactant at sub-CMC concentrations on solubilization of dodecane in porous media under dynamic flow conditions. Quartz sand was used as the porous medium and artificial groundwater was used as the background solution. The effectiveness of the monorhamnolipid was compared to that of SDBS, Triton X-100, and ethanol. The results demonstrated the enhancement of dodecane solubility by monorhamnolipid surfactant at concentrations lower than CMC. The concentrations (50–210 μM) are sufficiently low that they do not cause mobilization of the dodecane. Retention of rhamnolipid in the porous medium and detection of nano-size aggregates in the effluent show that the solubilization is based on a sub-CMC aggregate-formation mechanism, which is significantly stronger than the solubilization caused by the co-solvent effect. The rhamnolipid biosurfactant is more efficient for the solubilization compared to the synthetic surfactants. These results indicate a strategy of employing low concentrations of rhamnolipid for surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR), which may overcome the drawbacks of using surfactants at hyper-CMC concentrations.

  13. Isolation and characterization of Chilembwe and Sinda Rock Phosphate solubilizing soil microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to isolate and characterize soil microorganisms capable of solubilizing Chilembwe and Sinda rock phosphates readily available in Zambia. Single isolates were obtained by direct plating and enrichment cultures with succinate, cellulose and glucose as the carbon sources. Isola...

  14. Sub-CMC solubilization of dodecane by rhamnolipid in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Zhifeng; Yang, Xin; Brusseau, Mark L; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with a two-dimensional flow cell to examine the effect of monorhamnolipid surfactant at sub-CMC concentrations on solubilization of dodecane in porous media under dynamic flow conditions. Quartz sand was used as the porous medium and artificial groundwater was used as the background solution. The effectiveness of the monorhamnolipid was compared to that of SDBS, Triton X-100, and ethanol. The results demonstrated the enhancement of dodecane solubility by monorhamnolipid surfactant at concentrations lower than CMC. The concentrations (50-210 μM) are sufficiently low that they do not cause mobilization of the dodecane. Retention of rhamnolipid in the porous medium and detection of nano-size aggregates in the effluent show that the solubilization is based on a sub-CMC aggregate-formation mechanism, which is significantly stronger than the solubilization caused by the co-solvent effect. The rhamnolipid biosurfactant is more efficient for the solubilization compared to the synthetic surfactants. These results indicate a strategy of employing low concentrations of rhamnolipid for surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR), which may overcome the drawbacks of using surfactants at hyper-CMC concentrations. PMID:27619361

  15. Solubilized extracellular matrix from brain and urinary bladder elicits distinct functional and phenotypic responses in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fan Wei; Slivka, Peter F; Dearth, Christopher L; Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from a variety of source tissues has been successfully used to facilitate tissue reconstruction. The recent development of solubilized forms of ECM advances the therapeutic potential of these biomaterials. Isolated, soluble components of ECM and matricryptic peptides have been shown to bias macrophages toward a regulatory and constructive (M2-like) phenotype. However, the majority of studies described thus far have utilized anatomically and morphologically similar gastrointestinal derived ECMs (small intestine, esophagus, urinary bladder, etc.) and a small subset of macrophage markers (CD206, CD86, CCR7) to describe them. The present study evaluated the effect of solubilized ECM derived from molecularly diverse source tissues (brain and urinary bladder) upon primary macrophage phenotype and function. Results showed that solubilized urinary bladder ECM (U-ECM) up-regulated macrophage PGE2 secretion and suppressed traditional pro-inflammatory factor secretion, consistent with an M2-like phenotype. The hyaluronic acid (HA) component in solubilized U-ECM played an important role in mediating this response. Brain ECM (B-ECM) elicited a pro-inflammatory (M1-like) macrophage response and contained almost no HA. These findings suggest that the molecular composition of the source tissue ECM plays an important role in influencing macrophage function and phenotype. PMID:25678122

  16. DIRECT AND PHOTOACTIVATED TOXICITY OF A COMPLEX PETROLEUM MIXTURE: A COMPARISON OF SOLUBILIZATION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work addresses several issues associated with the toxicity of a complex petroleum mixture (combined kerosene/diesel and crude oil), including developmental effects and early lifestage mortality, method of solubilization, and potential photo-activated and photo-modified toxic...

  17. FIELD DEMONSTRATION STUDIES OF SURFACTANT-ENHANCED SOLUBILIZATION AND MOBILIZATION AT HILL AIR FORCE BASE, UTAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactant-enhanced subsurface remediation can dramatically improve contaminant removal rates compared to the traditional pump-and-treat technology. Surfactants can be used to significantly enhance the solubilization of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) constituents, or they can b...

  18. Exploring the Arabidopsis Proteome: Influence of Protein Solubilization Buffers on Proteome Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Marondedze, Claudius; Wong, Aloysius; Groen, Arnoud; Serrano, Natalia; Jankovic, Boris; Lilley, Kathryn; Gehring, Christoph; Thomas, Ludivine

    2014-01-01

    The study of proteomes provides new insights into stimulus-specific responses of protein synthesis and turnover, and the role of post-translational modifications at the systems level. Due to the diverse chemical nature of proteins and shortcomings in the analytical techniques used in their study, only a partial display of the proteome is achieved in any study, and this holds particularly true for plant proteomes. Here we show that different solubilization and separation methods have profound effects on the resulting proteome. In particular, we observed that the type of detergents employed in the solubilization buffer preferentially enriches proteins in different functional categories. These include proteins with a role in signaling, transport, response to temperature stimuli and metabolism. This data may offer a functional bias on comparative analysis studies. In order to obtain a broader coverage, we propose a two-step solubilization protocol with first a detergent-free buffer and then a second step utilizing a combination of two detergents to solubilize proteins. PMID:25561235

  19. Applying solubilization treatment to reverse clogging in laboratory-scale vertical flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Guofen, Hua; Wei, Zhu; Lianfang, Zhao; Yunhui, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Substrate clogging is characterized as a frequently occurring operational problem for subsurface-flow constructed wetlands. The application of solubilization treatment to reduce clogging was tested in lab-scaled setups to provide a promising solution. The performance of solubilization treatment on reducing clogging and the related effects on plants and biofilms in the wetland system were investigated in this paper. The results showed that the infiltration rate and available porosity of wetland substrate increased as a function of increased dosage of NaOH, HCl, NaClO, and detergent, respectively. Among the four solvents, it appeared that NaClO had the most obvious effects on reducing clogging and the infiltration rate and effective porosity recovered to 69% of the original condition. The two possible reasons for solubilization were the flocculents' structure of the clogs was broken up or parts of the organic clogs were dissolved. The function of adding NaOH and NaClO was to dissolve the protein and polysaccharides of the organic clogs; the function of adding HCl was to release the anaerobic gas wrapped in the organic clogs. Furthermore, experiments results also showed that the solubilized solvents did not demonstrate a long-term negative effect on plants and biofilms.

  20. A class-A GPCR solubilized under high hydrostatic pressure retains its ligand binding ability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on the solubilization of a class-A G protein-coupled receptor, the silkmoth pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR), was investigated. PBANR was expressed in expresSF+ insect cells as a C-terminal fusion protein with EGFP. The mem...

  1. 5?-Nucleotidase from bovine brain cortex: effect of solubilization on enzyme kinetics and modulation.

    PubMed

    Mallol, J; Bozal, J

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic characteristics and the EDTA inhibition of microsomal 5?-nucleotidase from bovine brain cortex were studied and compared with the properties of the enzyme solubilized with Lubrol WX. The K(m) value after enzyme solubilization was not significantly different from that of the membrane-bound enzyme. Likewise, di- and trinucleotides performed a similar competitive inhibition of the two forms of the enzyme. In contrast, divalent cations inhibited the intact microsomal enzyme activity at the same concentrations in which they increased the soluble-enzyme activity. The solubilization of microsomal 5?-nucleotidase did not change the progressive and irreversible character of the EDTA inhibition, but the mechanism of the irreversible inhibition was different. The addition of divalent metal cations did not affect the irreversibility of either inhibition, even though the effect on the residual activities was different. The Arrhenius plot of the 5?-nucleotidase activity in intact microsomal fraction exhibited a well-defined break at 31 +/- 0.1 degrees C, whereas that of the solubilized enzyme was a straight line. It is concluded then that microsomal 5?-nucleotidase from bovine brain cortex does not require the membrane environment to express its activity, although the influence of this lipidic environment was evident in the differences observed in the enzyme activity modulation by EDTA, cations and temperature.

  2. Solubilization of phenol and benzene in cationic micelles: Binding sites and effect on structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kandori, K.; McGreevy, R.J.; Schechter, R.S. )

    1989-02-23

    The effect of phenol and benzene additives on micellar structure in aqueous solutions of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide has been studied by means of various experimental measurements. The solution properties studied include additive solubilities, tracer diffusion coefficients, electrical conductivity, viscosity, and ultraviolet absorbance. From the trace diffusion measurements the degree of partitioning of phenol into the micelles was calculated as a function of phenol concentration. A procedure for determining surfactant aggregation number and micelle concentration in ionic surfactant systems by means of diffusion and electrical conductivity data is presented. The solubilization of phenol and benzene in this system causes the micelles to swell, and it was observed that phenol addition leads to a greater increase in the size of aggregates than addition of benzene. Ultraviolet absorbance measurements revealed that the site of solubilization within the micelles is different for the two additives: Benzene solubilizes in the central core, while at low concentrations phenol is taken up in the outer palisade layer. However, the site of phenol solubilization, the shape of the micelles, and the physical properties of DTAB/phenol solutions change at a concentration of 1 mol of phenol solubilizate per mole of surfactant. Due to the saturation of the palisade layer with surfactant and additive molecules, phenol added to the DTAB system beyond this transition point most likely binds to the exterior of the micelles.

  3. Isolation of phosphate-solubilizing fungi from phosphate mines and their effect on wheat seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chunqiao; Chi, Ruan; He, Huan; Qiu, Guanzhou; Wang, Dianzuo; Zhang, Wenxue

    2009-11-01

    Three phosphate-solubilizing fungi, identified as Penicillium expansum, Mucor ramosissimus, and Candida krissii, were isolated from phosphate mines (Hubei, People's Republic of China) and characterized. All the isolates demonstrated diverse levels of phosphate-solubilizing capability in National Botanical Research Institute's phosphate growth medium containing rock phosphate as sole phosphate source. Acidification of culture medium seemed to be the main mechanism for rock phosphate solubilization. Indeed, citric acid, oxalic acid, and gluconic acid were shown to be present in the culture medium inoculated with these isolates. Moreover, the isolates produced acid and alkaline phosphatases in culture medium, which may also be helpful for RP solubilization. A strong negative correlation between content of soluble phosphorus and pH (r = - 0.89; p < 0.01) in culture medium was observed in this study. All the isolates promoted growth, soil available phosphorus, phosphorus, and nitrogen uptake of wheat seedling in field soil containing rock phosphate under pot culture conditions, thus demonstrating the capability of these isolates to convert insoluble form of phosphorus into plant available form from rock phosphate, and therefore hold great potential for development as biofertilizers to enhance soil fertility and promote plant growth.

  4. SURFACTANT-ENHANCED SOLUBILIZATION OF RESIDUAL DODECANE IN SOIL COLUMNS - 2. MATHEMATICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical model is developed to describe surfactant-enhanced solubilization of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) in porous media. The model incorporates aqueous-phase transport equations for organic and surfactant components as well as a mass balance for the organic phase. Ra...

  5. Biogeochemical processes in the continental slope of Bay of Bengal: I. Bacterial solubilization of inorganic phosphate.

    PubMed

    Das, Surajit; Lyla, P S; Khan, S Ajmal

    2007-03-01

    Microorganisms play a vital role in the biogeochemical cycles of various marine environments, but studies on occurrence and distribution of such bacteria in the marine environment from India are meager. We studied the phosphate solubilizing property of bacteria from the deep sea sediment of Bay of Bengal, India, to understand their role in phosphorous cycle (and thereby the benthic productivity of the deep sea environment). Sediment samples were obtained from 33 stations between 10 degrees 36'N-20 degrees 01' N and 79 degrees 59' E-87 degrees 30' E along 11 transects at 3 different depths i.e. ca. 200 m, 500 m, 1000 m in each transect. Total heterotrophic bacterial (THB) counts ranged from 0.42 to 37.38 x 10(4) CFU g(-1) dry sediment weight. Of the isolates tested, 7.57% showed the phosphate solubilizing property. The phosphate solubilizing bacterial genera were Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Vibrio, Alcaligenes, Micrococcus, Corynebacterium and Flavobacterium. These strains are good solubilizers of phosphates which ultimately may play a major role in the biogeochemical cycle and the benthic productivity of the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Bay of Bengal, because this enzyme is important for the slow, but steady regeneration of phosphate and organic carbon in the deep sea. PMID:18457109

  6. Sub-CMC solubilization of dodecane by rhamnolipid in saturated porous media

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Zhifeng; Yang, Xin; Brusseau, Mark L.; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with a two-dimensional flow cell to examine the effect of monorhamnolipid surfactant at sub-CMC concentrations on solubilization of dodecane in porous media under dynamic flow conditions. Quartz sand was used as the porous medium and artificial groundwater was used as the background solution. The effectiveness of the monorhamnolipid was compared to that of SDBS, Triton X-100, and ethanol. The results demonstrated the enhancement of dodecane solubility by monorhamnolipid surfactant at concentrations lower than CMC. The concentrations (50–210 μM) are sufficiently low that they do not cause mobilization of the dodecane. Retention of rhamnolipid in the porous medium and detection of nano-size aggregates in the effluent show that the solubilization is based on a sub-CMC aggregate-formation mechanism, which is significantly stronger than the solubilization caused by the co-solvent effect. The rhamnolipid biosurfactant is more efficient for the solubilization compared to the synthetic surfactants. These results indicate a strategy of employing low concentrations of rhamnolipid for surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR), which may overcome the drawbacks of using surfactants at hyper-CMC concentrations. PMID:27619361

  7. Phagocytosis and solubilization of fixed cells by metastatic hamster embryo fibroblasts, Nil2C2

    SciTech Connect

    Sakiyama, H.; Nishino, Y.; Nishimura, K.; Noda, Y.; Otsu, H.

    1984-05-01

    When Nil2C2, a metastatic clone derived from hamster embryo fibroblasts (Nil), was inoculated over (/sup 3/H)leucine-labeled fixed cells, Nil2C2 cells solubilized and phagocytosed fixed cells, and the radioactivity was released into the culture medium as trichloroacetic acid-soluble fragments. The solubilization of fixed cells was dependent on both the time of incubation of living cells with fixed cells and the number of living cells inoculated. Nil2C2 cells were shown by autoradiographic and electron microscopic studies to peel off fixed cells and ingest them as large fragments. The solubilization of fixed cells was significantly decreased when plasminogen was depleted from the culture medium. Protease inhibitors such as leupeptin, epsilon-aminocaproic acid, and soybean trypsin inhibitor partially inhibited the proteolysis and phagocytosis of Nil2C2 cells. Mouse peritoneal macrophages activated by Salmonella typhimurium solubilized fixed cells after the addition of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. However, they did not phagocytose fixed cells as large fragments.

  8. Exploring the Arabidopsis proteome: influence of protein solubilization buffers on proteome coverage.

    PubMed

    Marondedze, Claudius; Wong, Aloysius; Groen, Arnoud; Serrano, Natalia; Jankovic, Boris; Lilley, Kathryn; Gehring, Christoph; Thomas, Ludivine

    2015-01-01

    The study of proteomes provides new insights into stimulus-specific responses of protein synthesis and turnover, and the role of post-translational modifications at the systems level. Due to the diverse chemical nature of proteins and shortcomings in the analytical techniques used in their study, only a partial display of the proteome is achieved in any study, and this holds particularly true for plant proteomes. Here we show that different solubilization and separation methods have profound effects on the resulting proteome. In particular, we observed that the type of detergents employed in the solubilization buffer preferentially enriches proteins in different functional categories. These include proteins with a role in signaling, transport, response to temperature stimuli and metabolism. This data may offer a functional bias on comparative analysis studies. In order to obtain a broader coverage, we propose a two-step solubilization protocol with first a detergent-free buffer and then a second step utilizing a combination of two detergents to solubilize proteins.

  9. Analyzing ligand and small molecule binding activity of solubilized GPCRs using biosensor technology.

    PubMed

    Navratilova, Iva; Dioszegi, Marianna; Myszka, David G

    2006-08-01

    We used Biacore technology to measure directly the binding of natural ligands and small molecules to the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. Both G protein-coupled receptors were solubilized from whole cell pellets and captured on antibody surfaces for analysis. Our solubilization conditions maintained high-affinity binding of chemokines SDF-1alpha and RANTES to CXCR4 and CCR5, respectively. Surface density- and buffer-dependent binding responses, along with binding data for a selective ligand (RCP-168), further validated the biosensor assay. In addition, we showed that it is possible to collect high-quality binding responses for the archetypal small molecule inhibitors JM-2987 and TAK-779. Finally, using our biosensor-based method, we characterized the kinetics of 19 novel small molecule inhibitors of CCR5 and showed that their affinities correlated with values determined for the membrane-associated receptor. Together, the chemokine and small molecule binding data provide evidence that the solubilized receptors maintain native binding properties. These solubilized receptor preparations could be useful reagents for biophysical studies as well as for structural analysis.

  10. Aggregate-based sub-CMC Solubilization of Hexadecane by Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hua; Yang, Lei; Zeng, Guangming; Brusseau, Mark L.; Wang, Yake; Li, Yang; Liu, Zhifeng; Yuan, Xingzhong; Tan, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Solubilization of hexadecane by two surfactants, SDBS and Triton X-100, at concentrations near the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the related aggregation behavior was investigated in this study. Solubilization was observed at surfactant concentrations lower than CMC, and the apparent solubility of hexadecane increased linearly with surfactant concentration for both surfactants. The capacity of SDBS to solubilize hexadecane is stronger at concentrations below CMC than above CMC. In contrast, Triton X-100 shows no difference. The results of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and cryogenic TEM analysis show aggregate formation at surfactant concentrations lower than CMC. DLS-based size of the aggregates (d) decreases with increasing surfactant concentration. Zeta potential of the SDBS aggregates decreases with increasing SDBS concentration, whereas it increases for Triton X-100. The surface excess (Γ) of SDBS calculated based on hexadecane solubility and aggregate size data increases rapidly with increasing bulk concentration, and then asymptotically approaches the maximum surface excess (Γmax). Conversely, there is only a minor increase in Γ for Triton X-100. Comparison of Γ and d indicates that excess of surfactant molecules at aggregate surface has great impact on surface curvature. The results of this study demonstrate formation of aggregates at surfactant concentrations below CMC for hexadecane solubilization, and indicate the potential of employing low-concentration strategy for surfactant application such as remediation of HOC contaminated sites. PMID:26925230

  11. Kinetics of degradation of surfactant-solubilized fluoranthene by a Sphingomonas paucimobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Willumsen, P.A. . Dept. of Marine Ecology and Microbiology); Arvin, E. . Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering)

    1999-08-01

    To achieve a better quantitative understanding of the stimulating or inhibiting effect of surfactants on the metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a biodegradation model describing solubilization, bioavailability, and biodegradation of crystalline fluoranthene is proposed and used to model experimental data. The degradation was investigated in batch systems containing the PAH-degrading bacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis strain EPA505, the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100, and a fluoranthene-amended liquid mineral salts medium. Surfactant-enhanced biodegradation is complex; however, the biodegradation model predicted fluoranthene disappearance and the initial mineralization well. Surfactant-amendment did increase fluoranthene mineralization rates by strain EPA505; however, the increases were not proportional to the rates of fluoranthene solubilization. The surfactant clearly influenced the microbial PAH metabolism as indicated by a rapid accumulation of colored products and by a surfactant -related decreased in the overall extent of fluoranthene mineralization. Model estimations of the bioavailability of micelle-solubilized fluoranthene, the relatively fast fluoranthene disappearance, and the accumulation of extracellular compounds in the degradation system suggest that low availability of micellar fluoranthene is not the only factor controlling surfactant-enhanced biodegradation. Also factors such as the extent of accumulation and bioavailability of the PAH metabolites and the crystalline solubilization rate in the presence of surfactants may determine the overall effect of surfactant-enhanced biodegradation of high molecular weight PAHs.

  12. Biogeochemical processes in the continental slope of Bay of Bengal: I. Bacterial solubilization of inorganic phosphate.

    PubMed

    Das, Surajit; Lyla, P S; Khan, S Ajmal

    2007-03-01

    Microorganisms play a vital role in the biogeochemical cycles of various marine environments, but studies on occurrence and distribution of such bacteria in the marine environment from India are meager. We studied the phosphate solubilizing property of bacteria from the deep sea sediment of Bay of Bengal, India, to understand their role in phosphorous cycle (and thereby the benthic productivity of the deep sea environment). Sediment samples were obtained from 33 stations between 10 degrees 36'N-20 degrees 01' N and 79 degrees 59' E-87 degrees 30' E along 11 transects at 3 different depths i.e. ca. 200 m, 500 m, 1000 m in each transect. Total heterotrophic bacterial (THB) counts ranged from 0.42 to 37.38 x 10(4) CFU g(-1) dry sediment weight. Of the isolates tested, 7.57% showed the phosphate solubilizing property. The phosphate solubilizing bacterial genera were Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Vibrio, Alcaligenes, Micrococcus, Corynebacterium and Flavobacterium. These strains are good solubilizers of phosphates which ultimately may play a major role in the biogeochemical cycle and the benthic productivity of the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Bay of Bengal, because this enzyme is important for the slow, but steady regeneration of phosphate and organic carbon in the deep sea.

  13. Inositol is a constituent of detergent-solubilized immunoaffinity-purified rat liver 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed Central

    Bailyes, E M; Ferguson, M A; Colaco, C A; Luzio, J P

    1990-01-01

    myo-Inositol analysis of detergent-solubilized immunoaffinity-purified rat liver 5'-nucleotidase showed the presence of 1 mol of myo-inositol/mol of enzyme monomer. This provides unequivocal evidence that the ectoenzyme 5'-nucleotidase is attached to liver membranes by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol lipid anchor. PMID:2306224

  14. Sub-CMC solubilization of dodecane by rhamnolipid in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Zhifeng; Yang, Xin; Brusseau, Mark L; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with a two-dimensional flow cell to examine the effect of monorhamnolipid surfactant at sub-CMC concentrations on solubilization of dodecane in porous media under dynamic flow conditions. Quartz sand was used as the porous medium and artificial groundwater was used as the background solution. The effectiveness of the monorhamnolipid was compared to that of SDBS, Triton X-100, and ethanol. The results demonstrated the enhancement of dodecane solubility by monorhamnolipid surfactant at concentrations lower than CMC. The concentrations (50-210 μM) are sufficiently low that they do not cause mobilization of the dodecane. Retention of rhamnolipid in the porous medium and detection of nano-size aggregates in the effluent show that the solubilization is based on a sub-CMC aggregate-formation mechanism, which is significantly stronger than the solubilization caused by the co-solvent effect. The rhamnolipid biosurfactant is more efficient for the solubilization compared to the synthetic surfactants. These results indicate a strategy of employing low concentrations of rhamnolipid for surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR), which may overcome the drawbacks of using surfactants at hyper-CMC concentrations.

  15. Role of phosphate solubilizing bacteria on rock phosphate solubility and growth of aerobic rice.

    PubMed

    Panhwar, Q A; Radziah, O; Zaharah, A R; Sariah, M; Razi, I Mohd

    2011-09-01

    Use of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) as inoculants has concurrently increased phosphorous uptake in plants and improved yields in several crop species. The ability of PSB to improve growth of aerobic rice (Oryza sativa L.) through enhanced phosphorus (P) uptake from Christmas island rock phosphate (RP) was studied in glasshouse experiments. Two isolated PSB strains; Bacillus spp. PSB9 and PSB16, were evaluated with RP treatments at 0, 30 and 60 kg ha(-1). Surface sterilized seeds of aerobic rice were planted in plastic pots containing 3 kg soil and the effect of treatments incorporated at planting were observed over 60 days of growth. The isolated PSB strains (PSB9 and PSB16) solubilized significantly high amounts of P (20.05-24.08 mg kg(-1)) compared to non-inoculated (19-23.10 mg kg(-1)) treatments. Significantly higher P solubilization (24.08 mg kg(-1)) and plant P uptake (5.31 mg plant(-1)) was observed with the PSB16 strain at the highest P level of 60 kg ha(-1). The higher amounts of soluble P in the soil solution increased P uptake in plants and resulted in higher plant biomass (21.48 g plant(-1)). PSB strains also increased plant height (80 cm) and improved root morphology in aerobic rice. The results showed that inoculation of aerobic rice with PSB improved phosphate solubilizing activity of incorporated RP.

  16. A Numerical Study of Heat and Water Vapor Transfer in MDCT-Based Human Airway Models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) thermo-fluid model is developed to study regional distributions of temperature and water vapor in three multi-detector row computed-tomography (MDCT)-basedhuman airwayswith minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min. A one-dimensional (1D) model is also solved to provide necessary initial and boundary conditionsforthe 3D model. Both 3D and 1D predicted temperature distributions agree well with available in vivo measurement data. On inspiration, the 3D cold high-speed air stream is split at the bifurcation to form secondary flows, with its cold regions biased toward the inner wall. The cold air flowing along the wall is warmed up more rapidly than the air in the lumen center. The repeated splitting pattern of air streams caused by bifurcations acts as an effective mechanism for rapid heat and mass transfer in 3D. This provides a key difference from the 1D model, where heating relies largely on diffusion in the radial direction, thus significantly affecting gradient-dependent variables, such as energy flux and water loss rate. We then propose the correlations for respective heat and mass transfer in the airways of up to 6 generations: Nu=3.504(ReDaDt)0.277, R = 0.841 and Sh=3.652(ReDaDt)0.268, R = 0.825, where Nu is the Nusselt number, Sh is the Sherwood number, Re is the branch Reynolds number, Da is the airway equivalent diameter, and Dt is the tracheal equivalentdiameter. PMID:25081386

  17. Conductive and convective heat flows of exercising humans in cold water.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, G; Veicsteinas, A; Rennie, D W

    1989-12-01

    The apparent conductance (Kss, in W.m-2.degrees C-1) of a given region of superficial shell (on the thigh, fat + skin) was determined on four nonsweating and nonshivering subjects, resting and exercising (200 W) in water [water temperature (Tw) 22-23 degrees C] Kss = Hss/(Tsf-Tsk) where Hss is the skin-to-water heat flow directly measured by heat flow transducers and Tsf and Tsk are the temperatures of the subcutaneous fat at a known depth below the skin surface and of the skin surface, respectively. The convective heat flow (qc) through the superficial shell was then estimated as qc = (Tsf - Tsk).(Kss - Kss,min), assuming that at rest Kss was minimal (Kss,min) and resting qc = 0. The duration of immersion was set to allow rectal temperature (Tre) to reach approximately 37 degrees C at the end of rest and approximately 38 degrees C at the end of exercise. Except at the highest Tw used, Kss at the start of exercise was always Kss,min and averaged 51 W.m-2.degrees C-1 (range 33-57 W.m-2.degrees C-1) across subjects, and qc was zero. At the end of exercise at the highest Tw used for each subject, Kss averaged 97 W.m-2.degrees C-1 (range 77-108 W.m-2.degrees C-1) and qc averaged 53% (range 48-61%) of Hss (mean Hss = 233 W.m-2).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Heat Shock Protein 70 Enhances Mucosal Immunity against Human Norovirus When Coexpressed from a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuanmei; Duan, Yue; Wei, Yongwei; Liang, Xueya; Niewiesk, Stefan; Oglesbee, Michael

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human norovirus (NoV) accounts for 95% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Currently, there is no vaccine available to combat human NoV as it is not cultivable and lacks a small-animal model. Recently, we demonstrated that recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) expressing human NoV capsid protein (rVSV-VP1) induced strong immunities in mice (Y. Ma and J. Li, J. Virol. 85:2942–2952, 2011). To further improve the safety and efficacy of the vaccine candidate, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was inserted into the rVSV-VP1 backbone vector. A second construct was generated in which the firefly luciferase (Luc) gene was inserted in place of HSP70 as a control for the double insertion. The resultant recombinant viruses (rVSV-HSP70-VP1 and rVSV-Luc-VP1) were significantly more attenuated in cell culture and viral spread in mice than rVSV-VP1. At the inoculation dose of 1.0 × 106 PFU, rVSV-HSP70-VP1 triggered significantly higher vaginal IgA than rVSV-VP1 and significantly higher fecal and vaginal IgA responses than rVSV-Luc-VP1, although serum IgG and T cell responses were similar. At the inoculation dose of 5.0 × 106 PFU, rVSV-HSP70-VP1 stimulated significantly higher T cell, fecal, and vaginal IgA responses than rVSV-VP1. Fecal and vaginal IgA responses were also significantly increased when combined vaccination of rVSV-VP1 and rVSV-HSP70 was used. Collectively, these data indicate that (i) insertion of an additional gene (HSP70 or Luc) into the rVSV-VP1 backbone further attenuates the VSV-based vaccine in vitro and in vivo, thus improving the safety of the vaccine candidate, and (ii) HSP70 enhances the human NoV-specific mucosal and T cell immunities triggered by a VSV-based human NoV vaccine. IMPORTANCE Human norovirus (NoV) is responsible for more than 95% of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Currently, there is no vaccine for this virus. Development of a live attenuated vaccine for human NoV has not been possible because it is

  19. The role of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2) in regulating human sperm-egg recognition.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Brett; Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Dun, Matthew D; Redgrove, Kate A; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Aitken, R John

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common lesions present in the spermatozoa of human infertility patients is an idiopathic failure of sperm-egg recognition. Although this unique cellular interaction can now be readily by-passed by assisted reproductive strategies such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), recent large-scale epidemiological studies have encouraged the cautious use of this technology and highlighted the need for further research into the mechanisms responsible for defective sperm-egg recognition. Previous work in this field has established that the sperm domains responsible for oocyte interaction are formed during spermatogenesis prior to being dynamically modified during epididymal maturation and capacitation in female reproductive tract. While the factors responsible for the regulation of these sequential maturational events are undoubtedly complex, emerging research has identified the molecular chaperone, heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2), as a key regulator of these events in human spermatozoa. HSPA2 is a testis-enriched member of the 70 kDa heat shock protein family that promotes the folding, transport, and assembly of protein complexes and has been positively correlated with in vitro fertilization (IVF) success. Furthermore, reduced expression of HSPA2 from the human sperm proteome leads to an impaired capacity for cumulus matrix dispersal, sperm-egg recognition and fertilization following both IVF and ICSI. In this review, we consider the evidence supporting the role of HSPA2 in sperm function and explore the potential mechanisms by which it is depleted in the spermatozoa of infertile patients. Such information offers novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing sperm function.

  20. Solubilization and Stabilization of Isolated Photosystem I Complex with Lipopeptide Detergents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Guihong; Yu, Daoyong; Ge, Baosheng; Wang, Jiqian; Xu, Fengxi; Huang, Fang; Xu, Hai; Lu, Jian R.

    2013-01-01

    It is difficult to maintain a target membrane protein in a soluble and functional form in aqueous solution without biological membranes. Use of surfactants can improve solubility, but it remains challenging to identify adequate surfactants that can improve solubility without damaging their native structures and biological functions. Here we report the use of a new class of lipopeptides to solubilize photosystem I (PS-I), a well known membrane protein complex. Changes in the molecular structure of these surfactants affected their amphiphilicity and the goal of this work was to exploit a delicate balance between detergency and biomimetic performance in PS-I solubilization via their binding capacity. Meanwhile, the effects of these surfactants on the thermal and structural stability and functionality of PS-I in aqueous solution were investigated by circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE analysis and O2 uptake measurements, respectively. Our studies showed that the solubility of PS-I depended on both the polarity and charge in the hydrophilic head of the lipopeptides and the length of its hydrophobic tail. The best performing lipopeptides in favour of PS-I solubility turned out to be C14DK and C16DK, which were comparable to the optimal amphiphilicity of the conventional chemical surfactants tested. Lipopeptides showed obvious advantages in enhancing PS-I thermostability over sugar surfactant DDM and some full peptide amphiphiles reported previously. Fluorescence spectroscopy along with SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that lipopeptides did not undermine the polypeptide composition and conformation of PS-I after solubilization; instead they showed better performance in improving the structural stability and integrity of this multi-subunit membrane protein than conventional detergents. Furthermore, O2 uptake measurements indicated that PS-I solubilized with lipopeptides maintained its functionality. The underlying mechanism for the favorable actions of

  1. Solubilization of DNAPLs by mixed surfactant: reduction in partitioning losses of nonionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baowei; Zhu, Lizhong; Yang, Kun

    2006-02-01

    Efforts to remediate the dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) by mobilizing them face with risks of driving the contaminants deeper into aquifer zones. This spurs research for modifying the approach for in situ remediation. In this paper, a novel solubilization of DNAPLs by mixed nonionic and anionic surfactant, Triton X-100 (TX100) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), was presented and compared with those by single ones. Given 1:40 phase ratio of DNAPL:water (v/v) and the total surfactant concentration from 0.2 to 10gl(-1), mixed TX100-SDBS at the total mass ratios of 3:1, 1:1 and 1:3 exhibited significant solubilization for the DNAPLs, trichloroethene (TCE), chlorobenzene (CB) and 1,2-dichlorobenzene (1,2-DCB). The solubilization extent by mixed TX100-SDBS was much larger than by single TX100 and even larger than by single SDBS at the ratios of 1:1 and 1:3, respectively. TX100 partitioning into the organic phase dictated the solubilization extent. The TX100 losses into TCE, CB and 1,2-DCB phases were more than 99%, 97% and 97% when single TX100 was used. With SDBS alone, no SDBS partitioned into DNAPLs was observed and in mixed systems, SDBS decreased greatly the partition loss of TX100 into DNAPLs. The extent of TX100 partition decreased with increasing the amount of SDBS. The mechanism for reduction of TX100 partition was discussed. TX100 and SDBS formed mixed micelles in the solution phase. The inability of SDBS to partition into DNAPLs and the mutual affinity of SDBS and TX100 in the mixed micelle controlled the partitioning of TX100 into DNAPL phase. The work presented here demonstrates that mixed nonionic-anionic surfactants would be preferred over single surfactants for solubilization remediation of DNAPLs, which could avoid risks of driving the contaminants deeper into aquifers and decrease the surfactant loss and remediation cost.

  2. Catalytic Signature of a Heat-Stable, Chimeric Human Alkaline Phosphatase with Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Sheen, Campbell R.; Gasque, Kellen Cristina da Silva; Bolean, Mayte; Ciancaglini, Pietro; van Elsas, Andrea; Hoylaerts, Marc F.; Millán, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant alkaline phosphatases are becoming promising protein therapeutics to prevent skeletal mineralization defects, inflammatory bowel diseases, and treat acute kidney injury. By substituting the flexible crown domain of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) with that of the human placental isozyme (PLAP) we generated a chimeric enzyme (ChimAP) that retains the structural folding of IAP, but displays greatly increased stability, active site Zn2+ binding, increased transphosphorylation, a higher turnover number and narrower substrate specificity, with comparable selectivity for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), than the parent IAP isozyme. ChimAP shows promise as a protein therapeutic for indications such as inflammatory bowel diseases, gut dysbioses and acute kidney injury. PMID:24586729

  3. Changes in arterial blood pressure elicited by severe passive heating at rest is associated with hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation in humans.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Ichinose, Masashi; Honda, Yasushi; Tsuji, Bun; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    The arterial blood pressure and ventilatory responses to severe passive heating at rest varies greatly among individuals. We tested the hypothesis that the increase in ventilation seen during severe passive heating of resting humans is associated with a decrease in arterial blood pressure. Passive heating was performed on 18 healthy males using hot water immersion to the level of the iliac crest and a water-perfused suit. We then divided the subjects into two groups: MAP(NOTINC) (n = 8), whose mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) at the end of heating had increased by ≤3 mmHg, and MAP(INC) (n = 10), whose MAP increased by >3 mmHg. Increases in esophageal temperature (T (es)) elicited by the heating were similar in the two groups (+2.3 ± 0.3 vs. +2.4 ± 0.4 °C). Early during heating (increase in T (es) was <1.5 °C), MAP, minute ventilation ([Formula: see text]), and end-tidal CO(2) pressure ([Formula: see text]) were similar between the groups. However, during the latter part of heating (increase in T (es) was ≥1.5 °C), the increase in [Formula: see text] and decrease in [Formula: see text] were significantly greater or tended to be greater, while the increase in MAP was significantly smaller in MAP(NOTINC) than MAP(INC). Among all subjects, heating-induced changes in [Formula: see text] significantly and negatively correlated with heating-induced changes in MAP during the latter part of heating (r = -0.52 to -0.74, P < 0.05). These results suggest that, in resting humans, 25-50 % of the variation in the magnitude of the arterial blood pressure response to severe passive heating can be explained by the magnitude of hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation.

  4. Chronic Heat Stress and Cognitive Development: An Example of Thermal Conditions Influencing Human Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riniolo, Todd C.; Schmidt, Louis A.

    2006-01-01

    Although thermal conditions influence the development of living organisms in a wide variety of ways, this topic has been recently ignored in humans. This paper reintroduces thermal conditions as a topic of importance for developmentalists by presenting an example of how thermal conditions are hypothesized to influence a particular developmental…

  5. Optimization of the phenylurea moiety in a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor to improve water solubility and the PK profile by introducing a solubilizing group and ortho substituents.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Hatsuo; Ebiike, Hirosato; Tsukazaki, Masao; Yamamoto, Shun; Koyama, Kohei; Nakamura, Mitsuaki; Morikami, Kenji; Yoshinari, Kiyoshi; Yoshida, Miyuki; Ogawa, Kotaro; Shimma, Nobuo; Tsukuda, Takuo; Ohwada, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) is a promising anti-cancer target, because various mutations and amplifications are observed in human tumors isolated from cancer patients. Our dihydropyrrolopyrimidine derivative with a phenylurea moiety showed strong PI3K enzyme inhibitory activity, but its pharmacokinetic property was poor because of lack of solubility. Herein, we report how we improved the solubility of our PI3K inhibitors by introducing a solubilizing group and ortho substituents to break molecular planarity. PMID:27189888

  6. Additive effect of heat on the UVB-induced tyrosinase activation and melanogenesis via ERK/p38/MITF pathway in human epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei-Jie; Ma, Hui-Jun; Zhao, Guang; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Wen; Ma, Li-Juan; Lei, Xiao-Bing

    2014-08-01

    Heat is known as an environmental factor that causes significant skin pigmentation, but its effects on melanogenesis have been poorly studied. It has been shown that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is involved in ultraviolet B (UVB) and stress-induced melanogenesis in melanocytes. In this study, we investigated the effects of heat and UVB, on melanocyte melanogenesis, differentiation, and MAPK phosphorylation. The results showed that heat (1 h at 40 °C for 5 days) increased cell dendrites, enlarged cell bodies, and induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)/p38/MITF activation but did not influence melanogenesis of human epidermal melanocytes from skin phototype III. UVB irradiation (20 mJ/cm(2) for 5 days) induced melanogenesis and c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNK)/p38/MITF/tyrosinase activation in melanocytes from skin phototype III. UVB combined with heat resulted in much more significant tyrosinase activation and melanogenesis as compared with UVB alone in melanocytes from skin phototype III. Furthermore, heat treatment and UVB irradiation induced JNK, ERK, and p38 activation but not melanogenic and morphological changes in melanocytes from skin phototype I. These findings suggested that heat promoted melanocyte differentiation, probably via heat-induced ERK/p38/MITF/activation. Furthermore, heat had an additive effect on the UVB-induced tyrosinase activation and melanogenesis. These results provide a new clue for dermatologists for the treatment of hypopigmented skin disease with heat combined with UVB irradiation.

  7. Effect of meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid from Machilus thunbergii Sieb et Zucc on MMP-1 expression in heat shock-induced cultured primary human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyung-In; Moon, Hyungin; Jung, Jae-Chul

    2006-08-01

    Ethanol and aqueous extracts of Machilus thunbergii Sieb et Zucc (Lauraceae) used traditionally for the treatment of a variety of diseases were screened in vitro for MMP-1 inhibitory actions. Meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (MDGA) from the stem bark of M. thunbergii showed a significant inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 in primary human fibroblasts by heat shock-induced. This study investigated the effect of MDGA isolated from M. thunbergii on heat shock-induced premature skin aging. MDGA reduced the expression of MMP-1 at the protein level in a dose-dependent manner in heat shock-induced cultured primary human fibroblasts. Taken together, these results show that MDGA can prevent the harmful effects of heat (and/or IR) that lead to skin aging. PMID:16775809

  8. Heat shock protein 47 expression in aged normal human fibroblasts: modulation by Salix alba extract.

    PubMed

    Nizard, Carine; Noblesse, Emmanuelle; Boisdé, Cécille; Moreau, Marielle; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Mahé, Christian

    2004-06-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP) 47 is a specific chaperone of procollagen. This heat shock protein is responsible for the correct three-dimensional organization of procollagen and its control-quality prior secretion. The aim of the study is to evaluate the level of HSP 47 in aged, photoaged, and senescent fibroblasts and its modulation by a plant extract (Salix alba). The level of HSP 47 and/or procollagen expression in fibroblasts was measured by real-time RT-PCR (mRNA transcripts) and by flow cytometry (immunochemistry technique for measurement of arbitrary fluorescence intensity). Immunochemistry techniques and confocal microscopy were used to visualize the cellular localization of HSP 47 and procollagen. These parameters were compared with different age donors, nonsenescent, and senescent fibroblasts. Fibroblasts were irradiated by a noncytotoxic dose of UVA (6 J/cm(2)), and HSP 47 level was evaluated. S. alba extract was tested for its capacity to modulate HSP 47 expression. Colocalization of HSP 47 and procollagen was shown by confocal microscopy, indicating that HSP 47 could play a role of procollagen molecular chaperone in the cellular model. It was also shown that the HSP 47 level is decreased in old-donor cells, senescent, and irradiated cells. This decrease can be modulated by a S. alba extract (polyphenols rich) in a dose-dependent manner. The evaluation of HSP 47 expression in the experimental conditions can lead to a new approach of aging and photoaging, pointing out the implication of this chaperone in these pathophysiologic phenomena. Modulation of HSP 47 expression by this family of molecules could be of cosmetic and/or dermatologic interest.

  9. Plasma hyperosmolality elevates the internal temperature threshold for active thermoregulatory vasodilation during heat stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Aoki, Ken; Morimoto, Keiko; Johnson, John M; Takamata, Akira

    2009-12-01

    Plasma hyperosmolality delays the response in skin blood flow to heat stress by elevating the internal temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation. This elevation could be because of a delayed onset of cutaneous active vasodilation and/or to persistent cutaneous active vasoconstriction. Seven healthy men were infused with either hypertonic (3% NaCl) or isotonic (0.9% NaCl) saline and passively heated by immersing their lower legs in 42 degrees C water for 60 min (room temperature, 28 degrees C; relative humidity, 40%). Skin blood flow was monitored via laser-Doppler flowmetry at sites pretreated with bretylium tosylate (BT) to block sympathetic vasoconstriction selectively and at adjacent control sites. Plasma osmolality was increased by approximately 13 mosmol/kgH(2)O following hypertonic saline infusion and was unchanged following isotonic saline infusion. The esophageal temperature (T(es)) threshold for cutaneous vasodilation at untreated sites was significantly elevated in the hyperosmotic state (37.73 +/- 0.11 degrees C) relative to the isosmotic state (36.63 +/- 0.12 degrees C, P < 0.001). A similar elevation of the T(es) threshold for cutaneous vasodilation was observed between osmotic conditions at the BT-treated sites (37.74 +/- 0.18 vs. 36.67 +/- 0.07 degrees C, P < 0.001) as well as sweating. These results suggest that the hyperosmotically induced elevation of the internal temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation is due primarily to an elevation in the internal temperature threshold for the onset of active vasodilation, and not to an enhancement of vasoconstrictor activity.

  10. Evidence for metaboreceptor stimulation of sweating in normothermic and heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibasaki, M.; Kondo, N.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    1. Isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise increases sweat rate and arterial blood pressure, and both remain elevated during post-exercise ischaemia. The purpose of this study was to identify whether the elevation in arterial blood pressure during post-exercise ischaemia contributes to the increase in sweating. 2. In normothermia and during whole-body heating, 2 min IHG exercise at 40% maximal voluntary contraction, followed by 2 min post-exercise ischaemia, was performed with and without bolus intravenous administration of sodium nitroprusside during the ischaemic period. Sodium nitroprusside was administered to reduce blood pressure during post-exercise ischaemia to pre-exercise levels. Sweat rate was monitored over two microdialysis membranes placed in the dermal space of forearm skin. One membrane was perfused with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine, while the other was perfused with the vehicle. 3. In normothermia, IHG exercise increased sweat rate at the neostigmine-treated site but not at the control site. Sweat rate remained elevated during post-exercise ischaemia even after mean arterial blood pressure returned to the pre-IHG exercise baseline. Subsequent removal of the ischaemia stimulus returned sweat rate to pre-IHG exercise levels. Sweat rate during post-exercise ischaemia without sodium nitroprusside administration followed a similar pattern. 4. During whole-body heating, IHG exercise increased sweat rate at both neostigmine-treated and untreated sites. Similarly, regardless of whether mean arterial blood pressure remained elevated or was reduced during post-exercise ischaemia, sweat rate remained elevated during the ischaemic period. 5. These results suggest that sweating in non-glabrous skin during post-IHG exercise ischaemia is activated by metaboreflex stimulation and not via baroreceptor loading.

  11. Sweat sodium concentration during exercise in the heat in aerobically trained and untrained humans.

    PubMed

    Hamouti, Nassim; Del Coso, Juan; Ortega, Juan F; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether sweat sodium concentration ([Na(+)](sweat)) during exercise in the heat differs between aerobically trained and untrained individuals. On three occasions, ten endurance-trained (Tr) and ten untrained (UTr) subjects (VO2peak = 4.0 ± 0.8 vs. 3.4 ± 0.7 L min(-1), respectively; P < 0.05) cycled in a hot-ventilated environment (36 ± 1°C; 25 ± 2% humidity, airflow 2.5 m s(-1)) at three workloads (i.e., 40, 60, and 80% VO2peak). Whole-body (SR(WB)) and back sweat rates (SR(BACK)) were measured. At the conclusion of the study, Na(+) in sweat and blood samples was analyzed to calculate Na(+) secretion and reabsorption rates. SR(WB) and SR(BACK) were highly correlated in Tr and UTr (r = 0.74 and 0.79, respectively; P < 0.0001). In both groups, SR(BACK) increased with the increases in exercise intensity (P < 0.05). Likewise, [Na(+)](sweat) increased with the exercise intensity in both groups (P < 0.05) and it tended to be higher in Tr than in UTr at 60 and 80% VO2peak (~22 mmol L(-1) higher; P = 0.06). However, when normalized for SR(BACK), [Na(+)](sweat) was not different between groups. In both groups, Na(+) secretion and reabsorption rates increased with the increases in SR(BACK) (P < 0.05). However, Na(+) reabsorption rate was lower in the Tr than in the UTr (mean slope = 48 vs. 82 ηmol cm(-2) min(-1); P = 0.03). In conclusion, using a cross-sectional study design, our data suggest that aerobic fitness level does not reduce sweat Na(+) secretion or enhance Na(+) reabsorption during prolonged exercise in the heat that induced high sweat rates.

  12. Human heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 interferes with Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA)-mediated adhesion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Paolo; Bozza, Giuseppe; Capecchi, Barbara; Caproni, Elena; Barrile, Riccardo; Norais, Nathalie; Capitani, Mirco; Sallese, Michele; Cecchini, Paola; Ciucchi, Laura; Gao, Zhenai; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Aricò, Beatrice; Merola, Marcello

    2012-03-01

    NadA (N eisseria meningitidisadhesin A), a meningococcal surface protein, mediates adhesion to and invasion of human cells, an activity in which host membrane proteins have been implicated. While investigating these host factors in human epithelial cells by affinity chromatography, we discovered an unanticipated interaction of NadA with heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, a molecular chaperone. The specific in vitro interaction of recombinant soluble NadA and Hsp90 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitations, dot and far-Western blot. Intriguingly, ADP, but not ATP, was required for this association, and the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG promoted complex formation. Hsp90 binding to an Escherichia coli strain used as carrier to express surface exposed NadA confirmed these results in live bacteria. We also examined RNA interference, plasmid-driven overexpression, addition of exogenous rHsp90 and 17-AAG inhibition in human epithelial cells to further elucidate the involvement of Hsp90 in NadA-mediated adhesion and invasion. Together, these data suggest an inverse correlation between the amount of host Hsp90 and the NadA adhesive/invasive phenotype. Confocal microscopy also demonstrated that meningococci interact with cellular Hsp90, a completely novel finding. Altogether our results show that variation of host Hsp90 expression or activity interferes with adhesive and invasive events driven by NadA.

  13. Search for heat-labile enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in humans, livestock, food, and water in a community in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, P; Verhaert, L; Basaca-Sevilla, V; Banson, T; Cross, J; Orskov, F; Orskov, I

    1978-07-01

    Environmental sources of heat-labile enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are unknown. The feces of 1,086 inhabitants (approximately 5%) of a small town in the Philippines, 28 pigs, and 10 water buffalo were cultured for enteric bacterial pathogens. Twenty-seven persons harbored pathogenic bacteria: five individuals had enterotoxigenic E. coli, 11 Salmonella species, nine Vibrio parahaemolyticus, one Shigella boydii, and one nonagglutinable Vibrio. Enterotoxigenic E. coli were isolated from two of 28 pigs and from one of 10 water buffalo. Cultures of 26 pieces of beef, 25 pieces of pork, and 52 leafy vegetables obtained from a community market failed to grow enterotoxigenic E. coli. None of 47 samples of contaminated surface water contained this pathogen. Serotypes of human and animal strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli were different, although E. coli O78:H12 isolated from a pig has previously been incriminated in human diarrheal disease. In this limited survey of a Philippine community, enterotoxigenic E. coli were isolated from humans and livestock. The possibility that enterotoxigenic E. coli infections are zoonotic warrants further investigation.

  14. A 3D analysis of flight behavior of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto malaria mosquitoes in response to human odor and heat.

    PubMed

    Spitzen, Jeroen; Spoor, Cornelis W; Grieco, Fabrizio; ter Braak, Cajo; Beeuwkes, Jacob; van Brugge, Sjaak P; Kranenbarg, Sander; Noldus, Lucas P J J; van Leeuwen, Johan L; Takken, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Female mosquitoes use odor and heat as cues to navigate to a suitable landing site on their blood host. The way these cues affect flight behavior and modulate anemotactic responses, however, is poorly understood. We studied in-flight behavioral responses of females of the nocturnal malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto to human odor and heat. Flight-path characteristics in a wind tunnel (flow 20 cm/s) were quantified in three dimensions. With wind as the only stimulus (control), short and close to straight upwind flights were recorded. With heat alone, flights were similarly short and direct. The presence of human odor, in contrast, caused prolonged and highly convoluted flight patterns. The combination of odor+heat resulted in longer flights with more landings on the source than to either cue alone. Flight speed was greatest (mean groundspeed 27.2 cm/s) for odor+heat. Odor alone resulted in decreased flight speed when mosquitoes arrived within 30 cm of the source whereas mosquitoes exposed to odor+heat maintained a high flight speed while flying in the odor plume, until they arrived within 15 cm of the source. Human odor evoked an increase in crosswind flights with an additive effect of heat at close range (<15 cm) to the source. This was found for both horizontal and vertical flight components. However, mosquitoes nevertheless made upwind progress when flying in the odor+heat generated plume, suggesting that mosquitoes scan their environment intensively while they progress upwind towards their host. These observations may help to improve the efficacy of trapping systems for malaria mosquitoes by (1) optimizing the site of odor release relative to trap entry and (2) adding a heat source which enhances a landing response.

  15. A 3D Analysis of Flight Behavior of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto Malaria Mosquitoes in Response to Human Odor and Heat

    PubMed Central

    Spitzen, Jeroen; Spoor, Cornelis W.; Grieco, Fabrizio; ter Braak, Cajo; Beeuwkes, Jacob; van Brugge, Sjaak P.; Kranenbarg, Sander; Noldus, Lucas P. J. J.; van Leeuwen, Johan L.; Takken, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Female mosquitoes use odor and heat as cues to navigate to a suitable landing site on their blood host. The way these cues affect flight behavior and modulate anemotactic responses, however, is poorly understood. We studied in-flight behavioral responses of females of the nocturnal malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto to human odor and heat. Flight-path characteristics in a wind tunnel (flow 20 cm/s) were quantified in three dimensions. With wind as the only stimulus (control), short and close to straight upwind flights were recorded. With heat alone, flights were similarly short and direct. The presence of human odor, in contrast, caused prolonged and highly convoluted flight patterns. The combination of odor+heat resulted in longer flights with more landings on the source than to either cue alone. Flight speed was greatest (mean groundspeed 27.2 cm/s) for odor+heat. Odor alone resulted in decreased flight speed when mosquitoes arrived within 30 cm of the source whereas mosquitoes exposed to odor+heat maintained a high flight speed while flying in the odor plume, until they arrived within 15 cm of the source. Human odor evoked an increase in crosswind flights with an additive effect of heat at close range (<15 cm) to the source. This was found for both horizontal and vertical flight components. However, mosquitoes nevertheless made upwind progress when flying in the odor+heat generated plume, suggesting that mosquitoes scan their environment intensively while they progress upwind towards their host. These observations may help to improve the efficacy of trapping systems for malaria mosquitoes by (1) optimizing the site of odor release relative to trap entry and (2) adding a heat source which enhances a landing response. PMID:23658792

  16. Combined effect of SLS and (SBE)(7M)-beta-CD on the solubilization of NSC-639829.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gang; Jain, Neera; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2004-01-01

    Complexation and micellization are two effective ways of solubilizing drugs. In this study, the combined effect of surfactant and complexant on the solubilization of a poorly water soluble compound (NSC-639829) is investigated. With increasing concentration of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) in solutions of fixed concentration of (SBE)(7M)-beta-CD, the total solubility of the drug decreases linearly, reaches a minimum and then increases linearly. At each minimum, the molar ratio of SLS to (SBE)(7M)-beta-CD is close to unity. The above observation is attributed to the fact that the surfactant molecule competes with the drug to "fit" in the non-polar cyclodextrin cavity. The surfactant depletes cyclodextrin to form a 1:1 complex. Once the concentration of free SLS reaches the CMC, it starts forming micelles and hence, solubilizes the drug. A slight decrease of the solubilizing power is noticed in the presence of SLS/(SBE)(7M)-beta-CD complex. The combined use of two solubilizing agents, a surfactant and a complexant, results in a much lower solubility than when either one is used alone at the same concentration. The surfactant molecule acts as a competitive inhibitor in the solubilization of the drug by the complexant. Similarly the complexant "pulls" the surfactant out of solution, making it unavailable for solubilizing the drug.

  17. Impact of thermo-chemo-sonic pretreatment in solubilizing waste activated sludge for biogas production: Energetic analysis and economic assessment.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, S; Rajesh Banu, J; Subitha, G; Ushani, U; Yeom, Ick Tae

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of solubilization during thermo-chemo-sonic pretreatment of waste activated sludge (WAS) on anaerobic biodegradability and cost for biogas production. The results revealed that it was possible to achieve 40-50% of solubilization of WAS when ultrasonic energy input was doubled (11,520-27,000kJ/kgTS). The cost to achieve 30-35% of solubilization of WAS was calculated to be 0.22-0.24USD/L, which was relatively lower than the cost of 0.53-0.8USD/L when 40-50% of solubilisation of WAS was achieved. There was no significant difference in biodegradability (0.60-0.64gCOD/gCOD) for samples with solubilization efficiency of 35-50%. Comparing energetic balance and economic assessment of samples with different solubilization percentages, the results showed that samples with 30-35% of solubilization had lower net cost (7.98-2.33USD/Ton of sludge) and negative energy balance compared to samples with other percentages of solubilization.

  18. Multifunctional properties of phosphate-solubilizing microorganisms grown on agro-industrial wastes in fermentation and soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, Maria; Serrano, Mercedes; Bravo, Vicente; Jurado, Encarnación; Nikolaeva, Iana; Martos, Vanessa; Vassilev, Nikolay

    2010-02-01

    One of the most studied approaches in solubilization of insoluble phosphates is the biological treatment of rock phosphates. In recent years, various techniques for rock phosphate solubilization have been proposed, with increasing emphasis on application of P-solubilizing microorganisms. The P-solubilizing activity is determined by the microbial biochemical ability to produce and release metabolites with metal-chelating functions. In a number of studies, we have shown that agro-industrial wastes can be efficiently used as substrates in solubilization of phosphate rocks. These processes were carried out employing various technologies including solid-state and submerged fermentations including immobilized cells. The review paper deals critically with several novel trends in exploring various properties of the above microbial/agro-wastes/rock phosphate systems. The major idea is to describe how a single P-solubilizing microorganism manifests wide range of metabolic abilities in different environments. In fermentation conditions, P-solubilizing microorganisms were found to produce various enzymes, siderophores, and plant hormones. Further introduction of the resulting biotechnological products into soil-plant systems resulted in significantly higher plant growth, enhanced soil properties, and biological (including biocontrol) activity. Application of these bio-products in bioremediation of disturbed (heavy metal contaminated and desertified) soils is based on another important part of their multifunctional properties.

  19. Dual Heat Pulse, Dual Layer Thermal Protection System Sizing Analysis and Trade Studies for Human Mars Entry Descent and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Mary Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    NASA has been recently updating design reference missions for the human exploration of Mars and evaluating the technology investments required to do so. The first of these started in January 2007 and developed the Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0 (DRA5). As part of DRA5, Thermal Protection System (TPS) sizing analysis was performed on a mid L/D rigid aeroshell undergoing a dual heat pulse (aerocapture and atmospheric entry) trajectory. The DRA5 TPS subteam determined that using traditional monolithic ablator systems would be mass expensive. They proposed a new dual-layer TPS concept utilizing an ablator atop a low thermal conductivity insulative substrate to address the issue. Using existing thermal response models for an ablator and insulative tile, preliminary hand analysis of the dual layer concept at a few key heating points indicated that the concept showed potential to reduce TPS masses and warranted further study. In FY09, the followon Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) project continued by focusing on Exploration-class cargo or crewed missions requiring 10 to 50 metric tons of landed payload. The TPS subteam advanced the preliminary dual-layer TPS analysis by developing a new process and updated TPS sizing code to rapidly evaluate mass-optimized, full body sizing for a dual layer TPS that is capable of dual heat pulse performance. This paper describes the process and presents the results of the EDL-SA FY09 dual-layer TPS analyses on the rigid mid L/D aeroshell. Additionally, several trade studies were conducted with the sizing code to evaluate the impact of various design factors, assumptions and margins.

  20. Regional relation between skin blood flow and sweating to passive heating and local administration of acetylcholine in young, healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, W. Larry; Alexander, Lacy M.

    2013-01-01

    Regional variation in sweating over the human body is widely recognized yet variation in vasomotor responses and mechanisms causing this variation remain unclear. This study aimed to explore the relation between regional sweating rates (RSR) and skin blood flow (SkBF) responses to thermal and pharmacological stimuli in young, healthy subjects. In nine subjects (23 ± 3 yr), intradermal microdialysis (MD) probes were inserted into the ventral forearm, abdomen, thigh, and lower back and perfused with lactated Ringer solution. RSR over each MD membrane were measured using ventilated capsules with a laser Doppler probe housed in each capsule for measurement of red cell flux (laser Doppler flux, LDF) as an index of SkBF. Subjects completed a whole body heating protocol to 1°C rise in oral temperature and an acetylcholine dose response (ACh 1 × 10−7-0.1 M; mean skin temperature 34°C). Maximal LDF were obtained at the end of both protocols (50 mM sodium nitroprusside).During heating RSR varied among sites (P < 0.0001) and was greater on the back versus other sites (P < 0.05), but LDF was similar between sites (P = 0.343). RSR and SkBF showed a strong relation during initial (arm: r = 0.77 ± 0.09, thigh: r = 0.81 ± 0.08, abdomen: r = 0.89 ± 0.04, back: r = 0.86 ± 0.04) but not latter stages of heating. No differences in RSR (P = 0.160) or SkBF (LDF, P = 0.841) were observed between sites during ACh perfusion. Taken together, these data suggest that increases in SkBF are necessary to initiate and increase sweating, but further rises in RSR are not fully dependent on SkBF in a dose-response manner. Furthermore, RSR cannot be explained by cholinergic sensitivity or variation in SkBF. PMID:23389110

  1. Frequency of Extreme Heat Event as a Surrogate Exposure Metric for Examining the Human Health Effects of Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Romeo Upperman, Crystal; Parker, Jennifer; Jiang, Chengsheng; He, Xin; Murtugudde, Raghuram; Sapkota, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological investigation of the impact of climate change on human health, particularly chronic diseases, is hindered by the lack of exposure metrics that can be used as a marker of climate change that are compatible with health data. Here, we present a surrogate exposure metric created using a 30-year baseline (1960-1989) that allows users to quantify long-term changes in exposure to frequency of extreme heat events with near unabridged spatial coverage in a scale that is compatible with national/state health outcome data. We evaluate the exposure metric by decade, seasonality, area of the country, and its ability to capture long-term changes in weather (climate), including natural climate modes. Our findings show that this generic exposure metric is potentially useful to monitor trends in the frequency of extreme heat events across varying regions because it captures long-term changes; is sensitive to the natural climate modes (ENSO events); responds well to spatial variability, and; is amenable to spatial/temporal aggregation, making it useful for epidemiological studies.

  2. Localized or Systemic {italic In Vivo} Heat-Inactivation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A Mathematical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pennypacker, Carl R.; Perelson, A.S.; Nys, N.; Nelson, G.; Sessler, D.I.

    1993-12-15

    Temperatures as low as 42 C, maintained for a little as 25 minutes, inactivate {approx}25% of HIV. Furthermore, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected T-cells are more sensitive to heat than healthy lymphocytes and susceptibility increases when the cells are pre-sensitized by exposure to tumor necrosis factor. Thus, induction of a whole-body hyperthermia, or hyperthermia specifically limited to tissues having a high viral load, are potential antiviral therapies for acquired immunodeficiency disease (AIDS). Accordingly, we incorporated therapeutic hyperthermia into an existing mathematical model which evaluates the interaction between HIV and CD4{sup +} T cells. Given the assumptions and limitations of this model, the results indicate that a daily therapy, reducing the population of actively infected cells by 40% or infectious virus by 50%, would effectively reverse the depletion of T cells. In contrast, a daily reduction of 20% of either actively infected cells or infectious virus would have a marginal effect. However, reduction by 20% of both actively infected cells and infectious virus could restore T cell numbers, assuming that permanent damage had not been inflicted on the thymus. Whole-body hyperthermia seems unlikely to be clinically useful, unless it can be induced non-invasively without general anesthesia. In contrast, heating directed specifically to areas of viral concentration may be effective and have a suitable risk/benefit ratio.

  3. Hormetic mechanisms of anti-aging and rejuvenating effects of repeated mild heat stress on human fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Suresh I S

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of hormesis is represented by mild stress-induced stimulation of maintenance and repair pathways, resulting in beneficial effects for cells and organisms. We have reported that repeated mild heat stress (RMHS) has anti-aging hormetic effects on growth and various cellular and biochemical characteristics of human skin fibroblasts undergoing aging in vitro. These effects of RMHS include the maintenance of the stress protein profile, reduction in the accumulation of oxidatively and glycoxidatively damaged proteins, stimulation of the activities of the proteasome and its 11S activator, improvement in cellular resistance to ethanol, hydrogen peroxide, and ultraviolet rays, and increased antioxidative activity of the cells. We have also reported that RMHS prolongs the lifespan of Drosophila. Others have reported anti-aging and life prolonging effects of a wide variety of so-called stressors, such as pro-oxidants, aldehydes, calorie restriction, irradiation, heat shock, and hypergravity. Although molecular mechanisms of hormesis are yet to be elucidated, there are indications that relatively small hormetic effects become biologically amplified, resulting in significant improvement of cellular and organic functions and survival. Hormesis, therefore, can be an effective approach for modulating aging, for preventing or delaying the onset of age-related diseases, and for improving the quality of life in old age.

  4. Large-eddy Simulation of Heat and Water Vapor Transfer in CT-Based Human Airway Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Tawhai, Merryn; Hoffman, Eric; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-11-01

    We propose a novel imaging-based thermodynamic model to study local heat and mass transfers in the human airways. Both 3D and 1D CFD models are developed and validated. Large-eddy simulation (LES) is adopted to solve 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with Boussinesq approximation along with temperature and water vapor transport equations and energy-flux based wall boundary condition. The 1D model provides initial and boundary conditions to the 3D model. The computed tomography (CT) lung images of three healthy subjects with sinusoidal waveforms and minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min are considered. Between 1D and 3D models and between subjects, the average temperature and water vapor distributions are similar, but their regional distributions are significantly different. In particular, unlike the 1D model, the heat and water vapor transfers in the 3D model are elevated at the bifurcations during inspiration. Moreover, the correlations of Nusselt number (Nu) and Sherwood number (Sh) with local Reynolds number and airway diameter are proposed. In conclusion, use of the subject-specific lung model is essential for accurate prediction of local thermal impacts on airway epithelium. Supported in part by NIH grants R01-HL094315, U01-HL114494 and S10-RR022421.

  5. Fever-range whole-body heat treatment stimulates antigen-specific T-cell responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasunobu; Ito, Yusuke; Ostapenko, Valentina V; Sakai, Mayuko; Matsushita, Norimasa; Imai, Kenichiro; Shimizu, Koichi; Aruga, Atsushi; Tanigawa, Keishi

    2014-11-01

    Increase in body temperature has been thought to play an important role in the regulation of immune responses, although its precise mechanisms are still under investigation. Here, we examined the effects of physiologically relevant thermal stress on the cytokine production from human peripheral T cells. Volunteers were heated using a whole-body hyperthermia device, the rectal temperature was maintained above 38.5 °C for more than 60 min, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained before and after the treatment. When T cells were stimulated with anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies, marked increases in the production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-2 were observed in PBMCs prepared immediately after and 24h after the treatment. Similarly, enhanced production of IFN-γ in response to the tuberculin purified protein derivative or antigenic viral peptides was also observed immediately after and 24h after the treatment. Fluorescence photo-bleaching analyses showed heat-induced increase of membrane fluidity in T cells, which probably enables them to induce rapid and efficient cluster formation of molecules involved in antigen recognition and signal transduction for T-cell stimulation. We concluded that physiologically relevant thermal stress could efficiently modify T-cell responsiveness to various stimuli, including enhanced responses to specific antigens.

  6. Frequency of Extreme Heat Event as a Surrogate Exposure Metric for Examining the Human Health Effects of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Romeo Upperman, Crystal; Parker, Jennifer; Jiang, Chengsheng; He, Xin; Murtugudde, Raghuram; Sapkota, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological investigation of the impact of climate change on human health, particularly chronic diseases, is hindered by the lack of exposure metrics that can be used as a marker of climate change that are compatible with health data. Here, we present a surrogate exposure metric created using a 30-year baseline (1960–1989) that allows users to quantify long-term changes in exposure to frequency of extreme heat events with near unabridged spatial coverage in a scale that is compatible with national/state health outcome data. We evaluate the exposure metric by decade, seasonality, area of the country, and its ability to capture long-term changes in weather (climate), including natural climate modes. Our findings show that this generic exposure metric is potentially useful to monitor trends in the frequency of extreme heat events across varying regions because it captures long-term changes; is sensitive to the natural climate modes (ENSO events); responds well to spatial variability, and; is amenable to spatial/temporal aggregation, making it useful for epidemiological studies. PMID:26641244

  7. Numerical model of heat transfer in the human eye with consideration of fluid dynamics of the aqueous humour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Samaras, Theodoros

    2010-10-01

    In this work we present a new 3D numerical model for heat transfer in the human eye, which takes into account the aqueous humour flow in the anterior chamber. We show that consideration of this phenomenon in the calculations alters the temperature distribution on the corneal and lens surfaces, without, however, noticeably changing their absolute values. The most notable effect is that the coolest area of the cornea moves at a point of 2 mm inferior to its geometric centre. The maximum velocity of the fluid in the anterior chamber was found to be 3.36 × 10-4 m s-1. The effect of the flow on displacing the cool area of the corneal surface temperature is counterbalanced by assuming anisotropic thermal conductivity. The model was implemented in the case of an artificial intraocular lens to show the resulting temperature variations.

  8. The taming of small heat-shock proteins: crystallization of the α-crystallin domain from human Hsp27

    PubMed Central

    Baranova, E. V.; Beelen, S.; Gusev, N. B.; Strelkov, S. V.

    2009-01-01

    Small heat-shock proteins (sHsps) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones. sHsps function as homooligomers or heterooligomers that are prone to subunit exchange and structural plasticity. Here, a procedure for obtaining diffraction-quality crystals of the α-crystallin domain of human Hsp27 is presented. Initially, limited proteolysis was used to delineate the corresponding stable fragment (residues 90–171). This fragment could be crystallized, but examination of the crystals using X-rays indicated partial disorder. The surface-entropy reduction approach was applied to ameliorate the crystal quality. Consequently, a double mutant E125A/E126A of the 90–171 fragment yielded well ordered crystals that diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution. PMID:20054128

  9. Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins can be distinguished from transmembrane polypeptide-anchored proteins by differential solubilization and temperature-induced phase separation in Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Hooper, N M; Bashir, A

    1991-12-15

    Treatment of kidney microvillar membranes with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-114 at 0 degrees C, followed by low-speed centrifugation, generated a detergent-insoluble pellet and a detergent-soluble supernatant. The supernatant was further fractionated by phase separation at 30 degrees C into a detergent-rich phase and a detergent-depleted or aqueous phase. Those ectoenzymes with a covalently attached glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (G-PI) membrane anchor were recovered predominantly (greater than 73%) in the detergent-insoluble pellet. In contrast, those ectoenzymes anchored by a single membrane-spanning polypeptide were recovered predominantly (greater than 62%) in the detergent-rich phase. Removal of the hydrophobic membrane-anchoring domain from either class of ectoenzyme resulted in the proteins being recovered predominantly (greater than 70%) in the aqueous phase. This technique was also applied to other membrane types, including pig and human erythrocyte ghosts, where, in both cases, the G-PI-anchored acetylcholinesterase partitioned predominantly (greater than 69%) into the detergent-insoluble pellet. When the microvillar membranes were subjected only to differential solubilization with Triton X-114 at 0 degrees C, the G-PI-anchored ectoenzymes were recovered predominantly (greater than 63%) in the detergent-insoluble pellet, whereas the transmembrane-polypeptide-anchored ectoenzymes were recovered predominantly (greater than 95%) in the detergent-solubilized supernatant. Thus differential solubilization and temperature-induced phase separation in Triton X-114 distinguished between G-PI-anchored membrane proteins, transmembrane-polypeptide-anchored proteins and soluble, hydrophilic proteins. This technique may be more useful and reliable than susceptibility to release by phospholipases as a means of identifying a G-PI anchor on an unpurified membrane protein.

  10. Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins can be distinguished from transmembrane polypeptide-anchored proteins by differential solubilization and temperature-induced phase separation in Triton X-114.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, N M; Bashir, A

    1991-01-01

    Treatment of kidney microvillar membranes with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-114 at 0 degrees C, followed by low-speed centrifugation, generated a detergent-insoluble pellet and a detergent-soluble supernatant. The supernatant was further fractionated by phase separation at 30 degrees C into a detergent-rich phase and a detergent-depleted or aqueous phase. Those ectoenzymes with a covalently attached glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (G-PI) membrane anchor were recovered predominantly (greater than 73%) in the detergent-insoluble pellet. In contrast, those ectoenzymes anchored by a single membrane-spanning polypeptide were recovered predominantly (greater than 62%) in the detergent-rich phase. Removal of the hydrophobic membrane-anchoring domain from either class of ectoenzyme resulted in the proteins being recovered predominantly (greater than 70%) in the aqueous phase. This technique was also applied to other membrane types, including pig and human erythrocyte ghosts, where, in both cases, the G-PI-anchored acetylcholinesterase partitioned predominantly (greater than 69%) into the detergent-insoluble pellet. When the microvillar membranes were subjected only to differential solubilization with Triton X-114 at 0 degrees C, the G-PI-anchored ectoenzymes were recovered predominantly (greater than 63%) in the detergent-insoluble pellet, whereas the transmembrane-polypeptide-anchored ectoenzymes were recovered predominantly (greater than 95%) in the detergent-solubilized supernatant. Thus differential solubilization and temperature-induced phase separation in Triton X-114 distinguished between G-PI-anchored membrane proteins, transmembrane-polypeptide-anchored proteins and soluble, hydrophilic proteins. This technique may be more useful and reliable than susceptibility to release by phospholipases as a means of identifying a G-PI anchor on an unpurified membrane protein. PMID:1837216

  11. Occurrence of salt, pH, and temperature-tolerant, phosphate-solubilizing bacteria in alkaline soils

    PubMed

    Johri; Surange; Nautiyal

    1999-08-01

    An ecological survey was conducted to characterize 4800 bacterial strains isolated from the root-free soil, rhizosphere, and rhizoplane of Prosopis juliflora growing in alkaline soils. Of the 4800 bacteria, 857 strains were able to solubilize phosphate on plates. The incidence of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) in the rhizoplane was highest, followed by rhizosphere and root-free soil. Eighteen bacterial strains out of 857 PSB were able to produce halo at 30 degrees C in a plate assay in the presence of 5% salt (NaCl) and solubilize tricalcium phosphate in National Botanical Research Institute's phosphate growth medium (NBRIP) broth, in the presence of various salts, pHs, and temperatures. Among the various bacteria tested, NBRI4 and NBRI7 did not produced halo in a plate assay at 30 degrees C in the absence of salt. Contrary to indirect measurement of phosphate solubilization by plate assay, the direct measurement of phosphate solubilization in NBRIP broth assay always resulted in reliable results. The phosphate solubilization ability of NBRI4 was higher than in the control in the presence of salts (NaCl, CaCl2, and KCl) at 30 degrees C. Phosphate solubilization further increased in the presence of salts at 37 degrees C as compared with 30 degrees C. At 37 degrees C, CaCl2 reduced phosphate solubilization ability of NBRI4 compared with the control. The results indicated the role of calcium salt in the phosphate solubilization ability of NBRI4.http://link.springer-ny. com/link/service/journals/00284/bibs/39n2p89.html PMID:10398833

  12. Caribbean Heat Threatens Health, Well-being and the Future of Humanity

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, Cheryl C.; Akpinar-Elci, Muge

    2015-01-01

    Climate change has substantial impacts on public health and safety, disease risks and the provision of health care, with the poor being particularly disadvantaged. Management of the associated health risks and changing health service requirements requires adequate responses at local levels. Health-care providers are central to these responses. While climate change raises ethical questions about its causes, impacts and social justice, medicine and bioethics typically focus on individual patients and research participants rather than these broader issues. We broaden this focus by examining awareness among health-care providers in the Caribbean region, where geographic and socioeconomic features pose particular vulnerabilities to climate change. In focus groups, Caribbean providers described rises in mosquito-borne, flood-related, heat-related, respiratory and mental illnesses, and attributed these to local impacts of climate change. Their discussions showed that the significance of these impacts differs in different Caribbean nations, raising policy and social justice questions. Bioethics and public health ethics are situated to frame, inform and initiate public and policy dialog about values and scientific evidence associated with climate change. We urge readers to initiate such dialog within their own institutions about the context-dependent nature of the burdens of climate change, and values and policies that permit it to worsen. PMID:26180551

  13. Inhibiting Heat Shock Proteins Can Potentiate the Cytotoxic Effect of Cannabidiol in Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Scott, Katherine A; Dennis, Jayne L; Dalgleish, Angus G; Liu, Wai M

    2015-11-01

    Cannabinoids possess a number of characteristics that make them putative anticancer drugs, and their value as such is currently being explored in a number of clinical studies. To further understand the roles that cannabinoids may have, we performed gene expression profiling in glioma cell lines cultured with cannabidiol (CBD) and/or Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and pursued targets identified by this screening. Results showed that a large number of genes belonging to the heat shock protein (HSP) super-family were up-regulated following treatment, specifically with CBD. Increases were observed both at the gene and protein levels and arose as a consequence of increased generation of ROS by CBD, and correlated with an increase in a number of HSP client proteins. Furthermore, increases impeded the cytotoxic effect of CBD; an effect that was improved by co-culture with pharmacalogical inhibitors of HSPs. Similarly, culturing glioma cells with CBD and HSP inhibitors increased radiosensitivity when compared to CBD-alone. Taken together, these data indicate that the cytotoxic effects of CBD can be diminished by HSPs that indirectly rise as a result of CBD use, and that the inclusion of HSP inhibitors in CBD treatment regimens can enhance the overall effect.

  14. A review of heat transfer in human tooth--experimental characterization and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian; Bai, Bo Feng

    2010-06-01

    With rapid advances in modern dentistry, high-energy output instruments (e.g., dental lasers and light polymerizing units) are increasingly employed in dental surgery for applications such as laser assisted tooth ablation, bleaching, hypersensitivity treatment and polymerization of dental restorative materials. Extreme high temperature occurs within the tooth during these treatments, which may induce tooth thermal pain (TTP) sensation. Despite the wide application of these dental treatments, the underlying mechanisms are far from clear. Therefore, there is an urgent need to better understand heat transfer (HT) process in tooth, thermally induced damage of tooth, and the corresponding TTP. This will enhance the design and optimization of clinical treatment strategies. This paper presents the state-of-the-art of the current understanding on HT in tooth, with both experimental study and mathematical modeling reviewed. Limitations of the current experimental and mathematical methodologies are discussed and potential solutions are suggested. Interpretation of TTP in terms of thermally stimulated dentinal fluid flow is also discussed. PMID:20303579

  15. Large scale solubilization of coal and bioconversion to utilizable energy. Quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1994-06-01

    In order to develop a system for large scale coal solubilization and its bioconversion to utilizable fuel, the authors plan to clone the genes encoding Neurospora protein that facilitate depolymerization of coal. They also plan to use desulfurizing bacteria to remove the sulfur in situ and use other microorganisms to convert biosolubilized coal into utilizable energy following an approach utilizing several microorganisms (Faison). In addition the product of coal solubilized by fungus will be characterized to determine their chemical nature and the mechanism of reaction catalyzed by fungal product during in vivo and in vitro solubilization by the fungus or purified fungal protein.

  16. Large scale solubilization of coal and bioconversion to utilizable energy. Fifth quarterly technical report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1995-12-01

    In order to develop a system for a large scale coal solubilization and its bioconversion to utilizable fuel, we plan to clone the genes encoding Neurospora protein that facilitate depolymerization of coal. We also plan to use desulfurizing bacteria to remove the sulfur in situ and use other microorganisms to convert biosolubilized coal into utilizable energy following an approach utilizing several microorganisms. In addition the product of coal solubilized by fungus will be characterized to determine their chemical nature and the mechanism of reaction catalyzed by fungal product during in vivo and in vitro solubilization by the fungus or purified fungal protein.

  17. Effects of detergent on the binding of solubilized sodium channels to immobilized wheat germ agglutinin: structural implications.

    PubMed

    Weiner, J S; Rudy, B

    1988-10-20

    The binding of the solubilized voltage-dependent sodium channel from rat brain to immobilized wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is detergent-dependent. When solubilized in sodium cholate, only 11% of total recovered channels bound to a WGA-Sepharose column. When solubilized in Triton X-100 or CHAPS, however, 80% and 60% could bind, respectively. The effect of cholate on sodium channel binding is relatively specific: the major rat brain glycoproteins which bind to immobilized WGA are roughly the same in either Triton or cholate, as analyzed by SDS gel electrophoresis. The structural implications for the channel are discussed.

  18. Immunomodulation in human and experimental arthritis: including vitamin D, helminths and heat-shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, L L W; Shoenfeld, Y; Sartori, A

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that is mainly directed to the joints, affecting the synovial membrane, the cartilage and also the bone. This disease affects 1% to 2% of the world population and is associated with significant morbidity and increased mortality. RA experimental models have allowed a great deal of information to be translated to the corresponding human disease. This review summarizes some of the most relevant findings targeting immunomodulation in arthritis. Some general guidelines to choose an adequate experimental model and also our experience with arthritis are supplied.

  19. Will the damage be done before we feel the heat? Infectious disease emergence and human response.

    PubMed

    Kock, R A

    2013-12-01

    The global political economy is facing extreme challenges against a backdrop of large-scale expansion of human and domestic animal populations and related impacts on the biosphere. Significant global socio-ecological changes have occurred in the period of a single lifetime, driven by increased technology and access to physical and biological resources through open markets and globalization. Current resource consumption rates are not sustainable and ecological tipping points are being reached and one of the indicators of these may be a changing balance between hosts and pathogens. A period of extraordinary progress in reducing infection risk and disease impact on humans and domestic animals in the 20th Century is reversing in the 21st, but not always and not everywhere. Drivers for this shift are discussed in terms of demographics, agroecology, biodiversity decline and loss of resilience in ecosystems, climate change and increasing interconnectedness between species globally. Causality of disease emergence remains highly speculative, but patterns and data are emerging to commend a precautionary approach, while reassessing our global political, social and economic systems.

  20. Will the damage be done before we feel the heat? Infectious disease emergence and human response.

    PubMed

    Kock, R A

    2013-12-01

    The global political economy is facing extreme challenges against a backdrop of large-scale expansion of human and domestic animal populations and related impacts on the biosphere. Significant global socio-ecological changes have occurred in the period of a single lifetime, driven by increased technology and access to physical and biological resources through open markets and globalization. Current resource consumption rates are not sustainable and ecological tipping points are being reached and one of the indicators of these may be a changing balance between hosts and pathogens. A period of extraordinary progress in reducing infection risk and disease impact on humans and domestic animals in the 20th Century is reversing in the 21st, but not always and not everywhere. Drivers for this shift are discussed in terms of demographics, agroecology, biodiversity decline and loss of resilience in ecosystems, climate change and increasing interconnectedness between species globally. Causality of disease emergence remains highly speculative, but patterns and data are emerging to commend a precautionary approach, while reassessing our global political, social and economic systems. PMID:24152741

  1. Local temperature-sensitive mechanisms are important mediators of limb tissue hyperemia in the heat-stressed human at rest and during small muscle mass exercise.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Scott T; Trangmar, Steven J; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Rakobowchuk, Mark; Banker, Devendar S; Lotlikar, Makrand D; Ali, Leena; González-Alonso, José

    2015-07-15

    Limb tissue and systemic blood flow increases with heat stress, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that heat stress-induced increases in limb tissue perfusion are primarily mediated by local temperature-sensitive mechanisms. Leg and systemic temperatures and hemodynamics were measured at rest and during incremental single-legged knee extensor exercise in 15 males exposed to 1 h of either systemic passive heat-stress with simultaneous cooling of a single leg (n = 8) or isolated leg heating or cooling (n = 7). Systemic heat stress increased core, skin and heated leg blood temperatures (Tb), cardiac output, and heated leg blood flow (LBF; 0.6 ± 0.1 l/min; P < 0.05). In the cooled leg, however, LBF remained unchanged throughout (P > 0.05). Increased heated leg deep tissue blood flow was closely related to Tb (R(2) = 0.50; P < 0.01), which is partly attributed to increases in tissue V̇O2 (R(2) = 0.55; P < 0.01) accompanying elevations in total leg glucose uptake (P < 0.05). During isolated limb heating and cooling, LBFs were equivalent to those found during systemic heat stress (P > 0.05), despite unchanged systemic temperatures and hemodynamics. During incremental exercise, heated LBF was consistently maintained ∼ 0.6 l/min higher than that in the cooled leg (P < 0.01), with LBF and vascular conductance in both legs showing a strong correlation with their respective local Tb (R(2) = 0.85 and 0.95, P < 0.05). We conclude that local temperature-sensitive mechanisms are important mediators in limb tissue perfusion regulation both at rest and during small-muscle mass exercise in hyperthermic humans.

  2. Local temperature-sensitive mechanisms are important mediators of limb tissue hyperemia in the heat-stressed human at rest and during small muscle mass exercise

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Scott T.; Trangmar, Steven J.; Kalsi, Kameljit K.; Rakobowchuk, Mark; Banker, Devendar S.; Lotlikar, Makrand D.; Ali, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Limb tissue and systemic blood flow increases with heat stress, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that heat stress-induced increases in limb tissue perfusion are primarily mediated by local temperature-sensitive mechanisms. Leg and systemic temperatures and hemodynamics were measured at rest and during incremental single-legged knee extensor exercise in 15 males exposed to 1 h of either systemic passive heat-stress with simultaneous cooling of a single leg (n = 8) or isolated leg heating or cooling (n = 7). Systemic heat stress increased core, skin and heated leg blood temperatures (Tb), cardiac output, and heated leg blood flow (LBF; 0.6 ± 0.1 l/min; P < 0.05). In the cooled leg, however, LBF remained unchanged throughout (P > 0.05). Increased heated leg deep tissue blood flow was closely related to Tb (R2 = 0.50; P < 0.01), which is partly attributed to increases in tissue V̇O2 (R2 = 0.55; P < 0.01) accompanying elevations in total leg glucose uptake (P < 0.05). During isolated limb heating and cooling, LBFs were equivalent to those found during systemic heat stress (P > 0.05), despite unchanged systemic temperatures and hemodynamics. During incremental exercise, heated LBF was consistently maintained ∼0.6 l/min higher than that in the cooled leg (P < 0.01), with LBF and vascular conductance in both legs showing a strong correlation with their respective local Tb (R2 = 0.85 and 0.95, P < 0.05). We conclude that local temperature-sensitive mechanisms are important mediators in limb tissue perfusion regulation both at rest and during small-muscle mass exercise in hyperthermic humans. PMID:25934093

  3. Immune responses to Mycobacterial heat shock protein 70 accompany self-reactivity to human BiP in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shoda, Hirofumi; Hanata, Norio; Sumitomo, Shuji; Okamura, Tomohisa; Fujio, Keishi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease, and a member of human heat shock protein (HSP) 70 protein family, Binding Immunoglobulin Protein (BiP), has been identified as an important autoantigen for T and B cells. We herein focused on Mycobacterial (Myc) HSPs and immune responses to MycHSPs in RA patients. Serum titers of antibodies against MycHSP70 were significantly elevated in RA patients and correlated with serum anti-BiP antibody titers. A MycHSP70-derived HLA-DR4 major epitope was identified using the proliferative capacity of RA PBMCs as an indicator. The major epitope, MycHSP70287–306, was located at the corresponding position in the major epitope for human BiP336–355, and a strong correlation was found between the proliferation of PBMCs in response to MycHSP70287–306 and BiP336–355. The immunization of HLA-DR4 transgenic mice with MycHSP70 induced the proliferation of T cells and development of anti-BiP antibodies. In contrast, the oral administration of MycHSP70287–306 resulted in the amelioration of collagen-induced arthritis, serum antibody responses, and T cell proliferation. In conclusion, immune responses to MycHSP70 were associated with adaptive immunity against BiP in RA, and could be an important mechanism underlying the development of autoimmunity. PMID:26927756

  4. Solubilization of the novel anionic amphiphilic photosensitizer TPCS 2a by nonionic Pluronic block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Lilletvedt, M; Smistad, G; Tønnesen, H H; Høgset, A; Kristensen, S

    2011-06-14

    The influence of four nonionic Pluronic block copolymers (L44, F68, P123 and F127) on the solubilization and aggregation of the novel anionic amphiphilic photosensitizer TPCS(2a), intended for use in the technology of photochemical internalization (PCI), was evaluated in aqueous media as part of pharmaceutical preformulation studies. The evaluation was performed by use of UV-Vis spectroscopy for diluted samples of TPCS(2a) (3×10(-6)M), and capillary viscosimetry, freezing point depression measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) at pharmaceutical relevant concentrations (2; 10 or 30 mg/ml TPCS(2a)). The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the Pluronics in presence of TPCS(2a) was determined spectrophotometrically. The Pluronic block copolymers solubilized the photosensitizer above CMC at ambient temperature by formation of vehicle-drug complexes apparently organized in networks of varying viscosity and morphology, which were sensitive towards the addition of neutral and charged excipients. PMID:21530656

  5. Photoinduced Solubilization and Photocatalytic Properties of Poly(3-alkylthiophene) under Carbon Dioxide Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Kuwabara, Takao; Yoshino, Katsumi

    1992-01-01

    Effects of light irradiation on poly(3-alkylthiophene) immersed in organic solvents have been studied under CO2 atmosphere. The insoluble part of poly(3-alkylthiophene) is solubilized in organic solvents by photoirradiation under CO2 atmosphere. Formation of carbonyl group in the solubilized poly(3-alkylthiophene) has been confirmed. The quenching effect of CO2 observed in the photoluminescence experiment of the poly(3-alkylthiophene) suggests electron injection from photoexcited poly(3-alkylthiophene) to CO2 molecules. Photocatalytic fixation of CO2 molecules resulting in formation of salicylic acid has also been achieved by a novel photocatalytic reaction using poly(3-alkylthiophene) as a photocatalyst under the existence of a substance such as phenol which reacts with CO2\\dot{-}.

  6. The production of fibers and films from solubilized hagfish slime thread proteins.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Atsuko; Armstrong, Clare L; Kreplak, Laurent; Rheinstadter, Maikel C; Lim, Loong-Tak; Gillis, Todd E; Fudge, Douglas S

    2012-11-12

    Hagfish slime threads, which make up the fibrous component of the defensive slime of hagfishes, consist primarily of proteins from the intermediate filament family of proteins and possess impressive mechanical properties that make them attractive biomimetic models. To investigate whether solubilized intermediate filament proteins can be used to make high-performance, environmentally sustainable materials, we cast thin films on the surface of electrolyte buffers using solubilized hagfish slime thread proteins. The films were drawn into fibers, and the tensile properties were measured. Fiber mechanics depended on casting conditions and postspinning processing. Postsecondary drawing resulted in fibers with improved material properties similar to those of regenerated silk fibers. Structural analyses of the fibers revealed increased molecular alignment resulting from the second draw, but no increase in crystallinity. Our findings show promise for intermediate filament proteins as an alternative source for the design and production of high performance protein-based fibers. PMID:23016557

  7. The production of fibers and films from solubilized hagfish slime thread proteins.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Atsuko; Armstrong, Clare L; Kreplak, Laurent; Rheinstadter, Maikel C; Lim, Loong-Tak; Gillis, Todd E; Fudge, Douglas S

    2012-11-12

    Hagfish slime threads, which make up the fibrous component of the defensive slime of hagfishes, consist primarily of proteins from the intermediate filament family of proteins and possess impressive mechanical properties that make them attractive biomimetic models. To investigate whether solubilized intermediate filament proteins can be used to make high-performance, environmentally sustainable materials, we cast thin films on the surface of electrolyte buffers using solubilized hagfish slime thread proteins. The films were drawn into fibers, and the tensile properties were measured. Fiber mechanics depended on casting conditions and postspinning processing. Postsecondary drawing resulted in fibers with improved material properties similar to those of regenerated silk fibers. Structural analyses of the fibers revealed increased molecular alignment resulting from the second draw, but no increase in crystallinity. Our findings show promise for intermediate filament proteins as an alternative source for the design and production of high performance protein-based fibers.

  8. Low-temperature kinetics of the reaction of oxygen and solubilized cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Chance, B; Saronio, C; Leigh, J S; Ingledew, W J; King, T E

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of solubilized cytochrome oxidase in the fully reduced state with O2 at low temperatures reveals components with characteristics similar to those observed with the membrane-bound oxidase, namely compounds A and B, which are proposed to be 'oxy' and 'peroxy' compounds respectively. Similar species are identified in both solubilized and membrane-bound oxidases; the reaction velocity constant for the reation with O2 and the dissociation constant are decreased 2-3-fold in the solubilied preparation as compared with the membrane-bound species, owing to decreased reactivity towards O2 in the former. The oxidase prepared in the mixed-valence state shows the distinctive absorption band characteristic of compound C, identified in the membrane-bound oxidase. The assignment of the alpha, beta, gamma and near-i.r. absorption bands to possible valence states of these compounds is made. PMID:208516

  9. Solubilization of benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) in aqueous micellar solutions of amphiphilic imidazolium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Łuczak, Justyna; Jungnickel, Christian; Markiewicz, Marta; Hupka, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Water-soluble ionic liquids may be considered analogues to cationic surfactants with a corresponding surface activity and ability to create organized structures in aqueous solutions. For the first time, the enhanced solubility of the aromatic hydrocarbons, benzene, toluene, and xylene, in aqueous micellar systems of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium chlorides was investigated. Above a critical micelle concentration, a gradual increase in the concentration of aromatic hydrocarbons in the miceller solution was observed. This phenomenon was followed by means of the molar solubilization ratio, the micellar/water partition coefficient, and the number of solubilizate molecules per IL micelle. The molar solubilization ratio for ionic liquid micelles was found to be significantly higher when compared to that of ionic surfactants of similar chain length. The incorporation of the hydrocarbon into the micelle affects also an increase of the aggregation number. PMID:23570459

  10. Alkali and Acid Solubilization Effects on Rheological Properties of Horse Mackerel Muscle Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo-Deaño, L.; Tovar, C. A.

    2008-07-01

    Influence of the acid (Type A) and alkali (Type B) solubilization of muscle proteins in the viscoelastic properties of surimi and surimi gels made from horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) muscle were evaluated. Stress and frequency sweep tests showed that surimi from method B presents higher viscoelastic moduli, lowest values of phase angle and minimum viscoelastic moduli dependence with frequency than surimi A. These results show a high inicial protein aggregation in surimi B, that could explain the greater firmness and hardness of this sample, showing a more compact network structure. From static and dynamic tests, gel developed from alkali solubilization resulted in higher gel strength and more rigid network than that from acidic pH, despite the incial protein aggregation of surimi B its protein keeps better gelation capacity. The less structural quality of GA gel is likely due to the more lipid content on the surimi as compared to alkali treatment.

  11. Real-time detection of lipid bilayer assembly and detergent-initiated solubilization using optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, V.; Armani, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    The cellular membrane governs numerous fundamental biological processes. Therefore, developing a comprehensive understanding of its structure and function is critical. However, its inherent biological complexity gives rise to numerous inter-dependent physical phenomena. In an attempt to develop a model, two different experimental approaches are being pursued in parallel: performing single cell experiments (top down) and using biomimetic structures (bottom up), such as lipid bilayers. One challenge in many of these experiments is the reliance on fluorescent probes for detection which can create confounds in this already complex system. In the present work, a label-free detection method based on an optical resonant cavity is used to detect one of the fundamental physical phenomena in the system: assembly and solubilization of the lipid bilayer. The evanescent field of the cavity strongly interacts with the lipid bilayer, enabling the detection of the bilayer behavior in real-time. Two independent detection mechanisms confirm the formation and detergent-assisted solubilization of the lipid bilayers: (1) a refractive index change and (2) a material loss change. Both mechanisms can be monitored in parallel, on the same device, thus allowing for cross-confirmation of the results. To verify the proposed method, we have detected the formation of self-assembled phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers from small unilamellar vesicles on the device surface in real-time. Subsequently, we exposed the bilayers to two different detergents (non-ionic Triton X-100 and anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate) to initiate solubilization, and this process was also detected in real-time. After the bilayer solubilization, the device returned to its initial state, exhibiting minimal hysteresis. The experimental wash-off was also collected and analyzed using dynamic light scattering.

  12. Nanolipoprotein particles and related methods and systems for protein capture, solubilization, and/or purification

    DOEpatents

    Chromy, Brett A.; Henderson, Paul; Hoeprich, Jr, Paul D.

    2016-10-04

    Provided herein are methods and systems for assembling, solubilizing and/or purifying a membrane associated protein in a nanolipoprotein particle, which comprise a temperature transition cycle performed in presence of a detergent, wherein during the temperature transition cycle the nanolipoprotein components are brought to a temperature above and below the gel to liquid crystalling transition temperature of the membrane forming lipid of the nanolipoprotein particle.

  13. Initial pH of medium affects organic acids production but do not affect phosphate solubilization.

    PubMed

    Marra, Leandro M; de Oliveira-Longatti, Silvia M; Soares, Cláudio R F S; de Lima, José M; Olivares, Fabio L; Moreira, Fatima M S

    2015-06-01

    The pH of the culture medium directly influences the growth of microorganisms and the chemical processes that they perform. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of the initial pH of the culture medium on the production of 11 low-molecular-weight organic acids and on the solubilization of calcium phosphate by bacteria in growth medium (NBRIP). The following strains isolated from cowpea nodules were studied: UFLA03-08 (Rhizobium tropici), UFLA03-09 (Acinetobacter sp.), UFLA03-10 (Paenibacillus kribbensis), UFLA03-106 (Paenibacillus kribbensis) and UFLA03-116 (Paenibacillus sp.). The strains UFLA03-08, UFLA03-09, UFLA03-10 and UFLA03-106 solubilized Ca3(PO4)2 in liquid medium regardless of the initial pH, although without a significant difference between the treatments. The production of organic acids by these strains was assessed for all of the initial pH values investigated, and differences between the treatments were observed. Strains UFLA03-09 and UFLA03-10 produced the same acids at different initial pH values in the culture medium. There was no correlation between phosphorus solubilized from Ca3(PO4)2 in NBRIP liquid medium and the concentration of total organic acids at the different initial pH values. Therefore, the initial pH of the culture medium influences the production of organic acids by the strains UFLA03-08, UFLA03-09, UFLA03-10 and UFLA03-106 but it does not affect calcium phosphate solubilization.

  14. Solubilization and reconstitution of pisatin demethylase, a cytochrome P-450 from the pathogenic fungus Nectria haematococca

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, A.E.; Matthews, D.E.; VanEtten, H.D.

    1984-07-01

    Some isolates of the fungus Nectria haematococca Berk. and Br. can demethylate pisatin, a phytoalexin from pea (Pisum sativum L.). Pisatin demethylation appears to be necessary for tolerance to pisatin and virulence on pea, and is catalyzed by a microsomal cytochrome P-450. We now report solubilization of this enzyme from N. haematococca microsomes. Pisatin demethylase activity was obtained in the high speed supernatant of detergent treated microsomes, if detergent was removed before assay. The CO-binding spectrum of the soluble enzyme preparation indicated the presence of cytochrome P-450. Cholic acids were the most effective of the detergents tested for solubilizing enzyme activity. Loss of enzyme activity during solubilization was reduced by certain protease inhibitors, but not by substrate, reducing agents, antioxidants, or phospholipids. The most effective solubilization medium tests was 1% sodium cholate, 100 millimolar potassium phosphate, 500 millimolar sucrose, 1 millimolar phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, pH 7.5, which yielded approximately 30% of the pisatin demethylase and over 95% of the NADPH-cytochrome c reductase in the soluble fraction. Demethylase activity was lost when the reductase was removed by adsorption on 2',5'-ADP-agarose. The demethylase activity of reductase-free fractions could be restored by adding a reductase preparation purified approximately 100-fold from microsomes of N. haematococca isolate 74-8-1, which does not demethylate pisatin. We conclude that pisatin demethylase requires NADPH-cytochrome c reductase for activity. The inability of some isolates to demethylate pisatin appears to be due to the absence of a suitable cytochrome P-450, rather than to a lack of functional reductase. 24 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  15. Nanolipoprotein particles and related methods and systems for protein capture, solubilization, and/or purification

    SciTech Connect

    Chromy, Brett A; Henderson, Paul; Hoeprich, Jr., Paul D

    2014-12-09

    Provided herein are methods and systems for assembling, solubilizing and/or purifying a membrane associated protein in a nanolipoprotein particle, which comprise a temperature transition cycle performed in presence of a detergent, wherein during the temperature transition cycle the nanolipoprotein components are brought to a temperature above and below the gel to liquid crystalling transition temperature of the membrane forming lipid of the nanolipoprotein particle.

  16. Yeast Display-Based Antibody Affinity Maturation Using Detergent-Solubilized Cell Lysates.

    PubMed

    Tillotson, Benjamin J; Lajoie, Jason M; Shusta, Eric V

    2015-01-01

    It is often desired to identify or engineer antibodies that target membrane proteins (MPs). However, due to their inherent insolubility in aqueous solutions, MPs are often incompatible with in vitro antibody discovery and optimization platforms. Recently, we adapted yeast display technology to accommodate detergent-solubilized cell lysates as sources of MP antigens. The following protocol details the incorporation of cell lysates into a kinetic screen designed to obtain antibodies with improved affinity via slowed dissociation from an MP antigen. PMID:26060070

  17. Yeast display-based antibody affinity maturation using detergent-solubilized cell lysates

    PubMed Central

    Tillotson, Benjamin J.; Lajoie, Jason M.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary It is often desired to identify or engineer antibodies that target membrane proteins (MPs). However, due to their inherent insolubility in aqueous solutions, MPs are often incompatible with in vitro antibody discovery and optimization platforms. Recently, we adapted yeast display technology to accommodate detergent-solubilized cell lysates as sources of MP antigens. The following protocol details the incorporation of cell lysates into a kinetic screen designed to obtain antibodies with improved affinity via slowed dissociation from an MP antigen. PMID:26060070

  18. Initial pH of medium affects organic acids production but do not affect phosphate solubilization

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Leandro M.; de Oliveira-Longatti, Silvia M.; Soares, Cláudio R.F.S.; de Lima, José M.; Olivares, Fabio L.; Moreira, Fatima M.S.

    2015-01-01

    The pH of the culture medium directly influences the growth of microorganisms and the chemical processes that they perform. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of the initial pH of the culture medium on the production of 11 low-molecular-weight organic acids and on the solubilization of calcium phosphate by bacteria in growth medium (NBRIP). The following strains isolated from cowpea nodules were studied: UFLA03-08 (Rhizobium tropici), UFLA03-09 (Acinetobacter sp.), UFLA03-10 (Paenibacillus kribbensis), UFLA03-106 (Paenibacillus kribbensis) and UFLA03-116 (Paenibacillus sp.). The strains UFLA03-08, UFLA03-09, UFLA03-10 and UFLA03-106 solubilized Ca3(PO4)2 in liquid medium regardless of the initial pH, although without a significant difference between the treatments. The production of organic acids by these strains was assessed for all of the initial pH values investigated, and differences between the treatments were observed. Strains UFLA03-09 and UFLA03-10 produced the same acids at different initial pH values in the culture medium. There was no correlation between phosphorus solubilized from Ca3(PO4)2 in NBRIP liquid medium and the concentration of total organic acids at the different initial pH values. Therefore, the initial pH of the culture medium influences the production of organic acids by the strains UFLA03-08, UFLA03-09, UFLA03-10 and UFLA03-106 but it does not affect calcium phosphate solubilization. PMID:26273251

  19. High temperature flow-through device for rapid solubilization and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    West, Jason A. A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Peterson, Kenneth A.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2009-09-22

    Devices and methods for thermally lysing of biological material, for example vegetative bacterial cells and bacterial spores, are provided. Hot solution methods for solubilizing bacterial spores are described. Systems for direct analysis are disclosed including thermal lysers coupled to sample preparation stations. Integrated systems capable of performing sample lysis, labeling and protein fingerprint analysis of biological material, for example, vegetative bacterial cells, bacterial spores and viruses are provided.

  20. High temperature flow-through device for rapid solubilization and analysis

    DOEpatents

    West, Jason A. A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Peterson, Kenneth A.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2013-04-23

    Devices and methods for thermally lysing of biological material, for example vegetative bacterial cells and bacterial spores, are provided. Hot solution methods for solubilizing bacterial spores are described. Systems for direct analysis are disclosed including thermal lysers coupled to sample preparation stations. Integrated systems capable of performing sample lysis, labeling and protein fingerprint analysis of biological material, for example, vegetative bacterial cells, bacterial spores and viruses are provided.

  1. [Isolation and characterization of two bacteria with heavy metal resistance and phosphate solubilizing capability].

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiang; Peng, Xia-Wei; Li, Xia; Sun, Ya-Jun; Feng, Hong-Mei; Jiang, Ze-Ping

    2014-06-01

    Two phosphate solubilizing bacteria (T PSB1 and T PSB 2) with high heavy metal resistance were isolated from soil of a lead-zinc mine in Huayuan of Hunan Province, China. These two bacteria were identified as Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Burkholderia gladioli by 16S rRNA sequencing analysis, respectively. In the media containing insoluble inorganic calcium phosphate, the soluble phosphate amounts reached respectively 402.9 mg x L(-1) and 589.9 mg x L(-1) with the bacteria T PSB1 and T PSB2 after two weeks' growth. Moreover, the two bacteria developed solubilizing halos on the plates supplemented with the organic phosphate compounds, and the resulting soluble phosphate amounts in the broth media were respectively 2.97 mg x L(-1) and 4.69 mg x L(-1). In addition, these two bacteria showed the resistance to up to 2000 mg x L(-1) Zn2+, and their phosphate solubilizing amounts reached respectively 114.8 mg x L(-1) and 125.1 mg x L(-1). Similarly, their heavy metal resistance and phosphate solubilizing ability were also found in the Cr and Pb broth media with the concentration of 1000 mg x L(-1). In the Pb media, the soluble phosphate amounts reached respectively 57.9 mg x L(-1) and 71.7 mg x L(-1), and the soluble P amounts in the Cr media were 60.1 mg x L(-1) and 98.4 mg x L(-1) at the concentration of 1000 mg x L(-1).

  2. A Novel Innate Response of Human Corneal Epithelium to Heat-killed Candida albicans by Producing Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xia; Yuan, Xiaoyong; Li, Zhijie; Coursey, Terry G.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Li, De-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections of the cornea can be sight-threatening and have a worse prognosis than other types of microbial corneal infections. Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRP), which are expressed on the ocular surface, play an important role in the immune response against bacterial corneal infections by activating toll-like receptors (TLRs) or increasing phagocytosis. However, the role of PGLYRPs in innate immune response to fungal pathogens has not been investigated. In this study, we observed a significant induction of three PGLYRPs 2–4 in primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) exposed to live or heat-killed Candida albicans (HKCA). The C-type lectin receptor dectin-1 plays a critical role in controlling Candida albicans infections by promoting phagocytic activity and cytokine production in macrophages and dendritic cells. Here, we demonstrate that dectin-1 is expressed by normal human corneal tissue and primary HCECs. HKCA exposure increased expression of dectin-1 on HCECs at mRNA and protein levels. Interestingly, dectin-1 neutralizing antibody, IκB-α inhibitor BAY11-7082, and NF-κB activation inhibitor quinazoline blocked NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, as well as the induction of the PGLYRPs by HKCA in HCECs. Furthermore, rhPGLYRP-2 was found to suppress colony-forming units of Candida albicans in vitro. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that dectin-1 is expressed by human corneal epithelial cells, and dectin-1/NF-κB signaling pathway plays an important role in regulating Candida albicans/HKCA-induced PGLYRP secretion by HCECs. PMID:26039076

  3. Differential internalization of amphotericin B--conjugated nanoparticles in human cells and the expression of heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Cristiana S O; Lino, Miguel M; Matos, António A; Ferreira, Lino S

    2013-07-01

    Although a variety of nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with amphotericin B, an antifungal agent widely used in the clinic, have been studied in the last years their cytotoxicity profile remains elusive. Here we show that human endothelial cells take up high amounts of silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated with amphotericin B (AmB) (SNP-AmB) (65.4 ± 12.4 pg of Si per cell) through macropinocytosis while human fibroblasts internalize relatively low amounts (2.3 ± 0.4 pg of Si per cell) because of their low capacity for macropinocytosis. We further show that concentrations of SNP-AmB and SNP up to 400 μg/mL do not substantially affect fibroblasts. In contrast, endothelial cells are sensitive to low concentrations of NPs (above 10 μg/mL), in particular to SNP-AmB. This is because of their capacity to internalize high concentration of NPs and high sensitivity of their membrane to the effects of AmB. Low-moderate concentrations of SNP-AmB (up to 100 μg/mL) induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), LDH release, high expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (IL-8, IL-6, G-CSF, CCL4, IL-1β and CSF2) and high expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) at gene and protein levels. High concentrations of SNP-AmB (above 100 μg/mL) disturb membrane integrity and kill rapidly human cells (60% after 5 h). This effect is higher in SNP-AmB than in SNP.

  4. Human Genetic Relevance and Potent Antitumor Activity of Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibition in Canine Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Clemente-Vicario, Francisco; Alvarez, Carlos E.; Rowell, Jennie L.; Roy, Satavisha; London, Cheryl A.; Kisseberth, William C.; Lorch, Gwendolen

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been an open question how similar human and canine lung cancers are. This has major implications in availability of human treatments for dogs and in establishing translational models to test new therapies in pet dogs. The prognosis for canine advanced lung cancer is poor and new treatments are needed. Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is an ATPase-dependent molecular chaperone ubiquitously expressed in eukaryotic cells. HSP90 is essential for posttranslational conformational maturation and stability of client proteins including protein kinases and transcription factors, many of which are important for the proliferation and survival of cancer cells. We investigated the activity of STA-1474, a HSP90 inhibitor, in two canine lung cancer cell lines, BACA and CLAC. Results Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of both cell lines revealed genetic relevance to human non-small cell lung cancer. STA-1474 inhibited growth and induced apoptosis of both cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The ICs50 after 72 h treatment with STA-1474 were 0.08 and 0.11 μM for BACA and CLAC, respectively. When grown as spheroids, the IC50 of STA-1474 for BACA cells was approximately two-fold higher than when grown as a monolayer (0.348 μM vs. 0.168 μM), whereas CLAC spheroids were relatively drug resistant. Treatment of tumor-stromal fibroblasts with STA-1474 resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in their relative cell viability with a low IC50 of 0.28 μM. Conclusions Here we first established that lung adenocarcinoma in people and dogs are genetically and biochemically similar. STA1474 demonstrated biological activity in both canine lung cancer cell lines and tumor-stromal fibroblasts. As significant decreases in relative cell viability can be achieved with nanomolar concentrations of STA-1474, investigation into the clinical efficacy of this drug in canine lung cancer patients is warranted. PMID:26560147

  5. Measuring chlorophyll a and /sup 14/C-labeled photosynthate in aquatic angiosperms by the use of a tissue solubilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.; Stewart, A.J.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    A compound that quantitatively correlated with chlorophyll a could be measured fluorometrically in the extracts of leaves of three aquatic angiosperms (Myriophyllum heterophyllum Michx., Potamogeton crispus L., Elodea canadensis Michx.) treated with the tissue solubilizer BTS-450. Fluorescent characteristics of the solubilized plant tissues were stable for several weeks in the dark at temperatures up to 60/sup 0/C but rapidly degraded in sunlight or when acidified. /sup 14/C-Labeled photosynthate, which had been fixed by leaf discs during 1- to 10-hour exposure to H/sup 14/CO/sub 3/, was also readily extracted by the tissue solubilizer. Solubilizer extraction can, therefore, be use to determine both chlorophyll a content and /sup 14/C incorporation rates in the same leaf sample. The method is practical, because no grinding is required, the fluorescent characteristics of the extracts are stable, and analyses can be performed with very little plant material (about 3 milligrams).

  6. Molecular identification of phosphate-solubilizing native bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of Prosopis glandulosa in Mexicali valley.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ramírez, L; González-Mendoza, D; Cecena-Duran, C; Grimaldo-Juarez, O

    2015-03-31

    One of the main limitations in intensive crop production in Northwestern Mexico is the dependence on the use of phosphate fertilizer. In this study, we isolated indigenous microorganisms with phosphate solubilization capacities from mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) present in the Mexicali valley. In total, 4 bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere of mesquite, including ICA01, ICA02Ba, ICA03Bs, and ICA04Ma. The bacterial isolates were identified based on their phenotypic and 16S rRNA gene sequencing data to be Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. The results showed that ICA01 was the most efficient in solubilizing phosphate, followed by ICA02Ba and ICA03Bs, while ICA04Ma showed the lowest phosphate-solubilizing activity. The pH value of the culture medium decreased with bacterial growth, suggesting that these strains produce organic acids that solubilize phosphorus. These results will be useful for biotechnological studies and A. calcoaceticus may be employed for biofertilization programs in northwest Mexico.

  7. Biosurfactant-producing strains in enhancing solubilization and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Wang, Hang; Chen, Xuehua; Liu, Na; Bao, Suriguge

    2014-07-01

    Three biosurfactant-producing strains designated as BS-1, BS-3, and BS-4 were screened out from crude oil-contaminated soil using a combination of surface tension measurement and oil spreading method. Thin layer chromatography and infrared analysis indicated that the biosurfactants produced by the three strains were lipopeptide, glycolipid, and phospholipid. The enhancement of solubilization and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater employing biosurfactant-producing strains was investigated. The three strain mixtures led to more solubilization of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater, and the solubilization rate was 10.5 mg l−1. The combination of biosurfactant-producing strains and petroleum-degrading strains exhibited a higher biodegradation efficiency of 85.4 % than the petroleum-degrading strains (71.2 %). Biodegradation was enhanced the greatest with biosurfactant-producing strains and petroleum-degrading strains in a ratio of 1:1. Fluorescence microscopy images illustrate that the oil dispersed into smaller droplets and emulsified in the presence of biosurfactant-producing strains, which attached to the oil. Thus, the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater was enhanced.

  8. Solubilizing properties of new surface-active agents, products of catalytic oxyethylation of cholic acid.

    PubMed

    Kołodziejczyk, Michał Krzysztof; Nachajski, Michal Jakub; Lukosek, Marek; Zgoda, Marian Mikołaj

    2013-01-01

    Solubilizing properties of aqueous solutions of a series of surface-active agents, products of oxyethylation of cholic acid, were examined in the present study. The content of oxyethylated segments determined by means of the 1H NMR method enabled the verification of the molecular mass of surfactants along with the calculation of the structural hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB), the solubility parameter delta1/2, and the required solubility level of balance HLB(R). Viscosimetric measurements enabled the calculation of the limiting viscosity number, the content-average molecular mass, the effective volume, the hydrodynamic radius of the surfactant micelle and their equilibrium adducts with rutin, diclofenac and loratadine (BCS Class II and III). By means of the spectrophotometric method (UV) the amount of the solubilized diclofenac, loratadine and rutin (rutoside) was determined in the equilibrium system (saturated solution) in the environment of aqueous solutions of cholic acid derivatives of n(TE) = 20-70. The obtained results serve as a basis for determining the solubilization mechanism of lipophilic therapeutic products and indirectly for estimating the influence of the above process on pharmaceutical as well as biological availability of a micellar adduct from model drug forms (Lindbladt lithogenolitic index).

  9. Effect of solubilizing agents on mupirocin loading into and release from PEGylated nanoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Cern, Ahuva; Nativ-Roth, Einat; Goldblum, Amiram; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2014-07-01

    Mupirocin was identified by quantitative structure property relationship models as a good candidate for remote liposomal loading. Mupirocin is an antibiotic that is currently restricted to topical administration because of rapid hydrolysis in vivo to its inactive metabolite. Formulating mupirocin in PEGylated nanoliposomes may potentially expand its use to parenteral administration by protecting it from degradation in the circulation and target it (by the enhanced permeability effect) to the infected tissue. Mupirocin is slightly soluble in aqueous medium and its solubility can be increased using solubilizing agents. The effect of the solubilizing agents on mupirocin remote loading was studied when the solubilizing agents were added to the drug loading solution. Propylene glycol was found to increase mupirocin loading, whereas polyethylene glycol 400 showed no effect. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) showed a concentration-dependent effect on mupirocin loading; using the optimal HPCD concentration increased loading, but higher concentrations inhibited it. The inclusion of HPCD in the liposome aqueous phase while forming the liposomes resulted in increased drug loading and substantially inhibited drug release in serum.

  10. Thermo-chemical pre-treatment to solubilize and improve anaerobic biodegradability of press mud.

    PubMed

    López González, Lisbet Mailin; Vervaeren, Han; Pereda Reyes, Ileana; Dumoulin, Ann; Romero Romero, Osvaldo; Dewulf, Jo

    2013-03-01

    Different pre-treatment severities by thermo-alkaline conditions (100°C, Ca(OH)2) on press mud were evaluated for different pre-treatment time and lime loading. COD solubilization and the methane yield enhancement were assessed. The biochemical methane potential was determined in batch assays under mesophilic conditions (37±1°C). The best pre-treatment resulted in a surplus of 72% of methane yield, adding 10g Ca(OH)2 100g(-1)TS(-1) for 1h. Pre-treatment also increased the COD solubilization, but the optimal severity for COD solubilization as determined by response surface methodology did not ensure the highest methane production. Inhibitory effects on anaerobic digestion were noticed when the severity was increased. These results demonstrate the relevance of thermo-alkaline pre-treatment severity in terms of both lime loading and pre-treatment time to obtain optimal anaerobic biodegradability of lignocellulosic biomass from press mud. PMID:23353040

  11. Insights on the solubilization products after combined alkaline and ultrasonic pre-treatment of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xinbo; Wang, Chong; Trzcinski, Antoine Prandota; Lin, Leonard; Ng, Wun Jern

    2015-03-01

    This work provides insights on the solubilization products after a simultaneous combination of alkaline and ultrasonic (ALK+ULS) pre-treatment of sewage sludge. Soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) increased from 1200 to 11,000 mg/L after such treatment. Organics with molecular weight around 5.6 kDa were solubilized because of the synergistic effect of ultrasound and alkali. Organics with molecular weight larger than 300 kDa increased from 7.8% to 60%, 16% and 42.3% after ULS, ALK and ALK+ULS treatment, respectively. Excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy analysis identified soluble microbial product-like and humic acid-like matters as the main solubilization products. Sludge anaerobic biodegradability was significantly enhanced with the simultaneous application of ALK+ULS pre-treatment. ALK+ULS pre-treatment resulted in 37.8% biodegradability increase compared to the untreated sludge. This value was higher compared to the biodegradability increase induced by individual ALK pre-treatment (5.7%) or individual ULS pre-treatment (20.7%) under the same conditions applied. PMID:25766017

  12. Solubilization of Tea Seed Oil in a Food-Grade Water-Dilutable Microemulsion

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lingli; Que, Fei; Wei, Hewen; Xu, Guangwei; Dong, Xiaowei; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Food-grade microemulsions containing oleic acid, ethanol, Tween 20, and water were formulated as a carrier system for tea seed oil (Camellia oleifera Abel.). The effect of ethanol on the phase behavior of the microemulsion system was clearly reflected in pseudo-ternary diagrams. The solubilization capacity and solubilization efficiency of tea seed oil dispersions were measured along the dilution line at a 70/30 surfactant/oil mass ratio with Tween 20 as the surfactant and oleic acid and ethanol (1:3, w/w) as the oil phase. The dispersed phase of the microemulsion (1.5% weight ratio of tea seed oil to the total amount of oil, surfactant, and tea seed oil) could be fully diluted with water without phase separation. Differential scanning calorimetry and viscosity measurements indicated that both the carrier and solubilized systems underwent a similar microstructure transition upon dilution. The dispersion phases gradually inverted from the water-in-oil phase (< 35% water) to the bicontinuous phase (40–45% water) and finally to the oil-in-water phase (> 45% water) along the dilution line. PMID:25996147

  13. Atomistic Simulation of Solubilization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Micelle.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xujun; Marchi, Massimo; Guo, Chuling; Dang, Zhi; Abel, Stéphane

    2016-04-19

    Solubilization of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), naphthalene (NAP, 2-benzene-ring PAH) and pyrene (PYR, 4-benzene-ring PAH), into a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle was studied through all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that NAP as well as PYR could move between the micelle shell and core regions, contributing to their distribution in both regions of the micelle at any PAH concentration. Moreover, both NAP and PYR prefer to stay in the micelle shell region, which may arise from the greater volume of the micelle shell, the formation of hydrogen bonds between NAP and water, and the larger molecular volume of PYR. The PAHs are able to form occasional clusters (from dimer to octamer) inside the micelle during the simulation time depending on the PAH concentration in the solubilization systems. Furthermore, the micelle properties (i.e., size, shape, micelle internal structure, alkyl chain conformation and orientation, and micelle internal dynamics) are found to be nearly unaffected by the solubilized PAHs, which is irrespective of the properties and concentrations of PAHs.

  14. Host-derived Loss of Dentin Matrix Stiffness Associated with Solubilization of Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Carrilho, Marcela R.; Tay, Franklin R.; Donnelly, Adam M.; Agee, Kelli A.; Tjäderhane, Leo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Breschi, Lorenzo; Foulger, Stephen; Pashley, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) bound to dentin matrices are activated during adhesive bonding procedures and are thought to contribute to the progressive degradation of resin-dentin bonds over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in mechanical, biochemical and structural properties of demineralized dentin treated with or without chlorhexidine (CHX), a known MMP-inhibitor. After demineralizing dentin beams in EDTA or phosphoric acid (PA), the baseline modulus of elasticity (E) of each beam was measured by 3-point flexure. Specimens were pretreated with water (control) or with 2% CHX (experimental) and then incubated in artificial saliva (AS) at 37°C for 4 weeks. The E of each specimen was remeasured weekly and, the media was analyzed for solubilized dentin collagen at first and fourth week of incubation. Some specimens were processed for electron microscopy (TEM) immediately after demineralization and after 4 weeks of incubation. In EDTA and PA-demineralized specimens, the E of the control specimens fell (p<0.05) after incubation in AS, while there were no changes in E in the CHX-pretreated specimens over time. More collagen was solubilized from PA-demineralized controls (p<0.05) than from EDTA-demineralized matrices after 1 or 4 weeks. Less collagen (p<0.05) was solubilized from CHX-pretreated specimens demineralized in EDTA compared to PA. TEM examination of control beams revealed that prolonged demineralization of dentin in 10% PA (12 h) did not denature the collagen fibrils. PMID:19090493

  15. Sonic hedgehog shedding results in functional activation of the solubilized protein.

    PubMed

    Ohlig, Stefanie; Farshi, Pershang; Pickhinke, Ute; van den Boom, Johannes; Höing, Susanne; Jakuschev, Stanislav; Hoffmann, Daniel; Dreier, Rita; Schöler, Hans R; Dierker, Tabea; Bordych, Christian; Grobe, Kay

    2011-06-14

    All Hedgehog (Hh) proteins are released from producing cells despite being synthesized as N- and C-terminally lipidated, membrane-tethered molecules. Thus, a cellular mechanism is needed for Hh solubilization. We previously suggested that a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)-mediated shedding of Sonic hedgehog (ShhNp) from its lipidated N and C termini results in protein solubilization. This finding, however, seemed at odds with the established role of N-terminal palmitoylation for ShhNp signaling activity. We now resolve this paradox by showing that N-palmitoylation of ShhNp N-terminal peptides is required for their proteolytic removal during solubilization. These peptides otherwise block ShhNp zinc coordination sites required for ShhNp binding to its receptor Patched (Ptc), explaining the essential yet indirect role of N-palmitoylation for ShhNp function. We suggest a functional model in which membrane-tethered multimeric ShhNp is at least partially autoinhibited in trans but is processed into fully active, soluble multimers upon palmitoylation-dependent cleavage of inhibitory N-terminal peptides. PMID:21664575

  16. Microwave-assisted chemical oxidation of biological waste sludge: simultaneous micropollutant degradation and sludge solubilization.

    PubMed

    Bilgin Oncu, Nalan; Akmehmet Balcioglu, Isil

    2013-10-01

    Microwave-assisted hydrogen peroxide (MW/H2O2) treatment and microwave-assisted persulfate (MW/S2O8(2-)) treatment of biological waste sludge were compared in terms of simultaneous antibiotic degradation and sludge solubilization. A 2(3) full factorial design was utilized to evaluate the influences of temperature, oxidant dose, and holding time on the efficiency of these processes. Although both MW/H2O2 and MW/S2O8(2-) yielded ≥97% antibiotic degradation with 1.2g H2O2 and 0.87 g S2O8(2-) per gram total solids, respectively, at 160 °C in 15 min, MW/S2O8(2-) was found to be more promising for efficient sludge treatment at a lower temperature and a lower oxidant dosage, as it allows more effective activation of persulfate to produce the SO4(-) radical. Relative to MW/H2O2, MW/S2O8(2-) gives 48% more overall metal solubilization, twofold higher improvement in dewaterability, and the oxidation of solubilized ammonia to nitrate in a shorter treatment period. PMID:23928124

  17. Silica nanoparticle stabilization of liquid crystalline lipid dispersions: impact on enzymatic digestion and drug solubilization.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Achal B; Barnes, Timothy J; Prestidge, Clive A

    2015-01-01

    The high internal surface area and drug solubilizing capacity of liquid crystal lipids makes them promising oral drug delivery systems. Pluronic F127 is typically used to disperse highly viscous cubic liquid crystal lipids into cubosomes; however, such copolymers alter the internal structure and provide little control over enzymatic digestion. This study aimed to use hydrophilic silica nanoparticles to stabilize glyceryl monooleate (GMO) cubosomes prepared by ultrasonication. We investigate the influence of silica nanoparticles size and concentration on the physical (colloidal) and chemical (enzymatic digestion) stability, as well as in vitro solubilization of cinnarizine as a poorly soluble model drug. Silica stabilized nanostructured liquid crystal dispersions (120 nm to150 nm in diameter and zeta potentials of-30 mV to -60 mV) were successfully prepared with excellent long-term stability (<10% size change after 30 days). Silica stabilized GMO cubosomes demonstrated reduced enzymatic digestion compared to pluronic F127 stabilized cubosomes. This reduced digestion was attributed to a combination of adsorbed silica nanoparticles acting as a physical barrier and excess dispersed silica adsorbing/scavenging the lipase enzyme. Under simulated intestinal digestion conditions, silica stabilized GMO cubosomes showed a greater solubilization capacity for cinnarizine, which precipitated in non-crystalline form, in comparison to pure drug suspensions or pluronic F127 stabilized GMO cubosomes. Silica nanoparticle stabilized GMO liquid crystal dispersions are a promising oral delivery vehicle.

  18. Gluconic acid production and phosphate solubilization by the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Hilda; Gonzalez, Tania; Goire, Isabel; Bashan, Yoav

    2004-11-01

    In vitro gluconic acid formation and phosphate solubilization from sparingly soluble phosphorus sources by two strains of the plant growth-promoting bacteria A. brasilense (Cd and 8-I) and one strain of A. lipoferum JA4 were studied. Strains of A. brasilense were capable of producing gluconic acid when grown in sparingly soluble calcium phosphate medium when their usual fructose carbon source is amended with glucose. At the same time, there is a reduction in pH of the medium and release of soluble phosphate. To a greater extent, gluconic acid production and pH reduction were observed for A. lipoferum JA4. For the three strains, clearing halos were detected on solid medium plates with calcium phosphate. This is the first report of in vitro gluconic acid production and direct phosphate solubilization by A. brasilense and the first report of P solubilization by A. lipoferum. This adds to the very broad spectrum of plant growth-promoting abilities of this genus.

  19. Agonist mediated conformational changes of solubilized calf forebrain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Vanderheyden, P; Andre, C; de Backer, J P; Vauquelin, G

    1984-10-01

    Muscarinic receptors in calf forebrain membranes can be identified by the specific binding of the radiolabelled antagonist [3H]dexetimide. These receptors (2.8 pM/mg protein) comprise two non-interconvertible subpopulations with respectively high and low agonist affinity but with the same antagonist affinity. For all the agonists tested the low affinity sites represent 85 +/- 5% of the total receptor population. 0.5% Digitonin solubilized extracts contain 0.8 pM muscarinic receptor/mg protein. In contrast with the membranes, these extracts contain only sites with low agonist affinity. The alkylating reagent N-ethylmaleimide causes an increase of the acetylcholine affinity for the low affinity sites in membranes as well as for the solubilized sites. This effect is time dependent until a maximal 3-fold increase in affinity is attained. The rate of N-ethylmaleimide action is enhanced by the concomitant presence of agonists. In contrast, N-ethylmaleimide does not affect antagonist binding. This suggests that agonists mediate a conformational change of both the membrane bound low affinity muscarinic sites and of the solubilized sites, resulting in their increased susceptibility towards NEM alkylation. PMID:6487351

  20. Reversibly enhanced aqueous solubilization of volatile organic compounds using a redox-reversible surfactant.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingjie; Tian, Senlin; Mo, Hong; Ning, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Surfactant-enhanced remediation (SER) is an effective method for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated soils and groundwater. To reuse the surfactant the VOCs must be separated from the surfactant solutions. The water solubility of VOCs can be enhanced using reversible surfactants with a redox-acive group, (ferrocenylmethyl)dodecyldimethylammonium bromide (Fc12) and (ferrocenylmethyl)tetradecanedimethylammonium bromide (Fc14), above and below their critical micelle concentrations (CMC) under reducing (I+) and oxidative (I2+) conditions. The CMC values of Fc12 and Fc14 in I+ are 0.94 and 0.56 mmol/L and the solubilization of toluene by Fc12 and Fc14 in I+ for toluene is higher than the solubilization achieved with sodium dodecyl sulfate, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and Trition X-114. The solubilization capacity of the ferrocenyl surfactants for each tested VOCs ranked as follows: ethylbenzene > toluene > benzene. The solubilities of VOCs by reversible surfactant in I+ were 30% higher than those in I2+ at comparable surfactant concentrations. The effects of Fc14 concentrations on VOCs removal efficiency were as follows: benzene > toluene > ethylbenzene. However, an improved removal efficiency was achieved at low ferrocenyl surfactant concentrations. Furthermore, the reversible surfactant could be recycled through chemical approaches to remove organic pollutants, which could significantly reduce the operating costs of SER technology.

  1. Effect of post-solubilization conditions on the yield and efficiency of recombinant streptokinase purification at large-scale.

    PubMed

    Beiroti, Ahmad; Kavianpour, Alireza; Sepahi, Mina; Arsalani, Firooz; Tavakoli Zaniani, Parinaz; Jalalirad, Reza

    2014-09-01

    Streptokinase, a plasminogen activator which converts plasminogen to plasmin and consequently promotes fibrinolysis, is the leading drug for treating acute myocardial infarction in developing countries and its production is industrially demanded. In this work, the substantial influence of inclusion body (IB) post-solubilization condition on the performance of a sequential chromatography method for large-scale purification of recombinant streptokinase was demonstrated. In the preliminary experiments, various post-solubilization pH conditions were studied, and it was shown that the pH value of solubilized inclusion bodies (i.e., in 4M urea) had a marked impact on the purity of streptokinase obtained at the end of post-solubilization process. When the pH value of the solution containing solubilized IBs was decreased from 7.5 to 6.5 and 6.0, the greatest increases (10% and 27%, respectively) in streptokinase purity occurred. The influence of different post-solubilization pH conditions on the efficiency and yield of large-scale chromatographic purification methods was next investigated. When the solubilized IBs solution with pH adjusted to 6.0 was utilized for subsequent sequential chromatography process, the complete elution peak with high overall yield (91.3%) and purity (98%) was achieved. In comparison to this, while the sequential chromatography procedure was instigated by using the solubilized IBs solution with pH 4.2, four elution fractions (EF1 to EF4) with disparate target protein purities (i.e., 57%, 77.3%, 91.4% and 86.7%, respectively) were attained, the process was incompletely effective, and the highest recovery and purity figures (81.8% and 91.4%, respectively, belonging to EF3) were much lower than those for the earlier process.

  2. Chromatographic removal and heat inactivation of hepatitis A virus during manufacture of human albumin.

    PubMed

    Adcock, W L; MacGregor, A; Davies, J R; Hattarki, M; Anderson, D A; Goss, N H

    1998-08-01

    CSL Limited, an Australian biopharmaceutical company, has recently converted its method of manufacture for human albumin from a traditional Cohn-ethanol fractionation method to a method employing chromatographic techniques. Studies were undertaken to determine the efficiency of the chromatographic and pasteurization steps used in the manufacture of Albumex(R) (CSL's trade name for albumin) in removing and inactivating the potential viral contaminant, hepatitis A virus (HAV). The manufacturing process for Albumex(R) includes three chromatographic steps, two of which are ion-exchange steps (DEAE-Sepharose(R) Fast Flow and CM-Sepharose(R) Fast Flow) and the third is a gel-filtration step (Sephacryl(R) S200 HR). The final stage of the Albumex(R) process involves a bulk pasteurization step where product is held at 60 degrees C for 10 h. HAV partitioning experiments on the DEAE-Sepharose(R) FF and CM-Sepharose(R) FF ion-exchange and Sephacryl(R) S200 HR gel-filtration columns were performed with scaled-down models of the production-scale chromatographic Albumex(R) process. Production samples collected before each of the chromatographic steps were spiked with HAV and processed through each of the scaled-down chromatographic columns. Samples collected during processing were assayed and the log10 reduction factors calculated. Inactivation kinetics of HAV were examined during the pasteurization of Albumex(R) 5 and 20 [5% and 20% (w/v) albumin solutions] held at 60 degrees C for 10 h. Log10 reductions for HAV through the DEAE-Sepharose(R) FF, CM-Sepharose(R) FF and Sephacryl(R) S200 HR chromatographic columns were 5.3, 1.5 and 4.2 respectively, whereas a 4.4 and a greater than 3.9 log10 reduction in HAV in Albumex(R) 5 and 20 respectively were achieved during pasteurization.

  3. Combined effect of heat stress, dehydration and exercise on neuromuscular function in humans.

    PubMed

    Ftaiti, F; Grélot, L; Coudreuse, J M; Nicol, C

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the combined effect of exercise induced hyperthermia and dehydration on neuromuscular function in human subjects. Six trained male runners ran for 40 min on a treadmill at 65% of their maximal aerobic velocity while wearing a tracksuit covered with an impermeable jacket and pants to impair the evaporation of sweat. These stressful experimental running conditions led the runners to a physiological status close to exhaustion. On average, the 40 min run ended at a heart rate of 196 (SD 8) beats.min-1, a tympanic temperature of 40 (SD 0.3) degrees C and with a loss of body mass of 2 (SD 0.5)%. Pre- and post-running strength tests included measurements of maximal knee extension and flexion torques in both isometric and isokinetic (at 60 and 240 degrees.s-1) conditions. A 20 s endurance test at 240 degrees.s-1 was also performed. Surface electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from six knee extensor and flexor muscles during the entire protocol. The treadmill run led to clear decrements in maximal extension torque and EMG activity both in isometric and at the slowest isokinetic velocity (60 degrees.s-1). However, no differences in these parameters were observed at 240 degrees.s-1. Furthermore, the EMG patterns of the major knee extensor and flexor muscles remained remarkably stable during the treadmill run. These results demonstrate that the exercise-induced hyperthermia and dehydration in the present experiments had only minor effects on the neuromuscular performance. However, it is also suggested that high internal body temperature per se could limit the production of high force levels.

  4. Improved oil solubilization in oil/water food grade microemulsions in the presence of polyols and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Garti, N; Yaghmur, A; Leser, M E; Clement, V; Watzke, H J

    2001-05-01

    Microemulsions based on five-component mixtures for food applications and improved oil solubilization have been studied. The compositions included water, oil phase [such as R(+)-limonene and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT)], short-chain alcohols (such as ethanol), polyols (propylene glycol and glycerol), and several surfactants and their corresponding mixtures (nonionic, such as ethoxylated sorbitan esters, polyglycerol esters, sugar ester, and anionic, such as phosphatidylcholine). The phase behavior of these systems is discussed with respect to the influence of polyols and short-chain alcohols on the degree of solubilization of oils in the aqueous phase. The alcohol and polyols modify the interfacial spontaneous curvature and the flexibility of the surfactant film, enhancing the oil solubilization capacity of the microemulsions. The solubilization of R(+)-limonene was dramatically improved in the presence of the alcohol and polyols, whereas the improvement of solubilization for triglycerides containing MCT was less pronounced. In some systems high oil solubilization was achieved, and some of them can be easily diluted to infinity both with the aqueous phase and with the oil phase. Viscosity measurements along selected dilution lines [characterized by a single continuous microemulsion region starting from a pseudo binary solution (surfactant/oil phase) to the microemulsion (water/polyol corner)] indicate that at a certain composition the system inverts from a W/O to an O/W microemulsion.

  5. The removal characteristics of natural organic matter in the recycling of drinking water treatment sludge: Role of solubilized organics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Yang, Yanling; Li, Xing; Ji, Siyang; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Shuai; Zeng, Qingping; Han, Xinghang

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the role of solubilized organics derived from drinking water treatment sludge (DWTS) in the elimination of natural organic matter (NOM) in the DWTS recycling process, a probe sonoreactor at a frequency of 25 kHz was used to solubilize the organics at varied specific energies. The coagulation behavior related to NOM removal in recycling the sonicated DWTS with and without solubilized organics was evaluated, and the effect on organic fractionations in coagulated water was determined. The study results could provide useful implications in designing DWTS recycling processes that avoid the enrichment of organic matter. Our results indicate that DWTS was disrupted through a low release of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and proteins, which could deteriorate the coagulated water quality under the specific energy of 37.87-1212.1 kW h/kg TS. The optimal coagulation behavior for NOM removal was achieved by recycling the sonicated DWTS without solubilized organics at 151.5 kW h/kg TS specific energy. Recycling the sonicated DWTS could increase the enrichment potential of weakly hydrophobic acid, hydrophilic matter, and <3 kDa fractions; the enrichment risks could be reduced by discharging the solubilized organics. Fluorescent characteristic analysis indicated that when recycling the sonicated DWTS without solubilized organics, the removal of humic-like substances was limited, whereas removal of protein-like substances was enhanced, lowering the enrichment potential of protein-like substances.

  6. Generally recognized as safe (GRAS) Lactococcus lactis strains associated with Lippia sidoides Cham. are able to solubilize/mineralize phosphate.

    PubMed

    de Lacerda, Jackeline Rossetti Mateus; da Silva, Thais Freitas; Vollú, Renata Estebanez; Marques, Joana Montezano; Seldin, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Eight strains isolated from the stems of Lippia sidoides were identified as belonging to Lactococcus lactis, a bacterial species considered as "generally recognized as safe". Their capacity to solubilize/mineralize phosphate was tested in vitro with different inorganic and organic phosphorus (P) sources. All strains were able to solubilize calcium phosphate as an inorganic P source, and the best result was observed with strain 003.41 which solubilized 31 % of this P source. Rock phosphate, a mined rock containing high amounts of phosphate bearing minerals, was solubilized by five strains. When calcium phytate was the organic P source used, the majority of the strains tested showed phosphate mineralization activity. Moreover, all strains were able to solubilize/mineralize phosphate from poultry litter, a complex P source containing inorganic and predominantly organic P. The presence of genes coding for phytase and alkaline phosphatase was searched within the strains studied. However, only gene sequences related to alkaline phosphatase (phoA and phoD) could be detected in the majority of the strains (excepting strain 006.29) with identities varying from 67 to 88 %. These results demonstrate for the first time the potential of L. lactis strains for phosphate solubilization/mineralization activity using a broad spectrum of P sources; therefore, they are of great importance for the future development of more safe bioinoculants with possible beneficial effects for agriculture.

  7. The removal characteristics of natural organic matter in the recycling of drinking water treatment sludge: Role of solubilized organics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Yang, Yanling; Li, Xing; Ji, Siyang; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Shuai; Zeng, Qingping; Han, Xinghang

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the role of solubilized organics derived from drinking water treatment sludge (DWTS) in the elimination of natural organic matter (NOM) in the DWTS recycling process, a probe sonoreactor at a frequency of 25 kHz was used to solubilize the organics at varied specific energies. The coagulation behavior related to NOM removal in recycling the sonicated DWTS with and without solubilized organics was evaluated, and the effect on organic fractionations in coagulated water was determined. The study results could provide useful implications in designing DWTS recycling processes that avoid the enrichment of organic matter. Our results indicate that DWTS was disrupted through a low release of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and proteins, which could deteriorate the coagulated water quality under the specific energy of 37.87-1212.1 kW h/kg TS. The optimal coagulation behavior for NOM removal was achieved by recycling the sonicated DWTS without solubilized organics at 151.5 kW h/kg TS specific energy. Recycling the sonicated DWTS could increase the enrichment potential of weakly hydrophobic acid, hydrophilic matter, and <3 kDa fractions; the enrichment risks could be reduced by discharging the solubilized organics. Fluorescent characteristic analysis indicated that when recycling the sonicated DWTS without solubilized organics, the removal of humic-like substances was limited, whereas removal of protein-like substances was enhanced, lowering the enrichment potential of protein-like substances. PMID:26384907

  8. Maize rhizosphere in Sichuan, China, hosts plant growth promoting Burkholderia cepacia with phosphate solubilizing and antifungal abilities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ke; Penttinen, Petri; Zhang, Xiaoping; Ao, Xiaoling; Liu, Maoke; Yu, Xiumei; Chen, Qiang

    2014-01-20

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria promote plant growth by direct and indirect mechanisms. We isolated twelve bacterial strains showing different degrees of phosphate solubilizing activity from maize rhizosphere. Four isolates solubilized over 300 μg mL⁻¹ phosphate from insoluble Ca₃(PO₄)₂, with isolate SCAUK0330 solubilizing over 450 μg mL⁻¹. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis SCAUK0330 was identified as Burkholderia cepacia. SCAUK0330 grew at 10-40 °C and pH 4.0-10.0, tolerated up to 5% NaCl, and showed antagonism against nine pathogenic fungi. SCAUK0330 promoted the growth of both healthy and Helminthosporium maydis infected maize plants, indicating that the isolate was a good candidate to be applied as a biofertilizer and a biocontrol agent under a wide range of environmental conditions.The expression of a single SCAUK0330 gene gave E. coli a pH decrease linked ability to solubilize phosphate. The nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequences of this phosphate solubilization linked gene showed high degree of sequence identity with B. cepacia E37gabY. The production of gluconic acid is considered as the principle mechanism for phosphate solubilization. In agreement with the proposed periplasmic location of the gluconic acid production, the predicted signal peptide and transmembrane regions implied that GabY is membrane bound. PMID:23932330

  9. Transitions induced by solubilized fat into reverse hexagonal mesophases.

    PubMed

    Amar-Yuli, Idit; Garti, Nissim

    2005-06-25

    Lyotropic liquid crystals of glycerol monooleate (GMO) and water binary mixtures have been extensively studied and their resemblance to human membranes has intrigued many scientists. Biological systems as well as food mixtures are composed of lipids and fat components including triacylglycerols (TAGs, triglycerides) that can affect the nature of the assembly of the mesophase. The present study examin